Agricola - Z
Th
th C e nt
ury: N
e 17
ot an
easy tim
ing
e for farm
(Agricol
a
er”)
is the Latin word for “farm
An agricultural development game for 1-5 players by Uwe Rosenberg
Playing time: Half an hour per player, shorter as a Family game. Age: From 12 years
Central Europe, around 1670 AD. The Plague which has raged since 1348 has finally been overcome. The civilized world is revitalized. People are upgrading and renovating their huts. Fields must be plowed, tilled and harvested. The famine of the previous years
has encouraged people to eat more meat (a habit that we continue to this day).
Components
Game boards:
• 5 farmyards for the players (with farmyard spaces as well as 1 example
on the reverse side)
• 3 game boards for the game actions (including one with an alternative
reverse side for the Family game, as well as two examples)
• 1 board for Major Improvements (with a summary of scoring on the reverse side)
360 Cards:
Wooden playing pieces:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Minor
Improvement
Occupation
Begging card
2 Wood
-1 Point
Fields
Pastures
1 Point
2 Points
3 Points
4 Points
0-1
0
2
1
3
2
4
3
5+
4+
Grain*
Vegetables*
0
0
1-3
1
4-5
2
6-7
3
8+
4+
Sheep
Wild boar
Cattle
0
0
0
1-3
1-2
1
4-5
3-4
2-3
6-7
5-6
4-5
8+
7+
6+
139 x
10 x
14 x
16 x
5x
Minor
Improvement
169 x
Scoring
-1 point per unused space in the Farmyard
*Planted &
1 point per fenced stable & per Clay hut room
harvested Grain /
2 points per Stone house room
Vegetables
3 points per Family member
5x
2x
5 Family member discs, 4 Stables and 15 Fences
in each of the five player colors (blue, green, red, natural wood and purple)
33 round, dark brown Wood counters
27 round, light brown Clay counters
15 round, white Reed counters
18 round, grey Stone counters
27 round, yellow Grain counters
18 round, orange Vegetable counters
21 Sheep tokens (white cubes)
18 Wild boar tokens (black cubes)
15 Cattle tokens (brown cubes)
1 Starting player token
33 brown/grey Field/Stone house tiles
24 brown/red Wood/Clay hut tiles
36 yellow Food markers labeled “1”
9 Multiplication markers (can apply to animals, goods or Food)
3 Claim markers (with “Guest” on the reverse)
1 Scoring pad
Stage 1
Round 1-4
During the Feeding phase of the
Harvest, whenever you cannot or
choose not to produce enough Food
to feed your family, you must take
1 Begging card for each missing Food.
33 x
And also:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Major
Improvement
Occupation
• 169 yellow “Occupation” cards (66 cards for 1-5 players;
41 cards for 3-5 players; 62 cards for 4-5 players)
• 139 orange “Minor Improvement” cards (including 7 upgrades
from Major or Minor Improvements)
• 10 red “Major Improvement” cards
• 14 blue Round cards with possible actions for rounds 1 to 14
• 16 green Action cards with possible actions that depend
on the number of players
•
5 grey Begging cards
•
5 Summary cards
•
2 Deck cards (1 Deck I, 1 Deck K)
36 x
9x
24 x
3x
Note: The terms
“Person” and “Family
member” are used in
the rules and on the
game cards to mean the
round Family member
discs (see illustration);
“Player” means the
humans who are taking
part in a game of
Agricola.
Object of the game
Players start the game with a farming couple living in a simple two-roomed hut. During
the course of the game, these families have abundant possibilities to improve their
quality of life by building up their home, improving their fields and breeding their
animals. In each of the game’s 14 rounds, each of a player’s Family members may take
exactly one action. They can generate building resources such as Wood and Clay, add
more people to their family, and ensure that they are fed. In each round, each action can
only be taken by one Person – players will miss out if another player chooses the action
first. A new action becomes available in each round – see Overview of game phases. You
must plan to grow your family at the right time – but not too soon, because even the next
generation must be fed. Growing your family is important, though, because it allows
you to take more actions as they become available. At the end of the game, the winner is
the player who has established the best farmyard – see Scoring overview. Victory points
are awarded for the number of fields, pastures and fenced stables, as well as for Grain,
Vegetables, Sheep, Wild boar and Cattle. Players lose one point for each unused farmyard
space. Additional points are awarded for extension and renovation of the family’s home,
for the number of Family members, and for played Occupation and Improvement
cards. There are examples of play, with explanations, on the reverse sides of three
of the boards.
The term “Other players” means
all other players – so not the player
taking the action.
Preparing to play
Place the three game boards as shown in the illustration to the right.
Each player chooses a color and takes the playing pieces in that color, as well
as one farmyard. These are placed in front of the player (facing whichever direction the
player chooses). On each of the two building spaces on this farmyard, players first place
a Wooden hut room tile and then (in each of these rooms) one of their Family members.
(See Illustration, top right). The remaining playing pieces (additional Family members,
fences and stables) remain in the bag for now or are placed to one side. Sort the remaining
house and hut tiles and the rest of the game components and place them beside the playing
area.
For your first game(s) of Agricola, we strongly recommend that you use the “Family
game” rules given on page 8. The game is the same as the full game, except that it is
played without Occupation and Minor Improvement cards and with slightly different
Action spaces. Starting with the Family game is a great way to get acquainted with
the game before you try the full Agricola experience
Reverse sides:
The first game board has a different reverse side which is used for the simplified
Family game.
The other two game boards should be
turned facedown during the rules explanation. They have illustrative examples.
The reverse sides of two of the farmyards
can be used as supply areas for game
components, if the farmyards are not in
use in the game.
Scholar
Cards
Sort the cards according to the color of the reverse side.
Depending on the number of players, different green Action cards (B) are used .
There are also blue Round cards (A), yellow Occupation cards (C), orange “Minor
Improvement” cards (D), red “Major Improvement” cards (E), grey Begging cards (F) and
Summary cards (G).
A. Sort the blue Round cards according to the Stage of the game. Shuffle each small pile
and place the piles on top of each other with the cards for Stage 6 at the bottom, Stage 5
on top of that, etc – finishing with the four cards for Stage 1 on the top. The Round cards
make new actions available during the game. (These are listed on the game summary
cards and in the Appendix, section 1.2).
B. If you are playing with 3, 4 or 5 players, take the corresponding set of green
Action cards and place them face up on the spaces to the left of the first game board.
The order in which the cards are laid out is irrelevant. In a 3-player game, there are
4 cards, in 4- and 5-player games there are 6 cards. (There is more information about
these cards in the Appendix, section 1.3). In solo and 2-player games, no green Action
cards are used.
C. The purple symbol on the left side of the yellow Occupation cards shows how many
players the card is used for:
means for 1-5 players,
for 3-5 players,
for 4-5
players. Cards that are not in use are removed from the game; the full deck of Occupation
cards is only available in a 4- or 5-player game. Shuffle the cards. Each player is dealt a
hand of 7 Occupation cards and may look through them. The remaining Occupation cards
are put to one side.
2
279
Stage 1
Round 1-4
2 Wood
Occupation
Once you have a Stone house, at the
start of a round, you can always either
pay 1 Food to play an Occupation
card or play an Improvement card by
paying its costs.
The “Occupation” and
“Minor Improvement” cards
are divided into 3 decks – a
Basic deck (E), an Interactive
deck (I) and a Complex deck
(K). To vary the cards that are
used in a game, players can
play with cards from only one
deck, can take a share of their
cards from each deck, or can
shuffle the decks together. The
deck that a card belongs to is
indicated by the symbol on the
right hand side of the card.
Minor
Improvement
Major
Improvement
D. Shuffle the orange Minor Improvement cards. Each player is dealt a hand
of 7 Minor Improvement cards and may look through them. The remaining
Minor Improvement cards are put to one side.
E. Place the 10 red Major Improvement cards face up on the Major
Improvements board. As soon as 9 Major Improvements have
been bought, the board is turned over to show the scoring overview
and the remaining Major Improvement is placed on the space on the
reverse of the board.
In the Family game variant, the
yellow Occupation cards and the
orange Minor Improvement cards
are not used. In addition, some of
the Action spaces are different in the
Family game. (See reverse of game
board 1 and also page 9). Apart from
that, all the rules of the full game
apply.
Begging card
During the Feeding phase of the
Harvest, whenever you cannot or
choose not to produce enough Food
to feed your family, you must take
1 Begging card for each missing Food.
F. Place the grey Begging cards face-up beside the playing area.
G. Each player takes a Summary card and places it in their
playing area. One side of the card gives an overview of the game
phases; the other explains the scoring at the end of the game.
There are no scoring rounds during the game.
Scoring
-1 Point
Fields
Pastures
1 Point
2 Points
3 Points
4 Points
0-1
0
2
1
3
2
4
3
5+
4+
Grain*
Vegetables*
0
0
1-3
1
4-5
2
6-7
3
8+
4+
Sheep
Wild boar
Cattle
0
0
0
1-3
1-2
1
4-5
3-4
2-3
6-7
5-6
4-5
8+
7+
6+
*Planted &
harvested Grain /
Vegetables
-1 point per unused space in the Farmyard
1 point per fenced stable & per Clay hut room
2 points per Stone house room
3 points per Family member
Starting player
Players choose a starting player who receives the Starting player marker and 2 Food.
The other players each receive 3 Food. The Starting player marker is not automatically
passed on to the next player at the end of a round: it passes to the player who chooses the
“Starting player” action (see Illustration).
(
The Starting player marker only
moves when a player chooses the
Starting Player action.
)
Play of the game
The game consists of six stages, which are divided into 14 rounds.
Each round follows the same pattern and consists of four phases. There is a Harvest at the
end of each stage (after rounds 4, 7, 9, 11, 13 and 14). This is shown on the game boards
as Harvest.
Phase 1: Start the round – draw a new Round card.
Turn over the top Round card and place it on the appropriate space on the board. The
action on this card is available to all players, and can be used not only in this round but in
all subsequent rounds.
All actions which occur at the beginning of a particular round or at the beginning of every
round occur now.
The text on some cards instructs players to place items on the Round card spaces. If there
are tiles, Food and/or other playing pieces on the space for the current round, these are
distributed to the appropriate players (who earned them by playing an Occupation or
Improvement) The functions of the cards are explained on page 7.
Phase 2: Replenish – place new goods and animals.
Place new goods and Food on any Action spaces on the board that require them (on the
printed spaces as well as on Action and Round cards). These spaces are shown by an
arrow (see Illustration). If goods or Food are already on a space, the new goods/Food are
added to them.
3 Wood means that 3 Wood tokens are placed on that space each round, 1 Cattle means
that 1 Cattle token is placed on the space each round, etc. The Fishing and Traveling
Players Action spaces receive 1 Food each round. These goods and Food are taken from
the general supply and can build up over several rounds – there is no upper limit.
Phase 3: Work phase
In clockwise order, starting with the Starting player, players take turns taking a single
Family member from their farmyard, placing it on an unoccupied Action space and taking
that action. Play continues until all Family members have been placed. A player may
only ever place one Family member at a time. Each Action space can only be used by
one Person in one round. A Family member may never occupy an Action space without
performing its action.
Some Action spaces offer players several choices of action or require a player to take
one action before (optionally) taking a second action. Whenever a player takes building
resources, Grain, Vegetables or Food, the tokens are placed in a player’s personal supply
in view of the other players. Animals may not be placed in the supply; they must be
placed directly into the farmyard (See Action D, page 9).
Plowman
293
3
Goose Pond
Occupations
72
Add 4, 7 and 10 to the current round
and place 1 field on each corresponding
Round space. At the start of these
rounds, you can Plow that field by
paying 1 Food.
Place 1 Food each on the next 4
remaining Round spaces. At the start
of these rounds, you receive the Food.
The Plowman receives fields in later
rounds; the owner of the Goose Pond
receives 1 Food for each of 4 rounds.
These are placed on the appropriate
Round card space(s)
The Traveling Players Action space
is only used in the 4- and 5-player
game. In the Family Game, Family
members can also obtain Food from
the Storehouse.
The Action cards are described individually in section 1 of the Appendix.
Some Action cards give you a choice
of action, while others (optionally)
allow you to take an additional
action
3
Animals that cannot be placed into the farmyard must be returned to the general supply or
immediately transformed into Food using an Improvement with the
symbol. A player
who plays a card from their hand or buys a Major Improvement (see page 10) must read
the text on the card aloud so that all the other players are aware of its effects.
Players are not allowed to hide their personal supply from other players or to completely
cover cards that they have played.
Phase 4: Return home
Players remove their Family members from the game boards and return them to their
home.
Example: A player who chooses the
Build room(s) and/or Build Stable(s)
Action space may choose not to build
a house and only to build stables. In
contrast, the After Family growth,
also 1 Minor Improvement action
does not allow a player to ignore
Family growth and only play a Minor
Improvement.
Harvest Time
Players feed their Family members during the Harvest, which occurs at the end of each
stage of the game (see Appendix, section 6) – that is, after rounds 4, 7, 9, 11, 13 and 14
(see game boards 2 and 3). The Harvest consists of three phases, which occur one after
another.
Harvest Phase 1: The Field phase
Players remove 1 Grain or Vegetable token from each Sown field in their farmyard (see
Illustration) and place them in their personal supply. Players may also receive additional
Food from Occupation or Improvement cards that they have played.
Harvest Phase 2: Feeding the family
At the end of this phase, each player must feed his or her family by paying 2 Food
per Family member. Offspring that were born during the current round (“Newborn
offspring”, typically from a Family growth action) only consume 1 Food for this round,
but will require 2 Food in future Harvests.
Each unprocessed Grain or Vegetable may be converted to 1 Food at any time. Fireplaces
and Cooking Hearths, as well as other specific Occupations and Improvements, allow
players to convert Vegetables at any time, at a better exchange rate. Improvements with
the
symbol can be used to convert animals to Food at any time. Improvements with
the
symbol can be used to Bake bread, but only when the player takes a Bake bread
action during a round.
Unprocessed animals have no Food value.
Begging
A player who cannot or does not wish to produce the required Food must take a Begging
card for each missing Food – players may not give up members of their family to avoid
the need to Feed them. At the end of the game, players lose 3 points for each Begging
card.
Harvest Phase 3: Breeding
Lastly, any player with at least 2 animals of the same type receives exactly one additional
(baby) animal of that type – but only if the lamb, the shoat (piglet) or the calf can be
accommodated in the farmyard (or on an appropriate Improvement card, for example
the “Animal Yard”, “Wildlife Reserve” or “Forest Pasture”). Baby animals and parent
animals may not be converted into Food immediately after the birth (for example, if you
only have room for two animals of that type); they simply run away if they cannot be
accommodated. The animals breed regardless of where the parent animals are placed (see
Example) – the parents may be in separate areas.
End of the game
The game ends after the Harvest at the end of the 14th round (Stage 6), after which the
players’ scores are calculated. There is a scoring overview on the back of the board for
Major Improvements and on the back of the Summary card, and the scoring is detailed on
page 8.
Tally each player’s Victory Points on the scoring sheet. The player with the most points is
the winner. If there is a tie, the tied players share the victory (or can play another game of
Agricola to break the tie).
4
Additional possibilities for feeding
the family are offered by the Joinery,
Pottery and Basketmaker’s Workshop.
These Major Improvements allow a
player to convert Wood, Clay and
Reed to Food during the Harvest (see
Appendix, Section 2).
Players with 3 or more animals of the
same kind do not get more than one
baby animal. There is room for this
baby animal in the stable.
The Actions
Four main types of action can be taken to improve a player’s farmyard. (A) Players can
extend and renovate their Wooden huts. (B) An extended home enables the family to
grow. (C) Fields can be Plowed and Sown and (D) Pastures can be fenced to hold animals.
Action A – Extend Wooden hut or renovate it into a Clay hut or Stone house
At the start of the game, each player has a Wooden hut with two rooms. Players can
extend their huts by Building rooms using the Build room(s) action (see Illustration).
New rooms must be orthogonally (i.e. not diagonally) adjacent to the existing rooms (see
Illustration).
There is no upper limit on the number of rooms that a player may build.
New rooms are always made from the same material as the rest of the home. Wooden
huts can only be extended with Wooden rooms; Clay huts only with Clay rooms; and
Stone houses only with Stone rooms.
Extending a Wooden hut costs 5 Wood and 2 Reed (for the roof), a Clay hut 5 Clay and
2 Reed, and a Stone house 5 Stone and 2 Reed.
During the game, the Wooden hut can be Renovated to a Clay hut and, later, a Stone
house. The first Renovation Action space becomes available during Stage 2 (rounds
5 to 7).
To renovate your Wooden hut to a Clay hut, you require 1 Clay token for each room in
your Wooden hut, plus 1 Reed (for the roof). Turn the Wooden hut tiles over to show the
Clay hut rooms.
For the second renovation – from Clay hut to Stone house – you require 1 Stone token
for each room in your Clay hut, plus 1 Reed (for the roof). Replace the Clay hut tiles with
Stone house tiles.
Players can only ever renovate a complete hut. Rooms may never be renovated one at a
time.
The Renovation action only allows a single renovation. A double renovation from
Wooden hut to Stone house in one turn is not allowed.
Stables
A player who chooses the Build Room(s) action space on the left-hand board may choose
to instead, or in addition, build up to 4 stables for 2 Wood each. Stables provide shelter for
animals (see page 7).
Additional actions after a Renovation
The Renovation card for Stage 2 allows players to purchase a Major (or Minor)
Improvement after performing the renovation – players may not, however, ignore the
Renovation action and only play an Improvement. A second Renovation card comes into
play in the last round of the game (see Illustration). This allows players to Fence pastures
after performing a renovation. (See Action D on page 6).
Action B- Family growth
In Stage 2 (Rounds 5-7), the after Family growth, also 1 Minor Improvement action
becomes available. Players must have room for offspring in their home before they can
use this action – that is, they must have more rooms in their home than they have
Family members. After taking Family growth, the player may choose to purchase a
Minor Improvement (see page 7).
The Family growth even without room in your home action card becomes available in
Stage 5 (Round 12 or 13). With this action, a player may grow his or
her family regardless of the number of rooms in their home.
After
A player who chooses a Family growth action adds their newborn
Family growth
offspring to the Action space (see Illustration, left).
also
1 Minor
In the Return home phase, the new Family member is taken home
Improvement
and placed in its room. If it doesn’t have its own room, it shares a
room with another Family member. A Player who takes the Family
growth action will therefore have one additional (adult) Family
member to use from the following round onwards. The new Family
member is not available for use in the round when it is produced – it
Stage 2
must first grow up. Families are limited to a maximum of 5 members.
A player who already has 5 Family members in play may not choose
the Family growth action.
Each Family member requires their
own room (Exception: see Family
Growth, below).
After
Renovation
plus
per room to Clay hut
per room to Stone house
also
1 Major or Minor
After
Renovation
Improvement
plus
per room to Clay hut
per room to Stone house
also
Fences
1 Wood per fence
Stage 2
Stage 6
Example: Claudia selects the Build
room(s) action and builds the third
room of a Wooden hut with 5 Wood and
2 Reed (see picture, at the top). Next,
she chooses the Renovate action, pays 3
Clay and 1 Reed and turns the 3 rooms
of the Wooden hut over to show the
Clay hut side. Later, she chooses Build
room(s) again, pays 5 Clay and 2 Reed
and extends her Clay hut by one room
(see picture, below).
After this, she could extend her hut
again or pay 4 Stone and 1 Reed to use
Renovation again and swap the four
Clay hut tiles for four Stone house tiles
– any additional rooms she built would
then have to be made of Stone.
5
Action C – Plowing fields – Grain and Vegetables
A player who chooses the Plow 1 field action takes a field
tile and places it on an empty space in his or her farmyard.
If the player already has fields, the new field must be placed
orthogonally adjacent to an existing field. Players may use at
most 1 Plow Improvement each time they select the Plow 1 field
action.
A player who chooses Take 1 Grain takes one Grain marker
and places it in his or her personal supply – the similar Take 1
Vegetable action becomes available in Stage 3 (Round 8 or 9).
Sow
and/or
Bake bread
Stage 1
Plow 1 Field
and/or
Sow
Stage 5
The Sow action allows a player to plant 1 or more empty fields: the
player takes 1 Grain from his or her personal supply and places it on an
empty (fallow) field, then adds 2 Grain from the general supply to the
field.
Instead of Grain, a player may also Sow Vegetables by taking
1 Vegetable from his or her personal supply and placing it on the empty
field. 1 Vegetable from the general supply is added to the field.
A newly planted Grain field holds 3 counters, a Vegetable field
2 counters (see illustration, top right).
Grain and Vegetables are harvested during the Harvest (see Play of the
Game on page 4, Harvest). Grain and Vegetables that are in a player’s
personal supply may be converted to 1 Food at any time – or to more
than 1 Food with an appropriate Improvement.
If a field is emptied, it can be replanted using the Sow action – a
Harvested field does not need to be re-Plowed. In Stage 5 (Round 12 or
13), a new action allows players to Plow a field and immediately Sow
one or more empty fields (see Illustration).
Baking bread as an additional action when plowing
A player who chooses the Sow and/or Bake bread Action space may choose what to
do with any or all Grain counters in his or her personal supply. Grain may be sown in
empty fields (see above), be Baked into a loaf of bread and converted to Food or be left
in the supply. Baking bread requires an appropriate Improvement with the
symbol.
A Fireplace allows one Grain to be converted to 2 Food, a Cooking Hearth converts it to
3 Food. A Stone Oven allows up to 2 Grain to be converted to 4 Food each and a Clay
Oven allows at most 1 Grain to be converted to 5 Food (see also Major Improvements in
Appendix, section 3).
ActionD–Raisinganimals:FencePastures,BuildStables,RaiseSheep,WildBoarandCattle.
Each player may raise exactly one animal as a pet in his or her home, regardless of the
home’s size and type. The pet does not take a room away from a Family member.
To hold more animals, players must Fence pastures. Each pasture may only hold animals
of one type – Sheep, Wild boar or Cattle. Up to 2 animals may live on each square of the
pasture: Pastures that occupy 1 farmyard square can hold 2 animals; 2 squares can hold 4
animals; 3 squares can hold 6 animals etc.
During the course of the game, players may rearrange their animals at any time, as long as
these rules are followed. A player may release some or all of their animals at any time, at
will (for example, to make room for other animals in a farmyard space). Animals breed at
the very end of the Harvest (see page 5). Animals breed at the very end of the Harvest (see
page 5).
The Fences action allows a player to immediately Fence pastures at a cost of 1 Wood
for each fence. Fences border the pastures and are laid between the farmyard spaces;
one fence may border more than one pasture. Like rooms and fields, all of a player’s
pastures must be orthogonally adjacent. Fences may only be built if they will create a fully
enclosed pasture, with fences on all sides. The edge of the farmyard board, stables, fields
and rooms do not count as fences. Each player may build at most 15 fences. Fields and
rooms may not be completely surrounded with a fence. Fences may not be demolished
once they have been built. If a player has already built pastures, any new pastures must
border the existing ones. You may subdivide an existing pasture by adding a fence or
fences (see example in the Appendix, section 1.2).
Enclosed farmyard spaces are considered to be “used” (See Scoring).
6
1 Grain becomes 3, 1 Vegetable
becomes 2. Players can use the Sow
action to sow several empty fields at
once. It is irrelevant whether Grain
or Vegetables was sown in the field
previously. If it has been completely
Harvested, it may be re-Sown.
Example: Jakob has 2 empty fields,
as well as 1 Grain and 1 Vegetable
in his personal supply. He uses the
Grain and Vegetables as seeds and
plants them in his fields, using the
Sow and/or bake bread action.
After Sowing, there are 3 Grain on
one field and 2 Vegetables on the
other. In each of the two following
harvests, he will receive 1 Grain and
1 Vegetable. After that, the Vegetable
field is empty. Jakob plows a new
field and chooses the Sow and/or
Bake bread action again. He plants
the two harvested Vegetables in the
two empty fields. He cannot plant
anything in the third field, because
it still contains one Grain. He uses
a Baking Improvement with the
symbol to bake his two Grain into
bread.
11 fences have created 3 pastures. In
one are two white Sheep (this pasture
is full), the next contains one Wild
boar and the large pasture (bottom)
provides grazing room for 3 brown
Cattle.
Building stables
Placing a stable in a pasture doubles the capacity of the entire pasture. Stables can be built
at a cost of 2 Wood using the Build room(s) and/or Build stable(s) Action space. They
may be placed on any space in the farmyard that does not already contain a room or a
field, and may not be removed. Stables need not be fenced in: each unfenced stable may
hold exactly 1 animal. Only 1 stable may be built in any farmyard space. A player may
fence the stable in later, in order to create a new pasture with doubled capacity.
Building the stable creates room for
4 more animals.
Occupation and Improvement cards
At the start of the game, each player receives 7 Occupation cards and 7 Minor
Improvement cards.
A player who plays a card from their hand or buys a Major Improvement must read the
text on the card aloud so that all the other players are aware of its effects.
When the term “supply” is used on
a card, it always means the general
supply, unless it specifically states
otherwise.
Occupation cards
A player can use the 1 Occupation Action space(s) to play one of these cards face-up on
the table.
On the 1 Occupation Action space that is printed on the lefthand game board, a player’s first Occupation is free, and each
additional Occupation costs 1 Food. In the 3–5 player game, a
second Occupation space has varying costs depending on the
number of players (see the appropriate Action cards).
1 Occupation
(costs 2 Food)
The text on the Occupation cards applies to the player as soon as the card
is played. Cards that are in a player’s hand have no effect on the game.
Several cards, including the Countryman, Acrobat and Net Fisherman, are
printed with a Claim symbol – if a player with one of these Occupations
meets the stated condition, a Claim token is placed on the appropriate
Action space with the arrow pointing towards the player with the claim.
Improvement cards
In addition to the Minor Improvements, there are also ten Major Improvement cards. In each
game, different Minor Improvements will come into play, but the same Major Improvements
are available in each game and may be used by any player. These are described in Section 2
of the Appendix.
The 1 Major or Minor Improvement Action space allows a player to purchase either a
Major or Minor Improvement – as does the Renovation space. Minor Improvements may
also be purchased – in conjunction with other actions – on the Starting player and Family
growth action spaces. Players may not choose the action After Family growth, also 1 Minor
Improvement and only purchase an Improvement: This card only allows an Improvement
after Family growth (see Action B – Family Growth on page 5).
The upper-right corner of an Improvement card shows its cost: goods that a player must pay
in order to play the card. Grain and Vegetables that are paid must be taken from a player’s
supply and may not be taken directly from a field. Some Improvement cards (for example the
Cooking Hearth) have a slash, showing that the player may choose between two options to
pay for the Improvement.
Some Minor Improvements require the player to have a prerequisite – these are shown in the
top left corner. In order to play these cards, the player must have the required goods, tiles or
cards on the table in front of him or her. Of course, the condition is fulfilled if the player has
more than the required number of fields or cards.
Many Minor and all Major Improvements are worth Victory Points at the end of the game.
These are shown by the symbol at the left beside the picture. The Bonus Points symbol on
some cards (bottom center) indicates that they also give variable Bonus points – these are
described in the text on the card.
Some Minor Improvements (Traveling cards) are placed in the hand of the next player to the
left after they are played and acted on. These are indicated by the brown arrows to
either side of the illustration and the text on the card explains how they are used.
Some Minor Improvements are Upgrade cards. Playing these cards not only costs goods
but also requires the player to return an existing played or acquired Improvement. Upgraded
Net Fisherman
248
If one of your people uses an Action
space that provides Reed, you can
take all the Food markers from the
“Fishing” space in the Returning
home phase (Phase 4).
As soon as a player who has played
the Net Fisherman uses a Family
member to harvest Reed, the green
Claim marker is placed on the Fishing space. If there is still Food on the
space during the Return home phase,
the player receives it.
If a card requires a player to have a
Vegetable (Grain) field, he must have
a field (or an Improvement card) with
Vegetables (Grain) growing on it. An
empty, plowed field does not count.
prerequisite
3
costs
Bookshelf
Occupations
112
Victory
Points
Whenever you play 1 Occupation,
you receive 3 Food before you pay
the costs of the Occupation.
Bonus points
7
Major Improvements are returned to the Major Improvements board and may be bought
again by any player (including the same one as before). Upgraded Minor Improvements are
removed from the game.
Scoring
The game is scored at the end of Round 14. The Summary cards have scoring tables, as
does the reverse side of the Major Improvements board. The following categories are
scored one after another:
Fields: All field tiles that are on the player’s farmyard are scored, regardless of whether
they are currently fallow or are sown. A player with 0 or 1 fields loses 1 point. Each field
after the first scores 1 point, up to a maximum of 4 points for 5 or more fields. Players
score -1/1/2/3/4 points for 0-1/2/3/4/5+ fields.
Pastures: Points are awarded for fenced areas (“Pastures”), not for the number of
farmyard spaces that are fenced in (“Pasture spaces”). The size of the individual pastures
is irrelevant. A player with no pastures loses 1 point. Each pasture scores 1 point, up to a
maximum of 4 points for 4 or more pastures. Players score -1/1/2/3/4 points for 0/1/2/3/4+
pastures.
Grain and Vegetables: All of a player’s Grain and Vegetables are scored – whether it is in
the fields or in the player’s supply. A player with no Grain loses 1 point. After that, players
score 1/2/3/4 points for 1/4/6/8+ Grain. A player with no Vegetables loses 1 point. After
that, players score 1 point per Vegetable up to a maximum of 4 points.
Animals: A player loses a point for having no animals of a particular type. Players score
-1/1/2/3/4 points for 0/1/4/6/8+ Sheep; -1/1/2/3/4 points for 0/1/3/5/7+ Wild boar; and
-1/1/2/3/4 points for 0/1/2/4/6+ Cattle.
Unused farmyard spaces: No additional points are awarded for using farmyard spaces,
but players lose 1 point for each unused farmyard space. Farmyard spaces are counted as
“used”, if they are fenced in or if they have a room tile, field tile or unfenced stable on
them. In other words, “unused” farmyard spaces are empty and unfenced.
Fenced Stables: Each fenced stable earns the player 1 point. No points are given for
unfenced stables. Players do not lose points for having no stables. An unfenced stable has
the advantage that the player avoids losing a point for having unused farmyard spaces.
Huts, Houses & Family Members
Players earn 1 point for each room in a Clay hut (so a player with 4 Clay rooms earns 4
points), and 2 points for each room in a Stone house (so a player with 4 rooms earns 8
points). Rooms in a Wooden hut do not earn any Victory Points.
Players earn 3 points for each Family member, up to a maximum of 15 points (as the
number of Family members cannot be greater than 5).
Points for cards
A point value is shown in a yellow circle on the left of the Minor and Major Improvement
cards. Players lose 3 points for each Begging Card that they hold at the end of the game.
Bonus points: The text on various Improvement and Occupation cards describes how
Bonus points are awarded. Cards which earn Bonus points have a Bonus point symbol at
the bottom.
Number of game components
The only game components that have been deliberately limited in number are the 5 Family
member discs, the 4 stables and the 15 fences for each player. If the other game components
run out, a substitute should be improvised. To help, there are also multiplication markers,
which multiply by 3 or 4 on the front and by 5 on the back. To show which resource the
marker applies to, one of the appropriate goods is placed on top of the marker. Some
markers are pre-printed with Food and Grain.
Agricola as a Family Game (for 1-5 people from 10 years)
In the simplified version of Agricola, the Occupation and Minor Improvement cards are
not used – players do not have a hand of cards.
The first game board is turned face-down, showing the “Agricola Family Game” side, and
in a 3–5 player game only the “Family Game” Action cards are used.
The Major or Minor Improvement action is restricted to Major Improvements.
Otherwise, the rules are the same as for the full game.
In scoring, enclosed pastures
are counted – not the individual
pasture spaces. In this example,
there are 2 pastures (not 3).
All of a player’s Grain and
Vegetable markers are counted
– in the player’s supply as well as
in the fields.
“Unused spaces”
means each space
in the farmyard that
is not covered with
a room tile, has not
been plowed into a field, that is not
enclosed by a fence and on which
there is no stable.
5 Food
(pre-printed)
5 Clay
3 Grain
(pre-printed)
4 Sheep
Solo version (for 1 person, from 12 years)
To play a Solo game, start with 0 Food. The left-hand spaces on the left game board
8
remain empty, as in the 2-player game. Otherwise, play the
game by the same rules as the multi-player game, taking your
turns one after another. After you play a Minor Improvement
that should be passed to the player on the left, it is removed
from the game.
Exceptions: Adult Family members must be fed 3 Food each at
Harvest time (Newborn offspring are still fed only 1). The
“3 Wood” Action space only supplies 2 Wood in any round.
To play a series of Solo games:
After the first game, choose one of your played Occupations.
This is now a permanent Occupation and is placed face-up
before the start of all subsequent games without requiring any
Action to be used. You can use the abilities of the Occupation
card from the start of the game, just as though you had already
played it. Each subsequent game, you choose another played
Occupation to be added to your permanent Occupations. Reduce
the number of cards in your Occupations hand by the number of
permanent Occupations that you have, so that you have a total of
seven Occupation cards at the start of each Solo game. Once an
Occupation has been made permanent, it must be placed face-up
at the start of each subsequent game in the series.
Because you have more permanent Occupations after each
game, the goal score that you must reach goes up in each game:
In the first game, your goal is 50 points, then 55, 59, 62, 64, 65,
66 and 67 points. After the eighth game, the Solo game series is
over. (You can of course play on with all permanent Occupation
cards, in which case the goal score increases by 1 point per
game.) At the start of each game in the series, you receive 1 food
for every 2 points by which you exceeded the goal score for the
previous game (rounded down). Any cards from the previous
game that were not moved to the permanent Occupations are
shuffled into the deck.
Many Solo players enjoy choosing their own cards – even
determining the order of the Round cards. You can also try
the following three “contests”: restrict your Occupation and
Improvement cards to only one of Deck E, I or K.
Agricola – Appendix
This appendix consists of 8 sections:
1. The Action spaces
9
2. Major Improvements
10
3. Minor Improvements
10
4. Occupation cards
11
5. Counters & Tokens
12
6. Variant
12
7. Cards played during a Harvest12
8. Credits
12
1. The Action Spaces
Some actions are printed directly on the game boards (1 .1) and others are on cards. Each
round during the game, a new Round card (1.2) is drawn. Depending on the number of players,
up to 6 additional Action cards may be laid out at the start of the game (1.3).
A player may never use an Action space without taking one of the actions shown on the
space.
1.1. Actions that are printed on spaces on the game board
The actions that are printed on the game board are the same each time the game is played.
They vary slightly in the Solo game and in the Family Game variant (see Rules).
Action spaces with an arrow: Players whose Family members use this space take all
the resources, animals or Food that are on the space. Food is found on the Fishing and
Traveling Players spaces and, in the Family Game variant, in the Storehouse. Apart from
these, the Action spaces are named after the goods that are placed on the spaces.
Build Room(s) and/or Stable(s): During the course of the game, each player may build
any number of rooms and at most 4 stables. Pieces must be placed immediately whenever
something is built.
Each stable costs 2 Wood and can be placed on a fenced or empty unfenced farmyard space.
A fenced stable doubles the holding capacity of a pasture. Each farmyard space can hold 1
stable. Each space within a pasture may have its own stable: the pasture’s capacity is then
multiplied by 4, 8, etc. An unfenced stable can hold at most 1 animal and may be fenced later.
Building houses is explained fully in the Rules (see Action A). A new room must be
orthogonally adjacent to existing rooms.
Starting player and/or Minor Improvement: The player takes or retains the Starting player
token. He may play one Minor Improvement from his hand
Take 1 Grain: The player takes 1 Grain from the general supply and places it in her own
supply. She may not Sow the Grain immediately, even if she has fallow fields. To Sow it, she
must choose one of the Sow action spaces. (see Appendix section 1.2 and Rules, Action C)
Plow 1 Field: The player places 1 field tile on an unfenced, empty farmyard space of her
choice. If she already has fields, the new field must be orthogonally adjacent to the existing
fields (see Rules, Action C). Players may not un-Plow plowed fields (that is, a player may
never remove a field tile) for any reason.
1 Occupation: The player plays 1 Occupation card from his hand by placing it face-up on
the table and reading it aloud. The first Occupation card a player plays in a game is free; each
additional Occupation card costs 1 Food (see Rules, Occupation and Improvement cards).
Day Laborer: The player takes 2 Food from the general supply in the standard game, or 1
Food and 1 Building resource in the Family Game.
1.2. Action Spaces on the Round cards.
The game is divided into 14 rounds over 6 stages – the first stage lasts for 4 rounds, the
second for 3, the third to fifth for 2 each and the sixth for 1 round. In each round, a new
Action space is added into the game; this can be used in the round in which it is turned up
and in each subsequent round. Each of the 6 stages ends with a Harvest.
The Action spaces are described here in the order of the game stages.
Sow and/or bake bread (Stage 1): For a description of Sowing, see Rules, Action C. When
Sowing, a player need not Sow all her empty fields, some may be left empty. Bake bread
means that the player takes Grain from her supply (she may not use Grain that is on one
of her fields) and uses a Baking Improvement with the
symbol to turn it into food. For
example, a Fireplace or Cooking Hearth can turn one Grain into 2 or 3 Food. Various Oven
Improvements allow players to bake Grain into even more food.
1 Major or Minor Improvement (Stage 1): The player may place either a Major or a Minor
Improvement. Major Improvements are shown on the red cards and may be placed by any
player. Minor Improvements are on the orange cards. Minor Improvements are held in a
player’s hand – other players do not have access to those cards.
1 Sheep (Stage 1): Place 1 Sheep on this space in the Replenish phase (Phase 2) of each
round. A player who selects this action takes all the Sheep from the Action space and must
either put them into his farmyard (see Rules, Action D) or use an Improvement to turn them
into Food. Sheep that cannot be pastured or turned into Food are returned to the general
supply.
Fences (Stage 1): Fences cost 1 Wood per fence. A fence that has been built may not be
demolished. Huts do not create a natural border for a pasture – a pasture must be surrounded
by fences even along the side(s) of a hut, the edges of the game board and beside fields and
stables. A pasture may be divided into several pastures by adding fences (see example).
(Keeping animals in fenced pastures is described in the Rules, Action D).
Example: To the left is a pasture with
a stable. It can hold 8 animals. In the
example to the right, the pasture has been
divided. The first pasture can only hold 2
animals, the second (with the stable) can
hold 4.
1 Stone (Stage 2): This Action space is a normal resource space as described in section 1.1.
In Stage 4 (Rounds 10 & 11), a second Stone space enters the game.
After Renovation, also 1 Major or Minor Improvement (Stage 2): Renovating is
described in the Rules under Action A. A player may only use this space to purchase a Major
or Minor Improvement after Renovating. A player may not undertake both renovations,
from a Wood to a Clay hut and to a Stone house, in one action.
After Family Growth, also 1 Minor Improvement (Stage 2): A player may only use this
Family growth space if he has more empty rooms than Family members. It is irrelevant
how the family has grown before and whether the Family members are on the game board
or in the farmyard. A player may not ignore the Family growth action and only purchase the
Minor Improvement.
A Guest – acquired through a Minor Improvement card – does not count as a Family
member.
Family growth is described in the Rules, Action B; Minor Improvements are described in
section 3 of this Appendix.
Take 1 Vegetable (Stage 3): The player takes 1 Vegetable from the general supply and
places it in her own supply. As with Grain, the player may not immediately Sow the
Vegetable. To Sow Vegetables, she must later place a Family member on one of the Sow
Action spaces.
1 Wild Boar (Stage 3): This Action space is the same as the 1 Sheep Round card, but
instead of a sheep it adds a Wild boar to the game.
1 Stone (Stage 4): This is a normal building resource space (see above).
1 Cattle (Stage 4): This action space is the same as the 1 Sheep Round card, but instead of a
Sheep it adds a Cattle to the game.
Plow and/or Sow 1 field (Stage 5): The player who takes this action may Plow one field
and after that may also Sow: he may plant Grain or Vegetables from his personal supply into
any empty field on his farmyard (See Rules, Action C). A player need not Sow all his fields;
some may be left empty.
Family Growth even without a room (Stage 5): Unlike the other Family Growth card, this
is not dependent on the number of rooms. By using this action three times, a player could
possibly have 5 Family members in only 2 rooms. Note: If a player who uses this card later
extends her home, she may not use the other Family Growth card again until she has more
rooms than Family members: the new rooms must first be used for Family members that did
9
not previously have their own room.
After Renovation, also Fences (Stage 6): Round 14 is the only round of the game in which
there are 2 Renovation actions (so that more than one player can build a Stone house). A
player must Renovate to be allowed to Fence pastures. Players may never perform both
renovations (to a Clay hut and to a Stone house) with one action.
1.3. Special Action spaces that vary according to the number of players.
In a 3-5 player game, additional Action spaces ensure that there are enough actions available
for all the players. Those that do not simply award Building materials or food are described
here.
1 Occupation (3 players): A player who chooses this action may play 1 Occupation
card from his hand. This Occupation costs 2 Food, so is much more expensive than the
Occupations on the other Occupation Action space (see Appendix 1.1).
Take 1 Reed, 1 Stone and 1 Food (4 players): The player takes 1 Reed, 1 Stone and 1 Food
from the general supply and places them in his personal supply.
1 Occupation (4 players): A player who chooses this action may play 1 Occupation card
from his hand. If this is the player’s first or second Occupation card, it costs 1 food, a
subsequent Occupation card costs 2 food.
Take 1 Reed, also 1 Stone and 1 Wood (5 players): 1 Reed is placed on this action space
each round. In addition, when a player takes this Action, he also takes 1 Stone and 1 Wood
from the general supply (Stone and Wood do not build up on this space over several rounds).
In a 5-player game, there are three action spaces on which a player must choose one of two
or more options. The restriction of only one Family member on any action space still applies
to these spaces: by taking an action, a player prevents other players from taking the other
actions on that card.
Take animals (5 players): A player who chooses this Action space has three
Take 1 Sheep
and 1 Food
choices: Take 1 Sheep and 1 Food; Take 1 Wild Boar; or pay 1 Food for 1 Cattle.
The animal is taken from the general supply and is immediately placed in the
Take
1 Wild boar
player’s farmyard or turned into Food using an appropriate Occupation (e.g.
Pay 1 Food
Butcher, Meat Seller) or an Improvement with the
symbol).
for 1 Cattle
Either 1 Occupation or, from Round 5, Family Growth (5 players): The player
may play an Occupation card from her hand. If this is the player’s first or second
Occupation card, it costs 1 Food, a subsequent Occupation card costs 2 Food. From the start
of Round 5, a player may choose to take Family Growth instead of an Occupation.
Build 1 Room or Traveling Players (5 players): A player choosing this Action space may
either build a room or use the Traveling Players. Unlike the other Building space, this action
can only be used to build a single room. Each round, 1 Food is placed on the Traveling
Players space. If a player chooses the Building action, the Food remains on the Action
space. The Food cannot be taken by another player in this round because the Action space is
occupied.
Or
Or
2. Major Improvements
There are 10 Major Improvement cards. These have their own board, on which the cards are
laid out. Each Major Improvement card has its own place on the board. Once all but one of
the Major Improvements have been sold, the board is flipped to the reverse side, which has
an overview of scoring. There is a space for the tenth Major Improvement card on this side
of the board; it may still be bought.
Fireplaces and Cooking Hearths: A player may own several Fireplaces and Cooking
Hearths. The two Fireplaces only differ in their price. There is an inexpensive one for 2
Clay and an expensive one for 3 Clay. Similarly, the two Cooking Hearths are identical
except for their cost (4 Clay/5 Clay). A player who chooses the Major Improvement action
may upgrade a Fireplace to a Cooking Hearth by taking a Cooking Hearth and returning
the Fireplace to the Major Improvements board, where it is available for purchase again.
Fireplaces and Cooking Hearths are worth 1 VP each. They make Vegetables worth more
than 1 Food, and can turn animals into Food. They also allow the player to use the Bake
bread Action space (see Appendix section 1.2) to make Grain more valuable. The difference
between a Fireplace and a Cooking Hearth is that the Cooking Hearth produces 1 more Food
from Baking bread and from cooking Vegetables, Wild Boar and Cattle.
Clay Oven and Stone Oven: These allow players to Bake bread more efficiently and are
worth 2 and 3 VP respectively. Players may Bake bread as a one-time action immediately
after they have bought an Oven.
The Ovens cost 3 Clay and 1 Stone / 1 Clay and 3 Stone. Some Minor Improvements allow
them to be upgraded to a more efficient Baking improvement.
The Joinery, Pottery and Basketmaker’s Workshop offer an additional scoring
opportunity for Wood, Clay and Reed. In each Harvest, up to 1 of the corresponding
Building resource may be converted into 2 or 3 Food (depending on the card). At the end of
the game, players with these cards earn up to 3 Bonus points for having several of the same
resource. These workshops each cost 2 Stone plus 2 Wood, Clay or Reed. At the end of the
game, each workshop is worth 2VP.
The Well provides 1 food for each of up to 5 Rounds. More importantly, the Well is worth 4
VP at the end of the game. The Well costs 3 Stone and 1 Wood.
3. Minor Improvements
The 169 “Occupation” cards (see Appendix, section 5) and the 139 “Minor Improvement”
cards are divided into three decks. This section clarifies questions about some of the Minor
Improvement cards. The following letters are used to indicate the deck that a card belongs to
(The decks may be combined with one another):
E Basic deck
I Interactive deck
K Complex deck
Many Improvements are worth Victory Points. They may also offer the opportunity to earn
Bonus points. The basic point value is shown as a number on the left side of the card.
The following abbreviations are used in the card descriptions:
B
Cards that offer Bonus points
U
Upgrade cards
T
Traveling cards (pass to the player on the left after play)
AS
One Minor Improvement, the Tavern, is available to all players as
an Action space
FS
Cards that function as a Farmyard space
10
Acreage (K, FS): Players who receive 4 Grain on fields when Sowing (through Occupations
like the Fieldsman and Smallholder) can also receive 4 Grain on the Acreage.
Alms (I, T): The current round is not a “completed” round.
Animal Feed (I): When acquiring this card, it is irrelevant whether the fields are planted
with Grain or Vegetables. A player may return animals to the supply in order to make room
for the new arrivals.
Bakehouse (K, 5, U): The Baker’s Kitchen may not be upgraded to a Bakehouse.
Baker’s Kitchen (I, 4, U): see Bakehouse.
Bean Field (E, 1, FS): May be combined with the Potato Dibber, Fieldsman and
Smallholder.
Boar Breeding (K, T): The Wild boar may immediately be converted into Food, using an
symbol or an appropriate Occupation.
Improvement with the
Bread Paddle (K): May be used with the Puppeteer and the Educator.
Bookshelf (K, 1): When used with the Writing Desk to play two Occupation cards, the
additional 3 Food are distributed twice (once for each card). The Patron gives an additional
2 Food.
Brushwood Roof (K, 1): The player may mix Wood and Reed when building a new room.
Instead of 2 Reed, he may use 1 Wood and 1 Reed.
Cattle Market (E, T): The cattle may immediately be converted into Food, using an
Improvement with the
symbol or an appropriate Occupation.
Chicken Coop (I, 1): May either be built with 2 Wood & 1 Reed or with 2 Clay & 1 Reed.
Clay Roof (E, 1): Players may mix Clay and Reed when building. Instead of 2 Reed, a
player may use 1 Clay & 1 Reed.
Clay Supports (E): A Clay Support is a support used in preparing a Clay wall. A player is
allowed to build 1 room for 5 Clay & 2 Reed and an additional room for 2 Clay, 1 Wood & 1
Reed in the same turn. The Clay Supports may not be combined with the Axe, Carpenter or
the Clay Plasterer.
Clogs (E): This card is worth 2 points even if the player receives Bonus points for the Halftimbered House or the Mansion. May be combined with the Chief’s Daughter.
Copse (I, 1, FS): Players who receive 4 Grain on fields when Sowing can also grow 4 Wood
once or twice in the Copse. Harvest the Wood during the Harvest.
Corn Storehouse (I, 1): This is built with either 2 Wood & 1 Reed or 2 Clay & 1 Reed. Use
the Corn Storehouse during the Harvest at the same time as the Watermill and the Harvest
Helper.
Crooked Plow (K, 1): A player may choose to only Plow 2 fields instead of 3 at once. Place
1 field tile on the card to show that the Plow may be used 1 more time. Each time a player
selects the Plow 1 Field action, s/he may only use 1 plow.
Field (E, T): The Harrow and Plows may not be used with the Field.
Fish Trap (I): The Fish Trap does not earn additional food for the Reed Exchange, Helpful
Neighbors, Reed Buyer and Reed Collector cards.
Flagon (I): If the Well is rebuilt after the Village Well upgrade, the Food is distributed again.
If both the Village Well and the Well have been played when the Flagon is played, the Food
is distributed twice.
Forest Pasture (K, 1, FS): The Wild boar on this card are included when scoring Wild boar.
Granary (K, 1): A player may not build the Granary with 2 Wood & 1 Clay or with 1 Wood
& 2 Clay. The Granary may not be combined with the Grain Cart, Corn Scoop, Pieceworker,
Sycophant, Seed Seller, Greengrocer, Market Crier or Field Watchman.
Greenhouse (K, 1): If the player does not wish to pay the 1 Food to buy the
Vegetables, the Vegetable token is returned to the general supply.
Guest (I, T): To show the Guest, take a Claim marker and turn it over to show
the word Guest. The Guest counts as an additional Family member. A player who
already has 5 Family members can use the Guest to play one round with 6. A Guest
is not counted in checking whether there is enough room in the home.
Gypsy’s Crock (E, 1): A player who converts 4 goods at once receives 2 additional Food,
for 6 Goods, 3 additional Food, etc.
Half-timbered House (E, B): If a player does not Renovate to a Stone house or if the player
has also played the Mansion, there is no advantage.
Harrow (I): Other players that use the Harrow may only Plow 2 fields at once if they
place one Family member on one of the Plow 1 field Action spaces. The Harrow cannot be
combined with any of the Plows. The owner of the Harrow may not deny other players the
right to use it.
Holiday House (I, 8): This costs either 3 Wood & 2 Reed or 3 Clay & 2 Reed. The player
may not add a Clay Roof, Brushwood Roof or Straw-thatched Roof when building this. The
owner of this card does not participate in the Work Phase (Phase 3) in round 14 – but s/he
can still profit from the “Start the Round” phase (Phase 1).
House Goat (K, 1): The goat was the first domesticated animal in the history of the human
race. Place 1 Food for each remaining Harvest on this card, to ensure that the Food is
not forgotten. A player cannot choose to let the Goat run free in order to make room for a
different animal in his or her house.
Lasso (I): Once the owner of this card has had a turn during the “Work” phase (Phase 3) and
has placed 2 Family members, she can place her third Family member as soon as she has her
second turn. Players cannot place more than two people at a time with the Lasso. A player
with 4 or 5 Family members may use the Lasso twice in the same round.
Lettuce Patch (E, 1, FS): To receive the 4 Food for Harvested Vegetables, the player must
convert the Vegetables to Food immediately after Harvesting. See also: Turnip Field.
Liquid Manure (K): Fields that have already been planted when the card is played will only
benefit from the Liquid Manure when they are emptied and replanted. Liquid Manure may
be combined with a Corn Storehouse, Potato Dibber, Planter Box, Bean Field, Turnip Field,
Lettuce Patch, Fieldsman and Smallholder.
Manure (I): The owner of the Manure has a Field phase (Harvest phase 1) after each round .
Outside a regular Harvest time, the Milking Shed, Spindle, Butter Churn, Milking Stool and
Loom do not earn any additional Food.
Market Stall (E, T): The Market Stall may not be combined with the Pieceworker but may
be combined with the Market Woman. A player with no Grain in the Supply may not use the
Market Stall, even in combination with the Market Woman.
Milking Shed (I, 2): Pets and live Animals on Improvement cards are also counted with the
animals in the farmyard. At Harvest time, the Milking Shed is processed before the Spindle,
Butter Churn, Milking Stool and Loom.
Millstone (E): With the Baker, the player receives at most 2 additional Food in each Harvest.
Mini Pasture (E, T): The new pasture must border an existing pasture. The Mini Pasture
may be combined with the Hedge Keeper, Farmer, Stablehand and Animal Breeder.
Moldboard Plow (I, 1): Place 2 field tiles on this card to show that the Plow may be used 2
times.
Potato Dibber (E): May be combined with Beanfield, Turnip Field and Lettuce Patch.
Punner (I): Unless another player Plows more than one field on his/her action, the player
with the Punner may not take a field with it.
Reed Exchange (I, T): A player may not exchange 1 Wood or 1 Clay for only 1 Reed, or
exchange 1 Wood and 1 Clay for 2 Reed.
Reed Hut (K, 1): The person in the Reed Hut is not counted when calculating whether
Family Growth is allowed. They do not count as part of the family.
Riding Plow (E, 2): A player may choose to only Plow 2 fields at once instead of 3. Place 2
field tiles on the card to show that the plow may be used 2 more times. Each time a player
selects the Plow 1 Field action, s/he may only use 1 Plow.
Sawhorse (K): A player that can already put those fences up at no cost cannot save the free
fences for another turn.
Shepherd’s Crook (I): If, for example, a pasture of size 5 or 6 is divided into a pasture of
size 4, this does not count as “newly fenced” and it does not receive the 2 Sheep.
Shepherd’s Pipe (E): May not be combined with the Stablemaster.
Sleeping Corner (K, 1): This can be used with either of the Family Growth actions.
Spinney (I, 1): When the owner of the Spinney demands the 1 Wood from another player,
the other player is entitled to change her mind & select a different action instead – it is easy
to overlook the Spinney.
Stone Exchange (K, T): A player may not exchange 1 Wood or 1 Clay for only 1 Stone, or
exchange 1 Wood and 1 Clay for 2 Stone.
Swing Plow (K, 1): A player may choose to only Plow 2 fields instead of 3 at once. Place
2 field tiles on the card to show how many times the Plow may be used. Each time a player
selects the Plow 1 Field action, she may only use 1 plow.
Turnip field (K, 1, FS): May be combined with the Potato Dibber, Fieldsman and
Smallholder.
Turnwrest Plow (E, 1): A player may choose to only Plow 2 fields at once instead of 3.
Place 1 field tile on the card to show that the Plow may be used 1 more time. Each time a
player selects the Plow 1 field action, she may only use 1 plow.
Weekly Market (I, T): The Weekly Market may be combined with the Market Woman but
not with the Pieceworker.
Wood Cart (I): The Wood Cart may not be used with the 1 Reed, also 1 Stone and 1 Wood
action space in the 5-player game.
Wooden Crane (I, 1): The Wooden Crane may not be used on the Take 1 Reed, 1 Stone
and 1 Food space from the 4-player game or the Reed, also 1 Stone and 1 Wood from the
5-player game.
Village Well (I, 5, U): The Well gives 1 Food per round for 5 rounds. These Food remain
on the board even when the 3 additional Food from the Village Well are distributed, and are
distributed again if the Well is purchased a second time.
4. The Occupation cards
This section clarifies questions about some of the occupation cards. The following
abbreviations have been used:
E
Basic deck
I
Interactive deck
K
Complex deck (The decks may be combined with one another).
B
Cards that offer Bonus points
AS
Cards that function as an Action space
FS
Cards that function as an additional Farmyard space
The number range shows the number of players that the card may be used with (1-5, 3-5 or
4-5).
Acrobat (K, 4-5): If the Acrobat uses the Traveling Players Action space, he should place
Claim markers on any unused Take 1 Grain, Plow 1 field and Plow 1 field and/or Sow
Action spaces as a reminder that these may be claimed later.
Adoptive Parents (K, 1-5): A player must pay 2 Food instead of 1 for an adoptive child,
even if it was adopted immediately before the Harvest.
Animal Dealer (I, 3-5): In the 5-player game, there is an Action space which gives Players
1 animal of their choice. The Animal Dealer cannot take an additional animal. See also:
Animal handler.
Animal Handler (K, 4-5): By paying 1 Food, a player may immediately convert the animal
into Food. The 1 Food may not be taken from the proceeds.
Animal Tamer (K, 1-5): No effect after acquisition of a House Goat.
Basin Maker (K, 4-5, B): Slaughtered Wild boar may either be placed on the Tanner or used
for the Basin Maker, not both
Berry Picker (E, 3-5): This card is activated by the Action space 1 Reed, in addition 1
Stone and 1 Wood that is used in a 5-player game and also by the Building Materials Minor
Improvement card.
Businessman (I, 3-5): In conjunction with the Traveling Salesman, up to 3 Minor
Improvements may be played one after another using the Starting Player Action space.
In conjunction with the Merchant, first 1 Minor Improvement and 1 Minor or Major
Improvement and then additionally, for 1 Food, either 2 Minor Improvements or 1 Major and
1 Minor Improvements may be played using the Starting Player Action space.
Carpenter (E, 1-5): May not be combined with the Axe or with the Clay Plasterer.
Charcoal Burner (E, 3-5): The player can place 1 Food and 1 Wood on the unbuilt Major
symbol, to remind her to take the tokens.
Improvements with the
Chief (E, 1-5, B): The third point per room is scored as Bonus points (see the Bonus point
symbol). The Chief may be combined with the Half-timbered House as well as with the
Mansion.
Clay Worker (K, 1-5): In a 5-player game, there is an Action space on which the player
always receives 1 Wood in addition to any other resources. The Clay worker also receives 1
additional Clay on this space.
Conservator (E, 1-5): May not be combined with the Stone Breaker. The Renovation is paid
as usual, with 1 Stone per room plus 1 Reed.
Countryman (K, 4-5): If the player chooses either the Take 1 Grain or Take 1 Vegetable
action, he places Claim markers on the empty Sowing spaces to show that he has a claim.
There are 2 Sowing Action spaces. The second Round card with this action appears during
Stage V.
Cowherd (I, 3-5): In the 5-player game, there is an Action space which gives players 1
animal of their choice. The Cowherd cannot take an additional Cattle token on this space.
Farm Steward (I, 1-5): Allows at most 1 Family Growth without space in the Hut.
Farmer (E, 4-5): The player only receives 1 new animal, even if several Pastures are created
with the same action.
Fence Builder (I, 1-5): From now on, the player has only 14 fences for building. Building
fences always follows all other actions on the Action space.
Fence Deliveryman (I, 1-5): Fences may not be removed from the Round space to build
them in the usual way. A player who only wishes to build 1-3 fences still pays 2 Food. A
player who chooses not to build any fences or not to build as many as were possible returns
the leftover fences to her own supply of unbuilt fences. A player may not leave a pasture
open.
Fence Overseer (K, 1-5): May be combined with Farmer, Animal Breeder, Stablehand and
Groom. Used with the Stablehand, it is possible to build fences, receiving 1 free stable that
could then be fenced for free. The player does not then receive a second stable, as only 1 free
stable is awarded in each action. Combined with the Groom: First the player puts up 1 stable,
then he surrounds it with fences.
Fieldsman (I, 1-5): May be combined with the Forester, Copse, Lettuce Patch, Beanfield,
Turnip Field and Acreage.
Field Guard (E, 4-5): see Head of the Family.
Field Watchman (I, 1-5): Plows and the Harrow cannot be used with the Field Watchman.
Field Worker (I, 3-5): The Field Worker is also activated when a Player uses the Corn
Storehouse.
Foreman (K, 4-5): Wood Distributor, Foreman and Taster can affect one another. A player
who decides to use the Occupation cannot take back the decision. A player who does not
wish to use the Occupation has until the start of the Work phase (Phase 3) to reconsider.
Forester (K, 1-5, FS): A player who may grow 4 Grain on a field, (eg. through an
Occupation) also grows 4 Wood on the Copse (1-3 times); a player who could grow 5 Grain
grows 5 Wood. A player with the Fieldsman receives a total of 5 piled Wood for a new Wood
planting, for 2 new Wood plantings she receives 4 Wood each.
Gardener (I, 1-5): All the player’s Vegetable patches remain untouched until the end of the
game. This also applies to the Beanfield, Turnip Field and Lettuce Patch.
Groom (I, 4-5): Wood that the player receives at the same time through a Private Forest,
Wood Collector or Wood Deliveryman may immediately be used to build 1 stable.
Harvest Helper (I, 3-5): A player may not take the additional Grain from one of his own
fields. The Corn Storehouse has precedence over the Harvest Helper. The Harvest Helper
may take the Grain from the Acreage Minor Improvement.
Head of the Family (E, 4-5): A player may not use the same Action space in the same round
with 2 of her own Family Members.
Hedge Cutter (E, 1-5): May be combined with the Fence Overseer, Fence Builder and
Fence Deliveryman as well as with the Farmer, Stablehand, Wood Carver and Sawhorse.
Hut Builder (E, 4-5): When the card is played, place a hut tile on the Action space for round
11.
Layabout (I, 1-5): The player does not participate in any part of the next Harvest, including
harvesting fields, breeding animals and feeding his or her family.
Lover (K, 3-5): If a player builds a room after the Lover has had Offspring, the Offspring
occupies the new room. It is better to first build the room, then take a normal Family Growth
action and only then use the Lover.
Market Woman (K, 1-5): The Market Woman may be combined with the Greenhouse,
Market Stall and Weekly Market. She may not be combined with Occupations. If the player
who has played the Market Woman also has the Market Stall or Weekly Market, he must first
give up Grain in order to get it back.
Mason (E, 1-5): The player may place a room tile on the Occupation card to show that he
has not yet taken the Extension action.
Merchant (E, 1-5): A player using the 1 Major or Minor Improvement Action space
can play either 2 Major or 2 Minor Improvements or 1 Major and 1 Minor Improvement.
In conjunction with the Traveling Salesman it is possible to acquire up to 4 Minor
Improvements, or to acquire 2 Major Improvements using the 1 Minor Improvement
and paying 1 Food. In conjunction with the Businessman, first 1 Minor Improvement
and 1 Minor or Major Improvement and then additionally, for 1 Food, either 2 Minor
Improvements or 1 Major and 1 Minor Improvements may be played using the Starting
Player Action space.
Net Fisherman (I, 1-5): When the Player places 1 Family member on an Action space with
Reed, he stakes his claim to fish by placing a Claim marker.
Parvenu (I, 4-5): The player receives the Stone immediately after Renovating, so can use
them immediately for the accompanying Improvement.
Pieceworker (K, 1-5): The Pieceworker can only buy goods in the “Work” phase (Phase
3) – not at the start of a round (Phase 1). The Pieceworker only affects goods that are earned
directly through an Action space, not through Improvements and Occupations.
Plow Driver (E, 1-5): May not be combined with any of the 5 Plows or the Harrow.
Plow Maker (E, 1-5): Unlike the Plow Driver, the Plow Maker may be combined with a
Plow or the Harrow.
Plowman (K, 1-5): If the player chooses not to take a field, the field is returned to the
general Supply.
Puppeteer (I, 4-5): The Puppeteer may only play Occupation cards if she has Food – even if
the card would provide Food immediately.
Reed Buyer (I, 4-5): If the Player takes Reed, he does not receive additional Food from the
general supply. The Other player may not refuse the Reed purchase. The Reed Buyer cannot
interfere if Reed is taken for the second time in a Round.
Resource Seller (K, 1-5): Resources may be bought at the start of the round (Phase 1) as
well as in the Work phase (phase 3). It is possible to buy more than 1 resource from the
Resource Seller by using Occupation cards like the Wood Distributor, Storekeeper or Clay
Worker.
Schnaps Distiller (K, 1-5): The Player does not require a Fireplace, Cooking Hearth or
Oven to convert the Vegetables.
Scholar (K, 1-5): The Bookshelf, Perpetual Student and Patron can be used with the Scholar.
Each round, the Scholar allows a player to play up to 1 additional card.
Sheep Farmer (K, 3-5): There is an additional animal space in the 5-player game. The
Sheep Farmer can affect this space. The Sheep Farmer may not be combined with the
Shepherd Boy, Animal Handler, Sheep Whisperer or Master Shepherd.
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Shepherd Boy (K, 4-5): The player does not receive a free Sheep for the current round. The
free Sheep may be immediately transformed into Food with an appropriate Improvement.
Smallholder (K, 1-5): May be combined with the Drinking Trough and the Shepherd’s
Pipe. Copse, Acreage, Beanfield, Turnip Field and Lettuce Patch do not count towards the
indicated maximum of 2 fields. Neither those nor the Forester may be combined with the
Smallholder.
Stable Hand (E, 1-5): Stable Hand and Fence Overseer can be combined. It would be
possible to build fences, receiving 1 free stable that could then be fenced for free. The player
does not then receive a second stable.
Stablemaster (E, 1-5): The Stablemaster and the Shepherd’s Pipe may not be used together.
Stone Breaker (K, 4-5): May not be combined with the Conservator.
Stone Buyer (I, 4-5): If the Player takes Stone, she does not receive additional Food from
the general Supply. The Other player may not refuse the Stone purchase. The Stone Buyer
cannot interfere if Stone is taken for the second or third time in a Round.
Stone Cutter (E, 3-5): If e.g. the Lumber card is played, the player need not give up any
Stone.
Sycophant (I, 4-5): Note that there are enough cards in the I deck for the other players to
avoid the Take 1 Grain Action space.
Tanner (K, 3-5, B): Slaughtered Wild Boar may either be placed on the Tanner or used for
the Basin Maker, not both.
Taster (I, 4-5): If e.g. the right-hand neighbor of the Taster is the Starting player, the Taster
pays him 1 Food and places her first person. The Starting player then places the second, the
third person is then played by the player who played the Taster (due to the normal flow of
the game). See also: Foreman.
Traveling Salesman (K, 1-5): In conjunction with the Merchant, it is possible to acquire up
to 4 Minor Improvements using the 1 Major or Minor Improvement space for 1 Food, or
to acquire 2 Major Improvements using the 1 Minor Improvement for 1 Food. In conjunction
with the Businessman, up to 3 Minor Improvements may be played using the Starting
Player Action.
Tutor (E, 1-5, B): The player may note the Bonus points immediately on his scoring pad, or
may also simply lay out his Occupations in the order that he plays them.
Veterinarian (K, 4-5): If the player draws 2 different animals, both are returned to the
container. If the animals are the same, the player may immediately convert the animal s/he
receives into Food. If you are playing with Wooden animals, take Stone, Reed and Wood
tokens for drawing and take one animal of the appropriate color.
Water Carrier (I, 1-5): Food is not distributed a second time when the Well is upgraded to
the Village Well. It is distributed again if the Well is built for a second time.
Well Builder (I, 1-5): After the upgrade to the Village Well, the Well may be built a second
time. The benefits of the Well builder also apply the second time.
Wet Nurse (K, 1-5): Players are allowed to build several rooms at once with the Build
Room(s) action. For 2 Food, the Wet Nurse allows an immediate Family Growth of 2
people, for 3 Food 3 people. The new Family members are placed on top of the Family
member that was placed on the Build Room(s) Action space. The newborns are available to
take actions in the following round.
Wood Buyer (I, 3-5): The card also applies to the 1 Reed, in addition 1 Stone and 1 Wood
Action space that is used in a 5-player game.
Wood Carver (K, 1-5): May only be used once in each Round. The player can place her
Wood supply on the Wood Carver card, to ensure that she does not forget the benefits.
Wood Distributor (K, 1-5): Occupations like Boar Catcher and Mushroom Collector may
mean that there is Wood on the Wood space that cannot be distributed evenly – in this case,
1 or 2 Wood are left on the Action space. The Wood Distributor, Foreman and Taster can
affect one another. A player who chooses to use the Wood Distributor cannot take back the
decision. A player who chooses not to use the Wood Distributor has until the start of the
Work phase (Phase 3) to reconsider.
Woodcutter (E, 1-5): see Wood Buyer.
5. Counters and tokens:
Counters and tokens are described in different ways:
Building resources:
Stone, Reed, Clay, Wood
Resources:
Building resources, Grain, Vegetables
Animals:
Sheep, Wild boar, Cattle
Goods:
All Resources, Animals
6. Variants
* 3:1 Exchange: At any time, a player may discard any 3 cards from his hand and draw the
face-down card at the top of either the Minor Improvements or the Occupations deck. This
card is placed in the player’s hand.
* 10-3: Each player draws 10 Occupation and 10 Minor Improvement cards and discards 3
of each.
* Mulligan: At the start of the game (and only at the start), a player may discard all 7
Occupations and/or Minor Improvements and draw 6 new cards of that type. (If the player is
still unhappy, he can keep trying this, always drawing 1 card fewer than he discards).
* Draft: Before the game starts, each player receives a hand of 7 Occupation cards as usual,
then chooses one and passes the rest to her left-hand neighbor. Each player chooses one of
the 6 new cards and passes on the remaining 5. This continues until each player has 7 cards.
Repeat this process with the Minor Improvement cards.
This variant allows players to create better combinations of cards than with a purely random
distribution. We recommend that each player should have played Agricola at least 4-5 times
before trying this variant.
7. Cards played during a Harvest
The Harvest consists of three phases. The Improvement and Occupation cards can divide the
Harvest into up to 11 parts.
Harvest Phase 1: Field Phase
1. Start: Milking Shed.
2. During the phase: Forester, Milking Hand, Copse, Butter Churn, Spindle,
Loom, Milking Stool, Beanfield, Turnip Patch, Lettuce Patch, Acreage.
3. At the end of the phase: Water Mill, Corn Storehouse.
4. Between Phases 1 and 2: Harvest Helper.
Harvest Phase 2: Feeding the Family
5. Start: Baker.
6. During the phase: Cook, Schnaps Distiller, Schnaps Distillery, Master Brewer,
Brewery, Hand Mill, Plane, Spit Roast, House Goat.
7. At the end of the phase: Slaughterman, Slaughterhouse.
8. Between Phases 2 and 3: n/a
Harvest Phase 3: Breeding
9. Start: n/a
10. During the phase: Shepherd, Forest Pasture, Nature Reserve, Animal Yard.
11. At the end of the phase: n/a
8. Credits
Agricola is a complex development game that was designed between December 2005 and
February 2006.
Game design: Uwe Rosenberg
Graphic design and Illustration: Klemens Franz / atelier198
Editing: Hanno Girke und Uwe Rosenberg
Thanks to the 138 Playtesters of the first edition as well as to the gaming public for the many
comments and compliments after publication, which helped us to improve the game even
further.
Special thanks to the Game Doctor Dale Yu for reviewing the Solo game rules.
The English translation was done by Melissa Rogerson, who thanks Hanno Girke and
William Attia for support and many late-night discussions, her family for their patience, and
John Kennard, Shawn Low, Dale Yu, Zev Shlasinger and the Agricola translators group for
their suggestions and proofing.
© 2007 - 2014 Lookout Games
www.lookout-games.de
English language publisher:
© 2014 F2Z Entertainment Inc.
31 rue de la Coopérative
Rigaud QC J0P 1P0
Canada
www.zmangames.com
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