confident cooking - North Dakota Beef Commission

confident cooking - North Dakota Beef Commission
CONFIDENT
COOKING
with
BEEF
America’s Favorite
Table of Contents
America’s Favorite
3
Nutrient-Rich Beef
4-5
Making the Grade
6
Keep It Safe
7
Beef Made Easy
8-11
How Much to Buy
12
Get Ready to Cook
13-14
Determining Doneness
15
Matching Cooking Methods to Cuts
16
Grilling 17-19
Pan-Broiling 20-21
Pan-Frying (Sautéing)
22-23
Just a whiff of a steak sizzling on
the grill or the thought of a thick, juicy
burger will start your mouth watering.
Easy, nutritious and delicious – beef is
America’s favorite protein choice.
Confident Cooking with Beef is designed to
provide the basics about beef – from what
to look for in the supermarket to putting
the best beef classics on your table. Enjoy!
The Meat Case Today
The beef aisles are brimming with exciting choices.
In addition to the traditional variety of steaks, roasts
and ground beef, there are several new steaks.
These cuts include:
Beef Shoulder Top Blade Steak (Flat Iron)
24-25
Beef Shoulder Center Steak (Ranch)
N E W CU TS
Stir-Frying
Beef Shoulder Petite Tender
Beef Round Sirloin Tip Center Steak
Broiling
Roasting
26-27
28-31
Braising (Pot Roasting) 32-33
Cooking Beef in Liquid (Stewing)
34-35
Beef Bottom Round Steak (Western Griller)
These new cuts are moderately priced and have been
carefully selected for their palatability, tenderness
and flavor. They are the result of an innovative cutting
approach pioneered by the beef industry.
What’s more, the growing array of convenient beef
products make mealtime extra easy. Favorite entreés
like pot roast, barbecued beef, meatloaf and meatballs
are available fully-cooked, microwavable and ready to
heat and serve. They deliver home-cooked flavor in
just a few minutes.
Nutrient-Rich Beef
29 Ways to Love Lean Beef
sat. fat total fat
Beef not only tastes great, it’s
naturally nutrient-rich and easily
fits into a healthful diet.
Choose Your Calories by the Company They Keep
A 3-ounce serving of lean beef (179 calories) contributes less than
10 percent of calories to a 2,000-calorie diet, yet it supplies more
than 10 percent of the Daily Value for:
Excellent Source
of these nutrients
Zinc
38%
Beef is a
Good Source
of these nutrients
37%
20%
12%
Riboflavin
14%
Iron
15%
B6
17%
Niacin
Phosphorus
Selenium
26%
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, 2005.
USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 18. Nutrient
Data Laboratory homepage www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp
The Facts on Fat
It is a common misperception that the majority of
beef’s fatty acids are saturated. In reality, beef is just
like most other foods that contain fat – it has a fatty acid
package containing various amounts of saturated fat,
monounsaturated fat and polyunsaturated fat. In fact,
half of the fatty acids in lean beef are monounsaturated,
the same heart-healthy type found in olive oil.
Lean Beef
There are 29 cuts of beef that meet government guidelines
for “lean,” defined as (per 100 g, 3.5 oz. cooked serving):
n Less than 10 g total fat
n 4.5 g or less saturated fat
n Less than 95 mg cholesterol.
0.9 g
There are
29 Cuts of
Lean Beef with a
total fat content
that falls between
a skinless
chicken breast
and skinless
chicken thigh
when comparing
cooked 3-ounce
servings.
3.0 g
1.4 g
4.0 g
1.6 g
4.1 g
1.6 g
4.6 g
1.7 g
4.9 g
Top Sirloin Steak
1.9 g
4.9 g
Brisket, Flat Half
1.9 g
5.1 g
95% Lean Ground Beef
B12
Protein
51% Beef is an
Skinless Chicken
Breast
Eye Round Roast
and Steak*
Sirloin Tip Side
Steak
Top Round Roast
and Steak*
Bottom Round Roast
and Steak*
2.4 g
5.1 g
Round Tip Roast
and Steak*
1.9 g
5.3 g
Round Steak
1.9 g
5.3 g
Shank Cross Cuts
1.9 g
5.4 g
1.8 g
5.7 g
Chuck Shoulder
Pot Roast
Sirloin Tip Center
Roast and Steak*
2.1 g
5.8 g
Chuck Shoulder Steak
1.9 g
6.0 g
Bottom Round Steak
(Western Griller)
2.2 g
6.0 g
Top Loin (Strip) Steak
2.3 g
6.0 g
Shoulder Petite Tender
and Medallions*
2.4 g
6.1 g
Flank Steak
2.6 g
6.3 g
Shoulder Center Steak
(Ranch) Tri-Tip Roast
and Steak*
Tenderloin Roast
and Steak*
2.4 g
6.5 g
T-Bone Steak
Skinless Chicken Thigh
2.6 g
7.1 g
2.7 g
7.1 g
3.0 g
2.6 g
8.2 g
9.2 g
*Cuts combined for illustration purposes.
Source: US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, 2005.
USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 18. Based on
cooked servings, visible fat trimmed.
Making The Grade
Keep It Safe
Meat Inspection =
safe and wholesome meat
When shopping, pick up beef just before checking out.
If it will take longer than 30 minutes to get it home, keep
it cold in a cooler in the car.
The wholesomeness of the U.S. meat
supply is ensured by meat inspection.
All meat that is sold must, by law,
pass inspection. Meat products are
among the most highly regulated
and supervised products in the
food supply. Everyone pays for
meat inspection through taxes.
Meat Grading =
taste and tenderness
The meat grading program is
administered by the U.S. Department of
Agriculture (USDA). Beef quality grades
indicate palatability characteristics such as
tenderness, juiciness and flavor. There are eight
quality grades for beef which reflect the amount of
marbling (fat within the lean), firmness, color and
texture of the beef, and the maturity of the animal.
Generally, only three grades are identified and sold
at retail: Prime, Choice and Select.
n
Prime has the most marbling.
It usually is sold to restaurants,
although some specialty meat
markets and supermarkets
may carry it.
n
Choice cuts tend to have a
little less marbling. Choice is the
most widely available grade
in the market.
n
Select has the least amount
of marbling, making it leaner
but often less juicy and flavorful
than the other two grades.
Grading is optional and is paid for by meat processors.
Just over half of the beef available is graded.
At-Home Storage
Ground meats are
n Refrigerate or freeze as soon as
more perishable than
possible after purchasing.
roasts or steaks.
During grinding,
n Label each package with the
more surface area is
date, name of beef cut and
exposed, resulting in
weight or number of servings.
Practice the FIFO inventory
shorter shelf life.
system—first in, first out.
n Freeze beef in its original transparent wrap up to
two weeks. For longer storage, wrap in heavy-duty
aluminum foil or place in plastic freezer bags; remove
as much air as possible.
n Refrigerate leftovers promptly after serving (within
two hours after cooking).
Refrigerator And Freezer Storage Guidelines
Recommended Storage Times for Maximum Quality
Beef Cut
Refrigerator
(35°F to 40°F)
Freezer
(0°F or below)
FRESH BEEF
Steaks, Roasts3 to 4 days6 to 12 months
Beef for Stew,
Kabobs or Stir-Fry2 to 3 days6 to 12 months
Ground Beef1 to 2 days3 to 4 months
LEFTOVER COOKED BEEF
All3 to 4 days2 to 3 months
CURED/SMOKED/READY-TO-SERVE BEEF
Corned Beef,
ready-to-cook1 week2 weeks
Frankfurters,
Deli Meats3 to 5 days1 to 2 months
Sausage, smoked1 week
Not recommended
Sausage, dry and
semi-dry, unsliced2 to 3 weeks
Not recommended
Defrosting Guidelines
Always defrost beef in the refrigerator, never at room temperature.
Place frozen package on a plate or tray to catch any juices and place
in the refrigerator accordingto chart. Approximate
Refrigeration Time
(at 35°F to 40°F)
Beef Cut
Thickness
Steaks 1/2 to 3/4 inch12 hours
Ground Beef* Beef for Stew, Kabob 1 to 1-1/2 inches24 hours
or Stir-Fry
Small Roasts Varies3 to 5 hours Thin Pot Roasts
per pound
Large Roasts Varies
4 to 7 hours
Thick Pot Roasts
per pound
*Cook as soon as possible after defrosting.
Beef
Made
Easy
Matching the
correct beef
cut to the
appropriate
cooking method
is the key to
moist, juicy,
flavorful beef.
There are beef
choices to
satisfy all tastes,
schedules and
budgets. But
choosing the
right cut can
be confusing.
Knowing what
to look for when
buying beef and
how to read the
label will help
you make wise
choices for your
meals.
Thanks to
industry efforts,
today’s beef
cuts are more
standardized.
Labeling is
improved,
and there is
more nutrition
and cooking
information
available at the
point of sale.
Understanding the Label
The meat package label identifies the kind of meat
(i.e., Beef), the wholesale (primal) cut and the retail
cut name. It also
includes the weight,
price per pound, total
2 0 1 0 2 4 9 0 4 0 1 9
price, sell-by-date
U.S.D.A. CHOICE BEEF
and safe handling
EYE OF ROUND STEAK
instructions. It
SAFE HANDLING INSTRUCTIONS
THIS PRODUCT WAS PREPARED Serving Size Servings
may also include
INSPECTED AND PASSED MEAT
4 oz. (112g) varied
AND/OR POULTRY. SOME FOOD
PRODUCTS MAY CONTAIN
a grade, nutrition
Amount / Serving
BACTERIA THAT COULD CAUSE
ILLNESS IF THE PRODUCT IS
Cal.240 Fat Cal.140
MISHANDLED OR COOKED
and preparation
IMPROPERLY. FOR YOUR PROTECTION FOLLOW THESE SAFE
Total Fat 16g
25%
information.
HANDLING INSTRUCTIONS.
Other terms you may
see on labels include:
KEEP REFRIGERATED OR
FROZEN. THAW IN REFRIGERATOR OR MICROWAVE.
KEEP RAW MEAT AND
POULTRY SEPARATE FROM
OTHER FOODS. WASH
WORKING SURFACES (INCLUDING CUTTING BOARDS),
UTENSILS, AND HANDS
AFTER TOUCHING RAW
MEAT OR POULTRY.
Sat. Fat 6g
32%
Cholest. 70mg 23%
Sodium 55mg
2%
Total Carb. 0g
0%
Protein 22g
Vit. B6 25% Zinc 20%
Vit. B12 59% Iron 8%
Branded Beef Names –
More and more beef
*Percent Daily Values
COOK THOROUGHLY. (DV) are based on a
in the supermarket
KEEP HOT FOODS HOT, 2000 calorie diet. Not a
REFRIGERATE LEFTsignificant source of
OVERS IMMEDIATELY fibers, sugar, Vitamin A,
carries a brand name
OR DISCARD.
Vitamin C, calcium.
Sell by
on the package.
Mar 29, 06
Branding beef, as
Net Wt/Ct
Unit Price
Total Price
for other products,
delivers a promise to
the consumer. For beef, that promise comes in the form
of attributes such as consistency in taste, tenderness,
juiciness and flavor. Every Branded Beef program is
unique. Most have specifications around grade, aging
and size, and they may offer some kind of satisfaction
guarantee.
Natural – All fresh beef is natural according to the
USDA definition of Natural Beef as “minimally processed
containing no additives.”
Organic – Certified organic beef must carry the
USDA Organic Seal. Organic food is grown, handled
and processed according to stringent United States
Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulations. Grass-Finished – This beef comes from animals that
have been pasture-fed throughout their lives. However,
the majority of U.S. beef is grain-finished. In general,
grain-feeding creates tender beef with the rich flavor
most consumers prefer.
10
Not less than
70% lean/30% fat
Not less than
80% lean/20% fat
Not less than
85% lean/15% fat
Ground Beef Label
Ground beef packages are labeled according to USDA
standards and by supermarket preferences. Lean to fat
ratios vary greatly. The information on the labels will be
expressed percent lean to percent fat (80% lean/20% fat,
for example).
Ground beef labels may also indicate the primal cut
(chuck, round or sirloin) that was used to produce the
ground beef. The primal cut does not correlate to the
percent lean to percent fat. For example, ground chuck is
available in various lean/fat ratios.
What to Look For
n Select beef with a bright cherry-red color, without any
grayish or brown blotches. The exception is vacuumpackaged beef which, in the absence of oxygen, has a
darker purplish-red color. When exposed to the air, it
will turn a bright red.
n Choose beef that is firm to the touch.
n Make sure the package is cold with no holes or tears.
n Choose packages without excessive liquid.
n Purchase beef before the sell-by date.
I R I D E SC E N C E
Occasionally an iridescent sheen may be visible on
sliced cured meats such as ham, dried beef and corned
beef, or on sliced, cooked beef or lamb. This is simply
the effect of bright light (such as daylight or direct
artificial light) on the fibrous cut surface of the meat
and shows up as a very faint multi-colored or rainbow
effect. This does not affect quality, and the meat is
perfectly safe to eat.
11
Get Ready To Cook
How Much To Buy
The amount of beef you need to buy varies with the cut
selected. Cooked yields per pound are related to the amount
of bone, fat trim and cooking method. Refer to the following
chart for helpful guidelines.
Beef Cut
Servings
Per Pound
(3-ounce cooked,
trimmed)
STEAKS
Chuck Shoulder3-1/2
Shoulder Center (Ranch)
4
Shoulder Top Blade (Flat Iron)
4
Chuck Top Blade3
Shoulder Petite Tender Medallions
4
Flank
4
Porterhouse/T-Bone2-1/2
Rib2-1/2
Ribeye3
Bottom Round Steak (Western Griller)
4
Round Sirloin Tip Center
4
Round Sirloin Tip Side 4
Round Tip, thin cut
4
Tenderloin
4
Top (Strip) Loin, boneless
4
Top Round
4
Top Sirloin, boneless
4
ROASTS
Eye Round
4
Ribeye3
Shoulder Petite Tender
4
Rib2-1/2
Round Tip
4
Tenderloin
4
Tri-Tip
4
POT ROASTS
Arm, boneless3
Blade, boneless3
Brisket2-1/2 to 3
Shoulder, boneless3
Handle It Right
n Pat beef dry with paper towels for better browning.
n When stir-frying, partially freeze beef (about 30
minutes) for easier slicing.
n Use a gentle touch with ground beef. Overmixing
will result in burgers, meatballs or meatloaves with a
firm, compact texture.
n When roasting or broiling, place beef on a rack in
the broiler or roasting pan to allow fat to drip away
during cooking.
Keep it Clean
To avoid cross-contamination and prevent foodborne
illnesses, follow these easy steps.
n Wash hands well in hot soapy water before and
after handling meat and other fresh foods.
n Keep raw meat and meat juices away from other
foods, both in the refrigerator and during preparation.
n Wash all utensils, cutting surfaces and counters with
hot, soapy water after contact with raw meat.
n Keep carving boards separate from other food
preparation areas and serving platters.
Cookware Basics
n Choose heavy, good quality pans that are thick
enough to heat evenly without scorching.
n Use the pan size specified in the recipe.
If the pan is too small, the beef will be crowded and
browning will be inhibited. If the pan is too large,
overcooking may result.
n Nonstick pans are easier to clean and allow for
cooking with little or no added fat. Best results are
achieved over medium heat with nonstick pans.
n When cooking with acidic ingredients, such as
tomatoes, citrus juices or wine, use pans with
a nonreactive interior surface such as nonstick,
anodized aluminum, and stainless steel. Reactive
metals such as aluminum and cast iron can affect the
taste and color of dishes with acidic ingredients.
OTHER CUTS
Beef for Stew2-1/2 to 3
Ground Beef
4
Shank Cross Cuts1-1/2 to 2-1/2
Short Ribs1-1/2 to 2-1/2
Short Ribs, boneless2-1/2 to 3
12
13
Get Ready To Cook, co n t i n u e d
The Basics
n High heat can overcook or char the outside of beef cuts
while the interior remains underdone. Overcooking
meat, poultry or fish is not recommended.
n Turn steaks and roasts with tongs. A fork pierces the
beef, allowing loss of flavorful juices.
n Turn ground beef patties with a spatula. Do not press.
Pressing causes the loss of juices and results in a dry
burger.
n Salt beef after cooking or browning. Salt draws out
moisture and inhibits browning.
Marinades and Rubs
Marinades are seasoned liquid mixtures that add flavor
to beef and may help tenderize depending on ingredients.
Always marinate in the refrigerator, never at room
temperature.
n Allow 1/4 to 1/2 cup of marinade for each 1 to 2 pounds
of beef.
n Tender beef cuts only need to be marinated 15 minutes
to 2 hours for flavor.
n Less tender cuts should be marinated in a tenderizing
marinade at least 6 hours, but no more than 24 hours.
Over-marinating will result in a mushy texture.
n A tenderizing marinade must contain an acidic
ingredient (such as lemon juice, vinegar, wine) or a
natural tenderizing enzyme (found in papaya, ginger,
kiwi, pineapple or figs).
n Marinate in a food-safe plastic bag or in a nonreactive
container such as glass or plastic. Turn or stir the beef
occasionally to allow even exposure to the marinade.
n Never save and reuse a marinade. Marinade that has
been in contact with uncooked meat must be brought
to a full rolling boil for at least one minute before it can
be used for basting or as a sauce.
n Before cooking, remove beef from marinade and pat
dry with a paper towel to promote even browning and
prevent steaming.
Determining Doneness
Using a Thermometer:
Roasts
n
Insert an ovenproof meat thermometer prior
to roasting (into the thickest part of the roast,
not resting in fat or touching bone) and leave in
throughout the cooking process.
n Or, check with an instant-read thermometer toward
end of cooking time. Insert (into the thickest part
of the roast, not resting in fat or touching bone)
for about 15 seconds to take a reading. Remove
thermometer; continue cooking, if necessary.
Steaks
n
n
Rubs are seasoning blends applied to the surface of
roasts, steaks and ground beef patties before cooking.
Rubs add flavor to beef but do not tenderize.
n
14
Dry rubs consist of herbs, spices and other dry
seasonings. Paste-type rubs contain small amounts of
wet ingredients, such as oil, crushed garlic or mustard.
n Rubs can be applied just before cooking or in advance
and refrigerated for several hours.
Determine doneness of steaks
(1/2 inch thick or thicker) with
an instant-read thermometer.
Insert horizontally from the
side, so that the thermometer
penetrates the thickest part
or the center of the steak, not
touching bone or fat.
Ground Beef
n
Insert an instant-read thermometer into
the center or thickest part of a meatloaf or meatball;
or horizontally from the side into the center for
patties.
n Cook ground beef (patties, loaves, meatballs) to an
internal temperature of 160°F (medium doneness),
until not pink in center and juices show no pink color.
n Due to the
Medium Rare: Internal temperature 145°F
natural nitrate
content
of certain
ingredients
often used in
meatloaf, such
Medium: Internal temperature 160°F
as onions,
celery and
bell peppers,
meatloaf may
remain pink
Well Done: Internal temperature 170°F
even when a
160°F internal
temperature
has been
reached.
15
16
] Requires marinating
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Classic Beef Cheeseburger
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Total preparation and cooking time: 25 to 30 minutes
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1-1/2
2
4
4
4
8
G RILLIN G
Beef Cut
CHUCK
Chuck 7-Bone Steak
] ] l
Chuck Mock Tender Steak
Chuck Arm Steak l
Chuck Eye Steak, boneless
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Shoulder Top Blade Steak, boneless
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Shoulder Top Blade Steak (Flat Iron)
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Shoulder Steak, boneless
] ] ] l
Shoulder Center Steak (Ranch)
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Shoulder Petite Tender Medallions
Short Ribs l
Chuck Pot Roast l
(Arm, Blade, Shoulder)
Shoulder Tender Petite Roast
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RIB
Rib Steak
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Ribeye Steak
Rib Roast
Ribeye Roast l l
LOIN
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Porterhouse/T-Bone Steak
Top Loin (Strip) Steak,
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Tenderloin Steak
Top Loin Roast, Tenderloin Roast l l
SIRLOIN
Sirloin Steak, Tri-Tip Steak
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Top Sirloin Steak, boneless
Tri-Tip Roast l l
ROUND
] l ] ]
Top Round Steak
Bottom Round Steak (Western Griller) ] ] ]
] ] l
Eye Round Steak
Round Tip Steak, thin cut
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l l l l Sirloin Tip Center Steak
Sirloin Tip Side Steak
] l ] ]
Eye Round, Bottom Round, Rump Roasts l l
Top Round Roast
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Round Tip Roast
SHANK & BRISKET
Brisket, Fresh or Corned l
Shank Cross Cuts l
PLATE & FLANK
] ] ] l
Skirt Steak
Flank Steak l ] ] l
OTHER CUTS
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Ground Beef
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Cubed Steak
Beef for Stew
Beef for Kabobs l l
Cook in Liquid
Braise
Roast
Broil
Grill
Stir-Fry
Pan-Broil/Pan-Fry
Matching Cooking
Methods to Beef Cuts
Ensures Success
pounds ground beef
teaspoons steak seasoning blend
hamburger buns, split
slices cheese
(such as Cheddar, American, Swiss, etc.)
lettuce leaves
tomato slices
1. Combine ground beef and steak seasoning in large bowl,
mixing lightly but thoroughly. Lightly shape into four
3/4-inch thick patties.
2. Place patties on grid over medium, ash-covered coals. Grill,
uncovered, 13 to 15 minutes to medium (160°F) doneness,
until not pink in center and juices show no pink color, turning
occasionally. About 2 minutes before burgers are done,
place buns, cut sides down, on grid. Grill until lightly toasted.
During last minute of grilling, top each burger with cheese.
3. Line bottom of each bun with lettuce leaf; top with tomato
slices and burger. Close sandwiches.
Makes 4 servings.
Nutrition information per serving using 80% lean ground beef and
1 ounce Cheddar cheese: 585 calories; 34 g fat (15 g saturated fat;
13 g monounsaturated fat); 146 mg cholesterol; 819 mg sodium;
23 g carbohydrate; 1.2 g fiber; 44 g protein; 8.5 mg niacin; 0.5 mg vitamin
B6; 3.8 mcg vitamin B12; 4.9 mg iron; 39.8 mcg selenium; 9.2 mg zinc.
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3
Easy Steps to GRILLING BEEF
1 Prepare grill (charcoal or gas) according to manufacturer’s
directions for medium heat.
2 Season beef (directly from the refrigerator) with herbs or
spices, as desired. Place on cooking grid.
3 Grill according to chart, turning occasionally. After cooking,
season beef with salt, if desired.
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17
Grilling Guidelines
Weight/
Beef Cut
Thickness
CHARCOAL GRILLING (uncovered unless noted)
Approximate Total Cooking Time
Medium Rare (145°F) to Medium (160°F)
GAS GRILLING
(covered)
Approximate
Total Cooking Time
Medium Rare (145°F)
to Medium (160°F)
CHUCK
(minutes) (minutes)
Shoulder Top Blade Steak (Flat Iron)
8 ounces each10 to 14 (grill covered) 12 to 16
Shoulder Steak, boneless (marinate)3/4 inch14 to 17 9 to 12
1 inch16 to 20 15 to 19
8 to 11
Shoulder Center Steak (Ranch) 3/4 inch
9 to 11 (grill covered)
1 inch 11 to 14 (grill covered)12 to 16
14 to 18 (grill covered) 14 to 19
Shoulder Petite Tender Roast 8 to 12 ounces each G R ILLIN G
(minutes)
(minutes)
RIB
Rib Steak, small end3/4 inch6 to 8 7 to 10
1 inch
9 to 12 10 to 15
Ribeye Steak3/4 inch6 to 8 7 to 9
1 inch11 to 14 9 to 14
(minutes)
(minutes)
LOIN
Porterhouse/T-Bone Steak3/4 inch10 to 12 9 to 13
1 inch14 to 16 15 to 19
Top Loin (Strip) Steak, boneless3/4 inch 10 to 12 7 to 10
1 inch 15 to 18 11 to 15
Tenderloin Steak 1 inch 13 to 15 11 to 15
1-1/2 inches 14 to 16 (grill covered)16 to 20
(minutes)
(minutes)
SIRLOIN
Top Sirloin Steak, boneless3/4 inch13 to 16 8 to 13
1 inch 17 to 21 13 to 16
1-1/2 inches 22 to 26 (grill covered) 24 to 30
ROUND (minutes)
(minutes)
Recommend cooking round cuts to medium rare (145˚F) doneness only.
Round Sirloin Tip Center Steak3/4 inch 8 to 9 (grill covered) 8 to 11
1 inch 11 to 13 (grill covered) 13 to 15
Round Sirloin Tip Side Steak 3/4 inch 9 to 11 (grill covered) 7 to 9
(marinate)1 inch12 to 14 (grill covered) 13 to 14
Bottom Round Steak 3/4 inch
8 to 10 (grill covered) 11 to 14
(Western Griller) (marinate)1 inch12 to 15 (grill covered) 15 to 17
Top Round Steak (marinate)3/4 inch
8 to 9 10 to 11
1 inch16 to 18 16 to 19 Eye Round Steak (marinate)3/4 inch 15 to 19 10 to 12
1 inch 19 to 23 17 to 19
PLATE & FLANK
(minutes)
(minutes)
Skirt Steak (marinate)1 to 1-1/2 pounds10 to 13 8 to 12
(4 to 6-inch portions)
Flank Steak (marinate)1-1/2 to 2 pounds17 to 21 16 to 21
(minutes)
(minutes)
OTHER
Ground Beef Patties 1/2 inch (4 ounces each)11 to 137 to 8
Cook to medium (160˚F) doneness.
3/4 inch (6 ounces each)13 to 15 13 to 14
Kabobs1 x 1-1/4 inches (1 pound)6 to 8 (grill covered)7 to 9
For charcoal grilling, when
coals are medium, ashcovered (approximately
30 minutes), spread in
single layer and check
cooking temperature.
Position cooking grid.
To check temperature,
cautiously hold the palm of
your hand above the coals
at cooking height. Count
the number of seconds you
can hold your hand in that
position before the heat
forces you to pull it away;
approximately 4 seconds
for medium heat.
For gas grillling, gas
grill brands vary greatly
and grilling times may
need to be adjusted.
Consult owner’s manual
for specific grilling
information.
Note: Chart guidelines
were developed using
Weber Genesis
gas grills.
All cook times are based on beef removed directly from refrigerator.
18
19
3
Easy Steps to PAN-BROILING BEEF
1 Heat heavy nonstick skillet 5 minutes over medium heat.
2 Season beef (directly from the refrigerator), as desired.
Place beef in preheated skillet (do not overcrowd). Do not
add oil or water; do not cover.
3 Pan-broil according to chart, turning once. (For cuts 1 inch
thick or thicker, turn occasionally.) After cooking, season
beef with salt, if desired.
Pan-Broiling Guidelines
Beef Cut
Weight/
Thickness
Top Loin Steaks With Red Wine Sauce
Total preparation and cooking time: 40 to 45 minutes
2 boneless beef top loin (strip) steaks, cut 1 inch t hick
or beef shoulder top blade steaks (flat iron)
(about 8 ounces each)
1 teaspoon lemon pepper
Chopped fresh parsley (optional)
Red Wine Sauce:
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 cup sliced cremini or button mushrooms
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup dry red wine
1/3 cup ready-to-serve beef broth
1/3 cup whipping cream
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
Salt
1. Press lemon pepper evenly onto beef steaks. Heat large
nonstick skillet over medium heat until hot. Place steaks
in skillet; cook top loin steaks 12 to 15 minutes (shoulder
top blade steaks 13 to 15 minutes) for medium rare to
medium doneness, turning occasionally. Remove to platter;
keep warm.
2. To prepare Red Wine Sauce, add oil to same skillet and heat
over medium heat until hot. Add mushrooms; cook and stir
1 to 2 minutes. Add garlic; cook and stir 20 to 30 seconds or
until fragrant. Add wine; cook and stir 1 to 2 minutes or until
browned bits attached to skillet are dissolved and liquid
is reduced by half. Stir in broth, cream and black pepper.
Continue cooking 5 to 7 minutes or until sauce thickens,
stirring occasionally. Season with salt, as desired.
3. Spoon sauce over steaks. Garnish with parsley, if desired.
Makes 2 to 4 servings.
Nutrition information per serving using top loin (strip) (1/4 of recipe):
292 calories; 17 g fat (7 g saturated fat; 7 g monounsaturated fat);
83 mg cholesterol; 166 mg sodium; 3 g carbohydrate; 0.2 g fiber;
26 g protein; 7.9 mg niacin; 0.6 mg vitamin B6; 1.5 mcg vitamin B12;
1.8 mg iron; 33.8 mcg selenium; 4.9 mg zinc.
COOK’S tip Beef shoulder center steaks (ranch),
20
cut 1 inch thick may be substituted for
top loin and flat iron steaks. Cook 13 to 16 minutes for
medium rare to medium doneness, turning occasionally.
Approximate
Total Cooking Time
Medium Rare (145°F) to Medium (160°F)
CHUCK
(minutes)
Chuck Eye Steak, boneless 3/4 inch
9 to 11
1 inch12 to 15
Shoulder Top Blade Steak, 3/4 inch10 to 12
boneless1 inch13 to 17
13 to 15
Shoulder Top Blade Steak 8 ounces each
(Flat Iron)
Shoulder Center Steak 3/4 inch
9 to 12
(Ranch)1 inch13 to 16
Shoulder Petite Tender 1/2 to 3/4 inch5 to 6
Medallions*
*Use medium-high heat.
(minutes)
RIB
Ribeye Steak3/4 inch
8 to 10
1 inch12 to 15
(minutes)
LOIN
Porterhouse/T-Bone Steak3/4 inch11 to 13
1 inch14 to 17
Top Loin (Strip) Steak, 3/4 inch10 to 12
boneless1 inch12 to 15
Tenderloin Steak3/4 inch7 to 9
1 inch10 to 13
(minutes)
SIRLOIN
Top Sirloin Steak, boneless3/4 inch10 to 13
1 inch15 to 20
ROUND (minutes)
PA N - B RO ILIN G
Recommend cooking round cuts to medium rare (145°F) doneness only.
Top Round Steak (marinate)1 inch15 to 16
Bottom Round Steak 3/4 inch11 to 14
(Western Griller) (marinate)1 inch16 to 22
Round Sirloin Tip 3/4 inch11 to 13
Center Steak1 inch14 to 15
Round Sirloin Tip3/4 inch10 to 12
Side Steak (marinate)
1 inch13 to 15
(minutes)
OTHER
Ground Beef Patties1/2 inch 10 to 12
Cook to medium
(4 ounces each)
(160°F) doneness.3/4 inch 12 to 15
(6 ounces each)
All cook times are based on beef removed directly from refrigerator.
21
3
Easy Steps to PAN-FRYING BEEF (Sautéing)
1
Heat small amount of oil in heavy nonstick skillet over
medium heat until hot.
2 Season beef (directly from the refrigerator), as desired.
Place beef in preheated skillet (do not overcrowd). Do not
add water. Do not cover.
3 Pan-fry to desired doneness, turning occasionally. After
cooking, season beef with salt, if desired.
This cooking method is best for thin beef cuts, 1/2 inch thick
or less. Cuts such as cubed steak or other cuts that are floured
or breaded, may require additional oil to prevent sticking.
Total preparation and cooking time: 25 to 30 minutes
4 beef cubed steaks (about 4 ounces each)
1 large egg, slightly beaten
3 tablespoons milk
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
Chopped fresh parsley (optional)
Gravy:
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1 cup milk
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon ground red pepper
CUBED STEAK is a flavorful cut of beef taken from the
Round or Chuck and tenderized (or cubed) by running
PA N - F RY IN G
Country-Fried Steak
it through a butcher’s tenderizing machine once or twice.
COOK’S tip to come...............
1. Beat egg and milk in shallow dish until blended. Combine
flour, salt and black pepper in second shallow dish. Dip
each beef steak into egg mixture, then into flour mixture
turning to coat both sides.
2. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in large nonstick skillet over medium
to medium-high heat until hot. Place 2 steaks in skillet;
cook 5 to 6 minutes to medium (160°F) doneness, until not
pink in center and juices show no pink color, turning once.
Remove steaks; keep warm. Repeat with remaining
1 tablespoon oil and steaks, adjusting heat as necessary to
avoid over browning.
3. To prepare gravy, heat oil in same skillet over medium heat,
scraping up any browned bits attached to skillet. Add flour;
cook and stir 1 minute. Gradually stir in milk; cook and stir
2 to 3 minutes or until thickened. Stir in salt, black and red
peppers.
4. Serve steaks with gravy. Garnish with parsley, if desired.
Makes 4 servings.
Nutrition information per serving: 375 calories; 21 g fat
(5 g saturated fat; 9 g monounsaturated fat); 132 mg cholesterol;
553 mg sodium; 14 g carbohydrate; 0.1 g fiber; 31 g protein;
4.2 mg niacin; 0.4 mg vitamin B6; 2.7 mcg vitamin B12; 3.4 mg iron;
28.2 mcg selenium; 6.3 mg zinc.
22
23
3
Easy Steps to STIR-FRYING BEEF
1
Cut beef into thin, uniform strips. If desierd, partially
freeze beef (about 30 minutes) for easier slicing.
Marinate beef to add flavor or tenderize while preparing
other ingredients, if desired.
2 Heat small amount of oil in large nonstick skillet or wok
over medium-high heat until hot.
3 Stir-fry beef in half-pound batches (do not overcrowd),
continuously turning with a scooping motion, until
outside surface of beef is no longer pink. Add additional
oil for each batch, if necessary.
Szechuan Beef Stir-Fry
Total preparation and cooking time: 25 to 30 minutes
1 pound boneless beef top sirloin or
beef top round steak, cut 3/4 to 1 inch thick
3 tablespoons water
4 cups fresh stir-fry vegetable blend
(about 10 to 12 ounces)
1/2 cup red bell pepper strips
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1-1/2 teaspoons crushed red pepper
Hot cooked white or brown rice
Coarsely chopped dry-roasted peanuts (optional)
Marinade:
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
1 tablespoon dry sherry
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon cornstarch
1. Cut beef steaks lengthwise in half, then crosswise into
1/8-inch thick strips. Combine marinade ingredients in
medium bowl. Add beef; toss to coat. Set aside.
2. Combine water, vegetable blend and bell pepper in large
nonstick skillet or wok; cover and cook over medium-high
heat 4 to 5 minutes or until crisp-tender. Remove and drain
vegetables; keep warm.
3. Heat 2 teaspoons oil in same pan over medium-high heat until
hot. Add crushed red pepper; stir-fry 30 seconds. Add 1/2 of
beef; stir-fry 1 to 3 minutes or until outside surface of beef is
no longer pink. (Do not overcook top round steak.) Remove
from pan. Repeat with remaining 1 teaspoon oil and beef.
4. Return beef and vegetables to pan. Cook and stir about
1 minute or until heated through. Serve over rice, as desired.
Garnish with peanuts, if desired.
Makes 4 servings.
Nutrition information per serving using top sirloin and 1/2 cup
white rice: 319 calories; 9 g fat (2 g saturated fat; 4 g monounsaturated
fat); 49 mg cholesterol; 304 mg sodium; 27 g carbohydrate; 1.6 g fiber;
29 g protein; 8.9 mg niacin; 0.7 mg vitamin B6; 1.5 mcg vitamin B12;
3.0 mg iron; 36.5 mcg selenium; 5.3 mg zinc.
24
Other beef cuts that can be stir-fried include:
n Eye Round Steak
Flank Steak
n Ribeye Steak
n Round Sirloin Tip Center Steak
n Round Sirloin Tip Side Steak
n Round Tip Steak
n Shoulder Center Steak (Ranch)
n Shoulder Top Blade Steak (Flat Iron)
n Top Sirloin Steak
n Skirt Steak
n Tenderloin Steak
n Top Loin (Strip) Steak
n Top Round Steak
n Tri-Tip Steak
STIR- F RY IN G
Cook’s Tip:
Cook beef and vegetables separately, then combine and
heat through. The cooking liquid may be thickened with
cornstarch dissolved in water, if desired.
n
For stir-fry, cut beef into thin,
uniform thickness strips so they
cook in the same amount of time.
Cut strips 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick.
COOK’S tip Beef shoulder top blade
(flat iron) or beef shoulder
center steaks (ranch), cut 3/4 to 1 inch
thick, may be substituted for top sirloin
or top round steak. It is not necessary
to cut these steaks lengthwise in half
before cutting crosswise into strips.
25
3
Easy Steps to BROILING BEEF
1 Set oven for broiling; preheat for 10 minutes. (Consult
owner’s manual for specific information.)
2 Season beef (directly from the refrigerator) with herbs
or spices, as desired. Place beef on rack of broiler pan.
Position broiler pan so that surface of beef is within
specified distance from heat as indicated in chart.
3 Broil according to chart, turning once. After cooking,
season beef with salt, if desired.
Broiling Guidelines
Classic Beef, Sweet Pepper & Mushroom Kabobs
1 pound well-trimmed boneless beef top sirloin
or beef tenderloin steaks, cut 1 inch thick
8 ounces medium mushrooms
2 medium red, yellow or green bell peppers,
cut into 1-inch pieces
Salt
Cucumber Sauce (recipe follows)
Seasoning:
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano or
1 teaspoon dried oregano leaves, crushed
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1. Cut beef steak into 1-1/4-inch pieces. Combine seasoning
ingredients in large bowl. Add beef, mushrooms and bell
peppers; toss to coat.
2. Alternately thread beef and vegetable pieces evenly onto
eight 12-inch metal skewers, leaving small space between
pieces.
3. Place kabobs on rack in broiler pan so surface of beef is
3 to 4 inches from heat. Broil 9 to 12 minutes for medium rare
to medium doneness, turning once. Season kabobs with salt,
as desired.
4. Meanwhile prepare Cucumber Sauce. Serve kabobs with
sauce.
Makes 4 servings.
Nutrition information per serving using top sirloin: 280 calories;
13 g fat (4 g saturated fat; 7 g monounsaturated fat); 55 mg cholesterol;
200 mg sodium; 9 g carbohydrate; 1.7 g fiber; 31 g protein; 10.1 mg niacin;
0.8 mg vitamin B6; 1.6 mcg vitamin B12; 2.4 mg iron; 36.9 mcg selenium;
5.5 mg zinc.
Cucumber Sauce: Combine 1/2 cup plain yogurt, 1/3 cup
finely chopped seeded cucumber, 2 tablespoons crumbled
feta cheese, 1 clove minced garlic, 1/4 teaspoon ground black
pepper and 1/8 teaspoon salt in small bowl.
COOK’S tip Beef shoulder top blade (flat iron) or beef
shoulder center steaks (ranch), cut 1 inch thick,
may be substituted for top sirloin or tenderloin steaks.
26
Shoulder Top 8 ounces each3 to 415 to 20
Blade Steak (Flat Iron)
Chuck Shoulder 3/4 inch2 to 3 10 to 13
Steak, boneless 1 inch3 to 4 16 to 21
(marinate)
RIB
(inches) (minutes)
Rib Steak, small end3/4 inch2 to 3 9 to 12
1 inch3 to 4 13 to 17
Ribeye Steak3/4 inch2 to 3 8 to 10
1 inch3 to 4 14 to18
LOIN
(inches) (minutes)
Porterhouse/3/4 inch2 to 3 10 to 13
T- Steak1 inch3 to 4 15 to 20
Top Loin (Strip) 3/4 inch2 to 3 9 to 11 Steak, boneless1 inch3 to 4 13 to 17
Tenderloin Steak1 inch2 to 3 13 to 16
1-1/2 inches3 to 4 18 to 22
SIRLOIN
(inches) (minutes)
Top Sirloin Steak,3/4 inch2 to 3 9 to 12
boneless1 inch3 to 4 16 to 21
1-1/2 inches3 to 4 26 to 31
2 inches3 to 4 34 to 39
ROUND
(inches) (minutes)
B RO ILIN G
Total preparation and cooking time: 30 to 35 minutes
Approximate
Total Cooking Time
Weight/
Distance Medium Rare (145°F)
from Heat to Medium (160°F)
Beef Cut
Thickness
CHUCK
(inches) (minutes)
Recommend cooking round cuts to medium rare (145°F) doneness only.
Top Round Steak3/4 inch2 to 3 12 to 13
(marinate) 1 inch2 to 3 17 to 18
1-1/2 inches3 to 4 27 to 29
Bottom Round Steak
(Western Griller) 1-1/4 inches3 to 418 to 20
(marinate)
PLATE & FLANK
(inches) (minutes)
Flank Steak (marinate) 1-1/2 to 2 pounds2 to 3 13 to 18
OTHER
(inches) (minutes)
Ground Beef Patties1/2 inch3 to 410 to 12
Cook to medium
(4 ounces each)
(160°F) doneness.
3/4 inch 3 to 4 12 to 14
(6 ounces each)
Kabobs1 pound
1 x 1-1/4-inch3 to 4 7 to 11
cubes
All cook times are based on beef removed directly from refrigerator.
27
3
Easy Steps
TO ROASTING BEEF
1 Heat oven to temperature specified in chart.
2 Place roast (directly from the refrigerator), fat side
up, on rack in shallow roasting pan. Season roast with
herbs and seasonings, as desired. Insert ovenproof
meat thermometer so tip is centered in thickest part
of roast, not resting in fat or touching bone. Do not add
water. Do not cover.
3 Roast according to chart. Transfer roast to carving
board; tent loosely with aluminum foil. Let stand
15 to 20 minutes. (Temperature will continue to rise
5°F to 10°F to reach desired doneness and roast will
be easier to carve.)
Rib Roast With Horseradish Sauce
TO CARVE A BEEF RIB ROAST
1 well-trimmed beef rib roast (2 to 4 ribs), small end, chine (back) bone removed (6 to 8 pounds)
Salt
Seasoning:
2 tablespoons coarsely ground mixed peppercorns (black, white, green and pink)
1 tablespoon minced garlic
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
Horseradish Sauce:
1/2 cup whipping cream
3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh fennel bulb
3 tablespoons finely grated fresh horseradish
1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh fennel fronds
1/8 teaspoon salt
1.Turn roast on
its side and place
on carving board.
(If necessary,
remove a thin slice
to stabilize roast. Insert
fork from the side, below the
top rib. Carve across the “face”
of the roast toward the rib bone.
1. Heat oven to 350°F. Combine seasoning ingredients; press
evenly onto all surfaces of beef roast.
2. Place roast, fat side up, in shallow roasting pan. Insert
ovenproof meat thermometer so tip is centered in thickest
part of beef, not resting in fat or touching bone. Do not add
water or cover. Roast in 350°F oven 2-1/4 to 2-1/2 hours for
medium rare; 2-3/4 to 3 hours for medium doneness.
3. Meanwhile prepare Horseradish Sauce. Beat cream in
medium bowl just until soft peaks form; do not overbeat.
Add fennel bulb, horseradish, fennel fronds and salt; mix
well. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.
4. Remove roast when meat thermometer registers 135°F for
medium rare; 150°F for medium. Transfer roast to carving
board; tent loosely with aluminum foil. Let stand 15 to 20
minutes. (Temperature will continue to rise about 10°F to
reach 145°F for medium rare; 160°F for medium.)
5. Carve roast into slices; season with salt, as desired. Serve
with horseradish sauce.
Makes 8 to 10 servings.
Nutrition information per serving (1/8 of recipe): 387 calories;
19 g fat (8 g saturated fat; 7 g monounsaturated fat); 134 mg cholesterol;
143 mg sodium; 3 g carbohydrate; 0.5 g fiber; 48 g protein;
13.6 mg niacin; 1.0 mg vitamin B6; 2.7 mcg vitamin B12; 3.2 mg iron;
55.0 mcg selenium; 8.9 mg zinc.
28
ROA STIN G
Total preparation and cooking time: 2-1/2 to 3 hours
2.Cut along the rib
bone with tip of
knife to release
slice of beef. To
serve, slide knife
under beef slice;
steadying from above with
the fork and lifting slice onto plate.
COOK’S tip Two tablespoons prepared
horseradish may be substituted
for fresh horseradish. Omit salt in sauce. Two
tablespoons chopped fresh chives may be
substituted for fresh fennel bulb and fronds.
29
Roasting Guidelines
Beef Cut
Oven
Temperature Weight
(Preheated) (Pounds)
Approximate
Total Cooking Time
Remove roast
from oven when
internal
temperature
reaches:
30
Medium rare doneness =
145°F final internal temperature after 15 to 20 minutes standing time.
Medium doneness =
160°F final internal temperature after 15 to 20 minutes standing time.
All cook times are based on beef removed directly from refrigerator.
ROA STIN G
CHUCK
Shoulder Petite Tender Roast 425°F
8 to 12 ounces
Medium Rare to Medium:145°F - 160°F
20 to 25 minutes
RIB
Ribeye Roast, small end350°F3 to 4
Medium Rare: 1-1/2 to 1-3/4 hours135°F
Medium: 1-3/4 to 2 hours150°F
4 to 6
Medium Rare: 1-3/4 to 2 hours 135°F
Medium: 2 to 2-1/2 hours150°F
6 to 8
Medium Rare: 2 to 2-1/4 hours135°F
Medium: 2-1/2 to 2-3/4 hours 150°F
Ribeye Roast, large end350°F3 to 4
Medium Rare: 1-3/4 to 2-1/4 hours135°F
Medium: 2 to 2-1/2 hours 150°F
4 to 6
Medium Rare: 2 to 2-1/2 hours 135°F
Medium: 2-1/2 to 3 hours150°F
6 to 8
Medium Rare: 2-1/4 to 2-1/2 hours 135°F
Medium: 2-3/4 to 3 hours 150°F
Rib Roast, chine bone removed350°F
4 to 6 (2 ribs)
Medium Rare: 1-3/4 to 2-1/4 hours 135°F
Medium: 2-1/4 to 2-3/4 hours150°F
Medium Rare: 2-1/4 to 2-1/2 hours 135°F
6 to 8 (2 to 4 ribs)
Medium: 2-3/4 to 3 hours 150°F
Medium Rare: 2-1/2 to 3 hours 135°F
8 to 10 (4 to 5 ribs)
Medium: 3 to 3-1/2 hours 150°F
LOIN
Tenderloin Roast, well-trimmed 425°F2 to 3 (center-cut)
Medium Rare: 35 to 40 minutes 135°F
Medium: 45 to 50 minutes 150°F
4 to 5 (whole)
Medium Rare: 50 to 60 minutes 135°F
Medium: 60 to 70 minutes150°F
SIRLOIN
Tri-Tip Roast
425°F1-1/2 to 2
Medium Rare: 30 to 40 minutes 135°F
Medium: 40 to 45 minutes 150°F
ROUND
Round Tip Roast325°F3 to 4
Medium Rare: 1-3/4 to 2 hours 140°F
Medium: 2-1/4 to 2-1/2 hours 155°F
4 to 6
Medium Rare: 2 to 2-1/2 hours 140°F
Medium: 2-1/2 to 3 hours 155°F
6 to 8
Medium Rare: 2-1/2 to 3 hours 140°F
Medium: 3 to 3-1/2 hours 155°F
Round Sirloin
Tip Center Roast325°F2 to 2-1/2
Medium Rare: 1-1/4 to 1-1/2 hours 140°F
Rump Roast325°F3 to 4
Medium Rare: 1-1/2 to 2 hours 135°F
Bottom Round Roast325°F3 to 4
Medium Rare: 1-1/2 to 2 hours 135°F
Eye Round Roast325°F2 to 3
Medium Rare: 1-1/2 to 1-3/4 hours135°F
OTHER
Ground Beef350°F
8 x 4-inch
Medium: 1-1/4 hours160°F
Cook to medium (160°F) doneness.1-1/2 pounds
31
3
Easy Steps to BRAISING BEEF (Pot Roasting)
1 Slowly brown beef on all sides in small amount of oil in
heavy pan over medium heat. Pour off drippings.
Season beef with herbs or spices, as desired.
2 Add small amount (1/2 to 2 cups) of liquid (such as
broth, water, juice, beer or wine).
3 Cover tightly and simmer gently over low heat on top of
the range or in a preheated 325°F oven according to
chart or until beef is fork-tender.
The cooking liquid may be thickened or reduced for a sauce,
as desired.
Classic Beef Pot Roast With Root Vegetables
1 boneless beef chuck shoulder, arm or blade pot roast (2-1/2 to 3 pounds)
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1 can (14 to 14-1/2 ounces) ready-to-serve beef broth
1 pound small red-skinned potatoes
(about 1-1/2-inch diameter), cut in half
1 pound carrots, peeled, cut diagonally into
1-1/2-inch pieces
1 large onion, cut into 8 wedges
1/2 cup frozen peas
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour dissolved in
1/4 cup cold water
Chopped fresh parsley (optional)
Seasoning:
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 teaspoons dried thyme leaves, crushed
1. Combine seasoning ingredients; press evenly onto all
surfaces of beef pot roast. Heat oil in stockpot over medium
heat until hot. Place pot roast in stockpot; brown evenly.
Pour off drippings. Season with salt and pepper.
2. Add broth to stockpot; bring to boil. Reduce heat; cover tightly
and simmer 2-1/4 hours. Add potatoes, carrots and onion to
stockpot; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; continue simmering,
covered, 25 minutes. Stir in peas; simmer until pot roast and
vegetables are fork-tender.
3. Remove pot roast and vegetables; keep warm. Skim fat from
cooking liquid. Measure 1-1/2 cups cooking liquid; return to
pot. Stir in flour mixture. Bring to boil, stir constantly; cook
and stir 2 to 3 minutes, until thickened.
4. Carve pot roast into thin slices; serve with vegetables and
gravy. Garnish with parsley, if desired.
32
Braising Guidelines
Beef Cut
Weight/
Thickness
Approximate
Total Cooking Time
(Covered Over
Low Heat)
(hours)
B R A IS IN G
Total preparation and cooking time: 3-1/4 to 3-1/2 hours
CHUCK
Chuck Pot Roast2-1/2 to 4
2 to 3
(Shoulder, Arm or pounds
Blade), boneless
Chuck Shoulder
Steak, boneless3/4 to 1 inch1-1/4 to 1-3/4
Short Ribs2 x 2 x 4 inches1-1/2 to 2-1/2
(hours)
ROUND Bottom Round,
Rump Roast, boneless3 to 4 pounds2-1/2 to 3-1/4
Round Steak,
(Eye or Bottom), 3/4 to 1 inch1-1/4 to 1-3/4
boneless1 to 1-1/2 inches1-3/4 to 2-1/2
Note: For Top Round Steak, braising is not recommended.
See dry-heat cookery methods. (hours)
SHANK & BRISKET
Brisket, fresh2-1/2 to 3-1/22-1/2 to 3
pounds
All cook times are based on beef removed directly from refrigerator.
COOK’S tip Beef bottom round or beef
round rump roast may be
substituted for shoulder, arm or blade pot
roast. Simmer 2-1/2 hours before adding
vegetables.
Makes 6 to 8 servings.
Nutrition information per serving (1/8 of recipe): 251 calories; 7 g fat
(2 g saturated fat; 3 g monounsaturated fat); 57 mg cholesterol;
475 mg sodium; 21 g carbohydrate; 3.2 g fiber; 24 g protein; 3.6 mg niacin;
0.3 mg vitamin B6; 2.4 mcg vitamin B12; 3.6 mg iron; 25.0 mcg selenium;
5.4 mg zinc.
33
3
Easy Steps to COOKING BEEF IN LIQUID (Stewing)
1
Coat beef lightly with seasoned flour, if desired. Slowly
brown beef, in batches, on all sides in small amount of oil
in heavy pan over medium heat. Pour off drippings.
Omit browning step for corned beef brisket.
2 Cover beef with liquid (such as broth, water, juice, beer or
wine). Add herbs or seasonings, as desired. Bring liquid to
boil; reduce heat to low.
3
Beef Bourguignonne
2-1/2
4
1/4 1
1/4
1/2
2
2
1
2
8
8
8
pounds beef for stew, cut into
1 to 1-1/2-inch pieces
slices bacon, chopped (about 4 ounces)
cup all-purpose flour
Vegetable oil
teaspoon salt
teaspoon pepper
cup ready-to-serve beef broth
cups Burgundy or other dry red wine
tablespoons tomato paste
tablespoon minced garlic
teaspoons dried marjoram leaves, crushed
ounces packaged baby carrots
ounces fresh pearl onions, peeled or frozen
pearl onions
ounces mushrooms, cut in half if large
Chopped fresh parsley (optional)
1. Cook bacon in stockpot over medium heat 8 to 10 minutes or
until crisp, stirring frequently. Remove with slotted spoon to
paper towel-lined plate. Set aside. Reserve drippings.
2. Lightly coat beef with flour. Heat 2 tablespoons drippings in
same stockpot over medium heat until hot. Brown 1/2 of beef;
remove from stockpot. Repeat with remaining beef, adding
drippings or oil as needed. Remove beef from stockpot; season
with salt and pepper. Pour off drippings.
3. Add broth to stockpot. Cook and stir 1 to 2 minutes or until
browned bits are dissolved. Stir in wine, tomato paste, garlic
and marjoram. Return beef and bacon to stockpot; bring to a
boil. Reduce heat; cover tightly and simmer 1 hour.
4. Add carrots and onions to stockpot; bring to a boil. Reduce
heat; continue simmering, covered, 30 minutes. Stir in
mushrooms; continue simmering, covered, 10 to 15 minutes
or until beef and vegetables are fork-tender.
5. Remove from heat. Skim fat from cooking liquid, if necessary.
Garnish with parsley, if desired.
Cooking in Liquid Guidelines
Weight/
Beef Cut
Thickness
Approximate
Total Cooking
Time
(Covered Over
Low Heat)
(hours)
CO O KIN G
IN LIQ U ID
Total preparation and cooking time: 2-1/4 to 2-3/4 hours
Cover tightly and simmer gently over low heat on top of the
range according to chart or until beef is fork-tender.
The cooking liquid may be reduced or thickened for a sauce,
as desired.
SHANK & BRISKET
Shank Cross Cuts1 to 1-1/2 inches2 to 3
Brisket, fresh2-1/2 to 3-1/2 pounds2-1/2 to 3
Brisket, corned2-1/2 to 3-1/2 pounds2-1/2 to 3-1/2
(hours)
OTHER
Beef for Stew 1 to 1-1/2 inches1-3/4 to 2-1/4
(Boneless Round or
Chuck Pieces for Stew)
All cook times are based on beef removed directly from refrigerator.
Determining Doneness of Beef Cooked By Moist Heat
(Braising and Cooking in Liquid):
n
n
Cook until fork-tender. To test, insert a double-pronged
meat fork into the thickest part of the beef. When fork
can be inserted without resistance and releases easily
when pulled out, the beef is done.
Do not overcook. When overcooked, beef will be dry
and stringy. Test at the end of suggested cooking time.
COOK’S tip The dark brown crust that forms
on the bottom of the stockpot
during step 2 dissolves when liquid is added
and gives the stew a rich flavor.
Makes 6 servings.
Nutrition information per serving: 378 calories; 12 g fat (4 g saturated fat;
5 g monounsaturated fat); 90 mg cholesterol; 681 mg sodium;
18 g carbohydrate; 2.4 g fiber; 34 g protein; 6.2 mg niacin; 0.5 mg vitamin B6;
34 2.7 mcg vitamin B12; 3.7 mg iron; 29.7 mcg selenium; 7.1 mg zinc.
35
For more beef recipes and information, visit
www.BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com
For more information, contact:
National Cattlemen’s Beef Association
9110 E. Nichols Ave.
Centennial, CO 80112
(303) 694-0305
Funded by
The Beef Checkoff
© 2006 Cattlemen’s Beef Board and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association
07-152 0606250
Alabama Cattlemen’s Association
201 S. Bainbridge Street
Montgomery, AL 36104
Phone: (334) 265-1867
www.bamabeef.org
e-mail: aca@bamabeef.org
© 2006 Cattlemen’s Beef Board and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association
Arkansas Beef Council
P.O. Box 31
Little Rock, AR 72203
(501) 228-1222
(501) 228-1846 (fax)
© 2006 Cattlemen’s Beef Board and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association
Colorado Beef Council
789 Sherman Street, Suite 105
Denver, CO 80203
Phone: (303) 830-7892
www.cobeef.com
© 2006 Cattlemen’s Beef Board and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association
Iowa Beef Industry Council
P.O. Box 451
Ames, IA 50010
Phone: (515) 296-2305
beef@iabeef.org
www.iabeef.org
© 2006 Cattlemen’s Beef Board and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association
Missouri Beef Industry Council
Montana Beef Council
2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #200
Columbia, MO 65201
Phone: (573) 817-0899
www.mobeef.org
420 North California
Helena, MT 59601
Phone: (406) 442-5111
Fax: (406) 449-5105
beefcncl@mt.net
© 2006 Cattlemen’s Beef Board and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association
© 2006 Cattlemen’s Beef Board and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association
Nebraska Beef Council
1319 Central Avenue
Kearney, NE 68847
Phone: (800) 421-5326
www.nebeef.org
© 2006 Cattlemen’s Beef Board and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association
North Dakota Beef Commission
4023 State Street
Bismarck, ND 58503
(701) 328-5120 or 1 (877) 321-BEEF
© 2006 Cattlemen’s Beef Board and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association
South Dakota Beef Industry Council
Texas Beef Council
316 South Coteau
P.O. Box 7051
Pierre, SD 57501
Phone: (605) 224-4722
Fax: (605) 224-4457
www.sdbeef.org
8708 Ranch Rd. 620 North
Austin, TX 78726-3503
Phone: (512) 335-2333
www.txbeef.org
© 2006 Cattlemen’s Beef Board and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association
© 2006 Cattlemen’s Beef Board and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association
Virginia Beef Industry Council
P.O. Box 9
4466 Roanoke Road
Daleville, VA 24083
Phone: (540) 992-1992
Fax: (540) 992-4632
www.vabeef.org
© 2006 Cattlemen’s Beef Board and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association
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