Trouble shooting manual (part 1 of 2), Procedures and

Trouble shooting manual (part 1 of 2), Procedures and
Trouble shooting manual (part 1 of 2),
Procedures and Descriptions
Robot Controller
IRC5
M2004
Trouble shooting manual (part 1 of 2), Procedures and
Descriptions
Robot Controller
IRC5
M2004
Document ID: 3HAC020738-001
Revision: A
The information in this manual is subject to change without notice and should not be
construed as a commitment by ABB. ABB assumes no responsibility for any errors that
may appear in this manual.
Except as may be expressly stated anywhere in this manual, nothing herein shall be
construed as any kind of guarantee or warranty by ABB for losses, damages to persons
or property, fitness for a specific purpose or the like.
In no event shall ABB be liable for incidental or consequential damages arising from
use of this manual and products described herein.
This manual and parts thereof must not be reproduced or copied without ABB's written
permission, and contents thereof must not be imparted to a third party nor be used for
any unauthorized purpose. Contravention will be prosecuted.
Additional copies of this manual may be obtained from ABB at its then current charge.
© Copyright 2005 ABB All right reserved.
ABB Automation Technologies AB
Robotics
SE-721 68 Västerås
Sweden
Table of Contents
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1 Safety
7
1.1 Safety signals, general . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.2 Safety during trouble shooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.3 Applicable safety standards for IRC5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1.4 Safe Trouble Shooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
1.4.1 DANGER - Manipulator without axes' holding brakes are potentially lethal! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
1.4.2 DANGER - Live voltage inside Drive Module!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1.4.3 WARNING - The unit is sensitive to ESD! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
1.4.4 CAUTION - Hot parts may cause burns! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
15
2.1 Types of symptoms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.2 Faults without event log messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.2.1 Start-up failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.2.2 Controller dead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
2.2.3 FlexPendant dead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
2.2.4 All LEDs are dead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2.2.5 FlexPendant does not communicate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
2.2.6 Erratic event messages on FlexPendant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
2.2.7 No voltage in service outlet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
2.2.8 The joystick doesn´t work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
2.2.9 Reflashing firmware failed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
2.2.10 Inconsistent path accuracy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
2.2.11 Oil or grease stains on motors and/or gearboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
2.2.12 Mechanical noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
2.2.13 Manipulator collapses on power-down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
2.2.14 Robot brakes do not release . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
2.3 Fault combinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
2.3.1 Overview, fault combinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
37
3.1 Recommended working procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
3.1.1 Overview, trouble shooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
3.1.2 Practical tips for trouble shooting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
3.1.2.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
3.1.2.2 Trouble shooting strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
3.1.2.3 Documentation and references . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
3.1.2.4 Work systematically . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
3.1.2.5 Keeping track of history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
3.1.3 Error reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
3.1.3.1 Filing an error report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
3.1.3.2 Resource usage report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
3.1.3.3 System dump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
3.1.4 Starting up and shutting down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
3.1.4.1 Using the boot application. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
3.1.4.2 Correctly starting up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
3.1.4.3 Correctly shutting down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
3.1.5 Connecting a FlexPendant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
3.1.6 Scrolling and zooming on the FlexPendant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
3.1.7 Safely disconnecting electrical Drive Module connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
3.1.8 Safe handling of USB memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
3.1.9 Reflashing firmware and FlexPendant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
3
Table of Contents
3.1.10 Updating revolution counters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
3.2 Trouble shooting instructions per unit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
3.2.1 Trouble Shooting the FlexPendant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
3.2.2 Trouble Shooting Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
3.2.3 Trouble Shooting Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
3.2.4 Trouble Shooting I/O units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
3.3 Trouble shooting instructions per symptom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
3.3.1 Intermittent errors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
3.4 Working with logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
3.4.1 Handling of logs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
3.4.2 What is an event log? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
3.4.3 How to read RAPID event log messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
3.4.4 Definition of RAPID run time error statuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
3.4.5 Definition of recommended actions for RAPID run time errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
3.4.6 Event log file format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
3.5 Working with configuration files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
3.5.1 Editing parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
4 Descriptions and background information
79
4.1 Basic reference material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
4.1.1 Screw joints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
4.1.2 Document references . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
4.1.3 Standard toolkit, trouble shooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
4.2 Servo System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
4.3 Description, components and details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
4.3.1 What is a FlexPendant? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
4.3.2 Serial Measurement Board, DSQC 562 and DSQC 633 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
4.4 Descriptions, functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
4.4.1 Motors ON/OFF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
4.4.1.1 Motors ON/OFF, chain and status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
4.4.1.2 Breaking the Motors ON chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
4.4.1.3 Emergency stop circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
4.4.1.4 Safeguarded stops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
4.4.1.5 Limit switch chain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
4.4.2 Power supply, Control Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
4.4.3 Power Supply, Drive Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
4.4.4 Communication, Control Module and Drive Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
4.4.5 Fuses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
4.4.6 Safety I/O signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
4.4.7 Compatibilities, hardware/software within the IRC5 system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
4.4.8 What is "the memory"? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
4.4.9 The structure of the main computer RAM memory contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
4.4.10 The structure of a RAPID application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
4.5 Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
4.5.1 LEDs in the Controller Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.5.2 LEDs in the Drive Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.5.3 LED indications, digital and combi I/O units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.5.4 DeviceNet Bus status LEDs at power-up. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.5.5 LEDs om Interbus boards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.5.6 LEDs on Profibus boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
122
128
132
134
135
141
Overview
Overview
About This Manual
This manual contains information, procedures and descriptions, for trouble shooting IRC5
based robot systems.
Usage
This manual should be used whenever robot operation is interrupted by malfunction,
regardless of whether an error message is displayed on the FlexPendant or not.
Who Should Read This Manual?
This manual is intended for the following personnel:
•
machine and robot operators qualified to perform very basic trouble shooting and
reporting to service personnel.
•
programmers qualified to write and change RAPID programs.
•
specialized trouble shooting personnel, usually very experienced service personnel,
qualified for methodically isolating, analyzing and correcting malfunctions within the
robot system.
Prerequisites
The reader should...
•
have extensive experience in trouble shooting industrial electro-mechanical
machinery
•
have indepth knowledge of the robot system function
•
be familiar with the actual robot installation at hand, it's surrounding equipment and
peripherals
References
A list of document references is given in section Document references on page 80
Revisions
Revision
Description
-
First edition
A
Information has been added
The document has been partly restructured
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
5
Overview
6
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
1 Safety
1.1. Safety signals, general
1 Safety
1.1. Safety signals, general
General
This section specifies all dangers that may arise from performing the work detailed in the
manual. Each danger is detailed in its own section consisting of:
•
A caption specifying the danger level (DANGER, WARNING or CAUTION) and the
type of danger.
•
A brief description of what will happen if the operator/service personnel do not
eliminate the danger.
•
An instruction of how to eliminate the danger to facilitate performing the activity at
hand.
Danger levels
The table below defines the captions specifying the danger levels used throughout this
manual.
Symbol
Designation
Signification
DANGER
Warns that an accident will occur if the instructions
are not followed, resulting in a serious or fatal injury
and/or severe damage to the product. It applies to
warnings that apply to danger with, for example,
contact with high voltage electrical units, explosion
or fire risk, risk of poisonous gases, risk of crushing,
impact, fall from height etc.
WARNING
Warns that an accident may occur if the instructions
are not followed, that can lead to serious injury,
possibly fatal, and/or great damage to the product. It
applies to warnings that apply to danger with, for
example, contact with high voltage electrical units,
explosion or fire risk, risk of poisonous gases, risk of
crushing, impact, fall from height etc.
ELECTRICAL
SHOCK
The electrocution or electrical shock symbol
indicates electrical hazards which could result in
severe personal injury or death.
CAUTION
Warns that an accident may occur if the instructions
are not followed, that can result in injury and/or
damage to the product. It also applies to warnings of
risks that include burns, eye injury, skin injury,
hearing damage, crushing or slipping, tripping,
impact, fall from height etc. Furthermore, it applies to
warnings that include function requirements when
fitting and removing equipment, where there is a risk
of damaging the product or causing a breakdown.
danger
warning
Electrical shock
caution
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
7
1 Safety
1.1. Safety signals, general
Continued
Symbol
Designation
Signification
ELECTROSTATIC The electrostatic discharge (ESD) symbol indicates
DISCHARGE (ESD) electrostatic hazards which could result in severe
damage to the product.
Electrostatic discharge
(ESD)
NOTE
Note symbols alert you to important facts and
conditions.
TIP
Tip symbols direct you to specific instructions, where
to find additional information or how to perform a
certain operation in an easier way.
Note
Tip
8
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
1 Safety
1.2. Safety during trouble shooting
1.2. Safety during trouble shooting
General
All normal service work; installation, maintenance and repair work, is usually performed with
all electrical, pneumatical and hydraulic power switched off. All manipulator movements are
usually prevented by mechanical stops etc.
Trouble shooting work differs from this. While trouble shooting, all or any power may be
switched on, the manipulator movement may be controlled manually from the FlexPendant,
by a locally running robot program or by a PLC to which the system may be connected.
Dangers during trouble shooting
This implies that special considerations unconditionally must be taken when trouble
shooting:
•
all electrical parts must be considered as live
•
the manipulator must at all times be expected to perform any movement
•
since safety circuits may be disconnected or strapped to enable normally prohibited
functions, the system must be expected to perform accordingly
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
9
1 Safety
1.3. Applicable safety standards for IRC5
1.3. Applicable safety standards for IRC5
Health and safety standards
The robot complies fully with the health and safety standards specified in the EEC's
Machinery Directives.
The ABB robots controlled by the IRC5 conforms to the following standards:
10
Standard
Description
EN ISO 12100-1
Safety of machinery, terminology
EN ISO 12100-2
Safety of machinery, technical specifications
EN 954-1
Safety of machinery, safety related parts of control systems
EN 775
Manipulating industrial robots, safety
EN 60204
Electrical equipment of industrial machines
EN 61000-6-4 (option)
EMC, generic emission
EN 61000-6-2
EMC, generic immunity
Standard
Description
IEC 204-1
Electrical equipment of industrial machines
IEC 529
Degrees of protection provided by enclosures
Standard
Description
ISO 10218
Manipulating industrial robots, safety
ISO 9787
Manipulating industrial robots, coordinate systems and motions
Standard
Description
ANSI/RIA 15.06/1999
Safety requirements for industrial robots and robot systems
ANSI/UL 1740-1998
(option)
Safety standard for robots and robot equipment
CAN/CSA Z 434-03
(option)
Industrial robots and robot systems - General safety
requirements
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
1 Safety
1.4.1. DANGER - Manipulator without axes' holding brakes are potentially lethal!
1.4 Safe Trouble Shooting
1.4.1. DANGER - Manipulator without axes' holding brakes are potentially lethal!
Description
Since the manipulator arm system is quite heavy, especially on larger manipulator models, it
is dangerous if the holding brakes are disconnected, faulty, worn or in any way rendered nonoperational.
For instance, a collapsing IRB 7600 arm system may kill or seriously injure a person standing
beneath it.
Elimination
Step
Action
Info/illustration
1.
If you suspect that the holding brakes are nonoperational, secure the manipulator arm system by
some other means before working on it.
Weight specifications etc.
may be found in the Product
Manual of each manipulator
model.
2.
If you intentionally render the holding brakes nonoperational by connecting an external voltage supply,
the utmost care must be taken!
NEVER stand inside the manipulator working area
when disabling the holding brakes unless the arm
system is supported by some other means!
How to correctly connect an
external voltage supply is
detailed in the Product
Manual of each manipulator
model.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
11
1 Safety
1.4.2. DANGER - Live voltage inside Drive Module!
1.4.2. DANGER - Live voltage inside Drive Module!
Description
The Drive Module has live voltage potentially accessible directly behind the rear covers and
inside the front cover, even when the main switches have been switched off.
xx0400001207
A
Live voltage at transformer terminals even if the main power switches have been
switched off.
B
Live voltage at Motors ON terminals even if the main power switches have been
switched off.
Elimination
Read this information before opening the rear cover of either module.
Step
12
Action
1.
Make sure the incoming mains power supply has been switched off.
2.
Use a voltmeter to verify that there is not voltage between any of the terminals.
3.
Proceed with the service work.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
1 Safety
1.4.3. WARNING - The unit is sensitive to ESD!
1.4.3. WARNING - The unit is sensitive to ESD!
Description
ESD (electro static discharge) is the transfer of electrical static charge between two bodies at
different potentials, either through direct contact or through an induced electrical field. When
handling parts or their containers, personnel not grounded may potentially transfer high static
charges. This discharge may destroy sensitive electronics.
Elimination
Step
Action
Note/Illustration
1.
Use a wrist strap
Wrist straps must be tested frequently to
ensure that they are not damaged and are
operating correctly.
2.
Use an ESD protective floor mat.
The mat must be grounded through a currentlimiting resistor.
3.
Use a dissipative table mat.
The mat should provide a controlled discharge
of static voltages and must be grounded.
Location of wrist strap button
The wrist strap button is located on the computer unit in the control module as shown in the
illustration below.
A
xx0400001061
A
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
wrist strap button
13
1 Safety
1.4.4. CAUTION - Hot parts may cause burns!
1.4.4. CAUTION - Hot parts may cause burns!
Description
During normal operation, many manipulator parts will become hot, especially the drive
motors and gears. Touching these may cause burns of various severity.
Elimination
The instruction below details how to avoid the dangers specified above:
Step
14
Action
1.
Always use your hand, at some distance, to feel if
heat radiates from the potentially hot component
before actually touching it.
2.
Wait until the potentially hot component has cooled if
it is to be removed, or handled in any other way, .
Info/illustration
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.1. Types of symptoms
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.1. Types of symptoms
Symptoms
A fault in the robot system first appears as a symptom, which may be:
•
an event log message displayed on the FlexPendant. A complete listing of these
messages is presented in Trouble shooting manual, part 2 of 2, event log messages.
•
the system performing poorly or displaying mechanical disturbances. These faults
are described in section Faults without event log messages on page 16
•
the system may not be started or displays irrational behavior during startup. These
faults are described in section Faults without event log messages on page 16
•
indications on the hardware, such as LEDs. The significance of each LED in the
controller is described in section Indications on page 122
•
other types of symptoms. Since the system is complex and features a large number of
functions and function combinations, it is virtually impossible to predict all types of
faults. To facilitate trouble shooting on a broader scale, a number of descriptions are
provided in chapter Descriptions and background information on page 79These
include descriptions of the complete systems, parts and components in the system and
specific functions performed by the system for reference purposes. Included in section
Recommended working procedures on page 37are recommendations on how to
perform frequently occurring events. This enables operator and service personnel to
make sure any malfunction is not due to incorrect handling of the system.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
15
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.1. Start-up failures
2.2 Faults without event log messages
2.2.1. Start-up failures
Description
This section details possible faults at start-up, and specify recommended actions for each
case.
Consequences
The system does not start correctly, or at all.
Symptoms and causes
A number of symptoms are possible:
•
No LED indications are lit on any unit
•
The earth fault protection trips
•
It's impossible to get load the system software
•
The FlexPendant is "dead"
•
The FlexPendant starts up, but does not respond to any input.
•
The disk containing the system software does not start correctly.
Recommended actions, No LED indications
This may be due to a loss of power supply in many stages.
Step
Action
Info/illustration
1.
Make sure the main power supply to the
system is present and within specified limits.
The working cell documentation
may provide this as well as other
vital information.
2.
Make sure the main transformer in the Drive
Module is correctly connected for the mains
voltage levels at hand.
How to strap the mains transformer
is detailed in the Product Manual,
IRC5Indications on page 122.
3.
Make sure the main swiches are switched on.
4.
Make sure the supply to the Control Module
If required, trouble shoot the power
Power Supply and Drive Module Power Supply supply units as detailed in section
respectively are within the specified limits.
Trouble Shooting Power Supplies
on page 63
5.
If no LEDs light up, please proceed in section
All LEDs are dead on page 20
6.
If you encounter problems trying to download
system software, please proceed in section .
7.
If the system seems to be totally "dead", please
proceed in section Controller dead on page 18
8.
If the FlexPendant appears to be "dead",
please proceed as detailed in section
FlexPendant dead on page 19
Continues on next page
16
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.1. Start-up failures
Continued
Step
9.
Action
If the FlexPendant starts, but does not seem to
communicate with the controller, please
proceed as detailed in section FlexPendant
does not communicate on page 22
10. If the system hard drive is working correctly, it
should make a whirring sound directly after
startup and the LED on the front should go on.
If the Computer Unit emits two beeps after
startup is attempted, and then stops, the disk is
probably not working correctly
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
Info/illustration
If the disk does not work correctly,
check its power supply (Control
Module Power Supply) as detailed
in section Power supply, Control
Module on page 101.
If the power supply is OK; replace
the disk as detailed in the Product
Manual, IRC5.
17
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.2. Controller dead
2.2.2. Controller dead
Description
The robot controller is completely or intermittently" dead".
No indications are lit and no operation whatsoever is possible.
Consequences
The system may not be operated using the FlexPendant.
Possible causes
The symptom may be caused by (the causes are listed in order of probability):
•
The controller is not connected to the mains power supply.
•
The main transformer is malfunctioning or not connected correctly
•
The main fuse (Q1) may have tripped
•
Missing connection between Control and Drive Modules.
Recommended actions
In order to remedy the symptom, the following actions are recommended (the actions are
listed in order of probability):
Step
18
Action
1.
Make sure the mains power supply in the shop is
working and that the voltage level matches that of the
controller requirement.
2.
Make sure the main transformer has been correctly
connected for the mains voltage level at hand.
3.
Make sure the mains fuse (Q1) inside the Drive
Module has not tripped. If it has, reset it.
4.
If the Drive Module does not start although the
Control Module is working and the Drive Module main
switch has been switched on, make sure all
connections have been made correctly between the
modules.
Info/illustration
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.3. FlexPendant dead
2.2.3. FlexPendant dead
Description
The robot FlexPendant is completely or intermittently "dead".
No entries are possible, and no functions are available.
If the FlexPendant starts up, but does not display any screen, proceed as detailed in section
FlexPendant does not communicate on page 22
Consequences
The system may not be operated using the FlexPendant.
Possible causes
The symptom may be caused by (the causes are listed in order of probability):
•
The system has not been switched on.
•
The FlexPendant is not connected to the controller.
•
The cable from the controller is damaged.
•
The cable connector is damaged.
•
The FlexPendant is faulty.
•
FlexPendant power supply from controller is faulty.
Recommended actions
In order to remedy the symptom, the following actions are recommended (the actions are
listed in order of probability):
Step
Action
Info/Illustration
1.
Make sure the system is switched on and
that the FlexPendant is connected to the
controller.
How to connect the FlexPendant to the
controller is detailed in the Getting
started manual, IRC5.
2.
Inspect the FlexPendant cable for any
If faulty, replace the FlexPendant.
visible damage.
If possible, test by connecting a different
FlexPendant to eliminate the FlexPendant
and cable as error sources.
Also test the FlexPendant at hand to a
different controller if possible.
3.
Check the Control Module Power Supply
supplying 24 VDC to the FlexPendant.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
Trouble shoot the Power Supply unit as
detailed in section Trouble Shooting
Power Supplies on page 63
Also see the Circuit Diagram in the
Product manual, IRC5.
19
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.4. All LEDs are dead
2.2.4. All LEDs are dead
Description
No LEDs at all are lit on the Control Module or the Drive Module respectively.
Consequences
The system may not be operated or started up at all.
Possible causes
The symptom may be caused by (the causes are listed in order of probability):
•
The system is not supplied with power.
•
The main transformer may not be connected for the correct mains voltage.
•
Circuit breaker F6 (if used) may be malfunctioning or open for any other reason.
•
Contactor K41 may be malfunctioning or open for any other reason.
xx0500001405
Continues on next page
20
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.4. All LEDs are dead
Continued
Recommended actions
Step
Action
Info/illustration
1.
Make sure the main switch has been
switched on.
2.
Make sure the system is supplied with Use a voltmeter to measure incoming mains
power.
voltage.
3.
Check the main transformer
connection.
4.
Make sure circuit breaker F6 (if used) The circuit breaker F6 is shown in the Circuit
is closed in position 3.
Diagram in the Product manual, IRC5.
5.
Make sure contactor K41 opens and
closes when ordered.
6.
The voltages are marked on the terminals.
Make sure they match the shop supply
voltage.
Measure between pins X1.1 and X1.5.
-
Disconnect connector X1 from the
Drive Module Power Supply and
measure the incoming voltage.
7.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
If the Power Supply incoming voltage Replace the power supply as detailed in the
is correct (230 VAC) but the LEDs still Product manual, IRC5.
do not work, replace the Drive Module
Power Supply.
21
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.5. FlexPendant does not communicate
2.2.5. FlexPendant does not communicate
Description
The FlexPendant starts up, but does not display any screen.
No entries are possible, and no functions are available.
The FlexPendant is not completely "dead". If it is "dead", proceed as detailed in section
FlexPendant dead on page 19
Consequences
The system may not be operated using the FlexPendant.
Possible causes
The symptom may be caused by (the causes are listed in order of probability):
•
The main computer has lost its power supply
•
No communication is possible between FlexPendant and main computer.
Recommended actions
In order to remedy the symptom, the following actions are recommended (the actions are
listed in order of probability):
Step
22
Action
Info/Illustration
1.
Make sure the main Control Module Power
Supply is OK.
If required, trouble shoot the power
supply unit as detailed in section
Trouble Shooting Power Supplies
on page 63
2.
If the power supply is OK, check all cables from
power supply unit to main computer, making
sure these are correctly connected.
3.
Make sure the FlexPendant has been correctly How to connect the FlexPendant is
connected to the Control Module.
detailed in section Connecting a
FlexPendant on page 54
4.
Check all indication LEDs on all units in the
Control and Drive Modules.
5.
Make sure the ribbon cable from the main
computer to the hard disk drive in the main
computer unit is correctly connected at both
ends.
All indication LEDs and their
significance are specified in
section Indications on page 122
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.6. Erratic event messages on FlexPendant
2.2.6. Erratic event messages on FlexPendant
Description
The event messages displayed on the FlexPendant are erratic and do not seem to correspond
to any actual malfunctions on the robot. Several types of messages may be displayed,
seemingly erroneously.
This type of fault may occur after major manipulator disassembly or overhaul, if not
performed correctly.
Consequences
Major operational disturbances due to the constantly appearing messages.
Possible causes
The symptom may be caused by (the causes are listed in order of probability):
•
Internal manipulator cabling not correctly performed. Causes may be: faulty
connection of connectors, cable loops too tight causing the cabling to get strained
during manipulator movements, cable insulation chafed or damaged by rubbing shortcircuiting signals to earth.
Recommended actions
In order to remedy the symptom, the following actions are recommended (the actions are
listed in order of probability):
Step
Action
Info/Illustration
1.
Inspect all internal manipulator cabling,
especially all cabling disconnected, connected
re-routed or bundled during recent repair work.
Refit any cabling as detailed in
the Product Manual of each
robot.
2.
Inspect all cable connectors to make sure these
are correctly connected and tightened.
3.
Inspect all cable insulation for damage.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
Replace any faulty cabling as
detailed in the Product Manual of
each robot.
23
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.7. No voltage in service outlet
2.2.7. No voltage in service outlet
Description
Some Control Modules are fitted with service voltage outlet sockets, and this information
applies to these modules only.
No voltage is available in the Control Module service outlet for powering external service
equipment.
Consequences
Equipment connected to the Control Module service outlet does not work.
Probable causes
The symptom may be caused by (the causes are listed in order of probability):
•
Tripped circuit breaker (F5)
•
Tripped earth fault protection (F4)
•
Mains power supply loss
•
Transformers incorrectly connected
xx0500001403
Continues on next page
24
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.7. No voltage in service outlet
Continued
Recommended actions
Step
Action
Info/illustration
1.
Make sure the circuit breaker in
Make sure any equipment connected to the
the Control Module has not been service outlet does not consume too much
tripped.
power, causing the circuit breaker to trip.
2.
Make sure the earth fault
protection has not been tripped.
3.
Make sure the power supply to
the robot system is within
specifications.
4.
Make sure the transformer (T3)
supplying the outlet is correctly
connected, i.e. input and oput
voltages in accordance with
specifications.
Make sure any equipment connected to the
service outlet does not conduct current to
ground, causing the earth fault protection to trip
xx0500001404
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
25
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.8. The joystick doesn´t work
2.2.8. The joystick doesn´t work
Description
The system can be started but the joystick on the FlexPendant doesn´t seem to work.
Consequences
The robot can not be jogged manually.
Possible causes
The symptom may be caused by (the causes are listed in order of probability):
•
The Flexpandant may not have been connected correctly or the cable may be damaged.
•
The power supply to the FlexPendant does not work correctly.
•
The FlexPendant is malfunctioning.
Recommended actions
In order to remedy the symptom, the following actions are recommended (the actions are
listed in order of probability):
Step
26
Action
Info/illustration
1.
Has the system bee switched on?
If NO, proceed as detailed in
section Correctly starting up
on page 50
2.
Has Jogging been selected in the Manual Mode?
If NO, proceed as detailed in
the Operator's manual, IRC5
with FlexPendant.
3.
Does the FlexPendant work at all?
If NO, proceed as detailed in
section FlexPendant dead
on page 19
4.
Make sure the FlexPendant is connected correctly to Detailed in section
the Control Module.
Connecting a FlexPendant
on page 54.
5.
Make sure the FlexPendant cable has not been
damaged.
6.
Make sure the Control Module Power Supply and
Panel Board are working correctly.
7.
If nothing else works, replace the FlexPendant.
How to check the power
supply is detailed in section
Trouble Shooting Power
Supplies on page 63
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.9. Reflashing firmware failed
2.2.9. Reflashing firmware failed
Description
When reflashing firmware, the automatic process may fail.
The reflashing process is described in section Reflashing firmware and FlexPendant on page
58.
Consequences
The automatic reflashing process is interrupted and the system stops.
Possible causes
This fault most often occurs due to a lack of compatibility between hardware and software.
Consequences
In order to remedy the symptom, the following actions are recommended (the actions are
listed in order of probability):
Step
Action
Info/illustration
1.
Check the FlexPendant event log for a message
specifying which unit failed.
How to access the
FlexPendant event log is
detailed in section Working
with logs on page 67.
2.
Was the relevant unit recently replaced?
If YES; make sure the versions of the old and new
unit is identical.
If NO; check the software versions.
How to check the versions is
detailed in section
Compatibilities, hardware/
software within the IRC5
system on page 115.
3.
Was the RobotWare recently replaced?
If YES; make sure the versions of the old and new
unit is identical.
If NO; proceed below!
How to check the versions is
detailed in section
Compatibilities, hardware/
software within the IRC5
system on page 115.
4.
Check with your local ABB representative for a
firmware version compatible with your hardware/
software combination.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
27
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.10. Inconsistent path accuracy
2.2.10. Inconsistent path accuracy
Description
The path of the robot TCP is not consistent. It varies from time to time, and this may
sometimes be accompanied by noise emerging from bearings, gearboxes or other locations.
Consequences
Production is not possible.
Possible causes
The symptom may be caused by (the causes are listed in order of probability):
•
Robot not calibrated correctly
•
Robot TCP not correctly defined
•
Parallel bar damaged (applies to robots fitted with parallel bars only)
•
Mechanical joint between motor and gearbox damaged. This often causes noise to be
emitted from the faulty motor.
•
Bearings damaged or worn (especially if the path inconsistency is coupled with
clicking or grinding noises from one or more bearings).
•
The wrong robot type may be connected to the controller.
•
The brakes may not be releasing correctly.
Recommended actions
In order to remedy the symptom, the following actions are recommended (the actions are
listed in order of probability):
Step
Action
Info/Illustration
1.
Make sure the robot Tool and Work
Object are correctly defined.
How to define these are detailed in the
Operator's Manual, IRC5 with
FlexPendant.
2.
Check the revolution counters' position. Updated if required as detailed in section
Updating revolution counters on page 60.
3.
If required, recalibrate the robot axes.
Make sure the robot is calibrated as
detailed the Operator's Manual, IRC5 with
FlexPendant.
4.
Locate the faulty bearing by tracking
the noise.
Replace faulty bearing as specified in the
Product Manual for each robot.
5.
Locate the faulty motor by tracking the
noise.
Study the path of the robot TCP to
establish which axis, and thus which
motor, may be faulty.
Replace the faulty motor/gearbox as
specified in the Product Manual for each
robot.
6.
Check the trueness of the parallel bar
(applies to robots fitted with parallel
bars only).
Replace the faulty parallel bar as specified
in the Product Manual for each robot.
Continues on next page
28
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.10. Inconsistent path accuracy
Continued
Step
Action
7.
Make sure the correct robot type is
connected as specified in the
configuration files.
8.
Make sure the robot brakes work
satisfactorily.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
Info/Illustration
Proceed as detailed in section Robot
brakes do not release on page 34
29
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.11. Oil or grease stains on motors and/or gearboxes
2.2.11. Oil or grease stains on motors and/or gearboxes
Description
The area surrounding the motor or gearbox shows signs of oil leaks. This may be at the base,
closest to the mating surface, or at the furthest end of the motor at the resolver.
Consequences
Besides the dirty appearance, in some cases there are no serious consequences. However, in
some cases the leaking oil lubricates the motor brake, causing the manipulator to collapse at
power-down.
Possible causes
The symptom may be caused by (the causes are listed in order of probability):
•
Leaking seal between gearbox and motor.
•
Gearbox overfilled with oil
•
Gearbox oil too hot
Recommended actions
In order to remedy the symptom, the following actions are recommended (the actions are
listed in order of probability):
Step
Action
Info/Illustration
1.
-
Caution!
Before approaching the potentially hot
manipulator component, observe the safety
information in section CAUTION - Hot parts may
cause burns! on page 14.
30
2.
Inspect all seals and gaskets between motor and Replace seals and gaskets as
gearbox. The different manipulator models use specified in the Product Manual
different types of seals.
for each robot.
3.
Check the gearbox oil level.
Correct oil level is specified in the
robot Product Manual.
4.
Too hot gearbox oil may be caused by:
• Oil quality or level used is incorrect
• The robot work cycle runs a specific axis
too hard. Investigate whether it is
possible to program small "cooling
periods" into the application.
• Overpressure created inside gearbox.
Check the recommended oil level
and type as specified in the
Product Manual for each robot.
Manipulators performing certain,
extremely heavy duty work cycles
may be fitted with vented oil
plugs. These are not fitted to
normal duty manipulators, but
may be purchased from your
local ABB representative.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.12. Mechanical noise
2.2.12. Mechanical noise
Description
During operation, no mechanical noise should be emitted from motors, gearboxes, bearings
or similar. A faulty bearing often emits scraping, grinding or clicking noises shortly before
failing.
Consequences
Failing bearings cause the path accuracy to become inconsistent, and in severe cases, the joint
may seize completely.
Possible causes
The symptom may be caused by (the causes are listed in order of probability):
•
Worn bearings
•
Contaminations have entered the bearing races
•
Loss of lubrication in bearings
If the noise is emitted from a gearbox, the following may also apply:
•
Overheating
Recommended actions
In order to remedy the symptom, the following actions are recommended (the actions are
listed in order of probability):
Step
Action
Info/Illustration
1.
-
Caution!
Before approaching the potentially hot
manipulator component, observe the
safety information in section CAUTION Hot parts may cause burns! on page 14.
2.
Determine which bearing is emitting the
noise.
3.
Make sure the bearing has sufficient
lubrication.
As specified in the Product Manual for
each robot.
4.
If possible, disassemble the joint and
measure the clearance.
As specified in the Product Manual for
each robot.
5.
Bearings inside motors are not to be
replaced individually, but the complete
motor is replaced.
Replace faulty motors as specified in
the Product Manual for each robot.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
31
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.12. Mechanical noise
Continued
Step
32
Action
Info/Illustration
6.
Make sure the bearings are fitted correctly. Also see the Product Manual for each
robot for general instruction on how to
handle bearings.
7.
Too hot gearbox oil may be caused by:
• Oil quality or level used is incorrect
• The robot work cycle runs a specific
axis too hard. Investigate whether it
is possible to program small
"cooling periods" into the
application.
• Overpressure created inside
gearbox.
Check the recommended oil level and
type as specified in the Product Manual
for each robot.
Manipulators performing certain,
extremely heavy duty work cycles may
be fitted with vented oil plugs. These
are not fitted to normal duty
manipulators, but may be purchased
from your local ABB representative.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.13. Manipulator collapses on power-down
2.2.13. Manipulator collapses on power-down
Description
The manipulator is able to work correctly while Motors ON is active, but when Motors OFF
is active, it collapses under its own weight.
The holding brake, integral to each motor, is not able to hold the weight of the manipulator
arm.
Consequences
The fault may cause severe injuries or death to personnel working in the area or severe
damage to the manipulator and/or surrounding equipment.
Possible causes
The symptom may be caused by (the causes are listed in order of probability):
•
faulty brake
•
faulty power supply to the brake
Recommended actions
In order to remedy the symptom, the following actions are recommended (the actions are
listed in order of probability):
Step
Action
Info/Illustration
1.
Determine which motor(s) causes the
robot to collapse.
2.
Check the brake power supply to the
collapsing motor during the Motors OFF
state.
Also see the Circuit Diagrams in the
robot and controller Product Manual
respectively.
3.
Remove the resolver of the motor to see
if there are any signs of oil leaks.
If found faulty, the motor must be
replaced as a complete unit as detailed
in the Product Manual for each robot.
4.
Remove the motor from the gearbox to
inspect it from the drive side.
If found faulty, the motor must be
replaced as a complete unit as detailed
in the Product Manual for each robot.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
33
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.14. Robot brakes do not release
2.2.14. Robot brakes do not release
Description
When starting robot operation or jogging the robot, the internal robot brakes must release in
order to allow for movements.
Consequences
If the brakes do not release, no robot movement is possible, and a number of error log
messages may occur.
Possible causes
The symptom may be caused by (the causes are listed in order of probability):
•
Brake contactor (K44) does not work correctly
•
The system does not go to status Motors ON correctly.
•
Faulty brake on the robot axis
•
Supply voltage 24V BRAKE missing
xx0500001405
Recommended actions
This section details how to proceed when the robot brakes do not release.
Step
Action
Infor/illustration
1.
Make sure the brake contactor is activated.
A 'tic' should be audible, or you
may measure the resistance
across the auxiliary contacts on
top of the contactor.
2.
Make sure the RUN contactors (K42 and K43) A 'tic' should be audible, or you
are activated. NOTE that both contactors must may measure the resistance
be activated, not just one!
across the auxiliary contacts on
top of the contactor.
Continues on next page
34
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.2.14. Robot brakes do not release
Continued
Step
Action
Infor/illustration
3.
Use the pushbuttons on the robot to test the
brakes.
If just one of the brakes malfunctions, the brake
at hand is probably faulty and will have to be
replaced.
If none of the brakes work, there is probably no
24V BRAKE power available.
The location of the pushbuttons
differ, depending on robot model.
Please refer to the Product
Manual for each robot!
4.
Check the Drive Module Power Supply to make
sure 24V BRAKE voltage is OK.
5.
A number of other faults within the system may Access the event log as detailed in
cause the brakes to remain activated. In such
section Accessing the event log.
cases, event log messages on the FlexPendant
will provide additional information.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
35
2 Fault symptoms and malfunctions
2.3.1. Overview, fault combinations
2.3 Fault combinations
2.3.1. Overview, fault combinations
General
This chapter contains information on combinations of fault symptoms known to ABB.
These may be any combinations of faults, displayed or not displayed on the FlexPendant. In
time, the cause of more and more combinations will become known, and this section will be
appended.
36
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.1. Overview, trouble shooting
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1 Recommended working procedures
3.1.1. Overview, trouble shooting
How to use this manual when trouble shooting
The illustration and description detail how to put the information in this manual to best use
during trouble shooting the robot system.
en0400001200
Trouble Shooting Manual, part 1, Procedures and Descriptions
Fault symptoms and malfunctions
•
Each fault or error is first detected as a symptom, with or without an event log message
displayed on the FlexPendant. It could be an event log message on the FlexPendant,
an observation that the gearbox on axis 6 is getting hot or that the controller can not
be started. The fault displaying an event log message are listed in the Event log
message list in Trouble Shooting Manual, IRC5, part 2 of 2, Event log messages.
Instructions, how to correct faults
•
The instructions are divided into two main categories: descriptions of how to correctly
handle the different parts of the system and instructions of how to remedy faults
causing the symptoms specified above. The latter category is divided into two sub-
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
37
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.1. Overview, trouble shooting
Continued
categories, depending on whether to trouble shoot a specific symptom or a suspected
unit causing the problem. The first category contains information on how to use the
event log to facilitate trouble shooting, etc.
Recommended working procedures
•
Here, you will find a procedures for how to correctly perform certain specific tasks.
These may be used to make sure the seemingly irrational behavior of the system is not
due to incorrect handling.
Basic reference info
•
This section contains information about what tools to use, references to documents
that may be useful when trouble shooting, etc.
Description, systems
•
The different systems and sub-systems are described to give a better understanding of
it's function when it works "as it's supposed to". This enables the trouble shooter to
better see and understand the differences between a system that's functional and one
that's not.
Description, components and details
•
Specific details of the system are described with regards to their function, etc.
Description, functions
•
Contains descriptions on how specific functions within the system work, e.g the RUN
chain, and what signals and other systems affect that particular function. This provides
for a better understanding of the relations and mechanisms of the robot system.
Indications
•
All indication LEDs and other indications (as found on the Control and Drive Modules
as well as separate circuit boards, etc) are described in this section along with
information about their indication modes and significances respectively.
Recommended actions are often specified or references containing such instructions.
Trouble Shooting Manual, part 2, Event log messages
Event log messages
•
This section is basically a printout of all available event log messages normally
displayed on the FlexPendant. Having access to all messages at the same time may be
useful during trouble shooting.
Additional information
In addition to the information given in this document, other documents may provide vital
information, e.g. the Circuit Diagram.
Such useful documents are listed in section Document references on page 80
38
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.2.1. General
3.1.2. Practical tips for trouble shooting
3.1.2.1. General
Overview
Trouble shooting complex technical systems such as robot systems requires a systematic
approach. The personnel must be trained and qualified to perform the task, and will be helped
by using the correct tools and methods.
This section specifies some of these methods. Any special tools are specified in the section
Standard toolkit, trouble shooting on page 81.
3.1.2.2. Trouble shooting strategies
Isolate the fault!
Any fault may give rise to a number of symptoms, event log messages on the FlexPendant or
other. In order to effectively eliminate the fault, it is vital to distinguish the original symptom
from the consequential ones.
A help in isolating the fault may be creating a historical fault log as specified in section Make
a historical fault log! on page 42
Split the fault chain in two!
When trouble shooting any system, a good practice is to split the fault chain in two. This
means:
•
identify the complete chain.
•
decide and measure the expected value at the middle of the chain.
•
use this to determine in which half the fault is caused.
•
split this half into two new halves, etc.
•
finally, a single component may be isolated. The faulty one.
Example
A specific IRB 7600 installation has a 12 VDC power supply to a tool at the manipulator
wrist. This tool does not work, and when checked, there is no 12 VDC supply to it.
•
Check at the manipulator base to see if there is 12 VDC supply. Measurement show
there are no 12 VDC supply. (Reference: Circuit Diagram in the Product manual,
IRC5)
•
Check any connector between the manipulator and the power supply in the controller.
Measurement show there are no 12 VDC supply. (Reference: Circuit Diagram in the
Product manual, IRC5)
•
Check the power supply unit LED. (Reference: Indications on page 122)
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
39
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.2.3. Documentation and references
Continued
Check communication parameters and cables!
The most common causes of errors in serial communication are:
•
Faulty cables (e.g. send and receive signals are mixed up)
•
Transfer rates (baud rates)
•
Data widths that are incorrectly set.
Check the software versions!
Make sure the RobotWare and other software run by the system are the correct version.
Certain versions are not compatible with certain hardware combinations.
Also, make a note of all software versions run, since this will be useful information to the
ABB support people.
How to file a complete error report to your local ABB service personnel is detailed in section
Error reports on page 44.
3.1.2.3. Documentation and references
General
A great deal of effort was put into writing the event log messages as well as the technical
documentation. Though imperfect, they may give vital clues. They are also constantly being
upgraded.
Read the documentation!
Do not wait until nothing else works to read the manual!
References to document numbers are specified in the chapter Reference Information in the
Product manual, IRC5.
Remember that the product documentation is available in several languages electronically as
.pdf-files as well as in binder format! You may order the format best suited for your needs!
Read the Circuit Diagram!
The complete electrical circuitry of the controller is documented in the Product manual,
IRC5. It contains a lot of information useful, or even essential, to a trained trouble shooter.
References to document numbers are specified in the chapter Reference Information in the
Product manual, IRC5.
Continues on next page
40
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.2.4. Work systematically
Continued
Read the logs!
The event logs available on the FlexPendant contain lots of information about any
malfunction detected by the system.
The logs are described in section Working with logs on page 67.
en0300000547
Check the electronical unit's LEDs!
If a fault is thought to be caused by an electronic unit (circuit board in the controller or other),
the LEDs on the unit front may give leads.
These are described in section Indications on page 122.
3.1.2.4. Work systematically
Do not replace units randomly!
Before replacing any part at all, it is important to establish a probable cause for the fault, thus
determining which unit to replace.
Randomly replacing units may sometimes solve the acute problem, but also leaves the trouble
shooter with a number of units that may/may not be perfectly functional.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
41
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.2.5. Keeping track of history
Continued
Replace one thing at a time!
When replacing a presumably faulty unit that has been isolated, it is important that only one
unit be replaced at a time.
Always replace components as detailed in the Repairs section of the Product manual of the
robot or controller at hand.
Test the system after replacing to see if the problem has been solved.
If replacing several units at once:
•
it is impossible to determine which of the units was causing the fault.
•
it greatly complicates ordering a new spare part.
•
it may introduce new faults to the system.
Take a look around!
Often, the cause may be evident once you see it. In the area of the unit acting erroneously, be
sure to check:
•
Are the attachment screws secured?
•
Are all connectors secured?
•
Are all cabling free from damage?
•
Are the units clean (especially for electronic units)?
•
Is the correct unit fitted?
Check for tools left behind!
Some repair and maintenance work require using special tools to be fitted to the robot
equipment. If these are left behind (e.g. balancing cylinder locking device or signal cable to
a computer unit used for measuring purposes), they may cause erratic robot behavior.
Make sure all such tools are removed when maintenance work is complete!
3.1.2.5. Keeping track of history
Make a historical fault log!
In some cases, a particular installation may give rise to faults not encountered in others.
Therefore, charting each installation may give tremendous assistance to the trouble shooter.
To facilitate trouble shooting, a log of the circumstances surrounding the fault gives the
following advantages:
•
it enables the trouble shooter to see patterns in causes and consequences not apparent
at each individual fault occurrance.
•
it may point out a specific event always taking place just before the fault, for example
a certain part of the work cycle being run.
Check up the history!
Make sure you always consult the historical log if it is used. Also remember to consult the
operator, or similar, who was working when the problem first occurred.
Continues on next page
42
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.2.5. Keeping track of history
Continued
At what stage did the fault occur?
What to look for during trouble shooting depends greatly of when the fault occurred: was the
robot just freshly installed? Was it recently repaired?
The table gives specific hints to what to look for in specific situations:
If the system has just: then:
been installed
Check:
• the configuration files (Editing parameters on page 78
• connections
• options and their configuration
been repaired
Check:
• all connections to the replaced part
• power supplies
• that the correct part has been fitted
had a software upgrade
Check:
• software versions
• compatibilities between hardware and software
Compatibilities, hardware/software within the IRC5
system on page 115
• options and their configuration
been moved from one site
to another (an already
working robot)
Check:
• connections
• software versions
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
43
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.3.1. Filing an error report
3.1.3. Error reports
3.1.3.1. Filing an error report
Introduction
If you require the assistance of ABB service personnel in trouble shooting your system, you
may file a formal error report as detailed below.
Depending on what the fault symptoms are, these files may be included in an Error Report:
•
Event log file. Contains a list of all system events.
•
Backup files. Is a regular complete backup.
•
Resource usage report. This file contains information on how the system is handling
it's system resources.
•
System dump. This is an instant dump of specific parts of the primary memory.
The contents and structure of the main computer primary memory during operation is
described in section The structure of the main computer RAM memory contents on page 117
Creating the report
How to determine which files are relevant in each case, you may want to contact your local
ABB representative's service personnel.
Step
44
Action
Info/illustration
1.
If required, create an event log file.
How to create it, is detailed in section
Saving log entries.
2.
If required, create a back up file.
How to create it is detailed in the
Operator's Manual, IRC5 with
FlexPendant.
3.
If required, create a resource usage
report.
How to create it is detailed in section
Resource usage report on page 45
4.
If required, create a system dump.
How to create it is detailed in section
System dump on page 45
5.
Gather all files in the same directory and
make a WinZip file of them all.
6.
Write a regular e-mail addressed to your
local ABB service personnel, and make
sure to include the following information
• Robot serial number
• RobotWare version
• A fault description. The more
detailed, the easier for the ABB
personnel to assist you.
• if available, enclose the license
key.
• include the zipped files specified
above!
7.
Mail it!
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.3.2. Resource usage report
3.1.3.2. Resource usage report
Overview
The resource usage report may be used to serve two separate needs:
•
To periodically monitor the system's usage of system resources in order to ensure that
it will not run into problems due to using up the resources.
•
To provide reference information to the ABB service personnel, should a malfunction
arise.
How to file a complete Error Report is detailed in section Filing an error report on page 44
What is a resource usage report?
The resource usage report file contains information on how the system is handling it's system
resources, and is primarily intended for expert ABB service personnel. If any one resource is
used up, the controller will go to the SYS_FAIL state and require restarting.
Typical system resources are memory usage, stack usage or data subscriptions. For each
system resource, facts such as current value, peak value and maximum value are recorded.
Use a PC to access the resource usage report as detailed below.
Accessing the resource usage report with a PC
In order to access the main computer operating system, a "console" must be connected. In
practice, this may be a regular portable PC running a standard terminal program.
Proceed as follows to access the data:
Step
Action
1.
Connect the PC to the main computer COM1 serial port connector..
2.
Start the PC, and then the terminal program.
3.
Type report_resource_usage, and then press Enter.
"Generating report..." will be shown.
4.
After a while a message is shown:
"Resource usage report has been generated. Output file is: /hd0a/
"your_system_name"/INTERNAL/REPORTS//resources_usage.log"
5.
You may now access the file over the factory LAN or the Service Port.
6.
If required, e-mail the file to your local ABB representative.
3.1.3.3. System dump
Overview
To assist in trouble shooting the system, the System dump may be used. It supervises specific
parts of the system and it's functions, and may be included in a complete Error Report.
How to file a complete Error Report is detailed in section Filing an error report on page 44
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
45
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.3.3. System dump
Continued
System dump
The system dump is automatically created when the system goes to SYS_FAIL state.
It is an instant dump of specific parts of the primary memory, and is primarily intended for
expert ABB service personnel.
Accessing the system dump
Step
46
Action
Info/illustration
1.
The system dump is automatically created when
the system goes to status SYS_FAIL.
As a default value, the dump will
be stored in directory: /hd0a/
"your_system_name"/
INTERNAL/SYSDMP.
2.
The directory specified now contains a cluster of You may now access the
files, and none of these must be opened or edited directory over the factory LAN
in any way.
or through theService Port.
3.
Move the complete directory to some other server,
for instance the internal hard drive of your PC.
4.
Make a WinZip file of the entire directory contents.
5.
If required, e-mail the file to your local ABB
representative.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.4.1. Using the boot application
3.1.4. Starting up and shutting down
3.1.4.1. Using the boot application
Boot application
The boot application is primarily used to start up the system when no RobotWare is installed,
but may also be used for other purposes, such as changing the system to start. You can also
use RobotStudio Online, see Operator's manual - RobotStudio Online.
Purpose of the boot application
The boot application is installed in the controller at delivery and may be used to:
•
install systems
•
set or check network settings
•
select a system/switch between systems from the mass storage memory
•
load the system from USB memory units or network connections
The illustration shows the boot application main screen. The buttons and functions available
are described below.
en0400000894
Installing a system
This procedure may take several minutes.
Step
Action
Info
1.
You may reach the boot application by
performing an X-start.
How to perform an X-start is detailed in
section Restart and select another
system (X-start) in Operator's manual IRC5 with FlexPendant.
2.
In the boot application, tap Install
System.
A dialog box is displayed urging you to
connect a USB memory.
Systems are created using the System
Builder in RobotStudio Online. See
Operator's manual - RobotStudio
Online.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
47
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.4.1. Using the boot application
Continued
Step
Action
Info
3.
Connect a USB memory containing a
system to the computer unit USB port.
How to load a system to the USB
memory is detailed in section Creating
boot media in Operator's manual RobotStudio Online.
The USB port is shown in section
Buttons on the FlexController in
Operator's manual - IRC5 with
FlexPendant.
4.
Tap Continue to proceed.
Tap Cancel to abort.
The system is read from the USB
memory, and a dialog box is displayed,
urging you to restart.
5.
Tap OK.
6.
Tap Restart Controller and then tap
OK.
The controller is now restarted and the
system from the USB memory is
installed. The restart may take several
minutes.
The USB memory may be disconnected
at this point.
Boot application settings
The boot application settings contain IP and network settings.
Step
Action
Info
1.
You may reach the boot application by performing
an X-start.
How to perform an X-start is
detailed in sectionRestart
and select another system
(X-start) in Operator's
manual - IRC5 with
FlexPendant.
2.
In the boot application, tap Settings.
en0400000902
Continues on next page
48
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.4.1. Using the boot application
Continued
Step
Action
Info
3.
Make the appropriate selections:
• Use no IP address
• Obtain IP address automatically
• Use the following settings
Use the numerical keyboard to enter the desired
values.
How to make these
selections is detailed in
section Set up the network
connection in Operator's
manual - IRC5 with
FlexPendant.
4.
Tap Service PC information to display network
settings to be used when connection a service PC
to the controller's service port.
5.
Tap FlexPendant to display FlexPendant software
versions.
Tap Advanced to display the boot loader version.
Selecting system
Step
Action
Info
1.
You may reach the boot application by performing
an X-start.
How to perform an X-start is
detailed in section Restart
and select another system
(X-start) in Operator's
manual - IRC5 with
FlexPendant.
2.
In the boot application, tap Select System.
A dialog box is displayed showing the available
installed systems.
3.
Tap the system to be selected and then Select.
The selected system is displayed in the box
Selected System.
4.
Tap Close.
A dialog box is shown urging you to restart to be
able to use the selected system.
Restarting controller
Step
Action
Info
1.
You may reach the boot application by performing
an X-start.
How to perform an X-start is
detailed in section Restart
and select another system
(X-start) in Operator's
manual - IRC5 with
FlexPendant.
2.
In the boot application, tap Restart System.
A dialog box is displayed specifying the selected
system.
3.
Tap OK to restart using the selected system or
Cancel to abort.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
49
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.4.2. Correctly starting up
3.1.4.2. Correctly starting up
General
Starting up the system involve a lot of common procedures regardless of to which state the
system is being started:
•
Make sure no personnel or obstacles are present within the working range of the robot
or any other piece of moving equipment.
•
Switch on the main switch on the Control Module.
•
Switch on the main switch on the Drive Module. When starting up multi robot
systems, make sure the main switch on all Drive Modules are switched on.
•
To enable starting any program execution, the Motors ON button must be pressed.
•
If required, start the program execution by pressing one of the buttons Start, Step
FORWARD or Step BACKWARD on the FlexPendant as shown below.
The illustration below shows the different FlexPendant Start buttons:
en0300000587
E
START button. Starts program execution. In systems without hold-to-run buttons, the
Start button is also used for the hold-to-run function.
F
Step BACKWARD button. Steps the program one instruction backwards. In systems
without hold-to-run buttons, the Backward button is also used for the hold-to-run
function.
G
Step FORWARD button. Steps the program one instruction forwards. In systems
without hold-to-run buttons, the Forward button is also used for the hold-to-run
function.
The main switches on Control and Drive Modules are shown in section Correctly shutting
down on page 51
First start
The first time a system is started up after delivery from ABB, the procedure detailed in the
document Getting Started with IRC5 and RobotStudioOnline should be followed.
If problems are encountered during this procedure, please refer to section Start-up failures on
page 16
Continues on next page
50
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.4.3. Correctly shutting down
Continued
Starting up a production system
The term"production system" implies that:
•
the system has been commissioned earlier.
•
an application program has been written and tested by a programmer.
•
all safety circuitry and equipment have been fitted, connected and tested.
When starting such a system, it is vital to remember:
•
Be sure to study any specific cell documentation before starting any piece of the
working cell. A working robot cell is a complex installation, and a large number of
rules and regulations may apply for operating it.
•
If the system is started in the AUTO mode, this means that an external controller (such
as a PLC or other superior computer) may take control of the system at any time. This,
in turn, means that the robot at any time may perform unexpected movements, may
open or close grippers, etc.
•
A production ready system may be programmed in such a way that specific outputs
may be activated at start-up. This means, that the robot system may activate any other
piece of machinery in the working cell in question or any other working cell connected
to the same LAN as the robot system.
3.1.4.3. Correctly shutting down
General
ABB has designed the system to reduce the sensitivity to not shutting it down correctly, and
a number of functions have been built into the system for this purpose.
However, ABB strongly recommends you to follow the guidelines specified below in order
to avoid injury to personnel, damage to equipment or creating situations which may take
unnecessary time and effort to resolve.
Shutting down the system involve a number of common actions:
•
If possible, make sure the robot is positioned in such a way that stopping it will not
cause any problems.
•
Stop the program execution by pressing the button Stop on the FlexPendant as shown
below.
•
Switch off the main switch on the Control Module.
•
Physically switching off the Drive Module is rarely required, but if it is, switch off the
main switch on the Drive Module. When shutting down multi robot systems, make
sure the main switch on all Drive Modules are switched off.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
51
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.4.3. Correctly shutting down
Continued
Specific considerations for specific situations are specified in the following sections.
The illustration below shows the FlexPendant Stop button:
en0300000587
H
STOP button. Stops the program execution.
The illustration below shows the Control Module main switch:
xx0400000978
The illustration below shows the Drive Module main switch
en0400001017
Continues on next page
52
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.4.3. Correctly shutting down
Continued
Shutting down a production system
The term"production system" implies that:
•
the system has been commissioned earlier
•
an application program has been written and tested by a programmer
•
all safety circuitry and equipment have been fitted, connected and tested
When shutting down such a system, it is vital to remember:
•
Be sure to study any specific cell documentation before stopping any piece of the
working cell. A working robot cell is a complex installation, and a large number of
rules and regulations may apply for operating it.
Shutting down a system during software installation/updating
When the system attempts to shut down for reasons such as these, it is vital to remember:
•
Never shut the system down during any type of software download!
•
Always wait for the system to ask you to shut it off, before doing so.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
53
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.5. Connecting a FlexPendant
3.1.5. Connecting a FlexPendant
Location of FlexPendant connector
The FlexPendant connector is located as shown below.
xx0400000729
A
FlexPendant socket connector
Connecting a FlexPendant
Step
1.
Action
Illustration
Locate the FlexPendant socket
connector on the controller.
xx0400000931
•
54
2.
Plug in the FlexPendant cable
connector.
3.
Screw the connector lock ring firmly
by turning it clockwise.
O: FlexPendant connector
(A22.X1)
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.6. Scrolling and zooming on the FlexPendant
3.1.6. Scrolling and zooming on the FlexPendant
Overview
The entire contents of a screen may not be visible at the same time. To see the entire contents,
you may:
•
Scroll up/down (and sometimes left/right)
•
Zoom in or out (only available in the Program editor)
en0400000685
A
Zoom in (larger text)
B
Scroll up (the height of one page)
C
Scroll up (the height of one line)
D
Scroll left
E
Scroll right
F
Zoom out (smaller text)
G
Scroll down (the height of one page)
H
Scroll down (the height of one line)
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
55
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.7. Safely disconnecting electrical Drive Module connectors
3.1.7. Safely disconnecting electrical Drive Module connectors
Description
Due to high power electrical currents, some connectors on the Drive Module may be damaged
if disconnected while the power is switched on. These are specified below:
xx0400001016
56
A
Connector XP0: incoming mains power. Make sure the Drive Module main switch is
switched off before disconnecting.
B
ConnectorXS25: mains power from Drive Module to Control Module. Make sure the
Control Module main switch is switched off before disconnecting.
C
Connector XS1: motor currents to robot. Make sure the Drive Module main switch is
switched off before disconnecting.
D
Connector XS7: motor currents to external axes (if used): make sure the Drive Module
main switch is switched off before disconnecting.
E-H
Additional connectors by users. If used for motor current connectors, make sure the
motor at hand is not running before disconnecting.
K-J
Serial measurement signal connectors. Will not be damaged if disconnected during
operation.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.8. Safe handling of USB memory
3.1.8. Safe handling of USB memory
Description
IRC5 is equipped with a USB port on the Control Module, shown in the Operating Manual,
IRC5 or Product Manual, IRC5.
A USB memory is normally detected by the system and ready to use within a few seconds
from plugging in the hardware. A plugged in USB memory is automatically detected during
system start up.
It is possible to plug in and unplug a USB memory while the system is running. However,
observing the following precautions will avoid problems:
•
Do not unplug a USB memory immediately after plugging in. Wait at least five
seconds, or until the memory has been detected by the system.
•
Do not unplug a USB memory during file operations, such as saving or copying files.
Many USB memories indicates ongoing operations with a flashing LED.
•
Do not unplug a USB memory while the system is shutting down. Wait until shutdown
is completed.
Please note the following limitations with USB memories:
•
There is no guarantee that all USB memories are supported.
•
Some USB memories have a write protection switch. The system is not able to detect
if a file operation failed due to the write protection switch.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
57
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.9. Reflashing firmware and FlexPendant
3.1.9. Reflashing firmware and FlexPendant
Overview of reflashing
After replacing hardware units, such as axis computer, buses, etc., or installing newer
versions of RobotWare, the system will automatically attempt reflashing the unit in order to
maintain hardware/software compatibility.
Reflashing is loading appropriate firmware (hardware specific software) onto a specific unit
running this software during operation.
If RobotWare is upgraded on the controller, then the FlexPendant will reflash, i.e. update to
the new version, when connected.
Note that performing any such replacements/updates might require running firmware
versions not available! To avoid jeopardizing the function of the system, ABB recommends
using the same versions as earlier, unless these are unavailable.
The units currently using the reflash function are:
•
Contactor interface board
•
Drive units
•
FlexPendant
•
Profibus master
•
Axis computer
•
Panel board
Reflashing process
The automatic reflashing process, described below, must not be disturbed by switching off the
controller while running:
Step
Event
Info
1.
When the system is restarted, the
system checks the versions of the
firmware used. These are checked
against the hardware versions used.
2.
If the hardware and firmware versions
do not match, the system restarts itself
automatically while going to a specific
Update Mode.
During the Update Mode, an attempt is
made to download appropriate firmware
onto the hardware while a message is
very briefly displayed on the
FlexPendant.
3.
Was an appropriate firmware version
found?
If YES, the reflash will proceed.
If NO, the system will stop. Proceed as
detailed in section Reflashing firmware
failed in the Trouble shooting manual IRC5.
In either case, a message is very briefly
displayed on the FlexPendant and
stored in the event log.
The actual reflashing may take a few
seconds or up to a few minutes,
depending on the hardware to be
reflashed.
4.
After performing a successful reflash,
the system restarts.
Continues on next page
58
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.9. Reflashing firmware and FlexPendant
Continued
Step
Event
5.
Another check is made for any
additional hardware/firmware
mismatches.
6.
Was any additional mismatches found?
If YES, the process is repeated until
none are found.
If NO, the process is complete.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
Info
59
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.10. Updating revolution counters
3.1.10. Updating revolution counters
Overview
This section details how to perform a rough calibration of each robot axis, i.e. updating the
revolution counter value for each axis, using the FlexPendant. Detailed information about
revolution counters and how to update them, with calibration positions and scales, can be
found in the respective robot's product manual. Also, see the manuals Instructions for
Levelmeter Calibration and Calibration Pendulum Instruction for information on calibration.
For robots using the Absolute Accuracy option, the calibration data file absacc.cfg must be
loaded first.
Storing the revolution counter setting
This procedure details the second step when updating the revolution counter; storing the
revolution counter setting.
Step
Action
1.
On the ABB menu, tap Calibration.
All mechanical units connected to the system are shown along with their
calibration status.
2.
Tap the mechanical unit in question.
A screen is displayed: tap Rev. Counters.
en0400000771
3.
Tap Update revolution counters....
A dialog box is displayed, warning that updating the revolution counters may
change programmed robot positions:
• Tap Yes to update the revolution counters.
• Tap No to cancel updating the revolution counters.
Tapping Yes displays the axis selection window.
Continues on next page
60
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.1.10. Updating revolution counters
Continued
Step
Action
4.
Select the axis to have its revolution counter updated by:
• Ticking in the box to the left
• Tapping Select all to update all axes.
Then tap Update.
5.
A dialog box is displayed, warning that the updating operation cannot be undone:
• Tap Update to proceed with updating the revolution counters.
• Tap Cancel to cancel updating the revolution counters.
Tapping Update updates the selected revolution counters and removes the tick
from the list of axes.
6.
-
Caution!
If a revolution counter is incorrectly updated, it will cause incorrect robot
positioning, which in turn may cause damage or injury!
Check the calibration position very carefully after each update.
See section Checking the calibration position in either of the manuals: Instructions
for Levelmeter Calibration or Calibration Pendulum Instruction, depending on
which calibration method to be used. The Product manual for the robot also
contains more information about calibration.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
61
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.2.1. Trouble Shooting the FlexPendant
3.2 Trouble shooting instructions per unit
3.2.1. Trouble Shooting the FlexPendant
General
The FlexPendant communicates, through the Panel Board, with the Control Module main
computer. The FlexPendant is physically connected to the Panel Board through a cable in
which the +24 V supply and two Enabling Device chains run.
Procedure
The procedure below details what to do if the FlexPendant does not work correctly.
Step
62
Action
1.
If the FlexPendant is completely "dead",
proceed as detailed in section FlexPendant
dead on page 19
2.
If the FlexPendant starts, but does not
operate correctly, proceed as detailed in
section FlexPendant does not communicate
on page 22.
3.
If the FlexPendant starts, seems to operate,
but displays erratic event messages, proceed
as detailed in section Erratic event messages
on FlexPendant on page 23
4.
If none of the above type cases apply, please
proceed below!
5.
If the display is not illuminated, try adjusting
the contrast.
6.
Check the cable for connections and integrity.
7.
Check the 24 V power supply.
8.
Read the event log message on the
FlexPendant and follow any instructions of
references.
Info/illustration
Communication errors between the
FlexPendant and the main computer
are displayed as event log
messages on the FlexPendant.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.2.2. Trouble Shooting Power Supplies
3.2.2. Trouble Shooting Power Supplies
Overview
This section details how to trouble shoot electrical power supplies in the Control and Drive
Modules.
Trouble Shooting Procedure
When trouble shooting power supply faults, follow the outline detailed below.
Step
Action
Info/illustration
1.
Check the indication LED on the
power supply unit.
The significance of all indication LEDs are
specified in section Indications.
2.
Disconnect the output connector of
the power supply unit.
3.
Measure the output voltage of the
unit.
If no or the wrong voltage is detected, proceed
below.
Most nominal voltage values are specified in
the Circuit Diagram in the Product Manual,
IRC5.
4.
Measure the input voltage.
If the input voltage is correct, the power supply
unit may be faulty.
Most nominal voltage values are specified in
the Circuit Diagram in the Product Manual,
IRC5.
5.
If required, disconnect the loads
from the power supply unit, one by
one, to eliminate any overloads.
6.
If the power supply unit is found
How to replace the unit is detailed in the
faulty, replace it, and verify that the Product Manual, IRC5.
fault has been fixed.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
63
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.2.3. Trouble Shooting Communications
3.2.3. Trouble Shooting Communications
Overview
This section details how to trouble shoot data communication in the Control and Drive
Modules.
Trouble Shooting Procedure
When trouble shooting communication faults, follow the outline detailed below:
Step
64
Action
1.
Faulty cables (e.g. send and receive signals are
mixed up
2.
Transfer rates (baud rates)
3.
Data widths that are incorrectly set
Info/illustrations
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.2.4. Trouble Shooting I/O units
3.2.4. Trouble Shooting I/O units
Checking function
The procedure detailed below is to be used when a certain I/O unit does not communicate
through it's in- and outputs as expected.
Step
Action
1.
Check that the current I/O signal has the desired
status using the I/O menu on the FlexPendant
display.
2.
Check the I/O unit's LED for the current input or
output. If the output LED is not lit, check that the 24 V
I/O power supply is OK.
3.
Check on all connectors and cabling from the I/O unit
to the process connection.
4.
Make sure the process bus, to which the I/O unit is
connected, is working.
Info/illustration
If a bus has stopped running,
an event log message is
usually stored in the
FlexPendant event log.
Also check the indication
LEDs on the bus boards.
Checking channel communication
The I/O channels can be read and activated from the I/O menu on the FlexPendant. In the
event of an error in the I/O communication to and from the robot, check as follows:
Step
Action
1.
Is I/O communication programmed in the current
program?
2.
On the unit in question, the MS (Module Status) and
NS (Network Status) LEDs must be lit with a steady
green light. See the tables below regarding other
conditions.
Info/illustration
LED indications
All LEDs, and their significance, are described in section Indications.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
65
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.3.1. Intermittent errors
3.3 Trouble shooting instructions per symptom
3.3.1. Intermittent errors
Description
During operation, errors and malfunctions may occur, in a seemingly random way.
Consequences
Operation is interrupted, and occasionally, event log messages are displayed, that sometimes
do not seem to be related to any actual system malfunction. This sort of problem sometimes
affects the Emergency stop or Enable chains respectively, and may at times be very hard to
pinpoint.
Probable causes
Such errors may occur anywhere in the robot system and may be due to:
•
external interference
•
internal interference
•
loose connections or dry joints, e.g. incorrectly connected cable screen connections.
•
thermal phenomena , e.g. major temperature changes within the workshop area.
Recommended actions
In order to remedy the symptom, the following actions are recommended (the actions are
listed in order of probability):
Step
66
Action
Info/illustration
1.
Check all the cabling, especially the cables in the
Emergency stop and Enable chains. Make sure all
connectors are connected securely.
2.
Check if any indication LEDs signal any malfunction
that may give some clue to the problem.
3.
Check the messages on the FlexPendant.
Sometimes specific error combinations are
intermittent.
4.
Check the robot's behaviour, etc, each time that type If possible, keep track of the
of error occurs.
malfunctions in a log or
similar.
5.
Check whether any condition in the robot working
environment also changes periodically, e.g,
interference from any electric equipment only
operating periodically.
6.
Investigate whether the environmental conditions
If possible, keep track of the
(such as ambient temperature, humidity, etc) has any malfunctions in a log or
bearing on the malfunction.
similar.
The significance of all
indication LEDs are
specified in section
Indications on page 122
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.4.1. Handling of logs
3.4 Working with logs
3.4.1. Handling of logs
Overview
This section details how to handle logs, which means:
•
opening logs and viewing their contents
•
saving logs
•
deleting logs
Opening a log
This section details how to open a log and access its contents:
Step
Action
Info/illustration
1.
There are two ways of accessing the logs:
• Tap the Status bar, then Event log.
• Tap the ABB menu, then Event log.
The log and it's contents is shown.
2.
If the log contents do not fit into a single screen, it can How to do this is detailed in
be scrolled and/or zoomed.
section Scrolling and
zooming on the FlexPendant
on page 55
3.
To view a specific log entry, simply tap on that line.
4.
Tap the Status bar again to close the log.
Selecting log category
This section details how to select which event log category to view and handle:
Step
Action
Info/illustration
1.
Open the log.
Detailed above!
2.
Tap View to select category.
The selected category is displayed.
Save a log
This section details how to save a log and it's contents:
Step
Action
Info/illustration
1.
Open the event log.
Detailed above!
2.
If a specific log category is to be saved, select it as
detailed above.
3.
Tap Save All Logs As...
A dialog box is displayed.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
67
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.4.1. Handling of logs
Continued
Step
Action
4.
Navigate to the location on your disk where the log is
to be saved.
5.
Use the buttons, from left to right, to:
• Make a new folder in which to put the log file.
• Step up one level in the file structure.
• ABC...: Access a virtual keyboard to edit the
name of the log file.
• OK: Accept all seletions made and save the
log file.
• Cancel: Do not save the log file and revert to
the previous window.
Info/illustration
Delete a log
This section details how to delete a log and it's contents:
Step
68
Action
Info/illustration
1.
Open the log.
Detailed above!
2.
If a specific log category is to be deleted, select it as
detailed above.
3.
Tap Delete...
A selection between Delete Log... and Delete All
Logs... is offered.
4.
Select Delete All Logs... to delete the entire
contents.
Select Delete Log... to delete the contents of the
specific log selected.
A selection box is displayed.
5.
Tap Yes to delete the log, and No to abort.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.4.2. What is an event log?
3.4.2. What is an event log?
Overview
Robot systems are often operated without any personnel present. The logging function is a
way to store information about past events for future reference in order to facilitate trouble
shooting.
References:
•
How to read RAPID event log messages on page 71
•
Definition of recommended actions for RAPID run time errors on page 75
•
Definition of RAPID run time error statuses on page 73
Concepts
This section defines a number of concepts used when discussing logs, entries and their use.
What is an event?
An event is a specific occurrance which generates an item in the log. For instance, if the
manipulator collides with an obstacle, this will cause a message to be sent to the log. A
message of the occurrance is displayed along with a time marker, etc.
What is an event log message?
An event log message is the actual wording, describing what has happened, what
consequences it will have on the system, etc.
The log list
The illustrations shows a list of log entries as displayed on the FlexPendant.
xx0300000448
A
The event type (error, warning, information)
B
The event code
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
69
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.4.2. What is an event log?
Continued
C
The event title
D
The date and time of occurrence
How to read general event log messages
Tapping on a specific event displays the following on the FlexPendant:
en0300000454
70
A
Event number. All error events are listed in accordance with this number.
B
Event title. This very briefly states what has happened.
C
Event time marker specifies exactly when the event occurred.
D
Description: A brief description of the event causing the message to be displayed.
Intended to assist in understanding the causes and implications of the event.
E
Consequences: A brief description of any consequences inflicted on the system,
transition to other operation mode, emergency stop, caused by the particular event
causing the message to be displayed. Intended to assist in understanding the causes
and implications of the event.
F
Probable causes: A list of probable causes, listed in order of probability.
G
Recommended actions: A list of the recommended correcting actions, based on the
"Probable causes" specified above. These may range from "Replace the xx..." to" Run
test program xx...", i.e. may be actions to isolate the problem as well as correcting it.
H
Acknowledge or OK button
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.4.3. How to read RAPID event log messages
3.4.3. How to read RAPID event log messages
Overview
Many of the error event log messages exclusive to RAPID errors are written in a specific form
to simplify understanding the messages.
References:
•
What is an event log? on page 69
•
Definition of RAPID run time error statuses on page 73
•
RAPID standard procedures
How to read a typical RAPID event log message
An example of a typical RAPID error event log message is explained below:
en0500001456
Description
See section What is an event log? on page 69
"Task: T_ROB1"
The task specified, is the task in which the error has been
detected. In this example: "T_ROB1".
"The signal..."
This is an explanatory text, without any specific format.
"Program Ref..."
The program reference " module name" / "routine name" /
"Instruction name" / "line number" for the instruction that created
the error event. In this example: error_layout/main/SetDO/6.
Consequences
See section What is an event log? on page 69
"Text"
This is an explanatory text, without any specific format.
Probable causes
See section What is an event log? on page 69
"Text"
This is an explanatory text, without any specific format.
Recommended actions
See section What is an event log? on page 69
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
71
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.4.3. How to read RAPID event log messages
Continued
"All signals..."
This is an explanatory text, without any specific format.
"Recovery: xx"
This is a predefined error recovery constant to be used when
building error handlers in the RAPID program. In this example:
ERR_ACC_TOO_LOW. How to build error handlers using error
recovery constants is detailed in RAPID Reference Manual RAPID Overview.
Understanding the concept "argument"
Many of the event log messages, as shown in Trouble shooting manual, part 2 of 2, Event log
messages include the marker arg.
This is a variable which may have a number of significances, mainly depending on the
context in which it appears.
In the example below, arg signifies the name of the mechanical unit to causing the error.
en0400001021
72
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.4.4. Definition of RAPID run time error statuses
3.4.4. Definition of RAPID run time error statuses
General
Run time errors are errors that occur when executing the program, it's modules and routines.
These errors may be due to the program being written incorrectly, conditions provided by
external equipment not being met, or a number of other reasons. To pinpoint the exact reason
for each fault is practically impossible.
Since these errors are most often encountered during program testing and debugging, they are
usually found by experienced programmers are will be solved directly before running the
working cell in production.
References:
•
What is an event log? on page 69
•
Definition of recommended actions for RAPID run time errors on page 75
•
How to read RAPID event log messages on page 71
The text in the "Consequences" field of an RAPID run time event log text often contains some
reference to a particular error status.
Run time errors have one of five possible consequences:
•
Warning
•
Error
•
SYS_STOP_RAPID_BLOCK
•
SYS_HALT
•
SYS_FAIL
Information message
An information message is an entry in the log corresponding to normal system events such as:
•
starting and stopping programs.
•
change in operational mode.
•
changing state between motors ON and OFF.
Warning
A warning is an event that you need to be aware of, but it's consequence is not considered
severe enough to stop program execution.
Some warnings require the operator to acknowledge the event.
It may also mean that program execution may be stopped due to the event, not at this specific
time, but later, or if some other condition is met, etc. In such case, the same event occurs, but
this time as an "error" as specified below.
Usually, the program execution does not stop, and in such cases no immediate action is
required by the operator.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
73
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.4.4. Definition of RAPID run time error statuses
Continued
Error
An error is an event that prevents the robot system from proceeding. Usually, the program
execution stops.
All errors must be acknowledged. Most errors also require some immediate action from
personnel to be solved.
SYS STOP
SYS STOP is:
•
All NORMAL tasks will be stopped. The parameter NORMAL is described in the
Technical reference manual - System parameters.
•
The robot motion stops gently.
•
Jogging is possible.
•
Program start is possible in one of the ways specified in section Definition of
recommended actions for RAPID run time errors on page 75
SYS HALT
SYS HALT is:
•
All NORMAL tasks will be stopped. The parameter NORMAL is described in the
Technical reference manual - System parameters.
•
The system goes to Guard Stop.
•
The robot motion stops abruptly, since the holding brakes are applied.
•
Jogging is possible.
•
Program start is possible in one of the ways specified in section Definition of
recommended actions for RAPID run time errors on page 75
SYS FAIL
SYS FAIL is:
74
•
All NORMAL tasks will be stopped. The parameter NORMAL is described in the
Technical reference manual - System parameters.
•
The system goes to System Failure State.
•
The robot motion stops abruptly, since the holding brakes are applied.
•
Jogging is not possible.
•
Program start is not possible.
•
Performing a system restart resets the system. How to perform a system restart is
detailed in section Restart in the Operator's manual - IRC5 with FlexPendant.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.4.5. Definition of recommended actions for RAPID run time errors
3.4.5. Definition of recommended actions for RAPID run time errors
General
The text in the "Recommended actions" field of an RAPID run time event log text often
contains some reference to a particular action recommended to solve the problem.
Due to the lack of space on the FlexPendant display, the most common actions are described
below.
References:
•
How to read RAPID event log messages on page 71
•
What is an event log? on page 69
•
Definition of RAPID run time error statuses on page 73
Run time errors may usually be remedied by performing one of a few standardized actions:
•
Edit program
•
Restart from the current position
•
Restart after moving the program pointer arbitrarily within the program list
•
Restart after moving the program pointer to Main
Edit program
Edit the program to find the cause of the problem by making sure:
•
all parameter values affecting the instruction are OK
•
all options used by the system have been configured correctly. Also make sure any
options not used have been configured.
Restart from the current position
Restart program execution from the current position, that is, from the start of the program line
on which the event occurred. If the event was caused by anything on that particular line, the
same event will probably be triggered again.
Restart after moving the program pointer arbitrarily within the program list
Restart program execution after moving the program pointer (PP) manually to any position
within the program list. This provides an opportunity to step past the offending instruction
and test the remaining program.
Restart after moving the program pointer to Main
Restart program execution after manually moving the PP to the Main routine. The concept
"Main routine" is described in section The structure of a RAPID application on page 120.
This enables the program execution to start from the beginning of the program list.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
75
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.4.6. Event log file format
3.4.6. Event log file format
File structure
Logs are saved as plain ASCII text files. The following illustration shows an example of an
event log file.
How to save a log file using the FlexPendant is detailed in section Handling of logs on page
67
B
D
E
F
G
en0300000478
Continues on next page
76
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.4.6. Event log file format
Continued
File elements
Item
Name
A
TBD
B
The date and time when saved
C
Identity of robot system and installed options
D
Event code
E
Event title
F
The date and time of occurence
G
The event message
H
The name of next category
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
77
3 Instructions, how to correct faults
3.5.1. Editing parameters
3.5 Working with configuration files
3.5.1. Editing parameters
Overview
When editing parameters you use the Instance Editor, which is opened from the Configuration
Editor.
You can either edit the parameters of one single instance, or you can edit several instances at
one time. Editing several instances at one time is useful when you want to change the same
parameter in several instances, like when moving signals from one I/O unit to another.
This section only describes how to set the parameters. For information about what to set the
parameters to for achieving certain results, see the Technical reference manual - System
parameters for the RobotWare version of your system.
Prerequisites
You must have Write access to the controller. See About access rights for details.
Edit parameters
To edit the parameters of one or several instances:
1. In the Robot View Explorer, expand the Controller and the Configuration node and
double-click the topic that contains the parameters to edit.
This opens the Configuration Editor.
2. In the Type name list of the Configuration Editor, select the type that the parameter to edit
belongs to.
The instances of the type is now displayed in the Instance list of the Configuration Editor.
3. In the Instance list, select the instances to edit and press the Enter Key. To select several
instances at once, hold down the SHIFT or CTRL key while selecting.
The Instance Editor is now displayed.
4. In the Parameter list of the Instance Editor, select the parameter to edit and change the
value of the parameter in the Value box.
When editing several instances at one time, the parameter values you specify will be
applied to all instances. For parameters that you do not specify any new value, each
instance will keep its existing value for that parameter.
5. Click OK to apply the changes to the configuration database of the controller.
For many parameters, the changes will not take affect until the controller is restarted. If
your changes require a restart, you will be notified of this.
Result
You have now updated the controller's system parameters. If the changes require a restart of
the controller, the changes will not take affect until you do this. If you are going to make
several changes, you can wait with the restart until all changes are done.
78
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.1.1. Screw joints
4 Descriptions and background information
4.1 Basic reference material
4.1.1. Screw joints
General
This section details how to tighten the various types of screw joints on the controller.
The instructions and torque values are valid for screw joints comprised of metallic materials
and do not apply to soft or brittle materials.
Tightening torque
Before tightening any screw, note the following:
•
Determine whether a standard tightening torque or special torque is to be applied. The
standard torques are specified in the tables below. Any special torques are specified in
the Repair, Maintenance or Installation procedure description. Any special torque
specified overrides the standard value.
•
Use the correct tightening torque for each type of screw joint.
•
Only use correctly calibrated torque keys.
•
Always tighten the joint by hand, and never use pneumatical tools
•
Use the correct tightening technique, i.e. do not jerk. Tighten the screw in a slow,
flowing motion.
•
Maximum allowed total deviation from the specified value is 10%!
The table below specify the recommended standard tightening torque for oil-lubricated
screws with slotted or cross-recess head screws.
Dimension
Tightening torque (Nm)
Class 4.8, oil-lubricated
M2.5
0.25
M3
0.5
M4
1.2
M5
2.5
M6
5.0
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
79
4 Descriptions and background information
4.1.2. Document references
4.1.2. Document references
General
This section specifies all necessary documentation required for service, repair and installation
of the industrial robot.
If supplemental documentation is required for certain procedures in a manual, this is listed as
required equipment in the instruction.
The tables below specify the available controller documentation.
The first digits of the article numbers are the same for a document in every language. The
exception is made in the last digit, represented with an "x" in the tables. Select last digit "x"
according to the listing below, depending on desired language:
•
English, x = 1
•
Swedish, x = 2
•
German, x = 3
•
French, x = 4
•
Spanish, x = 5
•
Portuguese, x = 6
•
Italian, x = 7
•
Danish, x = 8
•
Dutch, x = 9
References
80
Reference
Document ID
Product manual, procedures - IRC5
3HAC021313-001
Product manual, reference information - IRC5
3HAC021313-001
Operator's manual - IRC5 with FlexPendant
3HAC16590-1
Getting started - IRC5 and RobotStudioOnline
3HAC021564-001
Trouble shooting manual - IRC5
3HAC020738-001
Technical reference manual - System parameters
3HAC17076-1
Application Manual - MultiMove
3HAC021272-001
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.1.3. Standard toolkit, trouble shooting
4.1.3. Standard toolkit, trouble shooting
General
Listed are tools required to perform the actual trouble shooting work. All tools required to
perform any corrective measure, such as replacing parts, are listed in their Product Manual
section respectively.
Contents, standard toolkit, IRC5
Tool
Remark
Screw driver, Torx
Tx10
Screw driver, Torx
Tx25
Ball tipped screw driver, Torx
Tx25
Screw driver, flat blade
4 mm
Screw driver, flat blade
8 mm
Screw driver, flat blade
12 mm
Screw driver
Phillips-1
Box spanner
8 mm
Contents, standard toolkit, trouble shooting
Qty Art. no. Tool
Rem.
-
-
Normal shop tools
Contents as specified above.
1
-
Multimeter
-
1
-
Oscilloscope
-
1
-
Recorder
-
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
81
4 Descriptions and background information
4.2. Servo System
4.2. Servo System
Overview
This section describes the basic flow of energy through the drive system, from the three phase
mains supply to the pulse width modulated drive current to the robot motors.
The basic function of the drive system is:
•
The three phase mains supply is connected to the mains switch (to the left in the figure
below)
•
filtered in the filter
•
transformed in the transformer (if applicable)
•
Depending on the state of the system, the Motors ON contactors either connects or
disconnects the power to the rectifier unit. This is detailed in section Motors ON/OFF,
chain and status on page 94.
•
The rectifier converts the AC voltage to a DC voltage
•
to the DC link, acting as an energy bank by filtering the voltage,
•
which is chopped into a pulse width modulated (PWM) pulse train by the drive units
•
This variable three phase AC current is connected to the motor on each manipulator
axis, in which it creates a torque, turning the motor rotor.
Function
en0300000502
A
RS485 communication between axis computer and contactor interface board
C
RS422 communication between axis computer and serial measurement board (SMB)
D
SPI communication between axis computer and main servo drive
E, F
These are described in the text below!
Continues on next page
82
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.2. Servo System
Continued
Mains power supply
A three phase voltage supply (three phases, ground and protective earth) from the shop in
which the robot system is installed. The shop power supply is to be dimensioned by the site
designer.
Power supply unit contactor
The power supply unit contactor is the normal way of switching the electronic power to the
system on or off. It is activated by a signal from the control module power supply.
EMC filter
A low pass filter reduces the amount of harmonics back to the input power.
Main transformer
Not all robot installation require the use of a main transformer.
The transformer converts the shop voltage supply to a voltage level suitable for supplying the
rectifier. It may be connected internally for different mains voltages. Different capacities are
available for different power demands.
In some applications, the shop power supply is suited for supplying the rectifier, and in such
cases, no transformer is required. A smaller electronics supply transformer will still be
required to supply the electronics.
E (as in the illustration above)
The safety circuits (detailed in section Motors ON/OFF, chain and status on page 94)
ultimately controls the Motors ON contactors. When these circuits detect any malfunction the
safety contactors open, thus disconnecting the drive system.
Reactor
Larger robot models use a reactor to reduce the transient load on the contactors during high
power demands.
Motors ON contactors
Two Motors ON contactors are connected in series with each other. In case of any potentially
dangerous malfunctions, the system uses these contactors to disconnect the power from the
drive system.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
83
4 Descriptions and background information
4.2. Servo System
Continued
Contactor interface board
The contactor interface board, among other things, controls the Motors ON contactors, and
opens these through the two RUN-chains in case of any potentially dangerous malfunctions.
The illustration shows an overview of the contactor board signal interface.
en0300000545
The contactor interface board communicates on a RS485 line with the axis computer.
Panel Board
The panel board sends control signals to the contactor interface board, and switches the power
supply unit contactor on and off.
It also handles communication with the panel on the front of the controller.
Rectifier
The rectifier converts the transformed AC voltage to a stabilized DC voltage (DC link
voltage). This DC voltage is supplied to the servo drive units.
DC link
The DC link capacitor is a large capacitor to maintain the DC link voltage during various load
situations. The DC link voltage is the rectified voltage supplied to the drive units.
Bleeder resistors
The bleeder resistors are high power resistors connected in parallel with the DC link.
When there is an overvoltage in the DC link (typically caused by one of the axes' motors
braking, acting as a generator feeding electrical energy back to the drive unit), a transistor in
the rectifier connects the voltage through the bleeder resistors. The DC link voltage drops
instantly.
F (as in the illustration above)
The axis computer receives position references from the main computer.
The communication described in greater detail in section Communications on page 86.
Continues on next page
84
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.2. Servo System
Continued
Axis computer
The axis computer is a single circuit board, controlling the movements of the manipulators
axes.
Based on the programmed movement requirements, the main computer sends instructions
with movement requests to the axis computer which in turn sends instructions to the drive
units.
The axis computer communicates:
•
on a SPI line with the main servo drive
•
on an Ethernet line with the main computer
•
on a RS422 line with the serial measurement board (SMB)
•
on an RS485 line with the contactor board
Main computer
The main computer communicates on an Ethernet connection with the axis computer
Drive unit
Based on the current requests from the axis computer, the servo drives generate three phase
drive currents to the axes' motors. The technique utilized is called Pulse Width Modulation
(PWM) and this creates a voltage pulse train.
In the drive unit, the control and power electronics are integrated.
Each axis has a drive unit, but for many of the manipulator models, these are assembled into
one package, sometimes referred to as a SixPack.
Motor
The motor is a complete unit housing an AC motor, resolver and brake. The two latter are
described below.
The voltage pulse train from the drive unit is converted to torque when applied to the
inductance in the motors' rotor.
R
The resolver is a analog generator creating a sinusoidal signal, and the voltage value
generated depends on the position of the motor's rotor in relation to the stator.
This signal is used by the system to determine the actual position of the rotor.
Serial measurement board
The serial measurement board (sometimes referred to as SMB), converts the analog resolver
signals from all manipulators axes to digital form. It gathers them and sends them to the axis
computer for position reference.
B
The brake fitted to each motor is normally used for holding and emergency stop purposes
only. When the Motors OFF signal is active, which results in disconnecting the drive voltage
from the motor, the brake is used to hold the manipulator arm in position.
It is also used during an emergency stop, when instant stopping is required.
Power supply
The Drive Unit power supply is a 24 VDC supply for the Drive Unit.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
85
4 Descriptions and background information
4.2. Servo System
Continued
Power Supplies
The power supplies in the system are described in sections Power supply, Control Module on
page 101 and Power Supply, Drive Module on page 104 respectively. The complete circuits
are also shown in the Circuit Diagram.
How to trouble shoot power supplies is detailed in section Trouble Shooting Power Supplies
on page 63
Communications
Communications within the system is described in section Communication, Control Module
and Drive Module on page 107. The complete circuits are also shown in the Circuit Diagram.
How to trouble shooting communications is detailed in section Trouble Shooting
Communications on page 64
86
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.3.1. What is a FlexPendant?
4.3 Description, components and details
4.3.1. What is a FlexPendant?
Description of FlexPendant
The FlexPendant (occasionally called TPU, or teach pendant unit) is a device for handling
many of the functions involved with operating the robot system; running programs, jogging
the manipulator, producing and editing application programs, etc.
The FlexPendant consists of both hardware, such as buttons and joystick, and software. The
FlexPendant is connected to the controller module through an integrated cable and connector.
NOTE that specific functions may not be performed using the FlexPendant, but only through
RobotStudioOnline . How to perform these are specified in Operator's manual - RobotStudio
Online.
Main parts
These are the main parts on the FlexPendant.
en0300000586
A
Connector
B
Touch screen
C
Emergency stop button
D
Enabling device
E
Joystick
F
Hold-to-run buttons (not included in all systems)
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
87
4 Descriptions and background information
4.3.1. What is a FlexPendant?
Continued
Hardware buttons
There are a number of dedicated hardware buttons on the FlexPendant. Four of them are
programmable and four are pre-programmed.
en0300000587
A
Programmable key 1. How to define its function is detailed in section Programmable
keys in Operator's manual - IRC5 with FlexPendant.
B
Programmable key 2. How to define its function is detailed in section Programmable
keys in Operator's manual - IRC5 with FlexPendant.
C
Programmable key 3. How to define its function is detailed in section Programmable
keys in Operator's manual - IRC5 with FlexPendant.
D
Programmable key 4. How to define its function is detailed in section Programmable
keys in Operator's manual - IRC5 with FlexPendant.
E
START button. Starts program execution. In systems without hold-to-run buttons, the
Start button is also used for the hold-to-run function.
F
Step BACKWARD button. Steps the program one instruction backwards. In systems
without hold-to-run buttons, the Backward button is also used for the hold-to-run
function.
G
Step FORWARD button. Steps the program one instruction forwards. In systems
without hold-to-run buttons, the Forward button is also used for the hold-to-run
function.
H
STOP button. Stops the program execution.
Continues on next page
88
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.3.1. What is a FlexPendant?
Continued
Touch screen elements
The illustration shows the touch screen elements of the FlexPendant touch screen.
en0300000588
A
ABB menu
B
Operator window
C
Status bar
D
Close button
E
Task bar
F
Quickset menu
ABB menu
The ABB menu contains programs, configurations, and applications. This is described in
section The ABB menu in Operator's manual - IRC5 with FlexPendant.
Operator window
The Operator window displays messages from the program. This is described in section
Operator window in Operator's manual - IRC5 with FlexPendant.
Status bar
The Status bar displays information about the system and messages. This is described in
section Status bar in Operator's manual - IRC5 with FlexPendant.
Close button
Tapping the close button closes the presently open view or application.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
89
4 Descriptions and background information
4.3.1. What is a FlexPendant?
Continued
Task bar
The Task bar displays all open views and applications.
Quickset menu
The Quickset menu contains shortcuts to jogging and settings. This is described in section
The Quickset menu in Operator's manual - IRC5 with FlexPendant.
Left and right handheld
The FlexPendant is set to left handheld on delivery. This can easily be changed to right
handheld and back again whenever required.
The Operator's manual, IRC5 details how to change the screen presentation when changing
how to hold the FlexPendant.
en0400000913
90
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.3.2. Serial Measurement Board, DSQC 562 and DSQC 633
4.3.2. Serial Measurement Board, DSQC 562 and DSQC 633
Description
The Serial Measurement Board (referred to as SMB) is part of the measurement system, and
is generally located in the robot base. When used with additional, external axes, it's location
may differ.
The actual position is shown in the Product Manual of each robot model.
Illustration
The illustration shows the serial measurement board:
X2
X1
SM B 3 -6
SM B 1 -4
S M B 1.7
X3
SMB
xx0400001147
Parts
NOTE: Resolvers 1, 3 and 4 are connected to different connectors depending on the robot
model.
No.
Connector and description
1. SMB1-4: connection of resolvers of axes 1-4
2. SMB3-6:connection of resolvers of axes 3-6
3. SMB1.7: connection of resolvers of axes 1 and 7
4. SMB: 24 VDC power supply from the Drive Module Power Supply Unit and
communication with the Axis Computer
5. X1: Connector 1 to the SMS-01 controller board
6. X2: Connector 2 to the SMS-01 controller board
7. X3: Connector to battery pack (power supply to SMB memory)
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
91
4 Descriptions and background information
4.3.2. Serial Measurement Board, DSQC 562 and DSQC 633
Continued
Facts
This section specifies a number of facts applicable to the serial measurement board. Unless
stated otherwise, the data applies to the versions specified above.
This data is used when:
•
calibrating axes
•
the manipulator should be replaced
•
the SMB should be replaced
•
the controller should be replaced.
The following data is stored on the SMB:
•
calibration data
•
serial number for mechanical unit
•
SIS data
Function
The SMB primarily gathers resolver data from the robot's (or additional axes) motors. This
data is used to measure the speed and position of each axis. Each SMB is capable of measure
up to 7axes.
It also stores a number of data pertaining to each robot.
The SMB communicates with the axis computer through a standard RS422 link. All
communication in the system is schematically shown in section Communication, Control
Module and Drive Module on page 107
Power is supplied by the Drive Module Power Supply Unit. All power supplies are
schematically shown in section Power Supply, Drive Module on page 104
Handling of data on the SMB
In normal cases, the data on the SMB is automatically also stored in the controller. In special
cases (as specified below), this data may require manual handling. How to handle the data is
detailed in section Serial measurement board in the Operator's Manual, IRC5 with
FlexPendant:
Data on
SMB:
Data in
controller:
Data missing
Data missing
An event log text is displayed on the FlexPendant, and
new data must be loaded.
Data OK
Data missing
An event log text is displayed on the FlexPendant, and
data must be transferred to the controller.
Data missing
Data OK
An event log text is displayed on the FlexPendant, and
data must be transferred to the SMB.
How to proceed:
Data OK (robot Data OK (robot Same robot serial numbers. No action required. Proceed.
serial # X)
serial # X)
Data OK (robot Data OK (robot Different robot serial numbers. An event log text is
serial # X)
serial # Y)
displayed on the FlexPendant, and you must select if data
from the SMB is to be transferred to the controller or vice
versa. The new data will overwrite the "old data".
Continues on next page
92
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.3.2. Serial Measurement Board, DSQC 562 and DSQC 633
Continued
Available handling options are (as detailed in section Serial measurement board in the
Operator's Manual, IRC5 with FlexPendant):
•
SMB robot parameters may be loaded from the robot SMB into the controller memory.
•
If the robot is replaced by another robot of the same type, the parameters in the
controller may be read into the SMB.
•
The SMB memory may be erased.
•
The manipulator specific parameters in the controller parameter memory may be
erased.
•
If the data in the SMB and the controller memory differ, it is possible to select the
desired data.
•
The robot history, as specified in the SIS data, may be updated and read (in future
versions).
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
93
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.1.1. Motors ON/OFF, chain and status
4.4 Descriptions, functions
4.4.1. Motors ON/OFF
4.4.1.1. Motors ON/OFF, chain and status
General
The Motors ON chain is actually two circuits, identical in their contents, ultimately
controlling the power supply to the manipulator's motors.
If any of the chains are opened, the power is disconnected and the system goes to the Motors
OFF mode, i.e. the drive power is disconnected from the motors.
The basic circuit
One of the two identical circuits are shown in the illustration below:
en0300000521
Continues on next page
94
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.1.1. Motors ON/OFF, chain and status
Continued
The fundamental function of the circuit is to supply the motors with drive power. In order to
achieve this, a number of conditions must be met:
•
NO emergency stop condition must be active. The Emergency stop circuits are
detailed in section Emergency stop circuit on page 97
•
NO safeguarded stops must be active. The safeguarded stop circuits are detailed in
section Safeguarded stops on page 97.
•
When running in the Manual Reduced/Full Speed modes, the enabling device on the
FlexPendant must be pressed. The FlexPendant is described in section What is a
FlexPendant? on page 87
•
The other Motors ON chain must be OK, i.e. NONE of the fault conditions specified
in this section must be present in the other parallel Motors ON circuit.
•
The signals RUN, ENABLE1 and ENABLE2 must be active. These signals are issued
by the main computer and are detailed in section .
•
NO limit switches on any of the manipulator's axes must be activated, i.e. all
manipulator axes must be within it's normal operating range.
When all these conditions are met, both Motors ON contactors are activated, and the power
is supplied to the drive system.
Interlocking
The dual Motors ON chains supervise each other.
This way, any unbalance in the two chains is instantly detected, causing the chain to be broken
and the Motors ON contactor to fall.
It is not possible to go back to Motors ON mode without correcting the original fault.
Status Motors ON and Motors OFF
The robot system may be in either status Motors ON or Motors OFF. Motors ON means that
the Motors ON contactors are activated, i.e. that all conditions stated above are met.
When any of the conditions are not met, the system goes to status Motors OFF. The system
may be returned to the Motors ON status:
In AUTO mode
Return the robot to Motors ON mode by pressing the Motors ON button on the operator's
panel. If the circuit is OK, the computer closes the circuit to activate the contactor.
When switching to MANUAL from AUTO, the mode changes to Motors OFF and the
computer system opens the circuit.
In MANUAL mode
Start operation in any of the MANUAL modes by pressing the enabling device on the
FlexPendant. If the circuit is OK, the computer closes the circuit.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
95
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.1.2. Breaking the Motors ON chain
4.4.1.2. Breaking the Motors ON chain
Sequence
The Motors ON/OFF circuit and specifications of the conditions required to activate it, are
described in section Motors ON/OFF, chain and status on page 94
When any of the conditions specified are not met, the chain is broken as described below:
Event
results in...
Any one of the conditions is no one of the Motors ON chains are broken
longer fulfilled
a difference in the two Motors
ON chains is detected
the Motors ON contactors are deactivated
open Motors ON contactor
power supply is disconnected from the drive motors
manipulator stops and is held in position by the holding
brakes
an interrupt call is sent directly from the panel unit to the
main computer to indicate the cause of the interruption
Overriding the limit switch circuit
The Motors ON circuit may be temporarily closed to allow manually running the robot back
into the working area, should operation be stopped due to tripping a limit switch.
This requires a two pole "limit switch override switch" to be connected to the Contactor
interface board input for this purpose.
xx0500001569
A
Connector X23 on the contactor interface board: connect the limit switch override switch
first pole between pins 1-2 and the second between pins 3-4.
Keeping this override switch closed, the robot may be run manually using the joystick while
pressing the Motors ON button on the FlexPendant.
96
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.1.3. Emergency stop circuit
4.4.1.3. Emergency stop circuit
General
The emergency stop circuit is intended to cut the power to the system's drive motors if a
potentially dangerous situation should arise.
Opening any of the switches connected in series will break the chain, thus opening the Motors
ON 1 and 2 contactors.
How the emergency stop circuit relates to the Motors ON/OFF circuit is shown in the figure
in section Motors ON/OFF, chain and status on page 94
The circuit
The illustration shows the principle of the emergency stop chain.
en0300000522
The controller Circuit Diagram in the Product Manual, IRC5, contains detailed information
on how to connect the emergency stop buttons.
4.4.1.4. Safeguarded stops
General
Safeguarded stops are intended to cut the power to the system's drive motors if a potentially
dangerous situation should arise, e.g. if a person would enter the manipulator working range
during manual or programmed movement.
This is achieved by connecting external safety devices, such as light curtains, light beams or
pressure sensitive mats.
Three stop types are available: General mode safeguarded stop (GS), Automatic mode
safeguarded stop (AS) and Superior safeguarded stop (SS).
How the safeguarded stop circuit relates to the Motors ON/OFF circuit is shown in the figure
in section Motors ON/OFF, chain and status on page 94
Stop type
Function
Automatic mode safeguarded stop (AS) Used in automatic mode.
General mode safeguarded stop (GS)
Used in all operating modes.
Superior safeguarded stop (SS)
Used in all operating modes.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
97
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.1.4. Safeguarded stops
Continued
Automatic mode safeguarded stop
The AS is bypassed when the operating mode selector is in the MANUAL or MANUAL
FULL SPEED position.
General mode safeguarded stop
When this connection is open the robot changes to the Motors OFF mode.
To reset to MOTORS ON mode, the device that initiated the safety stop must be interlocked
in accordance with applicable safety regulations. This is not normally done by resetting the
device itself.
Superior safeguarded stop
When this connection is open the robot changes to the Motors OFF mode.
To reset to Motors ON mode, the device that initiated the safety stop must be interlocked in
accordance with applicable safety regulations. This is not normally done by resetting the
device itself.
Categories
There are two categories of safety stops; category 0 and category 1 (ISO/DIS 11161 Industrial
automation systems - safety of integrated manufacturing systems - Basic requirements).
Definitions:
•
Category 0: Use when the motor power must be disconnected immediately, such as
when a light curtain, used to protect against entry into the work cell, is passed. The
manipulator motion is likely to be stopped outside the programmed path, which may
require special restart routines.
•
Category 1: Use when the motor power must not be disconnected immediately, such
as when gates are used to protect against entry into the work cell. The manipulator
motion is stopped within the programmed path, which makes restarting easier.
Perform a safety analysis for each potential danger to determine which category to be used.
By default, the safety stops are of category 0. Changing the stop category is done by setting
a parameter.
Continues on next page
98
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.1.5. Limit switch chain
Continued
The circuit
The illustration shows principle of the safeguarded stop chain.
en0300000523
*)
The chains are bypassed on delivery, i.e. nothing is connected except a jumper. Any
number of switches may be connected in series.
The controller Circuit Diagram in the Product Manual, IRC5 contains detailed information
on how to connect the safeguarded stops.
4.4.1.5. Limit switch chain
General
The limit switches are moveable, electro-mechanical switches fitted at the end of a
manipulator's axis' working range. They are available for axis 3 for IRB 2400 and IRB 4400
only.
This way, the switches can be used to block parts of the manipulators potential working range
for safety or other reasons.
Usually, the robot program contains a software limit set within the manipulator working
range, so that the electro-mechanical limit switch is never hit during normal operation.
However, should a limit switch be hit, it must be due to some malfunction, and the Motors
ON chain is deactivated, and the robot operation is stopped.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
99
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.1.5. Limit switch chain
Continued
The circuit
The illustration shows principle of the limit switch circuit.
en0300000524
*)
The circuits are bypassed on delivery, i.e. nothing is connected
except a jumper. Any number of switches may be connected in series.
External limit switch
Intended for use with external equipment such as track motions etc.
The controller Circuit Diagram in the Product Manual, IRC5 contains detailed information
on how to connect the limit switches.
How the limit switch circuit relates to the Motors ON/OFF circuit is shown in the figure in
section Motors ON/OFF, chain and status on page 94
100
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.2. Power supply, Control Module
4.4.2. Power supply, Control Module
Overview
This section describes how the IRC5 Control Module is supplied with electrical power.
Supplies
The illustration below schematically depicts the main electrical power supply routes. The full
IRC5 Circuit Diagram is shown in the Product Manual, IRC5.
en0400001051
Panel Board
(A21)
The Panel Board is supplied with ± 24VDC by the G2 unit.
Main computer
unit (A3)
The Main Computer Unit is supplied with ± 24 VDC by the G2 unit. The unit
also has internal DC/DC converters for supply to logic circuits, etc.
Ext. computer
fan (E2)
Cooling fan fitted on the rear of the module. It is powered by 24VCOOL
from the G2 unit through the Panel Board.
Door fan (E3)
Option: Cooling fan fitted on the inside of the module's door. It is powered
by 24VCOOL from the G2 unit through the Panel Board.
Chassis fan
(E22)
Cooling fan fitted inside the Computer Unit. It is powered by the G31 power
supply unit on the Main Computer Board.
Chassis fan
(E23)
Cooling fan fitted inside the Computer Unit. It is powered by the G31 power
supply unit on the Main Computer Board.
Earth fault
protection (F4)
Option: A service outlet earth fault protection protects the 115V/230 VAC
service outlet from potentially dangerous earth currents.
Circuit breaker
(F5)
Option: A circuit breaker protects the Service outlet from overcurrents (2
A).
Control Moduel
Power Supply
(G2)
The Control Module Power Supply is the main AC/DC converter (DSQC
604) converting 230 VAC to ±24 VDC for a number of units.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
101
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.2. Power supply, Control Module
Continued
Backup Energy
Bank (G3)
The Backup energy bank (capacitor) is used suppling power to the Main
Computer Unit. In case of power failure, the unit ensures that a full backup
may be taken of the memory contents at the time of the failure. The G3 unit
is supplied by the G2 unit.
Customer Power The Customer Power Supplies are optional power supply units (DSQC
Supply (G4, G5) 608) for supplying Customer Connections.
DeviceNet
Power Supply
(G6)
Option: The DeviceNet Power Supply is an optional power supply (DSQC
608) for supplying the DeviceNet units.
DNbus
Option: The DeviceNet bus board is supplied by the G6 unit.
Q2
The main switch on the front of the Control Module.
Operator's Panel The panel board is supplied by the G2 unit and supplies the Operator's
(S1)
Panel and FlexPendant.
Transformer (T3) Option: A 230/230 VAC transformer for supplying the Service outlet.
X20
A connector connecting the 230 VAC from the main transformer in the
Drive Module to the Control Module.
Service Outlet
(X22)
Option: A 230 VAC service outlet for supply to external service equipment
such as laptop computers, etc.
Locations
The illustration below shows the physical location of the power supplies in the Control
Module.
xx0400001059
Continues on next page
102
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.2. Power supply, Control Module
Continued
Voltages
Below is a list of the 24V voltages generated in the Control Module, and the power supply
unit generating it.
Voltage
from power supply unit supplies
24V COOL
G2
Panel board
24V SYS
G2
Panel board
24V PC
G2
Main computer unit
24 V I/O
G4, G5
Customer connections
24V DeviceNet
G6
24V PANEL
A21
24V TP_POWER
A21
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
103
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.3. Power Supply, Drive Module
4.4.3. Power Supply, Drive Module
Overview
This section describes how the IRC5 Drive Module is supplied with electrical power.
Supplies
The illustration below schematically depicts the main electrical power supply routes. The full
Circuit Diagram of the IRC5 controller is shown in the Product Manual, IRC5.
en0400001052
Main Servo Drive
Unit (A41.1)
Drive unit providing the drive power to the robot's motors. It also powers
the fan unit. The low voltage electronics in the drive unit are powered by
the Drive Module Power Supply.
Rectifier (A41.2)
The drive equipment rectifier providing a DC voltage to the drive units.
Continues on next page
104
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.3. Power Supply, Drive Module
Continued
Axis Computer
Unit (A42)
The Axis Computer Unit has internal DC/DC converters for supply to
logic circuits, etc.
Contactor interface The contactor interface board controls a number of contactors in the
board (A43)
system, e.g. both RUN contactors.
Fan Unit (E1)
Cooling fans on the rear of the Drive Module.It is powered by the drive
unit.
Circuit breaker
(F1)
A circuit breaker (25 A) protecting the drive equipment from
overcurrents. Location shown in section Fuses on page 109
Circuit breaker
(F2)
A circuit breaker (10 A) protecting the electronics power supply.
Location shown in section Fuses on page 109
Drive Module
The Drive Module Power Supply (DSQC 626 for smaller robots and
Power Supply (G1) DSQC 627 for IRB 340, IRB 6600 and IRB 7600) in the Drive Module,
converting the 230 VAC to 24 VDC.
Contactor (K41)
A contactor, controlled by the Control Module Panel Board, supplying
the electronics power supply.
RUN contactor
(K42)
The first RUN contactor, controlled by the Contactor Board, supplying
the drive equipment with power.
RUN contactor
(K43)
The second RUN contactor, controlled by the Contactor Board,
supplying the drive equipment with power.
Main switch (Q1)
The main switch on the front of the Drive Module.
Transformer (T1 or T1: The main transformer, converting the mains supply (200-600 VAC)
T2)
to either 3 x 262 VAC (for smaller robots), 3 x 400 VAC (IRB6600) or 3
x 480 VAC (IRB 7600). T2 is used by direct power supply robots such as
IRB6600 (400-480 V) and IRB7600 (480 V) to supply 230 VAC to the
various power supply units.
X0
The main connector on the connector panel of the Drive Module.
Location not shown; behind cover.
X25
Connector for supplying two phase power to the Control Module.
Location not shown; behind cover.
Z1
Option: EMC filter
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
105
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.3. Power Supply, Drive Module
Continued
Locations
The illustration below shows the physical location of the power supplies in the Drive Module.
A41.1.4
A41.1
A41.1.3
A41.2
K43
K44
A41.3
Z1
K42
G1
Q1
H1
A43
F1
K41
F2
XP0
XS25
XS41
XS1
A42
XS2
XS7
xx0400001060
Voltages
Below is a list of the 24 V voltages generated in the Drive Module and the power supply unit
generating it:
106
Voltage
from power supply unit supplies
24V COOL
G1
24V SYS
G1
24V DRIVE
G1
Axis computer, Main servo drive unit,
Contactor unit
24V BRAKE
G1
Contactor unit
Contactor unit, Main servo drive unit
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.4. Communication, Control Module and Drive Module
4.4.4. Communication, Control Module and Drive Module
Overview
The illustration below schematically depicts the main communication routes. The full IRC5
Circuit Diagram of is shown in the Product Manual, IRC5.
Communications
This section describes the data communication within and between the IRC5 Control Module
and Drive Module.
en0400001063
Service port
Connector (A7) on the module front for connecting a PC for
service purposes, e.g. when installing software etc. Ethernet
communication.
FlexPendant
Connector (A9) on the module front for connecting the
FlexPendant. Ethernet communication and safety signals.
USB
One standard USB port (USB1) on the Control Module front for
connecting peripheral equipment and e.g. bulk memory.
LAN
Local Area Network: connector (LAN1) for communication with
other units.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
107
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.4. Communication, Control Module and Drive Module
Continued
Hard Disk Drive
OPTION: Hard disk mass memory.
Solid State Drive
Solid state disk mass memory.
Control Module
The complete control module, containing mainly control and
safety electronics.
Drive Module (X)
The complete drive module, containing mainly drive electronics.
On systems running the MultiMove option, up to four Drive
Modules may be connected to and controlled by one Control
Module. Each additional Drive Module must contain all drive
hardware.
RCC
Robot Communication Card: Communication interface between
various units as shown in the illustration above and in the Circuit
Diagram.
Panel Board
Communicates through a standard RS485 protocol with the Main
Computer (MC) , and works as an interface between the MC and
the controls on the Control Module panel. The user may also
connect safety equipment to a number of inputs and outputs (as
specified in section Safety I/O signals on page 112
Main Computer
The Main Computer runs the RobotWare application software.
EtherNet Board
OPTION: Communication interface between the Main Computer
and any additional Axis Computers when running the MultiMove
option.
DeviceNet
OPTION: bus for communicating with external equipment.
Standard DeviceNet protocol.
ProfiBus
OPTION: bus for communicating with external equipment.
Standard ProfiBus protocol.
InterBus
OPTION: bus for communicating with external equipment.
Standard InterBus protocol.
Axis Computer Board (X) The Axis Computer controls the drive units. It also receives
position feedback information from the robot's resolvers through
the serial measurement board (SMB).
Contactor Interface Board Controls a number of safety related functions within the drive
system (signals RUN, SPEED and ENABLE). It also
communicates with the axis computer through a RS485 interface.
108
Drive Unit
Supplies the drive motors with modulated drive current.
Resolver
A resolver on each drive motor shaft sends shaft position
information to the serial measurement board.
PCI Bus
A bus on the Main Computer Board itself. All other boards in the
Control Module (except the Panel Board) are fitted into PCI slots
on the Main Computer Board.
Serial Measurement
Board
The serial measurement board gathers resolver data from all
robot axes and sends it to the main computer.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.5. Fuses
4.4.5. Fuses
General
The electrical power supply to the IRC5 system is protected by a number of automatic fuses
as specified below.
Servo system fuse, F1
The supply to the servo system is protected by an automatic fuse, 25A.
It is connected as shown in section Schematical, drive module on page 111and it's physical
location is shown in section Location, drive module on page 111.
Main fuse, F2
The supply to the Drive Module Power Supply and the Axis Computer is protected by an
automatic fuse, 10A.
It is connected as shown in section Schematical, drive module on page 111and it's physical
location is shown in section Location, drive module on page 111.
Fuse (F5) and earth fault protection (F4) to the service outlet connector
The service outlet (115 - 230 VAC) on the Control Module is protected by a fuse, 2 A in
European applications and 4 A in US applications, and an earth fault protection unit.
It is connected as shown in section Schematical, control module on page 110and it's physical
location is shown in section Location, control module on page 110.
How to trouble shoot this is detailed in section No voltage in service outlet on page 24
Optional circuit breaker, F6
As an option, a 25 A circuit breaker may be fitted directly after the Q1 main switch on the
Drive Module.
It is connected as shown in section Schematical, drive module on page 111and it's physical
location is shown in section Location, drive module on page 111.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
109
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.5. Fuses
Continued
Schematical, control module
en0400001051
Location, control module
xx0500001556
Continues on next page
110
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.5. Fuses
Continued
Schematical, drive module
en0400001052
Location, drive module
xx0500001555
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
111
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.6. Safety I/O signals
4.4.6. Safety I/O signals
General
In the controller's basic and standard form, certain I/O signals are dedicated to specific safety
functions. These are listed below with a brief description of each.
All signals can be viewed in the I/O menu on the FlexPendant.
Safety I/O signals
The list below contains the safety I/O signals as used by the standard system.
Signal
name
Description
Bit value
condition
From - To
ES1
Emergency stop, chain 1 = Chain closed
1
From panel board to main
computer
ES2
Emergency stop, chain 1 = Chain closed
2
From panel board to main
computer
SOFTESI
Soft Emergency stop
1 = Soft stop enabled From panel board to main
computer
EN1
Enabling device1&2,
chain 1
1 = Enabled
From panel board to main
computer
EN2
Enabling device1&2,
chain 2
1 = Enabled
From panel board to main
computer
AUTO1
Op mode selector,
chain 1
1 = Auto selected
From panel board to main
computer
AUTO2
Op mode selector,
chain 2
1 = Auto selected
From panel board to main
computer
MAN1
Op mode selector,
chain 1
1 = MAN selected
From panel board to main
computer
MANFS1
Op mode selector,
chain 1
1 = Man. full speed
selected
From panel board to main
computer
MAN2
Op mode selector,
chain 2
1 = MAN selected
From panel board to main
computer
MANFS2
Op mode selector,
chain 2
1 = Man. full speed
selected
From panel board to main
computer
USERDOOV
LD
Over load, user DO
1 = Error, 0 = OK
From panel board to main
computer
MONPB
Motors-on pushbutton
1 = Pushbutton
pressed
From panel board to main
computer
AS1
Auto stop, chain 1
1 = Chain closed
From panel board to main
computer
AS2
Auto stop, chain 2
1 = Chain closed
From panel board to main
computer
SOFTASI
Soft Auto stop
1 = Soft stop enabled From panel board to main
computer
GS1
General stop, chain 1
1 = Chain closed
From panel board to main
computer
GS2
General stop, chain 2
1 = Chain closed
From panel board to main
computer
Continues on next page
112
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.6. Safety I/O signals
Continued
Signal
name
Description
Bit value
condition
SOFTGSI
Soft General stop
1 = Soft stop enabled From panel board to main
computer
SUPES1
Superior stop, chain1
1 = Chain closed
From panel board to main
computer
SUPES2
Superior stop, chain2
1 = Chain closed
From panel board to main
computer
SOFTSSI
Soft Superior stop
1 = Soft stop enabled From panel board to main
computer
CH1
All switches in run
chain 1 closed
1 = Chain closed
From panel board to main
computer
CH2
All switches in run
chain 2 closed
1 = Chain closed
From panel board to main
computer
ENABLE1
Enable from MC (read 1 = Enable, 0 = break From panel board to main
back)
chain 1
computer
ENABLE2_1
Enable from AXC1
1 = Enable, 0 = break From panel board to main
chain 2
computer
ENABLE2_2
Enable from AXC2
1 = Enable, 0 = break From panel board to main
chain 2
computer
ENABLE2_3
Enable from AXC3
1 = Enable, 0 = break From panel board to main
chain 2
computer
ENABLE2_4
Enable from AXC4
1 = Enable, 0 = break From panel board to main
chain 2
computer
PANFAN
Superv. of fan in
Control module
1 = OK, 0 = Error
From panel board to main
computer
PANEL24OV
LD
Overload, panel 24V
1 = Error, 0 = OK
From panel board to main
computer
DRVOVLD
Overload, drive
modules
1 = Error, 0 = OK
From panel board to main
computer
DRV1LIM1
Read back of chain 1
after limit switches
1 = Chain 1 closed
From axis computer to main
computer
DRV1LIM2
Read back of chain 2
after limit switches
1 = Chain 2 closed
From axis computer to main
computer
DRV1K1
Read back of contactor 1 = K1 closed
K1, chain 1
From axis computer to main
computer
DRV1K2
Read back of contactor 1 = K2 closed
K2, chain 2
From axis computer to main
computer
From - To
DRV1EXTCO External contactors
NT
closed
1 = Contactors
closed
From axis computer to main
computer
DRV1PANCH Drive voltage for
1
contactor-coil 1
1 = Voltage applied
From axis computer to main
computer
DRV1PANCH Drive voltage for
2
contactor-coil 2
1 = Voltage applied
From axis computer to main
computer
DRV1SPEED Read back of op. mode 0 = Man. mode low
selected
speed
From axis computer to main
computer
DRV1TEST1
A dip in run chain 1 has Toggled
been detected
From axis computer to main
computer
DRV1TEST2
A dip in run chain 2 has Toggled
been detected
From axis computer to main
computer
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
113
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.6. Safety I/O signals
Continued
Signal
name
Description
Bit value
condition
SOFTESO
Soft Emergency stop
1 = Set soft E-stop
SOFTASO
Soft Auto stop
1 = Set soft Auto stop From main computer to
panel board
SOFTGSO
Soft General stop
1 = Set soft General
stop
From main computer to
panel board
SOFTSSO
Soft Superior stop
1 = Set soft Sup. Estop
From main computer to
panel board
MOTLMP
Motors-on lamp
1 = Lamp on
From main computer to
panel board
ENABLE1
Enable1 from MC
1 = Enable, 0 = break From main computer to
chain 1
panel board
TESTEN1
Test of Enable1
1 = Start test
From main computer to
panel board
DRV1CHAIN
1
Signal to interlocking
circuit
1 = Close chain 1
From main computer to axis
computer 1
DRV1CHAIN
2
Signal to interlocking
circuit
1 = Close chain 2
From main computer to axis
computer 1
1 = Release brake
From main computer to axis
computer 1
DRV1BRAKE Signal to brakerelease coil
114
From - To
From main computer to
panel board
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.7. Compatibilities, hardware/software within the IRC5 system
4.4.7. Compatibilities, hardware/software within the IRC5 system
General
Not all software is compatible with all hardware or other software within the IRC5 system.
For instance, newer versions of a specific circuit board may require the driver software to be
updated.
This section does not claim to specify all compatible combinations, but only the most
common.
If you experience compatibility problems not addressed by this instruction, please contact
your local ABB dealer.
RobotWare 5.00
The table below lists the known allowed combinations when running RobotWare version
5.00:
Hardware
Version
Firmware version
Robot Communication Card
v.1
v.2
Profibus
Axis Computer
Panel Board
Contactor Board
RobotWare 5.01
The table below lists the known allowed combinations when running RobotWare version
5.01:
Hardware
Version
Firmware version
Robot Communication Card
v.3
v.4
Profibus
Axis Computer
Panel Board
Contactor Board
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
115
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.8. What is "the memory"?
4.4.8. What is "the memory"?
Overview
When using the term "memory", a number of things may be implied:
•
The main computer RAM memory
•
The system hard disk drive or flash disk drive
•
The hard disk of some other unit connected to the same LAN as the robot system,
serving as a storage for software.
Main computer RAM memory
The RAM memory is the main computer primary memory located on the computer
motherboard. The memory is used by the processor during all program execution.
The contents of the RAM memory during operation is described in section The structure of
the main computer RAM memory contents on page 117
System hard/flash disk drive
This is the main mass storage unit of the control module, and is located in the front of the
Control Module. Depending on controller version, it may be a hard disk drive or a flash disk
drive and may vary in size.
It contains all necessary software for operating the robot, and is the unit on which the
RobotWare is installed.
When starting up, data is loaded into the RAM memory from the disk drive.
When powering down, the image.bin is saved here. The contents of the image.bin is described
in section The structure of the main computer RAM memory contents on page 117
LAN unit
This may be used as extra mass storage device if the one in the controlled is not sufficient. It
is not normally considered a part of the robot system
116
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.9. The structure of the main computer RAM memory contents
4.4.9. The structure of the main computer RAM memory contents
General
This section describes what the main computer RAM memory contains during normal
operation.
The term "RAM memory" means the main computer primary memory, i.e. the memory
modules with which the main computer processor works during normal operation.
The generic term "memory" is described in section What is "the memory"? on page 116
Illustration of the RAM memory
Each part of the illustration is described in the table below.
en0500001446
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
117
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.9. The structure of the main computer RAM memory contents
Continued
Parts
Part
Function
RAM memory
The main computer memory modules, located on the computer
motherboard. The processor reads and writes to this memory during
program execution.
The size of the RAM memory may vary, but increasing the size will not
improve computer performance unless a number of hard- and software
changes are made to the robot system.
image.bin
When the system is powered OFF, intentionally or due to power failure, the
image.bin file is saved to the controller hard/flash disk.
It is an internal file, created by the system during operation, usually invisible
to the user.
When performing a "warm start" of the system, the complete image.bin file
is reloaded into the RAM memory. Other types of restarts may start with
another system, etc, which is described in the Operator's manual - IRC5 with
FlexPendant.
ctrl.bin
This file contains, among other things:
• robot identity data
• calibration data
• SIS data
• duty timer data
The file is stored on the SMB board on robot delivery. Data may then be
transferred to the controller as detailed in the Operator's manual - IRC5 with
FlexPendant.
NOTE that the ctrl.bin file is not stored in the system specific file on the hard/
flash disk drive. This means that all data in the file will be retained even if the
system software is updated or in any other way replaced.
SMB board
The SMB board (serial measurement board) is normally fitted on the
mechanical unit, and contains among other things, data from the ctrl.bin file.
How to handle the data on the SMB board, moving data between SMB and
controller, etc is detailed in the Operator's manual - IRC5 with FlexPendant.
Controller
The main mass storage unit of the control module, located in the Computer
hard/flash disk Unit. Depending on controller version, it may be a hard disk drive or a flash
disk drive and may vary in size.
It contains all necessary software for operating the robot, and is the unit on
which the RobotWare is installed.
When starting up, data is loaded into the RAM memory from the disk drive.
When powering down, the image.bin file is automatically saved here.
RAPID code
This section contains all executable RAPID code, whether written by ABB or
the customer.
Configuration
data
This data is basically the contents of the configuration files:
• proc.cfg
• moc.cfg
• sio.cfg
• mmc.cfg
• sys.cfg
Each file contains the settings made when creating and defining the system,
options etc.
The configuration files may not be changed after creation, but their contents
may be checked as detailed in the Trouble Shooting Manual - IRC5. When
changing the contents of the configuration files, ABB strongly recommends
using the tool RobotStudioOnline to reduce the risk of introducing errors.
Continues on next page
118
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.9. The structure of the main computer RAM memory contents
Continued
Part
Function
Texts
Some of the texts used by the system during operation, in all languages
selected when creating the system.
Event logs
All events logged in all event logs.
This means that the logs will be saved even if a power failure occurs, which
in turn, simplifies finding the fault causing the power failure.
Internal states This is data recording the state and position of all robot axes, all I/O, the
state of each manipulator connected to a Multimove system, etc.
This data is constantly updated during operation. This enables the system
to instantly return to it's previous state if the system for any reason stops,
there is a power failure or the robot collides with an obstacle etc.
Calibration
data
This is calibration data for one robot, i.e. all data describing the calibration
position for all six axes of one robot.
SIS
This is service data related to the SIS system (Service Interval System).
This means that SIS data will be kept by the robot even if it's controller is
replaced.
Duty timer
This is the Duty timer data.
This means that duty timer count will be kept by the robot even if it's
controller is replaced.
"My system"
This is the directory in which the RobotWare is stored after installation. The
image file is stored in the directory "Internal".
NOTE that the ctrl.bin file is not stored here, which means that the contents
of the image.bin file will be retained even if updating the system software
during operation.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
119
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.10. The structure of a RAPID application
4.4.10. The structure of a RAPID application
Illustration of a RAPID application
The structure and contents of the main computer RAM memory during operation is described
in section The structure of the main computer RAM memory contents on page 117
en0300000576
Parts
Part
Function
Task
Each task usually contains a RAPID program and system modules aimed
at performing a certain function, e.g. spot welding or manipulator
movements.
A RAPID application may contain one task. If you have the Multitasking
option installed, then there can be more than one task.
Read more about Multitasking in Application manual - Engineering tools.
Task property
parameter
The task property parameters set certain properties for all task contents.
Any program stored in a certain task, assumes the properties set for that
task.
The task property parameters are specified in RAPID reference manual.
Program
Each program usually contains program modules with RAPID code for
different purposes.
Any program must have an entry routine defined to be executable.
Continues on next page
120
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.4.10. The structure of a RAPID application
Continued
Part
Function
Program
module
Each program module contains data and routines for a certain purpose.
The program is divided into modules mainly to enhance overview and
facilitate handling the program. Each module typically represents one
particular robot action or similar.
All program modules will be removed when deleting a program from the
controller program memory.
Program modules are usually written by the user.
Data
Data are values and definitions set in program or system modules. The
data are referenced by the instructions in the same module or in a number
of modules (availability depending on data type).
Data type definitions are specified in the RAPID reference manual,
Functions and data types.
Routine
A routine contains sets of instructions, i.e. defines what the robot system
actually does.
A routine may also contain data required for the instructions.
Entry routine
A special type of routine, in English sometimes referred to as "main",
defined as the program execution starting point.
Note
Each program must have an entry routine called "main", or it will not be
executable. How to appoint a routine as entry routine is specified in RAPID
reference manual. The default name for main can be changed by the
system parameter configurations, type Task. See Technical reference
manual - System parameters.
Instruction
Each instruction is a request for a certain event to take place, e.g. "Run the
manipulator TCP to a certain position" or "Set a specific digital output".
The instructions, their syntax and function is thoroughly described in the
RAPID reference manual, Instructions.
System module Each system module contains data and routines to perform a certain
function.
The program is divided into modules mainly to enhance overview and
facilitate handling the program. Each module typically represents one
particular robot action or similar.
All system modules will be retained when "Delete program" is ordered.
System modules are usually written by the robot manufacturer or line
builder.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
121
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.1. LEDs in the Controller Module
4.5 Indications
4.5.1. LEDs in the Controller Module
General
The Controller Module features a number of indication LEDs, which provide important
information for trouble shooting purposes. If no LEDs light up at all when switching the
system on, trouble shoot as detailed in section All LEDs are dead on page 20
All LEDs on the respective units, and their significance, are described in the following
sections.
All units with LEDs are shown in the illustration below:
LEDs
dummy
A
Robot Communication Card (any of the five board slots)
B
Ethernet board (any of the five board slots)
C
Control module power supply
D
Customer I/O power supply (up to three units)
E
Computer unit
F
Panel board
G
LED board
Continues on next page
122
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.1. LEDs in the Controller Module
Continued
Robot Communication Card (RCC)
The illustration below shows the LEDs on the Robot Communication Card:
en0400000918
A
Status LED
B
Service connector LED
C
TPU connector LED
D
AXC1 connector LED
E-H
These are not LEDs and will not be discussed in this context
Description
Significance
Status LED (during
startup)
The significance of the LEDs are described in the sequence in which
they are lit during a normal startup.
RED flashing: Main computer self test is running.
RED steady: The main computer operating system is loading.
GREEN flashing: A system warm start is running.
GREEN steady: The system warm start has finished.
Status LED (during
operation)
RED steady: Internal failure. The unit needs to be replaced.
RED flashing: Communication failure. The unit does not need to be
replaced.
GREEN steady: The unit and its function is OK.
Service connector
LED
Shows the status of Ethernet communication between the Service
connector and the Robot Communication Card.
GREEN OFF:10 Mbps data rate has been selected
GREEN ON:100 Mbps data rate has been selected
YELLOW flashing: The two units are communicating on the Ethernet
channel.
YELLOW steady: A LAN link is established.
YELLOW OFF: A LAN link is not established.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
123
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.1. LEDs in the Controller Module
Continued
Description
Significance
TPU connector LED
Shows the status of Ethernet communication between the
FlexPendant and the Robot Communication Card.
See the description above!
AXC1 connector LED Shows the status of Ethernet communication between Axis
Computer 1 and the Robot Communication Card.
See the description above!
Ethernet board
The illustration below shows the LEDs on the Ethernet board:
en0400000919
A
AXC2 connector LED
B
AXC3 connector LED
C
AXC4 connector LED
D-F
These are not LEDs and will not be discussed in this context
Description Significance
AXC2
connector
LED
Shows the status of Ethernet communication between Axis Computer 2 and
the Ethernet board.
GREEN OFF:10 Mbps data rate has been selected.
GREEN ON:100 Mbps data rate has been selected.
YELLOW flashing: The two units are communicating on the Ethernet channel.
YELLOW steady: A LAN link is established.
YELLOW OFF: A LAN link is not established.
AXC3
connector
LED
Shows the status of Ethernet communication between Axis Computer 3 and
the Ethernet board
See the description above!
AXC4
connector
LED
Shows the status of Ethernet communication between Axis Computer 4 and
the Ethernet board
See the description above!
Continues on next page
124
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.1. LEDs in the Controller Module
Continued
Control module power supply
The illustration below shows the LEDs on the Control module power supply:
A
dummy
A
DCOK indicator
Description
Significance
DCOK indicator GREEN: When all DC outputs are above the specified minimum levels.
OFF: When one or more DC output/s below the specified minimum level.
Customer Power Supply
The illustration below shows the LEDs on the Customer Power Supply Module:
A
dummy
A
DCOK indicator
Description
Signficance
DCOK indicator GREEN: When all DC outputs are above the specified minimum levels.
OFF: When one or more DC output/s below the specified minimum level.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
125
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.1. LEDs in the Controller Module
Continued
Computer unit
The illustration below shows the LEDs on the Computer unit:
C
B
A
dummy
A
Ethernet LED
B
Mass memory indication LED
C
Power ON LED
Description
Significance
Ethernet LED
Shows the status of the communication on the main computer
Ethernet channel.
GREEN OFF:10 Mbps data rate has been selected.
GREEN ON:100 Mbps data rate has been selected.
YELLOW flashing: The two units are communicating on the
Ethernet channel.
YELLOW steady: A LAN link is established.
YELLOW OFF: A LAN link is not established.
Mass memory indication
LED
YELLOW: A flashing LED indicates communication between
hard drive and processor.
Power ON LED
GREEN steady: The computer unit is supplied with power and
working correctly.
GREEN OFF: The unit is not powered.
Continues on next page
126
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.1. LEDs in the Controller Module
Continued
Panel board
The illustration below shows the LEDs on the Panel board:
A
dummy
A
Panel board LEDs
The panel board LEDs are described from top to bottom below:
Description
Signficance
Status LED
GREEN flashing: serial communication error.
GREEN steady: no errors found and system is running.
RED flashing: system is in power up/selftest mode.
RED steady: other error than serial communication error.
Indication LED, ES1
YELLOW when Emergency stop chain 1 closed
Indication LED, ES2
YELLOW when Emergency stop chain 2 closed
Indication LED, GS1
YELLOW when General stop switch chain 1 closed
Indication LED, GS2
YELLOW when General stop switch chain 2 closed
Indication LED, AS1
YELLOW when Auto stop switch chain 1 closed
Indication LED, AS2
YELLOW when Auto stop switch chain 2 closed
Indication LED, SS1
YELLOW when Superior stop switch chain 1 closed
Indication LED, SS2
YELLOW when Superior stop switch chain 2 closed
Indication LED, EN1
YELLOW when ENABLE1=1 and RS-communication is OK
LED board
The LEDs on the LED board are identical copies of those found on the Panel board as
described above.
Should the LED board not be working, but the Panel board is, the problem is the
communication between these boards. Check the cabling between them.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
127
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.2. LEDs in the Drive Module
4.5.2. LEDs in the Drive Module
General
The Drive Module features a number of indication LEDs, which provide important
information for trouble shooting purposes. If no LEDs light up at all when switching the
system on, trouble shoot as detailed in section All LEDs are dead on page 20
All LEDs on the respective units, and their significance, are described in the following
sections.
All units with LEDs are shown in the illustration below:
LEDs
xx0400001084
A
Rectifier
B
Axis Computer
C
Contactor interface board
D
Single servo drive
E
Drive Module Power Supply
F
Main servo drive
Continues on next page
128
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.2. LEDs in the Drive Module
Continued
Axis computer
The illustration below shows the LEDs on the Axis computer:
xx0300000023
A
Status LED
B
Ethernet LEDs
Description
Signficance
Status LED
The significance of the LEDs are described in the sequence the are lit
during a normal startup.
RED steady: power ON. The axis computer is initializing basic hardware
and software
RED flashing: contacting host, attempting to download IP address and
image file to axis computer.
GREEN steady: startup sequence ready. VxWorks is running.
RED flashing: an initialization error has occured. The axis computer will
notify the main computer if possible.
Ethernet LED
Shows the status of Ethernet communication between an additional axis
computer (2, 3 or 4) and the Ethernet board.
GREEN OFF:10 Mbps data rate has been selected.
GREEN ON:100 Mbps data rate has been selected.
YELLOW flashing: The two units are communicating on the Ethernet
channel.
YELLOW steady: A LAN link is established.
YELLOW OFF: A LAN link is not established.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
129
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.2. LEDs in the Drive Module
Continued
Main servo drive, single servo drive and rectifier unit
The illustration below shows the indication LEDs on the Drive Module main servo drive,
single servo drive and rectifier unit.
NOTE that there are two types of main servo drive units: a six unit drive and a three unit drive
which are both used to power a six axes robot. Shown in the illustration is a six unit drive.
The three unit drive it half it's size, but the indication LED is positioned in the same place.
xx0400001089
A
Single servo drive
B
Rectifier unit
C
Main servo drive
D
Indication LED, single servo drive
E
Indication LED, rectifier unit
F
Indication LED, main servo drive unit
Description
Significance
Indication
GREEN flashing: Internal function is OK and there is a malfunction in the
LEDs D, E and interface to the unit. The unit does not need to be replaced.
F
GREEN steady: Program loaded successfully, unit function OK and all
interfaces to the units is fully functional.
RED steady: Permanent internal fault detected. The LED is to have this
mode in case of failure at internal self test at start-up, or in case of detected
internal failure state in running system. The unit probably needs to be
replaced.
Continues on next page
130
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.2. LEDs in the Drive Module
Continued
Drive Module Power Supply
The illustration below shows the LEDs on the Drive Module power supply:
A
xx0400001090
A
DCOK indicator
Description
Significance
DCOK indicator GREEN: When all DC outputs are above the specified minimum levels.
OFF: When one or more DC output/s below the specified minimum level.
Contactor interface board
The illustration below shows the LEDs on the Contractor interface board:
A
xx0400001091
A
Status LED
Description
Status LED
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
GREEN flashing: serial communication error.
GREEN steady: no errors found and system is running.
RED flashing: system is in power up/selftest mode.
RED steady: other error than serial communication error.
131
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.3. LED indications, digital and combi I/O units
4.5.3. LED indications, digital and combi I/O units
General
All digital and combi I/O units have the same LED indications. The figure below shows a
digital I/O unit, DSQC 328 and is applicable for the following I/O units:
•
120 VAC I/O DSQC 320
•
Combi I/O DSQC 327
•
Digital I/O DSQC 328
•
Relay I/O DSQC 332
xx0100000240
LED description, digital and combi I/O
This section describes all the LEDs on the boards.
LEDs general
The table shows the IN and OUT LEDs.
Designation
Color
Description
IN
Yellow
Lights at high signal on an input. The higher the applied
voltage, the brighter the LED will shine. This means that even
if the input voltage is just under the voltage level "1", the LED
will glow dimly.
OUT
Yellow
Lights at high signal on an output. The higher the applied
voltage, the brighter the LED will shine.
MS/NS
Green/Red
See sections below!
MS LED
MS LED is...
to indicate...
...requiring action:
off
Not powered
Check 24V CAN
Green
Normal condition
-
Flashing green
Software configuration missing,
standby state
Configure device
Flashing green/red
Device self testing
Wait for test to be completed
Continues on next page
132
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.3. LED indications, digital and combi I/O units
Continued
MS LED is...
to indicate...
...requiring action:
Flashing red
Minor fault (recoverable)
Restart device
Red
Unrecoverable fault
Replace device
NS LED
NS LED is...
to indicate...
...requiring action:
Off
Not powered/not on-line
-
Flashing green
On-line, not connected
Wait for connection
Green
On-line, connections established -
Red
Critical link failure, incapable of
communicating (duplicate MAC
ID, or bus-off)
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
Change MAC ID and/or check CAN
connection/cables
133
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.4. DeviceNet Bus status LEDs at power-up
4.5.4. DeviceNet Bus status LEDs at power-up
Process
The system performs a test of the MS and NS LEDs during start-up. The purpose of this test
is to check that all LEDs are working properly. The test runs as follows:
Order
LED action
1
NS LED is switched Off.
2
MS LED is switched On green for approx. 0.25 seconds.
3
MS LED is switched On red for approx. 0.25 seconds.
4
MS LED is switched On green.
5
NS LED is switched On green for approx. 0.25 seconds.
6
NS LED is switched On red for approx. 0.25 seconds.
7
NS LED is switched On green.
Additional LEDs
If a device has other LEDs, each LED is tested in sequence.
134
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.5. LEDs om Interbus boards
4.5.5. LEDs om Interbus boards
General
Interbus communication boards are generally fitted in the Control Module. On the front of the
boards, a number of indication LEDs show the status of the unit and it's communication:
Facts, DSQC 351A
Below are facts on the DSQC 351A board:
Illustration
xx0100000225
Board specific LEDs
The designations refer to LEDs shown in the figure in section Illustration of DSQC 351A.
Designation
Color
Description
POWER-24 VDC
(upper indicator)
GREEN
Indicates that a supply voltage is present, and has a level
above 12 VDC.
If there is no light, check that voltage is present on power
module. Check also that power is present in power
connector. If it is not, check cables and connectors.
If power is applied to unit but unit does not work, replace
unit.
POWER- 5 VDC
(lower indicator)
GREEN
Lit when both 5 VDC supplies are within limits, and no
reset is active.
If there is no light, check that voltage is present on power
module. Check also that power is present in power
connector. If it is not, check cables and connectors.
If power is applied to unit but unit does not work, replace
unit.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
135
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.5. LEDs om Interbus boards
Continued
Designation
Color
Description
RBDA
RED
Lit when this INTERBUS station is last in the INTERBUS
network. If it is not, verify the INTERBUS configuration.
BA
GREEN
Lit when INTERBUS is active.
If there is no light, check network, nodes and
connections.
RC
GREEN
Lit when INTERBUS communication runs without errors.
If there is no light, check system messages in robot and
in INTERBUS net.
Facts, DSQC 512
Below are facts on the DSQC 512 board
Illustration
xx0200000288
A
LEDs, master
B-E, G-L
These are not LEDs and will not be discussed in this context
F
LEDs, slave
Continues on next page
136
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.5. LEDs om Interbus boards
Continued
LEDs, master
en0400001121
Designation
Color
Description
PF
YELLOW
Peripheral fault
One or more pieces of peripheral equipment connected to
the bus is faulty.
HF
YELLOW
Host failure
The unit has lost contact with the host computer.
FC
GREEN
Reserved
N.A.
BSA
YELLOW
Bus segment aborted
One or more bus segments are disconnected (disabled).
FAIL
RED
Bus failure, an error has occured in the INTERBUS system.
SC
GREEN
flashing
Status controller
The unit is active, but not configured.
SC
GREEN
Status controller
The unit is active, and configured.
FO3
YELLOW
The fiber optics of channel 3 is OK.
Is on during initialization of the master board or during
communication failure.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
137
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.5. LEDs om Interbus boards
Continued
LEDs, slave
en0400001122
Designation
Color
Description
UL
GREEN
Power supply
The unit is supplied with external 24 VDC.
BA
GREEN
flashing
Bus active
The unit is active, but not configured.
BA
GREEN
Bus active
The unit is active, and configured.
FO1
YELLOW
The fiber optics of channel 1 is OK.
Is on during initialisation of the slave board or during
communication failure.
RC
GREEN
Remote bus check
The bus segment beyond the unit is active.
RD
RED
Remote bus disabled
The bus segment beyond the unit is disabled.
FO2
YELLOW
The fiber optics of channel 2 is OK.
Is on during initialization of the slave board or during
communication failure.
Continues on next page
138
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.5. LEDs om Interbus boards
Continued
Facts DSQC 529
Illustration
xx0200000287
LEDs, master
en0400001121
Designation Color
Description
PF
YELLOW
Peripheral fault
One or more pieces of peripheral equipment connected
to the bus is faulty
HF
YELLOW
Host failure
The unit has lost contact with the host computer.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
139
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.5. LEDs om Interbus boards
Continued
140
Designation Color
Description
FC
GREEN
Reserved
N.A.
BSA
YELLOW
Bus segment aborted
One or more bus segments are disconnected
(disabled).
FAIL
RED
Bus failure, an error has occured in the INTERBUS
system.
SC
GREEN flashing
Status controller
The unit is active, but not configured.
SC
GREEN
Status controller
The unit is active, and configured.
FO3
YELLOW
Only for DSQC 512.
The fiber optics of channel 3 is OK.
Is on during initialization of the master board or during
communication failure.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.6. LEDs on Profibus boards
4.5.6. LEDs on Profibus boards
General
Profibus communication boards are generally fitted in the Control Module. On the front of
the boards, a number of indication LEDs show the status of the unit and it's communication:
Facts, DSQC 352
Below are facts on the DSQC 352 board.
Illustration
xx0100000223
Board specific LEDs
The designations refer to LEDs shown in the figure in section Illustration.
Designation
Color
Description
PROFIBUS
active
Green
Lit when the node is communicating with the master.
If there is no light, check system messages in robot and in
PROFIBUS net.
POWER, 24 VDC Green
Indicates that a supply voltage is present, and has a level above
12 VDC.
If there is no light, check that voltage is present in power unit
and in the power connector. If not, check cables and
connectors.
If power is applied to the unit but it does not work, replace the
unit.
Continues on next page
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
141
4 Descriptions and background information
4.5.6. LEDs on Profibus boards
Continued
Facts, DSQC 510
Below are facts on the DSQC 510 board.
Illustration
xx0100000227
A
Slave channel. LED marked S, see below. See section Connections, slave connector
for connection tables!
B
Master channel. LED marked M, see below. See section Connections, master
connector for connection tables!
LEDs
Designation Description
142
0
Indicates the status of the slave channel.
Lit when the slave is in data exchange mode.
1
Indicates the status of the master channel.
Lit when the master has the Profibus token.
3HAC020738-001 Revision: A
Index
Numerics
24V BRAKE 106
24V COOL 103, 106
24V DeviceNet 103
24V DRIVE 106
24V I/O 103
24V PANEL 103
24V PC 103
24V SYS 103, 106
24V TP_POWER 103
A
ABB menu 89
Arg, what is? 72
Axis computer 85, 105, 108
Axis computer, LEDs 129
B
Backup Energy Bank 102
backward button 88
Bleeder resistors 84
boot application
restart 47
settings 48
using 47
Brake contactor, K44 34
Brake power supply, faulty 33, 34
Brake, release 34
C
cfg files 118
Chassis fan 101
Circuit breaker F1 105
Circuit breaker F2 105
Circuit breaker F5 24
Circuit breaker, F5 101
Circuit breaker, F6 20
close button 89
Collapsing manipulator 30
Computer unit, LEDs 126
Configuration files 118
Configuration, Edit Parameter 78
connection
FlexPendant 54
connector 87
Contactor interface board 84, 105, 108
Contactor interface board, LEDs 131
Contactor, K41 20, 105
Control Moduel Power Supply, LEDs 125
Control Module Power Supply 101
ctrl.bin file 118
Customer Power Supply 102
Customer Power Supply, LEDs 125
D
damaged bearings 28, 31
Damaged cable 19, 23
Damaged connector 19
damaged parallel bar 28
DC link 84
Description, event log messages 71
DeviceNet bus 108
DeviceNet Power Supply 102
Direct power robot 105
Disconnection of motor current connectors 56
Door fan 101
Drive Module Power Supply 105
Drive Module Power Supply, LEDs 131
Drive unit 85, 108
DSQC351A, LEDs 135
DSQC352, LEDs 141
DSQC510, LEDs 142
DSQC512, LEDs 136
DSQC529, LEDs 139
Duty timer data 119
E
Earth fault protection 24, 101
Earth fault protection, tripped 16
emergency stop button
FlexPendant 87
EN1 signal 95
EN2 signal 95
enabling device 87
Entry routine 121
Erratic event messages 23, 66
Error report 44
ESD
damage elimination 13
sensitive equipment 13
wrist strap connection point 13
Ethernet board 108
Ethernet board, LEDs 124
Event consequences 70
Event description 70
Event log message, what is? 69
Event probable causes 70
Event recommended actions 70
Event, what is? 69
explanation, safety symbols 7
Ext. computer fan 101
External emergency stop button 97
F
F1 109
F2 109
F4 109
F5 109
F6 109
Fan Unit 105
faulty brake 33
faulty calibration 28
faulty connections 23
faulty TCP definition 28
Filing an error report 44
firmware
reflashing 58
Flash disk drive 116
FlexPendant 87, 107
connecting 54
hardware buttons 88
how to hold 90
143
Index
main parts 87
reflashing 58
screen 89
FlexPendant, dead 19
FlexPendant, faulty 19
forward button 88
Fuses 109
H
Hard disk drive 108, 116
holding brakes 11
hold-to-run button 87
hot gearbox oil 30, 31
I
I/O
safety signals 112
I/O board, LEDs 132
image.bin file 118
incompatibility
hardware/software 58
Incompatibility, hardware/software 27
Instance, Edit 78
InterBus 108
Interference 66
J
joystick 87
Joystick, malfunction 26
Jumpers 99, 100
L
LAN port 107
LAN unit 116
leaking seals 30
LED Board, LEDs 127
LEDs , indication 20
Live voltage, Drive Module 12
M
Main computer 85, 101, 108
Main contactor 83
Main fuse, tripped 18
main module 121
Main routine 121
Main Servo Drive Unit 104
Main servo drive, LEDs 130
Main switch, Drive Module 105
Main transformer 20, 83, 105
Manual, how to use 37
Memory 117
memory, what is? 116
Motor 85
Motors ON contactor 83, 95, 96
N
network connections
setting 48
noise 28, 31
O
oil leaks 30
144
operator window 89
Operator's Panel 102
overfilled gearbox 30
P
Panel Board 101, 108
Panel board 84
Panel Board, LEDs 127
Parameter, Edit 78
path accuracy 28
PCI bus 108
Power supply, faulty 19
ProfiBus 108
program execution start button 50, 88
Program module 121
Program Ref 71
Q
quickset menu 89
R
RAM memory 116, 117, 118
RAM memory, illustration 117
RAPID application 120
RAPID, structure 120
Recovery 72
Rectifier 84, 104
Rectifier, LEDs 130
reflashing
axis computer 58
contactor interface board 58
drive unit 58
firmware 58
FlexPendant 58
panel board 58
profibus 58
Resolver 108
Resource usage report, how to create 45
Resource usage report, what is? 45
restart
controller 49
system 49
revolution counters
setting 60
updating 60
Robot Communication Card 108
Robot Communication Card, LEDs 123
Routine 121
run button 50, 88
RUN contactor, K42 105
RUN contactor, K43 105
RUN signal 95
S
safety I/O signals 112
safety, symbols 7
scrolling 55
Serial Measurement Board 91
Serial measurement board 85, 108
Service Outlet, X22 102
Service port 107
Index
Shop power supply 83
Single servo drive, LEDs 130
SIS 119
SMB 91
SMB board 118
Solid state drive 108
start button 88
status bar 89
stop button 88
strained cables 23
symbols, safety 7
system
installing 47
restarting 49
starting without software 47
System dump, how to create 45
System dump, what is? 45
System module 121
System Parameters, Edit 78
system, starting and selecting 49
T
T1 105
T2 105
task bar 89
tasks 120
teach pendant unit 87
touch screen 89
TPU 87
Transformer, T3 102
U
USB memory, handling 57
USB port 57, 107
Z
zooming 55
145
Index
146
Index
147
Index
148
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement