Sigma 900 MAX All Weather Refrigerated Sampler

Sigma 900 MAX All Weather Refrigerated Sampler
MAN026.53.90027
Sigma 900 MAX All Weather Refrigerated Sampler
USER MANUAL
July 2014, Edition 2
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Table of Contents
Section 1 Specifications ........................................................................................................... 7
Section 2 General information ............................................................................................... 13
2.1 Safety information ....................................................................................................................... 13
2.1.1 Use of hazard information.................................................................................................. 13
2.1.2 Precautionary labels .......................................................................................................... 13
2.2 Hazardous locations ................................................................................................................... 14
2.2.1 Confined space precautions .............................................................................................. 15
2.2.2 Definition of a confined space............................................................................................ 15
2.2.3 Certification ........................................................................................................................ 15
2.2.3.1 Canadian Radio Interference-Causing Equipment Regulation, IECS-003, Class A . 15
2.2.3.2 FCC Part 15, Class "A" Limits................................................................................... 15
Section 3 Introduction ............................................................................................................17
3.1 Controller cover........................................................................................................................... 17
3.2 Optional AC battery backup ........................................................................................................ 18
3.3 Controller compartment heater ................................................................................................... 18
3.4 Refrigeration compartment door ................................................................................................. 18
3.5 Interface connectors ................................................................................................................... 19
3.5.1 Receptacle caps ................................................................................................................ 20
3.6 Front panel.................................................................................................................................. 20
3.6.1 Keypad description ............................................................................................................ 21
3.6.2 Liquid crystal display.......................................................................................................... 22
3.6.3 Internal humidity indicator .................................................................................................. 22
Section 4 Installation ..............................................................................................................23
4.1 Unpacking the instrument ........................................................................................................... 23
4.2 Sampler installation..................................................................................................................... 25
4.3 Installing the pump tube in the sensor body ............................................................................... 28
4.3.1 Attaching the intake line..................................................................................................... 30
4.3.2 Setting up the intake line and strainer................................................................................ 31
4.4 Sampler preparation ................................................................................................................... 33
4.4.1 Clean the sample bottles ................................................................................................... 33
4.4.2 Single bottle installation ..................................................................................................... 33
4.4.2.1 Full bottle shut-off installation.................................................................................... 33
4.5 Choosing bottle and retainer configurations ............................................................................... 34
4.6 Setting up the bottles .................................................................................................................. 36
4.6.1 One-bottle sampling........................................................................................................... 36
4.6.2 Two- and four-bottle sampling ........................................................................................... 36
4.6.4 Twenty four-bottle sampling............................................................................................... 38
4.7 Installing the distributor ............................................................................................................... 38
4.7.1 Distributor arm alignment................................................................................................... 39
4.8 Installing the full-bottle shut-off device........................................................................................ 41
4.9 Power connections...................................................................................................................... 42
4.9.1 AWRS power connections ................................................................................................. 43
4.10 Auxiliary receptacle pin identification ........................................................................................ 43
4.10.1 Splitter interface ............................................................................................................... 44
Section 5 Basic programming setup .....................................................................................45
5.1 Initial power-up of sampler.......................................................................................................... 45
5.2 Basic programming setup ........................................................................................................... 45
5.3 Advanced sampling..................................................................................................................... 59
Section 6 Sensor setup........................................................................................................... 71
6.1 Downlook ultrasonic sensor ........................................................................................................ 71
6.2 Downlook ultrasonic sensor connection...................................................................................... 71
6.2.1 Downlook ultrasonic sensor programming......................................................................... 71
3
6.2.2 Downlook ultrasonic sensor calibration ..............................................................................71
6.2.2.1 Liquid depth ...............................................................................................................71
6.2.2.2 Sensor height ............................................................................................................72
6.2.2.3 Setting the invisible range .........................................................................................72
6.3 Submerged area/velocity sensor.................................................................................................73
6.3.1 Submerged area/velocity sensor programming..................................................................73
6.4 Submerged pressure sensor .......................................................................................................73
6.4.1 Submerged pressure sensor connection............................................................................74
6.4.2 Submerged pressure sensor programming ........................................................................74
6.4.3 Submerged pressure sensor calibration.............................................................................74
6.5 Thermal sensor ...........................................................................................................................76
6.5.1 Thermal sensor programming ............................................................................................76
6.5.2 Thermal sensor calibration .................................................................................................76
Section 7 Optional device installation...................................................................................77
7.1 Rain gauge ..................................................................................................................................77
7.1.1 Rain gauge programming ...................................................................................................78
7.2 pH probe......................................................................................................................................78
7.2.1 pH probe connection ..........................................................................................................78
7.2.2 pH probe programming.......................................................................................................79
7.2.3 pH probe calibration ...........................................................................................................80
7.3 ORP probe ..................................................................................................................................80
7.3.1 ORP probe connection .......................................................................................................81
7.3.2 ORP probe programming ...................................................................................................81
7.3.3 ORP probe calibration ........................................................................................................81
7.3.3.1 ORP preamplifier/junction box calibration .................................................................81
Section 8 Communication setup............................................................................................83
8.1 RS232 cable................................................................................................................................83
8.1.1 RS232 connection ..............................................................................................................83
8.1.2 RS232 programming ..........................................................................................................83
8.2 4–20 mA option ...........................................................................................................................84
8.2.1 4–20 mA programming .......................................................................................................84
8.2.2 4–20 mA calibration............................................................................................................85
8.3 Alarm relays ................................................................................................................................86
8.3.1 Alarm relays connection .....................................................................................................87
8.3.2 Alarm relays programming .................................................................................................88
8.3.2.1 Trouble alarms...........................................................................................................88
8.3.2.2 Set Point alarms ........................................................................................................89
8.4 Analog inputs...............................................................................................................................90
8.4.1 Analog inputs connection ...................................................................................................90
8.4.2 Analog inputs programming................................................................................................91
Section 9 Maintenance............................................................................................................93
9.1 Cleaning the sampler ..................................................................................................................93
9.1.1 Cleaning the refrigerator.....................................................................................................93
9.1.2 Cleaning the sampler cabinet .............................................................................................93
9.1.3 Cleaning the sample bottles ...............................................................................................93
9.1.4 No lubrication required .......................................................................................................93
9.2 Adjusting the refrigeration compartment door (AWRS only) .......................................................94
9.3 Pump tubing maintenance...........................................................................................................94
9.3.1 Tubing Life Estimates .........................................................................................................94
9.3.2 Replacing pump tubing.......................................................................................................96
9.4 Distributor arm tubing replacement .............................................................................................96
9.5 Upgrades, repairs, general maintenance ....................................................................................97
9.5.1 Electrostatic discharge (ESD) considerations ....................................................................97
4
9.6 Internal maintenance items......................................................................................................... 97
9.7 Removing and opening the controller ......................................................................................... 98
9.8 Re-installing the bottom panel .................................................................................................... 99
9.9 Fuse replacement information .................................................................................................. 100
9.10 Motor/gear box........................................................................................................................ 101
9.11 Internal desiccant module ....................................................................................................... 101
9.12 Memory battery ....................................................................................................................... 101
9.13 Resetting the circuit breaker ................................................................................................... 101
Section 10 Replacement parts and accessories ................................................................103
10.1 Replacement parts.................................................................................................................. 103
10.2 Base/bottle tray, composite/multiple sampling accessories.................................................... 104
Index ....................................................................................................................................... 105
5
6
Section 1
Specifications
Specifications are subject to change without notice.
General
Dimensions (W x D x H)
76 x 81 x 130 cm (30 x 32 x 51 in.) Refer to Figure 1 on
page 12.
Weight
86 kg (190 lb)
Enclosure
IP24, low-density polyethylene with UV inhibitor
Power requirements (includes compressor)
115 VAC, 60 Hz, 4.2 A or 6.4 A with optional controller
compartment heater
230 VAC, 50 Hz, 2.7 A or 4.1 A with optional controller
compartment heater
AC power backup (optional)
Pump/Controller only: Rechargeable 7 amp-hour gel lead
acid battery takes over automatically with ac line power
failure. Integral trickle charger maintains battery at full charge.
Internal battery
Three AA alkaline batteries maintains program logic and real
time clock for 5 years.
Overload protection
Controller: 5 A DC circuitry fuse
115 VAC: 7.5 A circuit breaker
230 VAC: 5.0 A circuit breaker
Compressor
1/5 HP
115 VAC: 115 °C (239 °F) thermal overload protector, 7.1
locked rotor amps
230 VAC: 120 °C (248 °F) thermal overload protector, 7.6 A
peak start current
Operating temperature
0 to 50 °C (32 to 122 °F)
With AC battery backup: 0 to 40 ºC (32 to 104 ºF)
With controller compartment heater: –40 to 50 °C (–40 to 122
°F)
With controller compartment heater and AC battery backup:
-15 to 40 ºC (5 to 104 ºF)
Relative humidity
0–95%
Temperature range
As is: 0 to 50 ºC
With AC battery back up: 0 to 40 ºC (32 to 104 ºF)
With optional controller compartment heater: -40 to 50 ºC (-40
to 122 ºF)
With AC battery backup and controller compartment heater:
-15 to 40 ºC (5 to 104 ºF)
Recovery time
Sampler temperature recovers to 4 ºC within 5 minutes after
the door has been held open for one minute in 24 ºC (75 ºF)
ambient environment while in an active cooling cycle.
Pull-down time
Air temperature drops from 24 ºC (75 ºF) to 4 ºC (39 ºF) within
20 minutes (typical).
Thermal system
Top mounted compressor/condenser with fan forced air
cooled condenser; 3 sided wrap-around evaporator plate;
rigid foam insulation; microprocessor controlled thermostat
maintains sample liquid at 4 °C (±1 °C); frost free;
compression gasket door seal; air cooled condenser is
protected against corrosion with a food grade epoxy; all
exposed copper tubing is insulated to avoid sweating and
condensation.
Installation category, pollution degree
II, 2
Protection class
I
Altitude
2000 m (6562 ft)
7
Specifications
Control panel
21 key membrane switch keypad with 4 multiple function soft
keys; 8 line x 40 character alphanumeric, back-lit
liquid-crystal graphics display. Self prompting/menu driven
program.
Data logging
Records program start time and date, stores up to 400
sample collection times/dates, all program entries,
operational status including number of minutes or pulses to
next sample, bottle number, number of samples collected,
number remaining, sample identification number, and all
logged data (i.e. level, flow, pH, stream temperature,
refrigerated compartment sample temperature, ORP, rainfall,
and any externally logged data - up to 7 external channels).
Also, up to 200 events are logged, including alarm conditions,
program run/stop events, etc.
Set point sample trigger
When equipped with integral flow meter or
pH/temperature/ORP meter...sampling can be triggered upon
an upset condition when field selectable limits are exceeded.
Concurrent with normal sampling routine, sample liquid is
deposited in designated “trouble bottle(s)”.
Sampling modes
Multiple Bottle Time, Multiple Bottle Flow, Composite Multiple
Bottle Time, Composite Multiple Bottle Flow, Composite Time,
Composite Flow, Flow with Time Override, Variable Interval,
Start/Stop, and Level Actuation.
Program delay
Three formats: (1) 1-9,999 minutes or flow pulses in one unit
increments (2) programmable sampler start time/date, and (3)
programmable time/day of week.
Diagnostics
Tests keypad, display, ROM, pump, and distributor.
Program lock
Access code protection precludes tampering.
Communications
EPROM flash memory
Via RS232. Permits embedded software upgrades in the field.
Serial interface
RS232 compatible; allows on-site collection of stored data.
Sample bottle capacity
Bottle capacity
(24) 1-L polyethylene and/or 350 mL glass bottles. (8) 2.3-L
polyethylene and/or 1.9-L glass bottles. (4) 2.5-gal
polyethylene and/or 2½-gal glass bottles. (2) 3-gal
polyethylene and/or 2½-gal glass bottles, (1) 5.5-gal
polyethylene.
Certifications
North America
cETLus listed - Conforms to UL 61010-1, Certified to CSA
C22.2. No. 61010-1
Sampling features
Multiple programs
Stores up to five separate sampling programs.
Cascade
Allows using two samplers in combination where the first
sampler at the completion of the program initiates the second.
Upset sampling
When equipped with integral flow meter,
pH/temperature/ORP meter, conductivity, and/or D.O.
monitoring options... Sampling can be triggered upon an
upset condition when field selectable limits are exceeded,
concurrent with normal sampling routine, sample liquid is
deposited in designated “trouble bottle(s)”. Can also be
triggered from an external trigger.
Status output
Alerts operator to low main battery, low memory power,
plugged intake, jammed distributor arm, sample collected,
and purge failure.
8
Specifications
Automatic shutdown
Multiple Bottle Mode: After complete revolution of distributor
arm (unless Continuous Mode selected). Composite Mode:
After preset number of samples have been delivered to
composite container, from 1–999 samples, or upon full
container.
Sample volume
Programmed in milliliters, in one mL increments from 10 to
9,999 mL.
Sample volume repeatability
±5% typical
Interval between samples
Time Proportional Sampling: Format: Selectable in single
increments from 1 to 9,999 minutes in one minute increments.
Flow Proportional Sampling: Continuous Volume, Variable
Time (CVVT):1–9999 units of flow volume, where units are
whatever is set up for in the integral flow option or-1–9999
external-meter flow pulses (momentary contact closure 25
msec or 5–12 V dc pulse; 4–20 mA interface optional)
Flow Proportional Sampling: Constant Time, Variable Volume
(CTVV):
Format: 999: 00 hrs:min.Selectable in 1-minute increments of
1 to 59,940 minutes.
Multiplex (multiple bottle mode)
Programming allows multiple samples per bottle and/or
multiple bottles per sample collection.
Sample pump and strainer
Sample pump
High speed peristaltic, dual roller, with 3/8” ID by 5/8” OD
medical grade silicone rubber pump tube.
Pump body
Impact/corrosion resistant, glass reinforced Delrin®
Vertical lift
27 ft maximum
Sample transport velocity
2 ft/sec minimum, at 15 ft vertical lift in a 3/8” ID intake tube
Pump flow rate
60 mL/sec at 3 ft vertical lift in a 3/8” ID intake line
Liquid sensor
Non-wetted, non-contact, ultrasonic
Intake purge
Air purged automatically before and after each sample;
duration automatically compensates for varying intake line
lengths
Pump/controller housing
High impact injection molded ABS; submersible, watertight,
dust tight, corrosion & ice resistant
Internal clock
Indicates real time and date; 0.007% time base accuracy.
Manual sample
Initiates a sample collection independent of program in
progress.
Intake rinse
Intake line automatically rinsed with source liquid prior to
each sample, from 0 to 3 rinses.
Intake retries
Sample collection cycle automatically repeated 0–3 times if
sample is not obtained on initial attempt.
Intake tubing
¼” and 3/8” ID vinyl or 3/8” ID Teflon* lined polyethylene with
protective outer cover.
Intake strainers
Choice of Teflon® and 316 stainless construction, and all 316
stainless steel in standard size and low profile for shallow
depth applications.
9
Specifications
Factory Installed Options
pH/temperature/ORP meter
Control/logging
Field selectable to log pH/temperature or ORP independent
of sample operation or to control sample collection in
response to volume exceeding low/high setpoints.
pH/temperature sensor
Temperature compensated; impact resistant ABS plastic
body.
Combination electrode with porous Teflon®-junction.
Measurement range
0 to 14 pH, -10 to 105 °C
Operating temperature
-18 to 80 °C (0 to 176 °F)
Dimensions
1.9 cm dia. × 15.2 cm long (0.75 in. × 6 in.) with 1.9 cm (0.75
in.) mpt cable end.
Rain gauge input
General Information
For use with Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge. The Sampler
Program can be initiated upon field selectable rate of rain.
Sampler records rainfall data. Each tip = 0.25 mm (0.01in.) of
rain.
4–20mA output
General information
Up to 2 output signals available. User assignable.
Maximum resistive load
600 ohms
Output voltage
24 V dc—no load
Insulation voltage
Between flow meter and 4–20 mA output—2500 V ac.
Between the two 4–20 mA outputs—1500 V ac.
Alarm relays
General Information
Four form C relays, rated 28Vrms, 5A maximum. When user
assigned alarm values are set, the alarm will trip within ± 1%
of full scale error.
Downhook ultrasonic sensor 40 kHz
Accuracy
0.003 m (±0.01 ft)
Maximum range
3.35 m (11 ft) with a 3.05 m (10 ft) span
Deadband
38 cm (15 in.) maximum, self-minimizing
Material
PVC housing with Buna-N acoustic window.
Cable
4 conductor with integral stainless steel support cable
Submerged depth sensor
Material
316 stainless steel body with titanium diaphragm
Cable
Polyurethane sensor cable with air vent.
Cable length
7.6 m (25 ft) standard
Sensor dimensions
2.54 x 17.2 cm (1 x 6.75 in.) Probe frontal area: 0.875 in.
squared
Temperature error
2.5 psi; 0.004 to 5.75 ft ± 0.006 ft per degrees F
Maximum allowable level
6x over pressure
Operating temperature range
0 to 71 °C (32 to 160 °F)
Compensated temperature range
0 to 36 °C (32 to 96 °F)
Air intake
Atmospheric pressure reference is desiccant protected.
Submerged area/velocity sensor
10
Specifications
Depth measurement
Method
Pressure transducer with stainless steel diaphragm.
Range
-1.52 to 6.10 m/s (-5 to 20 ft/s)
Maximum allowable depth
3x over pressure
Temperature range
Operating temperature range: 0 to 70 ºC (32 to 158 ºF)
Level compensated temperature range: 0 to 70 ºC (32 to 158
ºF)
Note: For temperatures above 40 ºC (104 ºF) add 0.3 cm
/degree C (0.03 in / degree F)
Velocity induced depth error
Compensated based on pipe geometry and flow velocity
Velocity measurement
Method
Doppler ultrasonic
Transducer type
Twin 1 MHz piezoelectric crystals
Recommended range
-1.52 to 6.10 m/s (-5 to 20 fps)
Depth for velocity
2 cm (0.8 in.) minimum, typical
General
Material
Noryl® plastic outer shell with epoxy potting
Power consumption
Less than or equal to 1.2W at 12 VDC
Operating temperature
0 to 70°C (32 to 158° F)
Air intake
Atmospheric pressure reference is desiccant protected.
Cable
Urethane cable with air vent.
Length: 9, 15, 23, and 30.5 m (30, 50, 75, and 100 ft)
Diameter: 0.91 cm (0.36 in.)
Dimensions
2.3 x 3.8 x 13.5 cm (0.9 x 1.5 x 5.31 in.)
11
Specifications
Figure 1 Sampler dimensions
12
Section 2
General information
In no event will the manufacturer be liable for direct, indirect, special, incidental or
consequential damages resulting from any defect or omission in this manual. The
manufacturer reserves the right to make changes in this manual and the products it
describes at any time, without notice or obligation. Revised editions are found on the
manufacturer’s website.
2.1 Safety information
NOTICE
The manufacturer is not responsible for any damages due to misapplication or misuse of this
product including, without limitation, direct, incidental and consequential damages, and disclaims
such damages to the full extent permitted under applicable law. The user is solely responsible to
identify critical application risks and install appropriate mechanisms to protect processes during a
possible equipment malfunction.
Please read this entire manual before unpacking, setting up or operating this equipment.
Pay attention to all danger and caution statements. Failure to do so could result in serious
injury to the operator or damage to the equipment.
Make sure that the protection provided by this equipment is not impaired. Do not use or
install this equipment in any manner other than that specified in this manual.
2.1.1 Use of hazard information
DANGER
Indicates a potentially or imminently hazardous situation which, if not avoided, will result in death
or serious injury.
WA R N I N G
Indicates a potentially or imminently hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in
death or serious injury.
CAUTION
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation that may result in minor or moderate injury.
NOTICE
Indicates a situation which, if not avoided, may cause damage to the instrument. Information that
requires special emphasis.
2.1.2 Precautionary labels
Read all labels and tags attached to the instrument. Personal injury or damage to the
instrument could occur if not observed. A symbol, if noted on the instrument, will be
included with a danger or caution statement in the manual.
Electrical equipment marked with this symbol may not be disposed of in European domestic or public
disposal systems. Return old or end-of-life equipment to the manufacturer for disposal at no charge to
the user.
This symbol, if noted on the instrument, references the instruction manual for operation
and/or safety information.
This symbol indicates that a risk of electrical shock and/or electrocution exists.
13
General information
This symbol, when noted on the product, identifies the location of a fuse or current limiting device.
This symbol, when noted on the product, indicates that the marked item can be hot and should not be
touched without care.
This symbol indicates the presence of devices sensitive to Electro-static Discharge (ESD) and
indicates that care must be taken to prevent damage with the equipment.
This symbol identifies a risk of chemical harm and indicates that only individuals qualified and trained
to work with chemicals should handle chemicals or perform maintenance on chemical delivery systems
associated with the equipment.
This symbol indicates the need for protective eye wear.
This symbol indicates that the marked item is the functional ground connection for cable shield wires.
Do not connect the ground wire of a power cord or conduit to this item.
This symbol indicates a potential pinch hazard.
This symbol indicates that the item is to be protected from fluid entry.
This symbol indicates the presence of a biohazard.
This symbol indicates that the object is heavy.
2.2 Hazardous locations
The Sigma 900 MAX All Weather Refrigerated Sampler is not approved for use in
hazardous locations as defined in the National Electrical Code.
DANGER
Although some Sigma products are designed and certified for installation in
hazardous locations as defined by the National Electrical Code, many Sigma
products are not suitable for use in hazardous locations. It is the responsibility of
the individuals who are installing the products in hazardous locations to determine
the acceptability of the product for the environment. Additionally, to ensure safety,
the installation of instrumentation in hazardous locations must be per the
manufacturer's control drawing specifications. Any modification to the
instrumentation or the installation is not recommended and may result in life
threatening injury and/or damage to facilities.
Important Note: The following information is provided to guide users of Sigma SD900
Refrigerated Samplers, Sigma SD900 All Weather Refrigerated Samplers, and 900MAX
Samplers on the dangers and risks associated with entry into confined spaces.
14
General information
2.2.1 Confined space precautions
DANGER
Explosion hazard. Training in pre-entry testing, ventilation, entry procedures,
evacuation/rescue procedures and safety work practices is necessary before
entering confined spaces.
The information that follows is supplied to help users understand the dangers and risks
that are associated with entry into confined spaces.
On April 15, 1993, OSHA's final ruling on CFR 1910.146, Permit Required Confined
Spaces, became law. This standard directly affects more than 250,000 industrial sites in
the United States and was created to protect the health and safety of workers in confined
spaces.
2.2.2 Definition of a confined space
A confined space is any location or enclosure that has (or has the immediate potential
for) one or more of the following conditions:
•
An atmosphere with an oxygen concentration that is less than 19.5% or more than
23.5% and/or a hydrogen sulfide (H2S) concentration that is more than 10 ppm.
•
An atmosphere that can be flammable or explosive due to gases, vapors, mists, dusts,
or fibers.
•
Toxic materials which upon contact or inhalation can cause injury, impairment of
health or death.
Confined spaces are not designed for human occupancy. Confined spaces have a
restricted entry and contain known or potential hazards. Examples of confined spaces
include manholes, stacks, pipes, vats, switch vaults and other similar locations.
Standard safety procedures must always be obeyed before entry into confined spaces
and/or locations where hazardous gases, vapors, mists, dusts or fibers can be present.
Before entry into a confined space, find and read all procedures that are related to
confined space entry.
2.2.3 Certification
2.2.3.1 Canadian Radio Interference-Causing Equipment Regulation, IECS-003, Class A
Supporting test records reside with the manufacturer.
This Class A digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian
Interference-Causing Equipment Regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de classe A répond à toutes les exigences de la réglementation
canadienne sur les équipements provoquant des interférences.
2.2.3.2 FCC Part 15, Class "A" Limits
Supporting test records reside with the manufacturer. The device complies with Part 15 of
the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following conditions:
1. The equipment may not cause harmful interference.
2. This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may
cause undesired operation.
15
General information
Changes or modifications to this equipment not expressly approved by the party
responsible for compliance could void the user's authority to operate the equipment. This
equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital
device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits are designed to provide
reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a
commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio
frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual,
may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in
a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case the user will be
required to correct the interference at their expense. The following techniques can be
used to reduce interference problems:
1. Disconnect the equipment from its power source to verify that it is or is not the source
of the interference.
2. If this equipment is connected to the same outlet as the device experiencing
interference, connect the equipment to a different outlet.
3. Move the equipment away from the device receiving the interference.
4. Reposition the receiving antenna for the device receiving the interference.
5. Try combinations of the above.
16
Section 3
Introduction
DANGER
Chemical or biological hazards. If this instrument is used to monitor a treatment
process and/or chemical feed system for which there are regulatory limits and
monitoring requirements related to public health, public safety, food or beverage
manufacture or processing, it is the responsibility of the user of this instrument to
know and abide by any applicable regulation and to have sufficient and appropriate
mechanisms in place for compliance with applicable regulations in the event of
malfunctionof the instrument.
The sampler is housed in a low-density polyethylene molded cabinet which is designed
for indoor or outdoor locations. No secondary enclosure is required. The refrigeration
compressor is located on top of the sampler to avoid hydrogen sulfide and other
corrosive, heavier-than-air gases. The microprocessor in the sampler controller runs all
refrigeration and heating operations directly without relying on mechanical thermostats.
No mechanical thermostat adjustments are required. All temperature settings, setup, and
calibrations are performed via the front panel.
3.1 Controller cover
The insulated, lockable top cover protects the controller compartment from extreme
weather as well as unauthorized use. A heavy duty perimeter gasket provides additional
protection from the environment and insects. The lock option (5697700) can be either
factory or field installed. The lock can be engaged when the door is open; it does not
require a padlock (Figure 2).
Figure 2 Controller lid
1
Strike plate on lid
3
Lock handle
2
Controller cover
4
Lock
17
Introduction
3.2 Optional AC battery backup
The AC Battery Back Up is an enclosed 12 VDC battery designed to temporarily power a
sampler when the normal AC power source has failed. The backup battery charge is
restored and maintained by normal operation of the sampler AC power supply.
In the event of a power fail, the optional battery back up will provide power to the
controller and allow the sampling program to continue running. The battery backup does
not provide power to the refrigerated cabinet. The operating temperature for the AC
battery backup is -15 to 40 ºC (5 to 104 ºF).
The battery backup can be factory or customer installed and is available in two models.
Item number 5698200 comes with a 29 in. output cable for SD900 All Weather
Refrigerated and SD900 Portable samplers.
3.3 Controller compartment heater
WARNING
Fire Hazard. Models of AWR Samplers with cabinet heaters may ignite flammable
materials and cleaning solvents. DO NOT use any flammable liquids or materials to
clean or disinfect either the Sampler or any other component under the cabinet
hood of the AWR Samplers. Before performing any cleaning operation, disconnect
the AWR Sampler from its power source. If cleaning of the sampler controller and
pump cannot be done with water, the sampler must be disconnected and moved to
a location outside of the cabinet for cleaning. Allow sufficient time for the sampler
controller / pump to dry before reinstalling and putting it back into service. Do not
attempt to clean the controller compartment heater by spraying it with liquids.
Protect the heater from moisture such as ice and snow.
The optional controller compartment heater provides several benefits in colder climates:
•
Prevents residual liquid from freezing in the pump.
•
Pump tubing stays resilient, prolonging the life of the tubing, pump rollers, motor, and
gear box.
•
Prevents ice and snow from building up on the cover.
•
Keeps LCD functional and electronics from temperature extremes.
The controller compartment heater is a factory installed option and needs to be specified
at the time of order.
3.4 Refrigeration compartment door
The lockable front door opens by pressing the round button in the center of the latch.
When closing the door, flip the latch closed to pull the door tight. Two keys are provided
for the door lock.
Since the door gasket may compress slightly over time, an adjustment screw is provided
to allow the door to be tightened. Loosen the lock nut before making adjustments and
tighten the lock nut when done (Figure 3).
18
Introduction
Figure 3 Door latch
1
Lock nut
2
Door tension adjustment screw
3.5 Interface connectors
Interface connectors are located on the left side of the controller housing.
The sampler comes standard with four interface receptacles:
•
12 VDC (Power Input)
•
Auxiliary (Multi-purpose input/output port)
•
RS232 (Serial communications port)
•
Thermal (Control port for heating and cooling system)
In addition, the sampler can be used with a wide variety of optional devices including
level and flow sensors, rain gauge, pH/ORP, D.O., temperature, conductivity, Modem,
4–20 mA current loop, and three additional analog inputs of 4–20 mA or -4.0 VDC to
+4.0 VDC.
Note: All mains powered equipment that connects to the controller terminals must be NRTL listed.
19
Introduction
1
12 V dc
2
RS232
4
3
Thermal
AUX
Figure 4 Controller housing connectors
1
12 VDC
3
Thermal
2
RS232
4
Auxiliary
3.5.1 Receptacle caps
Interface receptacles are covered with push-on receptacle caps. These caps protect the
connector pins from dirt and moisture and should be attached to any receptacle not in
use.
3.6 Front panel
The front panel of the sampler consists of the keypad, liquid crystal display, and the
internal case humidity indicator (Figure 5).
20
Introduction
Figure 5 Front panel
1
Soft keys
5
Power OFF key
2
MANUAL MODE key
6
MAIN MENU key
3
RUN/STOP key
7
Status bar
4
Power ON key
8
Menu bar
3.6.1 Keypad description
The keypad includes the numeric keypad, soft keys, and function keys.
Numeric keypad
The numeric keypad consists digits 0 through 9, a +/- key, and a decimal key.
Soft keys
Soft keys are blank, white keys located to the left and right of the display.
The appearance of each function key depends on the display. The key is not active when
there is no function displayed. The soft keys appear on the display and point to the proper
soft key to push for that action.
In some cases during a programming step an item from a list needs to be selected. The
soft keys on the right side of the display will change to display “up” and “down” arrows.
Scroll up and down the list of choices.
Power ON/OFF key
Press ON to turn the instrument on. A green light will flash to indicate power is active. To
turn the instrument off, press OFF.
21
Introduction
Function keys
There are three function keys that are used while operating the sampler (refer to Table
1). These functions are dedicated keys to allow quick access. They are the white keys
located just above the numeric keypad.
Table 1 Function key descriptions
Main Menu
This is the starting point to get to any other point in the program. Press the Main Menu key at any time during
programming to return to the Main Menu Screen. The current action is cancelled if changes are not yet accepted.
Manual Mode
Manually controls the operation of the sample pump and the distributor arm.
ADVANCED DISTRIBUTOR soft key: Moves the distributor arm to the user selected bottle. Used to verify the operation of
the distributor or when repositioning the arm if it was moved by hand.
GRAB SAMPLE soft key: Takes a sample in the same manner as when a program is running. Includes all pre-rinses and
sample retries, if programmed.
PUMP OPERATION soft key: Allows manual control of the pump in both forward and reverse directions. Once started, the
pump is stopped by pressing any key.
Run/Stop
Runs (or resumes) a program and stops a currently running program.
3.6.2 Liquid crystal display
Table 2 LCD displays
Menu Bar
The Menu Bar appears in a black band on the top edge of the display. The upper left corner of the menu bar
shows the time and date. The upper right corner shows the name of the current menu (Figure 5).
Status Bar
The Status Bar appears along the bottom edge of the display. The appearance of the status bar changes
depending upon the function performed (Figure 5). The lower left corner of the Status Bar indicates whether a
program is Complete, Running, Halted, or Ready To Start. If it is not needed during a programming step, it
disappears. The lower right corner displays system alarm conditions, such as low memory battery, jammed
distributor etc. For a list of possible alarms refer to section 8.3 on page 86. The status bar also lists the valid
choices when entering certain programming information.
3.6.3 Internal humidity indicator
The internal case humidity indicator (2660) turns pink when the internal case humidity
exceeds 60%.
The sampler is equipped with an internal desiccant module (8849) to absorb any humidity
trapped in the case during final assembly. Under normal operating conditions, this
desiccant provides long-term protection against condensed moisture inside the case.
Replacement of the internal desiccant module is only necessary if the indicator turns
pink. Refer to section 9.11 on page 101 for details.
22
Section 4
Installation
DANGER
This instrument should be installed by qualified technical personnel to ensure
adherence to all applicable electrical codes.
DANGER
Explosion hazard. The refrigerated sampler and all weather refrigerated sampler
are not certified for, nor suitable for use in hazardous classified locations.
DANGER
Potential Explosion, Fire, and Chemical Hazards. This sampler is designed for
collection of aqueous samples only. Collection of non-aqueous samples may
damage the equipment and could result in explosion, fire, and chemical hazards.
The 900MAX sampler automatically collects and preserves liquid samples. The sampler
is suitable for collection of conventional and toxic pollutants and suspended solids.
4.1 Unpacking the instrument
CAUTION
Lifting Hazard (86 kg) (190 lbs). The All Weather Sampler is very heavy and weighs
more than 86 kg (190 lbs). Do not attempt to unpack, carry or move a sampler
without proper equipment and sufficient people to do so safely. Remember, always
lift with your legs, not with your back. Those with a history of back or
cardiovascular problems should not attempt to unpack or lift the sampler.
Remove the sampler from the shipping carton and inspect it for any damage. Contact
Hach Customer Service at 1-800-227-4224 if any items are missing or damaged.
The sampler can be set up for single-bottle or multiple-bottle collection. The components
for each configuration will vary. For single-bottle collection, refer to Figure 6. For
multiple-bottle collection, refer to Figure 7.
Verify packing slip with items received. Optional components are often placed inside the
cabinet during shipping.
23
Installation
Figure 6 Sampler with single bottle
1
Controller
6
Tray, removable
2
Tubing support (8838)
7
Tubing clamp (2x)
8
Tubing connector
Intake tubing, vinyl or teflon-lined
extension1(3527)
3
Tubing
4
Full container shut-off (8847)
9
5
Sample bottle
10 Strainer
1 Not
24
used with 21 liter (5.5 gal) bottle
Installation
Figure 7 Sampler with multiple bottles
1
Controller
6
Tray, removable
2
Distributor assembly
7
Tubing clamp (2x)
3
Retainer1
8
Tubing connector
4
Sample bottles
9
Intake tubing, vinyl or teflon-lined
5
Bottle tray (1511)
10 Strainer
1 Glass
bottles require a different retainer (1056) than shown in the figure
4.2 Sampler installation
Fire Hazard. This product is not designed for the sampling of flammable
liquids. This product is not designed for hazardous locations where combustible
environments may exist.
When evaluating site location, refer to the following guidelines and Figure 8.
•
If the site is located in a confined space, refer to section 2.2.1 on page 15 for safety
information.
•
Make sure the instrument is positioned in a way that allows convenient access to the
power cord plug. The power cord plug is the only means of disconnecting power from
the AWRS.
•
Make sure that the temperature at the site is within the operating temperature range
that is specified for the sampler.
25
Installation
•
Make sure that the intake tube is as short as possible.
•
Maximize the vertical slope of the intake tube from the sampler to the sample source
so that the tube drains completely. This prevents cross-contamination of samples and
tube freeze.
Note: See Setting up the intake line and strainer on page 31 for limitations on transport velocity and
maximum vertical lift.
Note: If site conditions do not permit the intake tube to have a downward slope, or if the line is
pressurized, disable the liquid sensor and calibrate the sample volume.
•
Install the strainer in the middle of the sample stream (not near the surface or the
bottom) to make sure that a representative sample is collected.
•
Install the sampler on a level surface.
•
Secure the AWRS cabinet to its mounting surface using the two anchor brackets
provided and the customer supplied hardware. The instrument comes with two
anchor brackets already installed. An optional kit with two additional brackets
(6613100) can be ordered if the user wishes to secure all four corners of the
instrument. Refer to Figure 9.
Note: A 3/8” bolt or stud or bigger can be used to secure each anchor bracket to the mounting
surface.
•
Use the leveling feet to level the sampler. Turn the leveling feet clockwise to raise
the sampler.
The interior floor of the sampler cabinet is sloped for easy draining. A ½ in. - 14 NPT
female thread is provided on the bottom of the enclosure to direct liquids to a drain or
specific area away from the sampler cabinet.
26
Installation
Figure 8 Mounting configuration
1
Strainer
4
All weather refrigerated sampler
2
Intake tubing
5
Mounting surface
3
Vertical lift
27
Installation
Figure 9 Anchor bracket locations with mounting dimensions
1
Anchor brackets (2x)
2
Optional anchor brackets (6613100)
4.3 Installing the pump tube in the sensor body
Note: Do not stretch the tubing in the sensor body, as this could affect the ability of the sensor to
detect liquid through the pump tubing.
1. Remove the four screws on the pump cover.
2. Remove the front cover of the pump housing. Remove the tubing. Locate the black
dots on the tubing. Route the end of the tube that extends farthest beyond the black
dot through the S-shaped strain relief. Attach this end to the stainless steel tubing
connector. Refer to Figure 10.
3. Install the pump tube in the pump housing so the black dots are visible just outside
the pump body.
Note: Use the proper length of silicone tubing in the pump body. An improper length can reduce the
life of the tubing and pump rollers. Refer to Figure 10 for the correct length.
4. After inserting the new pump tube as shown, reinstall the front cover and secure it
with the four screws until finger tight.
5. Make sure that the tubing extends through the liquid sensor and out of the controller
as shown in Figure 11.
28
Installation
Figure 10 Pump tubing loading
1
To S-shaped strain relief
4
146.1 mm (5 3/4 in.)
2
Alignment dots
5
To sample fitting
3
295.3 mm (11 5/8 in.) tubing in pump
Figure 11 Pump tubing loading
1
Tubing connector
3
Intake tubing
2
Liquid sensor
4
Tubing clamp (2x)
29
Installation
4.3.1 Attaching the intake line
Note: If attaching Teflon® lined tubing using Teflon lined connection kit (2186), refer to the
instructions supplied with the kit.
Attaching the vinyl tubing
The connection kit (2248) contains two identical assemblies, one for connecting vinyl
tubing to the sampler pump, and the other for connecting the vinyl tubing to an intake
strainer. The kit contains four hose clamps and two stainless steel tubing connectors.
1. Push one end of the tubing connector into the vinyl tubing attached to the controller
until the tubing abuts the shoulder of the tubing connector. Secure with a tubing
clamp (Figure 12).
2. Push the other end of the tubing connector into the vinyl tubing until the tubing abuts
the shoulder of the tubing connector and secure with a tubing clamp (Figure 12).
3. Repeat Step 1 and Step 2 for the fitting that connects the vinyl tubing to an intake
strainer.
Figure 12 3/8” Vinyl tubing connector
1
Vinyl tubing to controller
3
Tubing clamp (2 required)
2
Vinyl tubing to strainer or pump
4
Stainless steel tubing connector
Attaching the Teflon®-lined tubing
The Connection Kit for Teflon-lined Tubing (2186) contains two identical assemblies, one
for connecting the Teflon-lined tubing to the stainless steel tubing connector and the other
for connecting the Teflon-lined tubing to the intake strainer. The kit contains six clamps,
two lengths of silicone tubing, and two stainless steel barbed fittings.
To connect the Teflon-lined tubing, refer to the instruction sheet supplied with the
Teflon-lined tubing connection kit.
30
Installation
4.3.2 Setting up the intake line and strainer
Note: If site conditions do not permit the intake to slope downward from the sampler to the sample
source, disable the liquid sensors and calibrate the sample volume using the Timed Calibrate
method when programming the sampler.
For each sampling location, the intake line should be as short as practical, and be free of
any sharp bends, coils, or loops. Install the intake line with a downward slope from the
sampler to the sample source because:
•
This will ensure the complete drainage of the intake line when it is air-purged before
and after each sample, and will help to prevent cross-contamination of the individual
samples.
•
Complete drainage is important in freezing conditions, as any liquid slugs that remain
could freeze and plug the line.
Place the sample intake and strainer in the mainstream of the sampling source, in an
area of turbulent and well mixed flow. Refer to Figure 13.
Note: Vertical lift should not exceed 27 ft.
Also, you must account for the vertical location of the intake. A position too near the
surface may yield excess lighter materials, while a position too near the bottom may yield
excess heavy materials. The constituents of interest must be considered when
positioning the intake strainer.
31
Installation
Figure 13 Installation
1
Strainer
4
All weather refrigerated sampler
2
Intake tubing
5
Mounting surface
3
Vertical lift
32
Installation
4.4 Sampler preparation
CAUTION
Biological sample hazard. Follow safe handling protocols during contact with
sample bottles and sampler components. Disconnect the sampler from power to
disable the pump before handling.
The sampler is set up at the factory with a single bottle or multiple bottle configuration. To
change the bottle configuration:
Determine the components that are required for the selected configuration.
Install the full bottle shut-off device or distributor assembly.
4.4.1 Clean the sample bottles
Clean the sample bottles and caps with a brush, water and a mild detergent. Flush the
containers with fresh water followed by a distilled water rinse.
4.4.2 Single bottle installation
Use a single bottle when one composite sample is needed. A full bottle shut-off signals
the controller when to stop sample collection. Figure 6 on page 24 shows a diagram of
required components.
Prerequisites:
•
One plastic or glass bottle
•
Tubing extension (if using 2.5 gallon bottles)
Installation procedure:
1. Clean the sample bottle as described in section
2. Place the sample bottle in the center of the refrigerator. Bottle position numbers are
molded on the tray.
3. Install the full bottle shut-off (Figure 20 on page 42).
4. Program the sampler.
4.4.2.1 Full bottle shut-off installation
The full bottle shut-off is typically installed at the factory and signals the controller when
the bottle is full. Complete the following steps to replace or install a new full bottle
shut-off.
Prerequisites:
•
Full bottle shut-off device
•
Tubing support and tubing
Installation procedure:
1. Install the rubber grommet into the center hole provided in the cap of the composite
bottle.
2. Slide the full bottle shut-off, float first, into the bottle through the center of the
grommet.
3. Connect the cable on the full bottle shut-off to the bottom of the controller (Figure 20
on page 42). Turn to tighten. Attach cable assembly to twist clip.
33
Installation
4. Slide the slot in the tubing support around the retainer pin on the top inside surface of
the refrigerator (Figure 20 on page 42). Make sure that the tube exits through the
ends of the tubing support.
5. Position the thumbscrew over the threaded hole and hand-tighten to hold the tubing
support in place.
6. Connect one end of the tubing to the inside tube fitting (Figure 20 on page 42).
7. Insert the other end of the tubing into the off-center hole provided in the cap of the
composite bottle.
4.5 Choosing bottle and retainer configurations
A broad range of bottle configurations is available for the Sigma 900 MAX All Weather
Refrigerated Sampler. Refer to Figure 14.
34
732 (24x) 350 mL
GLASS BOTTLES
737 (24x) 1 L
POLYETHYLENE BOTTLES
1118 (8x) 1.9 L (0.5 GAL)
GLASS BOTTLES
657 (8x) 2.3 L (0.6 GAL)
POLYETHYLENE BOTTLES
2317 (4x) 10 L (2.5 GAL)
GLASS CONTAINERS
2315 (4x) 10 L (2.5 GAL)
POLYETHYLENE CONTAINERS
2318 (2x) 10 L (2.5 GAL)
GLASS CONTAINERS
2316 (2x) 10 L (2.5 GAL)
POLYETHYLENE CONTAINERS
6559 10 L (2.5 GAL)
GLASS CONTAINER
1918 10 L (2.5 GAL)
POLYETHYLENE CONTAINER
6494 21 L (5.5 GAL)
POLYETHYLENE CONTAINER
3543R
900 MAX
ALL WEATHER
REFRIGERATED
SAMPLER
8847
FULL
CONTAINER
SHUT-OFF
3527
TUBING
EXTENSION
8838
TUBING SUPPORT
ASSEMBLY with
TUBING INSERT
8843
DISTRIBUTOR
ASSEMBLY
with
ARM (1789)
and 508 mm
[20 in]
TUBE (8852)
1511
BOTTLE
TRAY
8842
DISTRIBUTOR
ASSEMBLY
with
ARM (1785)
and 546 mm
[21.5 in]
TUBE (8850)
1322
RETAINER
8841
DISTRIBUTOR
ASSEMBLY
with
ARM (8822)
and 546 mm
[21.5 in]
TUBE (8850)
1056
RETAINER
Installation
Figure 14 Bottle and retainer configurations
35
Installation
4.6 Setting up the bottles
4.6.1 One-bottle sampling
For single bottle composite sampling, install the Full Bottle Shut-off (refer to 4.8 on
page 41). Place the bottle in the center of the bottle tray (Figure 20 on page 42). The Full
Bottle Shut-off positions the sample tubing over the bottle mouth.
4.6.2 Two- and four-bottle sampling
For two-bottle sampling, install the distributor (Installing the distributor on page 38). Place
the bottles in the Bottle #1 and Bottle #2 positions in the tray as shown in Figure 15.
For four-bottle sampling, install the distributor and place all four bottles in the tray as
shown in Figure 15.
Figure 15 Two or four bottle installation
1
Tray
3
10-liter (2.5-gal) plastic or glass bottles (4x)
2
10-liter (2.5-gal) plastic or glass bottles (2x)
4
Front of sampler
4.6.3 Eight-bottle sampling
For eight or 24-bottle sets, install the distributor (refer to section 4.7 on page 38). Place
the bottles in the tray and install the proper bottle retainer (Figure 16).
Bottle #1 is the first bottle clockwise (looking down on the tray) from the right side of the
tray. Bottle #1 is located on the inside of each bottle tray for all multiple bottle sets.
36
Installation
Figure 16 Eight bottle installation
1
Tray
5
Bottle one indicator wire
2
Bottle tray (1511)
6
Positioner slot for bottle tray
3
2.3-L (0.6-gal) poly or 1.9-L (0.5-gal) glass bottles (8x)
7
Front of sampler
4
Retainer (1322)
37
Installation
4.6.4 Twenty four-bottle sampling
Figure 17 Twenty four bottle installation
1
Tray
6
Positioner slot for bottle tray
2
Bottle tray (1511)
7
Front of sampler
3
1_L poly bottles (24x)
8
350-mL glass bottles (24x)
4
Retainer (1322)
9
Retainer (1056)
5
Bottle one indicator wire
4.7 Installing the distributor
CAUTION
Pinch hazard. Make sure the sampler is powered off before removing or installing
the distributor assembly.
The distributor automatically moves the sample tube over each bottle during multiple
bottle sampling. The distributor assembly is typically installed at the factory. Complete the
following steps to install a new or different assembly.
38
Installation
Prerequisites:
•
Distributor assembly—three assemblies are available. Make sure that the correct
distributor assembly is used. Refer to Figure 14 on page 35.
Installation procedure:
1. Locate the two slots along one edge of the distributor assembly base plate
(Figure 19). Slide the distributor assembly, slots first, under the retainer pins located
on the top inside surface of the controller section.
2. When fully seated, hand tighten the knurled thumbscrew to hold the distributor in
place.
3. Push the distributor tubing on the sampler fitting on the top inside surface of the
refrigerator (Figure 19).
4. Connect the distributor cable to the controller cable. Attach the cable assembly to the
twist clip to ensure the cable does not interfere with the motion of the distributor arm.
5. To make sure that the arm has sufficient freedom of movement, hand-rotate the arm
in a circle (both right and left) until it hits the arm stop. If the arm does not rotate
freely, reposition the tubing to the other side of the arm so that the arm can rotate.
6. Install the silicone distributor tubing to the sample fitting on the top underside surface
of the controller housing.
Note: Do not force the arm past the Arm Stop clip. The Arm Stop keeps the arm from being rotated
more than 360 degrees. This keeps the distributor tubing from kinking.
The distributor tubing should be installed so that the end of the tubing extends out of the
nozzle end of the distributor arm no more than 1/8 in. (Figure 18). Do not let the tubing
extend more than 1/8 in. past the nozzle end of the arm.
4.7.1 Distributor arm alignment
1. Program the sampler for 24-bottle operation.
2. Press START PROGRAM to set the distributor shaft to the
Bottle #1 position.
3. Place the arm on the distributor shaft and align the rib on the inside wall of the control
housing skirt (Figure 19).
4. Secure the arm to the shaft by tightening the 1/8 in. hex-head screw, located on the
distributor arm.
39
Installation
Figure 18 Distributor tubing in arm
1
Nozzle
4
Shaft
2
Distributor arm
5
Tube
3
Distributor motor
Figure 19 Distributor installation
1
Sampler fitting
4
Thumbscrew
2
Retainer pin
5
Arm stop
3
Slots
6
Twist clip
40
Installation
4.8 Installing the full-bottle shut-off device
1. Install the rubber grommet into the center hole provided in the cap of the composite
bottle.
2. Slide the Full Bottle Shut-Off, float first, into the bottle through the center of the
grommet.
3. Connect the cable on the full bottle shut-off to the bottom of the controller (Figure 20).
Turn to tighten.
4. Attach the cable assembly to the twist clip.
5. Slide the slot in the tubing support around the retainer pin on the top inside surface of
the refrigerator (Figure 20). Make sure that the tube exits through the ends of the
tubing support.
6. Position the thumbscrew over the threaded hole and hand-tighten to hold the tubing
support in place.
7. Connect one end of the tubing to the inside tube fitting (Figure 20).
8. Insert the other end of the tubing into the off-center hole provided in the cap of the
composite bottle.
41
Installation
Figure 20 Full bottle shut off installation
1
Inside tube fitting
5
Slot
2
Retainer pin
6
Full bottle shut-off assembly
3
Tubing support
7
Threaded hole
4
Thumbscrew
4.9 Power connections
DANGER
Electrocution Hazard. If the sampler is installed outdoors or in any wet or
potentially wet location, a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) is required. If the
sampler is installed outdoors, over-voltage protection is required.
Note: Install the sampler on its own circuit to ensure a continuous, stable source of power.
Important Note: This product is not intended for use with a split-phase (3-wire,
single-phase, mid-point neutral) AC power system. Use this product only with a 3-wire
(Hot/Neutral/Ground) polarized AC power system. Be sure that access to the power cord
plug is not blocked or obstructed. The AWRS sampler is not provided with a power switch.
The cord plug serves as the local disconnect.
42
Installation
4.9.1 AWRS power connections
DANGER
Electrocution hazard. If installed outdoors or in any wet or potentially wet location,
a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) is required for the sampler. If the sampler
is installed outdoors, over-voltage protection is required.
Important Note: This product is not intended for use with a split-phase (3-wire, single-phase,
mid-point neutral) AC power system. Use this product only with a 3-wire (Hot/Neutral/Ground)
polarized AC power system. Be sure that access to the power cord plug is not blocked or obstructed.
The AWRS sampler is not provided with a power switch. The cord plug serves as the local
disconnect.
•
The AWRS sampler is suitable for outdoor use. The 900MAX controller gets its power
directly from the AWRS sampler.
•
The mains power cord for 115VAC samplers is equipped with a NEMA 5 15P plug for
standard North American outlets. The mains power cord for 230VAC samplers is
equipped with an EU 1-16P plug for standard CEE-7/7 European outlets. If you have
other types of outlets that supply compatible AC power, contact a trained electrical
technician to connect the power cord with a locally-purchased plug, in accordance
with the local safety requirements.
•
All AC mains power connections require a 15A (max) circuit breaker and a good earth
ground for safety and performance.
•
Check the power source to make sure that it satisfies the AC power requirements of
the sampler.
•
Make sure that all electrical installations and connections are in accordance with
national and local electrical codes.
•
Before performing any connection, disconnect the sampler from the power source.
•
If the area is wet or hands or clothing or wet, do not attempt to make any connection
or handle the electrical components of the sampler when connected to the AC line
power.
•
If the circuit breaker or fuse in the AC power source is tripped, determine the cause
before restoring power to the sampler.
•
Make sure the power circuit is grounded and protected with a Ground Fault Interrupter
(GFI).
4.10 Auxiliary receptacle pin identification
F
A
E
B
D
C
Pin A/White (12 VDC)
Powers an external device or flow meter. Must be used in conjunction with Pin B (ground).
Pin B/Blue (Ground)1
Connected to dc ground and is isolated from the earth ground found in the ac power line.
43
Installation
Pin C/Yellow (Pulse Input)
With the sampler in Flow Proportional mode and connected to an external flow meter, a 5 to
12 VDC input pulse lasting at least 25 milliseconds will cause the sampler to decrement one
count. The 12 VDC line found on Pin A can be used directly with a simple contact closure to
Pin C or an external 5 to 12 V dc pulse may be applied providing the ground side of the
external signal is connected to the sampler ground at Pin B. This count is actuated at the
beginning of the input signal (the leading edge of the pulse).
Pin D/Black
(Liquid Level Actuator/
Auxiliary Control Input)
This line is held at 5 V dc inside the sampler. When shorted to ground (Pin B), a signal is sent
to the microprocessor inside the sampler causing it to “wake up” and begin or resume its
sampling program. It can be used in conjunction with a simple level float to actuate the
sampler when liquid is present or to take over after a second sampler has finished its
program. It may also be used with any device (such as a pH meter) that produces a dry
contact output to control the sampler in response to some user-defined condition (i.e. high or
low pH); must be used in conjunction with Pin B.
Pin E/Red (Special Output)
Normally at 0 VDC, this line goes to 12 VDC upon any of the selected events.
Normally an open circuit, this line switches to ground for 90 seconds at the conclusion of the
sampling program. Used to “wake up” another sampler to take over sampling or to signal an
Pin F/Green
operator or data logger upon the completion of the sampling program. This pin is also used to
(Program Complete Output)
signal the bottle full condition in a single bottle/continuous mode, and will transmit the bottle #
to a 950 Flow Meter if the program complete signal is disabled.
1 All
mains powered equipment that connects to the controller terminals should be NRTL listed.
Note: In some installations, it is necessary to connect external equipment to the Pulse input, Special
output and/or Program Complete output vial long cable runs. Since these are ground-referenced
pulse interfaces, there is a possibility of false signalling due to transient ground differences between
each end of the cable. High ground differentials are particularly likely in heavy industrial
environments. In such circumstances, it may be necessary to use third-party galvanic isolators (e.g.
optocouplers) in line with the affected signal(s). For the Current Input, external ground isolation is
not usually necessary because the 4–20mA transmitter normally provides isolation.
4.10.1 Splitter interface
Use the Splitter Interface (939) when more than one of the signals listed above are
needed simultaneously. Connecting the interface to the 6-pin connector on the sampler
provides three additional connectors. Two or more interfaces may be connected in series
to allow for additional connections.
Figure 21 Splitter interface
44
Section 5
Basic programming setup
5.1 Initial power-up of sampler
After pressing the ON key, the sampler performs a complete diagnostic test and displays
the menu shown when the unit was last turned off. Set the instrument programming
features when the Main Menu is displayed. The Main Menu is the starting point for all
programming operations. The Main Menu offers four choices:
•
Setup—Basic and advanced sampling programming
•
Status—Lists all current sampling status, power supply voltage, and values of any
data channels that are enabled.
•
Display Data—Shows graphs and tables of logged data
•
Options—Optional device programming
Setup and Option functions lead to sub-menus and will configure the basic and advanced
features of the sampler. The Display Data and Status Menus lead to sub-menus and will
provide information only. Press STATUS to display any data channels that have enabled
logging (flow, pH, temp., etc.)
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
* MAIN MENU*
DISPLAY DATA
SETUP
OPTIONS
STATUS
READY TO START
5.2 Basic programming setup
Basic programming setup must be performed, step-by-step and in its entirety, after the
instrument is installed. The basic program setup will modify the following items:
•
Bottles
•
Intake Tubing
•
Program Lock
•
Program Delay
•
Sample Collection
•
Sample Distribution
•
Liquid Sensor
•
Sample Volume
•
Intake Rinses
•
Sample Retries
•
Site ID
In addition, several advanced sampling features are found on a sub-menu called
Advanced Sampling. Refer to section 5.3 on page 59 for Advanced Sampling Basic
Programming Setup.
To make changes to the program entries after the basic programming setup, press the
MAIN MENU key and select SETUP, MODIFY SELECTED ITEMS and highlight the program
entry using the up and down keys.
To review all information in the Setup and Option menus without worrying about
accidentally changing the information. Use the Review All Items function to verify that the
program is setup properly.
45
Basic programming setup
1. Press SETUP from the Main Menu to prepare the instrument for use.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
* MAIN MENU*
DISPLAY DATA
SETUP
OPTIONS
STATUS
READY TO START
2. From the Main Menu select SETUP, MODIFY ALL ITEMS.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
* MAIN MENU*
MODIFY
ALL ITEMS
REVIEW ALL
ITEMS
MODIFY
SELECTED ITEMS
READY TO START
3. Press ACCEPT to begin setting up the Bottles.
Step 1 - Bottles
1-A. Enter the total number of sample bottles in the refrigeration compartment, using the
numeric keypad.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
BOTTLES
NUMBER OF BOTTLES:
—
CLEAR
ENTRY
BACKUP
ENTER: 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, OR 24
Note: The bottles may be installed directly in the refrigeration compartment or in the removable
bottle tray when using sets greater than four bottles.
1-B. Press ACCEPT to continue and move to the Bottle Volume menu.
1-C. Enter the bottle volume and select gallons or milliliters using the CHANGE UNITS
key.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
BOTTLES
BOTTLE VOLUME
——
CLEAR
ENTRY
BACKUP
ENTER: 0.500—99.90
1-D. Press ACCEPT and continue to Intake Tubing.
46
CHANGE
UNITS
Basic programming setup
Step 2 - Intake tubing
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
INTAKE TUBING
INTAKE TUBE LENGTH:
_____
CHANGE
UNITS
CLEAR
ENTRY
BACKUP
ENTER: 3—99
2-A. Enter the intake tube length of the intake tubing attached to the sampler. Length
values from 100 to 3000 cm (3 to 99 ft) are valid. Change the measurement unit
using the CHANGE UNITS key.
Note: Intake tube length affects sample volume accuracy, cut the tubing to the nearest whole foot.
Avoid excessively long tubing runs. Doubling the intake tubing length can quadruple the pump tubing
wear if intake rinses or sample retries are enabled. Always locate the sampler close to the sample
liquid source to minimize tubing, pump, motor, and gearbox maintenance.
2-B. Press ACCEPT to move to the Intake Tube Type menu.
2-C. Select the type of intake tube (3/8 in. Vinyl, ¼ in. Vinyl, 3/8 in. Teflon®) using CHANGE
UNITS key.
2-D. Press ACCEPT to select the intake tube type and continue with Program Lock.
Step 3 - Program lock
Note: The program lock password is configured at the factory as “9000” and cannot be changed.
Enabling the Program Lock will provide a protective “password” which will keep
unauthorized personnel from tampering with the instrument keypad.
3-A. Enable or Disable Program Lock using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
Note: When program lock is enabled and a user attempts to make a change in the program, a
screen will ask the operator to enter the password. The operator must enter 9000 and press
ACCEPT.
3-B. Press ACCEPT to continue the basic program setup and continue with Program
Delay.
Step 4 - Program delay
Note: If both Setpoint Sampling and Program Delay are enabled, the program delay is evaluated
first, prior to any checking for
setpoint conditions.
4-A. Enable or Disable Program Delay using the CHANGE CHOICE key. Enabling the
Program Delay will cause the sampling program to delay starting until a user
specified time and day of week are programmed.
47
Basic programming setup
4-B. After enabling the program delay, enter the time and day of week that the program
will begin. Use the soft keys to change the day of week as well as the AM/PM
indicator.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
PROGRAM DELAY
START PROGRAM:
CHANGE
AM/PM
00:00 AM MON
CLEAR
ENTRY
CLEAR
DAY
(USE THE NUMERIC KEYPAD)
4-C. Press ACCEPT to continue with Sample Collection.
Step 5 - Sample collection
5-A. Select the type of sample collection; Time Proportional,
Flow- Proportional Constant Volume, Variable Time (CVVT), or Flow-Proportional
Constant Time, Variable Volume (CTVV).
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
SAMPLE COLLECTION
SAMPLE COLLECTION
_______________
CHANGE
CHOICE
BACKUP
CHOICES: TIMED, FLOW PROPORTIONAL
Timed-proportional sampling intervals
When the program starts, a sample is taken immediately or delayed until after the first
interval has elapsed. Select either, Take First Sample Immediately or After the First
Interval.
Timed-proportional samples are taken each time a user defined time interval has elapsed.
Samples can be continually taken at that interval until the completion of the program.
a. From the Sample Collection menu, press CHANGE CHOICE until Timed
Proportional is displayed. Press ACCEPT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
SAMPLE COLLECTION
SAMPLE COLLECTION
TIMED PROPORTIONAL
CHANGE
CHOICE
BACKUP
CHOICES: TIMED, FLOW PROPORTIONAL
b. Enter the Interval Between Samples. Press ACCEPT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SAMPLE COLLECTION
ACCEPT
CANCEL
INTERVAL:
00:00 (hrs:min)
ENTER: 000:01—999.00 (hrs:min)
48
CLEAR
ENTRY
Basic programming setup
c. Select Take First Sample Immediately or After The First Interval?
Note: When the program is started, the first sample is taken immediately upon pressing the start
button or after the first interval has elapsed.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
SAMPLE COLLECTION
CHANGE
CHOICE
TAKE FIRST SAMPLE:
_______________
CANCEL
CHOICES: IMMEDIATE, AFTER 1st SAMPLE
d. Press ACCEPT to continue to Sample Distribution.
Flow proportional constant volume, variable time (CVVT)
CVVT sampling is a flow-proportional method of sampling. CVVT samples are taken
when a user-defined flow volume occurs in the flow stream. This occurs when the
sampler is programmed to take a sample every time a specified volume of flow occurs in
the flow stream. Specified flow volume intervals can vary with the flow rate of the stream,
therefore varied time intervals can occur when constant (fixed) volume occurs.
Flow volume is determined internally, by the optional integral flow meter or by an external
flow meter.
a. In the Sample Collection, press CHANGE CHOICE until Flow Proportional is
displayed. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SAMPLE COLLECTION
CHANGE
UNITS
ACCEPT
SAMPLE COLLECTION:
FLOW-PROPORTIONAL
CANCEL
ENTER: 1.00 - 99999999
b. In the Flow Proportional menu, press CHANGE CHOICE until Constant Volume,
Variable Time is displayed. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
FLOW PACING
CHANGE
CHOICE
ACCEPT
FLOW PACING MODE:
CONST VOL / VAR TIME
CANCEL
CHOICES: VAR T / CST VOL, CST T / VAR VOL
c. Select either Integral or External flow meter and press ACCEPT.
d. Enter the flow volume between samples and select a unit of measure using the
CHANGE UNITS key, then press ACCEPT. Refer to Table 3 for flow unit choices.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
TAKE SAMPLE EVERY:
1500 gal
SAMPLE COLLECTION
CHANGE
UNITS
CLEAR
ENTRY
CANCEL
ENTER: 1.00—99999999
49
Basic programming setup
Table 3 Sampler pacing flow units
Abbreviation
Volume
gal
gallons
ltr
liters
m3
cubic meters
af
acre-feet
cf
cubic feet
e. Enable or Disable Timed Over-Ride using the CHANGE CHOICE key. Press
ACCEPT, then enter a time period using the numeric keypad.
Note: Select Timed Over-Ride if the flow rate drops to an unusually low value during
flow-proportional sampling and if the sample is collected once an hour for example, even if the flow
interval has not elapsed.
50
Basic programming setup
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
SAMPLE COLLECTION
TIMED OVER-RIDE:
00:00 (hrs:min)
CLEAR
ENTRY
CANCEL
ENTER: 000:01 — 999:00 (hrs:min)
f.
Select Take First Sample Immediately or After First Interval?
Note: When the program is started, the first sample is taken immediately upon pressing the start
button or after the first interval has elapsed.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SAMPLE COLLECTION
CHANGE
CHOICE
ACCEPT
TAKE FIRST SAMPLE:
_______________
CANCEL
CHOICES: IMMEDIATE, AFTER 1st SAMPLE
g. Press ACCEPT to continue to Sample Distribution.
Flow proportional constant time, variable volume sampling (CTVV)
A level-velocity sensor input must be logged and electrically connected for the CTVV
feature to work correctly.
CTVV samples are taken at user-specified constant (fixed) intervals. However the actual
volume of each sampling is based on the known average flow rate of the site, the actual
metered flow rate for each specific interval, the total sample volume desired, the
user-specified collection period, and the specified Sampling Interval. Depending on the
flow volumes of a stream and various intervals within the Collection Period, the volume of
individual sampling can vary. Also, the total sample collected during the entire period can
carry slightly above or below the Total Volume Desired. For these reasons, the
manufacturer advises using a sampling container that has a larger volume than the Total
Volume Desired value.
•
Sample Distribution menus are not available when CTVV is selected.
•
A level-velocity sensor input must be logged and electrically connected for the CTVV
feature to correctly work.
•
The Flow Pacing Mode menu within the Flow Proportional menus sequence will not
remember the previous setting. Whenever you re-enter this menu, it will revert to the
CVVT default. When re-entering this menu, press CHANGE CHOICE to select the
sampling method, CVVT or CTVV.
Example:
This is an example of how the instrument determines sample volume, based on user
inputs and actual metered flow volume.
The user entered values are the following:
•
Average flow rate (historical, site specific): 150 gph
•
Sampling interval: 2 minutes
•
Total sample volume desired: 1500 mL
•
Collection sampling period: 30 minutes
Calculation 1: Total Number of Samples
51
Basic programming setup
Sample Period
30 min.
---------------------------------------------- = ------------------- = 15 samples total within specified period
Sampling Interval
2 min.
Calculation 2: Average Sample Volume
Total Sample Volume Desired
1500 mL
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- = --------------------------------------------- = 100 mL/sample
Total Number of Samples
15 samples Total
Calculation 3: Sample’s Volume per unit of Flow Rate
Avg. Sample Volume
100 mL/Sample
-------------------------------------------------------- = ------------------------------------------ = 0.7mL/gph
Avg. Flow Rate
150 gph
Calculation 4: Actual Sample Volume to be Collected
Sample Volumes per unit of Flow Rate × Actual metered Flow Rate
0.7 mL/gph ¥ 150 gph = 105 mL for this sample interval
a. In the Sample Collection menu, press CHANGE CHOICE until Flow Proportional is
displayed. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SAMPLE COLLECTION
CHANGE
UNITS
ACCEPT
SAMPLE COLLECTION:
FLOW-PROPORTIONAL
CANCEL
ENTER: 1.00 - 99999999
b. In the Flow Pacing menu, press CHANGE CHOICE Const Time/Var Vol appears.
Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
FLOW PACING
CHANGE
CHOICE
ACCEPT
FLOW PACING MODE:
CONST TIME/ VAR VOL
CANCEL
CHOICES: VAR T / CST VOL, CST T / VAR VOL
c. In the Average Flow Rate menu use the numeric keypad to enter the known
historical Average Flow Rate for a particular site.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CONST TIME/ VAR VOL
AVERAGE FLOW RATE:
150.00 gph
CLEAR
ENTRY
CANCEL
ENTER: 1.00—99999999
52
Basic programming setup
d. In the Interval menu use the numeric keypad to enter the time interval between
sample collections. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CONST TIME/ VAR VOL
INTERVAL:
0:02 (hrs:min)
CLEAR
ENTRY
CANCEL
ENTER: 1.00—999:00 (hrs:min)
e. In the Total Volume Desired menu use the numeric keypad to enter the total
volume of the sample. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CONST TIME/ VAR VOL
TOTAL VOLUME DESIRED:
1500 Ml
CLEAR
ENTRY
CANCEL
ENTER: 10—9999
f.
In the Collection Period menu use the numeric keypad to enter the time period for
collecting samples.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CONST TIME/ VAR VOL
COLLECTION PERIOD
0:30 (hrs:min)
CLEAR
ENTRY
CANCEL
ENTER: 000:01—999:00 (hrs: min)
g. Press ACCEPT to continue to Sample Distribution.
Step 6 - Sample distribution
Sample distribution describes the way samples are deposited in a bottle(s). Several bottle
combinations are available with the sampler (Figure 14 on page 35). Sample distribution
is deposited into a single bottle or multiple bottles. Multiple bottle applications use a
distributor arm to automatically aim the sample intake tubing into the proper bottle.
Multiple bottle sets deliver each sample to all bottles or deliver each sample into
individual bottles or a subset of bottles.
53
Basic programming setup
Single bottle
6-A. Select either Stop After Last Bottle or Run Continuously? Stop After Last Bottle
mode stops the program when the sample is deposited into the last bottle. Run
Continuously mode continues running until it is manually stopped.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
SAMPLE DISTRIBUTION
CHANGE
CHOICE
RUN MODE:
RUN CONTINUOUSLY
CANCEL
CHOICES: CONTINUOUS, STOP AFTER LAST
6-B. Press ACCEPT to continue to Liquid Sensor setup.
Multiple bottle sets
Multiple bottle applications use a distributor arm to automatically aim the sample intake
tubing into the proper bottle. Multiple bottle sets deliver each sample to all bottles or
deliver each sample into individual bottles or a subset of bottles.
6-A. Select YES or NO for Deliver Each Sample to All Bottles.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
SAMPLE DISTRIBUTION
DELIVER EACH SAMPLE TO
ALL BOTTLES?
NO
CHOICES: YES, NO
CHANGE
CHOICE
If NO is selected:
a. Select Samples per Bottle or Bottles per Sample.
Example 1: Samples per bottle
•
Bottles—8
•
Sample collection; time-proportional; sampling interval—30 min.
•
Sample distribution; deliver each sample to all bottles?— No
Samples per bottle— Yes
Number of samples per bottle— 3
•
Sample volume—100 mL
Every 30 minutes a sample is initiated. A 100 mL sample is drawn into bottle #1, 30
minutes later a second sample is drawn into bottle #1, 30 minutes later a third sample
is drawn into bottle #1. Thirty minutes later the distributor arm advances to bottle #2
and a 100 mL sample is drawn into bottle #2. The sequence continues until all bottles
are filled. Each bottle receives three samples before the distributor moves to the next
bottle.
54
Basic programming setup
Example 2: Bottles per sample
•
Bottles—4
•
Sample collection; timed proportional; sampling interval—30 min.
•
Sample distribution; deliver each sample to all bottles?—No
Bottles per sample—Yes
Number of bottles per sample—2
•
Sample volume—1000 mL
Note: A high pressure air purge is automatically applied to the intake tube between each sample
intake cycle.
Every 30 minutes a sample cycle is initiated. A 1000 mL sample is drawn into the first
bottle. the distributor arm immediately advances to bottle #2 and a 1000 mL sample is
drawn into the second bottle. Thirty minutes later, the distributor arm advances to
bottle #3, and a 1000 mL sample is taken. The distributor arm immediately advances
to bottle #4 and a 1000 mL sample is drawn into the fourth bottle. The pattern
continues each sample cycle with each set of two bottles receiving a sample each
time.
b. Press ACCEPT to continue with Liquid Sensor setup.
If YES is selected:
Each time a sample is taken it is consecutively placed in all bottles. This allows for
split samples.
a. Select Stop After Last Sample or Run Continuously.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
SAMPLE DISTRIBUTION
RUN MODE:
RUN CONTINUOUSLY
CHANGE
CHOICE
BACKUP
CHOICES: CONTINUOUS, STOP AFTER LAST
b. If Stop After Last Sample is chosen, enter the samples to collect using the
numeric keypad.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SAMPLE DISTRIBUTION
ACCEPT
BACKUP
SAMPLES TO COLLECT:
2
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER: 1 — 999
55
Basic programming setup
Example 1: The following example creates four identical composite samples
automatically if the sampler is programmed as follows:
•
Bottles—4
•
Sample collection; sampling interval—30 minutes
•
Sample collection; samples to collect—25
•
Sample volume—100 mL
Every 30 minutes a sample is initiated and a 100 mL sample is drawn into the first
bottle. The distributor arm advances to bottle #2 and 100 mL. sample is drawn into the
second. This also occurs in bottles #3 and #4.
Sampling will continue every 30 minutes until 25 samples are deposited. Once all
samples are deposited the program will terminate. If Run Continuously is selected the
sampling will restart automatically.
c. Press ACCEPT to continue to Liquid Sensor.
Step 7 - Liquid sensor
The liquid sensor contains a pair of ultrasonic transducers which sense the presence of
liquid inside silicone tubing.
7-A. Enable or Disable Liquid Sensor using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
Note: Sample retries cannot be enabled when the liquid sensor
is disabled.
Enabling the liquid sensor
When the liquid sensor is enabled, the sampler will perform two duties:
•
It senses when liquid reaches the pump during an intake cycle. The pump then
reverses to rinse the line, up to 3 times.
•
It senses the absence of liquid during a sample intake cycle if the intake tubing is
plugged or if the water level has dropped below the level of the intake tube strainer.
This initiates a Sample Retry if programmed
Disabling the liquid sensor/timed calibration
Disabling the liquid sensor turns the liquid sensor off. The sample volume is then metered
using a timed method (Timed Calibration), instead of a
sensed method.
7-B. Press ACCEPT to continue to Sample Volume.
Step 8 - Sample volume
Note: The minimum sample volume is ten milliliters.
When multiple bottles are selected in Bottle Per Sample mode all bottles in a subset
receive a full sample volume. The volume is not divided among the bottles.
56
Basic programming setup
8-A. Enter the desired volume of each sample using the numeric keypad. Press ACCEPT
to continue to Intake Rinses.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SAMPLE VOLUME
ACCEPT
BACKUP
SAMPLES VOLUME:
______
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER: 10 — 9999
Step 9 - Intake rinses
9-A. Enter number of rinses using the numeric keypad.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
INTAKE RINSES
ACCEPT
BACKUP
INTAKE RINSES:
0
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER: 0 — 3
Up to three intake rinses are enabled per sample cycle. After the sample cycle’s initial
purge has been completed, the sample liquid is drawn in until it reaches the liquid sensor.
The pump stops and purges the line before any liquid enters the bottle. This is repeated
up to three times before the actual sample is taken and the line purged for the final time
during that cycle.
Intake rinse can prevent cross contamination of samples. When the line is purged at the
end of each sample cycle, a few droplets of sample liquid may cling to the inside walls of
the tubing and the droplets are drawn in with the following sample. Intake rinses will
condition the intake line with a source liquid that minimizes contamination from the
previous sample.
9-B. Press ACCEPT to continue to Sample Retries.
Step 10 - Sample retries
Note: Excessive intake tube line lengths combined with multiple Intake Rinses and Sample Retries
can increase the pump tube and drive train wear. Locate the sampler as close to the sample liquid
source as possible to minimize wear and maintenance requirements.
10-A. Enter the number of Sample Retries using the numeric keypad.
Up to three sample retries are enabled per sample cycle. After the initial purge is
completed, the sample liquid is drawn until it reaches the liquid sensor. If the sample
liquid does not reach the sensor within a reasonable time (determined using the tubing
length), the sample attempt is aborted, a purge is initiated and the first of up to three
sample retries is attempted.
57
Basic programming setup
After three attempts and no sample liquid has been collected, the cycle is aborted, a
Missed Sample is reported to the Sample History Log, and the sampler begins a new
sample interval.
10-B. Press ACCEPT to continue to Site ID.
Step 11 - Site ID
11-A. Enter a site identification number of up to 8 digits. This Site ID will appear on all data
printouts. This feature is useful when multiple sites are monitored using a single flow
meter or if data readings from multiple flow meters are collected. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SITE ID
ACCEPT
BACKUP
SITE ID:
00000000
CLEAR
ENTRY
(USE NUMERIC KEYPAD)
11-B. After Site ID is accepted the following menu will appear:
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
DO YOU WISH TO
ACCESS THE ADVANCED
SAMPLING FEATURES?
ADVANCED SAMPLING
YES
NO
ENTER: 1 — 999
11-C. If NO, the basic setup program is complete.
Note: To return to the Advanced Sampling options at a later time, from the Main Menu select,
SETUP, MODIFY SELECTED ITEMS, PROGRAM ENTRIES.
4. Highlight Advanced Sampling and press SELECT. In the Advanced Sampling menu
highlight the an item using the up and down keys and press SELECT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SELECT
INTAKE RINSES
SAMPLE RETRIES
SITE ID
ADVANCED SAMPLING
RETURN
11-D. If YES, continue to Advanced Sampling, section 5.3.
58
PROGRAM ENTRIES
Basic programming setup
5.3 Advanced sampling
Advanced sampling choices:
•
Program Complete Output
•
Timed Bottle Sets
•
Setpoint Sampling
•
Upset Sample
•
Special Output
•
Variable Intervals
•
Start/Stop Times
•
Variable Volumes
•
Storm Water
Step 12 - Program complete output
Program Complete Output sends a +12 V dc signal out Pin F of the Auxiliary Receptacle
at the completion of the sampling program. This signal is also sent when a Full Bottle
condition causes the program to complete. The Program Complete signal remains on
(+12 V dc) for 61 seconds and then turns back off (0 V dc).
Program Complete Output is used for the following purposes:
•
Multiple Sampler Operation. Samplers are arranged in a “Cascade” control where the
first sampler signals a second sampler to start its program when the first sampler’s
program is complete. This feature requires the second sampler to be programmed for
external
start operation.
•
To interface to a PC to signal the end of the sampling program.
•
To interface to a relay that trips a signal light in a control room to indicate that sampling
is finished and samples are ready to be picked up.
12-A. From the Advanced Sampling menu highlight Program Complete using the up and
down keys. Press SELECT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ADVANCED SAMPLING
SELECT
RETURN
PGM CMPLT OUTPUT
SETPOINT SAMPLING
SPECIAL OUTPUTS
12-B. Enable or Disable Program Complete using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
12-C. Press ACCEPT to continue to Setpoint Sampling.
Step 13 - Setpoint sampling
Setpoint sampling allows the control of an automatic liquid sampler from one of up to 14
sources. Setpoint sampling defines a set of limits that inhibit sampling until an upset
condition occurs, causing the limits to exceed. Sampling is enabled only when the waste
stream falls outside the setpoints.
59
Basic programming setup
13-A. Highlight Setpoint Sampling using the up and down keys on the Advanced Sampling
Menu. Press SELECT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SELECT
RETURN
ADVANCED SAMPLING
PGM CMPLT OUTPUT
SETPOINT SAMPLING
SPECIAL OUTPUTS
START/STOP TIMES
13-B. Enable or Disable Setpoint Sampling using the CHANGE CHOICE key. Press
ACCEPT to continue.
13-C. Select either Start on Setpoint or Stop on Setpoint by pressing CHANGE CHOICE.
Press ACCEPT to continue.
•
Start on Setpoint will start a program when the setpoint condition is met. The
program continues to run even if the condition falls back within the setpoint limits.
•
Stop On Setpoint halts the program if the setpoint condition falls back within the
setpoint limits and starts again if the limits are exceeded.
13-D. Highlight the desired channel to trigger from, then press SELECT.
13-E. Press either HIGH CONDITION or the LOW CONDITION.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SETPOINT CONDITION:
SETPOINT SAMPLING
HIGH
CONDITION
LOW
CONDITION
Note: Flow Rate of Change and Rainfall are signals that only increase and never decrease in value,
therefore these signals do not require Low Condition.
The external control signal must be configured on the external equipment for the desired
setpoint. An external control device must provide a dry contact and can include a float
switch, push-button, external flow meter, etc. For interface connections refer to
section 4.10 on page 43.
13-F. Enable or Disable the trigger point using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
13-G. Select the desired high or low trigger point using the numeric keypad. Press
ACCEPT to continue. Refer to Table 4.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
SETPOINT SAMPLING
SETPOINT SAMPLING:
HIGH TRIGGER POINT:
00000 in.
(USE NUMERIC KEYPAD)
60
CLEAR
ENTRY
Basic programming setup
13-H. Enter the Deadband value if required or, if programming Flow Rate Of Change or
Rainfall, enter a time interval that the flow or rainfall change must take place (refer to
section 8.3 on page 86).
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
SETPOINT SAMPLING
SETPOINT SAMPLING
DEADBAND:
0.000
CLEAR
ENTRY
(USE NUMERIC KEYPAD)
13-I. Enter a delay when input is active. This delay will keep the program from starting
until the end of the delay period. Using the numeric keypad, enter the delay in
minutes and/or hours. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
SETPOINT SAMPLING
DELAY WHEN INPUT
BECOMES ACTIVE:
(hrs:min)
CLEAR
ENTRY
(USE NUMERIC KEYPAD)
Table 4 Sampling triggers and settings
Channel
Sampling trigger
Settings
1
Level
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
2
Flow
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
3
Flow Rate of Change
High Condition within Time Interval
4
pH or ORP
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
5
Process Temperature
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
6
Rainfall
High Condition within Timed Interval
7
Analog Input Channel 1
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
8
Analog Input Channel 2
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
9
Analog Input Channel 3
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
10
Analog Input Channel 4 or DO
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
11
Analog Input Channel 5 or DO Temperature
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
12
Analog Input Channel 6 or Conductivity
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
13
Analog Input Channel 7 or Conductivity
Temperature
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
14
External Control
Configured in External Equipment
61
Basic programming setup
Step 14 - Special output
The Special Output is a +12 V dc signal that appears on Pin E of the Auxiliary Receptacle
(refer to section 4.10 on page 43).
14-A. Highlight Special Output using the up and down keys on the Advanced Sampling
Menu. Press SELECT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SELECT
RETURN
ADVANCED SAMPLING
PGM CMPLT OUTPUT
SETPOINT SAMPLING
SPECIAL OUTPUTS
START/STOP TIMES
STORM WATER
14-B. Enable or Disable Special Outputs using the CHANGE CHOICE key. Press SELECT to
continue.
14-C. If enabled, select After Each Sample, Only When Pumping, or From Rinse to Purge.
Bottle number
If the Program Complete Output is disabled, then it is used in conjunction with this
Special Output to transmit the bottle number to the connected device.
The Special Output signal can be configured to activate during one of the following
conditions:
62
•
After Each Sample– One second pulse at the completion of each sample cycle. It
signals an external datalogger or PC that a sample cycle was initiated. When this
choice is enabled, the sample success/failure is also transmitted to the external
datalogger by means of Pin F on the
Auxiliary connector.
•
Only When Pumping– During sample intake portion of cycle only, ignoring all purges
and rinse cycles. Used for tipping solenoid or ball valves when sampling from a
pressurized line.
•
From Rinse To Purge– During entire sample cycle, including all purge and rinse
cycles. Used for tripping solenoid or ball valves when sampling from a pressurized
line.
Basic programming setup
Step 15 - Start/stop times
Start/Stop Times start and stop a program at pre-arranged times. For example, this
feature can be used to run a program during weekdays and stop the program during
weekends, restarting on the following Monday. It can also halt sampling for nighttime
shutdowns.
Up to 12 Start and 12 Stop time entries can be set in any one program. Either a Start
Time and Date or a Start Time and Day of the Week may be selected.
15-A. Highlight the Start/Stop Time choices on the Advanced Sampling menu. Press
SELECT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
PGM CMPLT OUTPUT
SETPOINT SAMPLING
SELECT
SPECIAL OUTPUT
START/STOP TIMES
STORM WATER
RETURN TIMED BOTTLE SETS
ADVANCED SAMPLING
15-B. Enable or Disable Start/Stop Times using the CHANGE CHOICE key. Press ACCEPT
to continue.
15-C. Press CHANGE CHOICE to select either Time/Date or Time/Weekday. Select
Time/Date if the start and stop times cover longer than a week. Select
Time/Weekday if the program repeats on a daily or weekly basis.
15-D. Press ACCEPT to continue.
15-E. Enter the Start Time #1, press ACCEPT to continue. Enter Stop Time # and press
ACCEPT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
START/STOP TIMES
PROGRAM START #
(TIME:DAY)
1
CLEAR
ENTRY
CHANGE
AM/PM
CHANGE
DAY
HIT CLEAR, THEN ACCEPT, AFTER LAST ENTRY
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
START/STOP TIMES
PROGRAM STOP #
(TIME:DATE)
CLEAR
ENTRY
HIT CLEAR, THEN ACCEPT, AFTER LAST ENTRY
1
CHANGE
AM/PM
CHANGE
DAY
15-F. Continue entering Start and Stop times until finished. To exit and save entries, enter
a blank time and date. Press CLEAR ENTRY and then press ACCEPT to continue to
Storm Water.
63
Basic programming setup
Step 16 - Storm water
EPA regulations for storm water discharges require monitoring of precipitation, flow, and
water samples in order to assess the impact of storm or snow melt runoff on receiving
waters. The manufacturer can help you create a storm water monitoring system that
consists of a multiple bottle sampler, an external flow meter, and a tipping bucket rain
gauge.
In addition to performing basic sampling routines, samplers that are equipped with the
storm water monitoring program have the following additional capabilities:
•
The storm water sampling routine allows collection of automatic grab sample(s) at
user-selectable timed intervals (up to 24 different intervals may be selected) during
the storm's early stage or “first flush.” First flush grab and main program flow-weighted
composite samples are automatically segregated. The first flush sample volume may
be set independently of the sample volume for the flow-weighted composite.
•
The special storm water program allows an external device to initiate the start of the
sampling program. A dry contact closure across Pins B and D on the Auxiliary
receptacle, held closed for at least 61 seconds, is required.
•
When sampling with multiple bottles, the sampler can be programmed to collect one
large “first flush” sample (or small multiple samples) at timed interval(s). The number
of bottles segregated for the first flush sample is selectable. Concurrently,
flow-weighted samples are collected from the beginning of the storm until all
remaining bottle(s) are filled, or after a user selected time has elapsed.
•
Storm water samplers are equipped with a special pre-rinse that occurs only with the
first sample collection. This “one time only” rinse ensures a clean intake for
installations that may remain dormant for extended periods, and extends battery life
by eliminating the pre-rinse for subsequent samples.
16-A. Highlight Storm Water using the up and down keys on the Advanced Sampling
Menu. Press SELECT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SETPOINT SAMPLING
SPECIAL PUTPUT
SELECT
START/STOP TIMES
STORM WATER
TIMED BOTTLE SETS
RETURN UPSET SAMPLE
ADVANCED SAMPLING
16-B. Enable or Disable Storm Water using the CHANGE CHOICE key. Press ACCEPT to
continue.
16-C. Select a Start Condition using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
64
•
Rain
•
Level
•
Rain or Level (either condition must be met for the program to begin)
•
Rain and Level (both conditions must be met for the program
to begin)
•
Immediate (program starts as soon as the RUN key is pressed, a start condition is
not required)
•
External Trigger (program starts when signaled by an external device at least 61
seconds through the Auxiliary connector. No start condition is required).
Basic programming setup
16-D. Enter the Start Condition Limits. Rainfall times will depend on the historical rainfall in
a specific area. Consult your state or an EPA regional office for details.
Table 5 Start condition requirements
Rain
Enter the amount of rainfall and the time period when it must fall.
Level
Level Limit
Rain and Level
Enter the amount of rainfall and the time period when it must fall, and desired level limit.
Immediate
No start condition required
External Trigger
No start condition required
First flush bottles
First flush describes the initial storm water runoff. This runoff may contain higher
concentrations of pollutants and is sequestered in separate bottles from the flow or
time-weighted composite samples.
a. Enter the number of bottles to set aside for the First Flush portion of the sampling
program using the numeric keypad.
The number of first flush bottles will depend on the sample volume requirements
in your NPDES permit.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
STORM WATER
FIRST FLUSH:
NUMBER OF BOTTLES:
1
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER: 1— 4
b. Enter number of samples to collect using the numeric keypad.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
STORM WATER
FIRST FLUSH:
SAMPLER TO COLLECT:
6
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER 1 — 999
c. Enter the first flush sampling interval. This is the time period between sample
cycles. The first flush samples are usually collected within thirty minutes of the
storm.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
SETPOINT SAMPLING
FIRST FLUSH
INTERVAL:
(hrs:min)
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER: 000:00 — 999:00 (hrs:min)
Variable time intervals may be entered or the same interval may be carried through the
entire first flush. Pressing FINAL ENTRY carries the last displayed interval through the
remainder of the first flush sampling period.
65
Basic programming setup
d. Enter the first flush sample volume using the numeric keypad.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
STORM WATER
FIRST FLUSH:
SAMPLE VOLUME
100 mL
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER 10 — 9999
e. Enable or Disable Program Time Limit using the CHANGE CHOICE key. When
enabled, the Program Time Limit will stop all sampling activity at the end of the
time limit, however data logging will continue.
f.
Enter the Program Time Limit. NPDES requirements typically ask that you monitor
the first three hours of any given storm. If the flow volume was not as high as
expected, flow-weighted sampling could continue for some time as flow rates drop
off and sample intervals
become longer.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
SETPOINT SAMPLING
STORM WATER:
PROGRAM TIME LIMIT:
(hrs:min)
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER: 000:01 — 999:00 (hrs:min)
g. Press ACCEPT to continue to Timed Bottle Sets.
Step 17 - Timed bottle sets
Timed Bottle Sets enables a single sampler to function like multiple samplers. With Timed
Bottle Sets you can take a 24-bottle sampler and sample using the first 12 bottles on the
first day and the second 12 bottles on the next day.
When a subset of bottles is set aside for each user defined time interval the sampler will
treat that subset as if it were the entire set. At the end of the time interval the sampler will
switch to the next subset and continue sampling.
17-A. Highlight Timed Bottle Sets using the up and down keys on the Advanced Sampling
Menu. Press SELECT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SPECIAL PUTPUT
START/STOP TIMES
SELECT
STORM WATER
TIMED BOTTLE SETS
UPSET SAMPLE
RETURN VARIABLE INTERVALS
ADVANCED SAMPLING
17-B. Enable or Disable Timed Bottle Sets using the CHANGE CHOICE key. Press ACCEPT
to continue.
17-C. Select a method for switching bottle sets. Select either clock time that switches
bottle sets every 24 hours or select duration that sets the bottles sets in minutes and
hours.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
66
TIMED BOTTLE SETS
Basic programming setup
ACCEPT
USE CLOCK TIME OR
DURATION:
DURATION (hh:mm)
CHANGE
CHOICE
CANCEL
The number of bottles that were selected in bottles-per-sample mode are used as the
bottle set size. Two bottles per-sample means two bottles per Timed Bottle Set.
17-D. Enable or Disable Continuous Mode using the CHANGE CHOICE key. If Continuous
Mode is enabled the program will continuously run and switch bottle sets after every
specified duration elapses, until manually stopped. If Continuous Mode is disabled,
then the sampling halts when the last bottle set in the tray is full.
17-E. Press ACCEPT to continue to Upset Sample.
Step 18 - Upset sample
Upset Sampling analyzes the collected samples to determine when samples meet or
exceed specified upset limits. The sampler will swing the distributor arm around to a
sequestered set of bottles and grab an upset bottle.
The upset sample bottles are always the last bottles in the tray. For example, if there are
24 bottles in the tray, 4 first flush bottles and 4 upset bottles, then the bottles assignment
is 1–4 first flush, 5–20 main program, and 21–24 upset samples.
Note: Unlike Setpoint Sampling, Upset Sampling can be enabled while the sampler is performing a
regular sampling program. There must be more than one bottle in the sampler to perform Upset
Sampling.
Upset Samples are collected even when there are no more regular samples to be taken;
when the status screen says Program Complete, but the bottom line of the display says
Program Running.
18-A. Highlight Upset Sampling using the up and down keys on the Advanced Sampling
Menu. Press SELECT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
START/STOP TIMES
STORM WATER
SELECT
TIMED BOTTLE SETS
UPSET SAMPLING
VARIABLE INTERVALS
RETURN VARIABLE VOLUME
ADVANCED SAMPLING
18-B. Enable or Disable Upset Sampling using the CHANGE CHOICE key. Press ACCEPT
to continue.
18-C. Press CHANGE CHOICE to select the desired channel to trigger from. Press ACCEPT
to make the selection.
18-D. Press either HIGH CONDITION or LOW CONDITION.
•
Flow Rate of Change and Rainfall are signals that only increase in value and do
not require Low Condition.
67
Basic programming setup
•
The external control signal (such as an external flow meter) must be configured in
the external equipment for the desired setpoint.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
UPSET CONDITION:
UPSET SAMPLES
HIGH
CONDITION
LOW
CONDITION
18-E. Enter the desired high or low trigger point using the numeric keypad. Press ACCEPT
to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
UPSET SAMPLES
UPSET SAMPLING:
HIGH TRIGGER POINT:
00000 in.
CLEAR
ENTRY
(USE NUMERIC KEYPAD)
18-F. Enter the Deadband value or, if programming for Flow Rate Of Change or Rainfall,
enter a time interval when the flow or rainfall change must take place
(refer to Alarm relays programming on page 88).
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
UPSET SAMPLES
UPSET SAMPLING
DEADBAND:
0.000
CLEAR
ENTRY
(USE NUMERIC KEYPAD)
18-G. Enter the number of bottles (out of the total set) to set aside for upset samples.
These will be the last bottles in the tray.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
UPSET SAMPLES
UPSET SAMPLING:
NUMBER OF BOTTLES
2
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER 1 — 4
18-H. Select the method of distribution, Sample Per Bottle or Bottles Per Sample.
68
Basic programming setup
18-I. Enter the sample volume using the numeric keypad.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
UPSET SAMPLES
UPSET SAMPLING
SAMPLE VOLUME:
0000
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER 10 — 9999
18-J. Press ACCEPT to continue to Variable Intervals.
Step 19 - Variable intervals
19-A. Highlight Variable Intervals using the up and down keys on the Advanced Sampling
Menu. Press SELECT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
STORM WATER
TIMED BOTTLE SETS
SELECT
UPSET SAMPLING
VARIABLE INTERVALS
VARIABLE VOLUME
ADVANCED SAMPLING
RETURN
19-B. Enable or Disable Variable Intervals using the CHANGE CHOICE key. Press ACCEPT
to continue.
19-C. Set sample intervals using the numeric keypad. Press ACCEPT to enter another
interval or press ACCEPT AS FINAL to return to the Advanced Sampling menu and
continue to Variable Volumes.
Step 20 - Variable volume
20-A. Highlight Variable Volume using the up and down keys on the Advanced Sampling
Menu. Press SELECT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
TIMED BOTTLE SETS
UPSET SAMPLES
SELECT
VARIABLE INTERVALS
VARIABLE VOLUME
ADVANCED SAMPLING
RETURN
20-B. Enable or Disable Variable Volume using the CHANGE CHOICE key. Press ACCEPT
to continue.
20-C. Enter the Sample Volume counts using the numeric keypad. Press ACCEPT to
return to the Advanced Sampling Menu.
69
Basic programming setup
70
Section 6
Sensor setup
6.1 Downlook ultrasonic sensor
The sampler uses a 40 kHz Downlook Ultrasonic Sensor.
6.2 Downlook ultrasonic sensor connection
The downlook ultrasonic sensor connection is located on the left side of the sampler
cabinet. The gray rectangular box houses the ultrasonic module and the transducer
connector labeled ULTRASONIC. The connector is keyed and can only be inserted in the
proper orientation.
6.2.1 Downlook ultrasonic sensor programming
The downlook ultrasonic sensor does not require specific programming, unless more than
one sensor option is connected to the sampler. When more than one sensor option is
connected to the sampler:
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS, LEVEL SENSOR.
2. Select Ultra-Sonic using the CHANGE CHOICE key, then press ACCEPT.
6.2.2 Downlook ultrasonic sensor calibration
Calibrate the current water level via one of two methods; Liquid Depth or Sensor Height.
An Invisible Range can also be set which allows the transducer to ignore reflections from
obstructions between the sensor and the water surface, such as ladder rungs, channel
side walls, etc. Each method has its own advantages and disadvantages; selecting the
proper method will depend upon the site conditions. Calibrate the ultrasonic sensor each
time the sensor is installed at a new site.
6.2.2.1 Liquid depth
This method requires the level or depth of liquid in the channel that is contributing to flow.
In a round pipe, the entire depth typically contributes to flow. In a weir, only the depth that
is flow over the weir plate contributes to flow. Many flumes have specific requirements.
Level Depth calibration is primarily is used when:
•
Access is available to the primary device for a physical measurement of the liquid
depth, and
•
When water is flowing during installation (channel is not dry).
Note: Always re-check the Level Adjust when re-installing the flow meter.
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS, ADVANCED OPTIONS, CALIBRATION,
ULTRASONIC SENSOR.
2. Select Calibrate U-Sonic using the up and down keys. Press SELECT.
3. Select Standard as the type of Ultrasonic Transducer using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
Press ACCEPT to continue.
Temperature time constant
The speed of sound in air varies with the temperature of the air. The ultrasonic sensor is
equipped with temperature compensation to help eliminate the effect of temperature
variation under normal site conditions. The transducer must be equal to the ambient air
temperature at the site prior to calibration for optimum results. The manufacturer also
recommends that sensors be shielded from direct sunlight for this reason.
4. Enter the ambient air temperature at the transducer location. For optimum results,
allow enough time (100 minutes) to ensure that the sensor is at equilibrium with the
surrounding ambient temperature. Press ACCEPT.
71
Sensor setup
5. Select the Liquid Depth method and enter the new level.
6. Take a physical measurement of the liquid depth (level) and enter the value.
7. Press ACCEPT when finished.
6.2.2.2 Sensor height
This method requires you to enter the distance between the face of the ultrasonic sensor
and the zero flow point in the primary device. The zero flow point in a primary device is
the level at which flow ceases. In a round pipe the zero flow point would typically be the
invert or bottom of the pipe. In a V-notch weir the zero flow point occurs when the liquid
behind the weir is level with the bottom of the ‘V’. (There would still be liquid behind the
weir plate but it would not be contributing to flow). Sensor Height calibration is generally
used when:
•
Access to the primary device is difficult (confined space entry) or
•
There is no liquid flowing during installation of the flow meter.
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS, ADVANCED OPTIONS, CALIBRATION,
ULTRASONIC SENSOR.
2. Select Calibrate U-Sonic using the up and down keys. Press SELECT.
3. Select Standard as the type of Ultrasonic Transducer using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
Press ACCEPT to continue.
4. The speed of sound in air varies with the temperature of the air. The ultrasonic
sensor is equipped with temperature compensation to help eliminate the effect of
temperature variation under normal site conditions.
5. Enter the ambient air temperature at the transducer location. For optimum results,
allow enough time (100 minutes) to ensure that the sensor is at equilibrium with the
surrounding ambient temperature. Press ACCEPT.
6. Select the Sensor Height method and enter the new level.
7. Enter the distance from the face of the transducer to the zero flow point of the
primary device.
8. Press ACCEPT when finished.
6.2.2.3 Setting the invisible range
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS, ADVANCED OPTIONS, CALIBRATION,
ULTRASONIC SENSOR.
2. Select the Invisible Range option using the up and down keys. Press SELECT to
continue.
3. Enter the Distance to End of the Invisible Range.
4. Select either inches or centimeters using the CHANGE UNITS key. The distance must
be greater than the minimum deadband of 9 in. (22.9 cm) for the 40kHz sensor.
5. Press ACCEPT when finished.
72
Sensor setup
6.3 Submerged area/velocity sensor
Submerged Area/Velocity Sensor utilizes a pressure transducer in conjunction with the
Doppler method of velocity measurement to calculate flow in open channels. A small
sensor containing both a transducer and velocity sensor is affixed in the flow stream. The
instrument reads the pressure of the water and converts it to a level reading. The
instrument then calculates the ‘wetted area’ of the flow stream utilizing the user centered
channel shape. Once the wetted area and the velocity are known the following formula is
used:
Area x Velocity = Flow.
See Submerged Pressure 770XXX manual for sensor details.
6.3.1 Submerged area/velocity sensor programming
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS, LEVEL SENSOR.
2. Select Submerged Xducer using the CHANGE CHOICE key, then press ACCEPT.
3. From the MAIN MENU, select SETUP, MODIFY SELECTED ITEMS.
4. Highlight Velocity Direction using the up and down keys. Press SELECT.
5. Set the velocity direction (upstream, downstream, or always positive) using the
CHANGE CHOICE key. Press ACCEPT to continue.
6. Highlight Velocity Units using the up and down keys. Press SELECT.
7. Set the Velocity Units (fps or m/s), using the up and down keys. Press ACCEPT to
continue.
8. Highlight Velocity Cutoff, using the up and down keys. Press SELECT.
9. Read the Velocity Cutoff information screen. Press any key to continue.
10. Set the Velocity Cutoff using the numeric keypad. Press ACCEPT.
11. Set the Velocity Default, using the numeric keypad. Press ACCEPT. Press RETURN to
go back to the Setup Menu or the Main Menu to return to the Main Menu display.
6.4 Submerged pressure sensor
The submerged pressure sensor contains a submerged pressure transducer that
measures level in an open channel flow stream.
The submerged pressure sensor is mounted in the flow stream at the proper location for
level measurement. As the level in the channel increases and decreases, the pressure at
the submerged sensor varies proportionately. The pressure transducer converts the water
pressure to a voltage. The sampler uses the voltage to calculate the liquid level in the
channel. After calculating the level, the sampler then converts the level reading to a flow
rate based on the user-defined characteristics of the installed primary device.
The transducer in the submerged sensor first reads the pressure in the channel, then at
regular intervals, switches to a reference port to compare it to the atmospheric pressure.
This pressure difference is converted to a number which represents the liquid level. At
regular intervals, both the pressure transducer diaphragm and the reference port are
switched to atmosphere together. Then they are electronically zeroed to eliminate any
drift due to changing barometric pressure.
73
Sensor setup
6.4.1 Submerged pressure sensor connection
The submerged pressure sensor connection is located on the left side of the controller
housing and is labeled submerged pressure sensor. The connector is keyed and can only
be inserted in the proper orientation (key up).
Table 6 Submerged level sensor base board connection (J-21)
Pin
Signal Description
Wire Color
A
V+
Red
B
Out +
Yellow
C
Out -
Green
D
Ground
Black
6.4.2 Submerged pressure sensor programming
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS, LEVEL SENSOR.
2. Select Submerged Xducer using the CHANGE CHOICE key and press ACCEPT.
6.4.3 Submerged pressure sensor calibration
To ensure optimum accuracy, calibrate the sampler approximately twice per year or when
changing to a different submerged pressure sensor.
In sites where harsh conditions (extremes of level, temperature, harsh chemicals, etc.)
calibration should be performed more often.
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS, ADVANCED OPTIONS > CALIBRATION,
SUBMERGED PROBE.
2. Choose the orientation that the sensor will be mounted in the flow stream, horizontal
or vertical, using the CHANGE CHOICE key. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
ORIENTATION OF
SUBMERGED PROBE:
HORIZONTAL
CALIBRATION
CHANGE
CHOICE
CANCEL
SELECT APPROPRIATE UNITS
1. Lift the sensor out of the water and hold it in the air in the same orientation selected
(horizontal or vertical) (Figure 22). Then press ACCEPT.
Figure 22 Lifting the sensor out of the water
1
74
Horizontal orientation
2
Vertical orientation
Sensor setup
2. Follow either the vertical or horizontal procedure below.
Vertical orientation only
a. Place the sensor under at least 16 cm (6 in.) of water in a vertical orientation.
Make sure the sensor is stable and not moving around. Then press ACCEPT to
continue.
b. Carefully measure the depth (D1) from the surface of the water to the first weld
mark that encircles the sensor body just above the breather vent holes
(Figure 23). The weld mark indicates the location of the internal diaphragm.
c. Enter the depth (D1) using the numeric keypad then press ACCEPT.
Figure 23 Measuring submerged depth, vertical orientation
1
Gray band
3
Detachable nose cone
2
Breather vents
4
Depth D1
Horizontal orientation only
Note: Always check the Level Adjust when reinstalling the sampler following a calibration.
a. Place the sensor under at least 16 cm (6 in.) of water in a horizontal orientation.
Make sure the sensor is stable and not moving around. Then press ACCEPT
to continue.
b. Measure the depth from the bottom of the bucket to the surface of the water (D1)
(Figure 24) and enter the value. Press ACCEPT.
Figure 24 Measuring submerged depth, horizontal orientation
1
Depth from bottom of the bucket to the water surface
75
Sensor setup
6.5 Thermal sensor
The sampler utilizes a unique refrigeration compartment thermal sensor which is encased
in a thermal mass (the thermal mass is located in the back right corner of the refrigerator
compartment). This mass is designed to simulate the thermal characteristics of a typical
liquid sample. When the refrigerator door is opened, warm air rushes in and displaces
some of the cool air. When the door is shut, the refrigerator cools the interior air back to
4 °C again.
The temperature of the sample is not affected as quickly as the temperature of the air. It
takes time for a volume of water to change temperature. Since it is the sample we wish to
keep at 4 °C and not the air, the sampler thermal sensor accurately simulates the sample
so the controller can maintain the sample temperature exactly. Typical air sensing
thermostats fight to maintain air temperature, not sample temperature and so are not as
accurate or efficient at preserving samples.
6.5.1 Thermal sensor programming
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS, ADVANCED OPTIONS, CALIBRATION,
THERMAL SETUP.
2. Enter the refrigeration compartment temperature in degrees centigrade from 2–10 °C.
Typical sample preservation temperature is 4 °C.
6.5.2 Thermal sensor calibration
Prerequisites:
•
Ice bath in a 500 mL beaker, using a 50/50 mix of crushed ice and water
•
Lab grade thermometer
Procedure:
1. Press the OFF on the sampler controller to shut off the sampler controller.
2. Remove the pull out tray.
3. Remove the Reference Temperature Sensor (RTS) from the bracket. Place the
beaker/ice bath next to the bracket.
4. Place the sensor and the lab grade thermometer in the
beaker / ice bath.
5. With the sampler controller off and the door closed, wait approximately 30 minutes for
the reference sensor and lab thermometer to stabilize with the ice bath temperature.
6. After waiting 30 minutes, mix (swirl) the ice bath.
7. Press the controller ON button.
8. Go to MAIN MENU, OPTIONS, ADVANCED OPTIONS, CALIBRATION. Press SELECT.
9. Highlight THERMAL SETUP and press SELECT.
10. Highlight THERMAL CALIBRATE and press SELECT.
11. The screen displays the current temperature read by the controller. In degrees C,
enter the reading indicated on the thermometer in the ice bath, to the nearest one
tenth degree, next to the actual temperature display and press ACCEPT. This
completes the calibration procedure.
12. Install the RTS.
76
Section 7
Optional device installation
This section describes how to setup a rain gauge to the Sampler as well as how to
connect, program, and calibrate the optional water quality probes:
•
Rain Gauge
(section 7.1 on page 77
•
pH Probe
(section 7.2 on page 78)
•
ORP Probe
(section 7.3 on page 80)
7.1 Rain gauge
An external “tipping bucket” rain gauge (2149) can be connected to the Rain Gauge
connector of the sampler (). The rain gauge provides a dry contact closure to the sampler.
As rainfall collects in the 20 cm (8 in.) diameter funnel, it is directed into one side of a
“tipping bucket” assembly. As each bucket fills, it causes the bucket assembly to tip and
empty out into the bottom of the rain gauge. Each tip of the bucket causes a single
contact closure to the rain gauge and sends a short 12 V dc pulse into pin C of the Rain
Gauge connector. Each pulse (tip) represents 0.025 cm (0.01 in.) of rain.
Figure 25 Rain gauge tipping bucket
Table 7 Rain gauge base board connections (J-5)
Pin
Signal Description
A
+12 V dc source output
B
not used
C
+12 V dc pulse input
D
not used
E
not used
F
not used
77
Optional device installation
7.1.1 Rain gauge programming
1. From the Main Menu select OPTIONS, ADVANCED OPTIONS, DATALOG.
2. Highlight Select Inputs using the up and down keys and press SELECT.
Note: If logging is enabled on any channel, then that channel will have an arrow in front of the
channel name that signifies that the channel is logged.
3. Highlight Rainfall using the up and down keys, then press SELECT.
4. Press CHANGE CHOICE to cycle between Logged and Not Logged, then press
ACCEPT.
5. Enter a logging interval, then press ACCEPT. Valid logging intervals are shown on the
status bar along the bottom edge of the display.
6. Select Rainfall Units (in. or cm).
7. Select another channel to configure, or press RETURN to back up one step or press
MAIN MENU to return to the Main Menu.
7.2 pH probe
The pH probes are shipped with a wetting cap that covers the probe tip. Remove the cap
by turning it counter-clockwise and gently easing it off. Keep this cap for long-term probe
storage. Rinse the probe tip with distilled water.
Store the probe in a pH 4.0 buffer (Cat. No. 2104) for both overnight and long term
storage. Never store a probe in distilled or deionized water because this will deplete the
probe filling solution.
7.2.1 pH probe connection
This connector is for installing the pH or ORP pre-amp interface junction box or a
stand-alone temperature sensor. The pH probe is attached to a terminal strip in the
junction box. The stand-alone temperature probe plugs directly into the receptacle on the
case.The pre-amplifier junction box is provided to allow for fast, easy replacement of the
pH probe.
Table 8 pH connector pin assignments (J-3)
Pin
Signal Description
Wire Color
A
+5 V dc
White
B
ground
Blue
C
reference
Yellow
D
pH/ORP
Black
E
-5 V dc
Red
F
RTD
Green
Figure 26 shows the wiring of the pH probe in the pre-amplifier junction box. Since the pH
reading needs to compensate for temperature variation, a temperature sensor is built into
every pH electrode. The pH probe consists of five wires, three for the pH probe and two
for the temperature sensor.
Stray electrical currents are sometimes found in wastewater streams. These stray
electrical currents can affect the pH readings. In the case of stray electrical currents, a
grounded pH probe is required (Figure 27).
78
Optional device installation
Figure 26 pH probe wiring to junction box (un-grounded)
1
Yellow
4
pH
2
Green
5
Glass
3
Clear
6
Red
Figure 27 pH probe wiring to junction box (grounded)
1
Yellow
5
Glass
2
Green
6
Black
3
Clear
7
Red
4
pH
7.2.2 pH probe programming
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS, ADVANCED OPTIONS, DATALOG.
2. Highlight Select Inputs using the up and down keys and press SELECT.
3. Highlight pH using the up and down keys, then press SELECT.
4. Press CHANGE CHOICE to cycle between Logged and Not Logged, then press
ACCEPT.
79
Optional device installation
5. Enter a logging interval, then press ACCEPT. Valid logging intervals are shown on the
status bar along the bottom edge of the display.
6. Select another channel to configure or press RETURN to back up one step or press
MAIN MENU to return to the Main Menu display.
7.2.3 pH probe calibration
Calibrate the pH probe after the pH probe is connected and programmed. Calibrating the
pH probe requires a thermometer and any two of the following buffer solutions: 4, 7, or 10
pH.
The pH probe is an application sensitive device. When used in harsh environments, the
accuracy and life expectancy of pH probes can decrease considerably. Probes must be
calibrated to the sampler each time they are cleaned or replaced. Regular inspection and
comparison to a hand-held pH meter can help determine the optimum cleaning and
calibration schedule for
specific applications.
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS, ADVANCED OPTIONS, CALIBRATION, pH.
2. Place the pH probe into the first buffer solution, then press any key to continue.
3. Enter the temperature of the first buffer solution using the numeric keypad. Press
ACCEPT to continue.
4. Select the pH for the first buffer solution (4, 7, or 10 pH) using the CHANGE CHOICE
key, then press ACCEPT to continue.
5. Remove the probe from the first buffer solution, rinse it under distilled water and
place it into the second buffer solution (4, 7, or 10 pH, different from the first buffer
used). Press any key to continue.
6. Select the pH for the second buffer solution using the CHANGE CHOICE key, then
press ACCEPT to continue.
If the pH probe is damaged and cannot be calibrated or if the buffer solutions do not fall
within an acceptable range, an error message will be displayed as shown below.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ERROR MESSAGE
pH CALIBRATION FAILED-GAIN
AND/OR OFFSET OUT OF RANGE
TRY AGAIN
(PRESS ANY KEY TO CONTINUE)
Another attempt at reading the second buffer solution will be made after pressing a key. If
this fails, it is likely that you have a bad pH probe or bad buffer solutions. Try a new set of
buffer solutions and if that fails try a different pH probe.
7.3 ORP probe
The probes are shipped with a wetting cap that covers the probe tip. Remove the cap by
turning it counter-clockwise and gently easing it off. Keep this cap for long-term probe
storage. Rinse the probe tip with distilled water.
Store the probe in a pH 4.0 buffer (Cat. No. 22834-49) for both overnight and long term
storage. Never store a probe in distilled or deionized water because this will deplete the
probe filling solution.
80
Optional device installation
7.3.1 ORP probe connection
This connector is for installing the pH or ORP pre-amp interface junction box or a
stand-alone temperature sensor. The ORP probe is attached to a terminal strip in the
junction box.
Table 9 ORP connector pin assignments (J3)
Pin
Signal Description
Wire Color
A
+5 V dc
White
B
ground
Blue
C
reference
Yellow
D
pH/ORP
Black
E
-5 V dc
Red
F
RTD
Green
The ORP probe consists of three wires; a pink, black, and red wire. There is no
temperature sensor on the ORP probe.
1. Attach the clear wire to either screw on the terminal strip labeled GLASS.
2. Attach the black wire to the REF screw on the other terminal strip.
3. Attach the red wire to the GND screw on the terminal strip.
7.3.2 ORP probe programming
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS, ADVANCED OPTIONS, DATALOG.
2. Highlight Select Inputs using the up and down keys and press SELECT.
3. Highlight ORP using the up and down keys, then press SELECT.
4. Press CHANGE CHOICE to cycle between Logged and Not Logged, then press
ACCEPT to continue.
5. Enter a logging interval using the numeric keypad, then press ACCEPT. Valid logging
intervals are shown on the status bar along the bottom edge of the display.
6. Select another channel to configure or press RETURN to back up one step or press
MAIN MENU to return to the Main Menu.
7.3.3 ORP probe calibration
7.3.3.1 ORP preamplifier/junction box calibration
Calibration of the ORP input circuit requires a source of dc voltage between 500 and
2000 mV dc. The reference voltage must be applied to the ORP input terminals on the
preamplifier/junction box during calibration. A regulated dc power supply or a standard
“C” cell battery (1500 mV dc) make excellent sources for reference voltage.
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS, ADVANCED OPTIONS, CALIBRATION, ORP.
2. Install the ORP junction box on the sampler with the ORP probe removed.
3. Apply a positive reference voltage to the ORP probe terminals in the junction box,
using either a 1.5 V dc “C” cell battery or a regulated power supply.
4. Attach the positive battery terminal to the terminal block screw labeled “glass” and
the negative battery terminal to the terminal block screw labeled “ref.”
81
Optional device installation
5. After making all connections, measure the exact voltage on the “C” cell or power
supply with a voltmeter. Then press a key to continue. The sampler displays the
message “Waiting for ORP to Stabilize.”
6. Once the reading is sufficiently stable enter a new millivolt level. The “C” cell battery
should be approximately 1500 mV (or 1.5 V) when new. Enter the exact voltage of
the current source in millivolts.
7. Press ACCEPT to store the new calibration values.
8. Disconnect the “C” cell battery or regulated power supply from the ORP input
terminals.
9. Reconnect the ORP Probe leads to the input terminals.
82
Section 8
Communication setup
Communication setup details connections and programming features of the:
•
RS232 Serial Port (section 8.1 on page 83)
•
4–20 mA Interface (section 8.2 on page 84)
•
Alarm Relays (section 8.3 on page 86)
•
Analog Inputs (section 8.4 on page 90)
8.1 RS232 cable
8.1.1 RS232 connection
The RS232 connector is a serial input/output port for communicating with a sampler from
an external device such as a Data Transfer Unit (DTU-II) or direct serial connection to a
personal computer running InSight® Software.
This port can be configured to communicate at 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, or 19,200 baud.
Table 10 RS232 connection
Pin
Signal Description
Wire Color
A
not used
White
B
ground
Blue
C
DSR
Yellow
D
RCD
Black
E
DTR
Red
F
TXD
Green
Cable required
RS232 Sampler/Flow Meter to PC Cable Assembly (Cat. No. 1727), 10’ long, 6-pin
connector on one end, 9-pin D connector on the other end (9-pin to 25-pin D type adapter
included).
8.1.2 RS232 programming
Note: Some early generation IBM compatibles may have a serial port that is not capable of
communicating reliably at 19,200 baud. If errors develop at high baud rates, try lowering the baud
rate one step at a time (on both the sampler and Streamlogg II™, InSight®, or Vision® software) until
error free communications is achieved.
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS, ADVANCED OPTIONS, COMMUNICATIONS
SETUP, RS232 SETUP.
2. Select a baud rate for data communications by pressing CHANGE CHOICE to cycle
through the possible choices; 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600 or 19,200 baud. The higher the
baud rate setting, the faster data will transfer. Set the baud rate to the highest setting
allowed by the computer. The baud rate must correspond to the baud rate selected in
the software. Press ACCEPT.
Note: Long runs of RS232 cable, especially if they are run near large motors or fluorescent lights,
can cause communication errors and may require a slower baud rate.
83
Communication setup
8.2 4–20 mA option
The 4–20 mA option provides a current loop for controlling external devices such as a
chart recorder or PC. Either one or both of the 4–20 mA outputs can be factory installed
and are isolated from each other.
The interface has a 3 ft cable with a connector on one end, and a 10 ft cable with two
open wire leads on the other. Insert the connector into the sampler receptacle labeled
“Auxiliary”, located on the left side of the control housing. On the 10 ft cable, the wire with
clear insulation is positive (+) and the wire with black insulation is negative (–).
Table 11 4–20 mA Connections (J-18)
Pin
Signal Description
Wire Color
A
Output 1 + (pos)
Yellow
B
Output 1 – (neg)
Black
C
Output 2 + (pos)
Red
D
Output 2 – (neg)
Green
Rating:
•
Isolation Voltage:
Between sampler and either 4–20 mA output: 2500 V ac
Between the two 4–20 mA outputs: 1500 V ac
•
Maximum Resistive Load: 600 ohm
•
Output Voltage: 24 V dc - no load
Cable Required
4–20 mA Interface Cable (2924), 25 ft long, 4-pin connector on one end, tinned wire
leads on the other end.
8.2.1 4–20 mA programming
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS, ADVANCED OPTIONS, 4–20 mA OUTPUTS,
SELECT.
Note: When the 4–20 mA outputs are disabled and not completely turned off, they will continue to
output a steady 4 mA.
2.
Enable the 4–20 mA outputs by pressing CHANGE CHOICE while in the 4–20 mA
output menu.
3. When the display shows the outputs as enabled, press ACCEPT.
4. Choose either Output A or Output B. Use the up and down keys to highlight the
choice, then press SELECT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SELECT
RETURN
84
OUTPUT A
OUTPUT B
4–20 mA OUTPUTS
Communication setup
5. Select an analog Input Channel (e.g., channel 1, 2, 3, or, flow, etc.) to assign to that
output. Press CHANGE CHOICE to cycle through the channel names. When the
desired channel is displayed, press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
4–20 mA OUTPUTS
CHANGE
CHOICE
ACCEPT
INPUT CHANNEL:
FLOW
CANCEL
SELECT APPROPRIATE UNITS
6. Assign a channel value to the 4 mA current value. This value is typically 0, however
any value can be set. Enter the value of the input needed to generate 4 mA of current
at the output.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
4–20 mA OUTPUTS
ACCEPT
CLEAR
ENTRY
4 mA INPUT VALUE
0.00 mgd
CANCEL
SELECT APPROPRIATE UNITS
7. Assign an input value to the 20 mA current level.
8. Repeat this process to configure the other 4–20 mA output.
8.2.2 4–20 mA calibration
After wiring the 4–20 mA connection perform a 4–20 mA output calibration. The 4–20 mA
output calibration requires a multimeter and an interface or access to the 4–20 mA
current loop wiring. Two 4–20 mA outputs are available and are designated Output A and
Output B. Both outputs are calibrated the same way and are isolated from each other.
Calibration may be performed while the 4–20 mA device is in the current loop, as shown
in Figure 28 on page 86. Calibration may also be performed with the device disconnected
from the current loop as shown in Figure 29. In either case, the multimeter must be set to
a 20 milliamp dc range or greater.
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS, ADVANCED OPTIONs, CALIBRATION, 4–20 mA
OUTPUTS.
2. Connect a multimeter to the 4–20 mA current outputs per Figure 28 and Figure 29.
3. Make sure that the 4–20 mA output is enabled. If it is not enabled, press CHANGE
CHOICE so that the display shows Enabled and press ACCEPT.
4. Select the Output (A or B) to calibrate.
5. Press any key to set the selected output to 4.00 mA dc.
6. Measure the current on the selected output using the multimeter and enter the
measured value using the numeric keypad. Press ACCEPT.
7. Press any key to set the output to 20.00 mA dc.
8. Measure the current on the selected output using the multimeter and enter the
measured value using the numeric keypad. Press ACCEPT to complete the
calibration.
85
Communication setup
By entering the measured current values, the microprocessor will electronically adjust the
outputs to compensate for the difference between the measured values and the expected
values.
Figure 28 Calibration with the meter in the loop
Figure 29 Calibration with the 4-20mA device disconnected from the loop
8.3 Alarm relays
WARNING
Alarm relay contacts are rated for low voltage applications only. Do not switch
power in excess of 28Vrms, 5A.
Four alarm relay outputs are available as a factory installed option. The relays are
mounted in an external NEMA 4X enclosure for installation to a wall or panel. Alarm
contacts are rated for 5A at 28Vrms maximum (resistive load).
The alarm wiring can be sized according to the load being used. The relay connector will
accept wire sizes from 18–12 AWG with a rating of 300 V, 80 °C minimum. Do not use
wire smaller than 18 AWG.
For relay pin assignments refer to Table 12 and Figure 30 and Table 13.
86
Communication setup
8.3.1 Alarm relays connection
Table 12 Relay connector on the sampler (J17)
Pin
Signal Description
Wire Color
A
+12 V dc
Red
B
Relay #1
Yellow
C
Relay #2
Black
D
Relay #3
Red
E
Relay #4
Green
Figure 30 Relay pin connections
Table 13 Relays
Connector
Relay
J2
1
J3
2
J4
3
J5
4
Relay junction box
Required relay box is an alarm relay box assembly with a 10-ft long cable with a 6-pin
connector on one end and a relay box on the other end (Figure 31).
1. Choose Normally Closed (NC) or Normally Open (NO) connections.
2. Hook into the terminal strip one wire in the common (COM) and the other in the
connector with the preferred signal.
87
Communication setup
Figure 31 Single relay wiring inside the relay junction box
8.3.2 Alarm relays programming
Alarms can be programmed to activate based on certain conditions (low battery, low
memory, etc.). When an alarm is tripped, an action is initiated. There are two types of
alarms:
•
Trouble Alarms
•
Set Point Alarms
8.3.2.1 Trouble alarms
Trouble Alarms initiate an action when a trouble condition occurs. For example, a relay
may close when the memory is full.
1. From the Main Menu, select SETUP, ADVANCED OPTIONS, ALARMS.
2.
Select one of the trouble conditions.
3. Select an action to occur when the alarm is activated. The list below shows each
Trouble Condition.
Trouble Condition
•
Low Main Battery
•
Memory Battery
•
Low Slate Memory
•
Slate Memory Full
•
Purge Failure
•
Missed Sample
•
RS485 Timed Out
•
Jammed Distributor
Alarm Actions
88
•
Set Relay #1
•
Set Relay #2
•
Set Relay #3
•
Set Relay #4
Communication setup
8.3.2.2 Set Point alarms
Set Point Alarms look for trip points to be reached (either high or low or both) before
initiating an action. For example an initiated action may be the closing of a relay when the
water level exceeds 60 cm (24 in.) or drops below 10 cm (4 in.). Set Point Alarms activate
when a user-definable high and/or low set point is reached.
1.
Enable one of the alarm conditions.
2. Select an action to occur when the alarm is activated.
3. Set either a High trip point or a Low trip point.
4. After entering the trip point enter the deadband value.
Note: Log rainfall to use an alarm on a rainfall condition; likewise, log flow in order to implement and
alarm on a flow rate of change.
Set point alarm conditions:
•
Level
•
Cabinet Temperature
(refrigerated samplers)
•
Flow
•
Analog Channels 1–3
•
Flow Rate of Change
•
Analog Ch. 4
•
pH
•
Analog Ch. 5
•
ORP
•
Analog Ch. 6
•
Process Temperature
•
Analog Ch. 7
•
Rainfall
Note: Rainfall and Flow Rate of Change alarms are HIGH set point conditions; they take no
deadband and they are time dependant.
Deadband
After entering the trip point, enter a deadband value. The deadband is the area between
alarm “turn-on” and “turn-off”.
The purpose of setting the deadband is to eliminate alarm chatter which may occur if the
“turn-on” and “turn-off” values are too close together. Small fluctuations occurring when
the reading is at or near the trip point can rapidly toggle an alarm relay on and off.
In the low setpoint example shown below, the deadband is set to 0.10 pH. When the pH
drops to 7.0 (lower solid line), the alarm trips, but the alarm does not turn off until the pH
comes back up to 7.10 (Figure 32). This difference is the deadband setting which should
be set according to the characteristics of the item being measured.
89
Communication setup
Figure 32 Deadband concept (low setpoint example)
1
pH values scale
4
Deadband
2
Setpoint trigger On
5
Setpoint (7.00)
3
Setpoint trigger Off
6
Scan intervals
8.4 Analog inputs
8.4.1 Analog inputs connection
Note: 4–20 mA inputs must be isolated. Maximum load per unit is 200 ohms.
Analog voltage as well as analog current input signals are accommodated in a single
connector. To connect the analog voltage signal (–4.0 to +4.0 V dc):
1. Tie ground wire to Pin B (ground).
2. Tie analog voltage wire to the appropriate voltage input pin
(Pin C, E, or G).
For example, to connect an analog voltage input to analog input channel 1, tie the ground
wire to pin B and your positive wire to pin C.
To connect and analog current signal (4–20 mA dc)
1. Tie ground wire to Pin B (ground).
2. Connect analog current wire to both voltage and current input pins for the appropriate
channel (Pin C and D, or E and F, or G and H).
90
Communication setup
Table 14Analog input pin assignments
Pin
Signal Description
Wire Color
A
+12 V dc
White
B
Signal Ground
Blue
C
Voltage Input 1 (–4.0 V dc to +4.0 V dc)
Yellow
D
Current Input 1 (4–20 mA dc)
Black
E
Voltage Input 2 (–4.0 V dc to +4.0 V dc)
Red
F
Current Input 2 (4–20 mA dc)
Green
G
Voltage Input 3 (–4.0 V dc to +4.0 V dc)
Gray
H
Current Input 3 (4–20 mA dc)
Brown
J
not used
Violet
K
not use
Orange
Note: There is no pin labeled “I”.
There are a total of three analog input channels available on the sampler. These inputs
accept 4–20 mA dc or –4.0 to +4.0 V dc analog signals. They can be logged and graphed
and can also be used to trigger alarms, cause setpoint samples, and control 4–20 mA
outputs.
8.4.2 Analog inputs programming
Analog input channels can accept a signal from an external device. This signal may
range from –4.0 V dc (min) to +4.0 V dc (max) or from 4 to 20 mA dc depending on the
input selected. In some cases, input signals from certain devices may also fall
somewhere within those ranges. For that reason, each analog input channel must be
mapped to the minimum and maximum signal limits of the external device.
To map an external device to an analog input channel:
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS, ADVANCED OPTIONS, DATALOG.
2. Highlight Select Inputs using the up and down keys and press SELECT.
Note: If logging is enabled on any channel, then that channel will have an arrow in front of the
channel name to signify the channel is logged.
3. Highlight the analog channel to log using the up and down keys, then press SELECT.
4. Press CHANGE CHOICE to cycle between Logged and Not Logged, then press
ACCEPT.
5. Enter a Logging Interval using the numeric keypad. Press ACCEPT.
6. Select unit of measurement (ppm, ppb, afd, cfs, cfm, cfd, cms, cmm, cmh, cmd, gps,
gpm, gph, lps, lpm, lph, or mgd).
7. Enter Low Point.
8. Enter High Point.
9. Select another channel to configure, or press RETURN to back up one step, or press
MAIN MENU to return to the Main Menu display.
91
Communication setup
92
Section 9
Maintenance
WARNING
Potential Electrical Shock and Fire hazards. Only qualified personnel should
conduct the tasks described in this section of the manual. Always disconnect
power to the sampler before performing any maintenance or service.
WARNING
Fire Hazard. Models of AWR Samplers with cabinet heaters may ignite flammable
materials and cleaning solvents. DO NOT use any flammable liquids or materials to
clean or disinfect either the Sampler or any other component under the cabinet
hood of the AWR Samplers. Before performing any cleaning operation, disconnect
the AWR Sampler from its power source. If cleaning of the Sampler controller and
pump cannot be done with water, the Sampler must be disconnected and moved to
a location outside of the cabinet for cleaning. Allow sufficient time for the Sampler
controller/pump to dry before reinstalling and putting it back into service.
CAUTION
Biological sample hazard. Follow safe handling protocols during contact with
sample bottles and sampler components. Disconnect the sampler from power to
disable the pump before handling.
DANGER
Potential Electrical Shock and Fire Hazard
Do not attempt to clean the controller compartment heater by spraying it with
liquids of any kind. The heater should be protected from moisture such as ice and
snow.
9.1 Cleaning the sampler
9.1.1 Cleaning the refrigerator
Clean the condenser fins and coils with a brush or vacuum every 6 to 8 months to
maintain efficient heat transfer.
9.1.2 Cleaning the sampler cabinet
Clean the interior and exterior of the sampler cabinet with a damp sponge and mild
detergent. Do not use abrasive cleaners or solvents.
9.1.3 Cleaning the sample bottles
Clean the bottles using a brush and water with a mild detergent, followed by a fresh water
rinse and a distilled water rinse. Glass bottles may also be autoclaved.
9.1.4 No lubrication required
The sampler does not require routine lubrication. Do not lubricate the pump tube with
petroleum jelly, silicone grease, oil, or any other lubricant, as this will substantially reduce
the life of the pump tube and roller assembly.
93
Maintenance
9.2 Adjusting the refrigeration compartment door (AWRS only)
Since the door gasket may compress slightly over time, an adjustment screw is provided
to allow the door to be tightened.
Procedure:
1. Loosen the lock nut (Figure 33).
2. Rotate the tension adjustment screw until the door shuts tightly.
3. Tighten the lock nut.
Figure 33 All weather refrigerated sampler door latch
1
Lock nut
2
Door tension adjustment screw
If you need assistance in performing any of the following service steps, please contact
the factory.
9.3 Pump tubing maintenance
CAUTION
Always disconnect power to the sampler before removing the pump cover.
Replacement pump tubing is available from the manufacturer in 15 ft bulk length
(4600-15), and 50 ft bulk length (4600-50). Use of tubing other than that supplied by the
manufacturer may cause excessive wear on mechanical parts and/or poor pump
performance.
9.3.1 Tubing Life Estimates
Pump tubing life depends on several factors:
94
•
Distance from sample source. Locate the sampler as close to the sample source
as possible.
•
Vertical lift. Minimize the vertical lift (ideally, 15 feet or less).
•
Intake Rinses. Minimize the number of intake rinses prior to
sample collection.
•
Pump roller assembly condition. Remove (clean) the silicone residue in the interior of
the pump housing and on the rollers before installing a new tube.
Maintenance
•
Constituents in the sample liquid. Grit and other abrasive solids cause greater wear
on the tubing as they are squeezed through the pump rollers.
Note: To extend the life of the tubing, rotate the pump tube 90 degrees in the pump housing after
approximately 2/3 of the life has been realized (once the tube life has been determined through use).
Experience at a particular site will be your best indicator of tubing life. Visually inspect the
tubing and rollers on a regular basis after initial installation to get a feel for what
maintenance your site will require. Be sure to replace the pump tubing before it splits to
prolong the life of the sampler and keep the work area free of contamination from the
sample liquid.
The proper length of silicone tubing must be used in the pump body. An improper length
can reduce the life of the tubing and pump rollers. For the correct length,
refer to Figure 34.
Figure 34 Pump tube loading
1
To S-shaped strain relief
4
146.1 mm (5 ¾ in.)
2
Alignment dots
5
To sample fitting
3
295.3 (11 5/8 in.) tubing in pump
95
Maintenance
9.3.2 Replacing pump tubing
1. To replace the pump tube, remove the four screws on the pump cover.
2. Remove the front cover of the pump housing.
3. Remove the existing tubing. Locate the black dot on the new tubing. The end of the
tube that extends farthest beyond the black dot is routed through the strain relief and
attaches to the stainless steel tubing connector.
4. Install the pump tube in the pump housing until the black dots are visible just outside
the pump body.
5. After inserting the new pump tube, reinstall the front cover and secure it with the four
screws until finger tight.
Figure 35 Pump tubing measurement
1
To S-shaped strain relief
4
146.1 (5 ¾ in.)
2
Alignment dots
5
To sample fitting
3
295.3 (11 5/8 in.) tubing in pump
9.4 Distributor arm tubing replacement
The distributor arm moves over each bottle during multiple bottle sampling. Inspect the
tubing in the distributor arm on a regular basis. Replace the tubing when deteriorated or
at regular intervals.
Prerequisites:
Tubing, distributor arm, pre-cut. Make sure that the correct tube is used for the correct
distributor arm. Refer to Figure 14 Bottle and retainer configurations on page 35. Refer
also to Section 10 Parts and Accessories on page 115.
Procedure:
1. Remove the old tubing from the distributor arm.
2. Insert the new tubing into the distributor arm so that the end of the tubing extends out
of the nozzle no more than 1/8 inch (Figure 36).
Note: Do not let the tubing extend more than 1/8 inch past the nozzle end of the arm. If the tubing
extends too far, the tubing will get caught on the bottles and interfere with sampling.
3. To make sure that the distributor is aligned properly, run the manual distributor
diagnostic.
96
Maintenance
Figure 36 Distributor assembly
1
Nozzle
4
Shaft
2
Distributor arm
5
Distributor tube
3
Distributor motor
9.5 Upgrades, repairs, general maintenance
Only a qualified technician should service the sampler. For example, steps that require
knowledge of CMOS electrostatic discharge precautions and advanced electronics
training and should only be performed by a qualified technician. If you need assistance in
performing any of the following service steps, contact the manufacturer.
9.5.1 Electrostatic discharge (ESD) considerations
To minimize ESD risks, maintenance procedures not requiring power to the
sampler should be performed with power removed.
Delicate internal electronic components can be damaged by static electricity, resulting in
degraded instrument performance or eventual failure.
The manufacturer recommends taking the following steps to prevent ESD damage to
your instrument:
•
Before touching any instrument electronic components (such as printed circuit cards
and the components on them) discharge static electricity from your body. This can be
accomplished by touching an earth-grounded metal surface such as the chassis of an
instrument, or a metal conduit or pipe.
•
To reduce static build-up, avoid excessive movement. Transport static-sensitive
components in anti-static containers or packaging.
•
To discharge static electricity from your body and keep it discharged, wear a wrist
strap connected by a wire to earth ground.
•
Handle all static-sensitive components in a static-safe area. If possible, use anti-static
floor pads and work bench pads.
9.6 Internal maintenance items
The following items require access to the inside of the case for service:
•
Internal desiccant module
•
RAM memory batteries
97
Maintenance
9.7 Removing and opening the controller
CAUTION
Always power the unit OFF and then disconnect all cables from the sampler before
removing the controller.
To remove the controller from the cabinet:
1. Turn the unit off by pressing the OFF key.
2. Disconnect and remove all cables to the controller housing, including the
distributor/full bottle shutoff cable.
3. Disconnect all tubing.
4. Remove the front clip holding the controller housing to the top of the cabinet.
5. Lift the controller off the cabinet using care to guide the distributor/full bottle shut-off
cable through the hole in the refrigerated compartment.
6. Remove the 17 screws from around the perimeter of the controller bottom panel.
7. Carefully pull open the bottom panel and let the attached connectors swing out of the
way.
8. If necessary for the repair being performed, unplug the appropriate connectors.
Always note each connector location before unplugging anything. Re-installing a
plug into the wrong connector can cause extensive damage.
98
Maintenance
Figure 37 900MAX controller components
Item
Description
Quantity
Catalog Number
1
Fuse
1
8753
2
AA-cell battery
3
-
3
Nut
17
SE 301
4
Lock washer
17
SE 306
5
Desiccant bag
1
8849
6
O-ring
1
8606
7
Screw
17
SE 343
Note: The front panel gasket has a light coating of grease to help assure a watertight seal. Do not
contaminate the grease or gasket area with dirt or debris during servicing. Always replace the gasket
if it is damaged or missing. Never reassemble the case without the gasket properly installed.
9.8 Re-installing the bottom panel
Note: Always follow the procedure below when re-installing the sampler bottom panel. Improper
panel installation may result in damage to the instrument.
1. Hand tighten each nut until it makes contact with the panel.
2. Tighten the nuts in sequence shown in Figure 38 to 5 in.-lb (0.56 N-m).
3. Repeat the tightening procedure in the same sequence to 10 in.-lb (1.13 N-m).
99
Maintenance
1
10
2
11
9
3
17
12
4
8
13
16
5
15
7
6
14
Figure 38 Tightening the nuts on the bottom panel
9.9 Fuse replacement information
WARNING
Potential Shock and Fire hazards. Only qualified personnel should conduct the
tasks described in this section of the manual. Always disconnect power to the
sampler before performing any maintenance or service.
DANGER
For continued protection against fire, replace fuses with only fuses of specified
type and current rating.
Table 15 gives details for all the fuses in the sampler. Only the fuse located at the rear of
the 900MAX controller is user-serviceable.
Table 15 Fuse listing
Operator
accessible
Location
No
6251400
Thermal control
circuit board in
the power
control box
under the rear
cover (Fig. 40)
Rear surface of
900MAX
controller (Fig.
38)
None
Yes
100
Reference
designator
Circuit
protection
Size
Rating
Hach part
number
F1
Power supply
output
(15 VDC)
¼ x 1 ¼ inch
T, 7A, 250V
6257700
F2 and F3
AC-DC Power
supply (AC)
T, 2A, 250V
6257600
F4 and F5
Optional
controller
heater (AC)
T, 5A, 250V
6610000
M, 5A, 125V
8753
900MAX
circuits (DC)
5 x 20 mm
Maintenance
9.10 Motor/gear box
The motor/gear box requires no regular maintenance. The special formulation gears are
self lubricating and require no oil or grease.
9.11 Internal desiccant module
Note: The desiccant module cannot be recharged by heating. Do not attempt to bake the desiccant
module in an oven to remove the moisture as this may result in a fire hazard.
The Internal Desiccant Module (8849) consists of a moisture-absorbent material inside a
poly bag. If the humidity indicator on the front panel turns pink, replace the module and
the back panel perimeter gasket (8606). The desiccant module is located under the CPU
board.
9.12 Memory battery
Random Access Memory (RAM) is a very reliable data storage medium for
microprocessor applications. However, RAM requires power at all times. If power is
removed, the data stored in the RAM chip is lost. Therefore, you cannot power the RAM
chips from the sampler power supply because you would lose data and program settings
every time you unplugged the power cord. A separate battery located inside the sampler
controller is provided to power the RAM chips and the real-time clock. The memory
battery keeps the program entries and logged sample data alive inside the RAM memory
when the main power fails or is removed for transport or replacement.
The sampler memory battery consists of three AA batteries.
Should the memory battery voltage fall too low to properly maintain the program settings,
a warning: MEMORY POWER LOW will alert you to replace the batteries. The sampler
utilizes a very small amount of energy from the memory batteries during normal
operation. The service life of the batteries in this application is typically five years.
9.13 Resetting the circuit breaker
DANGER
Electrocution hazard. Disconnect AC power from the sampler before attempting to
reset the internal circuit breaker.
DANGER
Fire hazard. Continual tripping of the circuit breaker is an indication of a potentially
serious problem with the sampler. Service is required.
The sampler refrigerator has an internal circuit breaker in the Power Junction Assembly
Control Box located in the upper rear compartment (Figure 39 Power junction assembly
thermal control box on page 102). If the circuit breaker is tripped, it must be reset.
Important Note: The circuit breaker protects only the heater, compressor, and fan circuits. The
AC-DC internal power supply is protected separately by its own internal fuses.
Prerequisites:
•
Phillips head screwdriver
Important Note: The power junction assembly thermal control box contains electro-static sensitive
components. Avoid contact with all printed circuit board components.
101
Maintenance
Procedure:
1. Disconnect AC power from the unit.
2. Remove the 2 screws from the rear lid.
3. Rotate the lid up and out of the way.
4. Examine the circuit breaker through the clear window of the thermal control box
(Figure 39).
5. If the circuit breaker is not in the OFF position, call service.
6. If the circuit breaker is in the OFF position, do the following:
a. Remove the clear cover.
b. Flip the switch to the ON position.
c. Replace and secure the clear cover.
d. Attach the rear lid.
7. Connect AC power to the unit.
Figure 39 Power junction assembly thermal control box
1
102
Circuit breaker
2
Power junction assembly control box
Section 10
Replacement parts and accessories
10.1 Replacement parts
Description
Item Number
3-way splitter assembly
939
4–20 mA interface, 10 ft cable
2021
900 series peristaltic pump tubing, 15 ft
4600-15
900 series peristaltic pump tubing, 50 ft
4600-50
AC battery back up
5698200
All Weather Refrigerated Cabinet, 115 VAC
All Weather Refrigerated Cabinet, 230 VAC
Anchor Mounting Bracket Kit
Cascade sampling for 25 ft. cable
3548R
3550R
6613100
2817
Controller compartment lock
5697700
Controller compartment heater, 220 VAC
6605200
Desiccant bag (1 pillow)
8849
Distributor arm, 2-and-4 bottle sampling
8846
Distributor arm, 8-bottle sampling
8845
Distributor arm, 24-bottle sampling
Door assembly
8844
6607700
Flow-thru module
2471
Front lid assembly
6607500
Humidity indicator
2660
Instrument manual
8854
Liquid level actuator, 25 ft cable
943
Multi-purpose full cable, 10 ft
940
Multi-purpose full cable, 25 ft
540
Multi-purpose half cable, 10 ft
941
Multi-purpose half cable, 25 ft
541
O-ring, main seal
8606
Pull-out tray
5697600
Pump tubing, 15 ft, for all distributors and 800 series peristaltic pumps
3866-15
Pump tubing, 50-ft, for all distributors and 800 series peristaltic pumps
3866-50
Pump tubing, pre-cut, AWRS 900MAX
6607400
Rear lid assembly
6607600
Replacement gasket for door
6611500
Replacement gasket for lid (fits front and back lids)
6611600
Strainer, all 316 stainless steel, 6.0 in. long x 0.406 in. OD
2071
Strainer, all 316 stainless steel, 7.94 in. long x 1.0 in. OD
2070
Strainer, stainless steel, 3.9 in. long x 0.406 in. OD
4652
Strainer, Teflon®/stainless steel, 5.5 in. long x 0.875 in. OD
926
Synchronizing sampling for 25 ft cable
2818
Teflon-lined connection kit
2186
Teflon lined tubing, 3/8 in., 10 ft
921
Teflon lined tubing,
3/8 in., 25ft
922
Teflon lined tubing,
3/8 in., 100ft
925
Vinyl intake tubing,
3/8 in., 25 ft
920
103
Replacement parts and accessories
10.1 Replacement parts
Description
Item Number
3/8 in., 100 ft
923
Vinyl intake tubing, 3/8 in., 500 ft
924
Vinyl intake tubing, 10 mm, 25 ft
6633500
Vinyl intake tubing, 10 mm, black, length is cut to order
6627200
Vinyl intake tubing,
10.2 Base/bottle tray, composite/multiple sampling accessories
Part number
Sampler
Composite
Multiple
bottle
104
Bottle
Full bottle
shut off
Tube
support
Extension
tube
Bottle tray
and
positioner
Retainer
Distributor
2.5 gal
glass
6559
8847
8838
3527
N/A
N/A
N/A
2.5 gal poly
1918
8847
8838
3527
N/A
N/A
N/A
5.5 gal poly
6494
8847
8838
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
(24) 1 L
poly
737
N/A
N/A
N/A
1511
1322
8841
(24) 350 mL
glass
732
N/A
N/A
N/A
1511
1056
8841
(8) 2.3 L
poly
657
N/A
N/A
N/A
1511
1322
8842
(8) 1.9 L
glass
1118
N/A
N/A
N/A
1511
1322
8842
(4) 2.5 gal
poly
2315
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
8843
(4) 2.5 gal
glass
2317
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
8843
(2) 2.5 gal
glass
2318
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
8843
(2) 2.5 gal
poly
2316
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
8843
Bottle type
Index
Numerics
4-20 mA Option ........................................................ 84
Calibration ......................................................... 85
Connection ........................................................ 84
Programming ..................................................... 84
Constant Volume, Variable Time ............................. 49
Controller
Cover ................................................................. 17
Heater ................................................................ 18
Removal and Opening ....................................... 98
A
D
Access Code ............................................................ 47
Advanced Sampling ................................................. 59
Program Complete ............................................ 59
Setpoint Sampling ............................................. 59
Special Output ................................................... 62
Start/Stop Times ................................................ 63
Storm Water ...................................................... 64
Timed Bottle Sets .............................................. 66
Upset Sample .................................................... 67
Variable Intervals ............................................... 69
Variable Volume ................................................ 69
Alarm Relays ........................................................... 86
Interface Connector ........................................... 87
Junction Box ...................................................... 87
Programming ..................................................... 88
Alarms
Actions ............................................................... 88
Deadband .......................................................... 89
Set Point Alarms ................................................ 89
Trouble Alarms .................................................. 88
Analog Inputs ........................................................... 90
Connection ........................................................ 90
Programming ..................................................... 91
Arm Stop .................................................................. 39
Auxiliary Receptacle ................................................ 43
Deadband ................................................................ 89
Desiccant module, internal ....................................... 22
Distributor
Arm Alignment ................................................... 39
Installation ......................................................... 38
Downlook Ultrasonic Sensor .................................... 71
Calibration ......................................................... 71
Connection ........................................................ 71
Programming ..................................................... 71
DTU-II ...................................................................... 83
B
Basic Programming Setup ....................................... 45
Baud Rate ................................................................ 83
Bottle Number .......................................................... 62
Bottle Volume .......................................................... 46
Bottles ................................................................ 34, 46
Bottom Panel ........................................................... 99
C
Calibration
4-20 mA ............................................................. 85
Downlook Ultrasonic Sensor ............................. 71
ORP Probe ........................................................ 81
pH Probe ........................................................... 80
Submerged Pressure Sensor ............................ 74
Cleaning the Sampler .............................................. 93
Connectors
Auxiliary ............................................................. 43
Constant Time, Variable Volume Sampling ............. 51
E
Eight-, 12-, or 24-bottle Sampling ............................ 36
Electrostatic Discharge ............................................ 97
F
First Flush Bottles .................................................... 65
Flow Units ................................................................ 50
Front Panel .............................................................. 20
Full-Bottle Shut-Off .................................................. 41
Function Keys .......................................................... 22
Fuse Replacement ................................................. 100
H
Humidity Indicator .................................................... 22
I
Installation site ......................................................... 25
Intake Line ......................................................... 30, 31
Intake Rinses ........................................................... 57
Intake Tubing ........................................................... 47
Interface Connectors ................................................ 19
Internal Desiccant .................................................. 101
K
Keypad ..................................................................... 21
L
Level Adjust ............................................................. 75
Liquid Crystal Display .............................................. 22
Liquid Depth ............................................................. 71
Liquid Sensor ........................................................... 56
Lubrication ............................................................... 93
105
Index
M
Maintenance ............................................................ 93
Memory Battery ..................................................... 101
Menu Bar and Status Bar ........................................ 22
Motor/Gear Box ..................................................... 101
Multiple Bottle .......................................................... 54
N
Numeric Keypad ...................................................... 21
O
ON/OFF Key ............................................................ 21
ORP Probe
Calibration ......................................................... 81
Junction Box ...................................................... 81
Junction Box Calibration .................................... 81
Programming ..................................................... 81
P
Password ................................................................. 47
pH Probe
Calibration ......................................................... 80
Connection ........................................................ 78
Programming ..................................................... 79
pin ............................................................................ 43
Power Connectors ................................................... 42
Program Delay ......................................................... 47
Program Lock .......................................................... 47
Pump Tube
Installation ................................................... 28, 31
Pump Tube Installation ............................................ 28
Pump Tube Replacement ........................................ 96
R
Rain Gauge .............................................................. 77
Connection ........................................................ 77
Programming ..................................................... 78
Receptacle Caps ..................................................... 20
Refrigerator Door ..................................................... 18
Retainers ................................................................. 34
RS232
Connection ........................................................ 83
106
Programming ..................................................... 83
S
Sample Collection .................................................... 48
Sample Distribution .................................................. 53
Multiple Bottle .................................................... 54
Single Bottle ...................................................... 54
Sample Retries ........................................................ 57
Sample Volume ........................................................ 56
Sampling Triggers and Settings ............................... 61
Sensor Body ............................................................ 28
Sensor Height .......................................................... 72
Set Point Alarms ...................................................... 89
Single-Bottle Sampling ....................................... 36, 54
Site Selection ........................................................... 25
Soft Keys .................................................................. 21
Specifications ............................................................. 7
Splitter Interface ....................................................... 44
Status ....................................................................... 45
Strainer .................................................................... 31
Submerged Area/Velocity Sensor ............................ 73
Connection ........................................................ 73
Installation ......................................................... 73
Programming ..................................................... 73
Submerged Pressure Sensor ................................... 73
Calibration ......................................................... 74
Connection ........................................................ 74
Programming ..................................................... 74
T
Timed Over-Ride ...................................................... 50
Timed Proportional Sampling ................................... 48
Trouble Condition ..................................................... 88
Two- and Four-bottle Sampling ................................ 36
U
Utility Board ............................................................ 100
V
Vertical Lift ................................................................. 9
Vinyl Tubing ............................................................. 30
HACH COMPANY World Headquarters
P.O. Box 389, Loveland, CO 80539-0389 U.S.A.
Tel. (970) 669-3050
(800) 227-4224 (U.S.A. only)
Fax (970) 669-2932
[email protected]
www.hach.com
HACH LANGE GMBH
Willstätterstraße 11
D-40549 Düsseldorf, Germany
Tel. +49 (0) 2 11 52 88-320
Fax +49 (0) 2 11 52 88-210
[email protected]
www.hach-lange.de
© Hach Company. 2008, 2014. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.
HACH LANGE Sàrl
6, route de Compois
1222 Vésenaz
SWITZERLAND
Tel. +41 22 594 6400
Fax +41 22 594 6499
07/2014, Edition 2
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