COUNSELOR EDUCATION GRADUATE STUDENT ORIENTATION HANDBOOK

COUNSELOR EDUCATION GRADUATE STUDENT ORIENTATION HANDBOOK
COUNSELOR EDUCATION
GRADUATE STUDENT
ORIENTATION HANDBOOK
Counselor Education Program
250 Neff Hall
Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne
2101 Coliseum Blvd East
Fort Wayne IN 46805-1499
260-481-6450 (phone)
260-481-5408 (fax)
www.ipfw.edu/educ/counsel.htm
Rev. 8/18/05
IMPORTANT TELEPHONE NUMBERS
COUNSELOR EDUCATION (www.ipfw.edu/educ/counsel.htm) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481-6450
(SCHOOL OF EDUCATION)
Mr. Tom Gordon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420-5740
Dr. Bill Utesch, Director, Counselor Education ([email protected]) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481-6003
Dr. Jim Burg, Coordinator, Marriage & Family Therapy Counseling ([email protected]) . . . . . . 481-5406
Dr. Amy Nitza, Coordinator, School Counseling ([email protected]) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481-6441
Mr. Ken Weaver ([email protected]) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 710-2434
Mrs. Linda Smith ([email protected]) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 450-0056
Mrs. Martha Goller ([email protected]) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 589-2181 or 589-3131
DEAN'S OFFICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481-6441
SCHOOL COUNSELOR CERTIFICATION OFFICER:
Mr. Jim Beard ([email protected]) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481-6449
IPFW PLACEMENT OFFICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481-6595
IPFW COMMUNITY COUNSELING CENTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481-5479 or 481-5405
(Appointments Only)
NIGHT ESCORTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481-6900
TABLE OF CONTENTS
STUDENT ORIENTATION HANDBOOK
General Program Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-13
Welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Program Office Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Keeping Us Informed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
IPFW School of Education Mission Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
IPFW School of Education Conceptual Framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
IPFW Counselor Education Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Mission Statement for the School Counseling Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Mission Statement for the Marriage & Family Therapy Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Program Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
What is Accreditation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Counselor Education Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Agency/MFT Counseling Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
School Counseling Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Portfolio Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Comprehensive Exam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Program Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-19
Class Attendance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Academic Dismissals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Preparing Papers in APA Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Student Program Revisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Annual Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Scoring Rubric for Written Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Student Retention Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Academic Integrity Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Time Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Sexual Harassment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Nondiscrimination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
HIV/AIDS Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Resources and Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-26
Joining Professional Organizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
The National Board for Certified Counselors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Academic and Personal Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Counselor Education Clinic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27-66
Who is Served? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Professional Responsibility and Liability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Periodic Evaluations of Clinical Work in Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Dual Relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
After-Hour and Off-Premises Contact with Clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Non-Supervised Counseling Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Ethical Practices and Confidentiality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Confidentiality of Tapes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Protection of Privacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Clinic Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Phone Protocol for Scheduling a First Appointment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Initial Interview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Missed Appointments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Referral Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Routine Referrals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Emergency Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Completed Client Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
How to Complete Client Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Writing Case Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Psychosocial Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Weekly Practicum Hours Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Weekly Practicum Hours Form Sample . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Request for Release of Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Termination Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Internships in Counselor Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67-83
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Definition of Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Purpose of the Internship Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
General Objectives for the Internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
The University Supervisor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Supervision Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
The On-Site Supervisor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
On-Site Supervision Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Internship Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Ethical Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Sample Internship Duties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Responsibilities of the Student Intern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Student Requirements with University Supervisor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
IPFW Agency/MFT Internship Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
IPFW Agency/MFT Internship Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
IPFW School Counseling Internships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
IPFW School Internship Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Appendices
Appendix A (Internship Agreement for School Counselors)
Appendix B (Internship Agreement for Agency/MFT Counselors)
Appendix C1 (Release and Permission to Use Taped Counseling Session)
Appendix C2 (Release and Permission to Observe Counseling Session)
Appendix D1 (Agency/MFT Internship Activity Log)
Appendix D2 (School Internship Activity Log)
Appendix E1 (Internship Evaluation)
Appendix E2 (Evaluation of Site Form: Agency/MFT)
Appendix E3 (Evaluation of Site Form: School)
Appendix F (IPFW School Counseling Program Internship Site Commitment Agreement)
Appendix G (Intern Site Visitation Standard Cover Letter)
Appendix H (ASCA Ethical Standards)
Appendix I (AAMFT Ethical Standards)
Appendix J1 (Licensure for Marriage and Family Therapists)
Appendix J2 (Verification of Marriage and Family Therapy Course Work)
Appendix J3 (Indiana Health Professions Board--MFT Standards)
Appendix K (Licensure for School Counselors)
Appendix L (Standards for School Services and School Counseling Professionals)
Appendix M (IPFW Counselor Education Program Portfolio Review and Evaluation)
Appendix N (Student Proficiencies Annual Review)
Appendix O (Faculty Feedback of Student Proficiencies Annual Review)
Appendix P (Counselor Education Student Program Revision)
Appendix Q (Job Description for Clinic Manager)
Appendix R (Integration of Curriculum and Standards)
Appendix S (A Reflection of My Experience in the Counselor Education Program)
Appendix T 1 (Indiana School Counselor Mission Statement)
Appendix T 2 (Elementary School Counselor Position Description)
Appendix T 3 (Middle School Counselor Position Description)
Appendix T 4 (High School Counselor Position Description)
1
WELCOME
Faculty of the Counselor Education program welcome you to participate in an Indiana University-Purdue
University Fort Wayne (IPFW) education we hope will prove challenging, stimulating, and valuable.
The intent of this Graduate Student Orientation Handbook is to highlight relevant information about resources,
policies, and procedures of the program. More detailed information regarding the program is available from
your advisor, the program coordinator, and from the School of Education. For university policies and
procedures applicable to all students, consult the IPFW Bulletin of Graduate Programs, IPFW Student
Handbook, and the Schedule of Classes.
PROGRAM OFFICE LOCATION
The Counselor Education faculty offices are located in Neff Hall, Room 250. Students seeking information
or appointments with department faculty members should contact the staff in the office or by calling 260-4816450. The office is staffed between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Faculty receive telephone messages and mail through the department office. Faculty also have e-mail and
office telephone numbers that may be dialed directly. You may leave messages or projects with the office
staff for delivery to a faculty member or you may deposit the information in their individual mail boxes. Ask
any office staff to point out the location of faculty mail boxes. After 5:00 p.m., envelopes addressed to faculty
can be slid under the door of Neff Hall, Room 250. All faculty have regularly scheduled office hours.
KEEPING US INFORMED
One of the more difficult tasks Counselor Education faces is keeping track of people. We need your HELP.
Please be sure we have your current local address and phone number. If you change your name, address,
or phone number during the year, please write out the changes for a secretary and your advisor. Be certain
to inform the School of Education and the Registrar of any changes. The university will not necessarily send
us any address changes, so please notify us.
It is important that Counselor Education keep in contact with our graduates to maintain our program
accreditation. We therefore ask that when you relocate or change addresses, please let us know where you
are. When you graduate you may leave us, but we do not want to lose contact with you. Please keep us
current as to your activities and accomplishments. A post-graduate survey will be sent three years after
graduation.
2
IPFW SCHOOL OF EDUCATION MISSION STATEMENT
(adopted January 10, 1996)
To prepare professionals in teaching, counseling, and leadership who demonstrate the capacity and willingness
to continuously improve schools and related entities so that they become more effective with their clients by:
•
Becoming more caring, humane, and functional citizens in a global, multicultural, democratic society;
•
Improving the human condition by creating positive learning environments;
•
Becoming change agents by demonstrating reflective professional practice;
•
Solving client problems through clear, creative analyses;
•
Assessing client performance and creating and executing effective teaching, counseling, and
educational leadership by utilizing a variety of methodologies reflecting current related research;
•
Utilizing interdisciplinary scholarship, demonstrating technological and critical literacy, and effectively
communicating with all stakeholders.
3
IPFW SCHOOL OF EDUCATION CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK:
A LEARNING AND LEADERSHIP MODEL
We in the School of Education are committed to the following conceptual framework for our program:
Democracy and Community
1.
Effective educators, such as teachers, counselors, and administrators need to be part of a dynamic educational
community as a model for the climate of community they hope to create. To do this, these educators need an
understanding of the moral, cultural, social, political, and economic foundations of our society. Consequently, the SOE
should foster a democratic, just, inclusive learning community among its students, faculty, and staff, and with all other
stakeholders in the educational enterprise.
2.
Habits of Mind
Effective educators realize that knowledge alone is not sufficient. They practice critical reflection in all endeavors.
Within the context of a compassionate, caring community, educators foster habits of mind necessary to engage learners,
such as investigating, inquiring, challenging, critiquing, questioning, and evaluating. Consequently, the SOE must
integrate critical habits of mind in all aspects of the teaching/learning process.
3.
Pedagogy
Effective educators need to understand multiple approaches to pedagogy as well as the multiple roles of the teacher,
such as facilitator, guide, role model, scholar, and motivator. Educators appreciate and are receptive to the diverse
perspectives, modes of understanding, and social circumstances that they and their students bring to the educational
setting. Consequently, the SOE needs to prepare educators to understand and use pedagogy creatively and thereby
ensure active learning, conceptual understanding, and meaningful growth.
Knowledge
4.
Effective educators need to be well-grounded in the content which they expect to teach. Educators need to understand
how knowledge is constructed, how the processes of inquiry are applied, how domains of knowledge are established,
how disciplines can be integrated and most effectively communicated to their students.
Educators also need
understanding of themselves, of communities in which they intend to teach and of students. Consequently, the SOE
should immerse educators in nurturing learning communities that deepen knowledge, and encourage on-going
intellectual, emotional, and personal growth.
Experience
5.
Effective educators learn their craft through experiences in actual educational settings.
Through on-site campus
activities and field-based experiences, students will observe and emulate exemplary teaching and learning.
These
educators will practice, collaborate, and interact with practitioners and their students. Consequently, the SOE must
integrate field and/or clinical experiences that reflect the diversity of educators, students, and schools into all aspects
of the curriculum, and help educators to assess and reflect on those experiences.
6.
Leadership
Effective educators are leaders. They have developed educational and social visions informed by historical and cultural
perspectives. They strive to set the highest goals for themselves and inspire students to do likewise. Educators are
enriched by the convergence of knowledge, theory and practice as they optimistically face the educational challenges
of the twenty-first century. Consequently, the SOE must provide opportunities for educators to develop as leaders in
their procession and in their communities.
* “Educator” is broadly defined as pre-service teachers, administrators, and counselors.
4
IPFW COUNSELOR EDUCATION PROGRAM
The counselor education program began in 1979 as a school counselor licensing program approved by the
Indiana Department of Education. In 1987 the Indiana University Board of Trustees enlarged this mission
by approving a master's degree in counseling for IPFW. The current program features two specialty areas:
agency/marriage & family therapy counseling and school counseling.
The counselor education program adheres to the scientist-practitioner model of training. Consistent with
this approach is the goal of graduating students who have a knowledge of counseling, who are competent
in providing professional services, and who have the skills necessary to conduct research. Especially
important to the program faculty is the commitment to mental "health" (vs. pathology), the value attached
to understanding the common developmental themes occurring throughout a person's life, and an orientation
that recognizes individuals embedded interactionally within multiple systems. The diversity characterizing
the faculty's theoretical orientation is an advantage to the program, providing students with a variety of
theoretical models as well as different applied settings for gaining training experience.
School Counseling master's graduates may apply for the “Initial Practitioner License” immediately upon
graduation. After a two-year internship period at their first job involving mentoring by a licensed school
counselor and a portfolio review of their first two years, they will receive a renewable “proficient
practitioner license” good for five years.
Agency/Marriage & Family Therapy master's graduates will have met all graduate-level pre-master's
requirements for the Indiana Marriage & Family Therapist license. They may apply for this license after
having met all post-graduate requirements.
5
MISSION STATEMENT FOR THE
INDIANA UNIVERSITY-PURDUE UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL COUNSELING PROGRAM
The mission of the IPFW school counseling program is to prepare professional school counselors who are
educational leaders and self-reflective practitioners. They will utilize a systemic orientation to serve the
needs of teachers, students, parents, and administrators. School counselors will provide advocacy for all
childrenand accept responsibilityfor improving educational practices through an active program of research
and evaluation. School counselors will collaborate with schools, homes, and community agencies in order
to support the academic achievement, career success, and personal social development of all students
regardless of ethnicity, gender, or economic status.
6
MISSION STATEMENT FOR THE
INDIANA UNIVERSITY-PURDUE UNIVERSITY
MARRIAGE & FAMILY THERAPY PROGRAM
The mission of the IPFW marriage & family therapy program is to train students to diagnose and treat
mental disorders within the context of marital and family systems. The practice of marriage & family
therapy involves the application of psychotherapeutic and family systems theories and techniques in the
delivery of services to individuals, couples, and families for the purpose of treating such diagnosed mental
disorders. Students will view individuals experiencing the symptoms of a mental disorder as part of a larger
system and, regardless of the eventual intervention modality, that larger system will be essential both in
evaluating the etiology of the symptom and in treatment. Particular emphasis will be placed on professional
collaboration, ethical practice, and attention to diversity.
7
PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
The Counselor Education program subscribes to the concept of the broader possible education for those
obtaining a master's degree in either Agency/MFT or School Counseling. Expectations at the graduate level
are demanding and include three hours of work outside of scheduled class time for every semester hour.
Program objectives and curricula are designed to meet the standards put forth by CACREP, IHPB, IPSB,
AAMFT/COA, NBCC, NCATE, and ASCA. Therefore, program objectives are the same for both cognate
areas and are as follows:
1.
Students will be educated to a wide range of theoretical perspectives with an appreciation for the
student's own world view and the moral, cultural, societal, political, and economic world view of
others.
2.
Students will be educated to view human issues from cognitive, affective, behavioral, and contextual
perspectives and pedagogies.
3.
Students will be educated to view human issues from a multicultural perspective.
4.
Students will attain expertise in individual, group, and systemic interventions. They will integrate this
expertise in field and clinical experiences that reflect the diversity of others.
5.
Students will be educated to a life-span developmental model for viewing human behavior, including
career development and the role of work in human development.
6.
Students will be educated to the appropriate selection and implementation of preventive/educational
interventions.
7.
Students will be educated to a variety of appraisal methods within different contexts and for the
attainment of appropriate goals.
8.
Students will be educated to be expert consumers of counseling research and practice critical
reflection in all of their counselor-related endeavors.
9.
Students will be encouraged to develop a strong identity with the counseling profession, including an
understanding of its history and philosophy, and identification with professional organizations such as
the American School Counseling Association and the American Association of Marriage & Family
Therapy. They will be encouraged to become leaders in their professions and communities.
10.
Students will be educated to the ethical and legal parameters of the counseling profession.
11.
Students will be encouraged to view professional development as a career-long process to include
continuing education and involvement with professional renewal beyond the attainment of the
master's degree and develop ongoing intellectual, emotional, and personal growth.
12.
Students will attain the knowledge and skills necessary to be successful entry-level counselors at their
specific employment setting.
8
WHAT IS ACCREDITATION?
Accreditation in the United States is a voluntary process performed by nongovernmental units, such as
institutional agencies or professional associations. These organizations establish criteria and procedures
for evaluating the quality of education offered by institutions or academic programs. There are two types
of accreditation: (1) Institutional Accreditation, granted by regionaland national accrediting commissions
of schools and colleges, is awarded to total units such as state universities or private colleges; (2)
Specialized Accreditation is awarded to professional programs within institutions, or to occupational
schools offering specific training skills and knowledge. Often, specialized accrediting bodies are organized
by professional associations representing such fields as business, counseling, law, or public health.
IPFW is currently accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, and our program
by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education and by the Indiana Department of
Education. Our School Counseling master's was designed to comply with standards stipulated by the
Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), and our Marriage
& Family Therapy master's was designed to comply with standards of the American Association of
Marriage & Family Therapy's Commission on Accreditation (AAMFT/COA). (See Appendix X)
9
COUNSELOR EDUCATION FACULTY
Our classes are taught by both full-time IPFW faculty and adjunct faculty. We're particularly proud of the ways our
adjunct faculty enrich the program by contributing a strong practitioner perspective. Full-time faculty are denoted by
an asterisk.
Tom Gordon, M.A., N.C.C., is a licensed school counselor and school psychologist with 24 years of experience in
the profession. He served on the executive council of the state branch of the American Counseling Association for
more than 15 years. Presently he is the executive director of the Schwab Foundation which underwrites the Pursuits
Program for Allen County students.
Linda Smith, M..S., is an Indiana licensed marriage and family therapist and licensed mental health counselor. She
also holds certifications as a national certified counselor and certified clinical mental health counselor. Linda has been
a contract therapist for Lutheran Social Services and a full-time therapist and supervisor for Park Center’s adult, child,
and adolescent outpatient clinics. Linda is currently in private clinical practice.
Amy Nitza, Ph.D.*, is Coordinator of School Counselor Education. She holds a master’s degree in Mental Health
Counseling from Purdue University and a doctorate in Counseling Psychology from Indiana University. She has
experience counseling children, adolescents, and families in school and community settings, as well as in the
supervision of school and agency counselor trainees. She is a full member of the American Counseling Association
and the American Psychological Association.
William Utesch, Ph.D.*, Director of the Counselor Education program, is a national board-certified counselor,
certified as an approved supervisor and clinical member of the Americ an Association for Marriage and Family
Therapy, a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, and a professional member of the American Counseling
Association. His master's degree in counseling is from Eastern Illinois University, and his doctorate in marriage and
family therapy was earned at Purdue University. He has 12 years' experience as an agency counselor and
administrator. As an associate professor at IPFW, he teaches practica, group, research, marriage/family therapy, and
internship courses.
James Burg, Ph.D.*, Coordinator, Agency/MFT Counselor Education, is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist,
a Licensed Mental Health Counselor, and a certified family and divorce mediator. He has experience as a private
practitioner, agency counselor, and therapy training-center administrator. He is a clinical member and approved
supervisor of the American Association for Marriage & Family Therapy. His master's degree in marriage & family
therapy is from Michigan State University and his doctorate in marriage & family therapy is from Purdue University.
Martha Goller, M.S., has been a teacher in a public school setting with a B.A. in Secondary Education from Millikin
University (cum laude). She has served as a clinical director and therapist at Park Center’s Decatur office and is
presently providing mental health counseling services for students in the South Adams School district. She is a national
certified mental health counselor and an Indiana state licensed mental health counselor.
Ken Weaver, M.A., was the Director of Outpatient and Acute Care Services at Northeastern Center Inc. for 12
years. He is a family mediator registered by the Indiana Supreme Court, a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, a pastoral
counselor, a Licensed Mental Health Counselor, and a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. Ken has over 23
years of experience in the provision, supervision, and administration of clinical mental health services. Ken is a clinical
member of the American Association of Marriage & Family Therapists.
AGENCY/MARRIAGE & FAMILY THERAPY CURRICULUM
CHECK SHEET
Revised 4/04
Student Name
ID#
1st Year
FALL
EDUC G590 Research in Counseling and Guidance
EDUC G503 Counseling Theories and Techniques I: Humanistic and Existential
SPRING
EDUC G504 Counseling Theories and Techniques II: Behavior and Family Systems
EDUC G505 Individual Appraisal: Principles and Procedures**
SUMMER I
EDUC G563 Foundations of Mental Health Counseling
SUMMER II
EDUC G502 Professional Orientation and Ethics
2nd Year
FALL
EDUC G524* Practicum in Counseling
EDUC G567 Introduction to Marriage and Family Counseling
SPRING
EDUC G525* Advanced Counseling Practicum
EDUC G590 Research in Counseling and Guidance (MFT)
SUMMER I
EDUC G525* Advanced Counseling Practicum
EDUC P514 Life Span Development: Birth/Death**
SUMMER II
EDUC G525* Advanced Counseling Practicum
EDUC G575 Multicultural Counseling
3rd Year
FALL
EDUC G532 Introduction to Group Counseling
EDUC G550 Internship in Counseling and Guidance
SPRING
EDUC G551# Advanced Internship in Counseling
EDUC P516 Adolescent Development
SUMMER I
EDUC G570 Human Sexuality
Comprehensive Exam/Final Portfolio Evaluation
Grade
Semester
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
*
Students must acquire student liability insurance from AAMFT prior to any practica (G524 or G525). Out-of-sequence students will not
have priority for practicum space.
#
The internship will require a site placement of no less than 13 face-to-face client contact hours per week totaling a minimum of 400 hours
of face-to-face client contact and 80 hours of approved supervision. A minimum of 2.5 hours per week of supervision with an approved
supervisor is also required. Internships are typically completed in 31 weeks (September to May).
**
Portfolio Checkpoints
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Students are accepted to the M.S. in Counseling only for classes beginning Fall semester.
All applications must be received by May 1.
A condition of acceptance is adherence to the above schedule.
A passing score on the comprehensive exam and a portfolio evaluation are required for degree completion.
Students will be eligible for a Marriage & Family Therapy license after completion of the degree and 1,000
hours/two years post-degree work experience with a minimum of 200 hours of supervision.
57 semester credits constitute the degree minimum credits.
Prerequisites:
EDUC G503 and EDUC G504 before G524 and G525;
EDUC G524 before G525;
6.
7.
11
8.
EDUC G524 and G525 before G550
An annual review of student progress is administered each year at the end of the spring semester.
SCHOOL COUNSELING CURRICULUM
CHECK SHEET
Revised 4/04
Student Name
ID#
1st Year
FALL
EDUC G590 Research in Counseling and Guidance
EDUC G503 Counseling Theories and Techniques I: Humanistic and Existential
SPRING
EDUC G504 Counseling Theories and Techniques II: Behavior and Family Systems
EDUC G505 Individual Appraisal: Principles and Procedures**
SUMMER I
EDUC G552 Career Counseling: Theory and Practice
SUMMER II
EDUC G502 Professional Orientation and Ethics
2nd Year
FALL
EDUC G524* Practicum in Counseling
EDUC G562 School Counseling: Intervention, Consultation, and Program Development
SPRING
EDUC P515 or P516 Child Development or Adolescent Development
EDUC G525* Advanced Counseling Practicum
SUMMER I
EDUC P514 Life Span Development: Birth/Death**
SUMMER II
EDUC G575 Multicultural Counseling
3rd Year
FALL
EDUC G532 Introduction to Group Counseling
EDUC G550# Internship in Counseling and Guidance
SPRING
EDUC G551# Advanced Internship in Counseling
EDUC K505 Introduction to Special Education for Graduate Students
SUMMER I
EDUC G570 Human Sexuality
Comprehensive Exam/Final Portfolio Evaluation
Grade
Semester
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
*
Students must acquire student liability insurance from ASCA prior to any practica (G524 or G525).
#
The internship requirement for all students regardless of their prior teaching credentials is 600 clock hours over one academic school year in
all three developmental levels (HS, MS, Elem). Of those hours, 240 hours must be spent working directly with children in the role of
school counselor.
**
Portfolio Checkpoints
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Students are accepted to the M.S. in Counseling only for classes beginning Fall semester.
All applications must be received by May 1.
A condition of acceptance is adherence to the above schedule.
A passing score on the comprehensive exam and a portfolio evaluation are required for degree completion.
Licenses may be applied for upon completion of the degree.
51 semester credits constitute the degree minimum credits.
Prerequisites:
EDUC G503 and EDUC G504 before G524 and G525;
EDUC G524 before G525;
EDUC G524 and G525 before G550
An annual review of student progress is administered each year at the end of the spring semester.
8.
13
PORTFOLIO REVIEW
Students are expected to maintain a portfolio of work produced as part of their graduate program. The portfolio will contain
the mandatory items listed below and student-produced papers, selected course projects, handouts, or any variety of
materials the student may choose. Selections should represent their best work. Portfolios will be employed by faculty to
assess student growth and learning and could be used by students to illustrate their competencies to future employees.
Confidentiality of clients must be maintained in all instances.
At a minimum, portfolios should contain:
1.
Final ethics paper from G502 and conceptual framework reflection paper.
2.
SBFT application paper from G503.
3.
Testing Protocol from G505.
4.
One completed career plan report from G552.
5.
The research proposal from G590.
6.
A psychosocial from either G524 or G525. All identifying information must be blacked out!
7.
Peer supervision feedback forms stapled in chronological order from G524 and G525.
8.
G562 Needs Assessment.
9.
The final paper from G567.
10.
Any paper from G590 (MFT).
11.
The group proposal from G532.
12.
The site supervisor's evaluation from G550 and G551.
13.
Three items from three separate courses not already required, selected as examples of your best work.
14.
A reflection paper that reviews portfolio evidence of student growth, learning, and alignment with
appropriate state standards for each item.
15.
A reflection paper completed at the end of the program that reviews your experience in the counselor
education program (Appendix S).
16.
Any paper from G575.
17.
A reflection paper completed in G503 and G551 reviewing the conceptual framework.
Portfolios are not graded, but they are expected to be complete and of the quality necessary to aid the student in gaining
employment or admission to doctoral study (Appendix M). First- and second-year students will submit portfolios at two
checkpoints: G505 and P514 respectively. Third-year students will submit their portfolios for final review in G570.
A three-ringed binder with pockets should be purchased to contain and display components of the portfolio.
the portfolio notebook should be organized as follows in this order:
The contents of
1.
Cover page on the outside of the notebook with student name, program (MFT or School), advisor name, and the word
“portfolio.”
2.
Table of contents for entire portfolio. Include tabs in notebook for every contents entry.
3.
State standards for respective program area: MFT = IHPB (Appendix J3), School = IPSB (Appendix L).
4.
Portfolio items from courses. Each item should be followed by a one-page reaction of the item and must include:
a.
a brief description of the item;
b.
analysis of what you learned; and
c.
how the evidence demonstrates competence in meeting one of the state standards.
5.
A copy of Faculty Portfolio Reviews (Appendix M) in the notebook pocket.
14
COMPREHENSIVE EXAM
Only eligible students may sit for the comprehensive exam. Eligible students are those that will be completing their
programs the Spring of their graduation year.
You may prepare for the exam by purchasing NBCC publication #10: The Preparation Guide for the National
Counselor Examination for Licensure and Certification. You may order the book by calling the NBCC at 336-5470607. The book will familiarize you with the format and type of questions that will be on the exam. You will also need
to review your past exams, required readings, and papers from the program. You may also review for the eight core
sections at http://licensure.com.
There are eight core sections to this exam with 20 questions per section: Professional Orientation (G502), The
Helping Relationship (G503 & G504), Group Dynamics (G532), Appraisal (G505), Research (G590 & P501), Social
& Cultural Foundations (G575), Human Development (P514 & G570), and Lifestyle & Career Counseling (G552 for
School), Mental Health Issues (G563 for MFT). A ninth section with 40 questions is given to specifically address
competencies in either the School or Agency/MFT Master's. Applicable School courses are G502 & P516, and the
applicable Agency/MFT courses are G567 and G590 MFT.
Retakes of failed sections will be required for graduation and will be scheduled approximately two weeks after the
initial exam. A remediation plan will be developed for the student by counseling faculty if retakes are failed.
Failure to pass comprehensive exams the first time will result in a delay of your graduation date.
Please call Dr. Utesch to confirm your attendance in the Fall semester prior to your exam.
CLASS ATTENDANCE
Students are expected to attend classes regularly because classroom work is one of the necessary and important
means of learning and of attaining the educational objectives of the institution.
Students should not miss classes except for valid reasons such as illness, accidents, or participation in officially
approved university activities. When absent from classes, it is the student's responsibility to inform his/her instructors
of the reason for the absence as early as possible and to arrange to make up missed assignments and class work
insofar as this is possible.
Typically, students are allowed one excused absence from class without penalty. A second absence may be excused
if the instructor is convinced sufficient reason exists. A third absence will result in the lowering of the student's grade
by one letter. A fourth absence will result in dropping the student from class, without credit.
Instructors may consider more strict attendance policies when assigning grades. In that event the requirement for
attendance will be stated in writing as part of the course syllabus, and will be distributed to students at the beginning
of the semester.
Because hours in such classes as Practicum, Advanced Practicum, and Internship are counted toward supervision,
licensing, and certification, students must make up all hours missed from such classes, or else subtract missed hours
from the total supervised hours credited.
15
ACADEMIC DISMISSALS
A remediation plan will be developed by the Counselor Education faculty for students who receive one grade of “C”
in the program. It is the policy of the Counselor Education program for the Director to recommend to the Dean of
the School of Education that students earning two grades of "C" or lower be dismissed from the program.
Students admitted conditionally must meet the terms of admission for conditional status or be dismissed from the
program. Conditional status students must maintain a grade point average (GPA) of 3.5 for the Fall, Spring, Summer
I, and Summer II classes of their first year.
All students must earn a grade of "B" or "A" in Practicum (G524) to be eligible to enroll in Advanced Practicum
(G525). Students must earn a grade of "B" or "A" in Advanced Practicum (G525) to be eligible to enroll in Internship
(G550). Failure to do so will result in the student having to retake the course.
Students must maintain a 3.0 GPA to graduate. Courses where a grade of “D” or “F” is received must be retaken.
A retaken course will be averaged with the course it replaces.
PREPARING PAPERS IN APA STYLE
Most major publications in counseling and psychology employ APA style. The APA publication manual was initiated
as a guide for preparation of papers in professional journals. Students in the counselor education program are required
to write in APA style. The IPFW Library has copies of the latest edition of the Publication Manual of the American
Psychological Association available for student use.
STUDENT PROGRAM REVISIONS
Under rare circumstances a student may need to revise or delay their program of study. ALL PROGRAM
REVISIONS MUST BE APPROVED BY THE COUNSELOR EDUCATION PROGRAM DIRECTOR. The
appropriate form to use is shown as Appendix P.
ANNUAL REVIEW
The annual student review process has two purposes: (1) for you to reflect on where you are as a counselor/therapistin-training, and (2) for the faculty to evaluate the effectiveness of the Counselor Education Program in training
students. This review is required; therefore, you must complete it in order to continue in the program. The annual
review occurs every spring semester (Appendix N).
The CE faculty will review your questionnaire and you will receive feedback in the form of a summary review paper.
If you would like to speak to a faculty member in person about your review, please call to arrange an appointment.
16
SCORING RUBRIC FOR COUNSELOR EDUCATION PROGRAM WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS
Description
Percentage of Points
The project meets all the major and minor project requirements.
The project contains no more than one or two grammatical or
spelling errors. The project design and organization is clear, coherent,
and easy to follow. Much critical thought and analysis is evident.
Strong evidence is present of scholarly research. The project topic
is highly relevant and material to the learning needs of counselors
and therapists.
The project meets all the major project requirements, but may not
meet one minor requirement. The project contains very few grammatical
and/or spelling errors. The project design and organization is clear, coherent,
and easy to follow. Critical thought and analysis is evident. Some evidence
is present of scholarly research. The project topic is relevant and material to
the learning needs of counselors and therapists.
100%
90%
89%
80%
The project substantially meets all of the major project requirements but
may not meet minor requirements. The project may contain some grammatical
and/or spelling errors. The project is designed well and organized well. Some
minimal critical thought and analysis is evident. Some, but not significant,
evidence is present of scholarly research. The project topic is somewhat
relevant and material to the learning needs of counselors and therapists.
79%
The project meets most, but not all, of the major project requirements. Only
minimal evidence of scholarly research is present. The project may contain
several grammatical and/or spelling errors. The project is not well designed
and organized. Minimal critical thought and analysis is evident. Little evidence
of scholarly research is present. The project topic is not in a significantly and
meaningful way relevant and material to the learning needs of counselors and
therapists.
69%
The project does not in a substantial way meet most of the major project
requirements. The project may contain numerous grammatical and/or spelling
errors. A lack of intelligent design and organization is evident. No critical
thought and analysis is evident. No evidence of scholarly research is present.
The project topic is not relevant and material to the learning needs of counselors
and therapists.
59%
70%
60%
0%
17
STUDENT RETENTION POLICY
The IPFW Counselor Education program, in compliance with the respective Ethical Standards, Standards of
Preparation, and Professional Conduct Codes of organizations and associations such as the American Association
of Marriage and Family Therapy, American School Counseling Association, Association for Counselor Education
and Supervision, and the National Board for Certified Counselors, as well as the Council for the Accreditation of
Counseling and Related Educational Programs and the Commission on Accreditation, abides by the following
retention policy for all students in the program.
The student review and retention policy of the counseling program enables the faculty to share information about
student progress. Student review is an item on the agenda on all regular Counselor Education faculty meetings.
At that time, any questions about students may be raised for faculty consideration.
Once a year, a faculty meeting is set aside for student review. At this meeting, the progress of all students in the
counseling program is assessed. Students who are not making satisfactory progress are asked to make an
appointment with a faculty advisor in order to facilitate appropriate program adjustment.
If, in the professional judgment of a Counselor Education faculty member, a student's behavior is deemed
professionally inappropriate, inadequate, and/or unethical, the following steps are taken (according to the student's
right to due process):
1.
The faculty member, or a team of faculty members (e.g. T.E.A.M. program faculty), who has become
aware of a problem will meet (in the presence of an additional faculty member) with the student. The
student will at this time be made aware of the concerns and be allowed to respond. If it is felt to be
helpful at this time, the faculty member(s) will offer suggestions for possible changes in the student’s
behavior. This meeting will be documented in writing. Examples of problems which may be addressed
include, but are not limited to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Inappropriate affect and emotions;
Ineffective interpersonal skills;
Lack of respect for the feelings, opinions, knowledge, and abilities of others;
Lack of awareness of social and professional behaviors and expectations;
Inability to reflect upon and take responsibility for own behavior;
Unwillingness/inability to accept suggestions positively and modify behavior appropriately.
2.
If deemed important and appropriate, the faculty member(s) will also write a letter to the SOE Associate
Dean concerning the meeting with the student. The written documentation of the meeting with the
student will be attached to this letter. The faculty concurrently will inform the student, in writing, that
such a letter has been sent to the Associate Dean. Upon the request by the student or Associate Dean, a
student advocate will be appointed from among the SOE faculty.
3.
If the Associate Dean deems the student’s problem to be serious enough in nature, he/she subsequently
will appoint a SOE faculty committee to investigate all aspects of the situation and to interview the
student. The student may then be given recommendations for modification of behavior and warning for
potential dismissal from the program.
4.
The faculty committee’s report, including recommendation and/or requirements, will be placed in the
student’s file and a copy will be delivered to the student. Included in this report will be an appropriate
timeline for the required modifications of behavior. At this point, the student’s advisor, the Dean,
appropriate faculty and supervisors will be notified of the student’s warning of potential dismissal from the
program.
18
Student Retention Policy (continued)
5.
The Dean, Associate Dean and faculty committee subsequently will monitor and document the student’s
progress or lack of progress in carrying out the recommendations for the student. The student’s failure to
comply with the recommendations will lead to his/her being dropped from the program.
6.
If the decision is made that the student will be dropped from the program, the Dean will provide the
student with written documentation of this decision.
7.
If the student is not satisfied with the SOE decision, he/she can subsequently follow the appeals procedure
of Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne.
Course Registration Process
Registration for courses occurs several weeks prior to each semester. A dropped class may result in graduation
delay. To obtain a class schedule, grades, fees, or updated transcripts, logon to http://www.ipfw.edu/oasis.
19
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY CODE
All graduate students are bound by the University's honor code as described in The Graduate Bulletin and
Student Handbook. Each IPFW Counselor Education student must also maintain the highest level of academic
honesty as described in the Ethical Standards of the American School Counseling Association, the American
Association of Marriage & Family Therapy, and the Publications Manual of the American Psychological
Association. All students are expected to understand and comply with this policy; ignorance of the rule is not a
valid excuse for an act of academic dishonesty. A violation may result in faculty censure of the student and/or
expulsion from the program. In addition to the breach of confidentiality proscribed by the profession's Ethical
Standards, the following are violations of the academic integrity code: plagiarism, lying, stealing, cheating, and
failure to report a violation.
Plagiarism
The act of imitating, or presenting as new and original, an idea derived from an existing source. All pertinent
material must be recognizably cited as the work of another author. Examples of plagiarism include submitting a
paper, or retyped copy of it, developed for a previous academic requirement as if it were an original response to a
current requirement. Further examples include "purchasing" a written document and presenting it as an original
response to a current class assignment, developing an idea heard in another's speech into a written document
without giving appropriate credit to the source, presenting the same written work for fulfillment of two concurrent
academic requirements.
Lying
A false statement made with the conscious intent to mislead others from knowing the truth. For example, it is
dishonest to pretend or neglect to contact a client for follow-up.
Stealing
The wrongful taking of another's physical or intellectual property, either by force or secret. This also applies to
library, laboratory, and clinic materials.
Cheating
Students will be expected to follow rules set by a course instructor as presented on a syllabus or test. For
example, it is cheating to either use or give others unauthorized assistance in the completion of academic work. It
is dishonest to leave client record forms incomplete.
Failure to Report
The conscious failure to report a student who has committed any of the above actions is complicity in the other's
breach of honor. In order to be an effective part of the community, individuals must understand and accept their
responsibility for maintaining the well-being of the community and university.
20
TIME LIMITS
Students must complete their degrees within six years and one semester of taking their first course. Courses
become out-of-date after that time. In the event your first semester courses become outdated, for example, you
must contact the IPFW faculty member responsible for the course (or the Coordinator of Counselor Education if
that person is no longer employed by the university) and the professor will identify an examination comparable to
current course requirements. The student must pass the test and receive written verification by the faculty
member for each out-of-date course.
SEXUAL HARASSMENT
IPFW's policy is to maintain an atmosphere free of pressure from sexual harassment for students, faculty, and
staff. For any person who believes he/she is the victim of sexual harassment, there is confidential advising
available. If you cannot solve your problem of sexual harassment informally and directly, file a formal written
complaint with the complaint officer with whom you feel most comfortable. These include: Judith Dilorio, 260481-6106; Donna Bialik, 260-481-6601; and James Ferguson, 260-481-6677.
NONDISCRIMINATION
IPFW is committed to maintaining a community valuing human worth and dignity. Students may study and work
free of discrimination--on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, or other protected status.
Harassment is unacceptable conduct and will not be condoned. Questions regarding our policy and practices
should be directed to the Affirmative Action Officer, Judith Dilorio, Kettler Hall 110P, 260-481-6106.
HIV/AIDS GUIDELINES
Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a serious defect in the body's immune system caused by the
Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). This defect renders the carrier susceptible to certain life-threatening
infections or cancerous processes.
HIV is a transmissible yet fragile agent. Research to date indicates infection results only from contamination of a
person's blood stream with infected secretions (blood, semen, vaginal secretions, and breast milk). Transmission
may occur during sexual activity, birth, the transfusion of contaminated blood products, breast feeding, or the use
of a contaminated needle. Recommended precautionary measures include use of latex condoms and spermicidal
foams and gels containing Nonoxynol-9, dental dams, new or sterilized needles, and--for health-care workers-consistent adherence to universal precautions for infection control required by the Centers for Disease Control.
There are no known cases of transmission from respiratory droplets (as from coughing and sneezing), saliva,
tears, or perspiration; or food; or environmental objects; or insect bites.
Because HIV is transmitted as described above, it does not present a risk in most university activities. Those
students and employees who may come in contact with blood products while carrying out their study or work
assignments (such as students and faculty in Health Sciences, police officers, or custodians) must be advised of
universal precautions regarding HIV (and other bloodborne pathogens).
21
JOINING PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
Joining professional organizations is the beginning of identifying yourself as a professional. These organizations
welcome student members and some encourage participation in activities at reduced rates. State and local
chapters of organizations provide networking opportunities and allow students to be active at the grassroots level.
An additional advantage to membership in professional organizations is the opportunity to preview state or national
conferences and national publications. Many organizations, such as the American Association of Marriage and
Family Therapy and the American School Counseling Association, offer reduced rates for membership services
such as liability insurance (required for IPFW practica and internships), travel services, and consumer discounts.
The American School Counseling Association (ASCA) is a professional association for school counselors.
State membership in the Indiana School Counselor's Association (ISCA) requires a separate application.
The American Association of Marriage & Family Therapy is a professional association for marriage and
family therapists. State membership in the Indiana Association of Marriage and Family Therapy is included
in national membership.
Below is a listing of professional organizations' addresses and telephone numbers so you might contact them for
"student member" information and applications:
ASCA
American School Counseling Association
PO Box 18136
Merrifield VA 22118-0136
1-800-306-4722
* Student liability insurance for ASCA is purchased through ASCA.
AAMFT
American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy
1717 K Street NW Suite 407
Washington DC 20006
202-452-0109
* Student liability insurance for AAMFT can be purchased from an AAMFT-approved provider
by calling AAMFT.
22
THE NATIONAL BOARD FOR CERTIFIED COUNSELORS
Graduates of both the Agency/MFT Counseling and School Counseling programs are encouraged to seek national
certification through the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC). NBCC is an independent, voluntary,
not-for-profit organization whose primary purposes are to establish and monitor a national certification system, to
identify to professionals and the public those counselors who have voluntarily sought and obtained generic
counselor certification, and to maintain a register of these counselors. This process grants recognition to
counselors who have met predetermined NBCC standards in their training, experience, and performance on the
NBCC Certification Examination. A counselor who is certified by the NBCC uses the designation NCC, National
Certified Counselor. In addition, school counselors can take the optional National School Counselor Exam.
The following are criteria for certification as an NCC:
1.
Graduate degree in counseling (minimum of 48 semester hours) from a regionally
accredited university.
2.
At least two years of post-master's professional counseling experience, with
3,000 client contact hours and 100 hours of weekly face-to-face supervision with
an NCC or equivalent.
3.
A minimum of two academic terms of supervised field experience in a counseling
setting.
4.
Assessment of counseling experience by two professionals in the field.
5.
Pass the National Counselor Examination administered by NBCC.
National Certified Counselors (NCC's) are certified for a period of five years. In order to be recertified
at the end of the five-year period, a counselor must:
1.
Demonstrate completion of 100 contact clock hours of approved continuing
education or retake the National Counselor Examination administered by NBCC.
2.
Adhere to the NBCC Code of Ethics in professional practice.
The IPFW counselor education program is an approved site for the NBCC/board-eligible special
administration of the NCE. Students may sit for the exam one semester prior to their graduation. See Dr.
Utesch to register.
National Board for Certified Counselors
3-D Terrace Way
Greensboro NC 27403
910-547-0607
23
ACADEMIC AND PERSONAL RESOURCES
Helmke Library
The IPFW library contains more than 600,000 books, journals, and microfiche holdings. In addition,
Cheryl Truesdell in Document Delivery Services can obtain additional journal articles or dissertations in 710 days. The electronic card catalog called "I/O" identifies resources on the shelves in Fort Wayne as
well as on seven other campuses of Indiana University. Students owning home computers with a modem
(and software) can access the library from their homes. Of particular interest are databases of journal
articles called "ERIC" (Educational Resources Information Center) and "Psych Info." Computers with
these databases can electronically search AAMFT, ACA/ASCA, and APA journals for you. Internet
computer connections allow searches of dozens of libraries worldwide. There are only a few "reference
librarians" whose expertise could assist you in uncovering pertinent journal articles. Pamela Sandstrom
(260-481-5404) is the librarian assigned to serve students in our program. She will make an appointment
at a mutually convenient time to assist with your project. Sue Skekloff works with psychology students,
so her expertise could serve as a substitute in a pinch.
IPFW Community Counseling Center
This is the primary training laboratory for our techniques, practicum, and advanced practicum classes.
Actual clients seek your help in a professional setting where you receive immediate feedback and clinical
supervision. It is located in the Dolnick Learning Center.
Learning Resource Center
In the basement of the library, this center provides graphic art assistance, audio and video production, and
audio-visual equipment assistance. If you make a presentation at a conference or just in class, you may
wish to take advantage of their free services.
Information Technology Services (IT Services)
IT Services provides computing support to IPFW faculty, staff, and students, and maintains a large
network of micro-, mini-, and mainframe computers. All IPFW students have Internet e-mail accounts. Email account activation packets are mailed to your home at the beginning of the first semester you attend.
Should you require help with your e-mail or lose your packet of information, you can obtain personal
assistance at the Help Desk in Kettler 206.
Open access computer labs are located in Kettler G13, 204A, 204B, and 217; Neff B71, B73; ET 305; SB
G15. A MacIntosh lab is available in Kettler 217D. These labs are open to all students for universityrelated purposes. Some schools and departments provide students access to additional specialized labs.
A staff of student consultants is available to answer your specific questions. Hours of operation are 7:00
a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, and 12:30 p.m. to 10:30
p.m. on Sunday during the Fall and Spring semesters. To check summer hours, contact the Help Desk at
260-481-6030.
Curriculum Lab
In 237 Neff Hall are MacIntosh (10), Apple (20), and IBM (1) personal computers available for your use,
including several thousand dollars' worth of counseling-related computer programs and curriculum
materials. Hours are posted on the door. Call to reserve a machine (260-481-6459).
24
Academic and Personal Resources (continued)
Placement Services
Students wishing to use the university's placement service should contact the office of Career Services
(260-481-6595) for information regarding activating a placement file. Vacancy notices received from
local schools, agencies, business, and government are posted frequently. Bulletins from both Bloomington
and West Lafayette identify state, national, and international opportunities. When you create your resumé
and collect your transcript and letters of reference, these can be assembled in a placement file sent on
request to numerous potential employers.
Other services provided include coordinating interviews with recruiters from business, government, and
school systems; providing information about major employers; job search skills; and career planning.
Materials on resumé-writing and interviewing skills are available for student use.
Follett's Bookstore
Textbooks and campus clothes are on sale in the basement of Kettler Hall (260-483-6100). Store hours
are 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays; 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Fridays; and 10:00 a.m. to 1:00
p.m. Saturdays. There's an Owl Bank machine nearby.
Student Union Services
The Sweet Shoppe (Walb 127, 260-481-6612) is more than a candy store, but you'd never know it! Few
students know it offers the following (shhh!): check-cashing service; student fax service; student-access
phone; Citilink bus schedules; mailbox; and sales of stamps, envelopes, newspapers, computer diskettes,
discounted movie tickets, and discounted Philharmonic tickets. The rec room downstairs features billiard
tables, ping-pong, and video games (reserve at 260-481-6614). Now if we could just talk the Student
Union into evening hours!
Counseling Service
Confidential personal counseling appointments are available at no charge. Call 260-481-6595.
Services for Students with Disabilities
Free assistance is available including reader and sign interpreter services, test proctoring, and appropriate
aids such as specially accessible microcomputers. If you have a disability or acquire one and wish to find
out about the special services and accommodations available, contact this office in Walb 113 (260-4816657 [voice/TDD]).
Dean of Students' Office
Several advisors in this office provide support services and information to students, e.g., Center for
Women and Returning Adults, International Services, Multicultural Services, African-American Student
Support Services, Hispanic Student Support Services, Native American Student Services, and Career
Services. Drop by Walb 111 or call 260-481-6601.
25
Academic and Personal Resources (continued)
Multicultural Services
The Office of Multicultural Services serves as a support system for African-American, Hispanic, and
other students of color enrolled at IPFW. Drop by Walb 118 or call 260-481-6608 for more information.
Registrar's Office
Didn't get your grades? Do these folks have your current name and address? Never just stop attending
class; your transcript will automatically gain an "F." Advise these folks of drop/add courses in Kettler 107
(260-481-6815).
Parking
A parking fee is included with registration.
Night Escorts
Call University Police at 260-481-6900 to give your location and request an escort to your car late at
night. Colleagues typically escort each other.
Weather Emergency
Is this a snow day? Decisions to cancel evening classes are made by 4:00 p.m. Call IPFW Weatherline
at 260-481-6050 or 260-481-5770.
Writing Center
Get assistance for writers at all proficiency levels in Kettler 234.
Counselor Education Library
A collection of books and journals are available to students in the counselor education program. The
library is located in the Dolnick Learning Center.
26
FINANCIAL AID
The University offers a few opportunities for financial aid and the Counselor Education program has
developed some auxiliary assistance. Counseling coursework is scheduled at 4:30 in the evenings,
enabling students to hold full-time jobs at other times of the day. People intending to become school
counselors should note the state's internship requirements for all school counselor students (see page 72).
The following describes some of the resources available:
Research Assistantships
When Counselor Education faculty work on funded research grants, these typically include assistantships
for students. Availability of such an opportunity is sporadic. Faculty serving as principal investigators will
select student volunteers as assistants.
Perkins Loans
Formerly called National Direct Student Loans, these are made available by the federal government. To
be eligible, students must be making satisfactory academic progress at the university and show financial
need as indicated by the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Those completing their
application prior to March 1 will receive priority for lower interest rate loans. Those applying after March
1 may receive higher interest rates, so those loans will be more expensive. Generally, the loan amount is
$1,500 or less in any one year. Cumulative borrowing for undergraduate and graduate study may not
exceed $30,000. No interest is charged or repayment expected while the student is still enrolled at least
half time. For new borrowers, repayment begins and interest accrues at 5% per year on the unpaid
balance nine months after the borrower ceases to be at least a half-time student. Contact the IPFW
Financial Aid Office for details.
Stafford Loan Program
Formerly called the Guaranteed Student Loan Program, this program makes loans available through local
lending institutions. Before making an application to the IPFW Financial Aid Office, the student should
talk to a potential lender (banks, savings and loans, credit unions). If the lender agrees to consider the
loan, the student should first complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) available from
the Financial Aid Office. Guidelines for this loan program include:
1.
Results of the FAFSA financial statement must be on file in the Financial Aid
Office before the Stafford Loan will be processed.
2.
Financial Aid Transcripts from all colleges previously attended must be on file in
the IPFW Financial Aid Office before a loan will be processed, even if you did
not receive aid at those schools.
3.
Graduate students may borrow a maximum of $8,500.
4.
The current interest rate for new borrowers is variable and cannot exceed
8.25%.
5.
Repayment begins and interest accrues six months after the borrower ceases to
be at least a half-time student.
27
Financial Aid (continued)
Vocational Rehabilitation
IPFW students with medical or learning disabilities may be eligible for financial assistance. Students
should contact Indiana Rehabilitation Services in their home areas for further information. IPFW's
Services for Students with Disabilities (260-481-6657 [voice/TDD]) may provide information on
contacting your local vocational rehabilitation agency. Rehabilitation authorizations granted to students
are processed through the Financial Aid Office.
Veterans Administration Benefits
The Office of Veterans Affairs can process GI Bill benefits. Financial assistance is provided by the
Veterans Administration (VA) to veterans who served more than six months active duty for other than
training purposes, have been out of the service for fewer than 10 years, have other than a dishonorable
discharge, or are members of an active reserve unit determined eligible by the Department of Defense for
VA educational benefits. Applicants qualifying will need to provide discharge papers (DD214), and
processing time for new applications averages 45-60 days. Contact the IPFW Registrar’s Office in
Kettler 107 (260-481-6126).
International Students
IPFW International Services exists to provide support services to international students, permanent
immigrants, and aliens. Call 260-481-6923 to ask if any new financial aid has become available recently.
Also see below.
Multicultural Services
This group exists to provide a support system for students and to communicate student needs to IPFW
staff, social service agencies, and the business community. Call 260-481-6608 to inquire if new financial
aid might have become available for graduate students. Networking with African-American Support
Services, Hispanic Student Support Services, or Native American Student Support Services may gain you
the most up-to-date information regarding new aid.
IPFW Financial Aid Office
This office is located in Kettler 102B and maintains current information on available financial support.
Ask to scan the Scholarship Resource book (Graduate Student version) for local information updated each
month. Call 260-481-6820.
29
WHO IS SERVED?
The identity of clients utilizing the Counselor Education clinic is confidential information. Demographic
information about groups of clients is illustrative, but can be described only to the extent it does not
jeopardize client anonymity.
Since 1982, 70 percent of our clients have been children and the remaining 30 percent adults. The
majority of children were between 11-15 years of age. The youngest client was 5 years old; the oldest,
68.
Examples of issues voiced by adults included: coping with terminal illness, adjusting to retirement, wanting
career counseling, seeking improved marital communication, recovering from post traumatic stress
syndrome, relating to alcoholic family members, and coping with a history of sexual abuse in childhood.
Issues causing parents to refer children included: poor self-concept, divorce, death of a parent, suicidal
tendencies or threats, poor parent-child communication, difficulty in forming friendships, previous sexual
abuse, difficulty in adjusting to a new school or grade, and post-high school planning.
Proportionate Ratio of Issues
Adults Bring to
IPFW Counselor Education Clinic
Proportionate Ratio of Issues
Children Bring to
IPFW Counselor Education Clinic
30
INTRODUCTION
Counseling practica in the counselor education clinic represent a vital period in the preparation of future
counselors. It is during this time that counselors involve themselves in synthesizing prior learnings involving:
information and concepts; counseling skills--techniques--strategies; and professional roles and selfdevelopment. Practica encompass the integration and application period of the counselor education program,
readying students for the professional internship. Practica involve systematic supervision and evaluation of
counseling cases with emphasis upon the following:
>
Handling actual clients.
>
Applying knowledge of cultural differences.
>
Conceptualizing cases, diagnostic impressions, and treatment planning.
>
Consulting with parents, significant others.
>
Recording, listening to, and evaluating taped interviews.
>
Administering and interpreting tests.
>
Report writing.
>
Reacting to observation and supervision both in individual conferences and in small group
sessions.
It is during practica that you move from your status as students to pre-professionals, developing your expertise
as counselors. This manual is presented to make the transition period as smooth as possible. The information
describes the system utilized by the IPFW Counselor Education Clinic. It is essential that practica counselors
become thoroughly familiar with the contents and procedures described.
Students will obtain a minimum of 400 hours of face-to-face client contact and 80 hours of approved
supervision.
A typical evening in the clinic begins with two students meeting with the practicum supervisor for individual
supervision (1:2) from 4:30 p.m. to 5:20 p.m. At 5:20 the “Practicum Assignment Chart” (Appendix U) is
completed and clients are seen. Every session is prefaced by a ten-minute pre-session followed by a tenminute post-session at the end using the “Pre-Post Session Form” (Appendix V). Students observing sessions
must complete a “Practicum Rating Form” (Appendix W) for every session they observe. Session breaks
are mandatory and must be taken near the end of every session. Students may use the “Treatment Planning
Guide” (Appendix X) to assist in planning treatment. After the last post-session at 9:00 p.m., all paperwork
is completed.
31
PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY AND LIABILITY
I.
Liability for Professional Practice
Internship settings are increasingly concerned that students and trainees be covered by professional
practice liability insurance. The Counselor Education program has no provision for offering liability
insurance, and is prevented from doing so on the basis of cost and university regulations. Students
are required to obtain "student liability insurance" (one million/three million) prior to their practicum
(G524) and maintain it throughout their internship. This is available from ASCA and AAMFT.
School counseling interns are included in student teaching contracts between the university and
individual school systems. This legal contract protects the school from liability, but does not
necessarily ensure students could not be sued separately. Therefore, both agency/MFT and school
counseling interns are required to acquire liability insurance prior to practicum.
II.
Student Counselor Behavior
Professional behavior is required of students at all times; this is especially true for students in practica
and internship. The Counselor Education code of ethics is based upon that of the American
Association of Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) and the American School Counseling
Association (ASCA). A copy of those ethical standards is printed in your ethics text. An important
ethical concern for students is that of confidentiality. This means a student does not discuss clients,
cases, or confidential information about other students outside of a professional setting. Disciplinary
action may be taken if any breach of confidence is observed, reported, or discovered. A violation
could result in censure of the student or expulsion from the program.
It is especially important students act professionally when in the IPFW Community Counseling
Center. Some clinic procedures are listed below:
A.
All student counselors are responsible for reading and understanding the Ethical Guidelines
of the AAMFT and the ASCA. Students should abide by these guidelines at all times.
B.
The IPFW Community Counseling Center is a professional counseling facility. Student
counselors are expected to reflect that image in both their dress and personal and
professional behavior.
C.
Use of the clinic is greatly facilitated by student counselors and staff following these
guidelines:
1.
Doors to the conference rooms should be kept closed at all times.
2.
Furniture and audio and video equipment should not be removed. If something
needs to be changed or added to a room, contact your supervisor.
32
Professional Responsibility and Liability (continued)
III.
IV.
3.
Students should only discuss cases in the conference room. The waiting room areas
and hallways are public areas unsuitable for confidential conversations.
4.
All audio and video equipment should be set up and operational before the clients
arrive. Students are responsible for the recording of each of their sessions. All
tapes/DVD’s are treated as confidential information and should not be removed
form the clinic at any time.
5.
Professional Dress: Students are required to dress professionally when working
with clients. While there is great latitude for personal preferences, jeans, tee shirts,
and tennis shoes are not allowed. On the other hand, business suits or dresses are
not required. It is the supervisor's discretion as to what is appropriate dress in
therapy.
Client Records
A.
Client records allow us to gather information about the number and type of clients seen in the
clinic. All information about clients must be kept in the client's file. These files must remain
in the clinic. Students may wish, with their supervisor's approval, to keep counseling notes
that aid them in their work with their clients. Those notes should not contain any names or
other identifying information, and should also remain confidential.
B.
Many times former clients seek counseling at other facilities. Those facilities often seek
information about the clients' prior treatment at IPFW. Other times clients need progress
letters for another service agency with which they are working. Any letter, or discussion,
regarding a client or any facet of the IPFW Community Counseling Center should be
discussed with the supervisor beforehand. All correspondence must be sent by faculty on
IPFW letterhead.
Appointments
A.
All appointments should be made through the Clinic Manager (Appendix T: “Job Description
for Clinic Manager”). Student counselors receiving or making referrals should have potential
clients call the clinic.
B.
It is inappropriate for student counselors to give clients their home phone numbers. Any
contact with the client should occur at the clinic.
C.
Student counselors should never see clients in the clinic alone.
supervised and audio- or videotaped.
D.
Students should not be involved in cases where they know the client or members of the
client's family. The student should notify his/her supervisor so other arrangements can be
made.
All sessions must be
33
Professional Responsibility and Liability (continued)
V.
Referrals
A.
The IPFW Community Counseling Center is not equipped to serve all types of clients. In the
case a client is in crisis (e.g., suicidal), needs hospitalization or medication, or is experiencing
a problem beyond the competencies of student counselors, a faculty supervisor will intervene
and referral will be made to the appropriate community agency.
B.
When a referral is made the student counselor should first consult his/her faculty supervisor
to determine appropriate agencies. Names and telephone numbers of appropriate agencies
should be given to the client, and follow-up arrangements identified.
C.
Clients who wish to continue at the IPFW Community Counseling Center should not be
promised they can see any particular counselor. These clients can place their name on a
waiting list and they will be assigned to the appropriate counselor by faculty.
D.
Student counselors in Advanced Practicum will not ordinarily continue with their clients in
internship sites. Clients must be terminated or referred at the end of the student's practicum
experience.
34
PERIODIC EVALUATIONS OF CLINICAL WORK IN PRACTICUM
We are ethically bound to protect the welfare of the clients we serve. We must keep this in mind when we
make decisions which may have an impact on them. This includes decisions about student participation in
clinical activities.
At least twice each semester, faculty supervisors will review the work of students enrolled in the clinical
practicum for whom they are responsible. If a student's work in practicum is below the minimum level, or
if the student exhibits behavioral or performance characteristics inconsistent with standards for behavior in
clinical practicum (as presented, for example, in this manual), the student will be counseled by his or her
clinical supervisor in consultation with the program faculty. This counseling should inform the student that
his or her privileges of participating in that clinical practicum are at risk of being terminated for the reasons
explained to the student. In some unusual circumstances, the student's participation may be immediately
terminated for just cause. The student is given written recommendations for rectifying the problem, along
with a deadline by which this must be accomplished. At the designated deadline, if the behaviors have not
been satisfactorily changed in the manner described to the student, the student will be informed that practicum
privileges have been withdrawn. Upon successful completion of the recommended changes, the student's
practicum privileges may be continued or reinstated.
Evaluation of Clinical Practicum Performance and Progress
Students may be told by the faculty supervisor that their work qualifies them to (1) continue in practicum with
the same responsibilities; (2) continue in practicum with reduced responsibilities; or (3) discontinue
participation in practicum. Decisions concerning continuation in clinical practicum include evaluation of the
progress of the student clinician in moving toward being able to function independently as clinicians without
requiring extraordinary supervision efforts.
If the student's work is at the level expected in practicum for students at that level of experience, the
privileges of participating in that clinical practicum are continued. The student is given specific written
recommendations for rectifying any problems, along with a deadline by which this must be accomplished.
If a student's clinical work is below the minimum level expected in practicum for students at that level of
experience, the student will be counseled by his/her clinical supervisor in consultation with the faculty. This
counseling informs the student that he or her privileges of participating in that clinical practicum are suspended
or are at risk of being suspended, and the reasons are explained to the student. The student is given specific
written recommendations for rectifying the problem, along with a deadline by which this must be
accomplished.
If the student exhibits any behavioral or performance characteristics which are determined by consensus of
the faculty to be inconsistent with the program's standards for behavior in clinical practicum (as presented,
for example, in this manual, or the ASCA/AAMFT Code of Ethics), including any threat to the welfare of the
clients, the student is counseled by his or her advising professor and practicum supervisor. This counseling
informs the student that his or her privileges of participating in that clinical practicum are suspended or are
at risk of being suspended, and the reasons are explained to the student. The student is given specific written
recommendations for rectifying any problem behaviors, along with a deadline by which this must be
accomplished.
35
Periodic Evaluations of Clinical Work in Practicum (continued)
Improving Practicum Performance Deficiencies
Students whose clinical practicum performance is below that expected level of experience will be given
opportunities for strengthening weak areas within a reasonable time period. A student who is not able to
make adequate improvement on specific areas of performance within a time period agreed to by the student
and practicum supervisor, in consultation with the faculty, will not be allowed to participate further in clinical
practicum until the student can demonstrate that previous problems which prevented adequate performance
in clinical practicum have been resolved. The burden of proof for this rests on the student.
If the student makes the recommended changes by the designated deadline, then the student's practicum
privileges are continued or reinstated on a trial basis.
If the student is not able to show evidence of satisfactory progress toward making these changes by the
designated deadline, then clinical privileges may be terminated by the faculty. Since supervised clinical work
is required for graduation, the faculty will also initiate a recommendation to the Dean of the School of
Education that the student be dropped from the program.
In some unusual circumstances the student's participation in clinical practicum may be immediately terminated
for just cause. Upon successful completion of recommended changes by a designated deadline, the student's
practicum privileges may be reinstated by the faculty supervisor in consultation with the rest of the faculty
members.
If a student is not able to perform adequately or learn to perform adequately in a reasonable period of time
and with a reasonable amount of aid from the faculty and supervisor, then the student may be informed that
practic um privileges have been terminated, meaning that the student may not continue in clinical practicum.
(Reasonable refers to expectations based on experiences with other students in similar assignments.) Again,
if this occurs, the faculty will also initiate a recommendation to the Dean of the School of Education that the
student be dropped from the program.
In addition, participation in practicum may be terminated immediately by the faculty supervisor in consultation
with the faculty, at any time that client welfare is considered to the be jeopardized.
Absence from Scheduled Practicum Responsibilities
Because consistent provision of services is deemed necessary to client/patent welfare, frequent absences
from practicum, whatever the cause, will be determined to be just grounds for termination from practicum.
When the student can demonstrate that the cause for such absences no longer exists and that there are no
other barriers to successful participation, readmission to practicum will be granted on a trial basis at a time
considered to be appropriate by the faculty supervisor. Further absences may result in permanent loss of
clinical practicum privileges.
36
Periodic Evaluations of Clinical Work in Practicum (continued)
Dual Relationships
During their program and practicum, students are involved in various dual relationships (e.g., student/teacher,
supervisee/supervisor, RA/TA/faculty supervisor). Some dual relationships are unavoidable and are not
considered unethical in and of themselves. However, the faculty are concerned about apparent, potential,
and perceived conflicts of interest and/or exploitation. The faculty are also concerned with the way dual
relationships are handled. Therefore, the faculty acknowledge the potential for dual relationships between
student therapists and their clients. When knowledge of any possible dual relationship issue emerges, the
student should consult his/her faculty supervisor immediately. Failure to do so may constitute a breech of
ethics.
We consider (for example) the participation for student therapist and their clients in the same therapeutic
endeavor (e.g., group therapy) as inappropriate. Thus, students are not allowed to engage in such activities.
If a student therapist learns that one or more of his/her clients plan to participate in the same social activity
as the therapist, the student therapist must consult with his/her faculty supervisor to obtain permission prior
to participation. Violations of this policy are considered a practicum performance deficiency and will be
treated according to the above stated standards.
37
DUAL RELATIONSHIPS
Counselors and Clients
Ethical codes caution members of the helping professions about the potential ill effects which can arise from
"dual relationships."
Although dual relationships may not be intrinsically unethical, they can easily give rise to situations which can
lead to subtle exploitation and/or manipulation. Such potential is increased to the extent that one of the parties
has a role of direct power, control, or influence over the life and/or activity of another.
Codes of ethics speak of the special relationship between a counselor and client and of the unique
transference-countertransference issues which such a relationship involves, cautioning against contaminating
the relationship with extrinsic involvement. Both counselor and client become vulnerable to exploitation,
manipulation, and inappropriate influence when the therapeutic role is complicated by additional relationships.
When the outside relationships involve areas of power, control, evaluation, or other such influence, the
freedom of both client and counselor is compromised. For this reason codes of ethics are clear that
professionals need to be careful to avoid dual relationships with clients.
All codes of ethics are explicit about the inappropriateness of sexual activity with clients. The
inappropriateness of such a relationship is clear to all responsible professions, to insurance carriers, to
members of the legal profession, and increasingly, to the public at large, given an understanding of the
"powerful" role of the counselor and the "vulnerability" of the client.
The potential ill effects of many other types of dual relationships may be much more subtle. In some
situations the potential for exploitation, manipulation, and inappropriate influence is very direct because of the
clear "authority" relationship between counselor and client; in other cases the potential influence may be one,
two, or even three or more steps removed. Commentators on ethical codes acknowledge that professionals
cannot avoid all potential influence from "dual relationships." Nonetheless they do affirm the responsibility
of mental health professionals to use due diligence in the conduct of their professional activities. Be certain
your faculty supervisor has approved any meeting with a client outside the IPFW Community Counseling
Center.
(See also After-Hour and Off-Premises Contacts, page 36).
Faculty and Students
Departmental procedures for professional assessment give every full-time faculty person an evaluative role
over all students. Adjunct faculty also have evaluative responsibilities over specific groups of students
depending upon their respective roles in the evaluation process. Given the responsibilities of the Counselor
Education faculty in terms of professional evaluation of candidates within the program, faculty have the
responsibility to take due diligence in assuring that its evaluative processes are as free from contamination
as possible. This requires that the faculty be attentive to the potential for dual relationships which might
interfere with the proper exercise of the program's responsibilities and the participation of faculty in the
evaluation processes. An underlying concern is that there not be an unnecessary reduction in the number of
faculty who are available for participation in the evaluative process.
38
AFTER-HOURS AND OFF-PREMISES CONTACT WITH CLIENTS
The counselor/client encounter is a unique relationship. It is built on trust and genuineness. However, the
relationship is also an intimate one for the client without being equally and reciprocally intimate for the
counselor. This unique relationship contributes greatly to the therapeutic progress of the client because of
the appropriate boundaries common to all current therapeutic modalities. The client brings his/her unique
problems and personal characteristics to the counseling relationship (seeking an objective set of eyes on these
problems) as well as the personhood of the client.
One of the most important therapeutic boundaries is the restriction of therapy to the counseling office. This
enables confidentiality and eliminates the contamination of social interference into the relationship. As
attorney and patient advocate Sandra Nye has stated in many workshops, "You must have a therapeutic
reason to have a Coke with your client." In other words, any contact outside the counseling room must be
therapeutic and, if it is not, then that interaction must be avoided.
Example 1: Counselor Diane was working with a phobic client, George, who was undergoing systematic
desensitization for fear of death and dying. As a part of the therapeutic contract, they agreed that the most
anxiety-producing stimulus would be to enter a funeral home. As the client successfully worked through the
progressive levels of anxiety-producing material, it became necessary to plan a trip to a funeral home for the
final level. Client and counselor went to the funeral home using the relaxation exercises and returned to the
office immediately to process the final step. This contact between client and counselor outside of the
therapeutic setting is appropriate because the total intent of the contact was meeting a therapeutic goal.
Example 2: Counselor Fred was working with client, Jane. Jane had been in an automobile accident which
left her very weak and necessitated her use of a wheelchair while she recovered. While in therapy, Jane
began to talk about wanting to see the other passenger of her vehicle, Beth, who was still recovering from
the accident. Fred decided to take Jane in his car to see Beth on one of the non-appointment days. He
picked her up, drove her to Beth's hospital, and waited while Jane visited. After the visit, Jane suggested that
she take Fred to lunch for his kindness. Fred agreed, Jane bought him lunch, and Fred returned Jane to her
home.
There is a blending of boundaries between the therapeutic and social in Example 2, which is inappropriate.
In Example 1, the total trip was within the therapeutic contract.
Therefore, counselors must carefully assess the necessity of meeting a client anytime or anywhere outside
the therapeutic hour. There should be a clear and logical reason for any after-hour or out-of-office contact.
If a counselor is unsure the contact is appropriate, he/she should seek supervision or consultation about this
matter. Further, all parties involved, e.g., supervisors or administrators, should be fully informed and must
concur that this contact has a therapeutic purpose.
39
NON-SUPERVISED COUNSELING ACTIVITIES OF GRADUATE STUDENTS
The position of the faculty in Counselor Education is that students enrolled in the program will not engage in
unsupervised counseling activities. It is the purpose of this statement to clarify those conditions under which
students can obtain permission to engage in helping activities independent of required practicum and internship
experiences.
This policy applies to any student enrolled in a degree program or in a non-degree program of study approved
by the faculty. The policy does not apply to students who engage in counseling under the auspices of a school
or agency in which they are employed, and in which there are established administrative and supervisory
procedures. Although students employed in settings providing on-site licensed supervision are exempt, the
university does not assume legal liability for the clinical work of the students in these instances.
Any student wishing to advertise or perform counseling (individual, group, marriage, or family) should secure
the written permission of the Director of Counselor Education. Permission will be granted only when it is
clear that the student: (a) is competent to perform the counseling, (b) has arranged for acceptable supervision
on a regular basis, and (c) will conduct the proposed activities during acceptable hours in a professional
setting. The written approval of the Coordinator of Counselor Education must be placed in the student's file.
Any student found in violation of this policy is subject to immediate removal from the program.
40
ETHICAL PRACTICES AND CONFIDENTIALITY
Counselors working in the IPFW Community Counseling Center are required to observe the rules and
procedures described by the Ethical Standards of the American School Counseling Association and the
American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. The IPFW Community Counseling Center
maintains complete confidentiality of all counseling interviews and records. The release of any information,
either verbal or written, is prohibited without prior written consent of the client. To protect all students from
legal and ethical liability, all formal reports must be endorsed by each student's faculty supervisor. Reports
are incomplete without this signature endorsement.
One exception to the confidentiality rule is professional consultation concerning cases, with authorized
personnel, in an appropriate place. Such consultation would be viewed as appropriate with IPFW Community
Counseling Center counselors, supervisors, and in case-study meetings. The proper place is an office or
similar setting where there is an assurance of privacy. Because counselors are working hard to identify and
maintain professional behavior, they will wish to avoid the following situations detrimental to clients:
>
Discussing clients or cases in restrooms, hallways, or reception areas.
>
Discussing clients or cases in offices with the door open.
>
Playing tapes or room monitors loudly so they could be overheard in offices or office halls.
>
Leaving records, notes, tests, or tapes lying around where unauthorized persons can read or use them.
>
Taking records out of the IPFW Community Counseling Center.
>
Leaving cabinets containing confidential files or tests unlocked.
The "Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act" (FERPA or PL 93-380) guarantees to parents and students
(18 and older) certain rights with regard to inspection of "educational records" and their distribution. The
legislative history of FERPA makes it clear that educational records do not include the personal files of
psychologists, counselors, or professionals if these files are entirely private and not available to other
individuals (120 Congressional Record 27, 36533, l974). Private files are not to be passed on to a person who
permanently takes over the responsibilities of the counselor who made the records. One exception to the type
of records that must be disclosed covers those made by a counselor seeing a student 18 years of age or older;
these records must be forwarded to a health-care professional of the student's own choosing, who is actively
involved in treatment of the student's issue.
This law has several implications for practice at the IPFW Community Counseling Center. Schools referring
clients to IPFW may not routinely transfer information about students without the written permission of the
client. Do not ask them to do so. It is prudent to gain an underage client's permission for access; it is
mandatory to also get an adult or parent/guardian permission in writing.
Session notes are your private records and assist you in learning patterns employed by clients. Additional
forms may be used occasionally that structure your observation in order to better teach a specific method or
model of counseling. These are devices primarily germane to your learning. The formal case file may be
requested by the client and forwarded to appropriate professionals, so forms must be typed and represent your
best effort. No client records or notes are allowed out of the clinic.
41
CONFIDENTIALITY OF TAPES
Every counselor-in-training has the obligation to abide by the ethical standards established by the profession.
Tapes should be played in private. Unauthorized persons should not have access to them. ACA Ethical
Standards, section B, part 5: "Records of the counseling relationship, including interview notes, test
data, correspondence tape recordings, electronic data storage, and other documents are to be
considered professional information for use in counseling, and they should not be considered as
part of the records of the institution or agency in which the counselor is employed unless specified
by state statute or regulation. Revelation to others of counseling material must occur only upon
the expressed consent of the client."
PLEASE NOTE:
In viewing and listening to recorded counseling sessions, counselors are bound by the
same legal and ethical considerations as they would be had they talked directly with
a client. There are times prior to class and during the day when tapes may be
viewed in the clinic. No video tapes of clients are allowed out of the clinic.
Information obtained in a clinical or consulting relationship is discussed only for professional purposes and only
with persons clearly concerned with the case.
PROTECTION OF PRIVACY
It is the policy of the IPFW Community Counseling Center to keep client's communication in strictest
confidence. When in doubt, counselors should err on the side of conservatism until they can consult a
supervisor. Our reputation for confidentiality is integral to our ability to serve clients. Such a high level of
confidentiality is sometimes burdensome; a IPFW Community Counseling Center does not function in the
same way as a high school counseling office--and neither place functions like a human service agency.
Conditions of communication and lines of communication vary from one setting to another. Guidelines for
confidentiality have to be adapted to the logistics of different situations.
42
CLINIC PROCEDURES
1.
All appointments should be made through the Clinic Manager.
making referrals should have potential clients call the clinic.
Student counselors receiving or
2.
It is inappropriate for student counselors to give clients their home phone numbers. Any contact with
the client should occur at the clinic.
3.
Student counselors should never see clients in the clinic alone. All sessions must be supervised and
audio- or videotaped.
4.
Students should not be involved in cases where they know the client or members of the client’s
family. The student should notify his/her supervisor so other arrangements can be made.
5.
Students should check the clinic voice mail, at least weekly, to see if there are any messages for
them. Students can then contact their client accordingly. If there is a message for one of your
cohorts on your night, you may notify your cohort. Do not erase other students’ messages, but do
erase yours. Students are advised to take their client’s phone numbers home in a discreet and
confidential manner in order to contact clients when necessary (i.e. an illness).
6.
Client assignment–contact client within 24 hours of case assignment. If you cannot contact within
24 hours, contact your supervisor. AVOID DELAY! Ideas of what to say are in this manual.
7.
After contacting client, note information in Status Form on back of INTAKE CARD.
8.
Fill out pink card for each long-distance phone call. Do not put client’s name or location on card.
9.
Any time a client terminates from therapy, fill out proper paperwork and put in Clinic Manager’s file.
10.
If a student has a client leaving therapy and has a vacant time slot, notify the Clinic Manager so a
new client can be assigned.
11.
It is important that the Clinic Manager be notified of any change in status of a case in order to keep
the database up to date.
12.
Make sure the Clinic Manager has your current contact information at all times. This includes your
name, address, home phone number, work phone number, and cell phone number, as well as which
is best to reach you at.
13.
First thing to do in your interview with clients is to have the informed consent signed.
14.
Make contact with clients who missed appointments on that same evening if possible.
15.
Intake cards are not to leave the green box and should not be kept in the clients folders.
43
PHONE PROTOCOL FOR CONFIRMING A FIRST APPOINTMENT
I.
Contacting the Client
A.
Contact the client within 24 hours of case assignment. If you cannot contact the client within
24 hours of the assignment, inform the practicum supervisor. Avoid Delay.
When you telephone a client, ask for that person by name. If another person answers the phone, say:
"Oh, hello, my name is (state name) from IPFW. I'm returning (client's name) phone call."
This will distinguish you from a bill collector, without violating the client's confidentiality. The person
answering the phone might not know your client is seeking counseling. Tell the person you will call
back at a mutually convenient time.
If your client answers, an initial contact might sound like this:
"Hello, my name is
from the IPFW Community Counseling Center, and I will be your
counselor. I would like to set up a time to meet for our first session. This session will take
about an hour. I have 5:30 and 6:30 available on Monday, the 6th of March. Will either of
those times work for you?
"Between now and the time we meet, I would like you to begin thinking about any questions
you may have about the clinic. Have you received the packet of information from the clinic
yet? I would like you to read and sign the form that explains what we will be doing and
complete the personal data inventory. You can bring those with you at the first session."
II.
*
Avoid doing therapy over the phone. Be supportive but let them know how important it is for
you to meet with them and understand before giving opinions or advice.
*
Speak to the person who made the initial contact with the clinic.
*
Tell the client it is important for the forms to be completed before you meet.
*
Make sure clients understand where the clinic is located.
*
Verify the information on the intake card.
*
Consult your supervisor if you do not know who should attend the first session.
After Contacting the Client
A.
Notify your practicum supervisor of the status of the case.
B.
Note this information on the Status Form on the back of the intake card. It is used to track
clinic activity. Use it whenever you transfer, terminate, assess, etc. The card should remain
filed in the clinic.
44
INITIAL INTERVIEW
At the beginning of the first interview it is necessary that the client be informed of the following:
1.
The counselor will record the interview;
2.
The function of the bug-in-the-ear, text messaging video camera;
3.
The counselor is working under supervision and consults with colleagues who are also bound by the
code of ethics regarding "confidentiality";
4.
All therapists must break confidentiality when clients are of danger to themselves or others, when
there is reported child abuse, or by court order.
The client will typically have already read and signed an informed consent form. After the counselor relates
the above information, ask clients if they have questions about the consent forms or the above information.
At the beginning of the second session, briefly remind clients of the tape recording and observation, and ask
if they have questions occurring to them since last week.
The following example represents one way this communication can be given:
"Hello, I'm Chris Jones. Before we begin I would like to point out that I am an advanced graduate
student working under the supervision of one of the IPFW faculty members. If it is agreeable with
you, I would like to record our interview so that I can go over it later--partly so I can review my
work.. My supervisor and colleagues may observe me during a counseling session. I also want you
to know that any therapist must report clients who are of danger to themselves or others, who report
child abuse, or by court order. Otherwise, both my colleagues and I are bound by professional
ethical standards to keep what you say here as confidential information. Do you have questions
about that?"
The opening for the second interview could be more brief:
"Last time I mentioned how the tape recorder is used and told you what you say here is confidential.
Did you think of any questions about that since last week?"
During the initial interview many clients find it helpful if you mention the consistent time, duration, and day
of succeeding sessions. They can be given a business card with the IPFW Community Counseling Center
phone number in case an emergency arises and they must cancel a session. Counselors may wish to write
their name on this card as a reminder to the client. An answering machine is available to take these client
calls, which will be returned by the student counselor or a faculty supervisor.
45
MISSED APPOINTMENTS
It is assumed counselors will not miss appointments, except in an emergency. In this event, counselors have
the responsibility to notify clients and the supervisor in advance.
When clients miss an appointment without notification, counselors typically get concerned. All clients are
given a business card so they can notify us of cancellations. Even though the term "no show" exists because
this happens often in counseling, counselors are frequently uncertain of how to proceed.
In most instances, the client can be telephoned the same evening. Counselors should monitor their inflections
to eliminate any trace of hostility or frustration in their voices. One example of a phone conversation might
be, "Hello. This is ____________ at IPFW. When you didn't come to your appointment this evening,
I wondered if everything was all right." If the client explains the absence, get a commitment for the
specific date and the time of the next appointment. Sending a letter is also appropriate. (Students should
prepare this letter with all relevant information and give it to their faculty supervisor. The letter will be sent
on IPFW letterhead with the supervisor's signature.)
If a client fails to arrive two consecutive times, and you suspect the excuses have no basis in reality, telephone
the client and say something like: "When you missed your appointment tonight, we assumed that this is
not a convenient time for you to meet. My supervisor has assigned your appointment time to someone
on the waiting list; if you would like another appointment time, you may call
(coordinator) at this
number (260-481-5405)."
The reason for making it clear that frequently absent clients are not getting "counseling" is so they will not
pretend to themselves that counseling occurs in fits and starts. If clients assume counseling is taking place
and become despondent when situations worsen, they may become desperate ("Couns eling doesn't help and
it's getting worse; maybe I should end it all."). It is, therefore, better that they be separated from an illusion
of counseling and encouraged to receive it in measured amounts through regularly kept appointments.
Invite clients to reapply for an appointment in a week, in such a manner that they do not feel shut out from
services.
46
REFERRAL PROCEDURES
The decision to make an appropriate case referral is an important counseling procedure. A referral requires
an understanding of the client's feelings and attitudes combined with a knowledge of various referral
resources and services offered. Practicum counselors are encouraged to become familiar with community
agencies and other available facilities on campus which can be utilized as referral sources.
Practicum counselors at the IPFW Community Counseling Center should consult with their supervisor and/or
instructor before making a case referral to another agency. This can be a valuable training experience in
reviewing salient aspects of the case and in surveying various resources. A United Way directory is available
in the IPFW Community Counseling Center.
Referrals under certain conditions are encouraged. The following represent conditions where referral should
be considered:
1.
The counselor's time limit expires and continued counseling would be useful to the client.
2.
It is apparent at the beginning of counseling that the counselor will have to terminate before
completion of the goals and objectives.
3.
The counselor does not have the appropriate skills to be helpful to the client. (The counselor's goal
is to be part of the solution, not part of the problem.)
4.
The counselor cannot agree to the goals the client wishes to achieve. (The counselor's value system
differs markedly from the desired goals set forth by the client.)
5.
The client wishes to be referred elsewhere. Normally, this will not be a problem unless the client
wishes to be referred to someone who is known professionally to be an unethical individual.
The AAMFT Ethical Standards state that counselors shall decline to initiate or shall terminate a counseling
relationship when they cannot be of professional assistance to the client either because of lack of competence
or personal limitation. In such instances, counselors shall refer clients to an appropriate specialist. In the
event the client declines the suggested referral, the counselor is not obligated to continue the counseling
relationship.
After discussing the referral with the supervisor, counselors should discuss the situation with the client, the
new counselor, and arrange, if possible, a conference involving the client, the new counselor, and yourself.
A problem related to referring comes from the personal need of the counselor to be helpful and appear
adequate. Well-integrated counselors are aware of their limitations and can distinguish between their own
needs and those of the client. Referral is often not the only or always the most appropriate solution to
counselor limitations. In a situation where the counselor's limitations are related to his/her own personality
rather than specific lack of skill, a solution is generally sought within the training program by consulting with
a supervisor or instructor. This approach facilitates counselor growth which is a prime goal of the practicum
experience.
47
ROUTINE REFERRALS
The following guides to good referrals were written for school counselors, but also provide a model for our
procedures at IPFW.
The Art of Referral*
1.
Get acquainted with the people working in community agencies in your area. There is no substitute for
personal respect and friendship in building smooth and effective community cooperation. Try inviting
them to a faculty meeting to tell of their service and to meet the staff. Visit them at the agency to get
the "feel" of their service.
2.
Help the agency or specialist by indicating which person should be the point of contact representing the
school. This person will supply additional information as needed, and will receive agency reports which
he/she in turn will share with others on the school staff as necessary.
3.
Try to discover what persons have had contact with the parent or student in regard to the problem, and
what results were obtained from these contacts before making a referral. A case conference may
result in the early and appropriate use of resources in the school and community. This will also serve
to bring together useful information about the student, and to coordinate the efforts of the total school.
"Let your right hand know what your left hand is doing."
4.
Check to see if the school has used all its own available resources in helping the student before looking
outside the school for help. Perhaps there are other steps which should be taken before referring the
student to an outside agency or specialist.
5.
Learn whether a community agency is already working with the family, because a consultation with that
agency is the proper first step in considering a referral in such cases.
6.
Try discussing an incipient problem with an agency or specialist before its referral becomes urgent.
Many agencies are willing to work in cooperation with the school in the area of prevention.
7.
All agencies, public and private, have their own eligibility requirements and accepted procedures. Do
not expect them to suspend rules for you.
8.
It is unwise and impractical to refer a student to community agencies without the knowledge, consent,
and cooperation of parents. Many child-guidance agencies will not accept students for treatment unless
parents cooperate fully and are willing to present themselves for help, too. Check on the policy of your
local agencies in this regard.
9.
When telling student or parents about available services, in the school or in the community, explain both
the functions and the limitations of these services. Do not give the impression that any specialist or
agency has all the answers and can work wonders.
10. Remember that parents' great emotional involvement with the child may make it difficult for them to
recognize that a problem exists.
11. Let the student or parents make their own arrangements for service whenever possible. Do not spoonfeed the student by being more "helpful" than necessary.
48
Routine Referrals (continued)
12. Remember that in some cases, however, help may be needed by very immature, dependent, or ill
students (or parents) in arranging an appointment or even in arranging transportation to the agency.
13. Secure a signed consent statement from the student's parents before releasing information to a social
agency. This is a wise precaution in all cases.
14. Share information about students with the new agency working with them, but do not violate the
confidence of the student except under very unusual circumstances. In passing along information,
distinguish between professional sharing of information and gossip. Facts, not your evaluation of facts,
will be most valuable.
15. A school can expect a report from a referral agency regarding its general plans for working with a case.
A school cannot expect to know the details of treatment, nor to share in confidences given by parents
or students to agency personnel.
16. Expect to be asked to work cooperatively with the specialist or agency during the treatment period. In
some cases this will be an important part of the treatment.
17. Do not expect immediate help for a particular symptom. Usually, basic attitudes and feelings are
involved in behavior, and these attitudes and feelings may change very slowly. Do not expect miracles
to be worked on cases you refer.
18. Respect the individual. The basic attitude in referrals, as in all counseling, is a fundamental respect for
the individual and a fundamental belief that it is best for clients to work out problems in their own ways.
Schools and agencies are helpers in this process, not directors.
The follow-through of referrals is an important area. It is not sufficient to make a successful referral, and
then forget about the student. It is noted in the guides above that the agency should make a report following
the referral. More than this, there should be periodic reports, or periodic inquiries from the referrals. The
responsibility would certainly be one of the personnel services of the school.
BE CERTAIN YOUR CLIENT INITIATES CONTACT WITH THE REFERRAL
-- DO NOT ASSUME!
*Courtesy of Purdue Counseling Center; West Lafayette, Indiana; used with permission.
49
TESTING
Testing is an educational part of the practicum experience for the future counselor as well as being useful
to clients. Each practicum student needs to develop an ability to administer and interpret tests. A test is
simply a standardized measure of an individual's responses to a sample of stimuli from which inferences about
the person's more general behavior can be drawn. Standardization requires that the same rules in
administration, scoring, timing, etc., be followed each time the test is given to permit valid reference to
normative information.
T he use of test data by a counselor necessitates an understanding of the behavior measured and the
operations used to measure it. Deciding the behavior to be measured and the test to be used are often
diffic ult decisions for the beginning counselor. The more familiar one becomes with different testing
instruments, the better one is able to make appropriate judgments in selection of tests. If counselors
understand the standardization, reliability, objectivity, and validity of a test, they are prepared to evaluate
whether it is a good measuring instrument for the behavior they intend to examine.
One important factor the counselor should be aware of is that any test score is subject to measurement error.
The counselor should treat test scores as tentative hypotheses and/or estimates rather than established truths.
Batteries of tests are typically employed so more confidence can be placed in the areas in which the tests
agree.
Tests are tools for assessment of behavior; therefore, their usefulness is highly dependent on the ability of the
counselor to interpret and utilize the results in a constructive framework.
Consult with your faculty supervisor prior to selection and prior to
interpretation of test results to clients.
50
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
I.
What is an Emergency?
Any situation involving a client that is of a serious nature requiring immediate medical or
psychotherapeutic attention constitutes an emergency. Sometimes emergencies can be handled
effectively by IPFW staff; other times referral sources must be called in. Examples of emergencies
include:
II.
> A.
Imminent suicide attempt
> B.
Drug overdose
> C.
Aggressive reaction (present or imminent)
> D.
Physical illness or adverse physical reactions requiring immediate
medical attention
> E.
Psychotic reaction or other serious psychological disturbance not easily
handled on our premises
> F.
Report of child abuse
> G.
Severe depression, anxiety, etc.
General Procedures for Handling Emergencies
A. CONTACT YOUR ON-SITE FACULTY SUPERVISOR. It would be preferable that an
observer summon the supervisor so the client would not be left alone.
B. While decisions are being made, inform your client you have sought consultation and familiarize
him/her with the names of those involved. Refer to faculty supervisors as "Dr.
or Mr./Ms.
" not "George" or "Jane."
C. Whenever possible, remain in the room with the client and supervisor -- two people in a room can
be calming.
D. Emergencies can be "contagious," so try to preserve your cool. The confidence you show could be
just the boost the client needs to help him/her to get over the crisis.
E. Make extensive and careful notes of the session. Detailed records are often essential when dealing
with crisis.
F. If you think you are witnessing a severe reaction to stress that has been repeated several times, you
should consider (with the client) the option of contacting family and/or the client's physician/therapist
to get an impression of how this kind of situation has been handled previously. However, if a client
is strongly set against this being done for reasons that sound sensible to you, the client's wishes
should be respected.
51
Emergency Procedures (continued)
G. If clients are "dangerous to self or others," make certain they are in competent hands before
terminating your contact with them. You might arrange for a relative or friend to accompany the
client if hospitalization is not advisable. Additionally, be sure the client is "locked in" to you with a
definite appointment the next day or as soon after the emergency as seems advisable. Even an
appointment to contact you by telephone is better than allowing the client to be without specific
prearranged contacts.
H. It is seldom wise to provide your clients with your home telephone number, but you could arrange
to call them at a designated time. A less desirable alternative might be to give them your work
number and the work number of your faculty supervisor in case it is not possible to reach you. This
tactic is only for clients who are likely to undergo legitimate crises -- it is not done to foster
dependence. Such clients should also be given the number of the Switchboard Crisis Hotline and
hospital emergency room numbers, along with instructions on how to get to the nearest emergency
room.
I.
It might be necessary to go with the client to a hospital or the emergency room in a crisis. It is best
to have the assistance of other IPFW Community Counseling Center staff. It is not advisable to go
alone. In some cases, you may call upon the campus police to assist you (unless this would be
upsetting to the client or dangerous to your relationship). If assistance from Campus Police is
necessary, advise them of the role you want them to play; that is, do you want them to accompany
you for your protection or will it be necessary only for them to help you move the client. Because
upset people are often further disturbed by the presence of armed persons, you might ask the
officer, in advance, if he/she might consider removing the pistol belt, holster, and revolver and putting
them out of sight and reach before dealing with the client.
If a police escort is needed, brief the client in advance and assure him/her that this does not make
the referral any less voluntary. Clients may change their minds at any time.
J.
Counselors or supervisors are n e v e r to put themselves in any physical danger in working with a
client. The procedures listed above assume that no staff member is endangered by following them.
III. Hospitalization
A. For a medical emergency (e.g., heart attack, stroke, etc.), call 16-911 and summon an ambulance
to your location (the Dolnick Learning Center). Ask Campus Police to escort the ambulance to your
location quickly.
B. For a psychotherapeutic emergency, the client will be voluntarily committed and the reason for
hospitalization will be explained by the most appropriate person (this may be a faculty supervisor,
supervisor, or counselor).
1.
If the client agrees to the referral, he/she will be asked to sign a consent form that states the
client agrees to the referral. The client will also be asked to sign a Release of Records form,
so the counselor can provide pertinent information to the hospital staff, as needed. Copies of
client records will be forwarded as soon as they are complete.
52
Emergency Procedures (continued)
2.
If the client needs to be hospitalized but refuses, the following will occur:
a.
The faculty supervisor will call a hospital emergency room and Campus Police for
consultation.
b. The client will be informed that it will not be possible for counseling to continue at IPFW.
3.
If, in the opinion of the Coordinator of the IPFW Community Counseling Center, the client does
not need to be hospitalized but should be referred to an agency for more intensive care, and
should the client refuse to do so, the client will be informed that it will not be possible for
counseling to continue at the IPFW Community Counseling Center.
IV. Handling Suicide Threats
Strategies for handling suicide threats vary, but the essential rule is to be alert for evidence a threat
exists. If a client intimates suicide or if you suspect an imminent attempt only on the basis of
circumstantial evidence, check this out with your client.
Ask directly (e.g., "It sounds like you're saying you will hurt yourself -- what's your plan?"). You must
assess both method and opportunity. A client who vows to drop an atomic bomb on him/herself is
dangerous only if access to that device is available. However, a client who replied he/she will use his
father's pistol, and knows where both the pistol and ammunition are kept, constitutes a clear "danger to
self or others." If you judge there is real danger, you should take steps to ensure the client's safety.
Consult with your or another faculty supervisor before taking action such as hospitalization.
Oftentimes, ensuring that the client will not be alone is sufficient prophylaxis, i.e., seeing to it that a
friend or family member stays with the client. Each practicum supervisor should discuss recommended
procedures for handling suicide threats with his/her team of counselors.
53
COMPLETED CLIENT FILES
Information generated about clients serves two purposes: it documents the prudent care our clients participate
in, and it serves to educate counselors in systematic observation and self-management. Client records are
confidential. They are kept in cabinets that are to be locked at all times. Even if you will return to the cabinet
in a few minutes, lock it each time it is unattended. The IPFW Community Counseling Center will retain the
official file for each client for seven years. These are sometimes requested by referral agencies, courts, or
clients themselves, so they must represent your best professional effort.* The forms constituting an official
client file are described in detail below. Other materials generated for your personal use such as genograms,
case conceptualizations, counselor observation checklists, or session transcripts highlighting your skills, are
to be shredded upon termination with your client.
As the chart on the following page shows, client files may consist of several forms. Each file must contain
an agreement/consent form, a Personal Data Inventory, and a closing summary. (The Intake card is filed
separately in a file box.) Others will also include test profiles, release of information forms, or requests for
referrals, when appropriate. Session notes are also retained in the client's file. If clients do not advise you
when their last session will occur, a Client Satisfaction Questionnaire with a stamped envelope addressed to
your supervisor will be mailed.
*
Nothing should be mailed to clients or referral sources without the approval of
the faculty supervisor.
54
Completed Client Files (continued)
Form
Number
Needed
Completion and Disposition
Intake Card
1
Completed by Clinic Manager and filed in
the Intake Card box, not the client's
folder.
Informed Consent for
Treatment
1
Completed by client; retained in folder.
Personal Data Inventory
1
Completed by client; retained in folder.
Release of Information
2
Prepared by client; signed by client; one
copy sent to referral, one retained in case
file.
Letters
2
Rough draft submitted to faculty
supervisor, who will see it is typed and
mailed. Copy for file.
Termination
1
Completed by counselor; retained in file.
Client Satisfaction Questionnaire
1
Completed
supervisor.
1
Completed by the third session.
by
client;
returned
Treatment Plan
Case Notes
As Needed
A record of session activity.
Psychosocial Assessment
1
Completed by the fourth session.
to
55
HOW TO COMPLETE CLIENT FORMS
Informed Consent for Treatment
This form is typically mailed to the client who signs it and brings it to the first session. It must be signed by
a person of legal age prior to the first session. During the opening of the first interview, when the client is
informed: (1) the counselor is recording the interview, (2) the function of the video camera, and (3) the
counselor is working under supervision; the counselor should ask clients if they have questions about these
procedures. If clients refuse to be recorded and observed on a continuing basis, they must be referred. Most
clients understand these conditions prior to the first counseling session.
Personal Data Inventory
Clients typically complete this form in advance of the first counseling session. This inventory enables the
counselor to have accurate demographic data about the client. It is appropriate that the counselor makes sure
the client has properly completed the inventory. In some cases a parent completes the inventory for a child
rather than with a child, thereby changing the nature of the "adjective block" information.
Release of Information
This form is completed when a client wishes to have information from a school, agency, or previous counselor
transferred to the IPFW Community Counseling Center. The form should be prepared by the client. It must
also be dated and witnessed. When this has been completed, the counselor drafts a letter to the outside
agency. The cover letter and the release are then submitted to the faculty supervisor for approval, typing,
and mailing. A xerox of the release will be made, marked "copy," and filed with a copy of the cover letter.
All letters sent to outside agencies are always signed by faculty, not the counselor.
Letters
Any official correspondence with the client or on behalf of the client should be approved by the supervisor
in advance (and typed and mailed at IPFW). A xerox copy should remain in the file.
56
How to Complete Client Forms (continued)
Case Notes
Case notes are our method of recording all case activity. You should record all sessions, noshows/cancellations, and phone calls. Session notes are to be written using the "DAP" format. The "D"
stands for data and is a description of the session, both content and process. You should also reference
interventions and progress on the goals listed on the treatment plan. "A" stands for assessment and contains
your working hypotheses or a summary of symptoms for a differential diagnosis. The "P" stands for plan and
may include your homework assignment, activities you need to accomplish before the next session, or longterm interventions or goals. Start each section of the case note with the appropriate letter with a circle around
it. This aids the reader in quickly finding information. Include in each session note the session number, clients
in attendance, length of session, name of supervisor present, session note, and your signature at end of the
note. Write on every line, cross off extra lines at bottom of the page, and keep all notations within page
frame. Put a single line through mistakes and initial.
Psychosocial Assessment
This form is completed by the counselor between the third and fourth sessions. Follow the outline listed in
this manual for completion. For areas that you do not have information, state "client has not disclosed
information on this topic." For areas that the client denies (such as drug use) please state "Client denies any
drug use." You and your supervisor should sign this form.
Treatment Plan
This form is completed by the counselor between the second and third sessions. Use your treatment planning
book as a guide for completing this form. If you are unsure of your diagnosis, consult your supervisor before
completing this section. You and your supervisor should sign this form.
Termination Summary
This form is completed by the counselor within one week of termination. There is an outline in forms drawer
for completing this form. This form must be typed and signed by you and your supervisor.
57
WRITING CASE NOTES
There are many different systems for writing case notes. The primary objectives in any system are to have
uniformity, brevity with completeness, and meeting legal standards of care. The system we use here may
not be the one you will use in your agency, but you will gain experience in writing in a structured and uniform
way.
All case notes are to be written:
• In the third person
• Using objective language (“Client was teary and looked at the floor” instead of “Client was sad.” You
could also state, “The client reported that he felt sad.”)
• Using the clients’ names, not codes.
• In ink.
• Do not skip lines.
• Cross off any extra lines at the bottom of the sheet if you start on another sheet (or start the next case
note on the same page).
• Draw a line through mistakes and initial (do not scribble over the error).
• Always sign your name at the last line and use your credentials.
At the IPFW Community Counseling Center we will be using the “DAP” system for case noting. The “D”
stands for data. This section starts with a “D” with a circle around it followed by a sentence that specifies
who attended the session, for how long (e.g.: one hour), the session number, and if it was live supervised (list
who supervised). Then you write a narrative about the session discussing the major themes. Be sure to
comment about process (how things were said and interactions between people) as well as content (what was
said). This section should also reference the goals and interventions on the treatment plan. For example, you
might state, “Counselor explained the use of behavioral techniques of charting to Mike and Mary to assist
them in reducing Johnny’s angry outbursts.” This section is the bulk of the case note and contains all of the
information relevant to the session.
If there is a “Duty to Warn” or “Duty to Report” issue that comes up, you must thoroughly document
what was said and the actions you took. Note the names of people involved and who has/will be contacted.
List any actions that need to take place after the session again in the “P” section of the case note. Be sure
to write follow-up notes on this issue to document your continued work.
The “A” stands for assessment. This section starts with an “A” with a circle around it and immediately
follows the previous section. This section can be used in a couple of ways. First, it is a place to write your
progress of making a differential diagnosis. For this, you could list the presenting symptoms with your
conclusion of the proper diagnosis. A second, and more common use after the initial diagnosis, is to use this
space for writing your theoretical hypothesis of what is happening for this client/family. For example,
“Johnny’s acting out behaviors appear to be detouring the parent’s conflict on to him. Therapy should focus
on strengthening the parental subsystem.” This section is relatively short, usually only a sentence or two.
58
Writing Case Notes (continued)
The “P” stands for plan. This section starts with a “P” with a circle around it and immediately follows the
previous section. This section is used to record what you and the clients will be doing in the future. Always
list your homework assignment here and you will be able to recall this information quickly for the next session.
You may use this section to write down any contacts or phone calls that you need to make between sessions.
This is also a place where you can list what you want to cover in the next session or in future sessions. This
is a short section composed of only a few sentences.
Example
1/15/99
D Met with Mary and Mike Jones and their ten-year-old son Johnny for one hour, first session;
Dr. Burg supervised. The parents report having difficulty with Johnny’s angry outbursts and lack
of self-control. Johnny stated that he wished his parents would stop nagging him. There are no
reported problems at school. As Mike and Mary talked about the problems at home, their tone
of voice raised and they began to blame each other for the problems. As the parents’ conflict
escalated, Johnny became more fidgety and disrupted the conversation frequently. The parents
attempted to redirect Johnny by telling him to “be quiet” and that “this is not your problem.” The
parents’ primary goal in therapy is to reduce the frequency and intensity of Johnny’s angry
outbursts. Johnny’s only goal was to get his parents off his back. A Johnny meets DSM-IV
criteria for V61.20 Parent-Child Relational Problem. Although the presenting problem is
Johnny’s anger, it appears that marital conflict may play a role with Johnny being the symptom
bearer. P Homework: Notice the times that Johnny is handling his anger better. Meet with
whole family in one week (1/22/99)------Shelly Student, B.A.
1/22/99
Returned Mary’s phone call. They will not be able to attend the scheduled session due to Johnny
being ill. Rescheduled for 1/29/99---------------------------Shelly Student, B.A.
1/29/99
D Met with Mary, Mike, and Johnny for one hour, second session. In regard to the homework
assignment, the parents reported that they found five times that Johnny handled his anger better.
Although the therapist attempted to direct the session around these successful times, Mary
continued to bring up the times that Johnny’s anger was inappropriate. Mike would typically
defend Johnny stating that was just what boys did. This pattern escalated three times to the point
that Mike and Mary were arguing with each other. The therapist asked Johnny to wait in the
lobby and proceeded to ask the parents what their opinion was of how their relationship was
impacting their co-parenting. Mary believes that conflict in their marriage is impacting their
parenting, while Mike believes that it is the conflict with Johnny that is impacting their marriage.
The couple did agree that either way, their marriage was suffering and agreed on a goal of
improving their marriage. A Parents are acknowledging their role in the problem; strengthening
the marital subsystem may improve Johnny’s anger problems. P Homework: List the things that
you would not want to change about your marriage. Meet next week with just Mike and Mary
for marital therapy (2/5/99). Work to clarify the goal of “improving the marriage.” ---------Shelly
Student, B.A.
59
Writing Case Notes (continued)
2/5/99
D Met with Mary and Mike for one hour, session three; Dr. Burg supervised. In working on
the goal of improving the clients’ marriage, the therapist reviewed the clients’ homework.
Neither Mike nor Mary did the assignment and could not think of what they would want to
change in their marriage. The therapist worked with them to clarify the goal of “improving the
marriage.” Mike believes the marriage would be better if Mary would not “nag” him and if they
did more fun things together. Mary believes that they need to communicate and that Mike needs
to show her that he is committed to the relationship before she is willing to have fun. When
asked about exceptions of when these things were already happening, both Mary and Mike were
able to list recent examples. The couple then decided to try to do more of what they already
liked doing as a couple, primarily bow-hunting pigeons. A Mike and Mary are accustomed to
working against each other but are attempting to work together on the new goals. P
Homework: Couple to practice bow-hunting together. Meet with couple again in one week on
2/12/99. Continue to focus on improving marital relationship, start relating it to parenting as a
team. ------------------------------------------Shelly Student, B.A.
60
PSYCHOSOCIAL ASSESSMENT
Client’s Name: Sally Sue
Address: 12345 Abcd St., Fort Wayne, IN 46800
Telephone: 260-555-0000
Interview Date: 00/00/0000
Interviewer Name: Counselor’s Name
Identifying Information:
Sally Sue, 1234 Abcd St., Fort Wayne, IN 46800,
260-555-0000. 33-year-old white married female. Client is a homemaker and living with her husband and
three of her children. Client dresses casually, physical appearance, general self-presentation.
Presenting Problem:
Client came into therapy due to extensive problems in her family life. Client has been married five times
and has four children. Client struggles in her relationship with her current husband and her children. Client
is depressed most of the time and is easily stressed by daily living activities and interactions with her
family and others. She states that she has rarely felt normal and has had a low self-esteem her entire life.
Client is concerned about her 15-year-old daughter who had a sexual relationship with her 23-year-old
neighbor.
Relevant History:
Client has been married five times and divorced four times. She is currently having marital problems with
her current husband. Client states she has an extensive history of physical and mental abuse from her
parents. Client states she has had problems with relationships her entire life. Client has had a low selfesteem her entire life. Client attempted suicide when she was 15 years old. Client is concerned about her
daughter due to being sexually promiscuous.
Education/Employment History:
Client did not graduate from high school but did receive her GED. Client went to Indiana Business College
but did not complete her degree.
Legal History:
Client does not have any current legal problems; however, her daughter is currently on probation.
Religious/Spiritual History:
Client states that she does believe in God and considers herself Baptist.
Substance Abuse History:
Client states that she is a recovering alcoholic. Client has used other drugs and states that she has not had
any substance abuse for a number of months.
Family History:
Client states that she has a family history of alcoholism.
61
Psychosocial Assessment (continued)
Past Psychiatric History:
Client has had previous counseling with Park Center and did not feel that she was able to achieve her
goals in therapy.
Family History:
Client states that her mother was diagnosed with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Bipolar Disorder.
Sexual/Physical Abuse History:
Client states that she was physically and mentally abused her entire childhood by her parents, especially
her stepfather. Client states that her stepfather whipped her and left marks on her body from head to toe.
She also states that her stepfather ridiculed her constantly. She also states that she was made to perform
oral sex with older cousins when she was six years old.
Medical/Physical History:
Client complains of trouble sleeping and being constantly stressed out. Client has had a hysterectomy and
states that her back has bothered her since that operation.
Suicidal/Homicidal Ideation:
Client states that she has thoughts of hurting herself and others at times, but states that she has “enough
self-control to not do anything. They are just thoughts.” Client did attempt suicide when she was 15 years
old.
Family/Interpersonal Functioning:
Client has been married five times. Client struggles with her intimate interactions with her current
husband. Client states that she is not sexually or emotionally satisfied by her current husband and does not
believe that she loves him. She has difficulty effectively disciplining her children. Client becomes stressed
out and yells at her children when she believes they are not doing what she wants. Her children continue
to misbehave, and client does not attempt to use a different approach to discipline her children. Client
becomes agitated easily with others in the community. She often believes that others are attempting to
degrade or harm her family, and she often verbally fights back.
Mental Health Status Exam :
Client dresses casually and often grooms herself in a juvenile manner. Client is very talkative when in
therapy. Client has normal speech rate, volume, and clarity. Client appears to be depressed and hopeless
about her current life situation improving. Client states that she has racing thoughts and at times sees
things that are not there such as spots or people. Client also states that at time she feels like spiders are
crawling on her. Client appears to have an average intelligence. Client has poor judgment in regard to
interpersonal and intra personal relationships. Client states that she has memory problems at times. Client
is orientated x3. Client has some insight into her difficulties and is willing to seek help and work on her
problems.
Psychosocial Impression (or Counselor’s Conceptualization of the Problems):
Client has difficulty in her interpersonal relationships due to extensive past abuse and her current negative
world view. Client presents as very depressed and seems has learned helplessness. Client often sees
normal interactions as very negative, which reinforces her negative self-image and has trouble interacting
with other in a positive manner. Client has not learned positive parenting skills and is not able to
effectively parent her children and becomes more stressed due to her belief that others think she is a
“bad” mother.
62
Psychosocial Assessment (continued)
DSM-IV Diagnosis:
Axis I: 296.33 Major Depressive Disorder, Recurrent, Severe
Axis II: V71.09 No Diagnosis
Axis III: No Diagnosis
Axis IV: Family Problems, Daughter on Probation
Axis V: GAF = 48 (current)
Treatment Plan (or Recommendations):
Therapist will teach client to recognize negative thoughts and beliefs and how to reframe her negative
beliefs or replace negative thoughts with more positive thoughts. Therapist will teach client positive
parenting skills.
Signature
Date
Type name here
Supervisor
Date
Type name here
63
WEEKLY PRACTICUM HOURS FORM
Be sure to list your student ID number on this form. File this form in the clinic manager’s folder at the
end of each class.
On the top of the form , “Client Number” is where you list the client’s file number. You only use the
“CX/NS” column if the client was an NS (no show), or CX (cancellation). Mark the amount of time you
spent with the client in ONE of the boxes marked “Individual,” “Couple,” or “Family,” according to what
the client is classified as on the intake card. For example, if you met with an individual for one hour you
would list “1.0" in the “individual” column next to that client’s number. The next three italicized columns
are for the clients that you observe. Fill those columns out the same way, but only if you observed the
client. Clients are observed by you or seen by you, not both at the same time, so please only mark one
column.
On the lower part of the hours form, “Individual” is defined as you alone or you and one of your
classmates. “Group” is defined as a group of three or more students. “Live” is defined as when your
practicum supervisor is actually watching you on camera while you are with a client, while the session is
happening. “Case” is defined as you and your practicum supervisor talking about your case(s) during
class time. “Audio/Video” supervision is defined as when your supervisor takes a copy of your tape and
listens to it, not during class time.
64
WEEKLY PRACTICUM HOURS FORM
Student
Jane Student
Student # 123
Date
00-00-00
Please record time to the nearest quarter hour, using decimals (e.g.: record 1 hour 15 minutes as 1.25). For
scheduled sessions that were canceled use CX code, for no-shows use NS code.
Observed
Observed
Client Number
Family
CX/NS
Individual
00-001
Couple
Family
Individual
Observed
Couple
1.0
00-002
CX
00-003
1.0
00-004
1.0
Individual supervision is two or less students per supervisor; group supervision is three or more students per
supervisor. Live supervision is when a supervisor is following your case as it happens. Case supervision is time
spent talking about your clients with your supervisor. Audio/Video supervision is provided through audio or
videotape review.
Supervision
Amount of Time in Hours
Live
Individual
Group
Case
1.0
.5
Audio/Video
65
66
INDIANA UNIVERSITY-PURDUE UNIVERSITY FORT WAYNE
IPFW COMMUNITY COUNSELING CENTER
REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF INFORMATION
I hereby request the IPFW Community Counseling Center and its staff to release the following identified
information in regard to:
Client Name ______________________________ Birthday _____________ SS#
__________________
I authorize
___________________________________________________________________________
(the other agency’s name and contact person)
___________________________________________________________________________
(the other agency’s address and phone number)
(choose one of the following)
to __________
to __________
release the following information to the IPFW Community Counseling Center.
obtain the following information from the IPFW Community Counseling Center
and hereby authorize the IPFW Community Counseling Center to release this
information to them.
to __________ to exchange information with the IPFW Community Counseling Center on an
on-going basis for the duration of the terms of this release.
This release applies to the following information:
_____ The entire record
______ Treatment Summary
_______________________
____ Other
This information is being released for the following purposes:
I understand that the record may contain medical records and records from other providers.
I understand that this Request is subject to revocation at any time, except to the extent that action has
already been taken on this Request. In order to revoke this Request I must deliver a revocation in writing
to the IPFW Community Counseling Center. I further understand that this authorization will expire on
____/____/____. If not otherwise revoked, this Request will expire upon the happening of the following
condition/event: ______________________________________________________________.
_________________________________________________
__________________________
67
Signature of client or legally authorized representative
Date
__________________
________
_________________________________________________
Date
Signature of witness
IPFW COMMUNITY COUNSELING CENTER
INDIANA UNIVERSITY-PURDUE UNIVERSITY FORT WAYNE
TERMINATION SUMMARY
Case Number 00-123
Identifying Information
Name: John Doe
Age: 13
Other people involved in counseling: Chuck (father), Mary (mother), and Rob (brother)
Address:1000 Abbot Dr., Fort Wayne, IN 46805
Phone: (260) 555-3592
Referral Source: Fort Wayne Community Schools
Dates of First and Last Sessions: 00-00-00 to 00-00-00
Total Number of Sessions: 10
Number of Missed Sessions: 2
Presenting Problem:
John’s parents initiated counseling at the request of his school, due to an increase in aggression and
rapidly falling grades. His parents reported that John has also been “difficult” at home, frequently defiant
and fighting with his bother Rob. The parents also stated that the problems have increased since the
father, Chuck, started a second job to help with the family’s financial difficulties.
Goals Established:
The primary goals were to reduce John’s acting out behaviors at home and school, and to improve his
grades. Additional goals were to improve the family’s interactional patterns and communication skills in
order to address both increased stressors and changes in the family system.
Goal Progress:
Primary goals were met with John’s grades returning to a “B” average and a decrease in his acting out
behaviors. The family goals were met with an increase in familial communication, boundaries, and overt
nurturing by the father, as well as an improvement in the marital relationship.
Reason for termination:
68
Termination was agreed upon by both the family members and the therapist, having achieved the goals of
therapy.
Counselor’s opinion of counseling outcome:
John and his family appear to be functioning at a higher level, particularly concerning the family structure,
communication, and nurturing. While the father and other son Rob were initially resistant to therapy, they
quickly became active participants.
69
Termination Summary (continued)
Counselor Recommendation for Post-Treatment
It was recommended that the family continue to create “family time” where the boys can both play and
check-in with their parents. They will reenter therapy if further acting out behaviors reemerge which
they are unable to handle on their own. Continued structural family therapy is recommended as the
treatment of choice.
Briefly describe the course of counseling:
The Doe family initially entered therapy due to John’s rapidly declining grades and behavioral problems.
John’s family had experienced significant stress due to financial hardships and this stress seems to have
increased when his father took a second job. While Mary was interested in therapy for the whole family,
the father and both boys were initially not receptive to counseling.
Structural therapy was the primary method used with the Doe family. Through reframing, the parents
were able to reestablish the parental hierarchy and became open to nurturing as well as increased
structure in their discipline methods. Both boys were resistant at first to the changes their parents were
making, but John in particular liked the increased attention he received during their structured “family
time.” Although the problems initially increased, after six weeks John’s behavioral and school problems
had significantly improved.
Therapy was terminated based on both the family’s and the therapist’s agreement that the goals of
therapy had been met.
Jane Student
Sally Supervisor, Ph.D.
00-00-00
00-00-00
70
71
COMPUTER SOFTWARE FOR COUNSELORS
IPFW CURRICULUM LAB
237 NEFF HALL
TESTING
DEVELOPMENT REPORTS
by Psychologistics, Inc.
WISC-R and Wippsi-R subtest scores
are converted to developmental skill
acquisition reports.
PIAT - 80 PROGRAM
by Precision People, Inc.
uses standardized test scores to identify
developmental learning objectives for
teachers.
LANGUAGE EXPERIENCE
RECORDER PLUS
by Teacher Support Software
identifies the reading level of written material
(also creates vocabulary lists).
READING STYLE INVENTORY
by Learning Research Associates
identifies reading styles.
LEARNING STYLES INVENTORY
by Educational Activities, Inc.
identifies preferred modes of learning.
COUNSELING ISSUES
SELF-EXPLORATION SERIES
WHO AM I
STUDY SKILLS
PARENT RELATIONS
by Educational Media Corporation
provocative self-ratings for follow-up
discussion.
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
ON BECOMING A HERO
STRESS MANAGEMENT
THE PUPPET (Pull Your Own Strings)
by Psychology Software
provocative self-ratings for follow-up
discussion.
CAREER/ACADEMIC
COLLEGE ENTRANCE
EXAM PREPARATION
by Borg-Warner Corp.
SAT preparation - verbal.
COLLEGE DIRECTIONS
by Systems Design Associates, Inc.
identifies qualities of colleges and
systematically provides selection
72
information (see also Peterson's Guide in
library).
Computer Software for Counselors (continued)
COMPUTERIZED CAREER
ASSESSMENT AND
PLANNING (CCAPP)
by System Design Associates, Inc.
four-step career planning with 300
occupations in memory (see also
on-line
services in WALB).
MICRO-SKILLS
by Eureka: California Career Information
System.
good for middle school, or returning adultshelps convert habits/hobbies to "skills".
TIME SAVERS
CERTIFICATE MAKER
by Springboard Software
for your positive rewards and
acknowledgement.
PRINT SHOP (four picture disks)
by Broderbund Software
create your own cards, signs, banners.
CHILDRENS WRITING AND
by The Learning Company
produces simple newsletters
(more complicated desktop publishing
available on Macintosh).
PUBLISHING CENTER
CROSSWORD MAGIC
by Mindscape
creates crossword puzzles automatically
from your list of words and definitions.
MAGIC SLATE
WORD PROCESSOR II
by Sunburst
20 point print is large enough to make
transparencies readable.
A SURVEY KIT
by D. C. Health, Inc.
generates simple survey instruments for
needs assessments (Remember the
Scantron!).
BOOK WHIZ
BOOK WHIZ JUNIOR
by Educational Testing Service
sorts lists of books by topic; create your
own bibliotherapy lists (see also The Book
Finder Volumes I & II).
BOOK WHIZ FOR TEENS
MICROZINE: Computer Learning
by Scholastic
73
Library on a Disk
CREATE WITH GARFIELD
(DELUXE)
Teddy - Bear - Rels of Fun
create a bibliography.
by DLM Software
create cartoons and metaphorical stories of
your own.
Computer Software for Counselors (continued)
DISNEY COMIC STRIP MAKER
by Sunburst
create cartoons and stories of your own.
MASK PARADE
by Springboard Software
learn about faces and expressions and
funny faces - for youngsters.
TIMELINER
by Tom Snyder Productions
create personal timelines, for future
planning scenarios - (@ middle school,
high school).
THE MUPPET WORD BOOK
(Muppet Keys Option)
by Sunburst
for nonreaders.
TOUCH WINDOW
A touch-sensitive screen to use instead of
keyboard, for nonreaders or disabled.
PRINT YOUR OWN BINGO (Plus)
by Hartley Courseware, Inc.
for vocabulary lists, psychological
education.
EASY GRAPH II
EduCalc
FRIENDLY FILER
NOTE CARD MAKER
by Houghton Mifflin
construct graphs, spreadsheet, simple file
system, construct note cards (see also
MECC disks for mazes, word search,
flashcards, graphs).
ADMINISTRATIVE
APPLEWORKS
by Apple
a word-processor combined with a spread
sheet and file system.
BANK STREET WRITER
by Broderbund
a word processor with separate disks for
add-on functions.
(Filer, Speller, Mailer)
PFS: WRITE
(Report, Graph, File)
GRADEBOOK PLUS
by Software Publishing Corporation
a word-processor with separate disks for
add-on functions.
by Educational Microcomputer Association
74
make friends with new teachers by telling
about comprehensive grading software.
SCHOOL OFFICE
by Grossberg & Associates
to rid counselors of administrivia, let
secretary run attendance sheets, rosters,
mailing labels.
Computer Software for Counselors (continued)
GRADE REPORTING AND SCHOOL
INVENTORY
by UNICOM, INC.
sample inventory program.
GROUP GUIDANCE
SCHOOL TRANSACTIONS
by Conduit
for teachers; identifies discipline by
TA style: parent, adult, child role.
WHERE IN THE USA
IS CARMEN SAN DIEGO
by Broderbund Software
useful in a lab setting for high score
list and motivation.
FREUD, ELIZA
by MECC
shows counselors they need not fear being
replaced by computers.
COMMUNICATION EDGEMIND PROBLEM
by Human Edge Software
shows counselors they are in no
danger of being replaced by computers
THE OTHER SIDE:
GLOBAL CONFLICT
RESOLUTION
by Tom Snyder Productions
modem - compatible conflict
resolution for teams
(complex).
PROBLEM SOLVING
by The Learning Company
a range of programs on creative problem
solving. Rocky can be made infinitely
perplexing with self-program feature.
BUMBLE GAMES (3-adult)
BUMBLE PLOT (8-13)
GERTRUDE'S PUZZLES (6-up)
GERTRUDE'S SECRETS (4-9)
JIGGLES' RAINBOW (3-6)
ROBOT ODYSSEY I (10-up)
ROCKY'S BOOTS (7-adult)
WRITER RABBIT (7-11)
PROBLEM SOLVING
THE FACTORY
THE FACTORY WORKBOOK
THE INCREDIBLE LAB
by Sunburst
problem solving for middle, high school,
college ages.
75
OTHER LAB LEARNING MATERIALS
STEP: Systematic Training for Effective Parenting (Step Teen for parents of teenagers)
SPIDERMAN COMICS: One on child abuse, one on alcoholism
The O. K. GAME, THE UNGAME
MR. ROCKHEAD, MS. KANGAROO PUPPETS
DUSO: Developing Understanding of Self and Others
Pre K - 3 DUSO Kit
Grades 4 - 6
DUSO Kit (Advanced)
Grades 6 - 8
TRANSITION
Grades 8 - 12
Contemporary Concerns of Youth
Paper, drawing materials, magazines for collages also available
76
IPFW COUNSELING VIDEOS
The following VHS videotapes are available in the curriculum lab and may be used by counselors for
groups, individuals, or as "homework" assignments. They are produced by Sunburst Publishing and are
typically best suited for children in grades 6 - 10.
TEENS WHO CHOOSE LIFE
DID JENNY HAVE TO DIE?
DYING IS PART OF LIVING
FOUR PREGNANT TEENAGERS
UNDERSTANDING HUMAN REPRODUCTION
UNDERSTANDING AIDS: WHAT TEENS NEED TO KNOW
AIDS: ONE FAMILY'S STORY
SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES
HOW CAN I TELL IF I'M HOOKED?
CRACK!
MEET A TEENAGE DRUG ADDICT
LEARNING TO SAY NO
I LIVE IN AN ALCOHOLIC FAMILY
HOW TO MAKE GOOD DECISIONS
LEARNING TO COMMUNICATE
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
EXPLORING YOUR FEELINGS
LOOKING AT SELF-CONCEPT
LIKING ME: BUILDING SELF-ESTEEM
BE A WINNER - SELF MOTIVATION
JOBS FOR THE 90's
SELF-IMAGE AND YOUR CAREER
GOT A JOB INTERVIEW?
ON-THE-JOB SURVIVAL SKILLS
JOB READINESS: ACQUIRING THE SKILLS
SECRET OF JOB SUCCESS
RESUMES/APPLICATIONS
77
68
INTRODUCTION
This manual has been developed through a joint effort of the IPFW university faculty, internship students,
and on-site supervisors in an attempt to develop a concise set of guidelines for the counseling internship.
The intent is that all persons involved in the experience will have a clear concept of the roles and
expectations placed upon them.
This manual is designed to:
1.
Serve as a guide for the student enrolled in the internship by providing information needed to
facilitate smooth operation of the internship experience.
2.
Provide information to the professional staff at internship sites about the IPFW internship
experience.
Included in the manual are a timetable for placement, explanation about the internship, objectives,
evaluating procedures, and examples of the forms to be used during practicum.
DEFINITION OF TERMS
Agency: The cooperating institution, typically a school, social service organization, mental health
organization, psychiatric setting, or private practice.
Internship: The supervised field experience component of the counselor education program in which the
student obtains practical experience in a community setting.
Internship Student: The individual enrolled in EDUC G550 and EDUC G551, Internship in Counseling
(used interchangeably with the terms "trainee" and "intern").
On-Site Supe rvisor: The individual employed by the cooperating agency who accepts the responsibility
for supervision of the student during the internship.
Practicum: The supervised on-campus experience component of the counselor education program in
which the student obtains practical work experience in the IPFW IPFW Community Counseling Center.
Supervision: The purposeful function of overseeing the work of the intern through a set of supervisor
activities which includes observation, consultation, counseling, training and instruction, and evaluation.
University Supervisor: The faculty member from the university assigned to coordinate internship
components among students, on-site clinical supervision, facilities, and instruction.
69
PURPOSE OF THE INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
The internship is mutually beneficial to the student and cooperating institution. As vital as the student's
learning is, equally important is the student's contribution to the cooperating site. Because the internship
occurs after most course work has been completed, students can contribute a great deal to the internship
site. Internship students are generally considered fully functioning members of the site's professional staff
for the duration of the experience. As such, students assist staff in carrying out the normal duties of the
institution. In addition, they may increase output by conducting short-term projects that are consistent
with site goals.
Naturally, in the initial stages more supervisory time is needed by the site; however, this time is
compensated for as the student increasingly takes on more independent and self-directed work. As a
result, the student learns and the institution gains a part-time professional staff member.
The purpose of the Internship in Counseling is to provide a supervised, field-based work experience that
enables students to:
1.
Apply theories and techniques in a real work setting.
2.
Synthesize knowledge and skills while using and developing personal qualities and characteristics
appropriate to the role of counselor,
3.
Grow from "trainee" to "professional practitioner" with minimal difficulty.
70
GENERAL OBJECTIVES FOR THE INTERNSHIP
The overall objective of the internship is to help students learn and apply knowledge, principles, and
techniques of counseling according to the values and ethics of the profession. Specific objectives for a
given setting will be determined mutually by the university and on-site supervisor in cooperation with the
student.
During the internship the student should be able to:
1.
Demonstrate the personal and professional attitudes needed to work with clients/students and
staff from a variety of backgrounds.
2.
Observe and gain perspective on well functioning programs as to their purposes and effectiveness
in relation to the population they are designed to serve.
3.
Demonstrate the effective use of counseling theory and practice by integrating appropriate skills
with clients/students in the work setting.
4.
Develop appropriate resource lists, becoming aware of working relationships with community and
educational agencies and resources that provide services to meet client/student needs.
5.
Demonstrate the ability to function consistently with ethical and professional standards.
6.
Demonstrate needs assessment skills, program planning, and implementation skills as appropriate
to the profession.
7.
Develop, implement, evaluate an individualized intervention plan for clients/students.
71
THE UNIVERSITY SUPERVISOR
The university supervisor is an IPFW faculty member with assigned responsibility for the internship.
Typically, the university supervisor will:
1.
Assist in arranging initial steps in the internship.
2.
Provide the host agency with information concerning the student program, learning objectives,
evaluation criteria, etc.
3.
Assist students and the site in developing a contract of internship activities and final approval of
the contract.
4.
Act as liaison to the host site.
5.
Collect weekly logs from student interns.
6.
Visit the student at least once during the semester on-site.
7.
Provide clinical supervision for the student on an individual basis, via direct observation, live
supervision, and review of audio/video tapes.
8.
Provide on-going assessment to the student throughout the semester.
9.
Schedule seminars for students on a regular basis.
10.
Receive evaluation forms from the on-site supervisor, schedule evaluation meetings, and assign
final grades.
72
SUPERVISION SEMINAR
In addition to the field experience, interns are required to attend seminars scheduled by the university
supervisor. In seminar, students come together to discuss internship experiences, serve as resources for
problem-solving, and explore common areas of interest or need. Audio and videotapes of client sessions
are employed for evaluation and class consultation. Supervision of tapes and live site supervision by the
university supervisor are a central component of our program.
Goals of the seminar are to:
1.
Develop, apply, and refine knowledge and skills needed for effective services in the work site and
beyond.
2.
Create a system in which goals, procedures, and alternatives can be discussed and evaluated.
3.
Build an interpersonal support system in which descriptive feedback serves as a source of
personal and professional growth.
73
THE ON-SITE SUPERVISOR
1.
The site's administrator will designate a staff member to serve as the on-site supervisor for the
student intern. It is our policy that each on-site supervisor shall hold credentials that exceed those
of the graduate student supervised. Earned degrees, licenses, and national registry certification
constitute prima facie evidence of credentials. Exceptions to this policy justified in terms of
experience, position, and title must be approved by the IPFW Director of Counselor Education.
Supervisors for school interns must be licensed as school counselors for two years. Agency/MFT
intern supervisors must meet Indiana LMFT supervisory requirements.
2.
Supervisory and orientation tasks may take relatively more time in the beginning stages of the
internship. However, the internship should benefit the host site as much as it does the student.
Although students are in training, they should have sufficient skills to perform many on-site
responsibilities. If a student lacks initiative, skills, or other qualities essential to effectively
function on the job, the university supervisor should be contacted immediately.
3.
In order to achieve maximum benefit, the student should be exposed to a variety of appropriate
aspects of the host institution. Ideally, the student needs to have experiences in conducting
individual and group counseling sessions, consultations with staff and parents, and other activities
that vary with the site's function. School counseling interns require experience at all three grade
levels. Agency/MFT interns must provide "MFT services" to 50% of their client population.
74
ON-SITE SUPERVISION RESPONSIBILITIES
The on-site supervisor assesses the student's progress, consults with students regarding strategies and
procedures, consults with the university supervisor, and completes a written evaluation of the student at
the end of the semester. The on-site supervisor has a central influence on the outcome of the internship.
The relationship with the student is most meaningful in exemplifying professional behavior in daily
counseling activities. The supervisor insures that relevant work experiences, on-site feedback, advising,
and consultation are provided for the student counselor.
Typically, the on-site supervisor will:
1.
Provide structure for the student to achieve internship objectives.
2.
Provide an orientation to the site and staff for the student, including policies, structure, personnel,
and resources.
3.
Provide access to site manuals, policy statements, and files as needed.
4.
Assist the student in refining details of the internship appropriate to the specific setting including
specific assignments, activities, scheduling, etc.
5.
Establish regular supervision sessions with the student. These meetings are to be held weekly
during hours when the student is normally scheduled to be at the site. The supervisor uses this
time to provide feedback on tapes, plan tasks, and discuss other aspects of the internship
experience with the student.
6.
Engage in some form of visual observation of the student's activities. If one-way mirror or video
equipment is not available, then the supervisor can be physically present during one or more
activities.
7.
Provide on-going evaluation of the performance of the student.
8.
Complete a final evaluation of the student (See Appendix E).
9.
Initiate immediate contact with the university supervisor if problems are encountered with the
student during the placement.
75
INTERNSHIP EVALUATION
Evaluation is a joint endeavor among the on-site supervisor, university supervisor, and student intern. The
main purpose of evaluation is to enhance the student's learning. Therefore, evaluation is an on-going
process, with verbal and written feedback provided throughout the internship. Evaluation focuses on: (1)
professional behavior, and (2) counseling competencies. Evaluation of field performance represents one
component of the student's final grade. Other aspects evaluated by the university supervisor may include,
but not be limited to, tape reviews, interview records, student journals, and seminar participation. A final
evaluation (Appendix E1) completed by both supervisors is considered in determining the intern's grade.
An appropriate grade is assigned when the student completes the requirements with a satisfactory level of
proficiency.
ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS
Being an intern in a professional role may raise some questions about invasion of privacy and
confidentiality. Student interns are held responsible for protecting the rights of their clients. They are
expected to abide by site regulations regarding records, gaining permission to work with students/clients
and to record sessions with clients. Recording information, including taping, is for supervisory purposes
only and is kept in strict confidence. In addition, prior to placement each student is required to obtain
professional liability insurance to protect themselves and the host site. The ethical standards of the
American School Counseling Association and the American Association for Marriage & Family Therapy
are the standards to which the intern subscribes. The intern is expected to respond in an ethical manner
in all client and/or site contacts or relationships. Internship students are expected to support the rules and
regulations of the host site.
76
SAMPLE INTERNSHIP DUTIES
When completing the Internship Agreement with the on-site supervisor, interns may wish to refer to the
examples below for "specific duties," as well as other activities selected by the university and on-site
supervisors. Most of the following activities apply to traditional settings such as schools, mental health
agencies, or higher education settings. For other settings these standards may need to be modified. The
student will develop a specific list of activities with the on-site supervisor prior to signing the agreement.
1.
The intern will complete a specified number of counseling sessions per week.
The interview may cover a variety of purposes. For example, in agencies counselors might
engage in intake interviews, and in schools interviews may deal with personal development,
curriculum, test interpretation, interpersonal behavior, educational and career planning, and so
forth.
Many of these interviews should deal with what is commonly referred to as "personal" concerns
of the client.
2.
Long-term Contacts: The intern will maintain at least five long-term client/student contacts during
the semester.
3.
Group Counseling: The intern will lead or co-lead at least one group with a minimum of four
members for a series of sessions. The members must be primary clientele of the agency (if in a
school setting, students will be members). In most cases this will be a structured group
experience and should be generated from a needs assessment of the population served by the
internship site. (Since it is often difficult to tape a group meeting, every effort should be made by
the student to schedule group meetings at times during which the group may be observed by
either the on-site supervisor or the university supervisor.
4.
Classroom Guidance: For interns in elementary, middle, and secondary schools, there will be
opportunities for participation in classroom guidance using materials and activities appropriate for
the setting.
5.
Consultation: The intern will complete at least two consultation sessions during the internship. In
most settings used for the internship this will largely be parent, teacher, and/or other staff
consultations. At least one of these should be observed by a supervisor or recorded.
6.
Testing/Assessment: The intern will select, administer, or interpret (either individually or in a
group) the results of at least two different tests to at least three clients/students or groups.
7.
Referrals : The intern will participate in the process of referring clients/students or observe at
least two referrals to other community agencies.
The intern should understand the referral process and participate when appropriate.
providing a client/student with a referral, follow-up will be required.
When
77
78
Sample Internship Duties (continued)
8.
Training and Development: The intern will help to develop and conduct a structured educational
experience for either students, clients, teachers, parents, or other agency staff. The intern should
either lead or co-lead these experiences.
The intern will complete additional or alternative requirements the on-site supervisor believes are
necessary. This might include participation in staff meetings, case presentations/staffings, in-service
workshops, or accompanying regular staff in other duties (e.g consultation with other agencies). It could
also include leading a parent education group, a PTA presentation, or a conference with community
helpers.
79
RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE STUDENT INTERN
The intern is at a point where current skills must be translated into action. Prerequisite course work has
been completed.
The intern must have consistently demonstrated the academic, personal, and
professional skills, attitude, judgment, and maturity to participate effectively in internship activities in a
specified setting. The intern also will have demonstrated appropriate independence in decision making as
a self starter who initiates tasks and carries them through to completion. Assessment of these qualities is
made by the Counselor Education faculty as a result of a cumulative assessment of the student's behavior
both in and outside classroom settings. The student must be judged to be able to effectively participate in
specific internship settings by both university and on-site supervisors.
The intern will have the following responsibilities:
1.
Contact the site to set up an appointment to discuss internship possibilities after receiving
permission from the university supervisor.
2.
Prepare a contract outlining experiences the student will have with the help of the site supervisor.
3.
Abide by terms of the contract and renegotiate these terms if conditions change.
4.
Complete assignments and arrange for consultation with supervisors.
5.
Maintain a professional commitment to the site; observe rules and policies of the site, dress
appropriately, be punctual, and display responsible conduct.
6.
Demonstrate the development and implementation of professional values, skills, and knowledge.
7.
Maintain client confidentiality. Abide by the ethical standards appropriate to the site and the
ethical standards of the American School Counseling Association or the American Association of
Marriage and Family Therapy.
8.
Make proper referrals. Professional ethics demand that cases beyond one's expertise be referred
to the proper person or agency for help. Discuss such cases with the on-site supervisor and
notify the university supervisor if needed. Follow up referrals.
9.
Evaluate performance and learning related to the educational objectives of the internship.
10.
Complete student evaluation forms for the internship.
80
STUDENT REQUIREMENTS WITH UNIVERSITY SUPERVISOR
1.
Meetings With University Supervisor: Each student is required to meet with the university
supervisor as scheduled during the semester. These meetings will be on campus unless otherwise
designated.
2.
Keeping a Log: Each student will maintain a log of daily tasks while on the internship site. A
brief narrative closing summary is written, using the log as a data base, and is submitted to the
university supervisor when the internship is completed. These practices shall be consistent with
professional ethic al standards and the General Education Provisions Act (Privacy Rights of
Parents and Students), Title IV of PL 90-247 and PL 93-380, enacted August, 1974.
3.
Professional Membership: It is strongly suggested that each student be an active member of a
professional counseling/therapy association.
4.
Insurance: It is expected that the student will have professional liability insurance, unless
comparable arrangements have been approved in writing by the university supervisor.
81
AGENCY/MFT INTERNSHIP REQUIREMENTS
The intern will have two contact persons available for assistance: the university supervisor and the on-site
supervisor. The roles of these individuals include serving as resources for training and as evaluators of
the intern's performance. A final grade will be assigned by the faculty member after examining the
on-site supervisor's evaluation. IPFW policy is that a minimum of 2.5 hours of supervision per week will
be provided by the on-site supervisor. Regular supervision will be provided by the IPFW faculty member.
A letter sent to the university supervisor by the site supervisor to confirm a student's placement will be
arranged by the student.
Interns gain permission to enroll in EDUC G550, Internship in Counseling, upon permission of the
university supervisor one semester in advance. Because there is no payment for services by the
cooperating agency, students are guests of the agency. The agency provides supervision and setting
arrangements according to its policies and as a professional courtesy. The agency is under no obligation
to accept internship students. Therefore, internship opportunities may be limited, especially at certain
times and in specific locations.
Most agencies have application forms for intern selection and will in addition ask to interview applicants.
Students should contact agencies only after conferring with the university supervisor.
The internship is a participatory experience in a specific counseling work setting. Interns participate as
entry level professionals engaged in the work performed in that setting under the supervision of a qualified
employee of the setting and IPFW faculty. Weekly logs (Appendix G) summarize the intern's
participation in work activities and the time allocated to each activity. The standard is that the internship
experience is a minimum of 13 face-to-face client contact hours per week for a 31-week time period.
IPFW credit will be awarded upon completion of 400 hours of face-to-face client contact and 80 hours of
approved supervision provided by a five-year licensed marriage & family therapist or equivalent,
documented by weekly logs. The requirement of 400 hours face to face and 80 hours of approved
supervision may be adjusted based upon how the practicum requirement was fulfilled.
STUDENTS MUST OBTAIN THEIR OWN INTERNSHIP SITE WITH THE
SUPPORT AND GUIDANCE OF THE COUNSELOR EDUCATION PROGRAM.
82
IPFW AGENCY/MFT INTERNSHIP GUIDELINES
The internship site is a valued part of the counselor education program. This is the student's opportunity
to integrate all that they have learned and practiced. In return for a site's offering of resources it is our
expectation that the student will contribute the best of their training and participation as an entry-level
professional counselor.
The following are a list of guidelines in the preparation and selection of an internship site.
Timeline
Objectives
Spring semester
prior to
internship
1.
2.
3.
Submit proof of membership in AAMFT (202-452-0109).
Submit proof of student liability insurance (NPG 800-253-5486).
Review Mental Health Internship Site Book (250 Neff Hall).
Ten weeks
prior to
internship
4.
Meet with university supervisor to confirm course prerequisites for
internship.
5.
Review internship site listings and select/prioritize three sites.
6.
Meet with university supervisor to discuss internship site
requirements/availability.
Eight weeks
prior to
internship
7.
Submit site applications and schedule interviews with sites approved for
you by the university supervisor. Include an official transcript,
endorsement letters, and résumé. Use the sample résumé in the Intern
Site Book. Submit a copy of your résumé to the university supervisor.
Four weeks
prior to
internship
8.
Submit a letter from the site confirming your placement. Include a copy
of supervisor's MFT license of at least five years or evidence of MFT
supervisor equivalency.
9.
Complete internship site agreements with the on-site supervisor and
submit to university supervisor for approval prior to internship placement
(Appendix B). The on-site or primary supervisor must be a five-year
licensed marriage & family therapist or equivalent.
It is preferred that students obtain an approved supervisor at their site. If one is
not available, someone from the approved supervisor team may be assigned.
83
IPFW SCHOOL COUNSELING INTERNSHIPS
School counselor interns are specifically mentioned in the contractual arrangements (between Indiana
University and each school system) regarding expectations for student teachers. Counselor interns share
legal rights and responsibilities similar to those of student teachers.
The internship requirement for all students regardless of their prior teaching credentials is 600 clock hours
over one academic school year in all three developmental levels (HS, MS, Elem). Of those hours, 240
hours must be spent working directly with children in the role of school counselor. The distribution of the
developmental levels can be established in any way you and your site choose. For example, you can
balance all three equally or spend the majority of your time at one site and a few days or weeks at two
others. The supervisor must be a licensed school counselor for at least two years and meet on a weekly
basis with you for one and one-half hours.
Past licensure in Indiana allowed a new graduate to complete an application and receive their Standard
License renewable every five years (Rules 46-47). Professionalizing a license was possible after one and
one-half years of full-time employment and was renewable every ten years. The new licensure process
(Rules 2000) will provide a school counseling graduate with an interim license that allows them to work as
a school counselor for two years while maintaining a portfolio and being mentored by another school
counselor at their new job site. The mentor will make a recommendation for licensure to the state and a
five year renewable license will be issued.
STUDENTS MUST OBTAIN THEIR OWN INTERNSHIP SITE WITH THE
SUPPORT AND GUIDANCE OF THE COUNSELOR EDUCATION PROGRAM.
84
IPFW SCHOOL INTERNSHIP GUIDELINES
The internship site is a valued part of the counselor education program. This is the student's opportunity
to integrate all that they have learned and practiced. In return for a site's offering of resources it is our
expectation that the student will contribute the best of their training and participation as an entry-level
professional counselor.
The following is a list of guidelines in the preparation and selection of an internship site:
Timeline
Objectives
Summer #1
prior to
internship
1.
2.
3.
Submit proof of membership in ASCA (800-306-4722).
Submit proof of student liability insurance (ASCA).
Review School Internship Site Book (250 Neff Hall).
Ten weeks
prior to
4.
Meet with university supervisor to confirm course prerequisites for
internship and review internship manual forms.
5.
Meet with university supervisor to discuss internship site
requirements/availability.
Eight weeks
6.
Submit site prior to applications and schedule interviews with internship
sites approved for you by the university supervisor. Include an official
transcript, endorsement letters, and résumé. Use the sample résumé in
the Intern Site Book. Submit a copy of your résumé to the university
supervisor.
Four weeks
7.
Submit a letter prior from the site confirming your placement.
Internship
8.
Complete internship site agreements with each on-site supervisor for
three levels of school site placement and submit to university supervisor
for approval prior to internship placement. (See Appendix B.)
9.
Interns may complete their requirements in one academic year of fulltime placement on site, or in two academic years placed half-time.
85
IPFW SCHOOL COUNSELOR INTERNSHIP GUIDELINES
(Interns With a Teaching License and > 2 Years of Experience)
The internship site is a valued part of the counselor education program. This is the student's opportunity
to integrate all that they have learned and practiced. In return for a site's offering of resources it is our
expectation that the student will contribute the best of their training and participation as an entry-level
professional counselor.
PLEASE NOTE THE TWO TYPES OF INTERNSHIPS AVAILABLE: Interns without two years of
teaching experience and teacher-licensed interns with two years of teaching experience).
Interns with a teaching license and a minimum of two years teaching experience are required to obtain
300 hours doing counselor type activities and 300 hours in a setting that provides work experience similar
to that of a school counselor. Students may begin logging hours formally for experiences they are
obtaining in their school-work settings the Fall semester prior to their Spring EDUC G550 class. A
maximum of 300 hours can be obtained in this manner. The student is not authorized to provide individual
or group counseling. The remaining 300 hours will be obtained in the Spring semester attending weekly
seminar classes and training modules, shadowing other counselor(s), and experiences like providing career
plans, guidance presentations, and groups on conflict resolution, esteem, and social skills at Wood Youth
Center, Pontiac Youth Center, Boys & Girls Clubs, Erin's House, and Crossroad. Job and role
descriptions from FWCS and the ISCA are used in selecting appropriate school counselor type activities.
* THE FALL SEMESTER PRIOR TO THE START OF THE SPRING SEMESTER IN WHICH YOU
WILL BEGIN THE EDUC G550 INTERNSHIP COURSE:
1.
Submit proof of membership in ASCA.
2.
Submit proof of student liability insurance.
3.
Meet with the university supervisor to confirm course prerequisites for internship and complete
the internship agreement (Appendix A). Obtain experience logs and begin tracking school
counselor type activities.
* Individual or group counseling cannot begin until enrolled in G550 and university supervision
is available.
Appendix A
INTERNSHIP AGREEMENT *
Counselor Education
School of Education
Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne
The following agreement is to be completed by the student and a university instructor.
Name of Student
Name of IPFW Supervisor
Semester:
20
Phone
The student named above will participate in 600 clock hours, which include 240 hours working with children at all
three levels, over two semesters, in order to earn six hours of credit in EDUC G550 Internship and EDUC G551
Advanced Internship. The specific experiences will include:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
(Use additional page if necessary)
Signature of Student
Signature of Site Supervisor
*
This agreement is for school interns.
Signature of IPFW Supervisor
Appendix B
INTERNSHIP AGREEMENT*
Counselor Education
School of Education
Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne
The following agreement is to be completed by the student, the on-site supervisor, and a university instructor.
Name of Student
Semester:
20
Name/Address of Internship Site
Name of LMFT Approved Supervisor
Phone
Approved Supervisor’s Degree and LMFT License Number
Initial Licensure Date
Name of Internship Site Supervisor
Phone
Site Supervisor Degree(s), Certification(s), License(s)
Name of IPFW Supervisor
Phone
The student named above will provide service for
hours per week (20 hours per week minimum) to earn six
hours of credit in EDUC G550 and EDUC G551 at the above named site.** MFT is complete at the completion of
400 face-to-face hours and 80 approved supervision hours. The specific duties include:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
(Use additional page if necessary)
If the student will work on the same days and hours each week, these days and hours are:
Signature of Student
Signature of
Signature of
Site Supervisor
*
This agreement is for agency/MFT interns.
IPFW Supervisor
87
**
Additional hours may be required if hours from practicum are not complete.
Appendix C1
IPFW
School of Education
Counselor Education
(260) 481-6003 FAX (260) 481-5408
RELEASE AND PERMISSION TO USE AN AUDIO OR VIDEO TAPE OF ONE
COUNSELING SESSION FOR THE SUPERVISION AND TRAINING OF COUNSELORS IN
THE IPFW COUNSELOR EDUCATION PROGRAM
The Counselor Education program at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW) is both a service to
the community and a training/research program. Your counselor has been placed at
as part
of an educational requirement in the Counselor Education program. The counselor has been trained to provide quality
services under the joint supervision of
and IPFW.
It is the practice of counselors in the IPFW program to make audio or video tapes of some of their counseling
sessions.
The tapes are reviewed at the IPFW IPFW Community Counseling Center by an IPFW faculty
supervisor and other counselors-in-training to provide the utmost in professional supervision.
No recording shall be made without prior knowledge and explicit consent of both the client and counselor.
Your permission may be revoked at any time during the counseling session and the tape turned off without affecting
the quality of service to the client.
Please review the names listed below. They are the names of the supervisor and counselors-in-training who will view
this tape. If you would like to exclude anyone listed from viewing your tape, please draw a single line through the
name(s).
I (We), the undersigned, acknowledge that the purpose and value of taping has been fully explained to me (us). I
(We) give IPFW permission to use the specified video or audio tape of me (us) for supervision and training purposes.
My (Our) consent to such taping is given freely and voluntarily.
This release is only for counseling session #
, with
at
This tape will be erased within ten days after the date of this release.
Date
Client
Date
Client
Date
Client
Date
Client
Date
Client
Date
Counselor
Fort Wayne IN 46805-1499
Appendix C2
IPFW
School of Education
Counselor Education
(260) 481-6003 FAX (260) 481-5408
RELEASE AND PERMISSION TO OBSERVE ONE COUNSELING SESSION FOR THE
SUPERVISION AND TRAINING OF COUNSELORS IN THE IPFW COUNSELOR
EDUCATION PROGRAM
The Counselor Education program at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW) is both a service to
the community and a training/research program. Your counselor has been placed at
as
part of an educational requirement in the Counselor Education program. They have been trained to provide quality
counseling under the joint supervision of
and IPFW. The reference to "client" includes students
at school sites.
It is the practice of counselors in the IPFW program to require live supervision of some counseling sessions guidance
presentations by an IPFW Counselor Education supervisor. We do this to provide the utmost in professional
supervision.
This permission may be revoked at any time during the counseling session and the supervisor dismissed without
affecting the quality of service to the client.
Please note that your counselor's supervisor is
.
I (We), the undersigned, acknowledge that the purpose and value of live supervision has been fully explained to me
(us). I (We) give
, a supervisor for the IPFW Counselor Education program, permission
to observe one counseling session of me (us) for supervision and training purposes.
My (Our) consent to such observation is given freely and voluntarily.
This release is only for counseling session #
, with
at
Date
Client
Date
Client
Date
Parent/Guardian
Date
Parent/Guardian
Date
Counselor
90
Fort Wayne IN 46805-1499
Appendix D1
INDIANA UNIVERSITY-PURDUE UNIVERSITY FORT WAYNE
COUNSELOR EDUCATION
Agency/MFT Internship Activity Log
Student Name
For week of
On-Site Supervisor
(must be five-year licensed marriage & family therapist or equivalent)
FACE-TO-FACE CLIENT CONTACT HOURS
This Week
1.
Individual Session Hours/MFT Theories Used
2.
Individual Session Hours/Non-MFT Theories Used
3.
Total Time, Individual Session Hours (add 1,2)
4.
Total Time, Family Session Hours
5.
Total Time, Couple Session Hours
6.
Total Time, Group Session Hours
7.
TOTAL FACE-TO-FACE CLIENT CONTACT HOURS
(add 3,4,5,6)
8.
Individual On-Site Supervision Session Hours
9.
Individual University Supervision Session Hours
10.
TOTAL TIME, INDIVIDUAL SUPERVISION HOURS
(add 8,9) 1:2 Ratio
11.
Group On-Site Supervision Session Hours
12.
Group University Supervision Session Hours
13.
TOTAL TIME, GROUP SUPERVISION HOURS (add
11,12) No Greater than 1:6 Ratio
14.
TOTAL TIME, STAFF MEETINGS
15.
TOTAL TIME, REPORTS, CASE RECORDS, ETC.
16.
TOTAL TIME IN OFF-SITE PROFESSIONAL
WORKSHOPS
17.
TIME IN OTHER ACTIVITIES (Please list):
18.
TOTAL
TIME IN
INTERNSHI
P ACTIVITY
(add
7,10,13,14,1
5,16,17)
Total to Date
(over)
THIS WEEK’S SUMMARY OF THE INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE
Personal
Administrative
Performance
Other
Appendix D2
INDIANA UNIVERSITY-PURDUE UNIVERSITY FORT WAYNE
COUNSELOR EDUCATION
School Internship Activity Log
Student Name
For week of
On-site
Supervisor Signature
Guidance Curriculum (Instruction)
This Week
Total to Date
Classroom
Small Group
Large Group
Individual Planning
Educational
Career Education
Responsive Services
Consultation (Parent)
Consultation/Referral (Agency)
Personal/Crisis Counseling
System Support
Consultation with Teacher/Administrator
Title I Collaboration
Meetings:
Faculty meetings
Staff meetings
Administrator/Supervisor
Crisis Intervention Team
Counselor/Case Manager Meeting
In-Service Meeting
Workshops, Conferences, etc.
Reports, Case Records, etc.
Program Planning
Individual Supervision
On-Site Supervision Session
University Supervision Session
Supervision of Students
Social Skills/Conflict Resolution, etc.
Other
(over)
THIS WEEK’S SUMMARY OF THE INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE
Personal
Administrative
Performance
Other
Appendix D3
IPFW SCHOOL INTERNSHIP ACTIVITY LOG
FOR LICENSED TEACHERS WITH A MINIMUM OF TWO YEARS OF EXPERIENCE
Check One: Fall
Name
Spring
Page
Date
Activity Description
I attest to the accuracy of the information listed above.
Student Signature
Date
APPENDIX E1
INDIANA UNIVERSITY-PURDUE UNIVERSITY FORT WAYNE
COUNSELOR EDUCATION
Internship Evaluation*
of
Duration
Date:
Name of Student:
Name of Rater:
Please rate this individual on the appropriate items:
Site:
Needs
Improvement
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Was punctual and
conscientious in
attendance
Showed enthusiasm for
learning about the site
Was skillful and courteous
in relating to population
served
Demonstrated ethical
behavior
Was responsive to
feedback from staff and
peers
Was sensitive to site
structure and policies
Showed an appropriate
degree of independence
Carried out responsibilities
Took initiative
Area of
Strength
Good
NA or No
Observation
1
2
3
4
5
N
1
2
3
4
5
N
1
2
3
4
5
N
1
2
3
4
5
N
1
2
3
4
5
N
1
2
3
4
5
N
1
2
3
4
5
N
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
N
N
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
N
N
1
2
3
4
5
N
1
2
3
4
5
N
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
N
N
1
2
3
4
5
N
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
N
N
N
N
Demonstrated skill in the following:
18.
19.
20.
Counseling individuals
Group counseling
Counseling with
couples/families
Teaching/training/guidance presentations
Management/administration
Testing/assessment
Consultation--on and off
site
Program development and
delivery
Research/evaluation
Other (specify)
Other (specify)
*
To be completed one week prior to each semester's end, then forwarded to university instructor.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
(over)
Please describe this student's most prominent professional and personal strengths:
Please describe any need for growth and improvement. If possible, describe progress made to date and recommendations for
the future listed in order of priority:
Additional comments:
Signature of Site Supervisor:
Signature of Student:
APPENDIX E2
INDIANA UNIVERSITY-PURDUE UNIVERSITY FORT WAYNE
COUNSELOR EDUCATION
Evaluation of Site Form: Agency/MFT
Agency Name:
Address:
Telephone Number:
Supervisor's Name:
Supervisor's Title:
Student's Name:
Dates of Practicum/Internship:
Please check the appropriate blanks:
1.
What type of counseling services are provided at your site?
Hot Line
Crisis
Brief
Longer Term
Individual
Couples
Family
No Fee
Sliding Scale
Insurance
Full Fee
Walk In
Out-Patient
In-Patient
Home Visit
Additional Comments:
2.
What are the characteristics of your client population?
Children
Adolescents
Adults
Geriatrics
Male
Female
Caucasian
Hispanic
Black
Asian
American Indian
Unemployed
Low Income
Middle Income
Upper Income
Additional Comments:
3.
What were the major presenting problems?
Behavioral
Relational
Marital
Drug/Alcohol Abuse
Eating Disorders
Court Ordered
Child Abuse
Adult Victims
Geriatrics
Career
Religious
Other (Please describe briefly):
4.
How would you describe the major theoretical orientation?
Systemic
Eclectic
Behavioral
Psychoanalytic
Medical
Other
5.
What types of supervision did you participate in?
Humanistic
Individual
Group
Staff Meetings
(over)
6.
7.
Did you have opportunities to participate in:
In-Service Training
Workshops
Seminars
What percentage of time did you spend counseling:
Individuals
Couples
Families
Groups
8.
How many hours did you spend at your site before you saw Client?
9.
How was your time divided?
Seeing Clients
Reading
Writing Case Notes
Individual Supervision
Not Knowing What To Do
Group Supervision
Other
10.
Which of the following resources were available to you at your site?
Books
Tapes
Referral Lists
Films
Files/Records
Manuals
Other Professionals
Other
11.
Describe the agency staff. How many:
MD
LMFT
LCSW
BA
Paraprofessionals
Administrative
Interns
LMHC
Volunteers
Total Number of Staff
12.
Did you receive a stipend or any form of pay?
Yes
No
. If so, how much?
13.
Which of the following are available to you?
Personal Office
Shared Office
Desk
Mail Box
Phone
Parking Space
14.
What was the size of your case load?
Daily
Weekly
Total Hours
15.
Approximately how much time did you spend on case work?
Daily
(or) Weekly
16.
Please describe briefly your relationship and experience in supervision:
17.
List briefly the advantages/disadvantages you found in working at this site:
18.
General comments about your practicum/internship experience:
100
APPENDIX E3
INDIANA UNIVERSITY-PURDUE UNIVERSITY FORT WAYNE
COUNSELOR EDUCATION
Evaluation of Site Form: School
School Name:
Address:
Telephone Number:
Supervisor's Name:
Supervisor's Title:
Principal's Name:
Student's Name:
Dates of Practicum/Internship:
Please check the appropriate blanks:
1.
What types of counseling services are provided at your school?
Additional Comments:
2.
What are the characteristics of your student population?
Additional Comments:
3.
What were types of individual counseling problems? (Please describe briefly):
4.
How would you describe the major theoretical orientation used in counseling individual and group?
Other
5.
What types of supervision did you participate in?
Individual
Group
Staff Meetings
6.
Did you have opportunities to participate in:
In-Service Training
Workshops
Seminars
7.
What percentage of time did you spend counseling:
Individuals
Families
Groups
8.
How many hours did you spend at your site before you were able to work directly with the students?
9.
How was your time divided?
10.
Which of the following resources were available to you at your site?
Books
Tapes
Referral Lists
Films
Files/Records
Manuals
Other Professionals
Other
(over)
11.
Describe the counseling staff. How many, degrees, licenses, etc.:
12.
Did you receive a stipend or any form of pay?
Yes
No
. If so, how much?
13.
Which of the following were available to you?
Personal Office
Shared Office
Desk
Mail Box
Phone
Parking Space
14.
What was the size of your student case load?
Daily
Weekly
15.
Approximately how much time did you spend weekly on:
Guidance activities:
Group counseling:
Individual counseling:
Preparation:
Supervision:
Staff development:
Please describe other weekly activities not listed and time spent:
16.
Please describe briefly your relationship and experience in supervision:
17.
List briefly the advantages/disadvantages you found in working at this school:
18.
General comments about your practicum/internship experience:
APPENDIX F
IPFW School Counseling Program
Internship Site Commitment Agreement
I
requirement
agree to fulfill my entire internship placement
IPFW Student Intern
within the Fort Wayne Community Schools system.
IPFW Student Intern
Date
IPFW Internship Coordinator
Date
APPENDIX G
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
INDIANA UNIVERSITY
PURDUE UNIVERSITY
FORT WAYNE
William E. Utesch, Ph.D.
Chair, Professional Studies
Director, Counselor Education
(260) 481-6003 or 6450 FAX (260) 481-5408
[email protected]
October 16, 2000
To Whom It May Concern:
The intern site visitation standard is a common requirement among mental health/counseling licensing and
accreditation organizations that prioritize direct therapy/counseling in their accreditation and evaluation process.
The Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW) Counselor Education Program with its two
Master’s programs in School Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy Counseling ascribes to the standards
established by several organizations: Indiana Health Professions Bureau, Indiana Professional Standards Board,
National Board of Certified Counselors, American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Commission on
Accreditation, and the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs.
IPFW interns will be visited by their university supervisor throughout their placement. The purpose of the intern
site visitation by the university supervisor is not one of remediation but of support, integration, and closure for the
student. Site visitation also provides continuity and accountability for the site.
The counselor education program appreciates your participation in the professionalization of our students. We
anticipate that their placement at your site will be a rewarding experience for everyone.
Sincerely,
William E. Utesch, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Education
Fort Wayne IN 46805-1499
APPENDIX H
ETHICAL STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL COUNSELORS
OF THE
AMERICAN SCHOOL COUNSELOR ASSOCIATION
APPENDIX I
AAMFT CODE OF ETHICS
OF THE
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY
APPENDIX J1
Licensure for Marriage and Family Therapists
State Contact: Health Professions Bureau
402 W Washington St
Indianapolis IN 46204
(317) 233-4437, 4430, 4422
It is important that you contact the Bureau and request "Application Information for Licensed Marriage
and Family Therapists." Below is a brief description of the requirements for the license:
1.
Possession of a Master's degree or higher in Marriage and Family Therapy or in a related area
determined by the Board. Three courses/9 hours in human development, sexuality, personality, and
psychopathology (G563, G570, P514). Three courses/9 hours in marital & family studies covering family
development/functioning, family life cycle & sociology, family stress, family subsystems & forms, and
theories of marital and family interaction (G575, G502, G590MFT). Three courses/9 hours in marital and
family therapy (G503, G504, G567). One course/3 hours in foundations of family therapy including
general systems theory and cybernetics (this information is woven through four courses: G502, G503,
G504, G567). One course/3 hours in professional studies (G563). One course/3 hours in research
(G590). One course/3 hours in appraisal and assessment (G505). A clinical practicum/internship in
marriage and family therapy of at least 500 hours of face-to-face contact with individuals, couples, and
families for the purpose of assessment and intervention, to be conducted over a period of one year at an
average rate of six clinical contacts per week. A minimum of 100 hours of supervision must be provided
during the provision of the 500-hour client contact requirement. The IPFW program requires 100 hours
face-to-face client contact with 20 hours of approved supervision in its practica, and 400 hours face-toface client contact with 80 hours of approved supervision in its internship (G524, G525, G550, G551).
2.
Two years/1000 face-to-face client contact hours of postgraduate supervised clinical experience in the
field of Marriage and Family Therapy. Supervision must be received by a Marriage and Family Therapist
or other qualified person who meets the standards for supervision established by the AAMFT.
Supervision must be face to face, and includes individual (1:2 ratio) and group supervision (1:6 ratio),
which equals 200 hours during the 1000 hours of clinical experience. A total of 1500 face-to-face client
contact hours with no more than 50% consisting of individuals and groups even when therapy is
conducted from a family therapy perspective. A minimum of 50% of the 1500 client contact hours must
consist of marriage and family services (couples and families). Final approved supervision hours should
total 200 individual and 100 group hours. Supervision post graduation can be provided by an AAMFT
approved supervisor or candidate, or a therapist with a master’s degree or higher in a mental health field,
five years of post-master’s licensed, professional practice experience and is supervising within their scope
of experience and training.
3.
Successful completion of an examination provided by the Board (AAMFTRB exam) or you may use your
licensure/certification as a Marriage and Family Therapist in another state to exempt yourself provided it
was the AAMFTRB exam.
4.
Your application for the exam must be filed with HPB 30 days prior to the examination date. Exams are
offered in Indianapolis two times per year, once in the Fall and once in the Spring. It consists of 200
questions, and you must pass the exam with a minimum converted score of 75 (61%).
APPENDIX J2
*Excerpted from the IHPB LMFT Licensure requirements.
FORM III
Verification of Marriage and Family Therapy Course Work
Course Work from Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne
Counselor Education Program, Marriage and Family Therapy Track
Please list the course titles in the areas indicated below, of the graduate courses, as they appear on your transcript, that in your opinion,
meet the following requirements. If the title of the course you are wishing to apply towards these requirements does not clearly reflect these
content areas, you should also submit additional supporting documentation, such as course descriptions from your college or university’s
catalog.
Twenty-seven (27) Semester hours or forty-one (41) quarter hours of graduate course work that must include graduate course credits
with material in at least the following content areas:
Theoretical Foundations of Marriage and Family Therapy
Name of Institution
Course Number
Course Title
IPFW
EDUC G504
Counseling Theories & Techniques II
Credit Hours
3
Major Models of Marriage and Family Therapy
Name of Institution
Course Number
Course Title
IPFW
EDUC G567
Introduction to Marriage and Family Counseling
Credit Hours
3
Individual Development
Name of Institution
IPFW
Course Number
EDUC P514
Course Title
Life Span Development: Birth/Death
Credit Hours
3
Family Development and Family Relationships
Course Number
Course Title
Name of Institution
EDUC P514
Life Span Development: Birth/Death
IPFW
Credit Hours
3
Clinical Problems
Name of Institution
IPFW
Course Number
EDUC G563
Course Title
Foundations of Mental Health Counseling
Credit Hours
3
Collaboration with Other Disciplines
Name of Institution
Course Number
IPFW
EDUC G563
IPFW
EDUC G502
Course Title
Foundations of Mental Health Counseling
Professional Orientation and Ethics
Credit Hours
3
3
Sexuality
Name of Institution
IPFW
Course Title
Human Sexuality
Credit Hours
3
Course Title
Human Sexuality
Multicultural Counseling
Credit Hours
3
3
Issues of Ethnicity, Race, Socioeconomic Status, and Culture
Course Number
Course Title
Name of Institution
EDUC G575
Multicultural Counseling
IPFW
Credit Hours
3
Therapy Techniques
Name of Institution
IPFW
IPFW
Credit Hours
3
3
Course Number
EDUC G570
Gender and Sexual Orientation
Name of Institution
Course Number
IPFW
EDUC G570
IPFW
EDUC G575
Course Number
EDUC G503
EDUC G504
Course Title
Counseling Theories & Techniques I
Counseling Theories & Techniques II
IPFW
IPFW
EDUC G567
EDUC G532
Introduction to Marriage and Family Counseling
Introduction to Group Counseling
3
3
(over)
Behavioral Research that Focuses on the Interpretation and Application of Research Data as it Applies to Clinical Practice
Course Number
Course Title
Credit Hours
Name of Institution
EDUC G590MFT Research in Counseling & Guidance (MFT)
3
IPFW
EDUC G590
Research in Counseling & Guidance
3
IPFW
TOTAL: 10 Courses in the content areas representing a total of 30 credit hours
The previously mentioned content areas may be combined into any one (1) graduate level course, if the applicant can prove that the
course work was devoted to each content area.
One graduate level course of two (2) semester hours or three (3) quarter hours in the following areas.
Legal, Ethical, and Professional Standards Issues in the Practice of Marriage and Family Therapy or
an Equivalent Course Approved by the Board
Course Number
Course Title
Name of Institution
EDUC G502
Professional Orientation and Ethics
IPFW
Credit Hours
3
Appraisal and Assessment for Individual or Interpersonal Disorder or Dysfunction
Name of Institution
Course Number
Course Title
IPFW
EDUC G505
Individual Appraisal: Principles and Procedures
Credit Hours
3
I, The undersigned applicant for Marriage and Family Therapist’s licensure, do hereby certify that I have also completed the following:
A clinical practicum in Marriage and Family Therapy of at least five hundred (500) hours of face-to-face client hours with
individuals, couples, and families for the purpose of assessment and intervention, that was conducted over a period of one (1) year at an
average rate of ten (10) hours of clinical contact per week. Of the five hundred (500) hours, no more than fifty percent (50%) of this time
was spent with individuals. This practicum also included a minimum of one hundred (100) hours of supervision administered by a Licensed
Marriage and Family Therapist who has at least five (5) years of experience as a qualified supervisor.
Practicum and Internship Experience
Name of Institution
Course Number
IPFW
EDUC G524
IPFW
EDUC G525
IPFW
EDUC G525
IPFW
EDUC G550
IPFW
EDUC G551
Course Title
Practicum in Counseling
Advanced Counseling Practicum
Advanced Counseling Practicum
Internship in Counseling & Guidance
Advanced Internship in Counseling
Signature of Applicant
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
Date
Applicant Information
Name of Applicant: Last, First, Middle, Maiden
Social Security Number
LMFT application Rev. 9/01
APPENDIX J3
Indiana Health Professions Board – MFT Standards
FORM III - B
GRADUATE COURSE WORK CONTENT AREAS
State Form 50710 (12-01)
1.
Theoretical Foundations of Marriage and Family Therapy
Studies that provide an understanding of the epistemology of family therapy.
A.
Theories of individual and family development and transitions across the life-span
B.
Theories of family therapy
2.
Major Models of Family Therapy
Studies that provide an understanding of clinical practices and treatments of family therapy.
A.
Structural and Strategic Family Therapy
B.
Brief Family Therapy
C.
Solution Oriented Family Therapy
D.
Narrative Family Therapy
3.
Individual Development
Studies that provide an understanding of a person’s development.
A.
Life-span human development
B.
Child psychology and development
C.
Adolescent developmental stages
D.
Adult in mid-life or menopausal women, etc.
4.
Family Development and Family Relationships
Studies that provide an understanding of family development and varying relationships within the
family.
A.
Advanced family studies
B.
Family stages during the life cycle
5.
Clinical Problems
Studies that provide an understanding of problems affecting a family system.
A.
Treating the abusing family
B.
Family treatment of incest
C.
Clinical treatment of alcoholism and other addictions in the family
D.
Helping a family cope with crisis
6.
Collaboration with Other Disciplines
Studies that provide an understanding of family therapy approaches cooperating with other
professionals.
A.
Behavior disorders
B.
Medical management and family therapy in ADD and ADHD
C.
Psychological Testing and how it relates to borderline families
D.
Family therapy in a school setting
7.
Sexuality
Studies that provide an understanding of sexuality in the family.
A.
Human sexuality
B.
Treating sexual dysfunction
C.
Principles, practices, and applications of sexual abuse treatment
112
Indiana Health Professions Board – MFT Standards (continued)
8.
Gender and Sexual Orientation
Studies that provide an understanding of the range of sexual differences.
A.
Human sexuality
B.
Gender and transgender clinical problems
C.
Comparing and contrasting treatment regarding issues of heterosexuality, bisexuality, and
homosexuality
D.
Homosexual and bisexual couples and families
9.
Issues of Ethnicity, Race, Socioeconomic Status, and Culture
Studies in the area include, but are not limited to, the following:
A.
Special clinical problems pertaining to treatment of African American, Asian, and Hispanic
families
B.
Clinical problems of the working poor
C.
First generation immigrant families
10.
Therapy Techniques
Studies in this area include, but are not limited to, the following:
A.
Family therapy skills
B.
Family sculpting
C.
The use of genograms in family therapy
11.
Behavioral Research That Focuses on the Interpretation and Application of Research Data
Studies in this area include, but are not limited to, the following:
A.
Research methods in child and family studies
B.
Qualitative research in marriage and family studies
12.
Legal, Ethical, and Professional Standards and Issues in the Practice of Marriage and Family
Therapy
A.
Professional issues in marriage and family therapy
B.
Ethical issues in marriage and family therapy
13.
Appraisal and Assessment for Individual or Interpersonal Disorder or Dysfunction
A.
The use of the DSM in diagnosis
B.
Comparing and contrasting the GAF and the GARF
APPENDIX K
Licensure for School Counselors
State Contact: Professional Standards Board
251 E Ohio St Suite 201
Indianapolis IN 46204
(317) 232-9010
The internship requirement for all students regardless of their prior teaching credentials is 600 clock hours over one
academic school year in all three developmental levels (HS, MS, Elem). Of those hours, 240 hours must be spent working
directly with children in the role of school counselor. The distribution of the developmental levels can be established in
any way you and your site choose. For example, you can balance all three equally or spend the majority of your time at
one site and a few days or weeks at two others. The supervisor must be a licensed school counselor for at least two years
and meet on a weekly basis with you for one and one-half hours.
Past licensure in Indiana allowed a new graduate to complete an application and receive their Standard License renewable
every five years (Rules 46-47).
Professionalizing a license was possible after one and one-half years of full-time
employment and was renewable every ten years. The new licensure process (Rules 2000) will provide a school counseling
graduate with an interim license that allows them to work as a school counselor for two years while maintaining a portfolio
and being mentored by another school counselor at their new job site. The mentor will make a recommendation for
licensure to the state and a five year renewable license will be issued.
IPSB STANDARDS AND IPFW COURSES
IPSB STANDARDS FOR
SCHOOL SERVICES PROFESSIONALS
IPFW COURSES
Standard 1
EDUC P514; EDUC P515/P516; EDUC G575; EDUC G550;
EDUC G551; EDUC G524; EDUC G525; EDUC G503; EDUC G504
Standard 2
EDUC G562; EDUC G550; EDUC G551; EDUC G575; EDUC G524; EDUC
G525
Standard 3
EDUC G524; EDUC G525; EDUC G550; EDUC G551; EDUC G503; EDUC
G504; EDUC G502; EDUC G552; EDUC G562; EDUC G575
Standard 4
EDUC G505; EDUC G550; EDUC G551; EDUC G590; EDUC G562; EDUC
G503; EDUC G504
Standard 5
EDUC G503; EDUC G550; EDUC G551; EDUC G575; EDUC G504; EDUC
G532; EDUC G562; EDUC G524; EDUC G525
Standard 6
EDUC G550; EDUC G551; EDUC G502
Standard 7
EDUC G502; EDUC G550; EDUC G551; EDUC G575
IPSB STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL
COUNSELING PROFESSIONALS
IPFW COURSES
Standard 1
EDUC G502; EDUC G552; EDUC G503; EDUC G550; EDUC G551; EDUC
G575; EDUC P514; EDUC P516; EDUC G562
Standard 2
EDUC G502; EDUC G504; EDUC G550; EDUC G551; EDUC G524;
EDUC G525; EDUC G562; EDUC G575; EDUC G503
Standard 3
EDUC G575; EDUC G562; EDUC G550; EDUC G551; EDUC G532
APPENDIX L
STANDARDS FOR
SCHOOL SERVICES
AND
SCHOOL COUNSELING
PROFESSIONALS
STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL SERVICES PROFESSIONALS
LICENSING RULES 2002
T he Standards for School Services Professionals are designed to serve as a core set of standards for all school
services providers. These standards are not designed to serve as profession-specific standards in any school
services area.
Standard #1: Students and the Learning Process.
School Services Professionals promote the success of all students by facilitating the academic, emotional,
social, and physical development of the student and the quality and effectiveness of the learning
environment.
Performances
School Counseling Professionals facilitate, engage
intervention, and educational activities by means of:
in,
and
demonstrate
a
variety
of
prevention,
1.
Using effective communication skills (oral and written) with other educators, parents, and other support
and community social service agencies;
2.
Collaboration with both internal and external publics;
3.
Using effective instructional techniques with groups and individuals;
4.
Protecting the rights and confidentiality of students, parents, and school personnel;
5.
Recognizing a professional code of ethics which results in ethical decision making.
Knowledge
School Counseling Professionals have knowledge and understanding of:
1.
Human growth and development and the impact of mental and physical disorders as related to students;
2.
Student behavior and classroom management;
3.
Student emotional, behavioral, and learning disabilities including biological bases of behavior;
4.
Learning theory and instructional techniques;
5.
Curriculum development and implementation in the schools;
6.
The role of technology in promoting both student learning and professional growth;
7.
Learning goals in a diverse and pluralistic society.
Standards for School Services Professionals – Licensing Rules 2002 (continued)
Dispositions
School Services Professionals believe in and are committed to:
1.
The dignity and worth of all students;
2.
The proposition that all students can learn;
3.
Sensitivity to the needs of all students;
4.
The acceptance of different learning and teaching styles;
5.
The importance of the teacher and student relationship;
6.
The understanding that societal forces and family issues influence learning.
Standard #2: Education and Learning Systems and Organizations.
School Counseling Professionals understand the breadth and scope of education systems and learning
organizations. They are able to facilitate processes and engage in practices that promote lifelong
development and learning.
Performances
School Counseling Professionals demonstrate the ability to:
1.
Practice collaborative approaches to the development of strategies that will lead to improved education
and learning systems and organizations;
2.
Improve educational programs through decisions and actions based on assessment, data collection, and
empirical evidence;
3.
Affirm the dignity and worth of all students by engaging in practices that value the contributions of all;
4.
Operate educational programs efficiently within the economic parameters established by school
governance;
5.
Communicate effectively with all stakeholders in an education environment;
6.
Engage stakeholders in problem solving;
7.
Practice positive interpersonal relations;
8.
Promote the purpose of schooling and the goals of education and learning systems and organizations.
Standards for School Services Professionals – Licensing Rules 2002 (continued)
Knowledge
School Counseling Professionals have knowledge and understanding of:
1.
The role and importance of schooling in a democratic society;
2.
The implications of public support for school funding;
3.
The establishment and maintenance of a safe and drug free environment in order to provide a positive
school climate;
4.
The impact of interest groups on educational systems and schools;
5.
The structure, governance, and organizational principles of schools;
6.
The use of technology to facilitate learning and school management.
Dispositions
School Services Professionals believe in and are committed to:
1.
Equitable treatment for all individuals;
2.
Continuous self-evaluation and professional improvement;
3.
Broad-based collaboration and cooperation;
4.
The practice of professional, ethical, and positive human relations, communication, and interpersonal skills.
Standard #3: Family and Community.
School Counseling Professionals work within the educational system to promote lifelong development and
learning. They collaborate with families and work with community resources to respond to student needs.
Performances
School Counseling Professionals demonstrate the ability to:
1.
Empower families to be involved in collaborative approaches to their children’s development;
2.
Advocate for and protect the rights of students and their families;
3.
Maintain positive working relationships with community-based agencies;
4.
Work collaboratively with other professionals and programs to benefit students;
5.
Communicate issues of families to other school personnel.
Standards for School Services Professionals – Licensing Rules 2002 (continued)
Knowledge
School Counseling Professionals have knowledge and understanding of:
1.
Family systems and how they impact student growth;
2.
Rights of parents and students;
3.
Availability of local and extended agencies, services, and resources;
4.
How to identify and work with various community service providers;
5.
Diverse cultures and cultural factors which influence student and family relationships with schools;
6.
Evolving social and demographic issues.
Dispositions
School Services Professionals believe in and are committed to:
1.
Sensitivity to and appreciation of issues of diversity;
2.
Respect for the needs of individual students and families;
3.
Sensitivity to the issues, needs, and workings of community agencies;
4.
Using positive approaches when working with students and families to resolve problems and achieve
solutions;
5.
A proactive position toward programs which bring together families and community resources.
Standard #4: Assessment.
School Counseling Professionals understand formal and informal assessment techniques and the theory
and research upon which administration, application, and interpretation of such techniques are based. A
variety of assessment techniques are employed within the specific area of competence of the professional
as appropriate for the given situation.
Performances
School Counseling Professionals demonstrate the ability to:
1.
Develop an assessment plan designed to assess students within their area of competence;
2.
Administer assessment instruments in an appropriate manner;
3.
Interpret results of assessment in a manner understandable to diverse populations;
Standards for School Services Professionals – Licensing Rules 2002 (continued)
4.
Apply results of assessment to curriculum, placement, and intervention decisions and plans.
Knowledge
School Counseling Professionals have knowledge and understanding of:
1.
A variety of approaches to assessment and are firmly grounded in a theoretical orientation within which
student problems may be conceptualized and assessed;
2.
Standards for assessment as required for their specific area of competence;
3.
Technical properties of assessment instruments including validity, reliability, test development, scoring
scales, norms, and comparability of instruments within their area of competence;
4.
Appropriate uses of assessment instruments, results, and interpretations based on knowledge from test
materials, research, and standards for assessment;
5.
Issues related to assessment of students from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds and individuals
with disabilities;
6.
Rights of individuals in assessment situations.
Dispositions
School Services Professionals believe in and are committed to:
1.
Recognizing the limits of their area of competence and referring or seeking consultation when necessary;
2.
Appreciating the limits of assessment instruments and the appropriate uses and interpretations of results
obtained through assessment;
3.
Valuing the need for multiple forms of assessment in evaluating students.
Standard #5: Intervention.
School Counseling Professionals understand intervention and prevention options available to address the
needs of students and the theory and research upon which such interventions are based. Interventions are
employed as appropriate within the professional’s area of competence.
Performances
School Counseling Professionals demonstrate the ability to:
1.
Develop and implement intervention strategies for individuals, groups, and systems;
2.
Evaluate interventions before, during, and following implementation with individuals, groups, and systems;
Standards for School Services Professionals – Licensing Rules 2002 (continued)
3.
Use appropriate interviewing and counseling skills;
4.
Collaborate with other professionals to determine and address needs of individuals, groups, and systems;
5.
Work effectively with parents and others to determine and address needs of students, families, and
communities;
6.
Determine and address the needs of individuals, groups, and systems in conflict and crisis situations;
7.
Assist others in accessing school and community resources.
Knowledge
School Counseling Professionals have knowledge and understanding of:
1.
A variety of theoretical approaches to intervention and have mastered at least one theoretical orientation
within which student problems may be conceptualized and interventions may be developed and
implemented;
2.
Group processes, dynamics, and patterns of behavior and the theory and research related to individual
interactions within groups;
3.
Theory and research related to consultation service delivery, models, processes, and roles within the
relationship;
4.
The impact of crises on individuals, groups, and systems, as well as current best practice in developing,
implementing, and evaluating crisis intervention plans;
5.
The nature of conflict between individuals and groups and techniques to prevent and resolve conflict as
related to the learning environment;
6.
School and community resources which may be accessed or developed to provide assistance to students;
7.
Procedures to determine needs of individuals, groups, and communities, and strategies to develop
interventions based on needs;
8.
Evaluation procedures for programs and interventions.
Dispositions
School Services Professionals believe in and are committed to:
1.
Valuing and respecting all persons;
2.
Exploring a range of prevention and intervention strategies designed to maintain the educational
opportunities for all students;
Standards for School Services Professionals – Licensing Rules 2002 (continued)
3.
Recognizing the limits of their expertise and referring or seeking consultation within the schools;
4.
Respecting the role, knowledge, expertise, and contribution of other professionals within the schools.
Standard #6: Legal Issues.
School Counseling Professionals are aware of and have an understanding of local, state, and federal laws
that affect schools and the educational process.
Performances
School Counseling Professionals:
1.
Advocate for and promote the rights and privacy of children and families;
2.
Demonstrate professionalism in working relationships with community agencies;
3.
Engage in activities which allow for collaboration with other staff and agencies to benefit students;
4.
Maintain accurate and appropriate documentation for procedural accuracy.
Knowledge
School Counseling Professionals have knowledge and understanding of:
1.
State laws and administrative rules that impact students and schools;
2.
Federal laws and regulations that impact students and schools;
3.
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act;
4.
Civil and criminal liability laws as related to students and schools.
Dispositions
School Services Professionals believe in and are committed to:
1.
Protecting the legal rights of students through enforcing state statutes related to child abuse;
2.
Protecting the privacy rights of students and families through adherence to the Federal Education and
Privacy Act;
3.
Recognition of personal limitations in interpreting education and public health laws.
123
Standards for School Services Professionals – Licensing Rules 2002 (continued)
Standard #7: Ethics and Professionalism.
School Counseling Professionals conduct themselves in an ethical and professional manner.
Performances
School Counseling Professionals demonstrate:
1.
The ability to articulate ethical standards and beliefs;
2.
The application of ethical principles to ethical dilemmas;
3.
Continual professional growth through personal study, in-service training, and participation in professional
associations.
Knowledge
School Counseling Professionals have knowledge and understanding of:
1.
Ethical standards of their respective professions;
2.
Laws and regulations regarding confidentiality and release of student information;
3.
The strength and limitations of their training and experience;
4.
Continuing education opportunities.
Dispositions
School Services Professionals believe in and are committed to:
1.
The right of each student to be treated with respect and dignity;
2.
The proposition that all students deserve the best service that can be offered;
3.
The student’s right of choice and responsibility for decisions;
4.
Continuing personal and professional growth and development;
5.
Exercising professional judgment and conviction even in the presence of personal and professional risk;
6.
The professional practice in which they are competent.
STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL COUNSELING PROFESSIONALS
LICENSING RULES 2002
The Standards for School Counseling Professionals are an extension of the core standards for School Service
Professionals. Individuals seeking licensure in School Counseling must meet both the core set of standards for
School Services Professionals and the Standards for School Counseling Professionals. The Standards for School
Counseling Professionals reflect the uniqueness of school counseling and the roles and functions of the school
counselor.
Standard #1
School Counseling Professionals are leaders who promote educational success for all students by
developing and managing school counseling programming related to academic, career, social, and
emotional growth.
School Counseling Professionals use facilitative, consultative, and collaborative
leadership skills to provide a certainty of educational opportunities for all students.
Dispositions
School Counseling Professionals believe in and are committed to:
1.
The proposition that all students can reach their potential;
2.
The worth of students of all racial, ethnic, and cultural groups;
3.
Advocacy for all students;
4.
Professional identity, professional growth, and ethical practice;
5.
The value of cooperation;
6.
Their leadership role in systemic change;
7.
The importance of data in decision-making;
8.
Continuous school improvement;
9.
A safe school environment.
Knowledge
School Counseling Professionals have knowledge and understanding of:
1.
Change theory and educational reform;
2.
School counseling as it relates to the total educational program;
3.
Lifespan growth and development;
4.
Ethnicity and culture and their relationship to the learning environment;
5.
Self as a change agent within the school community;
6.
Effective skills in leadership, program and resource management, and classroom management;
Standards for School Counseling Professionals – Licensing Rules 2002 (continued)
7.
Facilitation, collaboration, and consultation;
8.
The process of collection, analysis, and utilization of data in decision-making;
9.
Current literature, research, and resources, such as laws, ethical standards, and position statements
related to school counseling, continuous school improvement, and safe schools;
10.
Effective and ethical use of technology and its implications in academic, career, and social development.
Performances
School Counseling Professionals demonstrate the ability to:
1.
Develop, manage, and evaluate the school counseling program in the context of the community culture
and the total educational program;
2.
Promote positive relationships among the various cultural and ethnic groups in the school community;
3.
Evaluate, select, and use appropriate technology;
4.
Model and practice advocacy for all students;
5.
Promote teaching, learning, and behavioral strategies that reach all students;
6.
Analyze, interpret, and utilize data for decision-making;
7.
Recognize the need for improvement, identify improvement strategies, and facilitate a change process;
8.
Foster the application of developmentally appropriate policies, programs, and procedures;
9.
Team and collaborate with other educators, community leaders, and parents for the good of students;
10.
Establish and maintain a professional identity;
11.
Continually improve their knowledge and skills;
12.
Use current literature, research, and resources, such as laws, ethical standards, and position statements, to
promote school counseling programming;
13.
Convene and facilitate an advisory group;
14.
Provide school counseling services which are appropriately balanced among leadership, student assistance
services, and educational and career services.
Standards for School Counseling Professionals – Licensing Rules 2002 (continued)
Standard #2
School Counseling Professionals collaboratively design, coordinate, implement, and evaluate student
assistance services.
Dispositions
School Counseling Professionals believe that:
1.
Student assistance services must be provided in accordance with the highest ethical standards as defined
by the profession;
2.
Healthy physical, emotional, and social development support academic achievement;
3.
Prevention, assessment, intervention, and referral are components of a comprehensive school counseling
program;
4.
School services professionals, working collaboratively, positively influence the wellness of students and
the school environment;
5.
Family, culture, and community impact the educational process and thus can be mobilized to improve
achievement;
6.
Mental health problems and at-risk behaviors, such as substance abuse, interfere with healthy physical,
emotional, and social development as well as achievement;
7.
Consideration of ethnic and cultural diversity is essential to student assistance.
Knowledge
School Counseling Professionals have knowledge and understanding of:
1.
Ethical standards as defined by the profession;
2.
Physical, emotional, and social development throughout the life span;
3.
Current counseling theories and techniques and their appropriate application;
4.
Current treatments available to address mental health problems and at-risk behaviors such as substance
abuse;
5.
Mental health and substance abuse conditions and their impact on the educational process;
6.
The impact of family dynamics on development and achievement;
7.
The dynamics of and appropriate interventions with various cultural and ethnic groups and with special
populations in the school community;
Standards for School Counseling Professionals – Licensing Rules 2002 (continued)
8.
Strategies for supporting the development and maintenance of a safe and positive climate within the
school;
9.
Theories and research related to the learning process.
Performances
School Counseling Professionals demonstrate the ability to:
1.
Provide student assistance services in an ethical manner;
2.
Provide services from a multicultural perspective;
3.
Use current literature, research, and resources, such as laws, standards, and position statements, to
provide student assistance services;
4.
Implement prevention programming to support healthy physical, social, emotional, and academic
development for all students;
5.
Develop and implement a crisis management plan;
6.
Coordinate student assistance services using a team approach and supervise the provision of those
services;
7.
Utilize systemic approaches to recruit family, school, cultural, and community support for student wellness
and achievement;
8.
Identify and intervene with individuals exhibiting at-risk behaviors, including people affected by alcohol
and/or drug use;
9.
Assess the physical, emotional, and social level of individuals and make and follow up on referrals as
appropriate;
10.
Implement individual and group counseling strategies;
11.
Consult effectively with students, school staff, families, and others;
12.
Maintain a current referral list of community resources and assist individuals and families to access those
resources.
Standard #3
School Counseling Professionals collaboratively design, coordinate, implement, and evaluate education
and career services.
Standards for School Counseling Professionals – Licensing Rules 2002 (continued)
Dispositions
School Counseling Professionals believe that:
1.
The purpose of education includes preparing students for employment, developing responsible citizenship,
and creating lifelong learners;
2.
All students deserve assistance with academic, career, social, and emotional development;
3.
Productive educational and career development occurs when students are supported by families,
educators, and communities that have high expectations;
4.
All students deserve knowledge of all educational and career options;
5.
All careers and educational opportunities are valuable;
6.
All students must receive educational content that will prepare them for a wide range of occupational
choices;
7.
All students need a balance of education and enriching activities such as community service, leisure, and
the arts.
Knowledge
School Counseling Professionals have knowledge and understanding of:
1.
The development, coordination, and evaluation of educational and career curricula, advisement, and
mentoring services;
2.
The involvement of all educators and of community members in the collaborative development and
delivery of educational and career services;
3.
Educational content and opportunities at all levels (pre-K through 16+);
4.
Career opportunities, labor market trends, and global economics;
5.
Multicultural and diversity issues in education and career development, such as individual and institutional
racism, classism, and sexism;
6.
Methods for helping all students recognize and utilize their personal career interests, aptitudes, and
preferences;
7.
Methods for helping all students develop educational and career goals and specific plans for reaching
those goals;
8.
Learning styles and learning strategies and their application to educational achievement;
Standards for School Counseling Professionals – Licensing Rules 2002 (continued)
9.
Employability and academic success skills, such as personal management and team building;
10.
The effective use of technology in educational and career services.
Performances
School Counseling Professionals demonstrate the ability to:
1.
Involve all educators and community members in the collaborative development and delivery of
educational and career services;
2.
Develop, coordinate, and evaluate effective educational and career curricula;
3.
Develop, coordinate, and evaluate advisement and mentoring services;
4.
Analyze the strengths and needs of students from diverse populations and provide unbiased,
developmentally appropriate career and educational services;
5.
Insure educational opportunities at all developmental levels;
6.
Help students and families understand career opportunities, labor market trends, and global economics;
7.
Help students and families understand a variety of educational opportunities and how to prepare for them;
8.
Increase student awareness of the relationship among personal interests, values, and talents and their
application to educational and career choices;
9.
Help students recognize and utilize their personal career interests, aptitudes, and preferences;
10.
Help all students develop educational and career goals and specific plans for reaching those goals;
11.
Assess learning styles and serve as a consultant in the application of teaching/learning strategies to
enhance educational achievement;
12.
Utilize technology in the effective delivery of educational and career services;
13.
Discern and teach employability skills at all level;.
14.
Develop, coordinate, implement, and evaluate educational and career services in an ethical manner as
defined by the profession.
APPENDIX M
IPFW Counselor Education Program Portfolio Review and Evaluation
Student Name
Year in Program (select one) 1st
Portfolios were collected in
2nd
3rd
Date of Portfolio collection
Student Advisor
Evaluation Status:
/ 95 pts.
Accept (Portfolio is of good quality and complete)
/ 90-94 pts. Revise & Resubmit (Portfolio is of good quality and/or incomplete)
/< 89 pts. Reject (Portfolio is of poor quality and/or incomplete)
Checklist
1.
Portfolio is in a 3-ring pocket binder
(1 pt.)
2.
Past Faculty Portfolio Reviews (Appendix M) in notebook pocket
3.
Cover page is on the outside of the notebook
4.
Cover page: Student Name, MFT or School, Advisor Name, “Portfolio”
5.
Table of Contents
6.
Notebook Tabs to match Table of Contents Entries
7.
List of State Standards appropriate for student’s degree area (IPSB–Appendix L or
IHPB–Appendix J3)
(5 pts.)
8.
Required portfolio items with a reflection page for each showing student growth and learning. Reflection
page will contain (1) a brief description of the item, (2) analysis of what the student learned, and (3) how
the evidence demonstrates competence in meeting the appropriate state standard. (Items 2 pts. each,
Reflections 2 pts. each)
(1 pt.)
(1 pt.)
(1 pt.)
(1 pt.)
(1 pt.)
G502 Final Ethics Paper
Reflection page
G503 SFBT Application Paper
Reflection page
G505 Testing Protocol_______ Reflection page_____
G552 Career Plan
(School Only) Reflection page
G590 Research Proposal
Reflection page
G524/525 Psychosocial_______ Reflection page_____
G524/525 Peer Supervision Forms
Reflection page
G562 Needs Assessment
(School Only) Reflection page
G567 Final Paper
(MFT Only) Reflection page
G575 Any paper
Reflection page
G590MFT Any Paper
(MFT Only) Reflection page
G532 Group Proposal
Reflection page
G550/G551 Site Supervisor Evaluations
Reflection page
9.
Three additional items from three separate courses not listed here that represent a state standard not met
by required portfolio items. Items can be from required courses and must include a reflection page for
each. (Items 2 pts. each, Reflections 2 pts. each)
10.
A reflection paper that reviews your experience in the counselor education program (Appendix S).
(10 pts.)
11.
A reflection paper completed in G551 reviewing the conceptual framework. (10 pts.)
132
APPENDIX N
Student Proficiencies Annual Review
COMPLETE AND RETURN TO YOUR ADVISOR BY APRIL
Student Name
Advisor
The proficiencies in this evaluation reflect the course requirements of the IPFW Counselor
Education Program’s Master’s Degrees in School Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy
Counseling. They have been developed from the following licensing/accrediting organizations and
the IPFW School of Education Conceptual Framework: Council for the Accreditation of Counseling
and Related Educational Programs (CACREP); National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC);
Indiana Health Professions Board (IHPB); Indiana Professional Standards Board (IPSB); and the
Commission on the Accreditation of Marriage and Family Therapy Education (COAMFTE).
Evaluate what you believe to be your current attainment of the following proficiencies in the IPFW
Counselor Education Program. Rate yourself on each item by shading the appropriate letter on
your Scantron Form that coincides with a specific item number. Both Master’s Degrees are reflected
in this evaluation. While there is some overlap, there are also differences. Some items may not be
related to your degree or current level of training. The designation for “not applicable (N/A)” is
“0." There is no “0" on the Scantron Form. Please do not mark any letter for an item that you
consider not applicable (N/A) to your degree or current level of training.
Please use your SCANTRON Form for the following:
Place Your SS# Under “I.D. Number” On Your SCANTRON Form
1.
Degree: MFT Counseling
A
2.
Program Admission Year: 2002
Or School Counseling
A
2003
B
B
2004
C
A
B
C
D
Excellent
Good
E
Poor
Other
0
N/A
D
SOE
CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK
3.
I have an understanding of the influence of
society on the professional community................................................................................................................
(Democracy and Community) IPFW: G502, G550, G551, G563
4.
I participate in critical reflection by engaging
in investigating, inquiring, challenging,
critiquing, and questioning opportunities.............................................................................................................
(Habits of Mind) IPFW: G502, P514, G524, G525, G550, G551
5.
I have an appreciation and understanding
of multiple approaches to instruction...................................................................................................................
(Pedagogy) IPFW: G503, G504, G505, G590 (MFT), G562, G563
6.
I process and construct my own knowledge
base.......................................................................................................................................................................
(Knowledge) IPFW: G590, G590 (MFT), G562, G563, P575
7.
I have been exposed to teaching and
learning techniques through field-based or
clinical experiences..............................................................................................................................................
(Experience) IPFW: G524, G525, G550, G551
A
B
C
D
E
Excellent
Good
Poor
8.
0
N/A
I am developing a combination of
knowledge, theory, and practice that will
assist me to address the professional
challenges of the twenty-first
century..................................................................................................................................................................
(Leadership) IPFW: G503, G504, G567, G552, G532, G570, G524, G525, G550, G551
CACREP & NBCC*/IHPB**/COAMFTE***/IPSB****
9.
I understand the professional role of a
counselor/therapist as it pertains to advocacy
for clients, the profession related to public
and private policy, and institutional and social
barriers..................................................................................................................................................................
(*Professional Identity;**Collaboration with other Disciplines;***300.00, 300.02;
****STANDARDS 2, 3, & 8) IPFW: G563, G502, G562
10.
I understand the history and philosophy of
counseling/therapy................................................................................................................................................
(*Professional Identity;**Theoretical Foundations of Marriage and Family Therapy;***310.02,
310.03, 310.04, 320.03;****STANDARD 5) IPFW: G504
11.
I understand the ethical standards of my
profession and their related applications..............................................................................................................
(*Professional Identity;**Legal, Ethical, and Professional Standards and Issues in the Practice of
Marriage and Family Therapy;***340.02, 340.03, 340.04, 340.05;****STANDARDS 6 & 7)
IPFW: G502
12.
I understand multicultural and pluralistic
issues and their applications as they relate
to self and others...................................................................................................................................................
(*Social & Cultural Diversity;**Issues of Ethnicity, Race, S.E.S., and Culture;***300.001,
320.07;****STANDARDS 1, 3, & 9) IPFW: G575
13.
I understand theories of individual and family
development and transitions across the life
span and strategies for facilitating
optimum development..........................................................................................................................................
(*Human Growth and Development;**Individual Development, Family Development, and Family
Relations;***330.02, 330.03;****STANDARDS 1 & 9) IPFW: P514, P515, P516
14.
I understand career development theories and
decision-making models, information resources,
related interrelationships, assessment
instruments and techniques, program planning,
organization, implementation, administration,
and evaluation......................................................................................................................................................
(*Career Development;****STANDARDS 4, 5, & 10) IPFW: G552
15.
I understand the essential counseling skills and
theories required for successful planning,
intervention, termination, and consultation..........................................................................................................
(*Helping Relationships;**Therapy Techniques;****STANDARD 5) IPFW: G503, G504,
G567, G532
135
A
B
C
D
E
Excellent
Good
Poor
0
N/A
16.
I understand the major models of marriage
and family therapy and the application of systems
theories to my profession.....................................................................................................................................
(*Helping Relationships;**Major Models of Marriage and Family Therapy;***320.03)
IPFW: G504
17.
I understand the dynamics, theories,
leadership styles, and methods of various
types and groups...................................................................................................................................................
(*Group Work;***360.02;****STANDARD 5) IPFW: G532
18.
I understand the historical perspectives
of standardized and nonstandardized
testing, statistical concepts, psychometrics, and
the administration and interpretation of tests.......................................................................................................
(*Assessment;**Appraisal and Assessment for Individuals;****STANDARD 4) IPFW: G505
19.
I understand the general principles and
methods of case conceptualization,
assessment, and the diagnoses of mental
and emotional status.............................................................................................................................................
(*Assessment;**Appraisal and Assessment for Individuals, Interpersonal Disorder or
Dysfunction;***320.0;****STANDARDS 4 & 5) IPFW: G505
20.
I understand the significance of creating,
interpreting, and applying research to
improve counseling/therapy effectiveness............................................................................................................
(*Research and Program Evaluation;**Behavioral Research that Focused on the Interpretation and
Application of Research Data as it Applies to Clinical Practice;***350.02, 350.03, 350.04;****STANDARDS 4
& 5) IPFW: G590, G590 (MFT)
21.
I understand how to treat a variety of
clinical problems from a systemic perspective.....................................................................................................
(***320.02 & 320.05) IPFW: G563
22.
I understand issues of human sexuality,
including gender and sexual orientations
issues, and how these issues impact
clinical work.........................................................................................................................................................
(**Sexuality, Gender, and Sexual Orientation;***330.05.1Sexuality) IPFW: G570, G575
The following IPFW courses are required in the portfolio evaluation process: G502, G503, G505, G524, G525, G532,
G550, G551, G552, G562, G567, G590, G590 (MFT).
APPENDIX O
Faculty Feedback of Student Proficiencies Annual Review
Student Name
Evaluation Year
Date
Proficiency Attainment:
Proficiencies
Above Program Expectations
Meets Program Expectations
Below Program Expectations
Knowledge:
Attainment of Curricular
Content
Maintains all A’s;
Passes comp;
Frequent & consistent
demonstration of course content
comprehension through class
responses.
Mostly A’s;
Passes comp;
Consistent demonstration of
course content comprehension
through class responses.
Mostly B’s;
Does not pass all sections of
comp;
Shows limited understanding of
course content through class
responses.
Performance:
Demonstration of Curricular
Content (e.g.: internship,
practica, class interaction)
Passes review;
Skills exceed expectations for
students at this level of training.
Passes review;
Skills are consistent for students
at this level of training.
Fails portfolio review;
Skills fall below expectations
for students at this level of
training.
Disposition:
Student Models the Attributes of
a Professional
Counselor/Therapist
Shows appropriate (
) with
learning and mentoring
progress;
Shows appreciation for
knowledge and skill in the
profession;
Takes responsibility for one’s
own behavior;
Shows appreciation for diversity
and similarity;
Demonstrates ability to
effectively collaborate with
others.
(over)
138
Faculty Comments:
Action Taken:
Student Response:
Advisor Signature
Date
Student Signature
Date
APPENDIX P
COUNSELOR EDUCATION STUDENT REQUEST
FOR PROGRAM REVISION OR WITHDRAWAL
Student Name
Date of Request
Current Master's Program (check one):
School Counseling
Agency/MFT Counseling
Current Year and Semester of Master's Program:
Semester
Year
Description of Revision Request:
Student Approval
Date
Advisor Approval
Date
Coordinator Approval
Date
APPENDIX Q
INTERNSHIP TAKE-HOME FINAL PAPER
Your effort in the IPFW Counselor Education program has resulted in personal growth and increased
knowledge/skill in counseling.
The purpose of this paper is to review this process with a summary of the past and a preparation for your
future. The paper should be typed and double-spaced with no maximum limit.
Use the following questions to guide you:
1.
How have your personal and/or professional goals and perceptions changed regarding counseling
as a result of this program?
2.
What experiences (classes, workshops, etc.) were the most helpful to you personally and/or
professionally?
3.
Which counseling theory is currently the most predominant influence in your growth and
development as a counselor? What factors have played a part in your selection of this theory (e.g.,
your personality, therapists, professors, personal experiences, books, classes, etc.)?
4.
What growth areas do you see in the IPFW Counselor Education program, and how would you
strengthen them?
5.
What do you see yourself doing in five years?
APPENDIX Q
CALIFORNIA RISK ESTIMATOR FOR SUICIDE
Overview
The California Risk Estimator for Suicide, developed by JA Motto et al, is a 15-item interviewer-rated scale
to assess risk of suicide in depressed or suicidal patients. The scale items include demographic
characteristics (age, occupation), psychosocial factors (stress, financial status), and clinical features (sleep
time, suicidal thoughts). Items are rated based upon clinical interview. Each item is given a weighted
score, with a total score used to assess relative risk of suicide. A primary strength of the Risk Estimator is
its extreme brevity, although there is minimal information on validity/reliability of the scale. As with all
suicide risk assessment scales, the Risk Estimator should not be considered a solitary assessment and
should be utilized in concert with a comprehensive clinical evaluation.
General Applications
The California Risk Estimator for Suicide is used to assess suicide risk.
Selected Psychometric Properties
Items from the scale by Motto, et al, were identified from a large sample of psychiatric inpatients, of whom
nearly 5% committed suicide during a two-year-long follow-up period. Validity/reliability has not been
clearly established.
References
Motto JA, Heilbron DC, and Juster JP, “Development of a Clinical Instrument to Estimate Suicide
Risk,” Am J Psychiatry, 1985, 142(6): 680-6.
Copyright
Jerome A. Motto
American Journal of Psychiatry
1400 K Street, NW
Washington, DC 20005
Scale Generally Done By
Clinician or trained rater
Time To Complete Scale
Less than 5 minutes
Representative Study Utilizing Scale
Clark DC, Young MA, Scheftner WA, et al, “A Field Test of Motto’s Risk Estimator for
Suicide,” Am J Psychiatry, 1987, 144(7): 923-6.
THE CALIFORNIA RISK ESTIMATOR FOR SUICIDE
Instructions
1.
The California Risk Estimator for Suicide is designed to estimate the risk of suicide in adults aged
18-70, during a two-year period following the time of assessment.
2.
The scale is primarily applicable to persons known to be at some risk, such as those in a serious
depressive state, having suicidal thoughts or impulses, or having made a recent suicide attempt.
3.
The scale is to be administered by a clinician, not self-administered. Responses to the items in the
first column are best determined in the course of a clinical interview. The information need not be
obtained in the listed order.
4.
The subjective judgment of the interviewer is to be used throughout in categorizing the response, as
data provided in the clinical situation may be incomplete, ambiguous, or conflicting.
5.
For the one most appropriate response category in the second column, the indicated “assigned
score” in the third column should be entered into the last column as the “actual score.” If any data
are missing or unobtainable, score that item zero.
6.
Total the 15 actual scores and determine from the Table of Risk what category of risk is scored.
This is expressed in three ways:
a.
b.
c.
Numerically, on a score of one to ten, representing the decile of risk;
Descriptively, from “Very Low” to “Very High”; and
An estimated percentage of risk during the two years following assessment.
The California Risk Estimator for Suicide is intended as a supplement to, not a substitute for, clinical
judgment. A thorough evaluation is indicated in any serious emotional disturbance. Individual uniqueness
suggests that when the scale is not consistent with clinical judgment, clinical judgment should be given
precedence.
Item
Response Category
Assigned Score
1. Age (last birthday)
Find score in Age-Score table
See Age-Score table
2. Occupation
Executive/Administrator
Professional
Owner of business
Semiskilled worker
Other
48
48
48
48
0
3. Sexual orientation
Bisexual, sexually active
Homosexual, not sexually active
Other
65
65
0
4. Financial resources
None or negative (in debt)
0 to $100
Over $100
0
35
70
Actual Score
5. Threat of significant
financial loss
Yes
No
Item
63
0
Response Category
Assigned Score
6. Stress unique to
subject’s circumstances
Severe
Other
63
0
7. Hours of sleep per
night (approximate)
0-2
3-5
6 or more
0
37
74
8. Change of weight
during present episode of
stress (approximate)
Weight gain
Less than 10% loss
Other
60
60
0
9. Ideas of persecution or
reference
Moderate or severe
Other
45
0
10. Intensity of present
suicidal impulses
Questionable, moderate, or severe
Other
100
0
11. If current suicide
attempt made,
seriousness of intent to die
Unequivocal
Ambivalent, weighted toward
suicide
Other or not applicable
88
12. Number of prior
psychiatric
hospitalizations
None
1
2
3 or more
0
21
43
64
13. Result of prior
efforts to obtain help
Poor, unsatisfactory or variable
Other or not applicable
55
0
14. Emotional disorder in
family history
Depression
Alcoholism
Other
45
45
0
15. Interviewer’s
reaction to the person
Highly positive
Moderately or slightly positive
Neutral or negative
0
42
85
Actual Score
88
0
Total Score
TABLE OF RISK
Total Score
Decile of Risk
Relative Risk
Approximate Suicide Rate
0-271
1
Very low
Less than 1%
272-311
2
Low
1% to 2.5%
312-344
3
345-377
4
Moderate
2.5% to 5%
378-407
5
408-435
6
436-465
7
466-502
8
503-553
9
Over 553
10
High
5% to 10%
Very high
Over 10%
AGE-SCORE TABLE
Age
Score
Age
Score
Age
Score
18
0
36
45
54
80
19
3
37
47
55
81
20
6
38
49
56
83
21
9
39
51
57
85
22
12
40
53
58
86
23
14
41
55
59
88
24
17
42
57
60
90
25
20
43
59
61
91
26
22
44
61
62
93
27
25
45
63
63
95
28
27
46
65
64
96
29
29
47
67
65
98
30
32
48
69
66
99
31
34
49
71
67
101
32
36
50
72
68
102
33
39
51
74
69
104
34
41
52
76
70
106
35
43
53
78
Copyright c. 1982, Jerome A. Motto; c. 1985, American Psychiatric Association, from Motto JA, Heilbron DC, and Juster JP,
“Development of a Clinical Instrument to Estimate Suicide Risk,” Am J Psychiatry, 1985, 142(6): 680-6.
Reprinted with permission.
APPENDIX R
NO-HARM CONTRACT
(Expanded and Adapted from Johnson & Maile, 1987)
I,
, agree not to harm myself in any way, attempt to
kill myself, or kill myself during the period from
to
(the time of my next appointment). I agree that for any reason, if the appointed
session is postponed, cancelled, etc., that this period is extended until the next direct meeting with
.
In this period of time I agree to care for myself, promising to eat well and to get enough sleep each night.
I agree to make social contact with the following individuals:
I agree to rid my presence of all things I could use to harm or kill myself.
I agree that if I am having a rough time and come to the point I am going to break any of these promises, I
will call and make significant contact with any of the following individuals:
at
#
at
#
at
#
Or, if I cannot contact these individuals, I will immediately call Park Center’s 24-Hour Emergency
Response (MIT) at 471-9440.
I agree that these conditions are important, worth doing, and are a contract I am willing to make and keep.
By my word and honor I intend to keep this contract.
Signed
Date
Witnessed by
Date
APPENDIX Q
JOB DESCRIPTION FOR CLINIC MANAGER
1.
Order any forms that need replenishing.
2.
Check folders from previous semester to be certain they are current and signed properly.
3.
Call second-year students to make sure they have insurance.
4.
The first week of class, attend each Practicum and explain the different forms and clinic
procedures.
5.
Check phone messages on clinic phone and office phone twice a day when away from office.
6.
Explain to new clients how the clinic is run, the videotaping, and bug in the ear.
7.
The week before a new semester, call returning clients and new clients to set up appointments.
8.
Inform the practicum supervisor about any new clients.
9.
For new clients, fill out intake cards and set up a new folder.
10.
Mail out a packet of information to each new client. Include a letter, client rights and
responsibilities form, police and safety brochure, and a counseling clinic brochure.
11.
Enter all new clients in the database.
12.
Keep an updated log of each client, day and time of appointment, and which therapist they see.
13.
Check clinic manager folder in file cabinet for messages from student counselors or supervisors,
or for cases that need attention.
14.
Make sure there are enough supplies in the clinic (such as Kleenex).
15.
If there is a problem with any video equipment, call the Learning Resource Center to have it
fixed.
16.
Clean the clinic a couple times a month.
17.
Fill out Quality Assurance Forms once a semester making sure all forms are properly signed
and dated, in proper order, and that all forms are completed as necessary at the proper time.
18.
Keep the library card index up to date.
19.
The manager will engage in several forms of marketing and public relations.
20.
Make sure there are IPFW Community Counseling Center brochures on display throughout the
IPFW campus.
21.
At the beginning of the fall semester, mail out a letter describing the IPFW Community
Counseling Center to all schools in the area. Include several brochures.
APPENDIX T
PRACTICUM ASSIGNMENT CHART
Place “x” in box if no-show
Write “late” in box if late
DATE
Time
C (Mirror)
1.
5:30
2.
5:40
3.
6:30
4.
1.
6:40
2.
6:50
3.
7:40
4.
1.
7:50
2.
8:00
3.
8:50
4.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Therapist
Client
Supervisor(s)
Observers
B
A
G
F
E (Play)
APPENDIX U
PRE-POST SESSION
Date
Ther.
Super.
Client #
Sess. #
Time
Rm #
THEORY
SUPERVISOR
REQUESTS OF
REQUESTS OF OBSERVER(S)
CONTRACT
Pre-Session
Long-Term Goal
1.
2.
3.
4.
Session Order
1.
2.
3.
4.
Previous Hmwk:
1. If complete?
2. If incomplete?
Hypothesis
TF 1.
TF 2.
TF 3.
Sessions Objectives
YN 1.
YN 2.
YN 3.
Session Interventions
1.
2.
3.
Significant “Bug-ins”
1.
Post-Session
Feelings/Perceptions
1.
2.
3.
What does the therapist like about what they did?
1.
2.
3.
What would they do differently?
1.
Homework/Implicit-Explicit
1.
2.
3.
New Hypotheses/Revisions
1.
2.
3.
Revised Objectives
1.
2.
3.
Revised Session Interventions
1.
2.
3.
Supervisor Observations and Feedback
Process Observations
1.
2.
2.
3.
3.
4.
4.
Comments/Recommendations:
1.
2.
3.
4.
How could supervisor have been more helpful?
Break Summary:
1.
2.
3.
4.
APPENDIX V
PRACTICUM RATING FORM
Client I.D. Number Only
CHECK ONE: Audio
Date
Observation
Session #
Video
Counselor Name
Supervisor/Observer Name
DIRECTIONS:
Practicum supervisor or peer of the practicum student is to mark a rating for each item as much as possible to provide
remarks that will help the practicum counselor in his or her development. Students must include all rating forms in their
portfolios.
SPECIFIC CRITERIA
RATING
(best to least)
OPENING:
Was opening unstructured,
friendly, and pleasant?
Any role definition needed?
Additional introduction
necessary? Was the stage set
for a productive interview?
5 4 3 2 1
INTERVIEW PROCESS:
Did counselor assume
appropriate level of
responsibility for interview
conduct? Counselor
or client initiative?
5 4 3 2 1
CLIENT VALUES ACCEPTANCE:
How did the counselor
demonstrate acceptance of
client values and
expressed thoughts?
5 4 3 2 1
THEORY INTEGRATION:
Was a theory identified and
implemented?
5 4 3 2 1
REFLECTIONS OF FEELINGS:
Did counselor reflect and
react to feelings or did
interview remain on an
intellectual level?
5 4 3 2 1
COUNSELING RELATIONSHIP:
Were counselor-client
relationships conducive
to productive counseling?
Was a meaningful counseling
relationship established?
5 4 3 2 1
SPECIFIC CRITERIA
CLOSING:
Was closing initiated on
RATING
(best to least)
5 4 3 2 1
REMARKS
REMARKS
152
time? Was it abrupt or
brusque? Any follow-up or
further interview scheduling
accomplished?
GENERAL TECHNIQUES:
How well did the
counselor conduct the
mechanics of the
interview?
5 4 3 2 1
VOCABULARY LEVEL:
Was counselor
vocabulary appropriate
for the client?
5 4 3 2 1
MANNERISMS:
Did the counselor display
any mannerisms which might
have adversely affected
the interview or portions
thereof?
5 4 3 2 1
VERBOSITY:
Did the counselor dominate
the interview, interrupt,
override, or become too
wordy?
5 4 3 2 1
SILENCES:
Were silences broken to meet
counselor needs or were they
dealt with in an effectual
manner?
5 4 3 2 1
OVERALL RATING OF
THIS SESSION:
USE OF BREAK:
Was break used to
summarize and focus
session issues/closing?
Was break input/summary
presented to client clearly
and effectively?
5 4 3 2 1
5 4 3 2 1
153
APPENDIX W
EDUC G524 TREATMENT PLANNING GUIDE
1.
Describe the specific problem that the client wants changed. How will things be different if therapy is
successful?
2.
What is your hypothesis about why the client has this problem?
3.
What would work best with your client? Select one from Category A and one from Category B.
A
B
Present Information
Cognitive Pathway of Change
Past Information
(History)
Affective Pathway of Change
Behavioral Pathway of Change
4.
Does your hypothesis view the problem as something that exists within your client, intrapsychic, or in your
client’s interpersonal relationships?
5.
Select your theory based upon how you have answered the questions above. Match your theory selection
to the client, problem, context for therapy, and your ability.
6.
You are now ready to plan your first session. Make sure that your rationale for the content of every
session is consistent with the problem the client has stated they want changed. Use the pre-post to plan
each individual session and provide feedback and accountability.
APPENDIX R
Integration of Curriculum and Standards
* Not combined tracks
P550/
P501
G502
G503
G504
G505
P515/
P516
*
G524
G525
G532
G550
G551
X
X
X
X
G552
*
G562
*
G563
*
G567
*
G570
G575
P514
G590
G59
0MF
T*
SOE
Concept
Democracy
& Comm
X
Habits of
Mind
X
Pedagogy
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Knowledge
Experience
Leadership
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
CACREP &
NBCC
Prof
Identity
X
X
X
X
Soc & Cult
Diversity
X
Hum Grwth
& Develop
X
X
Career Dev
X
Helping
Relations
X
X
X
Group
Work
X
X
Assessment
X
Research &
Prog Eval
IHPB
Collab With
Other Discip
Theo Found
of MFT
X
X
X
X
P550/
P501
G503
G504
G505
P515/
P516
*
G550
G551
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Behavioral
Research
X
X
Sexuality
X
X
Legal &
Ethical
G502
G524
G525
G532
X
Issues of
Ethnicity
Individual
Develop
X
Therapy
Techniques
X
Models of
MFT
X
X
X
Appraisal &
Assessment
X
G552
*
G562
*
G563
*
G567
*
G570
G575
P514
X
310.02,
310.03,
310.04,
320.03
340.02,
340.03,
340.04,
340.05
X
X
320.03
X
X
X
360.02
320.0
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
330.02,
330.03
X
X
X
300.001,
320.07
G59
0MF
T*
X
COAMFTE
300.00,
300.02
G590
P550/
P501
G502
G503
G504
G505
P516
*
G524
G525
G532
G550
G551
G552
*
G562
*
G563
*
G567
*
G570
G575
P514
350.02,
350.03,
350.04
320.02,
320.05
G590
G59
0MF
T*
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
330.05
X
X
IPSB
Standards
1
X
2
X
3
X
X
X
X
4
X
X
5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
6
X
X
X
7
X
X
X
8
X
X
X
X
9
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
10
Portfolio
Evaluation
Comp
Exam
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
APPENDIX S
A REFLECTION OF MY EXPERIENCE
IN THE COUNSELOR EDUCATION PROGRAM
Your effort in the IPFW Counselor Education program has resulted in personal growth, increased knowledge,
and newly acquired skills in counseling.
The purpose of this paper is to review this process with a summary of the past and a preparation for your future.
The paper should be typed, double-spaced with no maximum limit, and added to your portfolio.
Use the following questions to guide you:
1.
How have your personal and/or professional goals and perceptions changed regarding counseling, as a
result of this program?
2.
What experiences (classes, workshops, etc.) were the most helpful to you personally and/or
professionally?
3.
Which counseling theory is currently the most predominant influence in your growth and development as
a counselor? What factors have played a part in your selection of this theory (e.g., your personality,
therapists, professor[s], personal experience[s], book[s], class[es], etc.)?
4.
What growth areas do you see in the IPFW Counselor Education program, and how would you
strengthen them?
5.
What do you see yourself doing in five years?
APPENDIX T1
INDIANA SCHOOL COUNSELOR MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of the Indiana School Counselor Association is to promote excellence in professional school
counseling.
ISCA ROLE STATEMENT
School counselors in the State of Indiana are an integral link in the educational system. School counselors
promote educational success by enhancing the development of academic skills, interpersonal skills, and selfunderstanding. School counseling services also educate students in decision-making, problem-solving, goalsetting, self-esteem, environmental concerns, and educational and occupational opportunities.
School counselors provide programs in four categories:
1.
RESPONSIVE SERVICES
Individual counseling
Group counseling
Family counseling
Crisis counseling
Consultation
Referrals
3.
GUIDANCE CURRICULUM
Classroom guidance activities
Small group guidance activities
Large group guidance activities
2.
INDIVIDUAL PLANNING
Academic counseling
Career counseling
Educational counseling
T est interpretation and assessment
of learning problems
4.
SYSTEM SUPPORT
Professional development
Committee/advisory board
Program management/operation
Staff/community development
Research
School counselors have often been inhibited from providing these services due to the counselors' involvement in
non-counseling tasks. Counselors have been utilized for supervision, master scheduling, record-keeping (report
cards, transcripts, GPA, ranks), substitute teaching, disciplining, attendance, and other non-counseling tasks.
These tasks are administrative or clerical in nature and are not included in the services defined above.
It is vital that school counselors be appropriately licensed by the State of Indiana. Licensing is necessary
because it ensures consistent and intensive education, supervised practicum and/or internship experiences, and
knowledge of counseling skills by persons providing programs as a school counselor. Such persons will be well
qualified to provide a balanced and effective school counseling program for all Indiana students.
APPENDIX T2
Fort Wayne Community Schools
1200 S Clinton St
Fort Wayne IN 46802
POSITION DESCRIPTION
Position Title: Elementary School Guidance Counselor Salary Schedule: III
Position Code: 1106302
Pay Code:
Responsible To: Building Principal
05/01
General Description of Position
An elementary school guidance counselor implements the three domains (Learning to Learn, Learning to Live,
Learning to Work) of the Fort Wayne Community School Comprehensive Developmental Guidance and
Counseling Program through the following delivery systems: Guidance Curriculum, Individual Planning,
Responsive Services, and System Support. The certified guidance counselor must possess and demonstrate
excellent counseling and communication skills in the course of promoting student development and achievement.
He or she must also exhibit an ability to organize and integrate a comprehensive developmental guidance and
counseling program into the total school educational program. The elementary school guidance counselor is also
expected to be involved with evaluation and discipline of certified and non-certified staff.
Finally, an elementary school guidance counselor must demonstrate leadership, ethical behavior, and professional
conduct as he or she provides support to other school-wide educational programs or activities.
Qualifications
Must be a licensed counselor in the state of Indiana by the State Department of Public Instruction.
Responsibilities and Duties
1.
Assists the development of the Guidance Curriculum through classroom activities, group activities,
proactive discipline programs/activities, and parent education (desired guidance program percentage of
45%).
2.
Implements Individual Planning with students through appraisal, advisement, and placement (desired
guidance program percentage of 9%).
3.
Provides Responsive Services to students and parents through consultation, personal counseling, crisis
counseling, and referral (desired guidance program percentage of 35%).
4.
Aids System Support efforts through professional development, staff and community relations,
consultation with teachers, advisory councils, community outreach, program management and operations,
and research and development (desired guidance program percentage of 11%).
5.
Understands and conducts the proper administration and usage of standardized tests and is able to
interpret test scores and test-related data to students, parents, educators, institutions, agencies, and the
public (e.g., IPASS, P-ACT, ACT, PSAT, SAT, ASVAB, Pursuits).
Elementary School Guidance Counselor Position Description (continued)
6.
Coordinates, conducts, or participates in each school's special education case conference process, PTA
Council, Crisis Response Team, Intervention Assistance Team (IAT), and/or similar activities.
7.
Understands and promotes elementary school level career development competencies such as
awareness of the benefits of educational achievement, awareness of the relationship between work and
learning, skills to understand and use career information, awareness of different occupations and
changing male/female roles, and awareness of the career-planning process.
8.
Provides information to facilitate the personal and educational transitions students encounter as they
move toward reaching their full educational potential (e.g., elementary school to middle school, parental
separation or divorce).
9.
Evaluates and revises the building-level guidance program as it relates to an ongoing assessment of
school needs and FWCS comprehensive (K-12) guidance and counseling services.
10.
Coordinates, conducts, supervises, or participates in activities which contribute to the effective operation
of the school (e.g., hallway, bus, or assembly supervision; year-end awards and extracurricular
programs; breakfast and latch-key program coordination).
11.
Provides information to the principal concerning performance issues with certified and non-certified
staff, and participates in formal evaluation, discipline, or employment procedures as requested.
12.
Conducts other activities consistent with the position as directed by the principal and/or supervisor. It is
anticipated that a minimum of 80% of the job responsibilities will be in guidance and counseling specific
roles.
APPENDIX T3
Fort Wayne Community Schools
1200 S Clinton St
Fort Wayne IN 46802
POSITION DESCRIPTION
Position Title: Middle School Guidance Counselor
Position Code: 1106310
Responsible To: Building Principal
Salary Schedule:
Pay Code:
III
05/01
General Description of Position
A middle school guidance counselor implements the three domains (Learning to Learn, Learning to Live,
Learning to Work) of the Fort Wayne Community School Comprehensive Developmental Guidance and
Counseling Program through the following delivery systems: Guidance Curriculum, Individual Planning,
Responsive Services, and System Support. The certified guidance counselor must possess and demonstrate
excellent counseling and communication skills in the course of promoting student development and achievement.
He or she must also exhibit an ability to organize and integrate a comprehensive developmental guidance and
counseling program into the total school educational program. The middle school guidance counselor is also
expected to be involved with evaluation and discipline of certified and non-certified staff.
Finally, a middle school guidance counselor must demonstrate leadership, ethical behavior, and professional
conduct as he or she provides support to other school-wide educational programs or activities.
Qualifications
Must be a licensed counselor in the state of Indiana by the State Department of Public Instruction.
Responsibilities and Duties
1.
Assists the development of the Guidance Curriculum through classroom activities, group activities,
proactive discipline programs/activities, and parent education (desired guidance program percentage of
35%).
2.
Implements Individual Planning with students through appraisal, advisement, and placement (desired
guidance program percentage of 17%).
3.
Provides Responsive Services to students and parents through consultation, personal counseling, crisis
counseling, and referral (desired guidance program percentage of 30%).
4.
Aids System Support efforts through professional development, staff and community relations,
consultation with teachers, advisory councils, community outreach, program management and operations,
and research and development (desired guidance program percentage of 18%).
5.
Understands and conducts the proper administration and usage of standardized tests and is able to
interpret test scores and test-related data to students, parents, educators, institutions, agencies, and the
public (e.g., IPASS, P-ACT, ACT, PSAT, SAT, ASVAB, Pursuits).
Middle School Guidance Counselor Position Description (continued)
6.
Coordinates, conducts, or participates in each school's special education case conference process, PTA
Council, Crisis Response Team, Intervention Assistance Team (IAT), and/or similar activities.
7.
Understands and promotes middle school level career development competencies such as knowledge of
the benefits of educational achievement to career opportunities; understanding the relationship between
work and learning; skills to locate, understand, and use career information; knowledge of different
occupations and changing male/female roles; and understanding the process of career planning.
8.
Provides information to facilitate the personal and educational transitions students encounter as they
move toward reaching their full educational potential (e.g., middle school to high school, parental
separation or divorce).
9.
Evaluates and revises the building-level guidance program as it relates to an ongoing assessment of
school needs and FWCS comprehensive (K-12) guidance and counseling services.
10.
Coordinates, conducts, supervises, or participates in activities which contribute to the effective operation
of the school (e.g., student council advisor; year-end awards and extracurricular programs; hallway, bus,
and assembly supervision; tutoring programs; student service workers and adult volunteers).
11.
Provides information to the principal concerning performance issues with certified and non-certified
staff, and participates in formal evaluation, discipline, or employment procedures as requested.
12.
Conducts other activities consistent with the position as directed by the principal and/or supervisor. It is
anticipated that a minimum of 80% of the job responsibilities will be in guidance and counseling specific
roles.
APPENDIX T4
Fort Wayne Community Schools
1200 S Clinton St
Fort Wayne IN 46802
POSITION DESCRIPTION
Position Title: High School Guidance Counselor
Position Code: 1106312
Responsible To: Guidance Coordinator and Building Principal
Salary Schedule:
Pay Code:
III
05/01
General Description of Position
A high school guidance counselor implements the three domains (Learning to Learn, Learning to Live, Learning
to Work) of the Fort Wayne Community School Comprehensive Developmental Guidance and Counseling
Program through the following delivery systems: Guidance Curriculum, Individual Planning, Responsive Services,
and System Support. The certified guidance counselor must possess and demonstrate excellent counseling and
communication skills in the course of promoting student development and achievement. He or she must also
exhibit an ability to organize and integrate a comprehensive developmental guidance and counseling program into
the total school educational program. The high school guidance counselor is also expected to be involved with
evaluation and discipline of certified and non-certified staff.
Finally , a high school guidance counselor must demonstrate leadership, ethical behavior, and professional conduct
as he or she provides support to other school-wide educational programs or activities.
Qualifications
Must be a licensed counselor in the state of Indiana by the State Department of Public Instruction.
Responsibilities and Duties
1.
Assists the development of the Guidance Curriculum through classroom activities, group activities,
proactive discipline programs/activities, and parent education (desired guidance program percentage of
20%).
2.
Implements Individual Planning with students through appraisal, advisement, and placement (desired
guidance program percentage of 29%).
3.
Provides Responsive Services to students and parents through consultation, personal counseling, crisis
counseling, and referral (desired guidance program percentage of 30%).
4.
Aids System Support efforts through professional development, staff and community relations,
consultation with teachers, advisory councils, community outreach, program management and operations,
and research and development (desired guidance program percentage of 21%).
5.
Understands and conducts the proper administration and usage of standardized tests and is able to
interpret test scores and test-related data to students, parents, educators, institutions, agencies, and the
public (e.g., IPASS, P-ACT, ACT, PSAT, SAT, ASVAB, Pursuits).
High school Guidance Counselor Position Description (continued)
6.
Coordinates, conducts, or participates in each school's special education case conference process, PTA
Council, Crisis Response Team, Intervention Assistance Team (IAT), and/or similar activities.
7.
Understands and promotes high school level career development competencies such as understanding of
the relationship between educational achievement and career planning; understanding the need for
positive attitudes toward work and learning; skills to locate, evaluate, and interpret career information;
understanding the continuous changes in male/female roles; and skills in career planning.
8.
Provides information to facilitate the personal and educational transitions students encounter as they
move toward reaching their full educational potential (e.g., high school to post-secondary
education/training, high school to military service, high school to workforce, parental separation or
divorce).
9.
Evaluates and revises the building-level guidance program as it relates to an ongoing assessment of
school needs and FWCS comprehensive (K-12) guidance and counseling services.
10.
Coordinates, conducts, supervises, or participates in activities which contribute to the effective operation
of the school (e.g., before and after school supervision, coordination and/or supervision of day and
evening school programs and events, year-end awards and extracurricular programs).
11.
Provides information to the principal concerning performance issues with certified and non-certified
staff, and participates in formal evaluation, discipline, or employment procedures as requested.
12.
Conducts other activities consistent with the position as directed by the principal and/or supervisor. It is
anticipated that a minimum of 80% of the job responsibilities will be in guidance and counseling specific
roles.
APPENDIX V
COUNSELOR EDUCATION PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT RUBRIC
Category
Accept
Supporting
Evidence
Provides clear
examples of using.
Provides one or
two examples of
using.
Provides general
examples that
present limited
evidence of using.
Little or no
examples are
provided to show
use.
Reflection
Provides clear
evidence of how.
Provides one or
two examples of
how.
Provides general
statements about.
Little or no
evidence of
considering how.
Organization
Information is well
organized with
well-constructed
paragraphs and
subheadings.
Information is
organized with
well-constructed
paragraphs.
Information is
organized, but
paragraphs lack
coherence.
Information lacks
organization.
Mechanics
No grammatical,
spelling, or
punctuation errors.
Minimal
grammatical,
spelling, or
punctuation errors.
A few
grammatical,
spelling, or
punctuation errors.
Numerous errors
that interfere with
comprehension.
Evaluator’s Name
Checkpoint
Revise
Reject
Date
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