MIG/Stick Welder - Northern Tool Welder Help!

MIG/Stick Welder - Northern Tool Welder Help!
Northern Industrial Welding
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
140MIG/Stick
Please read and save these instructions. Read through this owner’s manual carefully before
using product. Protect yourself and others by observing all safety information, warnings, and
cautions. Failure to comply with instructions could result in personal injury and/or damage to
product or property. Please retain instructions for future reference.
MIG/Stick Welder
Description
140MIG/Stick is a portable MIG/stick welder.
It uses single phase120VAC (110-120V),
60HZ and requires a 20 amp time delayed
fuse or circuit breaker. It has 90amp MIG
welding capability with infinite heat/voltage
setting and infinite wire speed control for
welds 24 gauge to ¼”. Also includes over
load and thermal protection. It can also be
used as a 70 amp DC Stick welder to weld
with 1/16”-5/64” electrodes on materials up
to 1/8”.
Ideal to weld mild steel and alloy’s used in
Hobby and light duty applications.
Specifications and Dimension
DESCRIPTION
Power supply
No-load voltage
Output Range
Duty cycle
Suggested wire
SPECIFICATIONS
1ph-120V-60HZ
75V
20-90A
30%
.023”-.035”
MIG(solid)
wire
or .030”-.035” Flux core wire
.023”,.030, .035”
1/16”, 5/64”
Wire Diameter
Electrode diameter
Dimension(L x W x H)
Weight
17.7”X 9.4”X 13.8”
44 Lbs
Removing from the carton
1.1 Remove cartons, bags or Styrofoam containing the welder and accessories.
1.2 Check the contents with the packing list below.
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Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
ITEM
QTY.
Portable MIG Welder
MIG torch
Ground cable
Gas hose
Contact tip, .030”
Sample wire, .030” solid and flux
core
Gas regulator
MIG nozzle
Spool adaptor
Hex wrench
Welding cable with electrode holder
Sample electrodes
Operator’s Manual
1 unit
1pc
1pc
1pc
2pc
2 spools
1 pc
1pc
1pc
1pc
1pc
1 bag
1set
1.3 After unpacking the unit, inspect carefully for any damage that may have
occurred during transit. Check for loose, missing, or damaged parts. Shipping
damage claim must be filed with carrier.
Know your Welder
MAX/MIN
Switch
Wire
compartment
Heat setting
Wire speed
adjust
Regulator
Indicators
Gas hose
Sample stick
electrode
Grounding
cable
MIG gun
Welding cable
and electrode
holder
Sample spools of
wire
ON/OFF Switch
In the “off” position there is no power being supplied to the MIG gun or electrode
holder circuit of the welder. In the “ON” position power is supplied to the main
transformer and control circuit. The on/off switch of this unit is on the back panel.
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Thermal Indic
Ground Cab
Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
Wire compartment
Open the wire compartment, and then you will see the wire feeder, spool holder
and polarity changing
Wire speed setting
Adjusts the wire feeding/amperage speed.
Regulator
Installs on the shielding gas cylinder for MIG welding with solid wires.
Gas Hose
Used to connect the machine to the regulator.
Sample Stick Electrode
Used when Stick welding and is a consumable.
Welding Cable and MIG gun
The welding wire is driven through the welding cable and MIG gun to the work
piece. It is attached to the drive system.
Sample Spools of Wire
There are two spools in the accessories package. The grey colored spool is flux
core wire for gasless welding, the other is copper colored requires shielding gas
for MIG welding. They are consumables and will need to be purchased when
used.
Welding cable and electrode holder
Used for stick welding.
Ground cable and clamp
The ground cable and clamp gets attached to the work piece to complete the
circuit to allow the flow of current needed to weld.
Indicators
There are three indicators on the left side of front panel, power indicator, thermal
overload indicator and work indicator. When power is turned on, the power
indicator will light. If there is a thermal/heat overload, the thermal overload
indicator will light and the machine stop working. The machine will not return to
work until mode until the internal temperature decreases. When welding, the
work indicator is on.
Heat Setting
Set output voltage and wire speed. Refer to the “set up” chart inside the wire feed
compartment. When stick welding, this knob is used for adjust output current
Power Cord
The power cord connects the welder to the 115 volt power supply. Plug the 15
amp plug into a 115 volt/20 amp receptacle to supply power to the welder.
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Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
not immerse them in water. These
components and the welder must be
completely dry before attempting to
use them.
-Follow the instructions in this manual.
-Keep welder in the off position when
not in use.
-Connect ground lead as close to the
area being welded as possible to
ensure a good ground.
-Do not allow any body part to come
in contact with the welding wire if you
are in contact with the material being
welded, ground or electrode from
another welder.
-Do not weld if you are in an awkward
position. Always have a secure
stance while welding to prevent
accidents. Wear a safety harness if
working above ground.
-Do not drape cables over or around
your body.
-Wear a full coverage helmet with
appropriate shade (see ANSI Z87.1
safety standard) and safety glasses
while welding.
-Wear proper gloves and protective
clothing to prevent your skin from
being exposed to hot metals, UV and
IR rays.
-Do not overuse or overheat your
welder. Allow proper cooling time
between duty cycles.
-Keep hands and fingers away from
moving parts and stay away from the
drive rolls.
-Do not point MIG gun at any body
part of yourself or anyone else.
-Always use this welder in the rated
duty cycle to prevent excessive heat
and failure.
General Safety Information
1.1 Your Welding Environment
-Keep the environment you will be
welding in free from flammable
materials.
-Always keep a fire extinguisher
accessible to your welding
environment.
-Always have a qualified person
install and operate this equipment.
-Make sure the area is clean, dry and
ventilated. Do not operate the welder
in humid, wet or poorly ventilated
areas.
-Always have your welder maintained
by a qualified technician in
accordance with local, state and
national codes.
-Always be aware of your work
environment. Be sure to keep other
people, especially children, away
from you while welding.
-Keep harmful arc rays shielded from
the view of others.
-Mount the welder on a secure bench
or cart that will keep the welder
secure prevent it from tipping over or
falling.
1.2 Your Welder’s Condition
-Check all cables, power cord and
welding cable to be sure the
insulation is not damaged. Always
replace or repair damaged
components before using the welder.
-Check all components to ensure they
are clean and in good operating
condition before use.
1.3 Use of Your Welder
Do not operate the welder if the
welding cables, electrode, MIG gun,
wire or wire feed system is wet. Do
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Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
1.4 Specific Areas of Danger,
Caution or Warning
Electrical Shock
-Do not breathe in fumes emitted by
the welding process. Make sure the
air you breath is clean and safe.
-Work only in a well-ventilated area or
use a ventilation device to remove
welding fumes from the environment
where you will be working.
-Do not weld on coated materials
(galvanized, cadmium plated or
containing zinc, mercury or barium).
They will emit harmful fumes that are
dangerous to breathe. If necessary
use a ventilator, respirator with air
supply or remove the coating from the
material in the weld area.
-The fumes emitted from some
metals when heated are extremely
toxic. Refer to the material safety
data sheet for the manufacturer’s
instructions.
-Do not weld near materials that will
emit toxic fumes when heated.
Vapors from cleaners, sprays and
degreasers can be highly toxic when
heated.
UV and IR Arc Rays
Electric arc welders can
produce a shock that
can cause injury or
death. Touching electrically live parts
can cause fatal shocks and severe
burns. While welding, all metal
components connected to the wire
are electrically hot. Poor ground
connections are a hazard, so secure
the ground lead before welding.
-Wear dry protective apparel: coat,
shirt, gloves and insulated footwear.
-Insulate yourself from the work piece.
Avoid contacting the work piece or
ground.
- Do not attempt to repair or maintain
the welder while the power is on.
-Inspect all cables and cords for any
exposed wire and replace
immediately.
-Use only recommended replacement
cables and cords.
-Always attach ground clamp to the
work piece or work table as close to
the weld area as possible.
-Do not touch the welding wire and
the ground or grounded work piece at
the same time.
-Do not use a welder to thaw frozen
pipes.
Fumes and Gases
The welding arc
produces ultraviolet (UV)
and infrared (IR) rays
that can cause injury to your eyes
and skin. Do not look at the welding
arc without proper eye protection.
-Always use a helmet that covers
your full face from the neck to top of
head and to the back of each ear.
-Use a lens that meets ANSI
standards and safety glasses. For
welders under 160 Amps output, use
a shade 10 lens; for above 160 Amps,
use a shade 12. Refer to the ANSI
standard Z87.1 for more information.
-Fumes emitted from the
welding process displace
clean air and can result in
injury or death.
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Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
-Cover all bare skin areas exposed to
the arc with protective clothing and
shoes. Flame-retardant cloth or
leather shirts, coats, pants or
coveralls are available for protection.
-Use screens or other barriers to
protect other people from the arc rays
emitted from your welding.
-Warn people in your welding area
when you are going to strike an arc
so they can protect themselves.
Fire Hazards
causing electrical shock and fire
hazards.
-To prevent any unintended arcs, cut
wire back to ¼" stick out after welding.
Hot Materials
Welded materials are hot
and can cause severe
burns if handled
improperly.
-Do not touch welded materials with
bare hands.
-Do not touch MIG gun nozzle or
electrode holder at the tip where
electrodes are held after welding until
it has had time to cool down.
Sparks/Flying Debris
Do not weld on containers
or pipes that contain or
have had flammable, gaseous or
liquid combustibles in them. Welding
creates sparks and heat that can
ignite flammable and explosive
materials.
-Do not operate any electric arc
welder in areas where flammable or
explosive materials are present.
-Remove all flammable materials
within 35 feet of the welding arc. If
removal is not possible, tightly cover
them with fireproof covers.
-Take precautions to ensure that
flying sparks do not cause fires or
explosions in hidden areas, cracks or
areas you cannot see.
-Keep a fire extinguisher close in the
case of fire.
-Wear garments that are oil-free with
no pockets or cuffs that will collect
sparks.
-Do not have on your person any
items that are combustible, such as
lighters or matches.
-Keep work lead connected as close
to the weld area as possible to
prevent any unknown, unintended
paths of electrical current from
Welding creates hot
sparks that can cause
injury. Chipping slag off
welds creates flying debris.
-Wear protective apparel at all times:
ANSI-approved safety glasses or
shield, welder’s hat and ear plugs to
keep sparks out of ears and hair.
Electromagnetic Field
-Electromagnetic fields
can interfere with various
electrical and electronic
devices such as pacemakers.
-Consult your doctor before using any
electric arc welder or cutting device
-Keep people with pacemakers away
from your welding area when welding.
-Do not wrap cable around your body
while welding.
-Wrap MIG gun and ground cable
together whenever possible.
-Keep MIG gun and ground cables on
the same side of your body.
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Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
Shielding Gas
Cylinders Can Explode
Retaining
groove
High pressure cylinders
can explode if damaged,
so treat them carefully
-Never expose cylinders to high heat,
sparks, open flames, mechanical
shocks or arcs
-Do not touch cylinder with MIG gun
-Do not weld on the cylinder.
-Always secure cylinder upright to a
cart or stationary object.
-Keep cylinders away from welding or
electrical circuits.
-Use the proper regulators, gas hose
and fittings for the specific application.
-Do not look into the valve when
opening it.
-Use protective cylinder cap
whenever possible.
1.5 Proper Care, Maintenance and
Repair
Ground cable
lead
MIG gun
connection
Trigger leads
2.2 Connect all the cables to
corresponding receptacles on front
panel. NOTE: the MIG torch and
electrode holder cable can not be
connected to the welder at the same
time. When MIG welding, only
connect the MIG torch. When Stick
welder, only connect the electrode
holder cable.
-Always have power disconnected
when working on internal
components.
- Do not touch or handle PC board
without being properly grounded with
a wrist strap. Put PC board in static
proof bag to move or ship.
-Do not put hands or fingers near
moving parts such as drive rolls or
fan
Receptacle for
Torch main
cable
Receptacle
for Electrode
Cable/Holder
Receptacle
for grounding
cable
Assembly
Receptacle
for trigger
leads
2.3 Connect the trigger leads to the
receptacles in the lower middle of
the front panel. The two leads can
be plugged in to either connection
point.
1. Tools required for assembly:
Hexagon wrench (M8).
2. Assembly
2.1 Remove the MIG torch and
ground clamp from of accessories
box, see following about the details
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Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
2.4. The polarity terminals are inside
the wire feed compartment. The
terminals beside the positive (+) and
negative (-) markings are for MIG
gun lead and ground lead. The MIG
gun lead is marked with Red, ground
lead is black. When flux core
welding, the ground cable lead is
connected to “+”, red MIG gun lead
is to “-“. When MIG welding, reverse
the polarity or connection.
connecting your welder’s power
cord to a properly grounded 120
VAC, 60Hz, single phase, 20 amp
power source.
2. Extension cord
It is strongly recommended not to use
an extension cord because of the
voltage drop it produces. This drop in
voltage can affect the performance of
the welder. If you need to use an
extension cord it must be a minimum
of #12 gauge. Do not use an
extension cord over 25 ft. in length.
3. Install the wire roller
Before installing any welding wire
into the unit, the proper sized groove
must be placed into position on the
wire drive mechanism. Adjust the
drive roller according to the following
steps, see following picture about the
wire feeder structure:
Installation
1. Power requirement
This unit uses a single phase
120VAC(110-120V), 60HZ circuit with
20 amp time delayed fuse or circuit
breaker is required. DO NOT
OPERATE THIS UNIT if the ACTUAL
power source voltage is less than 105
volts ac or greater than 132 volts ac.
Drive
Tension
Arm
• High voltage danger from power
source! Consult a qualified
electrician for proper installation of
receptacle. This welder must be
grounded while in use to protect
the operator from electrical shock.
• Do not remove the ground prong
or alter the plug in any way. Do
not use any adapters between the
welder’s power cord and the power
source receptacle. Make sure the
POWER switch is OFF when
Inlet Guide
Tube
Drive tension
adjustment
Drive
roll
3.1. Open the door to the welder drive
compartment.
3.2. Remove the drive tension (see 1)
by loosening the tension adjusting
knob and lifting the Drive Tension
Adjustor away from the Drive Tension
Arm (see 2). Pull the drive tension
arm away from the driver roller (see
3). See following images for
reference
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Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
3.5 Match the drive roller wire groove
to the wire diameter, see the chart
below.
Wire Diameter
Roller Groove
.024 inch
0.6
.030 inch
0.9
.035 inch
0.9
The drive roller has two wire size
grooves in it. When installing the
drive roller, the number stamped on
the drive roller indicates the wire
groove it is aligned with. Push the
drive roll onto the drive roller shaft
and use the “L” shaped hex wrench to
tighten the drive roller to the shaft.
To tighten turn set screw clockwise.
3.3. If there is wire already installed in
the welder, roll it back onto the wire
spool by hand-turning the spool
counterclockwise. Be careful not to
allow the wire to come out of the rear
end of the inlet guide tube without
holding onto it or it will unspool itself.
Put the end of the wire into the hole
on the outside edge of the wire spool
and bend it over to hold the wire in
place. Remove the spool of wire from
the drive compartment of the welder.
3.4. Remove the drive roller.
Use the “L” shaped hex wrench in the
accessory package. And insert the
tool into the set screw in the drive
roller and turn counter-clockwise to
loosen the set screw and remove the
drive roller from the drive roller shaft, see
the following images
3.6. Reinstall the Drive Roller Cap
and lock in place by turning it
clockwise.
3.7. Close the door to the welder
drive compartment.
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Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
4. Install the wire
4.1 Selecting the wire
The available wire for this machine
Wire Type
Available or not
MIG wire
Yes
.023 inch
MIG wire
Yes
.030 inch
Flux core
Yes
wire .030 inch
Flux core
Yes
wire .035 inch
MIG wire can be either mild steel,
stainless steel or aluminum solid wire.
For use with 4” or 8” spools of wire.
NOTE:
• Metal thinner than 24 gauge cannot
be welded with this machine.
Attempting to do so will cause burn
through in the metal you are intending
to weld.
• Remove any wire that is rusty, if the
whole spool is rusty discard it.
4.2 Install the wire
4.2.2 Make sure the groove on the
drive roller matches the wire size
being installed. If not, change the
drive roller as described above.
4.2.3 Remove any wrapping from the
outside of the spool of wire. DO NOT
UNHOOK THE WIRE AT THIS TIME.
4.2.4 Place the spool on the spool
hub so that the wire comes off the
bottom of the spool. The welding wire
should always come off the bottom of
the spool into the drive mechanism.
See following figure.
Electric shock can kill! Always turn
the POWER OFF and unplug the
power cord from the ac power
source before installing wire.
NOTE:
• Before installing, make sure that you
have removed any wire from the MIG
gun assembly. This will help to
prevent the possibility of the wire
jamming inside the MIG gun liner.
• Be careful when removing the
welding nozzle. The contact tip on
this welder is electrically live when
the torch trigger is pulled. Make
certain POWER is turned OFF.
4.2.1 Remove the nozzle and contact
tip from the end of the MIG gun
assembly. Please see following
images for reference
4.2.5 The welder can use both 4in
and 8in spools, see the following
figure for installation: The adjustment
knob is designed to adjust the
pressure tension of the wire spool.
8’
10
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Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
8’ spool
4.2.10. Insert the leading end of the
wire into the inlet guide tube. Then
push it across the drive roller and into
the torch assembly about six inches.
Wing nut
4’ spool
8” spool
Adaptor
• Make certain that the welding
wire is actually going into the torch
liner. If not, the wire can jam or
keep the wire from feeding
correctly.
4.2.11 Check to see if the wire is in
the drive roller groove, then position
the drive tension arm into place on
the drive roller.
4.2.12 Flip the quick release drive
tension back up into position on the
drive tension arm.
4.2.13 Tighten (turn clockwise) the
drive tension adjusting knob until the
tension roller is applying enough
force on the wire to prevent it from
slipping out of the drive assembly.
DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN
4.2.14. NOW YOU CAN RELEASE
THE WIRE.
4.2.15. Plug in the welder, turn power
switch to the ON position. Set the
VOLTAGE switch to the voltage (heat)
setting recommended for the gauge
metal that is to be welded. Refer to
the set up chart located inside the
wire compartment.
4.2.16. Set the WIRE SPEED control
to the middle of the wire speed range.
8.17. Straighten the MIG gun cable
and pull the trigger on the welding
torch to feed the wire through the
torch assembly. When at least one
inch of the wire sticks out past the
end of the torch, release the trigger.
4.2.18 Turn the Power Switch to the
OFF position.
4..2.19 Select a contact tip stamped
with the same diameter as the wire
being used.
4.2.6. . Setting the wire spool tension:
a) Turn the spool of wire with one
hand.
b) Increase the spool tension by
tightening (turn clockwise) the wing
nut while turning the spool. Turn the
spool while tightening the wing nut
until the spool slows down and
operator feels a slight drag.
Stop tightening the wing nut, operator
may need to repeat these steps until
proper spool tension is achieved.
NOTE:
If TOO MUCH tension is applied to
the wire spool, the wire will slip on the
drive roller or will not be able to feed
at all. If TOO LITTLE tension is
applied, the spool of wire will want to
unspool itself when the gun trigger is
released. Readjust the spool hub
tension as necessary to correct for
either problem.
4.2.7.After checking to make sure
that your welder is disconnected from
the ac power source, remove the
leading end of the wire from the spool,
DO NOT LET GO OF THE WIRE until
told to do so, or the wire will unspool
itself.
4.2.8. Using a wire cutter, cut the
bent end off the leading end of the
wire so that only a straight leading
end remains.
4.2.9. Loosen the tension adjusting
knob holding the drive tension arm in
place and lift the tension arm up off
the drive roller.
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Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
NOTE:
Due to inherent variances in fluxcored welding wire, it may be
necessary to use a contact tip one
size larger than your flux core wire if
wire jams occur.
4.2.20. Slide the contact tip over the
wire (protruding from the end of the
torch). Thread the contact tip into the
end of the torch and hand-tighten
securely with a pliers
4.2.21. Install the nozzle on the gun
assembly. To keep spatter from
sticking to inside of the nozzle use
anti-spatter spray or gel.
4.2.22 Cut off the excess wire that
extends past the end of the nozzle.
Leave ¼” stick out.
4.2.23. Turn the welder ON
-Do not touch cylinder with MIG
gun.
-Do not weld on the cylinder.
-Always secure cylinder upright to
a cart or stationary object.
-Keep cylinders away from welding
or electrical circuits.
-Use the proper regulators, gas
hose and fittings for the specific
application.
When MIG (solid) wires are used, the
shielding gas is required.
1. Polarity changing:
The factory polarity setting is for flux
core welding (no shielding gas is
required). At this mode, the MIG gun
lead is connect to “-” (negative)
polarity and ground cable end is to “+”
(positive). If MIG welding with
shielding gas the MIG gun lead is to
“+”, and ground cable is connected to
“-”. Secure leads tight with fasteners.
See illustrations below.
5. Setting the wire tension
Arc flash can injure eyes! To
reduce the risk of arc flash, make
certain that the wire coming out of
the end of the torch does not come
in contact with work piece, ground
clamp or any grounded material
during the drive tension setting
process or arcing will occur.
5.1. Press the trigger on the torch.
5.2. Turn the drive tension adjustment
knob clockwise, increasing the drive
tension until the wire seems to feed
smoothly without slipping.
6.Gas installation
2.
The gas hose, regulator and
gas cylinder connection
Attach one end of the gas hose to the
gas solenoid valve (gas inlet) located
on the back panel of the welder.
Attach the other end to the gas
regulator which is attached to the
shielding gas cylinder. See illustration
below
Shielding gas cylinders and high
pressure cylinders can explode. if
damaged, so treat them carefully.
-Never expose cylinders to high
heat, sparks, open flames,
mechanical shocks or arcs.
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Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
1
2
Mild steel: Use 75% Argon and 25%
for reduced spatter and reduced
penetration for thinner materials. Do
NOT USE Argon gas concentrations
higher than 75% on steel. The result
will be extremely poor penetration,
porosity, and brittleness of weld.
Mild Steel: Use CO2 for deeper
penetration but increased spatter.
Stainless steel: Use a mixed gas
consisting of Helium, Argon and CO2.
Aluminum or bronze: Use 100%
Argon
3
7
1.
Cylinder valve: Controls GAS
CYLINDER gas flow.
2.
Cylinder pressure gauge
3.
Gas flow gauge, set at 20 CFM
4.
Regulator
5.
Adjustment knob controls gas
pressure to the welder.
6.
Gas hose
7.
Gas cylinder
Operation
High voltage danger from power
source! Consult a qualified
electrician for proper installation of
receptacle at the power source.
This welder must be grounded
while in use to protect the operator
from electrical shock. If you are
not sure if your outlet is properly
grounded, have it checked by a
qualified electrician. Do not cut off
the grounding prong or alter the
plug in any way and do not use
any adapters between the welder’s
power cord and the power source
receptacle. Make sure the POWER
switch is OFF before connecting
your welder’s power cord to a
properly grounded 120 VAC(110v120v), 60Hz, single phase, 20 amp
power source.
Part1 The MIG welding operation
1. Main control component
Power switch - The power switch
supplies electrical current to the
welder. Whenever the power switch is
in the ON position, the welding circuit
is activated. ALWAYS turn the power
switch to the OFF position and unplug
the welder before performing any
maintenance.
NOTE:
Slowly open the cylinder valve by
turning it counterclockwise until the
cylinder pressure gauge registers on
the first gauge of the regulator. Turn
the adjustment knob clockwise (right)
slowly to increase gas flow to 20 cfm.
To reduce the gas flow turn the
adjustment counterclockwise (left).
The gas valve is located on the back
panel of the welder and activated by
the trigger. Gas flow should be heard
when the trigger is activated. No gas
flow will result in a harsh arc with
excessive spatter, a smooth weld
bead will be difficult to obtain. Avoid
unnecessary gas loss by closing the
tank valve when finished welding.
3. Gas selection.
Different materials require different
shielding gas when MIG welding,
refer to the set up chart inside the
wire feed compartment.
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Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
Voltage selector - The voltage
selector controls the welding heat.
This unit has infinite voltage control.
Refer to the label inside the welder
side door for recommended voltage
selector settings for your welding job.
Wire speed control - The wire speed
control adjusts the speed at which the
wire is fed out of the welding torch.
The wire speed needs to be closely
matched (tuned-in) to the rate at
which it is being melted off. Some
things that affect wire speed selection
are the type and diameter of the wire
being used, the heat setting selected,
and the welding position to be used.
Note: The wire will feed faster without
an arc. When an arc is being drawn,
the wire speed will slow down.
2. Hold the torch
The best way to hold the welding
torch is the way that feels most
comfortable to you. While practicing
to use your new welder, experiment
holding the torch in different positions
until you find the one that seems to
work best for you.
3. Position the torch to the work
piece
There are two angles of the torch
nozzle in relation to the work piece
that must be considered when
welding.
3.1. Angle A can be varied, but in
most cases the optimum angle will be
60 degrees, the point at which the
torch handle is parallel to the work
piece. If angle A is increased,
penetration will increase. If angle A is
decreased, penetration will decrease
also.
3.2. Angle B can be varied for two
reasons: to improve the ability to see
the arc in relation to the weld puddle
and to direct the force of the arc.
4. Distance from the work piece
If the nozzle is held off the work
piece, the distance between the
nozzle and the work piece should be
kept constant and should not exceed
1/4 inch or the arc may begin
sputtering, signaling a loss in welding
performance.
5. Tuning in the wire speed
This is one of the most important
parts of MIG welder operation and
must be done before starting each
welding job or whenever any of the
following variables are changed: heat
setting, wire diameter, or wire type.
EXPOSURE TO A WELDING ARC
IS EXTREMELY HARMFUL TO THE
EYES AND SKIN!
Prolonged exposure to the welding
arc can cause blindness and burns.
Never strike an arc or begin
welding until you are adequately
protected. Wear flameproof
welding gloves, a heavy long
14
Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
sleeved shirt, trousers with no
cuffs, high topped shoes, and an
ANSI approved welding helmet.
5.1. Connect the Ground Clamp to a
scrap piece of the same type of
material which you will be welding. It
should be equal to or greater than the
thickness of the actual work piece,
and free of oil, paint, rust, etc.
5.2. Select a heat setting. Refer to
set up chart
5.3. Hold the torch in one hand,
allowing the nozzle to rest on the
edge of the work piece farthest away
from you, and at an angle similar to
that which will be used when welding.
(See HOLDING THE TORCH if you
are uncertain of the angle at which
you will be welding).
5.4. With your free hand, turn the
Wire Speed Dial to maximum and
continue to hold onto the knob.
5.5. Lower your welding helmet and
pull the trigger on the torch to start an
arc, then begin to drag the torch
toward you while simultaneously
turning the Wire Speed Dial counterclockwise.
5.6. LISTEN! As you decrease the
wire speed, the sound that the arc
makes will change from a sputtering
to a high-pitched buzzing sound and
then will begin sputtering again if you
decrease the wire speed too much.
The point on the wire speed
adjustment where the high-pitched
buzzing sound is achieved is the
correct setting. You can use the wire
speed control to slightly increase or
decrease the heat and penetration for
a given heat setting by selecting
higher or lower wire speed settings.
Repeat this tune-in procedure if you
select a new heat setting, a different
diameter wire, or a different type of
welding wire.
6. Welding Techniques
EXPOSURE TO A WELDING ARC
IS EXTREMELY HARMFUL TO THE
EYES AND SKIN! Prolonged
exposure to the welding arc can
cause blindness and burns. Never
strike an arc or begin welding until
you are adequately protected.
Wear flameproof welding gloves, a
heavy long sleeved shirt, trousers
with out cuffs, high topped shoes
and an ANSI approved welding
helmet.
ELECTRIC SHOCK CAN KILL! To
prevent ELECTRIC SHOCK, do not
perform any welding while
standing, kneeling, or lying directly
on the grounded work.
6.1 Moving the torch
Torch travel refers to the movement
of the torch along the weld joint and is
broken into two elements: Direction
and Speed. A solid weld bead
requires that the welding torch be
moved steadily and at the right speed
along the weld joint. Moving the torch
too fast, too slow, or erratically will
prevent proper fusion or create a
lumpy, uneven bead.
Travel direction is the direction the
torch is moved along the weld joint in
relation to the weld puddle. The torch
is either PUSHED into the weld
puddle or PULLED away from the
weld puddle.
15
Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
For most welding jobs you will pull the
torch along the weld joint to take
advantage of the greater weld puddle
visibility.
Travel speed is the rate at which the
torch is being pushed or pulled along
the weld joint. For a fixed heat setting,
the faster the travel speed, the lower
the penetration and the lower and
narrower the finished weld bead.
Likewise, the slower the travel speed,
the deeper the penetration and the
higher and wider the finished weld
bead.
6.2 Types of welding beads
As you become more familiar with
your new welder and better at laying
some simple weld beads, you can
begin to try some different weld bead
types.
The STRINGER BEAD Is formed by
traveling with the torch in a straight
line while keeping the wire and nozzle
centered over the weld joint (See
following figure)
6.3 Welding position
FLAT POSITION Is easiest of the
welding positions and is most
commonly used. It is best if you can
weld in the flat position if at all
possible as good results are easier to
achieve.
HORIZONTAL POSITION Is
performed very much the same as
the flat weld except that angle B (see
HOLDING THE TORCH) is such that
the wire, Directed more toward the
metal above the weld joint is to help
prevent the weld puddle from running
downward while still allowing slow
enough travel speed .A good starting
point for angle B is about 30 degrees
DOWN from being perpendicular to
the work piece.
The WEAVE BEAD Is used when you
want to deposit metal over a wider
space than would be possible with a
stringer bead. It is made by weaving
from side to side while moving with
the torch. It is best to hesitate
momentarily at each side before
weaving back the other way.
VERTICAL POSITION Is easier for
many people to Pull the torch from
top to bottom. It can be difficult to
prevent the puddle from running
downward. Pushing the torch from
bottom to top may provide better
16
Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
puddle control and allow slower rates
of travel speed to achieve deeper
penetration. When vertical welding,
angle B (see HOLDING THE TORCH)
is usually always kept at zero, but
angle A will generally range from 45
to 60 degrees to provide better
puddle control.
OVERHEAD POSITION Is the most
difficult welding position. Angle A (see
HOLDING THE TORCH) should be
maintained at 60 degrees.
Maintaining this angle will reduce the
chances of molten metal falling into
the nozzle. Angle B should be held at
zero degrees so that the wire is
aiming directly into the weld joint. If
you experience excessive dripping of
the weld puddle, select a lower heat
setting. Also, the weave bead tends
to work better than the stringer.
NOTE:
WHEN USING SELF-SHIELDING
FLUX-CORE WIRE it is very
important to thoroughly chip and
brush the slag off each completed
weld bead before making another
pass or the next pass will be of poor
quality.
Fillet Weld Joints. Most fillet weld
joints, on metals of moderate to
heavy thickness, will require multiple
pass welds to produce strong joint.
The illustrations in Figure 19 show
the sequence of laying multiple pass
beads into a T fillet joint and a lap
fillet joint.
6.4 Multiple pass welding
Butt Weld Joints When butt welding
thicker materials you will need to
prepare the edges of the material to
be joined by grinding a bevel on the
edge of one or both pieces of the
metal being joined. When this is done,
a “V” is created between the two
pieces of metal that will have to be
welded closed. In most cases more
than one pass or bead will need to be
laid into the joint to close the “V”.
Laying more than one bead into the
same weld joint is known as a
multiple-pass weld.
The illustrations in following figure
show the sequence for laying multiple
pass beads into a single “V” butt joint.
6.5 Spot welding
There are three methods of spot
welding: Burn-Through, Punch and
Fill, and Lap. Each has advantages
and disadvantages depending on the
specific application as well as
personal preference.
17
Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
speed as if you were welding the
same thickness material with a
continuous bead.
6.6 SPOT WELDING
INSTRUCTIONS
1. Select the wire diameter and heat
setting recommended above for the
method of spot welding you intend to
use.
2. Tune in the wire speed as if you
were going to make a continuous
weld.
3. Hold the nozzle piece completely
perpendicular to and about 1/4 inch
off the work piece.
4. Pull the trigger on the torch and
release it when it appears that the
desired penetration has been
achieved.
5. Make practice spot welds on scrap
metal, varying the length of time you
hold the trigger, until a desired spot
weld is made.
6. Make spot welds on the actual
work piece at desired locations.
Part 2 STICK Welding Operation
1. Electrode
The welding electrode is a rod coated
with a layer of flux. When welding,
electrical current flows between the
electrode (rod) and the grounded
metal work piece. The intense heat of
the arc between the rod and the
grounded metal melts the electrode
and the flux. The most popular
electrodes are:
-E6011 60,000 PSI tensile strength
deep penetrating applications.
-E6013 60,000 PSI tensile strength
used for poor fit up applications
-E7014 70,000 PSI tensile strength
used for high deposition and fast
travel speeds with light penetration
-E7018AC 70,000 PSI tensile
strength, Used for out of position and
tacking.
1. The BURN-THROUGH METHOD
welds two overlapped pieces of metal
together by burning through the top
piece and into the bottom piece. With
the burn-through method, larger wire
diameters tend to work better than
smaller diameters. Wire diameters
that tend to work best, with the burnthrough method are 0.035 inch selfshielding flux-core wire. Do not
use .030 inch self-shielding flux core
wires when using the burn-through
method unless the metal is VERY thin
or excessive filler metal build-up and
minimal penetration is acceptable.
Always select the HIGH heat setting
with the burn-through method and
tune in the wire speed prior to making
a spot weld.
2. The PUNCH AND FILL METHOD
produces a weld with the most
finished appearance of the three spot
weld methods. In this method, a hole
is punched or drilled into the top
piece of metal and the arc is directed
through the hole to penetrate into the
bottom piece. The puddle is allowed
to fill up the hole leaving a spot weld
that is smooth and flush with the
surface of the top piece. Select the
wire diameter, heat setting, and tune
in the wire speed as if you were
welding the same thickness material
with a continuous bead.
3. The LAP SPOT METHOD directs
the welding arc to penetrate the
bottom and top pieces, at the same
time, right along each side of the lap
joint seam. Select the wire diameter,
heat setting, and tune in the wire
18
Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
2. Selecting the proper electrode
The type and thickness of metal and
the position of the work piece
determine the electrode type and the
amount of heat needed in the welding
process. Heavier and thicker metals
required more amperage. It is best to
practice your welds on scrap metal
which matches the metal you intend
to work with to determine correct heat
setting and electrode choice. See the
following helpful trouble shooting tips
to determine if you are using a correct
electrode
1.
a.
b.
c.
2.
a.
b.
3.
a.
b.
c.
d.
Note: Rate of travel over the work
also affects the weld. To ensure
proper penetration and enough rod
deposit, the arc must be moved
slowly and evenly along the weld
seam. After the welder is reliable
installed, turn on the power switch
3. Setting the amperage control
The welder has infinite output current
control. It is capable of welding with
1/16"and 5/64" electrodes.
Use lower output settings for 1/16”
electrodes and higher settings 5/64
electrodes. It is best to practice your
welds on scrap metal which matches
the metals you intend to work with to
determine correct setting for your job.
The electrode type and the thickness
of the work piece metal determine the
amount of heat needed in the welding
process. Heavier and thicker metals
require more voltage (amperage),
whereas lighter and thinner metals
require less voltage (amperage).
4. Welding techniques
The best way to teach yourself how to
weld is with short periods of practice
at regular intervals. All practice welds
should be done on scrap metal that
can be discarded. Do not attempt to
make any repairs on valuable
equipment until you have satisfied
yourself that your practice welds are
of good appearance and free of slag
or gas inclusions.
4.1Holding the electrode
The best way to grip the electrode
holder is the way that feels most
comfortable to you. Position the
Electrode to the work piece when
striking the initial arc it may be
necessary to hold the electrode
perpendicular to the work piece.
Once the arc is started the angle of
the electrode in relation to the work
piece should be between 10 and 30
When proper rod is used:
The bead will lay smoothly over
the work without ragged edges
The base metal puddle will be as
deep as the bead that rises
above it
The welding operation will make
a crackling sound similar to the
sound of bacon frying
When a rod too small is used:
The bead will be high and
irregular
The arc will be difficult to
maintain
When the rod is too large
The arc will burn through light
metals
The bead will undercut the work
The bead will be flat and porous
Rod may be freeze or stick to
work piece
19
Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
degrees. This will allow for good
penetration, with minimal spatter.
4.2 Striking the arc
EXPOSURE TO A WELDING ARC
IS EXTREMELY HARMFUL TO THE
EYES AND SKIN.
• Never strike an arc or begin
welding until you have adequate
protection.
• Wear flameproof welding gloves,
heavy long-sleeved shirt, trousers
with out cuffs, high-topped shoes
and a welding helmet or shield.
Scratch the work piece with the end
of electrode to start arc and then
raise it quickly about 1/8 inch gap
between the rod and the work piece,
see following picture
4.3 Types of weld bead
The following paragraphs discuss the
most commonly used arc welding
beads.
The stringer bead Formed by
traveling with the torch in a straight
line while keeping the wire and nozzle
centered over the weld joint.
The weave bead Used when you
want to deposit metal over a wider
space than would be possible with a
stringer bead. It is made by weaving
from side to side while moving with
the torch. It is best to hesitate
momentarily at each side before
weaving back the other way
penetration.
It is important that the gap be
maintained during the welding
process and it should be neither too
wide or too narrow. If too narrow, the
rod will stick to the work piece. If too
wide, the arc will be extinguished.
It needs much practice to maintain
the gap. When the rod sticks to the
work piece, gently rock it back and
forth to separate them. A stuck
electrode will cause a short circuit
and the circuit breaker of thermal
overload will shut the welder off.
A good arc is accompanied by a crisp,
cracking sound. The sound is similar
to that made by bacon frying. To lay a
weld bead, only 2 movements are
required; downward and in the
direction the weld is to be laid, as in
following figure:
4.4 Welding position
Flat position It is easiest of the
welding positions and is most
commonly used. It is best if you can
weld in the flat position if at all
possible as good results are easier to
achieve.
20
Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
A solid weld bead requires that the
electrode be moved slowly and
steadily along the weld seam. Moving
the electrode rapidly or erratically will
prevent proper fusion or create a
lumpy, uneven bead. To prevent
ELECTRIC SHOCK, do not perform
any welding while standing, kneeling,
or lying directly on the grounded work.
4.6 Finish the bead
As the coating on the outside of the
electrode burns off, it forms an
covering of protective gasses around
the weld. This prevents air from
reaching the molten metal and
creating an undesirable chemical
reaction. The burning coating,
however, forms slag. The slag
formation appears as an
accumulation of dirty metal scale on
the finished weld. Slag should be
removed using a chipping hammer.
The horizontal position it is
performed very much the same as
the flat weld except that the angle is
different such that the electrode, and
therefore the arc force, is directed
more toward the metal above the
weld joint. This more direct angle
helps prevent the weld puddle from
running downward while still allowing
slow enough travel speed to achieve
good penetration. A good starting
point for your electrode angle is about
30 degrees DOWN from being
perpendicular to the work piece.
CHIPPING THE SLAG FROM A
WELD JOINT CAUSES SMALL
CHIPS OF SLAG TO FLY
THROUGH THE AIR
• Slag flying through the air can
cause eye injury or injury to parts
of the head, hands or exposed
portions of the body.
• Wear goggles or eye glasses with
side shields and protect the hands
and other exposed parts of the
body with protective garments, or
if possible, work with a shield
between the body and the work
piece.
The intense heat produced at the arc
sets up strains in the metal joined by
welding. Chipping the weld not only
removes the slag left behind in the
welding but relieves the internal
strains developed by the heating and
cooling process.
4.5 Judging a good weld bead
When the skill of striking and holding
an arc has been learned, the next
step is learning how to run a good
bead. The first attempts in practice
will probably fall short of acceptable
weld beads. Too long of an arc will be
held or the travel speed will vary from
slow to fast (see following)
A. Weld speed is too fast.
B. Weld speed is too slow.
C. Arc is too long.
D. Ideal weld.
21
Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
MINOR AND ROUTINE
MAINTENANCE
Store in a clean dry location free from
corrosive gas, dust and high humidity.
Temperature should range from 10°
F–120°F and a relative humidity less
than 90%.When transporting or
storing the welder after use, it is
recommended to repack the product
as it was received for protection.
(Cleaning is required before storage
and you must seal the plastic bag in
the box for storage
Maintenance
The welder needs regular
maintenance.
Periodically clean dust, dirt, grease,
etc. from your welder. Every six
months, or as necessary, remove the
cover panel from the welder and airblow any dust and dirt that may have
accumulated inside the welder.
Replace power cord, ground cable,
ground clamp, or electrode assembly
when damaged or worn.
Trouble shooting Chart
Symptom (s)
Welder does
not works
when the
main switch is
turned on
Will not weld
Blown fuse or
tripped circuit
breaker
Arc is hard to
start
Inconsistent
arc or wire
feed
Possible Causes(s)
1. No power input
2. Power cord or power plug
is broken
3. Main switch is broken
4. Transformer is broken
1. Incorrect power input
2. Inadequate current at
output
3. Poor connection of output
cable
4. Dirty surfaces
5. Wrong welding wire
Inadequate fuse or circuit
breaker
Corrective Action(s)
1. Check circuit or fuse of
power source
2. Replace power cord
3. Replace switch
4. Replace the transformer
1. Check the power source
2. Check for proper
grounding to the work
piece.
3. Check output connection
4. Clean surfaces
5. Use correct wire
Check the fuse in power
source should be 20amp
1. The wrong wire
2. Base metal not grounded
reliable
1. Not enough drive roller
pressure
2. Spool hub tension too tight
or loose
3. Contact tip worn or wrong
size
4. Rusty or corroded wire
5. Too big of electrode or
damaged flux
1. Use the correct one
2. Make sure the
connection is good
1. Tighten the drive tension
adjustor on wire feeder
2. Adjust the wing nut on
the spool holder
3. Replace contact tip
Others
22
4.
5.
Replace wire
Use correct or
undamaged electrode.
Call Tech Help
PE
N
SW101
16A/250Vac
AC220V 50/60Hz
L
23
F
T101
5
3
4
1
2
CN101
B1
AC
AC
-
+
4
3
C15
C3
C1
C4
C2
R1
1 2 3 4
ZD4
ZD3 RG4
1 2
TH1
Q2
MINI-MMA-001
C5
MINI-MIG-CONTROL
CN202
CN1
RG3
ZD2
ZD1 RG2
Q1
C6
CT1
1 2
CT1
Q4
Q3
T-
RG8
RG6
1 2 3 4
ZD8
ZD7
RG7
ZD6
ZD5
RG5
CN201
1 2
T3
3
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
C10
C9
YR2
YR1
D7
D6
D5
D4
R8
R7
RED
LED202
YELLOW
LED203
GREEN
LED201
L2
C13
WELDING CURRENT
RP201
C12
C11
C14
Northern Industrial Welder
115:23+23|19/15VA
FAN1
RLY101
R101
R102
2
1
RG1
T+
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
140MIG/Stick
Main Circuit chart
Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
Repair Parts List
Reference
number
Description
Part number
Qty
1
Hinge
2.05.17.012
2
2
Case cover, enclosure
1.1.01.01.0277
1
3
Wire retainer
2.05.17.020
2
4
Control transformer
1.2.07.02.0645
1
5
Main PC Board
1.1.05.02.0146
1
6
Door
1.1.02.01.1902
1
7
Door lock
2.05.05.019
1
8
Spool holder
1.2.01.01.0756
1
24
Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
8.1
Rear bushing
2.06.29.301
1
8.2
Spool baffle
5.02.01.502
1
8.3
4” spool holder
5.02.01.503
1
8.4
8” spool adaptor
2.05.17.008
1
8.5
Washer
5.02.01.504
1
8.6
Front Bushing
2.05.17.010
1
8.7
Mat Washer
2.06.17.005
1
8.8
Wing nut
2.06.05.002
1
9
Vertical center sheet metal
1.26.1600.11-1
1
10
Connection terminal (red)
2.05.03.104
1
11
Connection terminal (Black)
2.05.03.113
1
12
Main Transformer
1.26.1400.08-3
1
13
Rectifier heat sink
1.15.101.12
1
14
Reactor assembly
1.26.1400.14-4
1
15
Plastic front panel
2.05.05.049
1
16
Front panel support
1.26.1600.03-01
1
17
Indicator
1.26.140.01-1
1
18
Wire speed potentiometer
1.26.1400.03-1
1
19
Voltage Potentiometer
1.26.1400.03-3
1
20
Potentiometer Knob
2.07.11.017
2
21
Ground cable and clamp
1.15.140.13
1
25
Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
22
MIG Torch
2.20.08.502
1
23
American Connector
2.05.05.050
1
24
MIG torch receptacle
1.21.100.10
1
25
Wire feeder assembly
1.26.1400.01-1-3
1
25.1
Tension adjustment nut
2.07.40.110-1
1
25.2
Tension nut washer
2.07.40.110-2
2
25.3
Tension spring
2.07.40.110-3
1
25.4
Drive roller
2.07.40.110-4
1
26
Welding mode (MIG/Stick)
selector
1.26.1400.03-2
1
27
Quick Connector, female
2.07.57.123
2
28
Trigger lead receptacle
2.05.17.006
2
29
Feet
2.05.05.016
4
30
Sheet metal case base
1.26.1402.09-01
1
31
Loaded PCB
1.26.1402.09-3
1
32
Capacitance PCB
1.15.101.03-3
1
33
Heat Sink
1.26.1400.14-6
1
34
Rectifier
2.07.37.553
1
35
Fan
1.26.1400.10-2
1
36
Middle board
1.26.1600.08-01
1
37
Back Panel
1.26.1400.10-1
1
38
Power Cord retainer
2.04.30.102
1
26
Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
39
Power Cord
1.26.1400.31
1
40
Circuit Breaker
2.07.80.301
1
41
Main Switch
2.07.80.213
1
42
Copper Nut
1.52.040.19
1
43
Gas Valve connector
1.21.100.70
1
44
Gas solenoid valve
1.31.160.10-7
1
45
Handle
2.05.08.028
1
Other Safety and Standards Information
This manual is designed to inform the operator of safety and general use of this
model only. For further information about welding safety refer to the following
standards and comply with them where applicable.
• ANSI Standard Z49.1 — SAFETY IN
WELDING AND CUTTING obtainable
from: American Welding Society 550 NW
Le Jeune Road, Miami, FL 33126
Tel. (800) 443-9353 Fax (305) 443-7559
www.amweld.org or www.aws.org
• ANSI Standard Z87.1 — SAFE PRACTICE
FOR OCCUPATION AND EDUCATIONAL
EYE AND FACE PROTECTION
Obtainable from: American National
Standards Institute (ANSI) 11 West 42nd
St. New York, NY 10036
Tel. (212) 642-4900 Fax (212) 398-0023 www.ansi.org
• NFPA Standard 51B — CUTTING AND
WELDING PROCESS obtainable from:
National Fire Protection Association,
1 Batterymarch Park, P.O. Box 9101
Quincy, MA 02269-9101
Tel. (617) 770-3000 Fax (617) 770-0700 www.nfpa.org
• OSHA Standard 29 CFR, Part 1910,
Subpart Q. —WELDING, CUTTING AND
BRAZING obtainable from your state
OSHA office or from: U. S. Dept. of Labor
OSHA, Office of Public Affairs Room
N3647, 200 Constitution Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20210 www.osha.gov
27
Northern Industrial Welder
140MIG/Stick
Operating Instructions and Parts Manual
• CSA Standard W117.2 — Code for
SAFETY IN WELDING AND CUTTING
Obtainable from: Canadian Standards
Association, 178 Rexdale Blvd.,
Etobicoke, Ontario M9W 1R3
www.csa.ca
• American Welding Society Standard A6.0
—WELDING AND CUTTING CONTAINERS
WHICH HAVE HELD COMBUSTIBLES
Obtainable from: American
Welding Society, 550 NW Le Jeune Road
Miami, FL 33126
Tel. (800) 443-9353
Fax (305) 443-7559
www.amweld.org or www.aws.org
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