Boot Agent book
Intel® Boot Agent Application Notes
for BIOS Engineers
Intel® 10/100/1000 Mb/s, 10 GbE and 40 GbE
Ethernet Controllers for Servers
November 2015
318275-009
Revision 1.9
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* Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.
© 2015 Intel Corporation.
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Boot Agent Application Notes—10/100/1000 Mb/s, 10 GbE & 40GbE Ethernet Controllers
Contents
1.0
Introduction .............................................................................................................. 5
2.0
Scope ........................................................................................................................ 5
3.0
Definitions................................................................................................................. 5
4.0
Boot Agent Image Options......................................................................................... 6
4.1
Memory Requirements ......................................................................................... 6
4.2
BootUtil ............................................................................................................. 6
5.0
PCI 3.0 Considerations .............................................................................................. 8
5.1
Differences Between PCI 2.x and PCI 3.0 Implementations ....................................... 8
5.1.1 PCI 2.x BIOS ........................................................................................... 8
5.1.2 PCI 3.0 BIOS ........................................................................................... 8
6.0
EEPROM Considerations............................................................................................. 8
7.0
EEPROM Contents ...................................................................................................... 9
7.1
Compatibility — Word 0x03 (1 GbE Controllers); Word 0x10 (10 GbE Controllers) ........ 9
7.2
Main Setup Options (Word 0x30)......................................................................... 10
7.3
Configuration Customization Options (Word 0x31) ................................................. 11
7.4
Boot Agent Version (Word 0x32) ......................................................................... 13
7.5
IBA Capabilities (Word 0x33) .............................................................................. 13
7.6
IBA Secondary Port Configuration (Words 0x34 and 0x35) ...................................... 14
7.7
iSCSI Option ROM Version (Word 0x36) ............................................................... 14
7.8
IBA Port Three Configuration (Words 0x38 and 0x39)............................................. 14
7.9
IBA Port Four Configuration (Words 0x3A and 0x3B) .............................................. 14
7.10 VLAN Configuration Block Pointer (Word 0x3C)...................................................... 14
7.11 iSCSI Boot Block Pointer (Word 0x3D).................................................................. 14
8.0
VLAN / 802.1p Support ........................................................................................... 14
9.0
Troubleshooting Tips ............................................................................................... 16
Table
1. Boot Agent Error Messages ...................................................................................... 16
3
10/100/1000 Mb/s, 10 GbE & 40GbE Ethernet Controllers—Boot Agent Application Notes
Revision History
Date
Revision
November 2015
1.9
March 2015
1.8
Description
•
Minor update (all sections).
•
Major update (all sections).
•
•
Updated Compliance to include 40 GbE PCI Express* (PCIe*) 1.0.00.
Added note referencing the X710, XL710 controllers' expansion ROM residency
in Flash storage requirement precluding integration into the BIOS and referral to
datasheet for pre-boot function solution/details.
Added note referencing PXE boot in UEFI environments.
October 2014
1.7
November 2013
1.6
Updated sections 6.0, 8.0 and 9.0.
August 2012
1.5
Added VLAN Block Examples table to section 9.0.
July 2012
1.4
Revised section 3.0 (Definitions; BootUtil).
Revised section 8.1 (Main Setup Options (Word 0x30; added bit 5 description).
Revised section 8.4 (IBA Capabilities (Word 0x33; bit 6 and 5 description).
Added new section 8.6 (iSCSI Option ROM Version; Word 0x36).
Added new sections 8.9 (VLAN Configuration Block Pointer; Word 0x3C)., 8.10
(iSCSI Boot Block Pointer; Word 0x3D), and 9.0 (VLAN/802.1p Support).
Added VLAN support details.
Added VLAN Configuration Block Pointer (Word 0x3C) details.
Added iSCSI Boot Block Pointer (Word 0x3D) details.
October 2011
1.3
Major update (all sections).
June 2009
1.2
Major update (all sections).
•
December 2008
1.1
September 2007
1.0
4
•
•
•
•
Added Boot Agent release versions.
Added Boot Agent memory requirements.
Added new sections.
Updated Table 1.
Initial public release.
10/100/1000 Mb/s, 10 GbE & 40 GbE Ethernet Controllers—Boot Agent Application Notes
1.0
Introduction
The Intel® Boot Agent (Boot Agent) is a personal computer option ROM designed to
supply industry standard PXE compliant pre-boot services for x86 architecture
computers. The agent might be stored on a Flash component, an add-in Network
Interface Card (NIC) or it might be integrated into the BIOS, depending on the
component design. Note that some components only support one storage model.
Configuration data for the Boot Agent is stored in the network device’s EEPROM/NVM
The Intel Boot Agent for 10/100 Fast Ethernet, 1 Gigabit Ethernet (GbE), 10 GbE and
40 GbE controllers is compliant to the PCI Firmware Specification R3.0 according to the
following release versions
• 10/100 - 4.2.00
• 10/100/1000 - 1.3.00
• 10 GbE PCI Express* (PCIe*) 2.1.00
• 40 GbE PCI Express* (PCIe*) 1.0.00
2.0
Scope
The purpose of this document is to assist BIOS developers in the process of integrating
the Boot Agent into the BIOS and troubleshooting common problems (refer to Table 1).
Note:
X710 and XL710 10/40 GbE controllers require that all expansion ROMs reside in the
attached Flash storage. Consequently, integration of the expansion ROMs into the BIOS
for those devices is not supported. This document addresses those devices in a very
limited fashion. For details on pre-boot functions for such devices, please reference the
Intel® Ethernet Controller XL710 Datasheet.
This document should be used in conjunction with a related EEPROM/NVM
Programming Guide for your networking device.
This document does not address Pre-Boot Execution Environment (PXE) boot in Unified
Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) environments. Intel provides UEFI drivers that
are used in conjunction with other UEFI software components to provide network
capabilities in UEFI environments. Refer to www.uefi.org for information on UEFI.
3.0
Definitions
• Initialization Code — The part of the option ROM that the BIOS calls during the
Power On Self Test (POST). It verifies the LAN On Motherboard (LOM) or NIC
configuration and signals the BIOS that the NIC is a bootable device. It is a part of
all Boot Agent option ROM images.
• Base Code — The run-time code that controls the execution of the boot agent and
includes the actual PXE protocol functions. This module is not hardware-specific
and works with any Universal Network Device Interface (UNDI) driver.
5
Boot Agent Application Notes—10/100/1000 Mb/s, 10 GbE & 40 GbE Ethernet Controllers
• UNDI Driver — Used solely for the Ethernet controller. There is a UNDI driver for
each LAN family: 10/100 GbE, 10 GbE and 40 GbE.
• Setup Code — An optional part of the Initialization Code that brings up the Ctrl-S
setup screen allowing pre-boot configuration of the boot agent. Note that setup
sode is not typically used in LOM designs. Note that this code will be deprecated in
a future release because it is no longer useful in modern computers. All
configurations formally supported in this code (and much more) is supported in the
BootUtil utility and Intel® PROSet.
• Monolithic Image — a single image containing all the components of the Boot
Agent (initialization code, UNDI driver, base code, etc.).
• Split Image — The base code and UNDI are created as separate images and are
called separately by the BIOS. Each image has its own initialization code to provide
the BIOS interface. Split images are no longer supported.
• BootUtil — The tool supplied by Intel used to create boot agent images and to
perform field upgrades of option ROMs on Intel plug-in NICs. This tool is available
for DOS*, Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI), Linux*, and Windows*. Bootutil can
only create monolithic PXE images.
• IBABuild.exe — A DOS tool formerly supplied by Intel used to create Boot Agent
images. IBABuild has been discontinued for server class Ethernet components.
4.0
Boot Agent Image Options
When creating a boot image, be aware that there are different agents for 10/100 Mb/s,
10/100/1000 Mb/s, 10 GbE devices and 40 GbE devices. Split images are no longer
supported. Only monolithic images can be created using BootUtil. In addition, split ROM
images are no longer supported.
4.1
Memory Requirements
The Boot Agent modules have the following memory space requirements. Note that
these values are approximate and might increase with future releases of the Boot
Agent.
Memory Requirements
Initialization
Runtime
10/100 Fast Ethernet
Monolithic Image
45 KB
4 KB
56 KB
4 KB
55 KB
4 KB
62 KB
4 KB
1 GbE
Monolithic Image
10 GbE (PCIe)
Monolithic Image
40 GbE (PCIe)
Monolithic Image
4.2
BootUtil
BootUtil is provided for DOS, EFI (IA64 and x64 versions), Windows (IA32 and x64
versions) and Linux (IA32 and x64 versions). For Windows and Linux, BootUtil must
first be installed before using. See the installation instructions provided with BootUtil
for details.
6
10/100/1000 Mb/s, 10 GbE & 40 GbE Ethernet Controllers—Boot Agent Application Notes
Images are created with Bootutil by using the following command line parameters:
• devid=0xyyyy – This specifies the PCI device ID of the target device, where yyyy
represents the four hexadecimal digit value of the ID.
• di=(desired contents of the image) – This specifies the components that can be
included in the resulting image. Separate each entry with a plus (+) sign and no
spaces. Possible values are;
— PXE - for legacy PXE)
— iSCSI - for legacy Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI) boot
— FCoE - for legacy Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) boot
— EFI - for x64 version of the UEFI driver
— CLP - for the SMASH/CLP agent, which is needed in cases where multiple legacy
expansion ROMs co-exist in a single combination ROM image.
• LOM - This specifies that the resulting output file should be formatted for inclusion
in a BIOS for a LOM implementation and created with a file name extension of
.LOM. If this is not specified on the command line, the resulting image is formatted
for storage on a Flash chip locally attached to the controller and created with a file
name extension of .NIC. LOM images normally contain only one component and
only PXE, iSCSI boot or FCoE boot.
Example 1, using Bootutil to create a PXE LOM image for device ID 0x1533:
Bootutil -devid=0x1533 -di=pxe -lom
Example 2, using Bootutil to create a combo image for a NIC with a device ID of
0x1533 containing PXE, iSCSI boot and EFI:
Bootutil -devid=0x1533 -di=pxe+iscsi+clp+efi
7
Boot Agent Application Notes—10/100/1000 Mb/s, 10 GbE & 40 GbE Ethernet Controllers
5.0
PCI 3.0 Considerations
If the BIOS reports itself as supporting PCI firmware version 3.0 or higher, it must also
set the BX CPU register to the final memory address of the option ROM memory area
before calling the initialization code. This, and the required input parameters, are
detailed in the PCI Firmware 3.0 (BIOS) specification. The PXE software has no method
to validate this address and, therefore, uses whatever value the BIOS passes in. For
example, if the option ROM is loaded at 0xC900:0, BX then needs to be set to 0xC900
before calling the PXE initialization code.
The size of the destination block in the Upper Memory Block (UMB) must be at least the
run-time size as specified in the PCI Data Structure (PCIR) header of the option ROM. If
not, the system might not be able to boot.
The initialization/UNDI component is created with an integrated table of all supported
PCI ID's. A PCI 2.x BIOS does not use this table; it only associates with the PCI ID that
was specified to BootUtil on the command line when it was created. A PCI 3.0 BIOS
supports all ID's listed in the table in the initialization/UNDI component.
A PCI 3.0 BIOS should restrict embedded PXE for LOMs only. It must not allow it to load
for compatible plug-in NICs, as they should carry their own version if applicable.
5.1
Differences Between PCI 2.x and PCI 3.0 Implementations
5.1.1
PCI 2.x BIOS
A complete image must be built for each individual controller. Also, each image contains
one and only one UNDI.
5.1.2
PCI 3.0 BIOS
• If using monolithic images, only one image is needed for multiple controllers,
assuming they are of the same family (such as all GbE controllers).
6.0
EEPROM Considerations
The adapter EEPROM image holds the Boot Agent configuration data in words 0x30
through 0x3E for 1 GbE components, and words 0x30 through 0x36 for 10 GbE
components, with the checksum stored in word 0x3F. Configuration data can be stored
for up to four interfaces. Refer to the documentation for your specific Ethernet
component for details.
The Boot Agent writes up to four interfaces to the EEPROM when it initializes under
some circumstances.
• If the Boot Agent version number stored in word 0x32 does not match the actual
Boot Agent version, it corrects the version number.
• If configuration changes are made via the setup utility that is built into the Boot
Agent and invoked by pressing Ctrl-S when the appropriate prompt appears after
POST, any changes are written to the EEPROM.
8
10/100/1000 Mb/s, 10 GbE & 40 GbE Ethernet Controllers—Boot Agent Application Notes
7.0
EEPROM Contents
The EEPROM configuration data in this section is included for reference purposes only.
The EEPROM images supplied for Intel Ethernet controllers are properly configured by
default. Editing the EEPROM image should only be done after verifying the changes with
your Intel technical representative.
7.1
Compatibility — Word 0x03 (1 GbE Controllers); Word
0x10 (10 GbE Controllers)
Bit(s)
15:12
Name
Function
N/A
Component specific. Refer to the appropriate datasheet for your Ethernet controller.
11
LOM
This bit indicates whether the NVM attached to the Ethernet controller contains a
dedicated area for storing option ROM firmware. This bit is used by option ROM
software update utilities to decide whether or not to enable updating the option ROM
firmware as well as whether or not to allow enabling/disabling the option ROM by
means of the PCI Expansion ROM Base Address Register (BAR).
0b = NIC (Attached Flash has an area for storing option ROM firmware).
1b = LOM (Attached Flash has no area for storing option ROM firmware). This bit must
be set for a LOM. If not, the utility software might enable the expansion ROM BAR,
which can cause failures in designs lacking the corresponding dedicated Flash.
Note: This bit is not applicable to the 40 GbE capable controllers (X710/XL710). All
option ROMs are stored locally on these devices.
10:0
N/A
Component specific. Refer to the appropriate datasheet for your Ethernet controller.
9
Boot Agent Application Notes—10/100/1000 Mb/s, 10 GbE & 40 GbE Ethernet Controllers
7.2
Main Setup Options (Word 0x30)
Configuring software is controlled by the EEPROM on a NIC. The Main Setup options are
stored in word 0x30. These options are those that can be changed by the user via the
Control-S setup menu or by using the BootUtil.exe utility. On the X710 and XL710
controllers, this field is a pointer to the start of the PXE setup options block. See the
Intel® Ethernet Controller XL710 Datasheet for those devices for details. Word 0x30
has the following format.
Bit(s)
Name
Function
15
RFU
Reserved. Must be 0b.
14
RFU
Reserved. Must be 0b.
13
RFU
Reserved. Must be 0b.
FSD
Bits 12:10 control forcing speed and duplex during driver operation. Valid values are:
000b = Auto-negotiate.
001b = 10 Mb/s Half duplex.
010b = 100 Mb/s Half duplex.
011b = Not valid (treated as 000b).
100b = Not valid (treated as 000b).
101b = 10 Mb/s Full duplex.
110b = 100 Mb/s Full duplex.
111b = 1000 Mb/s Full duplex.
Only applicable for twisted-pair copper adapters. Default value is 0x000. This setting
is not documented in the datasheet, as it can have negative consequences if used
inappropriately.
9
LWS
Legacy OS Wakeup Support. (For 82559-based adapters only) If set to 1b, the agent
enables PME in the NIC’s PCI configuration space during initialization. This enables
remote wake up under legacy operating systems that don’t normally support it. Note
that enabling this makes the NIC technically non-compliant with the ACPI
specification, which is why the default is disabled.
0b = Disabled (default value).
1b = Enabled.
8
DSM
Display Setup Message. If the bit is set to 1b, the “Press Control-S” message is
displayed after the title message. Default value is 1b.
12:10
Prompt Time. These bits control how long the “Press Control-S” setup prompt
message is displayed, if enabled by DIM.
00b = 2 seconds (default)
01b = 3 seconds
10bb = 5 seconds
11 = 0 seconds
Note: The Ctrl-S message is not displayed if the zero seconds prompt time is
selected.
7:6
10
PT
10/100/1000 Mb/s, 10 GbE & 40 GbE Ethernet Controllers—Boot Agent Application Notes
Bit(s)
5
4:3
2:0
7.3
Name
Function
iBD
iSCSI Boot Disabled. When the iSCSI Boot Disabled bit is set and the adapter port is
neither iSCSI primary nor secondary, the setup code must not be loaded; Otherwise,
the iSCSI banner and Setup menu should be accessible.
0b = iSCSI enabled.
1b = iSCSI disabled.
DBS
Default Boot Selection. These bits select which device is the default boot device.
These bits are only used if the agent detects that the BIOS does not support boot
order selection or if the MODE field of word 0x31 is set to MODE_LEGACY.
00b = Network boot, then local boot.
01b = Local boot, then network boot.
10b = Network boot only.
11b = Local boot only.
PS
Protocol Select. These bits select the boot protocol.
000b = PXE enabled on this port.
001b = This port disabled for PXE, iSCSI boot and FCoE.
010b = This port is the iSCSI boot primary port.
011b = This port is the iSCSI boot secondary port.
100b = This port enabled for FCoE.
101b = Invalid.
110b = Invalid.
111b = Invalid.
Configuration Customization Options (Word 0x31)
Word 0x31 of the EEPROM contains settings that can be programmed by an OEM or
network administrator to customize the operation of the software. These settings
cannot be changed from within the Control-S setup menu. The lower byte contains
settings typically configured by a network administrator using the BootUtil.exe utility
since these settings generally control which setup menu options are changeable. The
upper byte is generally settings for use by OEMs to control the operation of the agent in
a LOM environment, although there is nothing in the agent to prevent their use on a
NIC implementation. On the X710 and XL710 controllers, this field is a pointer to the
start of the PXE Configuration Customization options block. See the datasheet for those
devices for details. Word 0x31 has the following format.
11
Boot Agent Application Notes—10/100/1000 Mb/s, 10 GbE & 40 GbE Ethernet Controllers
Bit(s)
Name
Function
15:14
SIG
Signature. Must be set to 01b to indicate that the agent or other configuration
software has programmed this word.
13
RFU
Reserved. Must be 0b.
12
RFU
Reserved. Must be 0b.
11
RETRY
If set to 1b, enables continuous retry. If enabled, this feature modifies the boot
agent behavior to continually attempt to connect to the server until the server
becomes available. The default is 0b. This feature is not documented in the
datasheet, since it can have negative consequences if used inappropriately.
Selects the agent’s boot order setup mode. This field changes the agent’s default
behavior in order to make it compatible with systems that do not completely
support the BBS and PnP Expansion ROM standards. Valid values and their
meanings are:
10:8
MODE
000b
Normal behavior. The agent attempts to detect BBS and PnP expansion
ROM support as it normally does.
001b
Force Legacy Mode. The agent does not attempt to detect BBS or PnP
Expansion ROM support in the BIOS and assumes the BIOS is not
compliant. User’s can change the BIOS boot order in the Setup Menu.
010b
Force BBS Mode. The agent assumes the BIOS is BBS-compliant, even
though it might not be detected as such by the agent’s detection code.
User’s CANNOT change the BIOS boot order in the Setup Menu.
011b
Force PnP Int18 Mode. The agent assumes the BIOS enables boot order
setup for PnP Expansion ROMs and hooks interrupt 0x18 (to inform the
BIOS that the agent is a bootable device) in addition to registering as a
BBS IPL device. User’s CANNOT change the BIOS boot order in the Setup
Menu.
100b
Force PnP Int19 Mode. The agent assumes the BIOS enables boot order
setup for PnP Expansion ROMs and hooks interrupt 0x19 (to inform the
BIOS that the agent is a bootable device) in addition to registering as a
BBS IPL device. User’s CANNOT change the BIOS boot order in the Setup
Menu.
101b
Reserved for future use. If specified, is treated as a value of 000b.
110b
Reserved for future use. If specified, is treated as a value of 000b.
111b
Reserved for future use. If specified, is treated as a value of 000b.
7
RFU
Reserved. Must be 0b.
6
RFU
Reserved. Must be 0b.
5
DFU
Disable Flash Update. If this bit is set to 1b, the user is not allowed to update the
Flash image using Intel PROSet for Windows* Device Manager. Default value is 0b.
4
DLWS
Disable Legacy Wakeup Support. If this bit is set to 1b, the user is not allowed to
change the Legacy OS Wakeup Support menu option. Default value is 0b.
Disable Boot Selection. If this bit is set to 1b, the user is not allowed to change the
boot order menu option. Default value is 0b.
3
12
DBS
10/100/1000 Mb/s, 10 GbE & 40 GbE Ethernet Controllers—Boot Agent Application Notes
Bit(s)
7.4
Name
Function
2
DPS
Disable Protocol Select. If set to 1b, the user is not allowed to change the boot
protocol. Default value is 0b.
1
DTM
Disable Title Message. If this bit is set to 1b, the title message displaying the
version of the boot agent is suppressed; the Control-S message is also suppressed.
This is for OEMs who do not want the boot agent to display any messages at
system boot. Default value is 0b.
0
DSM
Disable Setup Menu. If this bit is set to 1b, the user is not allowed to invoke the
setup menu by pressing Control-S. In this case, the EEPROM can only be changed
via an external program. Default value is 0b.
Boot Agent Version (Word 0x32)
Word 0x32 of the EEPROM is used to store the version of the boot agent that is stored
in the Flash image. When the boot agent loads, it can check this value to determine if
any first-time configuration needs to be performed. The agent then updates this word
with its version. Some diagnostic tools that report the version of the boot agent in the
Flash also read this word. The format of this word is:
Bit(s)
15:12
7.5
Name
Function
MAJ
PXE Boot Agent Major Version. Default value is 0b.
11:8
MIN
PXE Boot Agent Minor Version. Default value is 0b.
7:0
BLD
PXE Boot Agent Build Number. Default value is 0b.
IBA Capabilities (Word 0x33)
Word 0x33 of the EEPROM is used to enumerate the boot technologies programmed
into the Flash. This is updated by IBA configuration tools and is not updated or read by
IBA.
Bit(s)
Name
Function
15:14
SIG
Signature. Must be set to 01b to indicate that this word has been programmed by
the agent or other configuration software.
13
APD
Allow PXE Disable. If this bit is set to 1b, PXE reads the setup options word
associated to the port and only executes if PXE is enabled (bits 2:0 = 000b). If this
bit is set to 0b, PXE executes when called regardless of the individual port setting.
The default value is 0b.
12:6
RFU
Reserved. Must be 0b.
5
FCoE
FCoE boot capability is present in Flash if this bit is set to 1b (applicable to PCIe 10
GbE connections).
4
iSCSI
iSCSI boot capability is present in Flash if set to a 1b (applicable to PCIe GbE and
10 GbE connections).
3
EFI
EFI UNDI capability is present in Flash if set to a 1b.
2
RPL
No longer used.
1
UNDI
PXE/UNDI capability is present in Flash if set to a 1b.
0
BC
PXE base code is present in Flash if set to a 1b.
13
Boot Agent Application Notes—10/100/1000 Mb/s, 10 GbE & 40 GbE Ethernet Controllers
7.6
IBA Secondary Port Configuration (Words 0x34 and 0x35)
Words 0x34 and 0x35 are used to provide a unique configuration for the second port of
multiple MAC devices such as the 82546. The format is the same as that used in words
0x30 and 0x31 for the first port. For X710/XL710, see the datasheet for details.
7.7
iSCSI Option ROM Version (Word 0x36)
NVM Word 0x36 is used to store the version of the iSCSI Option ROM. It is stored in the
same format as the PXE Version at Word 0x32. For the X710 or XL710, see the
datasheet for details.
7.8
IBA Port Three Configuration (Words 0x38 and 0x39)
Words 0x38 and 0x39 are used to provide a unique configuration for the third port of
quad MAC devices such as the 82580. These words are not used by 10 GbE
components. The format is the same as that used in words 0x30 and 0x31 for the first
port.
7.9
IBA Port Four Configuration (Words 0x3A and 0x3B)
Words 0x3A and 0x3B are used to provide a unique configuration for the fourth port of
quad port MAC devices such as the 82580. These words are not used by 10 GbE
components. The format is the same as that used in words 0x30 and 0x31 for the first
port. For X710/XL710. See the datasheet for details.
7.10
VLAN Configuration Block Pointer (Word 0x3C)
Word 0x3C contains a pointer to the starting address of the VLAN configuration block
for GbE PCIe products (address 0x20 is used for 10 GbE PCIe devices). A value of
0xFFFF or 0x0000 in this location means that the block is not present, thus PXE VLAN
tagging is not possible for a given adapter/NIC. This feature is only available on PCIe
devices (see Section 8.0). For X710/XL710, see the datasheet for details.
7.11
iSCSI Boot Block Pointer (Word 0x3D)
Word 0x3D contains a pointer to the starting address of the iSCSI boot configuration
block for GbE PCIe products (address 0x17 is used for 10 GbE PCIe devices). This
feature is only available on PCIe devices. For X710/XL710, see the datasheet for
details.
8.0
VLAN / 802.1p Support
Starting with GbE PXE version 1.3.95, 10 GbE PXE version 2.2.05 and 40 GbE PXE
version 1.0.00, VLAN tagging and priority tagging is supported on PCIe devices only.
This feature is not disclosed in end user documentation. The EEPROM image must be
configured for VLAN support before software utilities enable the setting of VLAN or
priority.
To specify a priority value, the command line parameter –PXEVLANPRIORITY =
<PRIORITYVALUE> must be used in conjunction with the –PXEVLAN parameter. If the –
PXEVLANPRIORITY parameter is used without the –PXEVLAN parameter, it is ignored.
This feature is not documented for end users but is available on supported devices.
14
10/100/1000 Mb/s, 10 GbE & 40 GbE Ethernet Controllers—Boot Agent Application Notes
Values passed to the -PXEVLAN option must be a 12-bit number, in a range from 0 to
4095 (FFF in hexadecimal), specified in decimal or hexadecimal form. A value of 0
disables VLANs and a value from 1 to 4095 enables VLANs and set the stated VLAN
number. Any value exceeding this range is rejected by BootUtil.
A hexadecimal form must be preceded by a 0x prefix. For example, PXEVLAN=0x24.
Also, a decimal form must not be preceded by any prefix. For example, PXEVLAN=36.
When –PXEVLANPRIORITY is entered, the option value is used as a VLAN priority value,
in a range of 0 to 7, specified in decimal or hexadecimal form.
A hexadecimal form must be preceded by the 0x prefix. For example,
PXEVLANPRIORITY=0x5.
• A decimal form must not be preceded by any prefix. For example,
PXEVLANPRIORITY=5.
• In all cases, the Bootutil command must also specify the NIC number. For example,
BootUtil –NIC=5 –PXEVLAN=0x23 –PXEVLANPRIORITY=0x2.
The EEPROM stores the VLAN configuration in a block. The starting address of the block
is defined in word 0x3C for GbE PCIe devices and word 0x20 for 10 GbE PCIe devices.
The total size of the block varies depending on how many ports the device supports.
One, two or four ports can be supported.
VLAN configuration data is stored in the PXE VLAN configuration block as listed in the
following table:
Configuration Item
Size in Bytes
Comments
VLAN Block Signature
2
V and L.
Structure Version
1
Version of this structure. Should be set to 1b.
Block Size
1
Total byte size of the configuration block.
Port 0 VLAN Tag
2
VLAN tag and priority values for the first port of the Ethernet
controller (see bit definition in the table that follows for details).
A value of zero means no VLAN is configured for the port.
Port 1 VLAN Tag
2
VLAN tag and priority values for the second port of the Ethernet
controller (see bit definitions in the table that follows for
details). A value of zero means no VLAN is configured for the
port.
Port 2 VLAN Tag
2
VLAN tag and priority values for the fourth port of the Ethernet
controller (see bit definitions in the table that follows for
details). A value of zero means no VLAN is configured for the
port.
Port 3 VLAN Tag
2
VLAN tag and priority values for the third port of the Ethernet
controller (see bit definitions in the table that follows for
details). A value of zero means no VLAN is configured for the
port.
15
Boot Agent Application Notes—10/100/1000 Mb/s, 10 GbE & 40 GbE Ethernet Controllers
The VLAN tag value and priority tag value is stored separately for every port, as listed
in the previous table named Port x VLAN tag, where x is a port number in the range of
0 to 3), one NVM word per port (16 bits), and in following form:
Bits
Field Name
15:13
Priority (0:7)
12
Reserved, always 0x0
11:0
VLAN ID (1 to 4095)
VLAN Block Examples
9.0
4C56 0601 E01A
1 port device, set to priority 7 and VLAN 0x1A (26d)
4C56 0801 0000 C001
2 port device, port 1 set to VLAN disabled, port 2 set to priority 6
and VLAN 0x1
4C56 0C01 0000 0000 0000 0000
4 port device, VLAN disabled on all ports
Troubleshooting Tips
• The Intel boot agent is a BEV device, and does not operate correctly if configured
as a BCV device.
• Unpredictable results can be due to extraneous copies of the option ROM in the
BIOS image. As BIOS are developed and maintained, sometimes whole copies of
old versions of the boot agent, or individual components, become orphaned in the
BIOS image. Search out and eliminate any extra copies of the option ROM.
• When using split images, all components should be updated, not just the UNDI.
Updates and fixes are frequently made to other components, and they all should be
updated to the same release.
• Legacy expansion ROMs, such as the Intel Boot Agent, are limited by the legacy
BIOS architecture to a maximum of 32-bit memory access. If the BIOS assigns a
memory BAR to the controller that is above 32-bit, the Boot Agent is unable to
access the device. In this case, there are 4 options to consider:
Table 1.
a.
Configure the BIOS to only assign 32-bit memory BAR addresses.
b.
Modify the BIOS to selectively assign 32-bit memory BAR addresses to devices
that support PXE.
c.
Configure the Ethernet controller to only request 32-bit memory BAR addresses.
All Intel PCIe Ethernet controllers have EEPROM settings that limit the device to
advertising only 32-bit memory BAR support.
d.
If the BIOS is UEFI capable, implement a UEFI-based solution instead of legacy
PXE. Memory addressing is not a limitation of the UEFI environment.
Boot Agent Error Messages
Message Text
16
Cause/Comments
Invalid PMM function number.
PMM is not installed or is not working correctly.
PMM allocation error.
PMM could not or did not allocate the requested amount of memory for driver
usage.
PXE-E01: PCI Vendor and Device IDs do not
match!
The device ID of the interface is not on the Boot Agent list of supported ID's.
Validate that the device ID is correct. Programmers might need a newer
version of the Boot Agent.
10/100/1000 Mb/s, 10 GbE & 40 GbE Ethernet Controllers—Boot Agent Application Notes
Message Text
Cause/Comments
PXE-E04: Error reading PCI configuration
space. The Intel Boot Agent cannot continue.
PCI configuration space could not be read. The Boot Agent was unable to
read one or more of the NIC's PCI configuration registers. The Boot Agent
returns control to the BIOS and does not attempt to remote boot. Try using a
newer version of the Boot Agent.
PXE-E05: The LAN adapter's configuration is
corrupted or has not been initialized. The
Intel Boot Agent cannot continue.
The Boot Agent determined that the adapter EEPROM checksum is incorrect.
The agent returns control to the BIOS and does not attempt to remote boot.
On products that use a shared Flash, such as the 82566, 82567, 82577,
82578, or 82579 in combination with the ICH or PCH, insure that the BIOS
has set the VSCC values correctly, and that an adequate number of blocks of
Flash have been allocated to store two complete versions of the boot agent.
Refer to the SPI Flash Programming Guide for the chipset you are using.
PXE-E06: Option ROM requires DDIM
support.
The system BIOS does not support DDIM. The BIOS does not support the
mapping of the PCI expansion ROMs into upper memory as required by the
PCI specification. The Intel Boot Agent cannot function in this system. The
Intel Boot Agent returns control to the BIOS and does not attempt to remote
boot.
PXE-E07: PCI BIOS calls not supported.
BIOS-level PCI services not available. System is probably not PCI compliant.
PXE-E09: Unexpected UNDI loader error.
Status == xx
The UNDI loader returned an unknown error status. xx is the status
returned.
PXE-E20: BIOS extended memory copy error.
BIOS could not move the image into extended memory.
PXE-E20: BIOS extended memory copy error.
AH == xx
Error occurred while trying to copy the image into extended memory. xx is
the BIOS failure code.
PXE-E51: No DHCP or BOOTP offers received.
The Boot Agent did not receive any DHCP or BOOTP responses to its initial
request. Please make sure that the DHCP server (and/or proxy DHCP server,
if one is in use) is properly configured and has sufficient IP addresses
available for lease. If you are using BOOTP instead, make sure that the
BOOTP service is running and is properly configured. This is most likely a
network configuration problem.
PXE-E53: No boot filename received.
The Boot Agent received a DHCP or BOOTP offer, but has not received a valid
file name to download. If using PXE, check the PXE and BINL configuration. If
using BOOTP, be sure that the TFTP service is running and that the specific
path and file name are correct. This is most likely a network configuration
problem.
PXE-E61: Media test failure.
The NIC does not detect link. Make sure that the cable is good and is
attached to a working hub or switch. The link light visible from the back of
the NIC should be lit.
PXE-EC1: Base-code ROM ID structure was
not found.
No base code could be located. An incorrect Flash image is installed or the
image has become corrupted. This should only happen on split ROM
configurations.
PXE-EC3: BC ROM ID structure is invalid.
Base code could not be installed. An incorrect Flash image is installed or the
image has become corrupted. This should only happen on split ROM
configurations.
PXE-EC4: UNDI ROM ID structure was not
found.
UNDI ROM ID structure signature is incorrect. An incorrect Flash image is
installed or the image has become corrupted. This should only happen on
split ROM configurations.
PXE-EC5: UNDI ROM ID structure is invalid.
The structure length is incorrect. An incorrect Flash image is installed or the
image has become corrupted. This should only happen on split ROM
configurations.
PXE-EC6: UNDI driver image is invalid.
The UNDI driver image signature was invalid. An incorrect Flash image is
installed or the image has become corrupted. This should only happen on
split ROM configurations.
17
Boot Agent Application Notes—10/100/1000 Mb/s, 10 GbE & 40 GbE Ethernet Controllers
Message Text
18
Cause/Comments
PXE-EC8:!PXE structure was not found in
UNDI driver code segment.
The Boot Agent could not locate the needed !PXE structure resource.
When PXE tries to boot the system, it copies the data from PMM memory to
conventional memory (below 640 KB). Then it tries to find the !PXE data
structure that is embedded in the UNDI driver code segment. This error
implies that the BIOS is either corrupting the PMM memory area after PXE
saves itself in conventional memory, or the memory allocated by PMM is not
writeable and therefore the PXE image doesn't get saved correctly. This can
also be caused by the memory BAR being set above the 4G boundary.
PXE-EC9: PXENV + structure was not found
in UNDI driver code segment.
The Boot Agent could not locate the needed PXENV+ structure. An incorrect
Flash image is installed or the image has become corrupted. This can be
caused by the memory BAR being set above the 4G boundary.
PXE-M0F: Exiting Intel Boot Agent.
Ending execution of the ROM image.
This option has been locked and cannot be
changed.
There was an attempt to change a configuration setting that has been locked
by BootUtil. This message appears either from within Intel® PROSet's Boot
Options tab when operating under Windows* or from the Configuration Setup
Menu when operating in a stand-alone environment.
PXE-M0E: Retrying network boot; press ESC
to cancel.
The Boot Agent did not successfully complete a network boot due to a
network error (such as not receiving a DHCP offer). The Boot Agent
continues to attempt to boot from the network until successful or until
canceled by the user. This only happens if the continuous retry feature is
enabled in the Custom Configuration word in the EEPROM for this port.
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