Family math games

Family math games
Family
Math
Games
Great
ways
to
learn
at
home
with
your
kindergarten
through
grade
3
kids!
Content
Game
Tug
of
War
Flip
and
Roll
Gel
Bag
Numbers
Capture
Ten
Rolling
for
Tens
Plus
1
or
2
Bingo
Leapfrog
Salute!
Close
to
20
The
Jump,
Jump
Game
Close
to
100
Multiplication
Draw
Grade
Preschool
K
K
1
1
1/2
2
2/3
2/3
3
3
2/3
Suggested
websites
for
math
learning
Math
practice
for
fourth
grade
Page(s)
2
3‐4
5
6‐8
9‐10
11‐13
14‐16
17
18‐19
20
21‐22
23‐24
25
26
The contents of this file were presented at the MRH Family Math Night on February, 28, 2011
TUG
OF
WAR
Pre‐School
Materials
• Counters/markers
• Dice
• Gameboard
(see
below)
How
to
Play:
1.
Place
the
counter
on
the
smile
in
the
center
of
the
gameboard.
2.
Player
1
rolls
the
dice
and
moves
the
counter
to
the
right.
3.
Player
2
rolls
the
dice
and
moves
the
counter
to
the
left.
4.
The
first
person
to
get
the
counter
to
the
edge
of
their
gameboard
wins!
We
want
the
student
to
learn:
‐One‐to‐one
tagging
‐One‐to‐one
correspondence
‐Counting
‐Cardinality

2
FLIP
AND
ROLL
2
players
Kindergarten
What
you
need:
o Flip
and
Roll
game
board
(math
bag)
o number
cards
1‐12
(math
bag)
o 1
dot
die
(math
bag)
o paper
and
pencil
for
recording
Directions
for
playing
o Put
the
cards
in
a
pile
face
down.
o Flip
over
a
card
from
the
pile
put
it
in
the
first
box
on
your
game
board.
o Roll
the
die
and
put
it
in
the
smaller
box
o Figure
out
the
answer.
*Encourage
your
child
to
“count
on”
to
figure
out
the
answer.
For
example
if
you
flip
a
4
and
roll
a
3,
DON’T
have
your
child
put
up
4
fingers
and
3
fingers
and
then
count
all
the
fingers,
instead
encourage
your
child
to
start
at
4
and
count
on,
4,
5,
6,
7.
They
can
touch
the
dots
on
the
die
for
additional
support
in
counting
on.
o Then
write
the
number
model
on
a
piece
of
paper.
For
example
if
you
flip
over
a
4
and
roll
a
3
you
would
write:
4
+
3=
7
o Work
together
until
there
are
no
more
cards
in
your
draw
pile!
What
is
the
math
behind
this
game?
o Recognizing
numbers
and
patterns
of
a
die
face
o Counting
on,
an
important
early
number
strategy
o Beginning
to
recognize
number
models
and
maybe
moving
into
quickly
knowing
math
facts.
3
GEL
BAG
NUMBERS
Kindergarten
Materials
o Gel
bags
(made
at
math
night)
o Number
cards
or
pencil
and
paper
Directions:
o Ask
your
child
to
write
a
number
with
their
finger
on
the
gel
bag.
If
they
are
having
difficulty
model
writing
the
number
on
a
piece
of
paper
or
show
a
number
card.
*
Focus
on
teen
numbers,
as
these
are
usually
the
most
difficult
for
children
to
write.
What
is
the
math
in
this
game?
o A
fun
way
to
have
children
practice
writing
their
numbers.
5
CAPTURE
TEN
2
PLAYERS
1ST
GRADE
Capture
10
provides
opportunities
to
make
equations.
It
supports
the
making
ten
strategy
–
an
important
strategy
for
automatizing
the
basic
facts.
For
example:
9+6
is
much
easier
to
recall
when
a
child
thinks
of
it
as
being
equivalent
to
10+5.
Directions:
• Children
play
in
pairs.
• Place
cards
facedown
in
the
center.
• Each
player
turns
over
a
number
card.
• Together
the
players
determine
the
sum
of
the
cards
and
determine
which
box
the
equation
belongs.
(For
example:
8+5=13
belongs
in
the
10+3
box)
• If
the
sum
of
the
two
cards
is
less
than
10
players
put
the
cards
back
in
the
deck
and
reshuffle.
Materials
Needed:
• Deck
of
cards
• Recording
sheet
6
ROLLING
FOR
TENS
2
PLAYERS
1st
GRADE
Rolling
for
Tens
promotes
the
exploration
of
equivalence
and
combinations
that
make
ten.
The
object
of
the
game
is
to
use
all
the
cubes
rolled
to
make
10
in
a
variety
of
ways.
A
pair’s
score
is
based
on
the
quantity
that
remains.
To
obtain
the
lowest
possible
score,
a
pair
of
players
needs
to
consider
a
variety
of
ways
to
make
10.
This
build‐in
incentive
pushes
children
to
think
about
a
variety
of
equivalent
expressions.
Directions:
• Children
play
in
pairs.
• Each
pair
has
20
number
cubes
in
a
cup.
• Roll
all
20
number
cubes.
• Figure
out
all
the
different
ways
to
make
10.
• The
numbers
that
are
not
used
to
become
10
are
added
and
become
the
score
of
the
pair
for
the
round.
Goal:
Achieve
the
lowest
possible
score
Materials
needed:
• 20
number
cubes
per
pair
of
children
• Small
cups/plastic
bags
• Recording
sheet
(appendix
x)
per
pair
of
children
9
PLUS
1
OR
2
BINGO
2
players
st
1 /2nd
GRADE
This
game
is
good
for
practicing
early
math
facts
involving
adding
one
or
two.
Materials:
deck
of
Primary
Number
Cards
(Without
Wild
Cards),
2
kinds
of
counters
(20
per
player),
gameboard
Directions:
1. Player
1
turns
over
the
top
card
in
the
deck.
2. Player
2
adds
1
or
2
to
that
number,
and
covers
the
sum
on
the
gameboard.
3. Player
2
turns
over
the
top
card.
4. Player
2
adds
1
or
2
to
that
number,
and
covers
the
sum
on
the
gameboard.
5. Keep
taking
turns.
If
all
of
the
possible
sums
are
covered,
take
another
card.
6. The
game
is
over
when
all
of
the
numbers
in
one
row
are
covered.
The
numbers
can
go
horizontal
(across),
vertical
(up
&
down),
or
diagonally
(corner
to
corner).
More
Ways
to
Play:
‐Play
with
Wild
Cards.
Wild
Cards
can
be
any
number.
‐Play
to
fill
more
than
one
row.
‐Play
as
a
team.
Try
to
fill
the
entire
gameboard.
11
LEAPFROG
2
players
2nd
GRADE
The
purpose
of
the
game
is
to
support
the
development
of
the
addition
strategy
of
keeping
one
number
whole
and
taking
leaps
of
ten.
Materials:
2
dice,
2
distinct
markers
(“frogs”),
game
board,
leap
cards
Directions:
Children
play
the
game
in
pairs
and
take
turns
rolling
the
dice.
The
roll
of
the
cubes
determines
the
number
of
steps
to
move.
For
example,
if
Player
1
rolls
a
3
and
a
4,
the
frog
marker
jumps
7
spaces
and
Player
1
writes
7
in
the
corresponding
box
on
the
game
board.
Player
1
then
turns
over
a
card
from
the
deck
of
Leapfrog
cards.
The
card
indicates
how
many
leaps
of
ten
to
take.
For
example,
if
the
card
says
“Leap
2
tens,”
Player
1
jumps
to
17
and
writes
17
in
the
box,
then
jumps
to
27
and
records
27.
Now
it
is
Player
2’s
turn.
Player
2
rolls
the
dice,
takes
a
card,
and
marks
his
game
board
accordingly.
Player
1
then
rolls
again,
takes
a
card,
and
marks
her
game
board.
For
example,
if
she
rolls
a
4
and
a
2
and
the
card
says,
“Leap
1
ten,”
she
moves
the
frog
piece
to
33
(ie,
27
+6)
and
then
to
43,
or
from
27
to
37
and
then
6
more
to
43.
Play
continues
in
this
way
until
both
frogs
reach
the
end
of
their
tracks.
14
SALUTE!
3
players
nd
2 /3rd
GRADE
This
game
helps
students
understand
the
inverse
relationship
between
addition
and
subtraction.
It
also
helps
them
with
basic
fact
recall.
Materials:
a
deck
of
cards—no
jokers
Directions:
Player
3
deals
the
entire
deck
of
cards
evenly
and
face
down,
to
the
two
other
players.
Players
1
and
2
count,
“1,2,3
Salute!”
As
they
say,
“Salute!”
they
bring
the
card
from
the
top
of
their
piles
to
their
foreheads,
number‐side
facing
out,
for
the
others
to
see.
Important:
Players
1
and
2
may
not
look
at
their
own
cards.
The
two
players
look
at
one
another’s
foreheads
as
Player
3
adds
or
subtracts
the
numbers.
Player
3
then
says,
“The
sum
is
_____”
or
“The
difference
is
______”.
(It’s
important
to
use
the
vocabulary
terms
sum
and
difference.)
Then
the
first
two
players
try
to
be
the
first
to
guess
their
own
number
by
adding
or
subtracting
the
other
player’s
number
from
the
sum/difference
reported
by
Player
3.
The
player
who
guesses
his
own
number
first
takes
the
other
player’s
card
and
the
process
repeats.
The
winner
is
the
one
with
the
most
cards
at
the
end.
That
player
then
becomes
Player
3.
17
CLOSE
TO
20
2
or
3
players
2nd/3rd
GRADE
This
game
helps
children
learn
“compliments
of
ten”.
Materials:
4
Decks
of
Number
Cards
0‐10
with
the
wild
cards
removed;
Student
Sheet
6,
Close
to
20
Score
Sheet;
counters
Directions:
The
object
of
this
game
is
to
choose
three
cards
that
total
as
close
to
20
as
possible.
1. Deal
five
cards
to
each
player.
2. Take
turns.
Use
any
three
of
your
cards
to
make
a
total
that
is
as
close
to
20
as
possible.
3. Write
these
numbers
and
the
total
on
the
Close
to
20
Score
Sheet.
4. Find
your
score.
The
score
for
the
round
is
the
difference
between
the
total
and
20.
For
example,
if
you
choose
8
+
7
+
3,
your
total
is
18
and
your
score
for
the
round
is
2.
5. After
you
record
your
score,
take
that
many
counters.
6. Put
the
cards
you
used
in
a
discard
pile
and
deal
three
new
cards
to
each
player.
If
you
run
out
of
cards
before
the
end
of
the
game,
shuffle
the
discard
pile
and
use
those
cards
again.
7. After
five
rounds,
total
your
score
and
count
your
counters.
These
two
numbers
should
be
the
same.
The
player
with
the
LOWEST
score
and
the
fewest
counters
is
the
winner.
18
THE
JUMP,
JUMP
GAME
2
players
3rd
GRADE
Materials:
numbers
cards
0‐9,
math
notebook
or
lined
paper,
pencil,
a
partner
Directions:
The
objective
of
the
game
is
to
jump
from
0
to
a
2‐digit
number
using
only
jumps
of
1,
10,
and
100
in
the
fewest
jumps
possible.
1. Put
deck
face
down
between
the
two
partners.
2. Player
one
turns
over
two
cards.
These
cards
are
used
as
digits.
For
example,
if
I
turned
over
5
&
2,
player
1
uses
these
cards
to
make
a
two‐digit
number.
Player
one
could
make
either
52
or
25.
3. Choose
the
two‐digit
number
that
you
and
your
partner
will
jump
to.
4. Draw
a
number
line
in
your
notebook.
Write
0
to
52
or
0
to
25
to
record
what
number
you
are
jumping
to.
5. At
the
same
time,
both
partners
make
jumps
on
the
number
line
of
1,
10,
or
100
to
the
number
in
the
fewest
possible
jumps.
6. Partners
compare
the
number
of
jumps.
If
the
amount
of
jumps
is
different,
partners
each
share
their
strategy.
7. Record
the
number
of
jumps
in
your
notebook.
This
is
your
score.
8. Player
two
turns
over
2
cards
and
play
begins
again.
9. At
the
end
of
the
game,
partners
add
up
their
total
score.
The
partner
with
the
LEAST
score
wins.
20
CLOSE
TO
100
1‐4
players
3rd
GRADE
This
game
helps
students
with
double‐digit
addition
and
subtraction.
Materials:
digit
cards‐deck
of
44,
Close
to
100
Recording
Sheet
for
each
player
Directions:
1. Deal
out
six
Digit
Cards
to
each
player.
2. Use
any
four
cards
to
make
two
numbers;
for
example,
6
and
5
could
make
either
56
or
65.
Wild
cards
can
be
used
as
any
numeral.
Try
to
make
numbers
that,
when
added,
give
you
a
total
that
is
close
to
100.
3. Write
these
two
numbers
and
their
total
on
the
Close
to
100
Recording
Sheet;
for
example,
42
+
56=98.
4. Find
your
score.
Your
score
is
the
difference
between
your
total
and
100.
For
example,
if
your
total
is
98,
your
score
is
2.
If
your
total
is
105,
your
score
is
5.
5. Put
the
cards
you
used
in
a
discard
pile.
Keep
the
two
card
you
did
not
use
for
the
next
round.
6. For
the
next
round,
deal
four
new
cards
to
each
player.
Make
more
numbers
that
come
close
to
100.
When
you
run
out
of
cards,
shuffle
the
discard
pile
and
use
those
cards
again.
7. Five
rounds
make
one
game.
Total
your
scores
for
the
five
rounds.
The
player
with
the
LOWEST
score
wins!
21
MULTIPLICATION
DRAW
2
or
3
players
2nd/3rd
GRADE
This
is
a
fun
way
to
practice
multiplication
facts.
Materials:
1
Multiplication
Draw
Record
Sheet,
Number
Cards‐four
of
each
#s
1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
&
10
Directions:
A
player
shuffles
the
cards
and
places
the
deck
number‐side
down
on
the
playing
surface.
Grade
2
Game:
Each
player,
on
her
section
of
the
Record
Sheet,
records
2
as
one
of
the
factors
for
each
draw
in
Round
1;
5
as
one
of
the
factors
for
each
drawn
in
Round
2;
and
10
as
one
of
the
factors
for
each
draw
in
Round
3.
The,
at
each
turn,
a
player
draws
a
card
from
the
deck
in
order
to
generate
a
missing
factor,
records
the
number
drawn
on
his
or
her
part
of
the
Record
Sheet,
and
write
the
product.
For
example,
if
in
Round
1
a
player
draws
a
3,
the
player
solves
the
fact
2x3
or
3x2.
Grade
3
Game:
At
each
turn,
a
player
draws
two
cards
from
the
deck
in
order
to
generate
two
factors,
and
then
records
both
of
the
factors
and
their
produce
on
his
part
of
the
Record
Sheet.
For
example,
if
in
Round
1
a
player
draws
a
3
and
a
4,
then
that
player
records
the
fact
4x3=12
or
3x4=12.
After
5
turns,
all
players
find
the
sums
of
their
five
products.
The
player
with
the
highest
sum
wins
the
round.
Grade
2
Variations:
Make
one
of
the
factors
a
number
other
than
2,
5
or
10.
Draw
2
cards
at
each
turn
in
order
to
generate
both
factors.
Grade
3
Variations:
Include
sets
of
4
cards
for
numbers
other
than
1,
2,
3,
4,
5
&
10.
23
SUGGESTED
WEBSITES
FOR
MATH
LEARNING
www.fLuu.nl/rekenweb/en/
http://illuminations.nctm.org
http://www.linkslearning.org/Home/Jndex.html
http://www.eduplace.com/kids/hmm/quiz/g_4.html
www.amathsdictionaryforkids.com
www.freerice.com
www.mathslice.com
www.multiplication.com
www.mathcats.com
www.funbrain.com
(math
arcade)
www.coolmath4kids.com
25

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