horse stables and track riding safety

horse stables and track riding safety
HORSE STABLES AND
TRACK RIDING SAFETY
1ST EDITION
JUNE 2007
CONTENTS
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Consulting employees and Health
and Safety Representatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
How to use this guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Stable Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1. Stable staff and contractors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2. Hazardous manual handling
in the stable environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
3. Using plant in the stable environment . . . . . . . . 11
4. General stable OH&S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Track Riding Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
5. Track security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
6. Track riding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Further Information and Guidance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Legislation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Publications and further information . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
The information presented in the Horse Stables and Track Riding Safety guide is
intended for general use only. It should not be viewed as a definitive guide to the law,
and should be read in conjunction with the Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004.
Whilst every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy and completeness of the
publication, the advice contained herein may not apply in every circumstance.
Accordingly, the Victorian WorkCover Authority cannot be held responsible, and
extends no warranties as to:
• the suitability of the information for any particular purpose;
• actions taken by third parties as a result of information contained in Horse Stables
and Track Riding Safety.
The information contained in this publication is protected by copyright. The
VictorianWorkCover Authority hereby grants a non-exclusive licence in this publication
to the recipient of this publication on the condition that it is not disseminated for
profit. The Victorian WorkCover Authority encourages the free transfer, copying and
printing of the information in this publication if such activities support the purposes
and intent for which the publication was developed.
WorkSafe Victoria is a division of the Victorian Workcover Authority.
INTRODUCTION
Horse Stables and Track Riding Safety is provided in accordance with section
7(1)(f) of the Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004 (OHS Act) to assist
employers and employees to comply with their duties and obligations under this
Act and associated Regulations.
It is expected that stable and training facility management, employees (staff),
Health and Safety Representatives (HSR) and contractors use this guide to form
an opinion about suitable health, safety and welfare risk controls under the test of
‘reasonably practicable’. WorkSafe Inspectors and Racing Victoria stewards should
also refer to this guide for the same purpose.
CONSULTING EMPLOYEES AND HEALTH AND SAFETY REPRESENTATIVES
The horse racing industry is unique in that it possesses a variation of hazards not
generally present in any other workplace. The unpredictable nature of a large
animal which at times may overreact or become easily spooked, poses a challenge
for the whole industry, as it presents both handling issues for horse and person
in confined spaces.
The horse racing industry shares many OHS issues common in other workplaces,
e.g. chemicals, manual handling and use of plant. The risks associated with
these hazards are somewhat predictable, which allows for the development
of adequate controls.
Consultation between employees (e.g. jockeys, track riders, stable hands or
strappers), HSR, contractors and employers (e.g. trainers) is crucial in identifying,
assessing, reducing and eliminating hazards in the workplace. Adopting
consultative processes results in the establishment of effective risk control
measures, thus providing a safer workplace for all people, and by extension
ensuring compliance with the relevant parts and sections of the OHS Act.
Principles of consultation
Parties should agree to effective consultation mechanisms keeping in mind the
following principles:
• Information sharing
• Employees, contractors and staff are encouraged to express their point of view
• Employees, contractors and staff should not be victimised or disadvantaged for
expressing a view
• All people to be given an opportunity to express a view prior to decisions
being made
• Consideration is given to views expressed by employees, contractors and staff
prior to decision making
• Where practicable, personnel affected by change to be consulted
• Consultation may not necessarily lead to agreed outcomes, but this should be
the ultimate goal.
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1
INTRODUCTION
Employer compliance with section 35 and 36 of the OHS Act
To establish effective consultation, parties need to develop a clear workplace
policy on consultation. This may include:
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Safety committees / safety meetings
Issue resolution process
Incident investigation
Hazard and risk identification and control
All changes to the workplace including facilities
Composition of Designated Work Groups (DWG’s)
Contractor management provisions.
Industry participants, including the Australian Trainers Association, Australian
Workers’ Union, Racing Victoria Limited (RVL) and WorkSafe can all assist in
facilitating the above.
HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE
This guide provides information that can be used to decide the most effective
solutions for providing safe stables and training facilities.
The tasks described in the following pages are presented in two columns.
Work practices undertaken in the stable environment or at a training facility which
are deemed to be unacceptable under occupational health and safety legislation
appear in the red column. To avoid exposing employees and contractors to risk
of injury or illness, the practices described in these columns must not be allowed
to occur.
Common risk control solutions to prevent exposing employees or contactors
to unacceptable work practices appear in the green column. These solutions are
regarded as ‘reasonably practicable’ for most stables and training facilities where
track work is undertaken and therefore would be expected to be implemented
when required. That said, the risk controls listed in the green column are
not exhaustive and where alternative risk controls are identified, these
should be implemented.
Section 20 of the OHS Act outlines what you must consider when determining
if something is ‘reasonably practicable’. Specifically, the factors to be taken into
account are:
• the likelihood of the hazard or risk eventuating
• the degree of harm that would result if the hazard or risk eventuated
• what you know, or ought reasonably to know, about the hazard or risk and any
ways of eliminating or reducing the hazard or risk
• the availability and suitability of ways to eliminate or reduce the hazard or risk
• the cost of eliminating or reducing the hazard or risk, if the cost is grossly
disproportionate to the hazard or risk.
It is important all factors listed above have to be taken into account when deciding
if something is ‘reasonably practicable’. No single factor is more important than
another – they all contribute equally.
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UNACCEPTABLE
WORK PRACTISE
RISK CONTROL
SOLUTIONS
Work practices in the red column
should not be used in a stable
environment or at a training facility
(e.g. race track). Stable or training
facility managers who allow these
work practices to be used are likely
to be in breach of OHS legislation.
The solutions in the green column are
the most effective at reducing risk and
should be the target for all stables and
training facilities.
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
STABLE SAFETY
1. STABLE STAFF AND CONTRACTORS
2. HAZARDOUS MANUAL HANDLING IN THE STABLE ENVIRONMENT
3. USING PLANT IN THE STABLE ENVIRONMENT
4. GENERAL STABLE OHS
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STABLE SAFETY
1. STABLE STAFF AND CONTRACTORS
Stable staff (full time, part time, casual or family members) and contractors (veterinarians, trades people, suppliers, etc.)
must be provided with the highest level of occupational health and safety protection.
This section describes the basic health and safety requirements which should be taken into account when employing staff
and/or contractors, such as stable hands or track riders, in a stable environment.
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Personal Protective Equipment
- No appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
provided and/or used where required when:
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riding horses
training horses
feeding and working with horses
cleaning stables
using items of plant, or
handling hazardous or dangerous chemicals.
- No training provided in the correct selection, use and
care of PPE.
- Employers must ensure staff are equipped with and use
all necessary PPE.
- Training is provided in the correct selection, inspection
for wear or damage, use and care of PPE such as:
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•
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hand protection
noise protection
respiratory protection
helmets, body protectors and other riding gear
weather protection, and
feet protection (e.g. leather work boots or shoes that
comply with Australian Standards 2210.3 Occupational
protective footwear).
Facilities and amenities
- No suitable toilets or meal areas provided.
- Adequate toilets and meal areas provided.
- Facilities such as:
- Facilities and amenities are functional, clean and
well maintained.
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tack room
first aid room
toilets
meal areas, and
showers
are not maintained in a clean and serviceable condition.
A basic tea room which is clean, well maintained
and functional for the number of staff employed.
Tack room is clean and well organised. Riding gear
is appropriately stored and maintained.
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STABLE SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Stable inductions
- No formal induction is provided to new staff or contractors.
- New staff and contractor inductions are formally undertaken.
- Staff capabilities are not assessed and recorded. Stable
hands are not registered with RVL and trainees are not
constantly supervised.
- Staff capabilities are assessed by the employer and a
training plan is developed and agreed to by both parties.
Stable hands are registered with RVL and trainees are
under constant supervision. To avoid doubt, constant
supervision means maintaining control over the tasks
undertaken by trainees.
- Stable hands have had appropriate RVL approved training
such as:
• Basic Stable hand course
• Certificate II Racing (stable hand), or
• Certificate III (advanced stable hand).
Workplace bullying and violence
- Employees or contractors are subjected or exposed
to repeated, unreasonable behaviour that creates a risk
to their health and safety. Unreasonable behaviour is
regarded as behaviour that a reasonable person, having
regard to all the circumstances, would expect to
victimise, humiliate, undermine or threaten a staff
member or contractor.
- Staff or contractors are subjected or exposed to
behaviour that involves physical attacks or are
threatened with physical attack in the workplace.
- Employers eliminate or reduce the likelihood of bullying
or violent behaviour occurring, by ensuring that they:
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•
promote bullying and violence awareness
develop a bullying and violence policy
inform, instruct and train in line with the policy
identify bullying and violence risk factors
prevent and control acts of bullying or violence, and
encourage reporting of bullying or violent behaviour.
For further information regarding workplace bullying and
violence, refer to WorkSafe’s publication Prevention of
Bullying and Violence at Work.
Racing industry participants’ including the Australian
Workers’ Union, Australian Trainers Association, RVL
and WorkSafe Victoria can all assist in resolving bullying
or violence in the stable environment.
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STABLE SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Drugs and alcohol in the workplace
- Employers allow, promote or fail to act on information
concerning the use of alcohol and/or drugs (illicit) in the
workplace, where it creates a risk or potential risk to the
health, safety or welfare of staff, contractors or the
general public.
- A policy concerning the use of alcohol in the workplace
has been developed. This policy should include information
concerning alcohol:
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prevention
education
counselling
rehabilitation, and
use on employer approval, where and when alcohol
consumption may be used in the workplace (e.g. after
hours, parties, celebrations, etc.)
The overall objective of an alcohol policy is to ensure
exposure to alcohol related occupational health and safety
risk is eliminated.
For further information regarding alcohol in the workplace,
refer to WorkSafe’s publication Alcohol In The Workplace
– Guidelines For Developing A Workplace Alcohol Policy
Illicit drug use is strictly prohibited. This is clearly
communicated and documented in workplace inductions.
Employees or contractors suspected or found to be using
and / or under the influence of alcohol or illicit substances
in the workplace should:
• be provided with appropriate counselling in the first
instance, and
• enact the workplace disciplinary policy, where
reasonable repeated attempts to council the individual
concerned have failed.
Fatigue
- Stable hands, track riders and other staff are subjected
to frequent
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•
- Stable employers ensure staff are not exposed
to frequent
long working days
very early starts
inadequate meal or rest breaks, or
overly demanding working environments (e.g. where
work demands are considered significantly greater
then would be normally expected)
• long working days
• very early starts
• inadequate meal or rest breaks, or
• overly demanding working environments
by eliminating in the first instance the frequent occurrence
of such events.
resulting in exposure to fatigue related risks to employee
health and safety.
To avoid or reduce exposing employees to workplace
related fatigue, employers should provide employees with:
• realistic task requests and adequate resources to
complete tasks safely. This is best achieved through
consulting with employees before assigning work
• adequate meal and rest breaks while on shift
• adequate time between shifts that enable the opportunity
for at least 7- 8 hours sleep, and
• sufficient time off shift to recover after a period of
continuous working days.
Only sufficient, quality sleep cures fatigue!
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STABLE SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Injury registers
- Stable injury and/or incidents are not recorded and
investigated by stable management. This includes
‘near miss’ incidents.
- All stable injury and incidents are recorded manually in
an injury register booklet or electronically.
- Stable hands, track riders, HSR and other staff and
contractors participate in investigations (as required) to
prevent reoccurrence and are advised of investigation
outcomes by stable management.
Notification of incidents to WorkSafe Victoria
- Incidents which must be reported to WorkSafe Victoria
immediately by law are not reported by stable
management. This would include:
• the loss of life
• serious injuries such as fractures, spinal and neck injuries
• serious lacerations (e.g. requiring inpatient treatment
at a hospital), and
• loss of bodily function (unconscious).
- For further detailed information regarding notification of
incidents by law to WorkSafe Victoria, refer to WorkSafe’s
publication Guide to Incident Notification (2nd Edition)
– October 2006.
The partial or total collapse of a building and/or fire must
also be reported, irrespective of the extent of damage.
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
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STABLE SAFETY
2. HAZARDOUS MANUAL HANDLING IN THE STABLE ENVIRONMENT
Tasks such as storing, preparing and feeding horses, cleaning, working with horses, handling horse gear such as saddles,
and general maintenance activities typically occur in a stable environment.
These tasks can cause musculoskeletal disorders (MSD), such as injuries, illnesses or diseases that arise in whole or in
part from hazardous manual handling tasks in the stable, whether occurring suddenly or over a long period of time.
MSD’s include:
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muscle sprains and strains
injuries to muscles, ligaments, spinal discs and other parts of the back
injuries to soft tissues, e.g. nerves, ligaments and tendons in the wrists, arms, shoulders, neck or legs, and
abdominal hernias.
It is important to note that not all manual handling in the stable environment will be hazardous.
This section describes common solutions which can be used in and around the stable to eliminate or reduce the chances
of developing MSD’s from exposure to hazardous manual handling.
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
- Employers have not identified in consultation, tasks that
could expose employees or contractors to hazardous
manual handling.
- Employers have identified, with consultation, all tasks
which could expose employees or contractors to
hazardous manual handling.
- Staff and/or contactors undertake tasks which involve
exposure to any of the following hazardous manual
handling characteristics:
- Employers, when determining any measure to control risk
of MSD’s, addressed the following factors:
• Handling horses in such a manner that exposes the
handler to hazardous manual handling
• repetitive or sustained application of force, awkward
postures or sustained movements
• application of high force
• sustained vibration, and
• unstable or unbalanced loads or loads that are difficult
to grasp or hold.
- Staff or contractors exposed to hazardous manual
handling from handling bags of feed. This may be due to:
• physically handling feed bags up to 40kg or more
• the position of the bag, e.g. flat on the floor
• movements required to handle the bag, e.g. forward
bending and reaching because the bag is behind
different bags, or
• the duration and frequency of the task, e.g. the
amount of bags handled by the one employee over
the shift.
•
•
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postures
movements
forces
duration and frequency of task, and
environmental conditions (e.g. heat, cold, vibration).
- Employers, after consultation, implement and periodically
review controls to eliminate or reduce the risk of
employees or contractors developing MSD’s by:
a. altering the workplace environment, design, layout or
systems of work to do the task (e.g. improving lighting,
housekeeping, rescheduling physically demanding tasks
during temperature extremes).
Workplace design – Silos are commonly used to
store high volume feed stock instead of handling
large numbers of bags.
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WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
STABLE SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
Physically handling heavy bags of feed up to 40kg.
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Silo is connected directly to the feed preparation area.
Feed is drawn on from the hopper bins as required
eliminating the need to manually handle large, bulky
and awkward bags.
b. Change the systems of work used, such as job design
(e.g. work positions), team handling (e.g. using two
or more persons in lifting tasks), pace and flow of
work (e.g. realistic work rates), job rotation or
durations of work.
c. Modify the load being handled and / or changing
objects used in the task (e.g. changing the wheels
on a trolley to better travel over rough terrain).
This feed trolley has wheels which allow the trolley
to be used over rough terrain in and around the stable.
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
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STABLE SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
d. use mechanical aids.
Purpose built trolleys for use around the stable
significantly reduces the need to physically manage
heavy, bulky or awkward loads.
Purpose built trolleys for use around the stable
significantly reduces the need to physically manage
heavy, bulky or awkward loads.
e. Any combination of (a) to (d).
Refer to WorkSafe Victoria’s Code of Practice for Manual
Handling 2000, for further details regarding hazardous
manual handling and suitable risk control measures.
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WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
STABLE SAFETY
3. USING PLANT IN THE STABLE ENVIRONMENT
The use of plant, such as oat crushers, augers, mixers, horse walkers and horse transport is commonly present in the
stable environment. The extent of exposure to hazards associated with using such plant in the stable environment will
depend on:
• the level of routine inspections and preventative maintenance
• how effectively moving parts or areas where staff are potentially exposed to hazards have been appropriately
guarded or isolated
• the training and instruction provided on the safe use of plant, and
• prior consultation with HSR and staff regarding the purchase and installation of plant for use in stables.
This section highlights the types of common risk associated with plant used in stables and the types of controls which
can be easily implemented.
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Oat crushers, augers, mixers and horse walkers
- Oat crushers, mixers, augers and horse walkers are not
regularly maintained to ensure their safe operation.
- Training and instruction on the safe use of oat crushers,
mixers, augers and horse walkers has not been provided
to staff required to use such plant.
- Oat crushers, mixers, augers and horse walkers have
one or more of the following exposed hazards:
• ‘draw in’ points such as V belts and pulleys or rotating
drive shafts
• shear or crushing points such as rotating blades or
crushing blocks
• entanglement areas such as spiral augers, mixer
shafts or electric motor drive belts or shafts, or
• other points of electrical, pneumatic (pressurised)
or mechanical exposure that could result in harm
or death.
- Oat crushers, mixers, auger and horse walkers are
regularly maintained to ensure:
• safe operation
• plant is clean, and
• safety controls, such as fix or ‘interlocked’ guards,
are in place and operational.
‘Interlocks’ are generally electrical devices (commonly
switches) connected to plant operational systems that
prevent or stop the plant from operating until the guard
associated with the ‘interlock’ is in the closed position.
Interlocked guards are typically used on plant where
routine access is required (e.g. the lid of most domestic
washing machines).
- Documented instruction and training has been provided
to staff required to operate oat crushers, mixers, augers
and horse walkers.
- Risk associated with oat crushers, mixers, augers and
horse walkers have been identified, in consultation with
staff and most importantly controlled.
- Emergency stop buttons are appropriately fitted.
- All plant is powered from an electrical outlet fitted with
a Residual Current Device (RCD).
Refer to WorkSafe Victoria’s Code of Practice for Plant
1995, for further details regarding plant hazards and
suitable risk control measures, such as guarding.
Mixers must stop instantly if access can be made whilst
operating. The picture above shows a feed mixer which
can be accessed whilst operating but does not have an
interlock fitted to the mixer cover (see arrow). Interlock
guarding must be used to ensure mixing blades instantly
stop when routine access to a feed mixer is required.
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
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STABLE SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Oat crushers, augers, mixers and horse walkers (continued)
Hazards associated with the use of oat crushers and
augers must be controlled.
Exposed drive belts and pulleys must be guarded.
As regular access is not required to this part of the
machine, fixed guards should be used. Guards must
be designed so that access by any body part can not
be made with the hazard.
Spiral rotating augers must be physically guarded. Guards
should be either fixed in place or ‘interlocked’ if routine
access is required.
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WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
STABLE SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Oat crushers, augers, mixers and horse walkers (continued)
Electric motor drive shafts and belts must be guarded.
Horse walker controls are located in close proximity
to gate and fitted with an emergency stop button.
Horse walker drive motors, shafts or belts must
be guarded.
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
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STABLE SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Horse transport
- Horse transport not registered with Vic Roads
and un-roadworthy.
- Horse transport not regularly maintained to ensure
safe operation.
- Horse transport registered by Vic Roads and roadworthy.
- Horse transport regularly maintained to ensure
safe operation.
- Horse transport ramps are:
• steeply pitched
• poorly designed or maintained (e.g. hydraulic or
mechanical lifting systems), and
• not provided, exposing staff to hazardous manual
handling and/or slip, trips and falls whilst loading and
unloading horses.
- Training and instruction on the safe use of horse
transport has not been provided to staff required to load
and unload horses.
- Loading and unloading of horse transport requires unsafe
access to the vehicle, exposing staff to entrapment and
crushing risks by the horse. This is particularly the case
where a horse is spooked, sick or in a distressed state.
Horse transport trailer couplings, powered brakes
(hydraulic or mechanical), safety chains, electrical couplings
etc. should be regularly inspected and maintained.
Wheel bearings, suspension and tyres, including
the spare should be in good condition and regularly
inspected for wear.
- Ramps are designed to provide ease of access in
and out of the transport vehicle, without the need
to use hazardous manual handling and with no trip
or slip hazards.
- Heavy ramps (e.g. those requiring a hydraulic or
mechanical raising and lowering device) must have
‘fail to safe’ design features to ensure that in the event
of hydraulic or mechanical failure, ramps do not fall in
an uncontrolled manner.
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WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
STABLE SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Horse transport (continued)
Ramps are designed to allow safe access and egress
without exposing staff to slip, trips and falls risks. This
ramp is set low to the ground with no side obstructions
to create tripping hazards. Where large, heavy and/or
awkward ramps are provided, suitable mechanical or
hydraulic lowering and raising mechanisms should be
provided (including ‘fail to safe’ design features).
- Training and instruction on the safe use of horse
transport is provided to all staff required to use them.
- Horse transport is designed to allow safe access/egress
while loading or unloading horses.
This vehicle is designed to allow for improved safe
loading, unloading and maintenance of horses without
being exposed to significant entrapment or crushing
hazards by the horse. Safe access to the entire length
of a horse can be made with this design.
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
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STABLE SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Horse transport (continued)
A front side access door on the vehicle provides safe
access to the front of the vehicle without the risk of
entrapment or crushing by the horse.
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WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
STABLE SAFETY
4. GENERAL STABLE OHS
A variety of other important OHS considerations should be taken into account as part of the broader risk control plan
for a stable environment. Left unchecked, the items covered in this section could contribute or ultimately be responsible
for workplace injury, illness or death.
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Design, layout and housekeeping
- Stables are poorly designed and/or laid out exposing
staff and contractors to risk of injury and/or illness.
Examples includes;
• rough and irregular flooring which is difficult to clean
or move around on (e.g. pot holed and grossly uneven)
• stables access/egress exposes staff and contractors
to horse traffic management risk
• stable working temperatures either very hot or cold
• insufficient facilities available to safely accommodate
the maximum number of horses typically housed, and
• quality lighting suitable for stable tasks/activities is
not provided.
- Stables are not appropriately maintained and a lack of
regular housekeeping exposes staff and contractors to
risk of injury, illness or disease. Examples include;
- Stables have been designed and laid out to safely
accommodate the maximum number of horses housed.
Under Section 28 of the OHS Act, those who design
buildings (stables) or structures (e.g. silos) must ensure
they are designed to appropriate specifications (including
relevant Australian Standards) and are safe for the
intended purpose.
If you are designing or building a new stable or structure,
please refer to WorkSafe Victoria’s Designing Safer
Buildings and Structures (1st Edition) – December 2005.
- Suitable, quality lighting (natural or otherwise) is available
for completing tasks.
- House keeping, stable hygiene and general maintenance
is regularly undertaken to ensure a safe working
environment for employees and contractors.
• general stable hygiene is grossly inadequate
(e.g. boxes housing horses are not cleaned and
refreshed daily)
• equipment, gear and general rubbish left lying around
exposing staff and contractors to slip, trip and fall
hazards; and
• regular maintenance to repair damage to stable areas
not routinely undertaken (e.g. damaged lining boards
or rails in boxes/yard areas).
Stable areas are clean, hygienic, well lit and designed
to provide a safe working environment for employees
and contractors.
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
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STABLE SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Design, layout and housekeeping (continued)
Stable boxes are hygienic, regularly cleaned and any
damage promptly repaired.
Stable yards are well laid out, tidy and maintained
regularly to avoid risk of injuries due to slips, trips and falls.
Electrical safety
- Electrical safety across the stable environment is grossly
inadequate, exposing staff and contractors to the risk of
electrocution or electrical fires. For example:
• damaged electrical leads in use
• inadequate number and location of power outlets
resulting in overloading of existing power points
• lengthy leads used in preference to fixed wiring
• broken light fittings
• no testing and tagging of portable leads, and
• exposed electrical circuits or wiring.
18
- Electrical safety is adequately addressed across the
stable environment. For example;
• Residual Current Device (safety switches) are hard
wired into all electrical switch boards and tested very 6
months (refer Australian Standards 3760:2003 In-service
safety inspections and testing of electrical equipment);
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
STABLE SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Electrical safety (continued)
Portable power leads permanently used instead
of fixed wiring.
Residual Current Device (safety switches) hard wired
into all electrical switch boards.
• portable power leads are only used for short term
work and are tested every 6 months for damage by
a qualified electrician and tagged (refer Australian
Standards 3760:2003);
• all permanent electrical circuits and wiring conform
to Australian Standards 3000 – Australian Wiring Rules
(consult a qualified ‘A’ grade electrician) and,
• an appropriate number of power outlets are well
located and provided.
Damaged power leads which have not been inspected
and tagged are used.
Stable security
- No stable perimeter fencing or partial/inadequate fencing
provided only. Likely risk of horses escaping onto
adjoining properties or public roads.
- The entire stable environment is adequately fenced,
eliminating the risk of horses escaping onto adjoining
properties or public roads.
- Access/egress points to and within the stable and
associated property not adequately controlled with
appropriate gates.
- Open water, such as horse swimming ponds, in close
proximity to the stable environment are not appropriately
fenced and secured.
Stable perimeter and internal fencing suitable for
containing horses.
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
19
STABLE SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Stable security (continued)
Stable perimeter and internal fencing suitable for
containing horses.
- Access/egress points to and within the stable and
associated areas are adequately controlled with
suitable gates.
Gates on all access/egress points suitable for
containing horses.
- Open water pools within close proximity to the stable
have suitable perimeter fencing and gates.
This horse swimming pond is within 50m of the main
stable area and has appropriate perimeter fencing and gate.
20
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
STABLE SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Handling horses
- Leading a horse with a headstall and bit that is not
attached to a lead.
- While being led, every horse must have a headstall and
bit in its mouth, with the bit attached to a lead.
- Riding a horse bare back.
- While being ridden, every horse must be properly bridled
and saddled.
- Open foot wear worn when working with or around horses.
- All those working with or around horses must wear fully
enclosed, durable footwear such as leather work boots that
comply with Australian Standards 2210.3 Occupational
protective footwear.
- Leading more than one horse at any time on foot.
- A horse should be lead from the near (left) side.
- Ensure a safe distance is maintained from other horses
while riding (track work) or when leading a horse.
- Leading no more then one horse at any time on foot.
Note: Leading a horse across public roads or spaces
on foot or while riding another horse should be avoided.
Such practice, in the event the horse being lead
unexpectedly breaks free, creates an uncontrolled risk
to the health and safety of the general public.
Please refer to Track Riding Gear and Horse Riding Gear
under Track Riding section in this guide for further
information concerning handling horses.
First aid
- No ‘first response’ first aid facilities available (including
first aid kits) suitable for the needs of the stable.
- No appropriately qualified first aiders available to
administer ‘first response’ first aid.
- Stable management have processes in place to ensure
the following:
• the selection, provision and maintenance of an
appropriate number of well stocked and located
first aid kits and
• an appropriate number of qualified first aiders
available to meet the needs of the stable
environment. However, it is recommended that
at least one qualified first aider should be available
at all times during stable operation.
This stable has a suitably stocked and maintained ‘first
response’ first aid kit. The kit is well located in the stable
environment and highly visible.
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
21
STABLE SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Dangerous goods and hazardous substances (chemicals)
- Chemicals are stored haphazardly across the stable.
- Chemicals to be used in the stable environment are
assessed for adverse health effects prior to being purchased.
Safer chemicals are used over more hazardous types (e.g.
water based chemicals are used in preference to chemicals
based on solvents).
- Chemicals must be safely stored and secured in
accordance with Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
requirements. It is highly recommended that you consult
with your chemical supplier as to how to safely store and
handle chemicals used within the stable environment.
An MSDS will include important information on the health
effects, storage, safe use, cleaning spills and more.
These chemicals are stored haphazardly in a shed with
other equipment. The content of some containers can
not be determined.
- Chemicals are decanted into unmarked containers.
- Chemicals decanted into other containers are clearly
labelled. Empty food or beverage containers are never
used to store decanted chemicals.
- Staff and contractors who use or could be expected to
use chemicals have been trained and are aware of the
associated hazards. Staff and contractors have access
to chemical MSDS.
- Staff and contractors have access to PPE, know how
to use it and care for it (e.g. storage and maintenance).
- Employees, contractors and first aiders know what to
do in the event of accidental consumption, spill,
contamination or other chemical emergency.
Chemicals used in a stable can be extremely hazardous.
This container of Creosote is toxic and is commonly used
in stables. Decanting it into unlabelled containers could
result in its accidental use leading to serious illness
or death.
- Staff and contractors are not aware of the hazards
associated with chemicals used in the stable
environment and have had no appropriate training in
using them safely.
- Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for all chemicals
used in the stable are not available to staff or contractors.
- PPE (e.g. gloves, face masks or respirators) and
protective clothing such as disposable overalls are not
available or maintained as identified by the MSDS for
the various chemicals used across the stable environment.
22
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
STABLE SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Fire protection and emergency evacuation plans
- Suitable fire fighting equipment unavailable for the
stable environment or not able to be readily accessed
(e.g. horse feed is stacked in front of fire extinguisher).
- Fire fighting equipment is poorly maintained
(e.g. extinguishers are out of date).
- No emergency evacuation plan for the stable.
- No regular emergency evacuation training for staff and
contactors against an emergency evacuation plan.
- An up-to-date fire and emergency evacuation plan has
been developed and a written copy clearly displayed in
the stable environment. Staff and contractors regularly
undergo training drills.
- Fire fighting equipment is provided and maintained at
six monthly intervals in accordance with Australian
Standards 1851 (consult your local fire authority or fire
fighting equipment supplier for advice).
- A minimum one metre ‘clear zone’ is provided around
all fire fighting equipment.
Fire fighting equipment must be adequately provided
for in the stable environment and easily accessible
at all times.
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
23
TRACK RIDING SAFETY
5. TRACK SECURITY
6. TRACK RIDING
24
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
TRACK RIDING SAFETY
5. TRACK SECURITY
Training facilities must be secure. Hazards such as loose horses escaping onto adjoining properties or roads, animals
such as dogs, kangaroos or cattle roaming onto training facilities and unauthorised access by the public must be
adequately controlled.
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Perimeter fencing
- No perimeter fencing or minimal fencing provided only.
- Fencing suitable to retain a horse erected around
the entire training facility.
Full perimeter fencing erected around the training facility
that is high enough to contain horses.
Access and egress
- Uncontrolled access and egress points.
- Gates or suitable barriers not used to secure access
and egress points.
- Access and egress to training facilities limited to one
point only (if possible).
- Automatic self closing gates used at primary access and
egress points.
Fully automatic security gates – access is strictly controlled.
- Barriers (such as ‘horse shoe’ design) help to entrap a
loose horse coming from the track. Most effective when:
• positioned between the ‘gap’ and the main entrance
to the track riding area:
• the main entrance and the ‘gap’ are in line of sight:
• positioned closer to the main entrance then the gap
itself, and
• the area between the ‘gap’ and the main entrance is
reduced as much as possible.
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
25
TRACK RIDING SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Access and egress (continued)
‘Horse shoe’ designed barrier looking towards the main
entrance from the ‘gap’.
View from inside the main entrance towards the ‘gap’.
View from outside the main entrance looking towards
the ‘gap’.
26
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
TRACK RIDING SAFETY
6. TRACK RIDING
There are various hazards involved in track riding. These hazards increase significantly when riding in dark, cold or hot,
foggy and/or icy/wet conditions. This section highlights the most common hazards track riders may be exposed to and
the types of controls readily available to make this activity as safe as it can reasonably be.
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Track riding conditions
- Training facility management do not have a restricted
track riding policy which clearly details:
• the circumstances under which track riding restrictions
apply (e.g. heavy rain, track ice and fog etc), and
• the types of track work reasonably permissible under
those conditions.
- Track riding undertaken when track supervision does not
have a minimum 75% visibility of the entire track proper.
- Training facility management have a restricted track riding
policy which clearly details:
• the circumstances under which track riding restrictions
apply (e.g. heavy rain, track ice and fog etc), and
• the types of track work reasonably permissible under
those conditions.
In determining reasonably permissible track work the
following factors should be taken into account:
•
•
•
•
track surfaces to be used (e.g. grass or sand)
speed of track work
experience of rider and/or horse, and
the number of horses using the track at any given time.
- Training facility management are responsible for enforcing
track riding restrictions when required.
Heavy ice and foggy mornings – riding should only be
undertaken in accordance with the training facilities
restricted track riding policy.
- Track supervision has a minimum 75% visibility of the
entire track proper. Where two or more track supervisors
are used to achieve this, suitable communication
mechanisms must be made available (e.g. two way radio
or mobile communications).
Track lighting
- Track riding completed:
• in pre-dawn hours (night) without quality lighting
which illuminates the entire track proper
• with lighting only provided at the gap, and/or
• with significant shadows or blind sections on
the track.
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
- Track riding is performed in daylight hours only.
- Where track riding is undertaken in pre dawn hours,
quality lighting available to ensure:
• illumination of the track proper
• clear visibility at all positions along the track, and
• shadows from lighting on track are minimised.
27
TRACK RIDING SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Track lighting (continued)
Sufficient lighting provided for pre-dawn track riding.
Sufficient lighting used at the ‘gap’.
Track riding gear
- Track work undertaken without RVL approved helmet
and body protector.
- Helmet is damaged or older than five years.
- Helmet continued to be used after sustaining an impact
from a fall or after a severe impact in general and/or the
wearer suffers from concussion following a fall.
- Helmets and body protectors to RVL standard. Helmets
no older then five years from the date of manufacture.
• Body Protector Standards
- ARB or Satra
Body protector – no damage or excessive wear.
Riding helmet - damaged and well over five years old.
28
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
TRACK RIDING SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Track riding gear (continued)
- Body vest is damaged or heavily worn.
• Helmets Standard
- AS/NZS 3838.2003
- US, ASTM F11 6301
- BS EN 1384/1997
Body protector – damaged with excessive wear.
Helmets must be in good condition and not older then
five years. The helmet manufacture date can be viewed
on the Australian Standards label inside the helmet.
Typical example of riding gear required for safe track work.
Note – florescence safety vest should also be worn.
- Training facility management should have in place
methodologies for ensuring all track riders are using vests,
helmets and riding boots.
- Florescence based riding gear, such as vests or jackets,
should be used during track work. They are a cost
effective means of identifying rider position on and off
the track.
Horse riding gear
- Riding gear such as girth, bridle, reins, stirrups, head
collars, leads and saddle leathers or synthetics in poor
or damaged condition.
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
- Riding gear such as girth, bridle, reins, stirrups, head
collars, leads and saddle leathers or synthetics in good
serviceable condition.
29
TRACK RIDING SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Horse riding gear (continued)
Riding reins – damaged and worn.
Saddle and stirrup leathers in good condition with no
tears or splits in the stirrup strap eyelets.
Girth straps – damaged and worn.
- Riding a horse in a trial or gallop without race boots
(with a heel) and safety irons.
Riding reins have sufficient rubber tread to ensure
satisfactory grip.
- Every saddle used in trials, tests or track work must
be equipped with safety irons and race boots (with
a heel) must be worn. In trials, provided the rider wears
race boots, the saddle can be equipped with race irons.
Safety irons used for track work.
30
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
TRACK RIDING SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Horse riding gear (continued)
- Use of stirrup safety devices. A variety is currently
available on the market and should be considered
where appropriate.
Refer to RVL for further advice concerning the use
of stirrup safety devices.
Track obstacles
- Track inspections are not undertaken prior to track
work commencing.
- Track inspection undertaken prior to commencing
track work.
- Hazardous obstacles or potential track hazards on or
near the track have not been eliminated or appropriately
controlled before commencing track work.
- Obstacles on or near the track which could pose a
hazard to track riders have been identified, assessed
for the level of risk and most importantly eliminated or
controlled. Those obvious hazards such as items of plant
or damaged rails are removed or repaired immediately.
Near track obstacles such as ‘winning posts’ may pose
a risk to track riders should they fall at that point on
the track.
‘Winning post’ has been removed on non race days to
reduce track side hazards to track riders, especially in early
morning track work.
‘Winning post’ foundation design allows quick removal
when not required and easy replacement for race
day events.
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
31
TRACK RIDING SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Safe Track Work Policy
- No training track policy and procedure in place on how
safe track work will be administered for:
• fast and slow track work
• reverse track work
• access and egress from the training track at the ‘gap’
to the main or inner ‘e.g. sand’ tracks, and
• other training facility specific track work (e.g. where
gallop track work is undertaken in conjunction with
other forms of training such as harness track work).
- Policy and procedures are in place and enforced at
training tracks by training facility management for all
types of approved track work.
A summary of training track policy and procedures
should be clearly displayed at the ‘gap’ concerning
approved track work.
- All track riders must be registered with RVL and
should have appropriate qualifications such as Certificate
III in Racing (Thoroughbred) Track Rider or equivalent
riding experience.
Track inductions
- Site specific training track inductions have
not been provided by training facility management to:
• trainers
• track riders, and
• stable hands
prior to training for the first time at the track.
- Site specific training track inductions have been
undertaken by all track and stable users. Beside track
orientation and rules of training, induction may include:
• an understanding of track and stable hazards and
associated risks
• having controls in place at the track to manage risk,
including specific risk control solutions used and the
overall system to manage safety while training at the
track (such as policy and procedure), and
• knowledge of the hazard and incident reporting process
used by the track.
In addition to track specific inductions, RVL now require
all racing industry personnel working, racing or training
at Melbourne and regional race tracks to complete an
industry generic online OHS induction.
For access and instructions concerning this online
induction contact RVL Risk Management Department
on (03) 9258 4367 or www.racingvictoria.net.au
Track facilities and amenities
- No appropriate facilities and amenities such as:
• Toilets, and
• access to hot and cold drinking water.
- Available facilities or amenities are in a poorly kept
condition and unfit for use.
32
- Toilet, showers, change rooms and tea rooms are
available (where appropriate) and accessible to all
track users.
- All facilities and amenities are fit for use and
regularly maintained.
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
TRACK RIDING SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Track first aid and emergency evacuation
- No first aid facilities and resources (including qualified
first aid providers) available at the track for all track work.
- No track emergency and evacuation plan and procedure.
- No clearly marked emergency services entry points to
the track.
- No communications available to the track supervisor(s).
- First aid facilities and resources available at the track.
Ideally first aid resources, such as kits, should be
located at the supervisor’s box and regularly inspected.
Appropriate first aid facilities, such as a dedicated first
aid room, should be available in a well maintained
building close to the track.
- As a minimum, track supervisor(s) trained to deliver
‘first response’ first aid.
- Emergency evacuation plan and procedure clearly
on display and understood by the track supervisor(s).
Emergency services advice used in developing
emergency management and evacuation plans.
- Emergency services access to the track is clearly visible.
- Appropriate communications, including mobile
communications, should be available to the track
supervisor(s).
Track supervision
- No track supervision provided during track work.
- Track supervision present at all training track sessions.
- Track supervision box (or boxes) not appropriately located
to provide complete track visibility.
- Track supervision box (or boxes) located next to the ‘gap’
and in locations (if required) to provide complete visibility
of the track.
- No means of alerting track riders and others of a fall,
loose horse or other track emergencies, such as sirens
and high visibility flashing lights, etc.
- No incident reporting log.
- Training facility management not enforcing track riding
rules, including safe riding and restricted riding policy
and use of approved helmets and body protectors.
Supervisor box located next to the ‘gap’. This position
often provides the best location as monitoring and
communicating to riders coming on and off the track
is easier.
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
33
TRACK RIDING SAFETY
UNACCEPTABLE WORK PRACTICE
RISK CONTROL SOLUTIONS
Track supervision
The supervisor box is well elevated to provide total
visibility of the entire course proper.
- Track supervision box (or boxes) equipped with
emergency siren and light systems.
Emergency siren and lighting devices provided at the
supervisor box.
- Training facility management ensure that:
• approved track riders are registered with RVL
• details of incidents at the track are recorded according
to track procedure
• riders have approved helmets, body protectors and
other safety equipment as required by RVL and track
management, and
• track riders comply with safe track riding policy.
34
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
FURTHER INFORMATION
AND GUIDANCE
General
• Employees can contact their union
• Employers can contact their industry association
• WorkSafe Victoria publications can be obtained by visiting workcover.vic.gov.au,
phoning 1800 136 089 or e-mailing [email protected]
• Contacting Racing Victoria Limited on 1300 139 401 or visit racingvictoria.net.au
• Contacting Country Racing Victoria on 1300 139 402 or visit countryracing.com.au
• Australian Horse Industry Council on horsecouncil.org.au
Legislation
• Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004
• Dangerous Goods Act 1985
• Consolidated Occupational Health and Safety Regulations 2007
For copies of the above Acts and Regulations go to dms.dpc.vic.gov.au
or phone Information Victoria on 1300 366 356.
Publications and further information available
from WorkSafe Victoria
Consultation
• There are many publications available including Talking Safety Together;
and Consultation – A User’s Guide
Incident Reporting – Notifying WorkSafe Victoria
• Guide to incident notification (2nd Edition) – October 2006
Issue Resolution in the workplace
• Resolving OHS issues in the workplace – December 2003
Workplace Bullying and Violence
• Prevention of Bullying and Violence at Work – February 2003
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
35
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
WorkSafe Victoria wishes to thank the following organisations
and their representatives for their valuable contributions to the
development of this guide:
Racing Victoria Limited
The Australian Workers’ Union
Thoroughbred Racehorse Owners’ Association
Australian Trainers’ Association
Victorian Jockeys’ Association
Country Racing Victoria
Victoria Racing Club
Melbourne Racing Club
Moonee Valley Racing Club
Agita Lodge Racing Stables
Bendigo Jockey Club
Brian McKnight Stables
David Hayes Stables
Dean Lawson Stables
Luke Oliver Stables
Lee Hope Racing Stables
Kilmore Racing Inc
36
WORKSAFE VICTORIA / HORSE STABLES AND TRACK RIDING SAFETY
WORKSAFE VICTORIA
Advisory Service
222 Exhibition Street
Melbourne 3000
Phone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 03 9641 1444
Toll-free . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1800 136 089
Email . . . . . [email protected]
Head Office
222 Exhibition Street
Melbourne 3000
Phone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 03 9641 1555
Website . . . www.workcover.vic.gov.au
Local Offices
Ballarat . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bendigo . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dandenong . . . . . . . . . .
Geelong . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Melbourne
(628 Bourke Street) . . . .
Mildura. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mulgrave . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preston . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shepparton . . . . . . . . . .
Traralgon . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wangaratta . . . . . . . . . .
Warrnambool . . . . . . . . .
VWA1099/01/05.07
03
03
03
03
5338
5443
8792
5226
4444
8866
9000
1200
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
9941
5021
9565
9485
5831
5174
5721
5564
0558
4001
9444
4555
8260
8900
8588
3200
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