The iPad for Photographers

The iPad for Photographers
The iPad
for Photographers
Second Edition
Master the Newest Tool in Your Camera Bag
Jeff CArlson
Peachpit Press
The iPad for Photographers:
Master the Newest Tool in Your Camera Bag, Second edition
Jeff Carlson
Peachpit Press
www.peachpit.com
To report errors, please send a note to [email protected]
Peachpit Press is a division of Pearson Education
Copyright © 2013 by Jeff Carlson
Project Editor: Susan Rimerman
Production Editor: Tracey Croom
Copyeditor/Proofreader: Scout Festa
Indexer: Karin Arrigoni
Composition: Jeff Carlson
Cover Design/Photo Collage: Mimi Heft
Interior Design: Mimi Heft
Notice of Rights
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form by any means,
electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of
the publisher. For information on getting permission for reprints and excerpts, contact [email protected]
peachpit.com.
Notice of Liability
The information in this book is distributed on an “As Is” basis, without warranty. While every
precaution has been taken in the preparation of the book, neither the author nor Peachpit shall
have any liability to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damage caused or alleged to be
caused directly or indirectly by the instructions contained in this book or by the computer software
and hardware products described in it.
Trademarks
iPad is a registered trademark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Many of
the designations used by manufacturers and sellers to distinguish their products are claimed as
trademarks. Where those designations appear in this book, and Peachpit was aware of a trademark
claim, the designations appear as requested by the owner of the trademark. All other product names
and services identified throughout this book are used in editorial fashion only and for the benefit of
such companies with no intention of infringement of the trademark. No such use, or the use of any
trade name, is intended to convey endorsement or other affiliation with this book.
ISBN 13: 978-0-321-90747-9
ISBN 10: 0-321-90747-7
987654321
Printed and bound in the United States of America
For Steve. Thank you.
Acknowledgments
It’s fabulous to experience a whisper of an idea turn into a completed
book, but without the encouragement and assistance of many people, that
whisper could have easily dissipated into the ether. I owe a lot of gratitude,
and no doubt coffees or martinis (or both) to the following good folks.
Susan Rimerman, Ted Waitt, Cliff Colby, Nancy Aldrich-Ruenzel, Nancy
Davis, Scott Cowlin, Sara Jane Todd, and everyone else at Peachpit Press
encouraged this project and made it happen.
Mimi Heft designed the book and provided first-class templates in which
I could work. Unlike many authors, I write directly into the book’s layout
using Adobe InDesign, so working in a template that’s properly styled and
professionally designed is a privilege.
My editing and production team, led by Susan Rimerman, made all the
practicalities happen: Scout Festa made me wish I could write as fast and
as sharp as she’s able to copyedit my text; Karin Arrigoni managed the
crush at the end of the project to produce a top-rate index; and Tracey
Croom put her production talents to good use shepherding the laid-out
files and keeping my work on the up-and-up.
Chris Morse and Chris Horne gave me access to pre-release versions of
their app Photosmith, and Brian Gerfort helped me understand better the
underpinnings of how iOS works with images.
Glenn Fleishman helped maintain my link to the outside world as virtual
officemate—and occasional in-person lunch or coffee companion—and
patiently listened to my laments and successes.
Agen G. N. Schmitz also put up with my electronic chatter, but more
importantly wrote the online chapter “Helpful Apps for Photographers.”
Dana and David Bos granted permission for me to use photos I’ve shot of
their daughter, Ainsley.
Jackie Baisa contributed advice and insight into professional workflows.
Peter Loh provided invaluable photo studio equipment.
Tor Bjorklund donated the wood used in many of the studio photos.
Kim Carlson built the App Reference appendix and served as a fantastic
photographer’s assistant and propmaster, but most importantly kept me
sane and supported this project from my first inkling of an idea.
And Ellie Carlson continues to serve as a great model and a good sport
when I turn the camera on her. She’ll thank me when she’s older. Right?
Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xii
Can You Really Leave the Laptop Behind? . . . . . . . . . . . . . xii
Which iPad Should You Use? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
What’s New in the Second Edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiv
Notes About This Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvi
Chapter 1 Capture
Photos with the iPad
3
Shoot with the Camera App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Shoot with Advanced Apps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Set Focus and Exposure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Filters and Editing in Camera Apps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Time Your Shots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Shoot HDR Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Create a Panorama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Chapter 2 The
iPad on Location
11
Build an iPad Photo Workflow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Shoot JPEG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Shoot Raw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Shoot Raw+JPEG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Review Photos in the Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Import Using the iPad Camera Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Import from a memory card or camera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
What About Importing from CompactFlash (CF) Cards? . . 24
Import from an iPhone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
The Secretly Versatile iPad USB Camera Adapter . . . . . . . 26
Import Wirelessly from the Camera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Shoot and import wirelessly using ShutterSnitch . . . . . . 28
ShutterSnitch as Photographer’s Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Shoot and import wirelessly using CameraMator . . . . . 30
Record Location Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Record Location Using Geotag Photos Pro . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Record Location Using GeoSnitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Use GPS to Mark Locations to Revisit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Record Reference Photos Using the iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Back Up Your Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
iCloud Photo Stream . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Dropbox and Similar Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Automatic Dropbox upload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Manual Dropbox upload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Portable Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Seagate Wireless Plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Dedicated media storage devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Use the iPad as a Fill Light . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Chapter 3 The
iPad in the Studio
45
Control a Camera from the iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Tethered Shooting Using Capture Pilot HD . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
CamRanger, CameraMator, and Other
Wireless Remote Control Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Connect the camera and iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Compose and shoot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Use Live View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Use Bracketing/HDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Shoot at specified intervals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Record video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Triggertrap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Blux Camera and Blux Lens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Mount the iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Tether Tools Wallee System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
The Stump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Extend Your Computer Desktop with Air Display . . . . . . . 57
Make a Stop-Motion or Time-Lapse Video . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Create a Stop-Motion Video in iStopMotion . . . . . . . . . . 58
Create a Time-Lapse Video in iStopMotion . . . . . . . . . . . 60
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The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
Chapter 4 Rate
and Tag Photos
63
Rate and Tag Using Photosmith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Import Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Importing from ShutterSnitch into Photosmith . . . . . . . . . . 65
Rate Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Rate multiple photos simultaneously . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Assign Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Create or assign keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Build keyword hierarchies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Remove keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Edit Metadata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Create metadata presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Filter Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Filter by metadata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Change the sort order and criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Filter using Smart Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Group Photos into Collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Sync with Photoshop Lightroom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Photosmith publish service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Sync photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Apply Develop settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Apply a metadata preset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Sync keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Photosmith Plug-in Extras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Sync photos from Lightroom to Photosmith . . . . . . . . . . 80
Export to Photosmith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Export to Other Destinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Dropbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
XMP Export . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
PhotoCopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Delete Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
The Proxy JPEG Workflow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Rate and Tag Using PhotosInfoPro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Import Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Rate a Photo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Contents
vii
Add Metadata to a Photo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Add Metadata to Multiple Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Export Metadata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Rate and Tag Using Editing Apps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Rate Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Add IPTC Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Create and use IPTC sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Export IPTC Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Chapter 5 Edit
Photos on the iPad
95
Make Photo Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Edit Photos in the Photos App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Edit Photos in Snapseed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Recompose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Adjust Tone and Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Adjust Specific Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Apply Creative Presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Edit Photos in Photogene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Recompose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Adjust Tone and Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Adjust brightness and contrast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Adjust color cast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Adjust white balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Adjust saturation and vibrance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Apply Selective Edits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Apply Creative Presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Edit Photos in iPhoto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Recompose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Straighten the image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Crop the frame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Adjust Exposure and Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Brightness and contrast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
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The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
Adjust Specific Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Apply Creative Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Edit Photos in Adobe Photoshop Touch . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Recompose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Straighten the image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Crop the frame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Rotate the canvas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Adjust Tone and Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Adjust Specific Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Edit Raw Files Directly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Retouch Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Photogene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Handy Photo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Chapter 6 Edit
Video on the iPad
131
Work with Projects in iMovie for iOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Choose a Theme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Apply a Fade In or Fade Out to the Movie . . . . . . . . . . 133
Open an Existing Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Add Video to a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Capture Video Directly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Import from an iPhone or iPod touch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Add Clips from the Media Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Edit Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Play and Skim Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Edit Clips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Move a clip on the timeline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Trim a clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Split a clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Delete a clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Use the Precision Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Edit Transitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Add a Title . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Contents
ix
Add a title to just a portion of a clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Specify a Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Add and Edit Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Edit the Ken Burns Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Disable the Ken Burns effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Edit Audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Change a Clip’s Volume Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Add Background Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Add automatic theme music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Add a background music clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Add a Sound Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Add a Voiceover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Share Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Share to the Camera Roll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Send the Project to Another Device via iTunes . . . . . . . . 152
Export a project to iTunes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Import the project into iMovie on another iOS device 153
Chapter 7 Build
an iPad Portfolio
155
5 Steps to Create a Great Portfolio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
iPad or iPad mini for Portfolios? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Prepare Images for the Portfolio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Adobe Photoshop Lightroom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Apple Aperture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Adobe Photoshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Create an action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Batch-process files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Adobe Photoshop Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Apple iPhoto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Using the Built-in Photos App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Create Your Portfolio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Create and Populate Galleries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Add Photos to a Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Load from iPad media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Load from iTunes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
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The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
Load from Dropbox or Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Edit a Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Reorder images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Choose a gallery thumbnail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Customize the Opening Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Rate and Make Notes on Photos in Portfolio for iPad . . 173
Present Your Portfolio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Present on the iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Present on an External Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wired . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wireless . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 8 Share
Photos
173
174
174
174
177
179
Upload Images to
Photo-Sharing Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Upload from Editing Apps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Upload from Snapseed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Upload from Photogene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
To Watermark or Not? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
iCloud Photo Stream . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Upload Photos Using Services’ Apps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Flickr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Camera Awesome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
PhotoStackr 500px . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Email Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .187
Share a Single Photo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Share Multiple Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Share Photos Using Adobe Revel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Import Photos to a Revel Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Rate and Edit Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Collaborate with Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Print Photos from the iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Print from Nearly Any App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Order Prints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Contents 
xi
Appendix App
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
Chapter
xii
Reference
1:
2:
3:
4:
5:
6:
7:
8:
196
Capture Photos with the iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
The iPad on Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
The iPad in the Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Rate and Tag Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Edit Photos on the iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Edit Video on the iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Build an iPad Portfolio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
Share Photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
Index 207
Appendix BONUS
Online
The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
Introduction
Photographers carry gear. It doesn’t matter whether you’re a pro with
multiple camera bodies and lenses or a casual shooter with an ever-present
point-and-shoot camera—there’s always stuff to pack along. And if you’re
traveling or away from your office or studio, part of that gear typically
includes a laptop for reviewing and backing up the photos you take. Too
often I’ve heard friends who are about to go on vacation moan that they
need to bring a bulky computer just to handle their digital photos.
The iPad is changing all that.
Measuring less than half an inch thick and weighing about 1.3 pounds,
the iPad is a fantastic device to take into the field. With the addition
of an inexpensive iPad camera adapter, you can import photos directly
from a camera or memory card and view them on the iPad’s large color
screen, revealing details that the relatively puny LCD on the back of your
camera may obscure. More important, a rich array of photography apps
and related products is adding to the list of things the iPad can do with
those photos: rate and add keywords, perform color adjustments, retouch
blemishes, and share the results online.
Oh, and don’t forget all of the iPad’s other capabilities: browsing the Web,
accessing your email, reading ebooks, playing movies and music, and, as
they say, so much more.
Can You Really Leave the Laptop Behind?
Although the iPad can do a lot that you would have needed a laptop to
do just two years ago, there are still some important limitations that you
should keep in mind when you decide whether a laptop stays at home.
If you’re generating a significant amount of image data, storage becomes
a problem. As this book goes to press, the current highest-capacity iPad
holds 128 GB. You can free up some memory by removing apps, music,
videos, and the like, but if you’re filling multiple 16 GB or 32 GB cards
with photos, the iPad won’t work as a repository of your shots. (But I detail
several workarounds in Chapter 2.)

xiii
One solution is to buy a lot of memory cards and use them as you would
film canisters. The originals stay on the cards, while the keepers remain
on the iPad; you delete the ones you don’t want as you cull through them.
Fortunately, memory cards are inexpensive now. Unfortunately, they’re
small and easy to lose. Make sure you know where they are, label them
accurately, and keep them protected. Most important, make sure you have
some system of backing up your images; options include uploading them
to online photo storage services or transferring them wirelessly to a Wi-Fi–
enabled hard disk like the Seagate Wireless Plus.
If you capture raw-formatted images, you won’t benefit from the same
level of editing that a dedicated application on a desktop computer can
offer. With a few exceptions, all image editing occurs on JPEG versions of
the raw files, and exports as JPEG files (see Chapter 5 for more details).
So, to answer my question, in many circumstances yes, you can leave the
laptop behind. If you’re going to trek across Africa for four weeks, that’s
likely not realistic, but for most day trips or short vacations, the iPad makes
a great companion.
Which iPad Should You Use?
If you don’t already own an iPad, here are some guidelines for choosing
one that will be a worthwhile addition to your camera bag.
For the reasons mentioned, I recommend getting the highest-capacity iPad
that’s available (and that you can afford). That gives you plenty of room
to store photos and apps; some image editors make a copy of a photo
to work with, so you could easily fill a couple of gigabytes just editing.
Plus, it’s an iPad, not just an extra hard disk, so you’ll want to store music,
movies, books, and all sorts of other media.
Size and weight are also extremely important factors. Until last year, you
bought whatever iPad was available, because they were all mostly the
same. But then Apple introduced the svelte and light iPad mini, which
is really a great traveling size. The tradeoff is that the iPad mini’s screen
measures 7.9 inches (versus 9.7 inches for the regular iPad) and doesn’t
have a high-resolution Retina display like its older sibling. Even so, the
xiv
The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
size is definitely compelling, and it’s fine for reviewing and editing images.
(If Apple releases an iPad mini with a Retina screen, that’s likely to be my
choice for my next iPad.)
You also need to determine whether you want to buy a model that connects
to the Internet via Wi-Fi only or that also connects via cellular networking.
For photographic uses, cellular isn’t as important, because you may burn
up your data allotment quickly if you transfer images to sharing sites or to
online backup sources like Dropbox. (And it’s turning out that even when a
cellular provider offers “unlimited” data plans, they’re not really unlimited.)
I personally find the cellular capability useful in general iPad use, but not
necessarily for photo-related uses.
In terms of which iPad model to get if you don’t own one yet, I’d argue for
the latest model. As I write this, Apple sells the fourth-generation iPad with
Retina display, the iPad mini, and the iPad 2 as the line’s low-cost point of
entry. The iPad 2 is a fine model for photographers (it’s what I used to write
the first edition of this book), but your investment will last longer if you
buy a newer model. The original iPad will also work in many cases, but just
barely—its older processor and small amount of working memory prevent it
from running iOS 6, and many developers (at Apple’s insistence) are starting
to phase out support for older versions of the operating system.
What’s New in the Second Edition
As more photographers and developers have adopted the iPad, more and
better uses for it as a photo companion continue to appear. This second
edition of the book includes a host of new or changed material. Here are
some highlights.
The cameras in the iPad 2 were so bad that I didn’t want to touch this
topic, but improvements in hardware convinced me that it was time to talk
about taking photos with the iPad. Chapter 1 looks at the built-in Camera
app as well as a few alternatives.
When I wrote the first edition, the only option for transferring photos
wirelessly from the camera to the iPad was via an Eye-Fi memory card.
Chapter 2 now includes mention of more wireless SD cards and adapters,
including the CamRanger and CameraMator devices. More important, I
Introduction
xv
shifted my recommendation away from Eye-Fi’s software to the superior
ShutterSnitch app, which supports most of the new devices. Chapter 2
also beefs up the section on making backups and adds that topic to the
workflow diagrams.
Speaking of wireless communications, OnOne discontinued their DSLR
Camera Remote app, which occupied the bulk of Chapter 3. Instead, I
go into detail about using the CamRanger and CameraMator to shoot
tethered—without wires this time—and control the camera remotely. Also
new is a section on TriggerTrap, which adds all sorts of novel ways to
control how a DSLR’s shutter is fired.
When I first wrote Chapter 4, I was using a pre-release version of
Photosmith because it was the only app that could import, rate, and tag
photos on the iPad. The reality of publishing deadlines meant that some of
the information quickly became outdated when Photosmith 2 shipped. For
example, I talked about using the Seagate GoFlex Satellite drive to make
wireless backups of photos from the app; however, a bug in the GoFlex
firmware cropped up that corrupted data transfers (and Seagate never
bothered to address it), so the feature was pulled from the app. This time
around, I was able to again work with a pre-release version, but in this case
it is for the revamped Photosmith 3 (which addresses the stability issues of
version 2). My thanks go out again to developers Chris Morse and Chris
Horne for trusting me enough to put their pre-release baby into my book.
Chapter 4 also had its own surprise: Pixelsync, the app I included that was
used to sync photos with Aperture, is also discontinued. (The developer
is working on a new app called Pixelstream, but timing prevented me
from including it in this edition.) In Pixelsync’s place, I’ve included details
about PhotosInfoPro, a streamlined way of rating and tagging that exports
sidecar files for importing into any photo management application that
supports XMP files.
Chapter 5 incorporates sections about Apple’s iPhoto app and Adobe’s
Photoshop Touch app that I wrote shortly after the first edition appeared—
literally, the book was on press when Apple announced the thirdgeneration iPad and iPhoto—and which was available as a downloadable
addendum.
Last of the major changes, I had to pull the chapter “Helpful Apps for
Photo­graphers” from the print version of this edition due to page count
xvi
The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
restrictions. Look for a link to it online at ipadforphotographers.com. If you
purchased an ebook this bonus appendix is already included.
There are lots of little changes here and there that aren’t worth calling out
specifically, so in short I’ll say: I’m proud that this is a meaty update to the
first edition.
Notes About This Book
As you read, you’ll run into examples where I’ve adopted general terms or
phrases to avoid getting distracted by details. For example, I frequently
refer to the “computer” or the “desktop” as shorthand for any traditional
computer that isn’t the iPad. Although the iPad is most certainly a computer,
I’m making the distinction between it and other computing devices, such
as laptops, towers, all-in-one machines, and other hardware that runs OS X
or Windows. When those details are important to a task, I note specific
applications or computers.
The same general rule applies to iPad models. The iPad mini, despite its size,
is still a fully functional iPad, so when I refer to “iPad” in general it applies to
the iPad mini as well as the larger flagship model.
I also assume you’re familiar with the way an iPad works—using gestures
such as taps and swipes, syncing with a computer, connecting to the Internet,
charging the battery, and otherwise taking care of your tablet. If you’re
brand new to the iPad, allow me a shameless plug as I encourage you to
buy my iPad Pocket Guide (also from Peachpit Press).
Don’t be surprised when you frequently run across the phrase, “As I
write this.” Both the iPad and the software useful to photographers are
advancing rapidly, which makes this an exciting topic to cover.
Throughout the book, you’ll find QR codes in the margins that provide
shortcuts to the software or Web site mentioned. Download a free app
such as QR Reader for iPad and scan the code to jump directly to the
iTunes Store (in the case of an app) or Web site (A, on the next page); the code
at right takes you to the product page for QR Reader.
QR Reader

xvii
A Using QR Reader
to scan a QR code
that leads to the
QR Reader app in
the iTunes Store. I
think I just broke the
universe.
If you don’t want to deal with QR codes, or you’re reading this on the very
same iPad that you’d use to scan a QR code, you’ll find URLs in the App
Reference appendix at the end of the book.
To stay abreast of the changing field, be sure to visit the companion site
for this book, www.ipadforphotographers.com, where I’ll post updates and
information related to the newest tool in your camera bag.
iPad for
Photographers
Web site
iPad for
Photographers
Google+
Community
xviii
I’ve also set up an iPad for Photographers community on Google+ (which
has turned into a popular social destination for photographers) for readers
and others to share photos and conversation. (Here’s the URL if you
haven’t yet downloaded a QR reader:
https://plus.google.com/communities/111822708330207901957)
Have fun shooting, and please feel free to contact me at the sites above
with feedback!
The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
This page intentionally left blank
CHapter 4
Rate and Tag
Photos
Even if I were to do nothing else with photos on my iPad,
I would want to perform my first round of rating and keyword tag­
ging. I’d much rather spend time in front of my computer editing
the photos than sorting them, especially since rating and tagging
can be done with the iPad during downtime like waiting for a flight,
chilling out in a coffee shop, or sitting on the couch in the evening.
Actually making that possible, however, is a difficult task, which
explains why there are only a few apps capable of doing it. The
ones I’m focusing on are Photosmith and PhotosInfoPro, which let
you rate and assign keyword tags to imported photos, and then
export them with the metadata intact to your computer (including
direct sync with Adobe Photoshop Lightroom in the case of Photo­
smith). Several image editing apps also now offer tools for rating
and tagging.
63
Rate and Tag Using Photosmith
Apple introduced the iPad Camera Connection Kit at the same time as the
original iPad. In the years since, we’ve seen all kinds of software innova­
tions with Apple’s tablet, but surprisingly, being able to rate and tag photos
hasn’t quite succeeded until now. It seems like a natural request: Take the
images you imported onto the iPad; assign star rankings to weed out the
undesirable shots and elevate the good ones; add important metadata such
as keywords; and, lastly, bring the photos and all that data into a master
photo library on the computer.
Photosmith, in my opinion, finally delivers those capabilities. When you’re
shooting in the field, you can act on those photos instead of keeping them
in cold storage. Back at the computer, that work flows smoothly into Photo­
shop Lightroom, so you don’t have hours of sorting ahead of you.
Photosmith
Import Photos
After you import photos into the iPad using a camera adapter or wire­
less device (as described in Chapter 2), you next need to bring them into
­Photosmith. To pull images from the iPad’s photo library, do the following:
1. Tap the Import Photos button.
2. Choose an album from your library at left to view its photos
(4.1).
3. Select the images you want to import. The checkbox above each
group selects all shots in that group; you can drag the Smart Group
slider to adjust the groups by their capture times. Or, tap the All,
Invert, or None buttons to refine the selection.
4. The default import setting is to copy files from the iOS library to
Photosmith’s library, which is what I recommend. It occupies more of
the iPad’s storage, but is more stable than choosing the alternative,
which is to link to the files. If you’re running short on free space, delete
the images using the Photos app after you’ve imported them into
Photosmith.
5. Tap the Import button to copy the photos to Photosmith’s library.
Photosmith can also import photos directly from an Eye-Fi card or from an
FTP site. You’ll find the configuration options in the Dashboard pane.
64
The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
4.1 Importing photos
into Photosmith
CC
Note If you used Photosmith 2 and encountered problems, especially with
large photo libraries, you’ll be happy to know that Photosmith 3 (in beta at
press time, but which should be available by the time you read this) imports
images in a slightly different way. Before, the app would automatically scan
the Camera Roll and use that as the photo library. To work around bugs in
iOS, the Photosmith developers rewrote the app so photos are stored in
the app’s own library.
Importing from ShutterSnitch into Photosmith
As I mentioned in Chapter 2, I prefer to use ShutterSnitch to import photos wire­
lessly from Eye-Fi cards and other compatible adapters, but the app stores the
images in its own database. That required exporting shots to the Camera Roll, and
then re-importing into Photosmith. However, the developers of both apps have
come up with a grand solution (and even open-sourced the FileXchange method
for sharing images between apps for other developers that want to implement it).
In ShutterSnitch, export the photos using the PhotoCopy option. Choose Photo­
smith as the destination app, and the photos transfer over.
Chapter 4: Rate and Tag Photos
65
Rate Photos
As you’ll learn in the pages ahead, Photosmith features several ways to
organize and group your photos. But let’s start with the most likely first
action: reviewing and rating the images you imported. The app supports
ratings (1–5 stars) and color labels that track with those features in Light­
room. You can also mark photos that don’t make the cut as rejected.
To rate photos, do the following:
1. Double-tap a thumbnail to expand the photo in Loupe view. You can
also tap the Fullscreen button to hide the sidebar and review each
photo larger. Pinch to zoom in or out to view more or less detail.
2. Tap a star rating on the QuickTag bar to assign it to the photo (4.2).
Or, if the shot isn’t salvageable, tap the Reject (X) button to mark it as
rejected. (The photo will still be transferred to Lightroom if you sync it,
but it will arrive marked as rejected.)
3. If you use colors to label your shots, tap one of the color buttons.
4.2 Rating a photo in
Loupe view
QuickTag bar
66
The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
4. Use the Rotate buttons to turn photos that arrived with incorrect orien­
tation in 90 degree increments.
5. Swipe left or right to switch to the next or previous photo.
6. Continue until you’ve rated all the photos you want.
To return to Grid view, tap the Grid button; the photos are marked
with stars to indicate their ratings (4.3).
The values of the stars are up to you. My approach is to rate anything that
looks promising (which sometimes means, “Oh hey, that one’s in focus after
all!”) as one star. Photos that strike me more creatively get two stars. On
rare occasion I’ll assign three stars at this stage, but usually I reserve stars
three through five for after I’ve edited the photos in Lightroom.
Rate multiple photos simultaneously
For an even faster initial review pass, you don’t need to enter the Loupe
or Fullscreen views. Select the photos you want to rate or categorize in
Grid view, and apply the information at once, like so:
1. In Grid view, tap once on a photo to select it. Tap to select others.
2. Tap the rating or color label in the QuickTag bar to apply it to each
selected photo.
3. To let go of your selections, you can tap each one again, but there’s a
better way: Swipe up on the QuickTag bar and tap one of the selection
buttons—All, Invert, or None (4.4).
4.3 Ratings and color assignments appear on thumbnails in Grid view.
4.4 The filter controls in the expanded QuickTab bar include buttons to select all thumbnails or none, or to invert the selection.
Chapter 4: Rate and Tag Photos
67
Assign Keywords
In the interests of speed and convenience when reviewing photos, one task
that’s often ignored is assigning keywords to the images. On the computer,
it’s a mundane but important task (especially if you’ve ever found yourself
trying to find an old photo and ended up just scrolling through thousands
of shots); on the iPad, it was darn near impossible to do until only recently.
Create or assign keywords
Bring up a photo in Loupe view or select one or more photos in Grid view,
and then do the following:
1. Tap the Tagging button in the sidebar.
2. Tap the Keywords field to bring up the Keywords editor (4.5).
3. To create a new keyword, tap the Search field and begin typing. As
you do so, in addition to listing matches to existing terms, the text also
appears under a Create New Keyword heading. Tap the tag that appears
to add it to the selected photo or photos and to the keyword list.
4. To assign an existing keyword, locate it in the list on the left and tap
its ­button. You can also choose from the lists of Recent and Popular
­keywords that appear to the right.
To quickly locate a keyword, begin typing it in the Search field at the
top of the screen.
5. Tap Done when you’re finished.
4.5 The Keywords
controls
68
The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
Build keyword hierarchies
Keywording is a form of organization, and organization varies from person to
person. While I prefer a single list of tags, you may be more comfortable with
multiple levels of parent and children terms. Photosmith caters to both styles,
letting you build keyword hierarchies that Lightroom understands, like so:
1. With the Keywords editor open, tap the Detail (>) button to the right
of any tag to set that tag as the parent.
2. Type the name of the child keyword in the Search field. As the child
keyword appears under the Create New Keyword section, Photosmith
notes that it will belong to the parent tag (4.6).
3. Tap the new keyword to add it to the list and to the selected photo or
photos.
CC
Tip When multiple photos are selected and some contain keywords that
are missing from the others, an asterisk (*) appears on any term that isn’t
shared by all. To quickly add it to the rest of the group, touch and hold
the keyword and choose Apply to All from the group of commands that
appears.
Remove keywords
Suppose you mistype a keyword or apply it to a term by accident. To
remove a keyword from those already applied to a photo, touch and hold
it and then tap the Remove button (4.7, on the next page). Or, to just remove a
keyword from the hierarchy, swipe left to right over it and tap Delete.
4.6 Creating a
new child keyword,
“­winter,” under “farm”
Chapter 4: Rate and Tag Photos
69
4.7 Removing a
­keyword from a photo
Edit Metadata
Keywords are essential for locating your images later and for assigning
terms that can be found in photo-sharing services and commercial image
catalogs, but you should also take advantage of other metadata while
you’re processing your photos in Photosmith.
With one or more photos selected in your library, go to the Tagging panel of
the sidebar and tap any field to enter text (4.8). The Photo Title and Caption
fields, for example, are used to identify images on Flickr and other sites. The
IPTC fields are also important, because they embed your contact informa­
tion, copyright statement, and job-specific metadata into the image file.
4.8 Add metadata
to multiple selected
photos.
70
The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
Create metadata presets
Unless you’re narcissistic and enjoy typing your name over and over, you
don’t want to re-enter the same metadata for each photo. Create meta­
data presets that include all your information, and then apply them to your
photos in batches.
1. Select at least one photo in Grid view, or switch to Loupe view.
2. In the Tagging menu, tap the New Preset button.
3. In the drawer that appears, rename the preset at the top of the
drawer, and fill in any other metadata fields you wish to save (4.9). For
example, you may want a generic preset that includes your contact
and copyright information, and an additional one that applies to a
specific location or project.
CC
Tip Unfortunately, you can’t specify keywords in a metadata preset,
which would be great for adding tags that you always apply (in my case,
“­jeffcarlson” and the camera I’m shooting with, like “D90” or “G12”). I’m
hoping that capability arrives in a future update.
4.9 Creating a
­metadata preset
Chapter 4: Rate and Tag Photos
71
To apply that metadata, do the following:
1. In the Tagging menu, tap the name of the preset you created. The
information appears in the drawer.
2. Any fields you filled out before are selected automatically; if you want
to omit one, tap the checkbox to the right of the field to deselect it.
3. Tap the “Apply to X photos” button to tag the selected photos.
If you want to choose a different preset without applying anything, tap the
preset’s name in the sidebar to hide its drawer.
You can edit a metadata preset at any time simply by updating the con­
tents of the fields. However, the change isn’t retroactive—earlier photos
tagged with that preset don’t gain the new information.
Filter Photos
Now that you’ve rated and tagged the photos and applied metadata to
them, you can take advantage of Photosmith’s filtering tools to custom­
ize which images appear based on all that information. Swipe up on the
QuickTag bar to reveal the filtering options.
CC
Note Naturally, you don’t need to apply every last bit of metadata before
you can start filtering your library. Particularly when I want to share some­
thing online quickly, I’ll do a pass of reviewing and rating my imported
photos and then filter that group to view just my two-star picks. But for the
purpose of explaining how the features work, it made sense to cover it all
before talking about how to filter against it.
Filter by metadata
Here’s where that rating and tagging pays off on the iPad. To display
­photos that match certain criteria, do the following in Grid view:
1. Swipe up on the QuickTag bar to reveal the filter options.
2. Tap the Set Filters button to reveal more specific filter controls.
3. Tap the criteria you wish to filter against (4.10). Selecting a star rating,
for example, displays only images matching that rating. You can also
filter by color labels and rejected status.
72
The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
4. Tap Done to apply the filters.
5. To toggle filtering on and off, tap the checkbox to the left of the Set
Filters button.
4.10 Using filters to view only photos marked with two or three stars
Change the sort order and criteria
Normally, photos appear in Grid view based on their capture date, with the
newest additions at the bottom of the list. To change the order in which
they appear, or to list them by import date, star rating, or color label, do
the following:
1. Swipe up on the QuickTag bar to reveal the filter options.
2. To toggle the sort order between descending and ascending, tap the
arrow at the left of the Sort button (4.11).
3. Tap the Sort button itself to reveal more sorting options.
4. Tap the button for the sorting criterion you wish to use
(4.12).
5. Tap Done to go back to the filter options.
4.11 Swipe up on the QuickTag bar to reveal the filter options, including this button for changing the sort order.
4.12 Tapping the Sort button reveals more sorting options.
Chapter 4: Rate and Tag Photos
73
Filter using Smart Groups
Here’s an issue I run into often when importing photos into Lightroom.
The pictures on my memory cards tend to span several events, or even
days if I haven’t been shooting regularly. Lightroom sees the photos as one
big collection, regardless of their contents. If I want to split them out into
groups—and more importantly, apply accurate metadata during import—
I need to bring them over from the camera in several batches.
Photosmith’s Smart Groups feature enables you to view those photos in
separate batches, adjusted on the fly using a simple slider control. Even if
the photos cover one larger event, it’s likely they represent distinct experi­
ences. For example, when I’m on vacation I don’t usually sit around and
shoot in one place. I could be fly-fishing in the morning, sightseeing in
town in the early afternoon, hiking later in the day, and waiting for the sun­
set at a scenic overlook in the evening. (Now I want to go on vacation!)
When I bring the photos I took during that day into the iPad, I get them all
in one event based on the date they were shot. Even importing in batches
doesn’t help, because I end up with just the iPad’s Last Imported and All
Imported smart collections, not the groupings I prefer (and I can’t assign
metadata anyway).
A better and faster workflow instead works like this:
1. Import all the photos into the iPad.
2. Import the photos into Photosmith. (This step also lets me cull the
obviously poor shots.)
3. Swipe up on the QuickTag bar to view the Smart Groups slider
(4.13).
4. Drag the slider to the left to break the library down into finer
events (4.14). Or, to group more photos together, drag to the right.
This grouping gives you the opportunity to select ranges of photos by tap­
ping the button to the left of the date stamps. Then you can apply ratings
and keywords in batches that better match the grouping of real-life events.
CC
Tip The Smart Groups slider doesn’t have to be tied to capture dates. It
takes its cues from the Sort criteria that are to the left of the slider.
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The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
4.13 The Smart
Groups slider at its
default position
Smart Groups slider
4.14 Selecting a finer
setting (drag to the
left) breaks the shoot
into groups.
Chapter 4: Rate and Tag Photos
75
Group Photos into Collections
I mentioned earlier that people organize photos in different ways—and that
includes how they group photos. For some, having metadata in place is
good enough to locate photos using filters and searches. Other people pre­
fer to store images in albums, folders, or other types of digital shoeboxes.
Photosmith’s collections scratch that itch, giving photos an address within
the app where they can be easily found, versus being scattered through­
out the larger library. (Collections also play an important part in syncing
between the iPad and Lightroom, as I’ll discuss shortly.)
Follow these steps to add photos to a collection:
1. Select the photos in your library that you want to include in a collection.
2. If you need to create a collection from scratch, tap the New Collection
button and give the collection a name.
3. To add the selected photos to the collection, take one of two actions:
••
Drag one of the photos onto the collection’s name in the sidebar;
all selected photos will accompany it.
••
Tap the collection’s Detail (>) button to view its options in the side­
bar drawer, and then tap the Add Selected Photos button (4.15).
Deleting photos from a collection is just as easy: Select the photos you
wish to remove, tap the collection’s Detail (>) button, and tap the Remove
Selected Photos button. You can also delete a collection by tapping
Remove Collection in the Detail options pane; the photos in the collection
are not deleted from your library.
4.15 Adding selected
photos to a c­ ollection
using the sidebar
drawer
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The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
CC
Tip A faster method of creating a collection is to select the photos you
want and then drag them as a group to the New Collection button. Photo­
smith prompts you to name the collection and then you’re done.
Sync with Photoshop Lightroom
And now we get to the whole point of using an app like Photosmith.
­Rating and tagging is helpful, but if you can’t transfer that metadata with
your photos to Lightroom, all the work you put into it ends up being futile.
Photosmith offers two methods to synchronize your images and data.
Photosmith publish service
Lightroom’s Publish Services panel lets you sync photos to your libraries on
Flickr, Facebook, and others. Photosmith takes advantage of this conduit,
enabling two-way synchronization between the iPad and the desktop.
Download the free Photosmith plug-in at www.photosmithapp.com, and
install it in Lightroom using the Plug-in Manager.
Any collections you create in Photosmith show up in Lightroom as well, and
the photos and metadata remain in sync when you click the Publish button in
Lightroom (4.16).
4.16 Collections appear in Lightroom (left) and in Photosmith (right).
Chapter 4: Rate and Tag Photos
77
Sync photos
To synchronize everything in Photosmith’s catalog, do the following:
1. Make sure Photosmith is running on the iPad, Lightroom is running on
your computer, and both devices are on the same network.
2. In Photosmith, go to the Dashboard menu and tap the Lightroom
button.
3. Tap the Sync Now button to sync the catalog. The photos transfer to
Lightroom, and any collections you’ve made are kept intact (4.17).
4.17 Sync all photos
in your catalog.
Or, synchronize just a collection. I like this option when I am dealing with
a specific project—a single photo shoot or location—and don’t want to
transfer every new photo from the iPad to Lightroom. Tap the collection’s
Detail (>) button and then tap the Sync Now button.
CC
Tip Before you sync, I recommend adjusting the Local Destination setting
in Lightroom for where the Photosmith plug-in stores the files. In my case,
Photosmith put everything from my first sync into the Pictures folder on my
Mac—a logical assumption. However, Lightroom stores imported photos
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The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
in subfolders named according to the images’ capture dates. In Lightroom,
double-click the Photosmith publish service in the Publish Services pane to
reveal its settings. Then, go to the Photosmith –> Lightroom Image Options
area and specify where the files will end up in the Local Destination field. If
your Lightroom catalog already sorts by chronological folders, choose By
Date from the Organize pop-up menu and then select a style from the Date
Format pop-up menu.
Apply Develop settings
Does your camera tend to capture everything with a slight color cast?
Or perhaps you’ve hit upon a favorite combination of edits that reflect
your photographic style. If you’ve saved those values as Develop module
presets, you can apply them (or any of the built-in Lightroom ones) during
the sync process. Since Lightroom is performing the edits, they’re nondestructive, so you can change or remove them within Lightroom at any
point. Double-click the Photosmith publish service to bring up the Light­
room Publishing Manager, and expand the Photosmith -> Lightroom Image
Options section. Then select the Develop Settings checkbox and choose
the setting you want (4.18).
4.18 Apply During
Import options
Apply a metadata preset
Earlier, I bemoaned the fact that Photosmith can’t save keyword tags in a
metadata preset. With help from Lightroom, you can overcome that limita­
tion by applying one of Lightroom’s metadata presets at import. If you’ve
already created metadata presets in Lightroom, go to the Lightroom Pub­
lishing Manager, select the Metadata Preset checkbox, and then choose
the preset you want. In the Action pop-up menu that appears, set how the
data will be applied: Photosmith first, Lightroom first, just Photosmith, or
just Lightroom.
Chapter 4: Rate and Tag Photos
79
Sync keywords
In addition to transferring the image files, Photosmith keeps Lightroom’s
library of keywords up to date every time you sync. This option, also in the
Lightroom Publishing Manager, gives you the option of syncing just the
keywords applied to the current set of photos or syncing all keywords in
the catalog (which happens more slowly).
CC
Tip Want to speed up Lightroom import? Of course you do! Here’s a clever
way to copy your photos faster. When you get to your computer, connect
the iPad via USB (even if you normally synchronize over Wi-Fi), and use
Lightroom’s standard import process to pull the photos from the Photo
Library; transferring files over USB is much faster than over Wi-Fi. Next,
use the Photosmith publish service in Lightroom to sync it with Photosmith
(or initiate a sync from Photosmith). The sync copies only the metadata
between iPad and computer; it doesn’t re-copy the image files.
Photosmith Plug-in Extras
If you’d prefer to transfer photos one-way from Photosmith to Lightroom,
use the Plug-in Extras functionality:
1. In Lightroom, choose File > Plug-in Extras > Photosmith, and then
choose one of the following options:
••
Sync Keywords: Transfers only the keyword list.
••
Sync Multiple Collections: Transfers one or more collections that
you choose.
2. Click the Sync Now (for keywords) or Sync Collections Now (for
­collections) button to perform the transfer.
3. Click Close to exit the dialog.
Sync photos from Lightroom to Photosmith
Consider this alternate scenario: You didn’t get a chance to review your
photos in Photosmith while you were out in the field, and you imported
them into Lightroom directly from the camera. However, you’d still like to
use Photosmith to review the shots, rather than accomplish the task while
chained to your computer. The Photosmith plug-in can transfer JPEG ver­
sions of your photos (optimized for the iPad’s screen if you want, cutting
down on storage space and transfer time). Rate and tag them there, and
then sync the metadata back to Lightroom when you’re ready.
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The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
1. In Lightroom, right-click the Photosmith publish service and choose
Create User Collection.
2. Enter a custom name for the collection in the dialog that appears
(4.19).
3. Click the Create button. If Photosmith is running, an empty collection
automatically appears.
4. With the collection selected, click the Publish button. Or, in Photo­smith,
sync the catalog or just the collection. The images copy to the iPad.
CC
Tip When you transfer photos from Lightroom to Photosmith, you don’t
need to send over the original high-resolution files—the goal is to review
the photos, rate and tag them, and then sync just that metadata back. That’s
especially true if you’re shooting with massive files created by cameras like
the Nikon D800. The Photosmith plug-in transfers only JPEG-formatted files,
at a size of your choice. Go to the Lightroom Publishing Manager (doubleclick the publish service) and, under Lightroom -> Photosmith Image
Options, choose an image size: Full Screen, which matches the resolution
of the original iPad 2 and the iPad mini; Full Screen (Retina), the size for the
third- and fourth-generation iPads; or Full Resolution, which matches the
original photo’s dimensions.
4.19 Create a
user collection
in Lightroom.
After you mark the photos on the iPad, sync the collection or your entire
library to update the changes in Lightroom. The same applies if you update
a synced photo’s metadata in Lightroom: When you sync again, the lastupdated version is retained on both devices.
Chapter 4: Rate and Tag Photos
81
CC
Tip Do you rely on Smart Collections in Lightroom that update themselves
based on criteria you feed them? Photosmith doesn’t yet support Smart
Collections (although the developers say they’re working on the feature),
but you can achieve similar functionality. In Lightroom, select all photos in
a Smart Collection, and then drag them to a Photosmith Publish collection.
You’ll need to do this again the next time the Smart Collection is updated,
but duplicates aren’t transferred.
Export to Photosmith
If those aren’t enough options, you can also set up Photosmith as an
export target. In Lightroom, choose File > Export and then specify Photo­
smith from the Export To menu. You can specify the image format and
size, and you can choose whether to sync keywords for the entire library
(slower) or just the keywords in use by photos (faster). The export settings
can also be set up as a preset for easier export later.
Export to Other Destinations
As you’d expect, you can share photos to Flickr and Facebook or attach
them to outgoing email messages. And you can also copy photos to
albums within the iOS photo library, which makes them accessible to other
apps on the iPad. You’ll find these options in the Export menu.
However, I want to draw attention to three other export options that
broaden the usefulness of Photosmith. Although the app was designed to
work with Lightroom, you can still export tagged photos to your computer
for later processing in other software.
Dropbox
If you’re on a robust Internet connection, copy images from Photosmith
to Dropbox, which makes them automatically appear on any computer on
which you’re running the online service.
1. Select the photos you want to transfer.
2. Tap the Export button at the bottom of the sidebar.
3. Tap the Dropbox button to reveal the Export to D
­ ropbox drawer
4. At the top of the drawer, choose which photos to send (such as
“Send 5 selected photos”).
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The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
(4.20).
4.20 Send photos to
your Dropbox account.
5. Tap one of the upload size buttons (Med JPG, Large JPG, or Orig) if
you want to resize the photos.
6. If you want metadata saved in separate files alongside the image
files, select the Create XMP Sidecar checkbox (more about this in a
moment).
7. Tap the Send Photos button to start copying.
XMP Export
When you’re working with JPEG images, additional metadata is written
to the image file. But raw images are treated as sacred originals in Photo­
smith and not changed in any way. To associate metadata with the file,
you can export an additional XMP (Extensible Media Platform) file that
contains the information and rides alongside the image. So, a raw file
named DSC_1234.NEF would have a sidecar file named DSC_1234.XMP
that includes the metadata. When imported into most photo management
software, the data is combined with the image.
Photosmith’s Dropbox option is capable of adding the XMP files during
export. If you don’t use Dropbox, you can still access the metadata files by
tapping the XMP Export button, exporting selected files, and then copying
them from within iTunes or via FTP.
Chapter 4: Rate and Tag Photos
83
PhotoCopy
The PhotoCopy option lets you export photos and their metadata to other
iOS apps that support the FileXchange method of sharing images between
apps. With images selected, tap the Export Photos button and then
choose the app to receive them.
Delete Photos
You’re bound to hit the ceiling of how many photos your iPad can store
(even if you sprang for the 128 GB model), so you’ll want to delete photos
from Photosmith. After you’ve processed your photos and transferred them
to your computer, do the following to remove them:
1. Select the photos to delete.
2. Touch and hold the Rejected button in the QuickTag bar to bring up
the Delete Photos window.
Photosmith notes whether the images have been synced to Lightroom
or not (to make sure you don’t accidentally delete images), and gives
you the option of deselecting any shots you want to keep (4.21).
3. Tap the Delete button to remove the images. If you copied them
originally from the iOS photo library, those originals still remain on
the iPad. If you imported them into Photosmith as links, the links are
removed.
4.21 Deleting photos
from the Photosmith
library
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The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
The Proxy JPEG Workflow
What if, as I describe in Chapter 2, you’re recording photos as Raw+JPEG to two
memory cards in your camera—one for raw and one for JPEG files? Using a “proxy
JPEG workflow,” you can import only the JPEG images into the iPad, work with
them in Photosmith, and then marry them with their raw counterparts in Lightroom.
See http://support.photosmithapp.com/knowledgebase/articles/66161-proxy-jpgworkflow-v2- for more information.
Proxy JPEG
Workflow
Rate and Tag Using PhotosInfoPro
Unlike Photosmith, which focuses on syncing photos to Photoshop Light­
room, PhotosInfoPro takes a streamlined approach that exports metadata in
XMP files to be imported into any software that supports the sidecar files.
PhotosInfoPro
Import Photos
PhotosInfoPro reads images in the iOS photo library, so the first step is to
choose which album you want to work with. Assuming you’ve just imported
a card’s worth of images into the iPad, tap the Library button and choose
either the Last Import or All Imported album (4.22).
4.22 Choose
an album in
PhotosInfoPro.
Chapter 4: Rate and Tag Photos
85
Rate a Photo
PhotosInfoPro makes it easy to scan your photos and apply ratings.
1. Tap a photo thumbnail to view it larger and to see the metadata your
camera applied (4.23).
2. Tap the rating dots below the photo to assign zero to five stars or to
mark the image as rejected.
3. Flick right-to-left to view and rate the next image.
I find the default review size to be too small to get a good idea of the
image’s quality. Tap once anywhere to expand the size (hiding the toolbar
at the top) and put the photo against a black background. You can also
view the image full screen by tapping the double guillemet (») symbol to
hide the sidebar. Pinch-to-zoom works in this view, but the picture snaps
back to the screen edges when you lift your fingers.
However, the full-screen view obscures the ratings, so you’ll need to tap
once on the photo again to reveal them (making the photo smaller again).
4.23 Rating a photo
in PhotosInfoPro
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The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
Add Metadata to a Photo
To assign IPTC metadata to a single photo, tap it and then do the following:
1. Tap the Metadata button. The Keywords panel appears by default.
2. Type a keyword in the search field to locate a tag you’ve used previ­
ously, or tap Return on the keyboard to create a new one (4.24).
You can remove a keyword you applied by tapping the Delete (–)
button to the right of the word. To delete a keyword from the app’s
database, swipe left-to-right on it in the Vocabulary list and then tap
the Delete button.
3. Tap the tab for another metadata category to edit its information:
Headline, Creator, Copyright, Title, or Location.
4. To define a location, type a name in the Search field. Or, navigate the
map using your fingers and tap the Drop Pin button in the upper-left
corner to set the location in the middle of the map (4.25).
5. To exit, tap the button that hides the keyboard at the bottom right.
4.24 Adding
keywords
4.25 Set geolocation
information.
Chapter 4: Rate and Tag Photos
87
CC
Tip While you’re editing metadata, swipe left or right on the photo to
switch between images.
CC
Tip When you switch to another image in the Location tab, the map posi­
tion remains the same. Tap the Drop Pin button to assign the same location
as the previous photo.
Add Metadata to Multiple Photos
Of course, you don’t want to apply metadata to every photo individually if
you’re working on a large batch of similar shots. Here’s how to tag multiple
photos in one swift stroke.
1. In the Album view, tap the Metadata button.
2. Tap to select the photos you want to work with, or tap the Select All
button.
3. Tap the Done button to finish making selections.
4. Enter the metadata in the respective tabs
(4.26).
5. To exit, tap the button that hides the keyboard at the bottom right.
4.26 Edit metadata
for multiple photos.
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The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
Export Metadata
PhotosInfoPro exports the metadata you apply in three ways.
••
Master + XMP. This option sends the original image file plus an XMP
sidecar file that contains the metadata.
••
XMP. Just the XMP files are sent, saving considerable time (especially if
you’re in an area that does not offer robust Internet access). For exam­
ple, you could upload the XMP files to Dropbox and then, when you’re
back on your computer, import the images from your memory cards.
You’d then import the XMP files and match them with the photos.
••
JPEG. The JPEG option writes the metadata into the JPEG file, bypass­
ing the need to deal with XMP sidecar files. However, note that the
JPEG route applies an additional level of compression to your images,
reducing their quality. Even if the photos were shot on JPEG originally,
you’ll end up with higher-quality photos by using Master + XMP.
To export photos and metadata, do the following:
1. Choose one image or multiple images; for the latter, tap the Export
button in the Album view, select the photos you want, and then tap
Done. The Export window appears (4.27).
2. Choose an export option and tap the method you’d like to use, such as
the iTunes shared folder, Dropbox, or FTP.
3. In the photo organizing software on your computer, import the image
files and XMP pairs.
4.27 Exporting
­multiple photos and
their metadata
Chapter 4: Rate and Tag Photos
89
Rate and Tag Using Editing Apps
I’ve spent this chapter focused on Photosmith and PhotosInfoPro because
they both work with many photos at once. The way I prefer to work, I first
review and rate my photos, find the ones that are worth spending more
time on, and then bring them into an editing program (on the iPad or on
the computer) later. Sometimes it feels as if I can fire off 200 shots just
watching dust migrate, so sorting images one at a time just isn’t practical.
However, if you’re under the gun to process a few shots and share them
with a client, editor, or friends online, running them through Photosmith is
overkill. That’s why some editing apps now offer the ability to edit various
metadata and save that information to the exported image file.
Photogene
By way of example, I’m using the image editor Photogene, which I cover in
more detail in the next chapter. Although the app contains some metadata
support, the pro version adds star ratings and the ability to create IPTC sets
that you can apply, which allows you to avoid the drudgery of entering the
same information repeatedly.
Rate Photos
Photogene (in its pro mode) offers two methods for assigning star ratings:
••
While you’re viewing photos in their albums, touch and hold a photo
until an options bar appears, and then choose View Metadata.
••
Open and edit a photo in Photogene’s editing environment, and tap
the Metadata button.
Tap the General heading in the popover that appears, and then select a
star rating (4.28).
4.28 Assign a star
­rating in Photogene.
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The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition
4.29 Add descriptive
information to the
photo’s metadata.
Add IPTC Information
Much of the IPTC information that gets embedded with the photo is specific
to the shot. In the Metadata popover, tap to edit any of the text fields (4.29).
However, the core data about you presumably stays the same, in which
case you’ll want to create IPTC defaults and sets that you can easily copy
and paste to new photos.
Create and use IPTC sets
The advantage to creating sets is that you might want most of the same
information (such as contact info) but need something about it tailored
for specific uses. In my case, I shoot with two cameras: a Nikon D90 and a
Canon PowerShot G12. So, I’ve set up separate IPTC sets that are nearly
identical except for the camera-specific information.
1. In the Metadata popover, tap the IPTC heading and then tap the IPTC
Sets button.
2. Tap the plus (+) button to create a new set. Tap the name of the new
set to reveal its information fields.
Chapter 4: Rate and Tag Photos
91
4.30 Make sure
­Preserve IPTC is
turned on.
3. Enter the relevant information in the IPTC fields. When you’re done,
tap the IPTC Sets button in the popover’s menu bar.
The next time you need to quickly add metadata from one of your sets to
a photo, tap the Metadata button, tap IPTC Sets, and then tap the Use Set
button belonging to the set you created.
CC
Tip Using the pro version of Photogene, you can also apply IPTC sets to
several photos in a batch. After you fill in the values in one photo, scroll to
the bottom of the Metadata window and tap the Copy IPTC button. Then,
when viewing your library, tap the Select\Collage button. Tap to choose
one or more images, and lastly, tap the Paste IPTC button.
Export IPTC Information
When you’re ready to export the photo, make sure the IPTC data goes
along with it. Tap the Export button and set the Preserve IPTC switch to
On (4.30). The information is written into the file that gets exported.
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INDEX
500px app, 186, 204
A
Adobe Nav app, 57, 200
Adobe Photoshop. See Photoshop
Adobe Photoshop Elements. See
Photoshop Elements
Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. See
Photoshop Lightroom
Adobe Photoshop Touch app. See
Photoshop Touch app
Adobe Revel app, 190–193, 204
AE/AF Lock indicator, 4
Air Display app, 57, 200
AirPlay, 177
AirPrint technology, 194
albums
adding photos to, 37
All Imported, 23, 74, 85
creating, 37, 165
Facebook, 181
Flickr, 185
Last Import, 23, 74, 85
naming, 37
Photo Stream, 37, 184
Snapseed, 180–181
viewing photos in, 144
Aperture
exporting photos from, 160–161
Import GPS feature, 34
App Store, 165
Apple Aperture. See Aperture
Apple Fairplay DRM scheme, 148
Apple iPhoto. See iPhoto
Apple TV, 177
apps
500px, 186, 204
Adobe Nav, 57, 200
Adobe Revel, 190–193, 204
advanced, 5–9
Air Display, 200
AutoStitch Panorama for iPad, 9,
198
Blux Camera for iPad, 7, 54, 198
Blux Lens, 54, 201
Box, 36, 169, 198
Camera, 4–5
Camera Awesome, 204
Camera+ for iPad, 6–7, 198
CameraMator, 30, 47–53, 198
CamRanger, 31, 47–53, 199
Capture Pilot, 201
Capture Pilot HD, 46
Dropbox. See Dropbox
DSLR Camera Remote, xvi, 46
FlickStackr, 185, 205
GarageBand, 26, 199
GeoSnitch, 31, 33, 199
Geotag Photos Pro, 31–32, 199
Handy Photo, 127–129, 203
image pixel size and, 158
iMovie. See iMovie for iOS
Ink Cards, 205
iStopMotion, 58–60, 201
iStopMotion Remote Camera, 202
Messages, 190
Phase One, 46
photo service, 185–186
Photogene. See Photogene app
PhotoRaw, 125, 203
PhotoRaw Lite, 203
Photos. See Photos app
Photoshop Touch. See Photoshop
Touch app
PhotosInfoPro, 85–89, 202
Photosmith. See Photosmith app
PhotoStackr for 500px, 205
PhotoSync, 24–25, 199
Pinnacle Studio, 132, 204
piRAWnha, 125, 203
Pixelsync. See Pixelsync app
PlainText, 42, 199
PopBooth, 195, 205
Portfolio for iPad. See Portfolio for
iPad app
Portfolio Loader, 167
printing from, 194–195
QR Reader for iPad, xvii–xviii
remote photo, 46–54
Index
207
apps (continued)
Seagate Media, 200
ShutterSnitch, 28–29, 33, 200
Sincerely Ink, 195
Skype for iPad, 26, 200
SmugMug, 186, 204
Snapseed. See Snapseed app
SoftBox Pro, 42, 200
for studio use, 45–60
SugarSync, 36, 200
Triggertrap, 53–54, 202
TrueHDR, 8, 198
Walgreens for iPad, 195, 205
Artistic effects, 118
aspect ratio, 1090
audio
adjusting volume, 146
background music, 147–148
in movies, 146–150
recording in iMovie, 149
sound effects, 118, 146, 149
sounds while editing, 118
voiceovers, 150
audio clips, 146–149
audio tracks, 147, 150
Auto-Lock setting, iPad, 30
AutoStitch Panorama for iPad, 9, 198
Avatron Air Display, 57
B
background music, 147–148
backups
dedicated storage devices, 41
to Dropbox, 35, 38–39
to hard disks, 40–41
to iCloud Photo Stream, 35, 36–37
importance of, 36
on memory cards, 34
online services for, 35–39
overview, 34–36
portable storage for, 40–41
to Seagate Wireless Plus, 40–41
wireless connections and, 35–36
batch-processing images, 162–163
Beam button, 118
208
The iPad for Photographers
black levels, 105
black-and-white effects, 118, 119
black-and-white photos, 118, 119
Blux Camera for iPad, 7, 54, 198
Blux Lens app, 54, 201
Box app, 36, 169, 198
Box service, 167
bracketing, 51–52
brightness
adjusting in iPhoto, 114–115
adjusting in Photogene, 105–107
adjusting in Photoshop Touch, 122
adjusting in Snapseed, 102
Brightness setting, iPad, 102
brush tools
Handy Photo, 128
iPhoto, 116–117
Photogene, 109
Brushes and Effects tools, 116–117
Burst mode, 7
C
Camera app, 4–5
Camera Awesome app, 186, 204
Camera Connection Kit
connecting microphone/headset,
26, 150
importing photos with, 20–26
importing video with, 134–135
Camera+ for iPad, 6–7, 198
Camera Roll
Dropbox uploads, 38
moving clips to, 134–135
Photo Stream uploads, 36, 184
sharing iMovie projects to, 151
camera sensors, 105–106
CameraMator app, 30, 47–53, 198
cameras
Connection Kit. See iPad Camera
Connection Kit
controlling from iPad/iPhone,
46–54
importing photos from, 21–24
iPhone vs. iPad, 118
tethered, 46, 55–56
CamNexus, 47, 201
CamRanger app, 31, 47–53, 199
Capture Pilot app, 201
Capture Pilot HD app, 46
capturing video, 4, 134–135
CF (Compact Flash) card readers, 24
Clip Settings window, 140–142, 146
clips. See audio clips; video clips
CNN iReport, 151
collections, 76–77, 80
color
adjusting, 96
adjusting in iPhoto, 115–116
adjusting in Photoshop
Touch, 122
adjusting in Snapseed, 100–103
in portfolios, 158, 159
saturation, 102, 108
vibrance, 96, 108
color cast, 108
color management, 158, 194
color temperature, 96, 108, 109, 116
Compact Flash (CF) card readers, 24
component cables, 174
compression, 14, 181
contrast
adjusting in iPhoto, 114–115
adjusting in Photogene, 105–107
adjusting in Photoshop Touch, 122
adjusting in Snapseed, 102
cropping photos
considerations, 96, 158
in iPhoto, 113
in Photogene, 104
in Photos app, 97
in Photoshop Touch app, 121
in Snapseed, 99
D
dedicated storage devices, 41
digital cameras. See cameras
Direct Mode, 28
disks. See hard disks
display. See monitors
DRM scheme, 148
Dropbox
adding photos to gallery, 166–167,
169
backing up to, 35, 36–37
considerations, 39
copying photos to, 38–39
obtaining, 199
“printing” to, 194
sharing photos via, 166–167, 169
uploading photos from, 180
uploading photos to, 38–39
dropbox.com, 167
droplets, 163
DSLR Camera Remote app, xvi, 46
DSLR cameras. See cameras
E
editing
images. See image editing
video. See video editing
effects
artistic, 118
black-and-white, 118, 119
film grain, 118
in iPhoto, 117–119
Ken Burns Effect, 144–145
presets for, 96
sepia, 118
in Snapseed, 103
sound, 118, 146, 149
vignettes, 118
vintage, 118, 119
emailing photos, 187–190, 192
exporting items
iMovie projects to iTunes, 152
IPTC data, 92
metadata, 89
exporting photos
from Aperture, 160–161
from iPhoto, 164–165
from Lightroom, 82, 159–160
from Photoshop, 161–163
from Photoshop Elements,
163–164
with PhotosInfoPro, 89
Index
209
exposure
adjusting in iPhoto, 114–115
adjusting in Photogene, 105–107
long, 53–54
setting, 6
Eye-Fi cards, 27–29, 64, 65
F
Face Balance option, 116
Facebook
photo albums, 181
sharing movies via, 151
uploading images to, 180–183, 192
Fairplay DRM scheme, 148
files
GPX, 31, 32
JPEG, xiv, 12, 89, 124
raw. See raw images
XMP, 89
FileXchange method, 65
fill light, iPad as, 42
film grain, 118
filtering photos
considerations, 7
by criteria, 73
by metadata, 72–73
in Photosmith, 72–75
with Smart Groups, 74–75
by sort order, 73
FingerPrint utility, 194
flash, 4
Flickr, 185, 189, 192, 204
FlickStackr app, 185, 205
focus, 4, 6, 50
focus point, 4
G
galleries
adding photos to, 166–167
creating, 166
editing, 170–171
populating, 166
210
The iPad for Photographers
presenting, 173–177
thumbnails, 171, 175
GarageBand app, 26, 199
geolocation data, 31–34, 87
GeoSnitch app, 31, 33, 199
Geotag Photos Pro app, 31–32, 199
Global Positioning System. See GPS
Google+ iPad community, xviii
GPS (Global Positioning System), 31–34
GPS adapters, 31
GPS eXchange format (GPX) files, 31,
32
GPX (GPS eXchange format) files, 31,
32
grid, onscreen, 4
grouping photos
into collections, 76–77, 80
Smart Group feature, 74–75
gyroscope, 113
H
Handy Photo app, 127–129, 203
hard disks
considerations, 40
dedicated storage devices, 41
HyperDrive Colorspace UDMA, 41
Seagate GoFlex Satellite, xvi, 41
Seagate Wireless Plus, 40–41
USB, 40
HDMI cables, 174
HDR (high dynamic range), 8
HDR images, 4, 8, 51–52
headsets, 26, 150
healing tools, 109, 126–127
Helpful Apps for Photographers, xvi
high dynamic range. See HDR
highlights
adjusting in iPhoto, 115
adjusting in Photogene, 106
clipping, 107
Histogram, 105, 107
HyperDrive Colorspace UDMA, 41
I
iCloud Photo Stream, 35, 36–37, 184
image editing, 95–128
brightness. See brightness
color. See color
contrast. See contrast
cropping. See cropping photos
enhancing photos, 98
with Handy Photo, 127–129
healing tools, 109, 126–127
with iPhoto, 111–119
overview, 95, 96
with Photogene, 104–111
with Photos app, 97–98
presets, 96, 103, 110–111
raw files, 14, 16, 96, 124–125
recomposing. See recomposing
photos
red eye correction, 98
retouching photos, 96, 126–129
rotating photos. See rotating photos
selective edits, 109–110
with Snapseed, 98–103
straightening. See straightening
photos
tone. See tone
image stabilization, 6
images. See photos
iMessage instant messaging, 190
iMovie for iOS, 131–153. See also
video
audio features. See audio
capturing video directly, 134–135
considerations, 132
editing process. See video editing
getting video into, 134–135
interface, 132
Ken Burns Effect, 144–145
Media Library, 132
microphones, 26
obtaining, 199
playhead, 132, 136
playing video, 136
Project Settings window, 132
skimming video, 136
timeline, 132, 134–139, 150
Viewer, 132, 136
iMovie projects. See also movies; video
clips
adding background music, 147–148
adding clips from Media Library, 135
adding photos to, 143–145
adding titles, 140–141
adding video to, 134–135
adding voiceovers, 150
applying fade in/out, 133
audio in. See audio; audio clips
capturing video directly, 134–135
choosing themes for, 133
creating, 132–133
described, 132
editing. See video editing
exporting to iTunes, 152
importing video from iPhone/iPod
touch, 135
Ken Burns Effect, 144–145
location data, 142–143
naming, 133
opening existing, 134
playing, 136
resolution, 151
reversing actions, 143
sending to devices via iTunes,
152–153
sharing options, 151–153
skimming, 136
theme music, 147
transitions, 138, 139, 140
using Precision Editor, 139
working with timeline, 132,
134–139, 150
importing photos
from camera, 21–24
with CameraMator, 30
with CamRanger, 31
considerations, 27
Direct Mode, 28
with iPad Camera Connection Kit,
20–26
from iPhone, 24–25
from memory card, 21–24
with Photosmith, 64–65
to Revel library, 191
with ShutterSnitch, 28–29
wirelessly, 27–31
Index
211
importing video, 135
Ink Cards app, 195, 205
International Press Telecommunications
Council. See IPTC
intervalometer, 52–53
iOS devices. See also specific devices
importing video from, 135
Photo Stream, 35, 36–37, 184
as remote camera, 58
screenshots captured, 36
sharing iMovie projects with,
152–153
iPad. See also iOS devices
3G vs. Wi-Fi, xv
audio, 118
Auto-Lock setting, 30
basics, xvii
capabilities of, xiii
cases/stands, 55–57
considerations, xiii–xiv, 3
controlling DSLR cameras from,
46–54
as external monitor, 57
on location, xiii–xiv, 11
memory, xiii–xiv, xv, 40, 173
models, xiv–xv, xvii
mounting, 55–57
new/changed features, xv–xvi
printing photos from, 194–195
resolution, 158
Retina display, xiv, xv
size/weight, xiv
using as fill light, 42
using in studio, 45–60
workflow, 12–19
iPad 2, xv, 31–34
iPad adapters, 174
iPad camera. See cameras
iPad Camera Connection Kit
connecting microphone/headset,
26, 150
importing photos with, 20–26
importing video with, 134–135
iPad for Photographers community, xviii
iPad for Photographers Web site, xviii
iPad mini
considerations, xv, xvii, 3, 81
Lightning adapters, 20
212
The iPad for Photographers
on location, 11, 20
for portfolios, 157
iPad Pocket Guide, xvii
iPad portfolio. See portfolios
ipadforphotographers.com, xvi
iPhone. See also iOS devices
controlling DSLR cameras from,
46–54
HDR mode, 8
importing photos from, 24–25
importing video from, 135
location data, 31–34
panorama feature, 9
iPhone 4S, 24
iPhone camera, 118
iPhoto, 111–118. See also Photo
Library
adjusting color, 115–116
adjusting exposure, 114–115
adjusting specific areas, 116–117
brightness adjustment, 114–115
considerations, 111
contrast adjustment, 114–115
creative effects, 117–119
cropping photos, 113
exporting images from, 164–165
image editing in, 111–119
obtaining, 202
recomposing photos, 112–113
Revert to Original, 111
Show Original, 111
straightening photos, 112–113
thumbnails, 112
tone adjustment, 114, 117
iPod touch. See also iOS devices
controlling DSLR cameras from,
46–54
importing video from, 135
location data, 31
IPTC fields, 70, 92
IPTC information, 91–92
IPTC sets, 91–92
ISO setting, 29
iStopMotion app, 58–60, 201
iStopMotion Remote Camera app, 202
iTunes
accessing music library, 147, 148
file sharing, 168, 169
loading images into gallery, 168,
169
sharing iMovie projects via, 152–153
iUSBportCamera, 46, 47, 201
J
JPEG compression, 14
JPEG files, xiv, 12, 89, 124
JPEG format
capturing photos in, 13–14
considerations, xiv, 12, 14, 96
pros/cons, 14
vs. raw format, 12–19
JPEG previews, 14, 16, 96, 124
K
Ken Burns Effect, 144–145
keyboards, 26
keyword hierarchies, 69
keywords
assigning with PhotosInfoPro, 87–88
assigning with Photosmith, 68–70
considerations, 63, 64, 68
metadata presets and, 71
removing, 69–70, 87
L
LePage, Rick, 34
light, fill, 42
Lightroom. See Photoshop Lightroom
Live View option, 50–51
location data, 31–34
Lock button, 174
logo screen/page, 172, 176
M
Media Library
adding clips from, 135
interface, 132
sound effects in, 149
viewing photos in, 144
memory, iPad, xiii–xiv, 40, 173
memory card adapter, 20–21
memory card readers, 24
memory cards
for backups, 34
capacity, 27
considerations, xiii–xiv, xv, 21–24
deleting images from, 23
Eye-Fi, 27–29, 64, 65
importing photos from, 21–24
SD cards, 20–24
wireless, 27–31
Messages app, 190
metadata
adding with PhotosInfoPro, 87–88
editing, 70–72
exporting, 89
IPTC information, 70, 87, 91–92
in Photosmith, 70–72
presets, 71–72
microphones, 26, 150
MMS (multimedia messaging service),
190
monitors
iPad as external monitor, 57
presenting portfolios on, 174–177
movies. See also iMovie entries; video
adding photos to, 143–145
audio in. See audio; audio clips
background music in, 147–148
choosing themes for, 133
editing. See video editing
fading in/out, 133
Ken Burns Effect, 144–145
playing, 136
sharing options, 151–153
skimming, 136
theme music, 147
titles, 140–141
transitions, v, 138, 140
voiceovers, 150
Mpix.com, 195
multimedia messaging service (MMS),
190
music, background, 147–148
Index
213
N
New Collection button, 77
notes, photos, 173
O
onscreen grid, 4
ordering prints, 195
P
paint effects, 116–117
panorama images, 4, 9, 198
passcode, 174
Phase One app, 46
photo editing apps, 7, 180–183
Photo Library. See also iPhoto
Photogene and, 104
Photosmith and, 64–65
Snapseed and, 98
viewing with Photos app, 187
photo service apps, 185–186
photo sharing services, 180–186
Photo Stream, 35, 36–37, 184
Photogene app
applying selective edits, 109–110
Auto button, 104
brightness adjustment, 105–107
color adjustment, 105–109
contrast adjustment, 105–107
cropping photos, 104
image editing in, 104–111
obtaining, 202
presets, 110–111
rating photos, 90
recomposing photos, 104–105
retouching photos, 126–127
straightening photos, 104–105
tone adjustment, 105–109
uploading photos from, 181–182
watermarks, 183
PhotoRaw app, 125, 203
PhotoRaw Lite app, 203
214
The iPad for Photographers
photos
adding to movies, 143–145
in albums. See albums
backing up. See backups
batch-processing, 162–163
black-and-white, 118, 119
carousel, 190–193
collections, 76–77, 80
copying to Dropbox, 38–39
copying to hard drive, 40–41
criteria, 73
cropping. See cropping photos
deleting from Photo Stream, 37
dimensions, 158
editing. See image editing
emailing, 187–190, 192
enhancing, 98
exporting. See exporting photos
filtering. See filtering photos
galleries. See galleries
grouping. See grouping photos
HDR, 4, 8, 51–52
iCloud Photo Stream, 35, 36–37, 184
importing. See importing photos
location data, 31–34
metadata. See metadata
notes, 173
ordering prints, 195
panorama, 4, 9, 198
preparing for portfolio, 158–165
printing from iPad, 194–195
rating. See rating photos
raw format. See raw images
recomposing. See recomposing
photos
reference, 34
rejected, 66, 72, 84, 86
reviewing, 20–31
rotating. See rotating photos
screenshots, 36
sharing. See sharing photos
sharpening, 158, 160
slideshows, 156, 165, 174
straightening. See straightening
photos
time-lapse, 52–54
vignettes, 118
watermarks, 183
workflow, 12–19
zooming in on, 96
Photos app
considerations, 165
cropping photos, 97
image editing in, 97–98
sharing photos, 187–190
straightening photos, 97
Photoshop
Adobe Nav app, 57
batch-processing images, 162–163
creating actions, 161–163
exporting/processing images,
161–163
Photoshop Elements, 163–164
Photoshop Lightroom
exporting photos from, 159–160
exporting to Photosmith, 82
keywords and, 69
publishing service, 77, 79, 80
syncing with Photosmith, 77–82
Photoshop Touch app
adjusting color, 122
adjusting specific areas, 122–124
brightness adjustment, 122
considerations, 119
contrast adjustment, 122
cropping photos, 121
image editing in, 119–124
obtaining, 202
recomposing photos, 120–121
rotating photos, 120, 121
straightening photos, 120
tone adjustment, 122
PhotosInfoPro app, 85–89, 202
Photosmith 2 app, xvi, 65
Photosmith 3 app, xvi, 65
Photosmith app
assigning keywords, 68–70
considerations, xvi, 41
exporting photos to, 65, 82
filtering photos, 72–75
importing photos, 64–65
obtaining, 202
photo collections, 76–77, 80
rating photos, 66–67
rejected photos, 66, 72, 84
scanning library, 65
Smart Group feature, 74–75
sorting photos, 73
syncing with Lightroom, 77–82
Photosmith plug-in, 77, 78, 80–81
Photosmith publish service, 77, 79, 80
photosmithapp.com, 77
PhotoStackr for 500px, 186, 205
PhotoSync app, 24–25, 199
Photo/Video switch, 4
Pinnacle Studio app, 132, 204
piRAWnha app, 125, 203
pixels, blown, 106
Pixelsync app, xvi
PlainText app, 42, 199
playhead, 132, 136
playing video, 136
podcasting, 26
PopBooth app, 195, 205
portable storage. See hard disks
Portfolio for iPad app. See also
portfolios
creating portfolio, 165–172
opening screen, 172, 176
photo notes, 173
presenting portfolio, 173–177
Portfolio Loader app, 167
portfolios, 155–177. See also slideshows
advantages of, 155
color issues, 158, 159
considerations, 155, 165
creating, 165–172
galleries. See galleries
iPad vs. iPad mini, 157
multiple, 157
online, 157
opening screen, 172, 176
preparing images for, 158–165
presenting, 173–177
tips for, 156–157
updating, 157
wired connections, 174–176
wireless connections, 177
Precision Editor, 139
presets
image editing, 96, 103, 110–111
iPhoto effects, 117–119
metadata, 71–72
Photogene app, 110–111
Index
215
printing photos, 194–195
printing utilities, 194–195
Printopia utility, 194–195
prints, ordering, 195
projectors
wired connections to, 174–176
wireless connections to, 177
projects, iMovie. See iMovie projects
Q
QR codes, xvii–xviii
QR Reader for iPad, xvii–xviii
QR readers, xviii
Record button, 4
recording video, 53
red eye correction, 98
reference photos, 34
remote camera, 58–60
remote control devices, 46–54
remote photo apps, 46–54
resolution, 151, 158
Retina display, xiv, xv, 158, 159
retouching photos, 96, 126–129
Revel, 190–193, 204
“revisit” tags, 34
rotating photos
in iPhoto, 112–113
in Photogene, 104–105
in Photos app, 98
in Photoshop Touch app, 120, 121
in Snapseed, 99–100
R
rating photos
in Adobe Revel, 192
considerations, 63, 64
in Photogene, 90
in PhotosInfoPro, 86
in Photosmith, 66–67
in Portfolio for iPad, 173
raw format
capturing photos in, 14–16
considerations, xiv, 12, 14, 16
vs. JPEG format, 12–19
pros/cons, 16
raw images
considerations, 27
described, 12
editing, 14, 16, 96, 124–125
geo-tagging and, 33
Raw+JPEG format
capturing photos in, 16–19
considerations, 12
pros/cons, 18
recomposing photos
considerations, 96
in iPhoto, 112–113
in Photogene, 104–105
with Photoshop Touch app,
120–121
in Snapseed, 99–100
216
The iPad for Photographers
S
saturation, 102, 108, 115, 158
screenshot capture, 36
Scribble Selection tool, 122, 123
SD card adapter, 20–21
SD cards, 20–24
Seagate GoFlex Satellite disk, xvi, 41
Seagate Media app, 200
Seagate Wireless Plus disk, 40–41
sepia effects, 118
shadows, 106, 115
Share button, 118
sharing items
iMovie projects, 151–153
video to Camera Roll, 134–135,
151
sharing photos, 179–195. See also
uploading photos
between devices, 118
emailing photos, 187–190, 192
photo sharing services, 180–186
via Adobe Revel, 190–193
via Box, 169
via Dropbox, 166–167, 169
via iTunes, 168, 169
sharpening images, 158, 160
shooting photos
with Camera app, 4–5
with Camera+ for iPad, 6–7
timer, 7
shooting video, 4
shutter button, 4
ShutterSnitch app, 28–29, 33, 200
Sincerely Ink Cards app, 195, 205
skin tones, 116
Skype for iPad app, 26, 200
slideshows, 156, 165, 174. See also
portfolios
Smart Group feature, 74–75
SmugMug app, 186, 204
SmugShot app, 186
Snapseed app
brightness adjustment, 102
contrast adjustment, 102
cropping photos, 99
image editing in, 98–103
obtaining, 203
recomposing photos, 99–100
straightening photos, 100
uploading photos from, 180–181
SoftBox Pro app, 42, 200
sorting photos, 73
sound. See audio
sound effects, 118, 146, 149
special effects. See effects
splitting clips, 138
stabilization, image, 6
stands, 55–57
star ratings. See rating photos
stop-motion video, 58–60
straightening photos
in iPhoto, 112–113
in Photogene, 104–105
in Photos app, 97
in Photoshop Touch, 120
in Snapseed, 100
studio, using iPad in, 45–60
The Stump, 56–57
SugarSync app, 38, 200
T
tagging. See keywords
terminology, xvii
Tether Tools, 55–56
tethered cameras, 46, 55–56
theme music, 147
themes, movies, 133
thumbnails, 112, 171, 175
time-lapse shots, 52–54
time-lapse video, 60
timeline, iMovie, 132, 134–139, 150
timer, 7, 52, 54, 60
tone
adjusting, 96
adjusting in iPhoto, 114, 117
adjusting in Photogene, 105–109
adjusting in Photoshop Touch, 122
adjusting in Snapseed, 100–103
Toshiba wireless memory cards, 27
Transcend wireless memory cards, 27
transitions, video, 138, 139, 140
Triggertrap app, 53–54, 202
trimming clips, 137
TrueHDR app, 8, 198
Tumblr, 192
TVs
wired connections to, 174–176
wireless connections to, 177
Twitter, 180–183, 192
U
uploading photos. See also sharing
photos
Camera Awesome, 186
Dropbox, 35
to from editing apps, 180–183
Flickr, 185
iCloud Photo Stream, 35, 36–37,
184
to photo sharing services, 180–183
from Photogene, 181–183
PhotoStackr for 500px, 186
from Snapseed, 180–181
via photo service apps, 185–186
Index
217
USB
USB
USB
USB
USB
adapter, 20–21, 26
hard disks, 40
headsets, 26, 150
keyboards, 26
microphones, 26, 150
V
VGA cables, 174
vibrance, 96, 108
vibrance control, 96
video, 131–153. See also iMovie
entries; movies
adding clips from Media Library, 135
adding to iMovie projects, 134–135
audio in. See audio; audio clips
capturing directly, 134–135
editing. See video editing
importing from iPhone/iPod touch,
135
playing, 136
recording, 53
resolution, 151
sharing options, 151–153
shooting, 4
skimming, 136
stop-motion, 58–60
time-lapse, 60
video clips. See also movies; video
adding titles to, 140–141
deleting, 138
editing, 137–139
Ken Burns Effect, 144–145
from Media Library, 135
moving on timeline, 137
splitting, 138
transitions between, 138, 139, 140
trimming, 137
video editing, 136–143
in Adobe Revel, 192
considerations, 131, 132
deleting clips, 138
editing audio clips, 146–150
editing video clips, 137–139
moving clips, 137
with Precision Editor, 139
218
The iPad for Photographers
splitting clips, 138
transitions, 138, 139, 140
trimming clips, 137
video editors, 132
Viewer, 132, 136
vignettes, 118
Vimeo, 151
Vintage effects, 118, 119
voiceovers, 150
volume, audio clips, 146
W
Walgreens for iPad app, 195, 205
Wallee Connect system, 55–56
watermarks, 183
website, companion to book, xvi
white balance, 96, 108, 109, 116
white levels, 105
Wi-Fi networks, 177
Wi-Fi printers, 194–195
wired connections, 174–176
wireless connections, 177
wireless keyboards, 26
wireless memory cards, 27–31
wireless networks, 27, 35–36, 47
Wireless Plus disk, 40–41
wireless printers, 194–195
wireless remote control devices, 46–54
workflow, 12–19
X
XMP files, 89
Y
YouTube, 151
Z
Zenfolio.com, 195
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