Health and Safety Risk Assessment (BS4163:2007)

Health and Safety Risk Assessment (BS4163:2007)
Health and Safety Risk Assessment (BS4163:2007)
LOCATION
ALL
Workshop Health and Safety
General Health and Safety
Whole workshop – Electric shock from machinery, guards and fences on machinery correctly set, machinery used at
correct speed settings, Loose clothing not worn, jewellery removed, eye protection (goggles) worn when working,
ventilation, extraction, equipment properly adjusted / used when working & emergency stop locations in the workshop.
Workshop rules and behaviour (safe working practice).
 Aprons and Goggles must be worn at all times when using machinery.
 Loose hair tied back and jewellery taken off. Shirt / pullover sleeves pulled up.
 Know where the Emergency stops are - locations within the room.
 Workshops should be kept clean and tidy. Scrap material should be put in bins.
 Never run in a workshop.
 Stools under desks if practical work is being undertaken.
 Never blow dust – sweep into a bin.
 Excess tools and materials put away after use. Carrying tools the correct way.
 Main risk when people do not know or understand how to use something correctly – if not sure always ask.
LOCATION
ALL
Material Health and Safety
Hazards
Timber Hazards:
 Wood dust irritates eyes and respiratory tract.
 High exposure to wood dust can cause skin, lung
and nasal disorders.
 High amounts of wood dust can become explosive.
 Accumulating wood dust can cause fire hazard.
 Wood dust on the floor can be slippery.
 Brushing can create airborne dust.
Plastic Hazards:
 Dust from hand and machine cutting and shaping
of acrylic and other thermoplastics materials can
irritate the eyes, nose and throat. Inhalation of dust
can present a hazard.
 Heat softened plastics can stick to skin.
 Work pieces can shatter during manufacture.
Metal Hazards:
 Waste materials from processing metals can
damage the eyes and skin.
 Coolants and cutting oils can irritate the eyes and
cause dermatitis.
 Falling materials can present a hazard.
LOCATION
ALL
Hazards
MID
Timber Control Measures:
 Sufficient general ventilation should be provided.
 Respiratory protective equipment should be worn
during any prolonged hand or machine sanding.
 Suitable eye protection should be worn.
 Machine sanding should be kept to a minimum.
 Work areas should be kept clean.
Plastic Control Measures:
 Sufficient general ventilation should be provided.
 Water should be used as a lubricant to minimise
dust. Suitable eye protection and respiratory
protective equipment should be worn during
machining.
 Gloves should be used if work pieces are heat
softened.
 Work pieces should be securely clamped during
machining.
Metal Control Measures:
 Proper instruction should be given on safe
handling of metals and metal waste.
 Suitable eye protection should be worn when
machining metals.
 Hands should be washed thoroughly after contact
with metals and coolants.
Portable Tools and Equipment
 Electric Shock from tools.
 Contact with cutters, blades, abrasive wheels and
sanding discs can cause injuries.
 Broken cutters, blades and abrasive wheels (or
particles from cutting operations) can be violently
ejected. Dust can be inhaled.
 Trailing cables could be tripped over.
 Inadvertent operation of portable tools.
 Noise can lead to hearing problems.
 Batteries can spontaneously combust or explode if
incorrectly used. Start up torque can cause the
user injuries.
RISK LEVEL
Risk Control Measures
RISK LEVEL
Risk Control Measures
MID
 Portable tools should only be used for the design
purpose in accordance with the manufacturers
recommendations.
 Students should be aware of hazards associated
with portable tools and precautions that should be
taken during use.
 Portable tools should be immobilized when
changing cutters, blades, etc.
 If the machine has moving parts or is likely to
produce hazardous material, long hair and loose
clothing should be secured, dangling jewellery
should be removed, suitable gloves and eye
protection worn.
LOCATION
ALL
Portable Drills
Hazards
 Loose hair and clothing which can become
entangled in moving parts of the drill should be tied
back. Electric shock from tools.
 Be aware of chuck keys, broken drill bits, swarf and
work pieces that could be violently ejected.
 Be aware of sharp edges on drill bits, work pieces
and swarf which can cause cuts.
 Leads could cause a trip hazard.
 Drill jamming could produce a torque reaction.
 Dust produced could be inhaled and other particles
could be ejected.
LOCATION
ALL
 Trailing leads should not become entangled with
the operator or others in the vicinity or the drill.
 Long hair and loose clothing should be tied back
and jewellery taken off.
 Suitable eye protection should be worn.
 The chuck key should only be used to tighten and
loosed the chuck, and otherwise kept safely away
from the drill.
 Training should be given on how to remove burrs
from material.
Portable Biscuit Cutters
Hazards





Electric Shock from tools.
Leads could cause a trip hazard.
Rotating parts can cause cuts.
Long hair and clothing can become entangled.
Dust produced could be inhaled and other particles
could be ejected.
 Jamming or ‘kick back’ of the biscuit cutter could
cause an injury.
LOCATION
ALL
Portable Sanding Machines
Electric Shock from tools.
Leads could cause a trip hazard.
Rotating or moving parts can cause injuries.
Dust produced could be inhaled.
Jamming of the sanding belt.
LOCATION
ALL





Electric Shock from tools.
Leads could cause a trip hazard.
Rotating parts can cause injuries.
Dust produced could be inhaled.
Jamming or ‘kick back’ of the machine.
MID
RISK LEVEL LOW
Risk Control Measures
 Respiratory protective equipment should be worn.
 Trailing leads should not become entangled with
the operator or others in the vicinity or the portable
sanding machine.
 Long hair and loose clothing should be tied back
and jewellery taken off.
 Suitable eye protection should be worn.
 The operator should have sufficient strength to
with stand the turning moment of the sanding disc
or belt if it becomes jammed.
Portable Planning Machines
Hazards
RISK LEVEL
Risk Control Measures
 Respiratory protective equipment should be worn.
 Trailing leads should not become entangled with
the operator or others in the vicinity or the portable
biscuit cutter.
 The peripheral speed of the saw blade should
match the speed of the machine.
 The blade should be securely fitted to the machine
and inspected for damage prior to each use.
 Long hair and loose clothing should be tied back
and jewellery taken off.
 Suitable eye protection should be worn.
 The operator should have sufficient strength to
with stand any ‘kick back’ that may occur if the
machine becomes jammed.
Hazards





RISK LEVEL LOW
Risk Control Measures
RISK LEVEL
Risk Control Measures
MID
 Respiratory protective equipment should be worn.
 Trailing leads should not become entangled with
the operator or others in the vicinity or the planer.
 Long hair and loose clothing should be tied back
and jewellery taken off.
 The planer blades should be checked for damage.
 Suitable eye protection should be worn.
 The operator should have sufficient strength to
with stand any ‘kick back’ the machine produces.
LOCATION
ALL
Portable Routers
Hazards





Electric Shock from tools.
Leads could cause a trip hazard.
Rotating parts can cause cuts.
Long hair and clothing can become entangled.
Dust produced could be inhaled and other particles
could be ejected.
 Jamming, ‘kick back’ or biting of the router could
cause an injury.
 Distraction of the user.
LOCATION
IC7
Soldering Irons
Electric Shock from tools.
Leads could cause a trip hazard.
Hot soldering iron tips can cause burns.
Splashes of flux and solder can cause injury and
damage to clothing.
LOCATION
ALL
Hot Melt Glue Gun
ALL
RISK LEVEL LOW
Risk Control Measures
 Supply leads for glue guns should be heat
resistant. Care should be taken to ensure that
trailing leads do not become entangled with the
operator, others in the vicinity or the hot glue
nozzle.
 Suitable eye protection should be worn.
Electric Shock from tools.
Leads could cause a trip hazard.
Hot glue nozzle tips can cause burns.
Splashes of glue can cause burns.
LOCATION
RISK LEVEL LOW
Risk Control Measures
 Extra-low voltage soldering irons are preferred if
practicable.
 Supply leads for soldering irons should be heat
resistant. Care should be taken to ensure that
trailing leads do not become entangled with the
operator, others in the vicinity or the hot soldering
iron.
 Soldering should be carried out where distractions
to the user can be minimized.
 Suitable eye protection should be worn.
Hazards




MID
 Respiratory protective equipment should be worn.
 Trailing leads should not become entangled with
the operator or others in the vicinity or the cutter.
 The peripheral speed of the router cutter should
match the speed of the machine.
 The cutter should be securely fitted to the machine
and inspected for damage prior to each use.
 Long hair and loose clothing should be tied back
and jewellery taken off.
 Suitable eye protection should be worn.
 The operator should have sufficient strength to
withstand any ‘kick back’ or biting that may occur
when the router is in use.
 A router should not be used when there is a
likelihood of the operator being distracted when
using the tool.
Hazards




RISK LEVEL
Risk Control Measures
Hand Tools
Hazards
 Sharp tools, falling tools, tools breaking or coming
apart in use, slipping tools (which can occur when
pressure is applied to them) can all cause injury.
RISK LEVEL LOW
Risk Control Measures
 Hand tools should be stored at a suitable height
for access. Hand tools should not be left projecting
from a bench.
 Faces of hammer heads and hammer shafts
should be frequently inspected.
 Edged tools should be kept sharp and in good
condition. Sharp or pointed tools should be
handled with care (with cutting edges protected or
pointing downwards).
 Bench hooks should be maintained in good
condition.
 Tools should not be carried in pockets or under
belts.
LOCATION
IC5 & D1
Hazards
Mortising Machine
 Work pieces in the mortising machine can become
loose and can be ejected.
 Hands or clothing can become entangled with the
cutting tool.
 Inadvertent starting of the machine can present a
hazard.
 Wood dust can be inhaled.
LOCATION
IC4 & PREP
Hazards
LOCATION
IC5 & D1,2,5
Hazards
MID
 A means of electrical isolation using a fused
switch-disconnector on or adjustment to the
machine, and that it is controlled by a starter
incorporating overload protection.
 A conveniently positioned mushroom headed stop
button or other suitable control device that can
quickly stop the machine in an emergency.
 Fixed guards, or alternatively interlocked guards
that enclose the drive mechanisms.
Planner and Thicknesser
 The work piece in planning and thicknessing
machines can be ‘kicked back’ towards the
operator.
 Hands or clothing can become entangled with the
cutting tool.
 Inadvertent starting of the machine can present a
hazard.
 Noise can cause permanent hearing damage.
 Wood dust can be inhaled.
RISK LEVEL
Risk Control Measures
RISK LEVEL HIGH
Risk Control Measures
 A means of electrical isolation using a fused
switch-disconnector on or adjustment to the
machine, and that it is controlled by a starter
incorporating overload protection.
 A conveniently positioned mushroom headed stop
button or other suitable control device that can
quickly stop the machine in an emergency.
 Fixed guards, or alternatively interlocked guards
that enclose the drive mechanisms.
 The upper part of the machine, including the
infeed and outfeed rollers, should be guarded to
prevent accidental access to the cutter block and
feed rollers.
 It should be possible to lock the machine ‘off’ when
not in use.
 A ‘push stick’ should be used to push short work
pieces into the machine.
Disk Sanding / Belt Sanding Machines
RISK LEVEL
MID
Risk Control Measures
General Health and Safety
 Work can become jammed in the machine.
 Hands or clothing can become jammed in the
sanding machine.
 Wood dust can be inhaled.
 Inadvertently starting the machine.
 The belt can break and lash out.
 Hands can come in to contact with the abrasive
surface.
 The machine has a means of isolation,
emergency stop.
 Fixed or locked guards to enclose the drive
mechanism.
 Belt should be narrower than the belt support
plate and pulleys, to protect the user from the
belt edges. Belt should be set in the correct
direction of rotation.
 The standing table on the vertical belt sander
should be of rigid metal construction. The gap
between the table and the belt should be
sufficient to clear the debris but small enough to
ensure sufficient support for the timber.
 For angled sanding it should only be possible to
tilt downwards away from the belt to avoid
jamming between the table and the belt.
 Eye protection (goggles) should be worn when
the machine is in operation. Long hair should be
protected from entanglement.
 Abrasive belts should be examined before use,
torn belts should be discarded. Fingers should be
kept 40mm away from the sanding belt.
LOCATION
IC4 & PREP
Hazards
Band Saws
 Work pieces can become jammed in band sawing
machines.
 Bench mounted band saws can become detached
from the bench.
 Hands or fingers can come into contact with the
blade.
 Clothing can become entangled with the blade.
 Wood dust can be inhaled.
 Noise can cause permanent hearing damage.
 Inadvertent starting of the machine can present a
hazard.
 Withdrawing the wrk piece with the machine
running can present a hazard.
 Blunt or damaged blades can present a hazard.
LOCATION
IC4 & PREP
Hazards
LOCATION
IC4 & D3,5
Hazards
 A means of electrical isolation using a fused
switch-disconnector on or adjustment to the
machine, and that it is controlled by a starter
incorporating overload protection.
 A conveniently positioned mushroom headed stop
button or other suitable control device that can
quickly stop the machine in an emergency.
 It should be possible to lock the machine ‘off’ when
not in use.
 Suitable eye protection should be worn, long hair
should be tied back and protected from
entanglement.
 Saw blades should be of the correct pattern, sharp
and distortion free.
 The guide blocks and table should be maintained
in good condition.
 Ensure that users keep their fingers clear of the
saw line and do not make adjustments to the
machine set-up until it stops.
Table Circular Saws
 The work piece can become jammed in the circular
sawing machine or can ‘kick back’.
 Hands or clothing can become entangled with the
blade.
 Inadvertent starting of the machine can present a
hazard.
 Noise can cause permanent hearing damage.
 Wood dust can be inhaled.
 Blunt or damaged blades can present a hazard.
RISK LEVEL HIGH
Risk Control Measures
 A means of electrical isolation using a fused
switch-disconnector on or adjustment to the
machine, and that it is controlled by a starter
incorporating overload protection.
 A conveniently positioned mushroom headed stop
button or other suitable control device that can
quickly stop the machine in an emergency.
 Fixed guards, or alternatively interlocked guards
that enclose the drive mechanisms.
 It should be possible to lock the machine ‘off’ when
not in use.
 There should be sufficient space around the saw
bench so that the timber can be handled safely.
 The riving knife should be securely fixed below the
surface of the table.
 A ‘push stick’ should be used to push short work
pieces into the machine.
 Suitable eye protection should be worn, long hair
should be tied back and protected from
entanglement.
 Saw blades should be of the correct pattern, sharp
and distortion free.
Powered Fret Saws
 Hands or fingers can come in to contact with blade.
 The fret saw can become detached from the
bench,
 Inhaling wood dust – proper extraction should be in
place and on.
 Inadvertently starting the machine.
RISK LEVEL HIGH
Risk Control Measures
RISK LEVEL LOW
Risk Control Measures
 A means of electrical isolation using a fused
switch-disconnector on or adjustment to the
machine, and that it is controlled by a starter
incorporating overload protection.
 Machine has means of isolation, emergency stop.
 Eye protection (goggles) worn when operating the
machine, long hair should be tied back and
protected from entanglement. Loose clothing and
jewellery should be tucked in / removed.
 Blades should be sharp and distortion free.
LOCATION
IC4 & PREP
Hazards
Chop / Radial Arm Saw
 Hands or clothing can become entangled with the
blade.
 The saw blade can become loose.
 The blade can move forward inadvertently.
 Inadvertent starting of the machine can present a
hazard.
 Wood dust can be inhaled.
 Blunt or damaged blades can present a hazard.
LOCATION
IC5 & D4
Hazards
LOCATION
IC5 & D2
Hazards
 A means of electrical isolation using a fused
switch-disconnector on or adjustment to the
machine, and that it is controlled by a starter
incorporating overload protection.
 A conveniently positioned mushroom headed stop
button or other suitable control device that can
quickly stop the machine in an emergency.
 It should be possible to lock the machine ‘off’ when
not in use.
 Eye protection (goggles) worn when operating the
machine, long hair should be tied back and
protected from entanglement. Loose clothing and
jewellery should be tucked in / removed.
 Blades should be sharp and distortion free.
Wood Turning Lathes
 Long hair and loose clothing can become
entangled in moving parts of the lathe.
 Hand held wood turning tools can become trapped
between the rest and the work piece.
 Work pieces can fly off if not correctly mounted to a
face plate, chuck or between centres.
 Timber particles can fly off poorly selected or
prepared wood.
 Inadvertent starting of the machine can present a
hazard.
 Wood dust can be inhaled.
 Lack of space around the machine can lead to the
operator being pushed by passers by.
 Slippery floor surfaces or loose items around the
machine can cause slips that result in contact with
moving parts.
RISK LEVEL
Risk Control Measures
MID
 A means of electrical isolation using a fused
switch-disconnector on or adjustment to the
machine, and that it is controlled by a starter
incorporating overload protection.
 A conveniently positioned mushroom headed stop
button or other suitable control device that can
quickly stop the machine in an emergency.
 It should be possible to lock the machine ‘off’ when
not in use.
 Fixed guards, or alternatively interlocked guards
that enclose the drive mechanisms.
 Eye protection (goggles) worn when operating the
machine, long hair should be tied back and
protected from entanglement. Loose clothing and
jewellery should be tucked in / removed.
 Blades should be sharp and distortion free.
 There should be sufficient space around the
machine to prevent the operator from being
accidentally pushed by passers-by.
 Only one person at a time should operate the
machine.
 Timber should be inspected carefully to ensure it is
free from any defect.
 Care should be taken to ensure that work mounted
to a faceplate, a chuck or between centres is
properly secured and balanced to prevent
excessive vibration.
Centre Lathes
 Long hair and loose clothing can become
entangled in moving parts of the lathe.
 Work pieces, chuck keys, broken cutting tools and
swarf can be violently ejected from the lathe.
 Centre lathes can present a hazard of electrical
shock.
 Sharp edges on tools, work pieces and swarf can
cause cuts. Contact with cutting fluids, oil and
grease can irritate the skin.
 Swarf can jam or be ejected if allowed to build up.
RISK LEVEL HIGH
Risk Control Measures
RISK LEVEL
Risk Control Measures
MID
 A means of electrical isolation using a fused
switch-disconnector on or adjustment to the
machine, and that it is controlled by a starter
incorporating overload protection.
 A conveniently positioned mushroom headed stop
button or other suitable control device that can
quickly stop the machine in an emergency.
 Fixed guards, or alternatively interlocked guards
that enclose the drive mechanisms.
 The machine should be fitted with a chuck guard.
LOCATION
IC5 & D2
Hazards
Centre Lathes continued…
 Inadvertent starting of the machine can present a
hazard.
 Lack of space around the machine can lead to the
operator being pushed by passers-by.
 Slippery floor surfaces or loose items around the
machine can cause slips that result in contact with
moving parts.
LOCATION
IC5
Hazards
MID
 There should be sufficient space around the
machine to prevent the operator from being
accidentally pushed by passers-by. Only one
person at a time should operate the machine.
 Eye protection (goggles) worn when operating the
machine, long hair should be tied back and
protected from entanglement. Loose clothing and
jewellery should be tucked in / removed.
 The machine should be electrically isolated before
any internal mechanisms are adjusted.
 Care should be taken to ensure that work mounted
to a faceplate, a chuck or between centres is
properly secured and balanced to prevent
excessive vibration.
 Coolant nozzles should not be adjusted while the
machine is in operation.
 Swarf should not be allowed to accumulate as it
can become entangled or ejected by the chuck or
work piece. Swarf should not be removed while
the machine is operating.
 Contact with the skin should be kept to a
minimum. Hands should be washed thoroughly
after using the machine.
Milling Machine
 Contact with revolving cutters can present a
hazard.
 Long hair and loose clothing can become
entangled in moving parts of the machine.
 Broken cutters, swarf and work pieces can be
violently ejected.
 Sharp edges on tools, work pieces and swarf can
cause cuts. Contact with cutting fluids, oil and
grease can irritate the skin.
 Milling machines can present a hazard of electrical
shock.
 Closing movement between parts, under power
feed, can result in finger trapping.
 Heavy objects such as vices and index fixtures can
fall from the table.
 Inadvertent starting of the machine can present a
hazard.
 Lack of space around the machine can lead to the
operator being pushed by passers-by.
 Slippery floor surfaces or loose items around the
machine can cause slips that result in contact with
moving parts.
RISK LEVEL
Risk Control Measures
RISK LEVEL
Risk Control Measures
MID
 A means of electrical isolation using a fused
switch-disconnector on or adjustment to the
machine, and that it is controlled by a starter
incorporating overload protection.
 A conveniently positioned mushroom headed stop
button or other suitable control device that can
quickly stop the machine in an emergency.
 Fixed guards, or alternatively interlocked guards
that enclose the drive mechanisms.
 Handles or hand wheels to operate the table
mechanism should be set up so that they do not
rotate when the power drive is engaged.
 There should be sufficient space around the
machine to prevent the operator from being
accidentally pushed by passers-by.
 Eye protection (goggles) worn when operating the
machine, long hair should be tied back and
protected from entanglement. Loose clothing and
jewellery should be tucked in / removed.
 The machine should be electrically isolated before
any internal mechanisms are adjusted.
 Coolant nozzles should not be adjusted while the
machine is in operation.
 Suitable implements should be used to remove
swarf to avoid hand contact.
 Swarf should not be allowed to accumulate as it
can become entangled or ejected by the chuck or
work piece. Swarf should not be removed while
the machine is operating.
 Contact with the skin should be kept to a
minimum. Hands should be washed thoroughly
after using the machine.
LOCATION
ALL
Drilling Machines
Hazards
 Chuck keys, broken drills, work pieces, etc. can be
violently ejected. The chuck key should be
removed immediately after use and before starting
using the machine. The machine should be fitted
with a spindle guard.
 Unexpected spinning of hand held work pieces
could cause injuries to hands. The work piece
should be prevented from spinning around by using
a vice, hand grips or clamping to the table.
 The drill table can slip down and heavy objects can
fall from the table.
 Machine presents an electric shock hazard.
 Closing movements between parts can lead to
trapping, sharp edges on drills, work pieces and
swarf can cause cuts.
 Inadvertently starting of the machine can present a
hazard.
 Lack of space around the machine can lead to the
operator being pushed by passers-by, slippery
floors or loose items around the machine can result
in contact with the moving parts.
LOCATION
IC4 & PREP
Hazards
LOCATION
IC4 & D2
Hazards
MID
 The machine has a means of isolation, emergency
stop.
 A foot operated emergency stop so the machine
can be stopped quickly in an emergency with the
operator not having to let go of the spindle feed or
work piece.
 Fixed guards should enclose the pulleys and belts.
 Eye protection (goggles) should be worn whilst
operating the machinery. Long hair and loose
clothing should be secured so as not to come in to
contact with moving parts. Dangling jewellery
should be removed.
 Gloves or bandages should not be worn whilst
operating the machine.
 Manual handling tasks of lifting materials and the
table should be reduced as can be beyond the
physical capabilities of some persons.
 Coolant nozzles should not be adjusted while the
machine is in operation.
 Suitable implements should be used to remove
swarf to avoid hand contact.
Grinding Machines
 Over speeding, damaged or incorrectly mounted
abrasive wheels can break while rotating and be
violently ejected from the grinding machine.
 Contact with the wheel can cause cuts.
 Long hair and loose clothing can become
entangled in moving parts of the machine.
 Work pieces can be violently ejected.
 Fingers or work pieces can be ejected from the
machine. Sharp edges can cause cuts.
 Hot work pieces can cause burns.
 Grinding machines can present a hazard of
electrical shock. Inadvertent starting of the machine
can present a hazard. Dust can be inhaled.
 Lack of space around the machine can lead to the
operator being pushed by passers-by.
RISK LEVEL
Risk Control Measures
RISK LEVEL
Risk Control Measures
MID
 A means of electrical isolation using a fused
switch-disconnector on or adjustment to the
machine, and that it is controlled by a starter
incorporating overload protection.
 A conveniently positioned mushroom headed stop
button or other suitable control device that can
quickly stop the machine in an emergency.
 There should be sufficient space around the
machine to prevent the operator from being
accidentally pushed by passers-by.
 Eye protection (goggles) worn when operating the
machine, long hair should be tied back and
protected from entanglement. Loose clothing and
jewellery should be tucked in / removed.
Polishing (Buffering) Machines
RISK LEVEL LOW
Risk Control Measures
 Long hair and loose clothing can become
entangled in moving parts of the machine.
 Work pieces, wires from brushes and particles from
the polishing process can be ejected from the
machine. Sharp edges can cause cuts.
 Hot work pieces can cause burns.
 Polishing machines can present a hazard of
electrical shock. Inadvertent starting of the machine
can present a hazard.
 Dust can be inhaled.
 Lack of space around the machine can lead to the
operator being pushed by passers by.
 Slippery floor surfaces or loose items around the
machine can cause slips that result in contact with
moving parts.
 A means of electrical isolation using a fused
switch-disconnector on or adjustment to the
machine, and that it is controlled by a starter
incorporating overload protection.
 A conveniently positioned mushroom headed stop
button or other suitable control device that can
quickly stop the machine in an emergency.
 There should be sufficient space around the
machine to prevent the operator from being
accidentally pushed by passers-by.
 Eye protection (goggles) worn when operating the
machine, long hair should be tied back and
protected from entanglement. Loose clothing and
jewellery should be tucked in / removed.
 Wire brushes and mops should be suitable.
LOCATION
IC4 & PREP
Hazards
Powered Hacksaws
 Long hair and loose clothing can become
entangled in moving parts of the saw.
 Closing movements between parts can result in
trapping.
 Forward motion of the saw arm can result in
trapping or cuts.
 Sawing machines can present a hazard of
electrical shock.
 The bar stock projecting from the vice can present
a tripping hazard.
 Sharp edges on tools and work pieces can cause
cuts.
 Blunt or damaged blades can present a hazard.
 Contact with cutting fluids, oil and grease can
irritate the skin.
 Inadvertent starting of the machine can present a
hazard.
 Lack of space around the machine can lead to the
operator being pushed by passers-by.
 Slippery floor surfaces or loose items around the
machine can cause slips that result in contact with
moving parts.
LOCATION
IC5
IC5
MID
 A means of electrical isolation using a fused
switch-disconnector on or adjustment to the
machine, and that it is controlled by a starter
incorporating overload protection.
 A conveniently positioned mushroom headed stop
button or other suitable control device that can
quickly stop the machine in an emergency.
 Fixed guards, or alternatively interlocked guards
that enclose the drive mechanisms.
 There should be sufficient space around the
machine to prevent the operator from being
accidentally pushed by passers-by.
 Eye protection (goggles) worn when operating the
machine, long hair should be tied back and
protected from entanglement. Loose clothing and
jewellery should be tucked in / removed.
 Blade guides should be correctly adjusted.
 Badly worn or damaged blades should not be
used.
 Measures should be taken to prevent persons
tripping over long bars being sawn.
 Work pieces should be securely held in the vice
and properly supported.
 Contact with the skin should be kept to a
minimum. Hands should be washed thoroughly
after using the machine.
Guillotines, Shears, Folding and Rolling Machine RISK LEVEL LOW
Hazards
Risk Control Measures
 Closing movement between surfaces and other
parts can result in trapping and serious injury.
 Sharp edges on cut materials can cause cuts.
 Lack of space around the machine can lead to the
operator being pushed by passers-by.
 Slippery floor surfaces or loose items around the
machine can cause slips that result in contact with
moving parts.
 Manual handling of sheet materials and operating
levers or treadles can present a hazard.
 Entanglement of long hair and loose clothing in
moving parts can present a hazard.
LOCATION
RISK LEVEL
Risk Control Measures
 These machines should be secured to a bench or
stand specifically designed for the purpose.
 There should be sufficient space around the
machine to prevent the operator from being
accidentally pushed by passers-by.
 Loose clothing and jewellery should be tucked in /
removed.
 When the machine is not in use it should be made
safe by locking the action.
Injection and Extrusion Moulding Machine
RISK LEVEL LOW
Hazards
Risk Control Measures
 Hot or molten plastics discharges from injection
moulding machines can cause burns.
 Fumes can be inhaled.
 The machine can become unstable and cause
injuries.
 Absorption of moisture by hygroscopic material can
present a risk of explosive discharge.
 The machine must be provided with a means of
electrical isolation.
 The machine should be fitted with safety guards
around the nozzle area to provide protection in all
directions from possible ejection of hot material.
 Appropriate personal protective equipment should
be worn. Eye protection (goggles) worn when
operating the machine.
LOCATION
IC5 & D1
Hazards
Vacuum Forming Machines
 Fumes can be inhaled.
 Overheated plastics can cause burns or a fire.
 The pressure tank can fail and cause injury.
LOCATION
ALL
IC5 & D4
Hazards
IC5
 Simple heat output controls should be provided.
 Guarding should be provided.
 Heat resistant gloves should be worn.
Oven
 Fumes can be inhaled.
 Hot surfaces can cause burns.
LOCATION
 The heater system should be shielded or guarded
against accidental contact. The moving heater
system should be mechanically attached to the
machine.
 It should be possible to regulate the output from
the heater system.
 Vacuum forming machines should not be left
unattended when plastics are being heated.
Strip Heaters and Line Bending Heaters
RISK LEVEL LOW
Hazards
Risk Control Measures
 Fumes can be inhaled.
 Hot plastics and hot surfaces can cause burns.
 Unstable equipment or work pieces can cause
injury.
 Strip heaters present an electric shock hazard.
LOCATION
Blow Moulder
Hazards
IC5 & D2
Hazards
IC5 & D2
Hazards
RISK LEVEL LOW
Risk Control Measures
 The appropriate material should be used at all
times.
Forging and Brazing
 Care should be taken when carrying hot metals.
 Clay bricks should not be heated as they can
disintegrate violently.
 Ceramic chips remain hot for a considerable time
after the heat source has been removed.
 Quenching of hot metals, particularly tubular
components can present a risk of scalding.
LOCATION
RISK LEVEL LOW
Risk Control Measures
 The oven chamber should be kept clean at all
times.
 Heat resistant gloves should be worn.
 Fumes can be inhaled.
 Hot plastics and hot surfaces can cause burns.
 Unstable equipment or work pieces can cause
injury.
LOCATION
RISK LEVEL LOW
Risk Control Measures
RISK LEVEL
Risk Control Measures
MID
 Firebrick or other refractory materials should be
used for the brazing base.
 Appropriate personal protective equipment should
be used. Fire resistant aprons, gloves, face
protection and sturdy protective footwear should
be used.
 Hot metal should be held using appropriately
shaped tongs.
Welding and welding Installations
RISK LEVEL HIGH
Risk Control Measures
 Compressed oxygen cylinders if damaged or
involved in a fire can explode violently.
 Oxygen leaks make fires burn quicker and more
violently.
 Cylinders of acetylene gas can explode violently if
involved in a fire. Acetylene gas leaks can form an
explosive mixture inside buildings.
 Welding equipment can present an electric shock
hazard.
 Welding areas must be separated from other work
areas by fixed or portable screens.
 Welding areas should be kept free of combustible
materials and flammable liquids.
 A good level of general ventilation should be
provided.
 Welded materials should be put in a safe place to
cool.
 Appropriate goggles or shields should be worn.
LOCATION
IC5 & D2
Welding and welding Installations cont… RISK LEVEL HIGH
Hazards
Risk Control Measures




Sparks can cause burns to skin, eyes and clothes.
Hot metal components can cause burns.
Chipping or cleaning welds can lead to eye injuries.
Ultraviolent and infra red radiation can cause ‘arc
eye’.
 Welding can present a fire hazard.
 Explosive vapours can form inside containers that
have contained flammable liquids.
 Hazardous fumes can be produced.
LOCATION
IC5 & D2
Hazards
Casting
 Hot molten metal can present a hazard.
 Molten metal in contact with moisture on moulds
and equipment can cause an explosion.
 A violent reaction can occur between molten
aluminium and various metallic oxides.
 Degassing tablets cause fumes that can be harmful
if inhaled.
 Some molten metals can give off harmful fumes.
LOCATION
ALL
 Appropriate personal protective equipment should
be used. Fire resistant aprons, gloves, face
protection and sturdy protective footwear should
be used.
 Appropriate personal protective equipment should
be used. Fire resistant aprons, gloves, face
protection and sturdy protective footwear should
be used.
 Crucibles should be preheated before use to avoid
cracking and to remove moisture.
Low Temperature Casting
Hazards
 Molten metal in contact with moisture on moulds
and equipment can cause an explosion.
 Some molten metals can give off harmful fumes.
 Hot metal can cause burns.
 Unstable equipment or work pieces can cause
injury.
 The equipment can present an electric shock
hazard.
LOCATION
IC7
Hazards
LOCATION
IC3 & D7
Hazards
RISK LEVEL
Risk Control Measures
MID
 Appropriate personal protective equipment should
be used.
 Skin contact should be avoided.
Laser Cutters
 The equipment can present an electric shock
hazard.
 Leads could be tripped over.
 Fumes from materials being cut might be harmful.
 Looking into the light source when working on
reflective materials might be harmful.
 Moving parts might present a tripping hazard.
RISK LEVEL LOW
Risk Control Measures
 Appropriate personal protective equipment should
be used.
 Crucibles should be preheated before use to avoid
cracking and to remove moisture.
Electronic Circuit Board Etching
 Ferric chloride is irritant and harmful.
 Sodium persulfate is an oxidising agent and an
irritant.
RISK LEVEL HIGH
Risk Control Measures
RISK LEVEL LOW
Risk Control Measures
LOCATION
IC6
CNC Controlled Router
Hazards
 Contact with revolving cutters can present a
hazard.
 Long hair and loose clothing can become
entangled with rotating cutters or arbors.
 Broken cutters, waste and work pieces can be
violently ejected.
 Wood dust can be inhaled.
 Closing movement between parts, under power
feed, can result in finger trapping.
 Heavy objects such as vices and index fixtures can
fall from the table.
 CNC routing machines can present a hazard of
electrical shock.
 Sharp edges on tools, work pieces and swarf can
cause cuts.
 Inadvertent starting of the machine can present a
hazard.
 Lack of space around the machine can lead to the
operator being pushed by passers-by.
 Slippery floor surfaces or loose items around the
machine can cause slips that result in contact with
moving parts.
 Contact with cutting fluids, oil and grease can
irritate the skin.
LOCATION
IC6
 Long hair and loose clothing can become
entangled with rotating cutters or arbors.
 Work pieces, chuck keys, broken cutters, waste
and work pieces can be violently ejected.
 Closing movement between parts, under power
feed, can result in finger trapping.
 CNC routing machines can present a hazard of
electrical shock.
 Sharp edges on tools, work pieces and swarf can
cause cuts.
 Inadvertent starting of the machine can present a
hazard.
 Lack of space around the machine can lead to the
operator being pushed by passers-by.
 Slippery floor surfaces or loose items around the
machine can cause slips that result in contact with
moving parts.
 Contact with cutting fluids, oil and grease can
irritate the skin.
LOCATION
ALL
Adhesives
Hazards
 Adhesives in contact with the eyes can cause
permanent injury.
 Adhesives in contact with the skin can cause
irritation. Hot adhesives can cause burns.
 Inhalation of solvents, fumes and vapours can
present a hazard and can cause respiratory
sensitization. Adhesives containers can spill or
leak. Adhesives vapours can be highly flammable.
MID
 A means of electrical isolation using a fused
switch-disconnector on or adjustment to the
machine, and that it is controlled by a starter
incorporating overload protection.
 A conveniently positioned mushroom headed stop
button or other suitable control device that can
quickly stop the machine in an emergency.
 Fixed guards, or alternatively interlocked guards
that enclose the drive mechanisms.
 There should be sufficient space around the
machine to prevent the operator from being
accidentally pushed by passers-by.
 Eye protection (goggles) worn when operating the
machine, long hair should be tied back and
protected from entanglement. Loose clothing and
jewellery should be tucked in / removed.
 The machine should be electrically isolated before
any internal mechanisms are adjusted.
 Suitable implements should be used to remove
swarf to avoid hand contact.
CNC Controlled Centre Lathe
Hazards
RISK LEVEL
Risk Control Measures
RISK LEVEL
Risk Control Measures
MID
 A means of electrical isolation using a fused
switch-disconnector on or adjustment to the
machine, and that it is controlled by a starter
incorporating overload protection.
 A conveniently positioned mushroom headed stop
button or other suitable control device that can
quickly stop the machine in an emergency.
 Fixed guards, or alternatively interlocked guards
that enclose the drive mechanisms.
 There should be sufficient space around the
machine to prevent the operator from being
accidentally pushed by passers-by.
 Eye protection (goggles) worn when operating the
machine, long hair should be tied back and
protected from entanglement. Loose clothing and
jewellery should be tucked in / removed.
 The machine should be electrically isolated before
any internal mechanisms are adjusted.
RISK LEVEL LOW
Risk Control Measures
 Adhesives should be used in accordance with the
manufacturer’s instructions.
 Sufficient ventilation should be provided, in
accordance with the manufacturers
recommendations.
 Local exhaust ventilation should be provided if
required.
LOCATION
ALL
Acrylic Cement
Hazards
 Inhalation of acrylic cement vapour can present a
hazard. Vapours can irritate the eyes, skin and
respiratory tract.
 Methyl methacrylate is a respiratory sensitizer.
 Acrylic cement vapour is flammable and potentially
explosive in air.
RISK LEVEL LOW
Risk Control Measures
 Sufficient ventilation should be provided.
 Suitable eye protection should be worn. Students
with sensitive skin should wear gloves.
 Acrylic cement should only be used for a short
time.
 Work should be carried out well away from any
source ignition.
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