Philips CMS Patient Monitoring System

Philips CMS Patient Monitoring System
Philips CMS Patient Monitoring System
Service Guide
PAD
Part No. M1046-9423L
Printed September 2002
Notice
This document contains proprietary information which is protected by copyright. All
Rights Reserved. Reproduction, adaptation, or translation without prior written
permission is prohibited, except as allowed under the copyright laws.
Philips Medical Systems
Cardiac and Monitoring Systems
3000 Minuteman Road
Andover, MA 01810
+1 (800) 934-7372
Publication number
M1046-9423L
Printed in Germany
Warranty
The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice.
Philips makes no warranty of any kind with regard to this material, including, but not
limited to, the implied warranties or merchantability and fitness for a particular
purpose.
Philips shall not be liable for errors contained herein or for incidental or consequential
damages in connection with the furnishing, performance, or use of this material.
© 2002 Philips Medizin Systeme Böblingen GmbH
All rights are reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without the prior written consent of the
copyright holder.
ii
Printing History
New editions of this document will incorporate all material updated since the
previous edition. Update packages may be issued between editions and contain
replacement and additional pages to be merged by a revision date at the bottom of the
page. Note that pages which are rearranged due to changes on a previous page are not
considered revised.
The documentation printing date and part number indicate its current edition. The
printing date and part number change when a new edition is printed.
Part Number M1046-9303F
First Edition ......................................... January 1996
Part Number M1046-9303G
Second Edition ..................................... May 1997
Part Number M1046-9088G
Third Edition........................................ January 1998
Part Number M1046-9303H
Fourth Edition ...................................... June 1998
Part Number M1046-9303K
Fifth Edition ......................................... March 1999
Part Number M1046-9303L
Sixth Edition ........................................ June 2000
Part Number M1046-9423L
Seventh Edition.................................... September 2002
iii
Overview
Introduction
The Philips CMS Patient Monitoring System Service Guide is a reference guide
featuring six chapters on how to test, troubleshoot, and repair the instrument.
The Philips CMS Patient Monitoring System and the Philips Anesthesia CMS Patient
Monitoring System, as well as the Philips Neonatal CMS Patient Monitoring System
will be referred to throughout this guide as the CMS.
Target Audience
This reference guide is intended for hospital Biomedical Engineers and Technicians,
Philips Customer Engineers, Response Center Engineers, and Installation Planning
Specialists who have experience servicing Philips patient monitoring devices or
similar products.
Prerequisites
In addition to this guide we recommend you to complete the Philips Patient Monitors
– Concepts Guide also contained in the Service Training Kit.
Course Objectives
This guides objectives are:
•
Identify the major units of CMS.
•
Identify the controls and connectors of the major units of CMS.
•
Identify the four operating modes of CMS.
•
Connect the cabling of the CMS.
•
Complete a Quick Check of the system.
•
Perform Safety checks.
•
Perform recommended maintenance.
•
Perform a general inspection of the system.
•
Clean the major units of the CMS.
•
Perform Self-check procedures for CMS modules.
•
Recognize a properly operating CMS.
•
Identify symptoms of improper operation for the CMS.
•
Use any symptoms or indications to identify a fault as being in the display
module, computer module, or the plug-in parameter modules.
•
Further isolate faults down to field-replaceable assemblies.
•
Locate and understand the removal and replacement procedures for the CMS and
ACMS.
•
Provide a list of available parts for the CMS and ACMS.
iv
In This Guide
Chapter 1 - Introducing the CMS provides a physical/functional overview of the
monitor.
Chapter 2 - Testing & Maintaining the CMS describes how to test, maintain and
check that the instrument operates in an optimum condition.
Chapter 3 - Troubleshooting the CMS provides troubleshooting and diagnostic
procedures for the monitor.
Chapter 4 - Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules provides troubleshooting and
self-test procedures for the parameter modules.
Chapter 5 - Repairing the CMS includes removal and replacement procedures for
field replaceable parts.
Chapter 6 - Parts List for CMS lists replacement and exchange part numbers for the
instrument.
Appendix A - Product Information gives a listing of the options for the monitor.
Appendix B - Conversion Charts gives relative conversion information.
Appendix C - Philips 15210B Calibration Unit gives service and installation
information for this instrument used in calibrating plug-in modules.
Appendix D - CPC Programming Tool Manual
Glossary gives relevant definitions for the system
Index gives an alphabetical listing the contents of the guide.
v
How to Use this Guide
Each chapter begins with a title which is followed by three sections: an opening
statement, an objectives statement and a concepts listing. These three sections can be
thought of as your guide to the chapter. They will tell you what you are going to find
in the chapter, what you should take away from the chapter in the way of goals and
terms, and concepts central to the chapter.
Chapters containing procedures will then proceed with a procedure overview table
and the body of the chapter. The procedure overview table is your guide to the actual
procedures in the chapter. It is designed to be used by an experienced user who needs
a quick review of the procedure or a page number of a particular procedure.
The body of the chapter will cover all of the procedures associated with the task. In
order to make the procedure easier to follow, we have kept the body of the text
focused on the procedure at hand and pulled the extra information, which might be
helpful to a new engineer, into the outside column. Here is a formatting example:
___________________________________________________________________
Example: Inspect the System Hardware
Inspecting the system
on an annual basis
will help you keep
track of your system
and identify potential
parts that need to be
replaced.
No tools are required to perform this inspection.
Step 1
Examine the exterior of the unit for cleanliness and general physical
condition. Check that the plastic housings are intact, that all
hardware is present and tight, and that there are no signs of spilled
liquids or other serious abuse.
Step 2
Check fuse values and type against that marked on the chassis, and
ensure that a spare is provided.
Step 3
Inspect connectors of the module rack and ensure that the plug-in
modules are locked into place and do not slide out without first
releasing the locking plate on the bottom of the module.
Step 4
Ensure all labeling is present and legible.
Inspect all accessories external to the system such as transducers,
referring to the manufacturer’s documentation.
___________________________________________________________________
Step 5
vi
vii
viii
Table of Contents
1. Introducing the CMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-1
Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Main Display Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Objective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Front Panel Controls and Connectors – CRT Display. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
Front Panel Controls and Connectors – Flatscreen Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8
Rear Panel Controls and Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-11
Slave Display Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-13
14" Slave Display Front Panel Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-14
14" Slave Display Rear Panel Controls and Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-14
Handheld Keypad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-16
Objective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-16
Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-16
Handheld Keypad Membrane Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-17
Handheld Keypad Rear Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-18
External Alarm Device M1109A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-18
Computer Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-19
Objective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-19
Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-19
Brief Functional Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-20
Delivered Configurations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-21
Function Cards of the Computer Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-21
Function Card Placement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-22
EEPROM Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-28
Front Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-33
Rear Connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-35
Computer Module External Connector Pinouts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-36
Mounting the CMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-39
Connecting the CMS Cables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-39
To Connect the Computer Module and Plug-in Module Rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-39
To Connect the CRT Display to the Computer Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-41
To Connect the Flatscreen Display to the Computer Module
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-42
To Connect the XGA-Compatible Display to the Computer Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-42
To Connect the Satellite Rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-42
To Connect the Strip Recorder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-42
To Connect the Handheld Keypad to the CRT Display Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-42
To Connect the Handheld Keypad to the External Alarm Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-43
To Connect the External Alarm Device to the Computer Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-43
To Connect Printers and PCs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-43
Configuring and Adjusting Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-45
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-45
Configuring the RS-232 Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-45
XGA Display Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-46
Calibrating the Touch Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-47
Performing the Functionality Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-48
Configuring the Mouse or Trackball . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-49
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-49
Configuring the RS-232 Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-49
Performing the Functionality Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-49
Contents-ix
Adjusting the Pointer Speed of the Mouse or Trackball (Optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Integral Power Supply - Computer Module (M1046B) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Integral Power Supply - Connectors and Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Front Panel Controls - Remote Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote Power Supply - Rear Controls and Connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuse Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plug-in Module Racks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Objective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Front and Rear Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plug-in Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Objective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plug-In Module Control Panel Keys and Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plug-in Module Pin-outs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Objective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating Rules to Remember . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Identifying Monitoring Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Identifying Demo Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Identifying Configuration Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Identifying Service Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Operating Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-50
1-51
1-51
1-52
1-52
1-53
1-54
1-55
1-55
1-55
1-56
1-58
1-58
1-58
1-59
1-63
1-65
1-65
1-65
1-66
1-66
1-66
1-67
1-67
1-68
2. Testing & Maintaining the CMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-1
Objectives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Concepts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Procedure Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Test and Inspection Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
Safety Tests. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11
Preventive Maintenance Procedure for the Philips M1180A #A01 and #A02 Wall Mount Assembly. . . . . . . . 2-15
Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
Step 1: Inspect visible fasteners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
Step 2: Check maximum tilt range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17
Step 3: Inspect mounting plate for movement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17
General Inspections of the System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-19
Objective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-19
Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-19
Inspect the System Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-19
Inspect the Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-20
Inspect the Red Power Indicators (LEDs) of the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-20
Inspect the Display CRT / LCD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-21
Inspect the Controls of the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-22
Cleaning and Disinfecting Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-23
Objective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-23
Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-23
General Cleaning of the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-24
General Disinfecting of the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-25
x
Cleaning the Recorder Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-26
Cleaning the Blood Analysis Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-27
3. Troubleshooting the CMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-1
Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Procedure Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
General System Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14
Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14
Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14
What an Error Code Tells You . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-15
Using Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-15
Using Status Log Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16
Using Start-up Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16
How Device ID Codes and Error Codes Relate to Each Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-17
Identifying the Slot Number Using the Error Code Chart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-17
Device ID 16400 (or 4010H) Error Code Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-18
CMS System Hardware Configuration Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-23
Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-23
Rules for Card Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-24
Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-25
CMS System Hardware/Software Problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-27
Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-27
Loudspeaker Test at Power On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-27
CMS System RAM Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-27
Error Code Lists for Other Device IDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-28
Error Code List for Specific Device IDs other than 16400 (4010H). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-30
Device ID Codes for Software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-33
Local Jet Printer Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-37
Accessing & Leaving Service Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-39
Facilities Available in the Service Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-40
Changing the Global Switches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-40
Line Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-40
Control Panel Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-41
Settings Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-41
Setting the Altitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-42
Setting the Date and Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-42
French Homologation (French language CMS only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-42
Displaying the Status Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-42
RS-232 Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-42
Checking the Hardware and Software Revisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-43
Power On Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-44
Display Alignment Patterns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-44
Network Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-45
Description of the Boot Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-48
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-48
xi
Summary of the Power On Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-49
4. Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-1
Objectives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Concepts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Procedure Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Troubleshooting tcpO2/tcpCO2 Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
To Troubleshoot the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Test Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Troubleshooting ECG and ECG/RESP Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
To Troubleshoot the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
Troubleshooting Pressure Problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11
To Troubleshoot the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11
Troubleshooting NBP Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13
To Troubleshoot the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13
Using the Calibration Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15
Selecting NBP Measurement Characteristic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15
Troubleshooting Cardiac Output Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-17
To Troubleshoot the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-17
Troubleshooting SpO2/Pleth Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-22
To Troubleshoot the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-22
Troubleshooting SvO2 Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-24
To Troubleshoot the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-24
Troubleshooting FIO2 Module Problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-28
To Troubleshoot the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-28
Troubleshooting Temperature Module Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-30
To Troubleshoot the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-30
Troubleshooting CO2 Module Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-32
To Troubleshoot the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-32
Troubleshooting Blood Analysis Module Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-35
To Troubleshoot the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-35
Troubleshooting EEG Module Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-40
To Troubleshoot the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-40
Troubleshooting BIS Module Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-43
To Troubleshoot the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-43
General Test Procedures for the BIS components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-48
Additional information available in the Service Mode Task Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-49
Compatibility Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-51
Troubleshooting VueLink Module Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-52
M1032A VueLink Tests using VueLink Test Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-52
Performing Plug-In Module Self-Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-54
Objective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-54
Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-54
Performing a Quick System Check. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-54
Self-Test Procedure Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-55
Performing the ECG or ECG/RESP Module Self-Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-57
Performing the M1006A/B Pressure Module Self-Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-57
Performing the NBP Module Self-Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-58
Performing the SpO2/Pleth Module Self-Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-58
xii
Performing the Cardiac Output Module Self-Test. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-59
Performing the tcpO2/tcpCO2 Module Self-Test. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-59
Performing the SvO2 Module Self-Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-60
Performing the SvO2 Optical Stability Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-60
Performing the FIO2 Module Self-Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-61
Performing the CO2 Module Self-Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-61
Performing the Temperature Module Self-Test. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-62
Performing the Blood Analysis Module Self-Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-62
Performing the Recorder Module Self-Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-63
Performing the VueLink Module Self-Test. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-63
Performing the Data Management Database Self-Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-63
Performing the RS-232 Card Loopback Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-64
5. Repairing the CMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-1
Objective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Procedure Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Display Module Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Differences Between Models. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Rear Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Power Fail Relay (French ICU Option). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
Power Fuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
Line Power Filter (M1094A Display) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
Rear Enclosure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
Locking Cam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10
Front Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-11
Human Interface Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12
Membrane Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-13
Metal Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-14
Fuse Assembly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16
Switch-Mode Power Supply (M1092A) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-18
Switch-Mode Power Supply (M1094A) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-20
Video/Philips-HIL Connector PCA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-22
M1094B Removal and Replacement Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-23
Rear Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-23
Power Fuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-24
Rear Enclosure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-26
Locking Cam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-27
Front Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-28
Human Interface Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-29
Membrane Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-30
Top Metal Cover and SMPS Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-32
Switch-Mode Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-33
M1095A Backlight Removal and Replacement Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-34
Backlight replacement procedure for M1095A Old-Color Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-35
Backlight replacement procedure for M1095A New-Color Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-38
Handheld Keypad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-41
Housing Assembly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-41
External Alarm Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-43
xiii
Computer Module Removal and Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rear Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DC/DC Converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Integral Rack - M1046A only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Front Plastic Cover - M1046B only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Fuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Integral Power Supply - M1046B only. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sheet Metal Cover - M1046B only. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Front Function Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rear Function Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Side Cover. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Top Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Backplane Board Assy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plastic Feet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Locking CAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plug-In Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mounting Clamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plug-in Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Snap Lock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plug-In Module Disassembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NBP Inlet Connector Insert. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NBP Pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
tcpO2/tcpCO2 Calibration Chamber Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FIO2 Battery Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recorder Module Paper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-44
5-45
5-46
5-47
5-48
5-48
5-49
5-51
5-51
5-54
5-56
5-57
5-58
5-59
5-60
5-61
5-61
5-62
5-63
5-64
5-65
5-67
5-68
5-69
5-70
5-71
6. Parts List for CMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-1
Objective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Concepts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
14” CRT Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
Flatscreen Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10
External Alarm Device. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-14
Fuses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-14
Computer Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-15
Upgrade Tools and Miscellaneous Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-22
Plug-In Modules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-25
Plug-in Module Racks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-32
Handheld Keypad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-32
Patient Connectors and Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-34
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-34
ECG & ECG/Respiration Module Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-34
Pressure Module Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-37
Non-Invasive Pressure Module Accessories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-38
Cardiac Output Module Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-40
CO2 Module Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-41
Sidestream CO2 Module Accessories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-42
SvO2 Module Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-42
FIO2 Module Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-43
xiv
SpO2 Module Accessories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-44
Temperature Module Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-44
tcpO2/tcpCO2 Module Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-45
Thermal Array Recorder Module Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-45
Blood Analysis Module Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-45
EEG Module Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-46
VueLink Test Module Parts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-46
A. Product Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
CMS Release E Beta. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
ACMS Release E Beta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3
CMS Release F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5
ACMS Release F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7
NCMS Release F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9
CMS Release G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-11
ACMS Release G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-13
NCMS Release G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-15
CMS Release A.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-17
ACMS Release A.0. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-19
NCMS Release A.0. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-21
CMS Release B.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-23
ACMS Release B.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-25
NCMS Release B.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-27
CMS Release C.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-29
ACMS Release C.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-31
NCMS Release C.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-33
B. Conversion Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
C. Philips 15210B Calibration Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Description. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unpacking the Instrument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Instrument Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fitting the Gas Cylinders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Storage of Gas Cylinders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disposal of Used Gas Cylinders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Routine Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Gas Cylinders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Care and Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Theory of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gas Flow Performance Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Test Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disassembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parts List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-1
C-1
C-1
C-2
C-2
C-3
C-3
C-3
C-3
C-3
C-4
C-4
C-4
C-5
C-6
C-6
C-8
C-9
xv
D. CPC Programming Tool Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1
Introducing the CPC Programming Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-1
Parts Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-1
Power Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-2
Host Product Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-2
Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-2
CPC Programming Tool Functional Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-3
Programming Card Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-3
Internal EEPROM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-3
VPP Converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-4
DIP Switches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-4
Service Port Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-4
Before Using the CPC Programming Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-5
Using the CPC Programming Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-6
Connect the Tool. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-6
Enter the Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-7
Create or Change the Password for the Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-7
Edit the Monitor Serial Number (Philips Internal Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-7
Clone User Settings with the Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-8
Perform Upgrades with the Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-8
Troubleshooting the Tool through Tool LED Patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-9
Troubleshooting the Tool through Monitor Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-9
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Glossary-1
xvi
This chapter gives a detailed description of the components and operating modes of the
CMS, a modular patient monitor with networking and data management capabilities. The
system can be upgraded with additional modules as needed, or you can interchange the
modules between systems in your units.
This version of the CMS Service Guide introduces the new CMS Release C.0 range of
monitors. The new options H03 or H04 (with version M1167A or M1177A) enable the use
of an off-the-shelf XGA-compatible display as the main display. The new option H05
(M1167A/77A only) provides a touchscreen XGA display with an External Alarm Device
and a RS232 Interface.
There are three versions of CMS corresponding to the three major types of application:
CMS (for Critical and Cardiac Care), Anesthesia CMS (ACMS), and Neonatal CMS
(NCMS).
The versions and models described by this guide are listed as follows (models indicated
by asterisk were discontinued. (“(S)” indicates a non-US-model):
CMS: M1165A/66A/67A
Models 54(S)*, 56(S), 64(S), 66(S) and 68(S)
CMS: M1175A/76A/77A
Models 54*, 56, 66 and 68
ACMS: M1165A/66A/67A
Models 74(S)*, 76(S), 84(S), 86(S) and 88(S)
ACMS: M1175A/76A/77A
Models 74*, 76, 86 and 88
NCMS: M1166A/67A
Models 34(S)*, 36(S)*, 44(S), 46(S)* and 48(S)
NCMS: M1176A/77A
Models 34*, 36*, 46* and 48
All of these systems run on fully compatible hardware and are hereafter commonly
referred to as the Monitor or CMS.
Objectives
In order to meet the chapter’s goals, you should be able to:
• Identify the major units of CMS.
• Identify the controls and connectors of the major units of CMS.
• Identify the operating modes of CMS.
Introducing the CMS 1-1
Introducing the CMS
Chapter 1 Introducing the CMS
Introducing the CMS
Concepts
Concepts
CMS Release C.0 contains the following major units:
• Main Display Module - Main Display Modules are 10.4" Flatscreen Color, 14" CRT
Color, 14" CRT Mono, or an off-the-shelf XGA-compatible display. The first three have an
integrated Control Panel for the human interface; the XGA display option has the
External Alarm Device with the Handheld Keypad for the human interface. See page 1-4.
• Independent Display Module - Independent Display Modules can be: 10.4" Flatscreen
Color; XGA-compatible display; 14" CRT Color or 14" CRT Mono or 21" CRT Color
without Control Panels. These displays are connected to the Computer Module by their
own display controller and may display different information than the Main Display
Module under software control. See page 1-13.
• Slave Display Module - Slave Display Modules are 14" CRT Color or 14" CRT Mono or
21" CRT Color without Control Panels. These displays can be daisy-chained to any CRT
and display the same information as the display they are connected to. See page 1-13.
• Handheld Keypad - The Handheld Keypad is an input device connected to the HIL
connector on the Main Display and is used to interact with patient data management
and drug calculator software. With the XGA-compatible display options, the External
Alarm Device complements the Handheld Keypad to give a full set of user controls. See
page 1-16.
• Computer Module - The Computer Module contains the hardware and software for the
processing functions of the monitor. Most of the external connections of the monitor are
in the rear of the Computer Module. See page 1-19.
• Integral Power Supply - The Integral Power Supply, located in the new Computer
Module (M1046B) in CMS products M1167A and M1177A that have the M1095A
flatscreen (or an XGA-compatible) as the main display, provides the power for the
Flatscreen Display, Computer Module and satellite-mounted Plug-in Modules. See page
1-51.
• Remote Power Supply - The Remote Power Supply, used with CMS models that have a
flatscreen as the Main Display Module and a M1046A Computer Module, provides the
power for the Flatscreen Display Module, Computer Module and Plug-in Modules. See
page 1-52.
• Plug-in Module Rack (Integral or Satellite) - The Plug-in Module Rack is the interface
between the Plug-in Modules and the Computer Module. Plug-in Module Racks can be
integrated in the M1046A Computer Module or remotely located in the patient vicinity.
See page 1-55.
• Plug-in Modules - The Plug-in Modules are the interface between the patient cables
and the Plug-in Module Rack. Each Plug-in Module is responsible for specific types of
patient measurement (pressure, temp, and so on). These types of measurement are also
known as Parameters. The number and type of Plug-in Modules used will depend on the
monitoring situation. See page 1-58.
The CMS monitors can be networked on the Philips Network (also known as SDN). If
your system is connected to such a network you can receive information from other
Philips monitors or send information to the Philips Central Stations.
1-2
Introducing the CMS
Independent
IndependentDisplay
Display
Remote
RemoteDisplays
Displays
(CRT)
(CRT)
(color
(colororormonochrome)
monochrome)
Independent
Independent
Display
Display
Interface
Interface
(color
(color
andand
monochrome)
monochrome)
i-Stat
i-Stat
OrOrXGA
XGADisplay
Display Central
Central
(4(4oror8 8channels
channelsin incolor)
color)
Data
DataStation
Station
(Flatscreen)
(Flatscreen)
Main
MainDisplay
Display
Independent
Independent
Display
Display
Interface
Interface
(color
(color
only)
only)
Defibrillator
DefibrillatorSync.
Sync.
Monitoring
Network Network
InterfaceInterface
8 Channel
8 Channel
Analog
Analog
Output
Output
Interface
Interface
Monitoring
Monitoring
Network
Network
RS232
RS232
Interface
Interface
(standard)
(standard)
2nd RS232 Interface
2nd RS232 Interface
M1046B
M1046B
Digital
Digital
Recorder
Recorder
Interface
Interface
(4-Channel
(4-ChannelRecorder
RecorderM1117A)
M1117A)
RS232
RS232Interface
Interface
totothe
theOhmeda
Ohmeda
7800/7810/7900
7800/7810/7900Ventilator
Ventilator
Gateway
Gateway
Satellite
SatelliteRacks
Racks
Printer
Printer
M1026A
M1026A
Anesthetic
AnestheticGas
GasModule
Module
PCPC
(8(8oror6 6slots)
slots)
“VueLink”
“VueLink”M1032A
M1032A
(link
(linktotoexternal
externaldevices)
devices)
M1167A/77A
CMS (Flatscreen) System Overview
Remote Displays
Independent
Display
(color or monochrome)
Remote Displays
(color or monochrome)
Main Display
(6 channels in monochrome,
4 or 8 channels in color)
i-Stat
Central Data Station
Independent Display
Interface
(color or monochrome)
Gateway
Defibrillator Sync.
8 Channel Analog Output Interface
M1046A with Integral
Rack (8 slots)
Digital Recorder Interface
(4-Channel Recorder M1117A)
RS232 Interface
to the Ohmeda
7800/7810/7900 Ventilator
Satellite Racks
PC
M1026A
Anesthetic Gas Module
Printer
2nd RS232 Interface
Monitoring Network Interface Monitoring
Network
RS232 Interface
(standard)
PC
(8 or 6 slots)
“VueLink” M1032A
(link to external devices)
M1165A/66A/75A/76A
CMS (CRT) System Overview
Figure 1-1 Philips CMS Patient Monitoring System
Introducing the CMS
1-3
Introducing the CMS
Concepts
Introducing the CMS
Main Display Module
Main Display Module
The Main Display Module of the CMS can be a 10.4" Color flatscreen, a 14" CRT, or an offthe-shelf XGA-compatible display. CRT display-based CMSs can use either a Color CRT
Display (M1094B or M1094A) or a Monochrome CRT Display (M1092A) as the Main
Display Module. Slave CRT Displays can be daisy-chained from any other CRT displays.
Additional independent displays, CRTs and flatscreens can be connected but they need
their own display controller in the Computer Module allowing them to show different
information than the main display under software control.
Flatscreen
Main Display
The main display (flatscreen or CRT) contains a consistent arrangement of indicators and
keys on the Control Panel (human interface). There are two versions of the Control Panel
and Handheld Keypad: Standard and Classic. The Classic is no longer available. The
Standard Control Panel is available in supported local languages. Slave and independent
displays have no Control Panel fitted.
CRT Main Display
Objective
In order to meet this section’s goals, you should be able to:
• Identify the controls and connectors of the Display Module.
• Be familiar with the function of the controls and connectors of the Display Module.
Concepts
Front Panel of
Display Module
With the exception of Options H03/4, the Main Display Module can be either a flatscreen
or CRT with a Control Panel on the front panel or bezel. The bezel contains the Control
Panel, as well as the main power switch and the adjustments for brightness and contrast.
The rear of the display is referred to as the rear panel and contains the rest of the
adjustment controls and all of the connectors. The HIL Connector on the CRT Display is
on the lower right-hand corner of the front panel.
Note: With Options H03/4 the Main Display Module is an XGA-compatible display and the
Control Panel is the Handheld Keypad with External Alarm Device.
1-4
Introducing the CMS
Front Panel
The plastic bezel on the front of the display that contains controls
and connectors, including the Control Panel and display
adjustments.
Standard
Control Panel
The hardkeys, softkeys and alarm indicators of the Standard human
interface (Release E or later). Includes Airway Gas/Ventilation key.
Classic Control
Panel
The hardkeys, softkeys and alarm indicators of the Classic human
interface. Available with and without the SUSPEND key (see Parts
List). Includes HELP key. The Classic Control Panel is not supported
from CMS Release B.0.
HIL Connector
The Human Interface Link (HIL) Connector on the Main Display is
used to attach the Handheld Keypad and uses Philips HIL protocol to
transfer data to the system. The HIL Connector on the CRT Display,
which is on the lower right-hand corner of the front panel, can be
covered with a plastic insert when not in use.
Softkeys
These are blank single-press keys used as selection controls to enter
Task Windows. They correspond to the softkey labels displayed
above them on the screen.
Hardkeys
These are single-press keys with labels used as selection controls.
Typically, a hardkey accesses the Selection Window of its label.
Rear Panel
The panel on the rear of the display that contains display controls
and connectors for power, HIL and video.
Introducing the CMS
1-5
Introducing the CMS
Main Display Module
Introducing the CMS
Main Display Module
302mm
(11.9")
280mm
(11")
Flatscreen Main Display Module
63mm
(2.5")
337mm
(13.5")
CRT Main Display Module
451mm
(17.8")
370mm
(14.6")
333,5mm
(13.2")
XGA Flatscreen Display Module
76,7mm
(3.2")
1-6
Introducing the CMS
408mm
(16.1")
Figure 1-2 Display Modules with Dimensions
Front Panel Controls and Connectors – CRT Display
The controls and connectors on the front panel of the Display Module are shown below:
mar2bb.mif
CONFIRM
SILENCE /
RESET
ALARMS/
VOLUME
SUSPEND
MAIN
SCREEN
OTHER
PATIENTS
MONITOR
SETUP
CHANGE
SCEEN
PROCEDURES
REALTIME
RECORD
DELAYED
RECORD
TRENDS/
CALC
MODULE
SETUP
AIRWAYS GASES/
VENTILATION
HIL
ON/OFF Switch
(1)
Contrast
Power ON Control
(3)
Indicator
(2)
Control
Panel
(6)
Human
Brightness Interface Link
Control
Connector
(4)
(5)
Figure 1-3 The Display Module Front Panel
Table 1-1 Display Module Front Panel Controls and Connectors
Controls
Function
1
ON/OFF Switch
Used to turn the display On/ Off. This is the only power switch for the
system and it must be pushed in for power ON.
2
Power ON indicator
Green LED, which is lit when the display is switched ON.
3
Contrast Control
Rotary control, used to vary the contrast of the display.
4
Brightness Control
Rotary control, used to vary the brightness of the display.
Introducing the CMS
1-7
Introducing the CMS
Main Display Module
Introducing the CMS
Main Display Module
Table 1-1 Display Module Front Panel Controls and Connectors
Controls
Function
5
HIL Connector
Human Interface Link (HIL) connector is used to connect the
Handheld Keypad. This connector may be covered by a plastic insert
when not in use.
6
Control Panel
User interface of the Display Module.
Front Panel Controls and Connectors – Flatscreen Display
The controls on the front panel of the Flatscreen Display are shown below:
3
2
1
4
Figure 1-4 The Flatscreen Display Front Panel
Table 1-2 Flatscreen Display Front Panel Controls and Connectors
Controls
1-8
Function
1
ON/OFF Switch
Used to turn the display On/Off and used as the remote switch for
either the M1047A Remote Power Supply or the M1046B Computer
Module integral power supply.
2
Brightness Control
Rotary control, used to vary the brightness of the display.
3
Power ON indicator
Green LED which is lit when the display is switched ON.
4
Control Panel
User interface of the Display Module.
Introducing the CMS
Softkeys
(1)
50/140
Alarm Indicators (2)
(18)
Confirm
Silence/
Reset
Alarms/
Volume
Suspend
Main
Screen
Monitor
Setup
Other
Patients
Change
Screen
Procedures
Realtime
Record
Trends/
Calcs
Delayed
Record
Module
Setup
Airway Gases
Ventilation
wclo12a7.tif
(3)
(4)
Hardkeys (6-16)
(5)
Arrow Keys (17)
Table 1-3 Standard Control Panel Controls
Controls
Function
1
Softkey
Selection controls for the softkey labels displayed above them on the screen. Softkeys
bring up Task Windows.
2
Alarm Indicators
Indicates the color of the alarm: RED and YELLOW.
3
Silence/ Reset
4
Suspend
5
Alarms Off Indicator
6
Alarms/Volume
Used to turn all alarms off/on and individual alarms on/off, adjust alarm limits and volume,
limits, show the alarm messages and go to standby mode.
7
Other Patients
Used to view data and alarms between beds.
8
Monitor Setup
Used to change settings such as screen displays and patient type, setup OxyCRG (Standard
CMS only) and recording and make general configuration changes.
9
Procedures
Used to perform Cardiac Output and Wedge Pressure measurements, make ST segment
monitoring adjustments, review ST wave segments, admit and discharge patients, or end
particular patient case and transfer patient data.
10
Trends Calc
Used to view data in graphs and tables, do physiological calculations in graphs, print
reports and mark events to view in graphs.
11
Module Setup
12
Main Screen
13
Change Screen
14
Realtime Record
Used to start a realtime preset recording or a realtime selected recording.
15
Delayed Record
Used to start a delayed recording.
16
Airway Gases
Ventilation
17
18
Arrow Keys
Confirm
Used to silence an alarm and, if the cause has been eliminated, reset it.
Used to switch all alarms on/off.
Indicates that all alarms have been shut off.
Used to set up and change settings for all modules that are plugged into the CMS.
Used to return the standard monitoring screen.
Used to freeze waves on the screen and change between screen layouts.
Used to measure airway gases or show ventilator data.
Used to move highlighting and make selections in the Task Windows - only active when lit.
Used to confirm that the user input is correct - only active when lit.
Introducing the CMS
1-9
Introducing the CMS
Main Display Module
Introducing the CMS
Main Display Module
Softkeys
(1)
50/140
Alarm Indicators (2)
(18)
Confirm
Silence/
Reset
Alarms
Suspend
Standard
Display
Overview
Instrument
Config
Capture
Screen
Monitoring
Procedures
Mark
Event
Patient
Data
Record
Parameters
Help
wclo12a7.tif
(3)
(4)
(5)
Hardkeys (6-16)
Arrow Keys (17)
Table 1-4 Classic Control Panel Controls
Controls
Function
1
Softkey
Selection controls for the softkey labels displayed above them on the screen. Softkeys
bring up Task Windows.
2
Alarm Indicators
Indicates the color of the alarm: RED and YELLOW.
3
Silence/ Reset
4
Suspend
5
Alarms Off Indicator
6
Alarms
7
Overview
8
Instrument Config
9
Monitoring Procedures
Used to silence an alarm and, if the cause has been eliminated, reset it.
used to switch all alarms on/off.
Indicates that all alarms have been shut off.
Used to turn all alarms off/on and individual alarms on/off, adjust alarm limits, show the
alarm messages and go to standby mode.
Used to view data and alarms between beds.
Used to setup OxyCRG and recording, change between main screens and combinations of
OxyCRG or Split Screen Trending, or to make general configuration changes.
Used to perform Cardiac Output and Wedge Pressure measurements, review ST wave
segments, admit and discharge patients, or transfer patient data.
10
Patient Data
Used to view data in graphs and tables, do physiological calculations in graphs and print
reports.
11
Parameters
Used to setup and change settings for all modules that are plugged into the CMS.
12
Standard Display
13
Capture Screen
14
Mark Event
15
Record
16
Help
17
18
1-10
Arrow Keys
Confirm
Used to return to the standard monitoring screen.
Used to freeze the screen.
Used to display softkeys to mark events you can view in graphs and softkeys for cal signals.
Used to display softkeys to make delayed recordings or realtime recordings.
Used to provide information about tasks. NOTE: HELP below softkey label on screen
points to item you will get help for.
Used to move highlighting and make selections in the Task Windows - only active when lit.
Used to confirm that the user input is correct - only active when lit.
Introducing the CMS
Rear Panel Controls and Connectors
Local Power Connector
(7)
Fuses (6)
Equipotential Grounding
Terminal (12)
LOCATED ON RIGHT SIDE OF DISPLAY
Video Termination Switch (1)
Video Out Connector (10)
Video In Connector (9)
EAST WEST
(5)
V SHIFT H AMP
(4)
(3)
V AMP
(2)
Human Interface
Link Connector
(11)
System Power
Connector
(8)
rear1
Figure 1-5 Rear Panel of the M1094B Display Module
Table 1-5 Main CRT Display Rear Panel Control and Connectors
Controls and Connectors
Function
1
Video Termination Switch
Used to terminate the video signal at this display. This must be switched to the
75Ω position if only a main display is used. When a remote display is connected,
the video termination switch on the main display must be switched to High Imp.
2
V AMP
Vertical amplitude control, used to adjust the height of the displayed video.
3
V SHIFT
Vertical shift control, used to adjust the vertical position of the displayed video.
4
H AMP
Horizontal amplitude control, used to adjust the width of the displayed video.
5
EAST WEST
Used to adjust the pin-cushion effect of the displayed video.
6
Fuse Holders
Two fuse holders for the line protection fuses, one for the higher operating voltage
range and one for the lower operating voltage range.
7
Local Power Connector
3-pin connector, used to input the local line voltage.
8
System Power Connector
15-pin “D” type connector, used to output the 60V dc supply to a similar connector
on the DC/DC converter in the rear of the Computer Module.
9
Video In Connector
9-pin “D” type connector, used to input the video signal to be displayed from the
display controller in the Computer Module (DSPC for monochrome or CDSPCVideo for color).
10
Video Out Connector
9-pin “D” type connector, used to output the video signal to be displayed on a slave
display.
Introducing the CMS
1-11
Introducing the CMS
Main Display Module
Table 1-5 Main CRT Display Rear Panel Control and Connectors
Controls and Connectors
Function
11
Human Interface Link
Connector
Human Interface Link (HIL) connector, used to output the information from the
Control Panel and the Handheld Keypad to the Utility CPU function card in the
Computer Module.
12
Equipotential Grounding
Terminal
Grounding stud connector, used to connect the Display Module to an equipotential
grounding system, if required. The overall system is normally grounded at the
grounding terminal on the Computer Module.
90Human
x 120
Interface Link
Equipotential
Grounding Terminal
(12)
Connector
(11)
Video Out
Connector
(10)
M1092A
System Power
Connector
(8)
Limited
MEDICAL
UL EQUIPMENT
x xxxxx
N
SA
C
R
LR 49394
HIL
STANDARD NORME
C22 NO 12b
RISA
CATEGORIE
CLASS DE RISQUES
FI
tuv
GS
871-8
VIDEO
CAUTION
ATTENTION
VORSICHT
CUIDADO
U
U
75
HIGH
IMP.
U
Introducing the CMS
Main Display Module
VIDEO
Video Termination
Switch
(1)
U
Video IN
Connector
(9)
Local Power
Connector
(7)
H AMP EAST WEST
Fuses
(5)
(6)
V AMP V SHIFT (4)
(3)
(2)
mar5b
Figure 1-6 Rear Panel of the M1092A & M1094A Main Display Modules
1-12
Introducing the CMS
Figure 1-7 Rear Panel of the M1095A Main Display Module
Slave Display Module
Table 1-6 Flatscreen Rear Panel Controls and Connectors
Controls and Connectors
Function
1
Brightness Control
Adjusts the brightness of the display.
2
ON/OFF Switch
Used to turn the display On/Off and used as the remote switch for either the
M1047A Remote Power Supply or the M1046B Computer Module integral
power supply.
3
Combined Video In / Power
Connector
This is a male SCSI connector with 25 pin pairs used to input the video signal
and the 60 V DC line voltage.
4
Human Interface Link Connector
In
This Human Interface Link (HIL) connector is used to connect the handheld
keypad.
5
Human Interface Link Connector
Out
This Human Interface Link (HIL) connector is used to output the information
from the handheld keypad and control panel to the Utility CPU function card in
the computer module.
Introducing the CMS
1-13
Introducing the CMS
Slave Display Module
Introducing the CMS
Slave Display Module
Independent
Flatscreen Display
without Control Panel
The CMS supports additional displays as either CRT Slave or Flatscreen and CRT
Independent Display Modules. CRT Slave Displays connect directly to any CRT and
display the same information as the CRT they are connected to. Independent Displays
have their own display controller in the Computer Module and may display different
information than the Main Display under software control. Slave and Independent
Displays are intended as a visual reference and do not have a Control Panel. The
information on the 21" slave display can be found in its accompanying manual. See also
the Appendix, “Remote 21" Displays”.
14" Slave Display Front Panel Controls
Table 1-7 Slave Display Front Panel Controls
Controls
Independent / Slave
CRT Display
without Control Panel
Function
ON/OFF Switch
Push button switch, used to turn the slave display ON and OFF.
This must be pushed in for power ON.
Power ON indicator
Green LED which is lit when the display is switched ON.
Brightness Control
Rotary control, used to vary the brightness of the display.
Contrast Control
Rotary control, used to vary the contrast of the display.
14" Slave Display Rear Panel Controls and Connectors
Table 1-8 Slave Display Rear Panel Controls and Connectors
Controls and Connectors
1-14
Function
Video Termination Switch
Push button switch, used to terminate the video signal at this
display. This switch must be ON (in) or 75Ω if the slave display is
the last in the chain. Otherwise the switch must be OFF (out) or
High Imp.
Fuse Holders
Holders for the line protection fuses.
Local Power Connector
3-pin connector, used to input the local line voltage.
Video In Connector
Male 9-pin “D” type connector, used to input the video signal to
be displayed from the main Display Module.
Video Out Connector
9-pin “D” type connector, used to output the video signal to be
displayed on another Slave Display Module.
Equipotential Grounding
Terminal
Grounding stud connector, used to connect the system to an
equipotential grounding system.
Introducing the CMS
Front Panel
BRIGHTNESS CONTROL
POWER ON INDICATOR
CONTRAST CONTROL
ON/OFF SWITCH
Rear Panel of M1094B
LOCAL POWER CONNECTOR
FUSES
EQUIPOTENTIAL GROUNDING
TERMINAL
VIDEO TERMINATION SWITCH
VIDEO OUT CONNECTOR
VIDEO IN CONNECTOR
Rear Panel of M1092A and M1094A
FUSES
OUT CONNECTOR
90VIDEO
x 120
EQUIPOTENTIAL
GROUNDING TERMINAL
M1092A
Limited
UL MEDICAL
EQUIPM ENT
xx xxxx
N
SA
C
R
LR 49394
HIL
ST ANDARD NORM E
C22 NO 1 2b
RISA CATEGORIE
CLASS DE RISQUES
FI
tuv
GS
VIDEO TERMINATION SWITCH
871-8
VIDEO
CAUTION
U
ATTENTION
U
VORSICHT
CUIDADO
75
HIGH
IMP.
U
LOCAL POWER
CONNECTOR
VIDEO
U
VIDEO IN CONNECTOR
mar5b
Figure 1-8 Slave Display Controls and Connectors
Introducing the CMS
1-15
Introducing the CMS
Slave Display Module
Introducing the CMS
Handheld Keypad
Handheld Keypad
The Handheld Keypad of the CMS is an external device used for inputting patient
information and working with the drug calculator that is a part of the monitor. There are
three released versions of the Handheld Keypad. The first release (M1106A) is called the
Classic Handheld Keypad. The second release (M1106B) added the SUSPEND hardkey to
the Classic Handheld Keypad. The current release (M1106C) is called the Standard
Handheld Keypad and it contains the same number of keys as the M1106B but improves
on the hardkey key labels and functionality to make them more user-friendly.
Handheld Keypad
Note: Only the Standard Handheld Keypad (M1106C) is supported with Release B.0. The
Classic Handheld Keypad (M1106A or M1106B) is not supported for use with Release B.0.
Objective
In order to meet this section’s goals, you should be able to:
• Identify the controls and connectors of the Handheld Keypad.
• Be familiar with the function of the controls and connectors of the Handheld Keypad.
Concepts
The Handheld Keypad provides remote access to all monitoring tasks. There are 55
domed buttons on the membrane keyboard which provides a fluid seal to make cleaning
easier. A coiled cable is used to connect the keypad to the master or main display, or to
the External Alarm Device.
1-16
Membrane
Keypad
The plastic bezel on the front of the Handheld Keypad that contains
the controls and connectors, including the Control Panel and
alphanumeric keypad.
Standard
Control Panel
The hardkeys, softkeys and alarm indicators of the Standard user
interface (Release E or later).
Classic Control
Panel
The hardkeys, softkeys and alarm indicators of the Classic user
interface. Available with and without the SUSPEND key (see Parts
List).
HIL Connector
Human Interface Link (HIL) Connector is used to connect the
Handheld Keypad to the Main Display, or to the External Alarm
Device. Information is transferred to the system using Philips HIL
protocol.
Alphanumeric
Keys
These are single-press keys used to input patient information and
drug calculations into the monitor.
Introducing the CMS
Handheld Keypad Membrane Keyboard
All of the softkeys and hardkeys on the Display Module are also found on the Handheld
Keypad. See Table 1-3 and Table 1-4 and for descriptions of these keys. In addition, the
Philips Handheld Keypad has keys for alphanumeric data entry.
Softkeys
Standard
Hardkeys
Silence/Reset
Key
Alarms/
Other
Monitor
Volume
Patients
Setup
Main
Screen
Suspend Key
Silence/
Reset
Trends/
Procedures
Delayed
Airway Gases/
Screen
Record
Record
Ventilation
A
B
C
7
8
9
D
.
-.
E
J
G
H
I
5
6
X
Space
K
L
M
N
Space
1
2
3
-
T
U
W
.
V
0
Shift
Confirm Key
Realtime
F
Space Key
Setup
Change
4
Suspend
Module
Calcs
Confirm
Arrow Keys
O
P
Q
R
S
X
Y
Z
.
,
Alphanumeric
Keys
+
Shift Key
M1106C
210/140
keypada1
Handheld Keypad
Connector
Figure 1-9 Handheld Keypad Controls and Connector
Table 1-9 Handheld Keypad Standard Control Panel
Standard Control Panel
Space
Shift
Function
Used to enter spaces between numbers or letters
Used to switch between alpha and numeric mode. The LED is lit when keypad is in alpha
mode.
Alphabet Characters (A - Z)
These characters can be entered only in alpha mode (when the LED on the Shift key is lit).
Punctuation Marks (, .)
The punctuation marks can be entered only in numeric mode (when LED on Shift key is
not lit).
Numeric Characters (0 - 9)
These characters can be entered only in numeric mode (when LED on Shift key is not lit).
Arithmetic Operators (+ - * /)
These characters can be entered only in numeric mode (when LED on Shift key is not lit).
Decimal Point (.)
The decimal point can be entered only in numeric mode (when LED on Shift key is not lit).
Handheld Keypad Connector
(Philips-HIL)
This connector fits into the Philips-HIL connector on the lower right corner of the Display
Module.
Introducing the CMS
1-17
Introducing the CMS
Handheld Keypad
Introducing the CMS
Handheld Keypad
Handheld Keypad Rear Cover
The rear cover of the Handheld Keypad contains a magnet to secure it to the keypad
mounting bracket or to the External Alarm Device.
External Alarm Device M1109A
Red Alarm
indicator
Yellow Alarm
indicator
Alarms-Off indicator
Green LED
Remote On-Off
to Computer Module
On-Off Switch
Keypad
Mounting
Bracket
HIL to Computer Module
HIL to Keypad
Universal Mounting Clamp
eadevice.hpg
The External Alarm Device, for use with off-the-shelf XGA displays, provides visual and
audible alarm indicators. It has a bracket to hold the Handheld Keypad. It also provides an
on/off switch to remotely control the M1046B CMS Computer Module.
CAUTION
1-18
Always locate this device in such a way that the speaker at the rear and the lights
on the front are not blocked.
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
Computer Module (M1046A)
with integral rack
The Computer Module of the CMS contains the hardware and software for the processing
functions of the monitor. It can be thought of as the heart of the system. It distributes all
the power, clocks and data for the whole system. There are several released
configurations for the function cards of the Computer Module. Your configuration will
depend on the version of software and hardware your monitor is running and the options
it is supporting. All of the function cards connect to the Computer Module backplane,
whether from the front or from the rear of the unit. Function cards that require external
connections are located in the rear of the Computer Module.
Objective
In order to meet this section’s goals, you should be able to:
Computer Module (M1046A)
with integral blank rack
• Identify the connectors of the Computer Module
• Be familiar with the functions of the Computer Module.
Concepts
Computer Module (M1046B)
with integral power supply
The Computer Module of CMS is not fitted with any controls, just connectors. The front of
the M1046A Computer Module can be mounted with an integral plug-in module rack or a
blank rack. Each rack contains an internal rack connector used to output information
from the rack to the Rack Interface function card placed in slot 18 of the computer
module. All of the other connections for the Computer Module are in the rear and will
depend on the options and revision of your monitor.
Integral Plug-in
Module Rack
The integral plug-in module rack fits in the front of the Computer
Module (M1046A) and holds plug-in modules. It contains a rear
connector that is used to output information from the rack to the
Computer Module.
Blank Rack
The blank rack is used to cover the front of the Computer Module
(M1046A) when a satellite plug-in module rack is being used. It
contains a rear connector that is used to output information from the
rack to the Computer Module.
Integral Power
Supply
The integral power supply is used to power the Computer Module
(M1046B), a satellite plug-in module rack, and a flatscreen main
display without the need for a Remote Power Supply. It connects to
the REMOTE_SWITCH card in the Computer Module to allow the
flatscreen display to control the Computer Module power.
Backplane
The backplane of the Computer Module contains the connections for
the front and rear function cards.
Introducing the CMS
1-19
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
CPC Flash Port
This port is located on the Configurable Processor Card (CPC) in slot 12
and is the connector for the CPC Programming Tool.
M1046A with Integral Blank Rack
M1046A with Integral Rack & Parameter Modules
156mm
(6.2")
156mm
(6.2")
451mm
(17.8")
370mm
(14.6")
370mm
(14.6")
491mm
(19.3")
M1046B with Integral Power Supply
156mm
(6.2")
370mm
(14.6")
451mm
(17.8")
Figure 1-10 Computer Module Dimensions
Brief Functional Overview
The Philips CMS Patient Monitoring System is a loosely coupled multi-processor system
containing several CPU cards. They can communicate with each other but do not have access
to each other’s memory. They can only exchange information in the form of messages.
The backplane can be functionally sectioned into three logical parts or buses, the Message
Passing Bus, the Local Bus and the Utility Bus.
Message Passing
Bus
This is the global communication bus for the system, and is used for
communications between CPU cards as well as to intelligent interface
cards (for example, RS232 Interface and the display controllers). This
bus appears on all the connectors.
Local Bus
This is the local communication system. It is a buffered processor bus
that allows access to local memory cards, SRAM and EPROM that
contain software for the exclusive use of the master processor.
The local bus appears on all the connectors on the backplane but is
interrupted to connect groups of connectors into local clusters.
1-20
Introducing the CMS
Utility Bus
This includes functions required by the whole system; for example,
power and clock signal distribution. This bus appears on all the
connectors.
Local Clusters
The local bus is connected to all the connectors in the backplane but
it is interrupted to form clusters that share a connection to the same
local bus. There are 10 local clusters in the backplane with varying
numbers of connectors.
Delivered Configurations
The versions and models described by this guide are listed as follows (models indicated
by asterisk were discontinued. “(S)” indicates a non-US-model):
CMS: M1165A/66A/67A
Models 54(S)*, 56(S), 64(S), 66(S) and 68(S)
CMS: M1175A/76A/77A
Models 54*, 56, 66 and 68
ACMS: M1165A/66A/67A
Models 74(S)*, 76(S), 84(S), 86(S) and 88(S)
ACMS: M1175A/76A/77A
Models 74*, 76, 86 and 88
NCMS: M1165A/66A/67A
Models 34(S)*, 36(S)*, 44(S), 46(S)* and 48(S)
NCMS: M1175A/76A/77A
Models 34*, 36*, 46* and 48
The CMS products M1167A and M1177A use the Computer Module (M1046B).
There are three types of Application CPU Cards used in the Systems: M1054 (10 MHz) and
M1051 (15 MHz) and M1053 (40 MHz CPC Card).
Function Card placement in the Backplane is dependent upon the variant of the System
and the type of Application CPU Cards. Card placements for all variants of the CMS are
illustrated in Table 1-10 Function Card Placement on page 1-23
Function Cards of the Computer Module
The function cards are interconnected by the backplane within the Computer Module;
refer to the Concepts Guide for a full functional description of the backplane and its
theory of operation. The function cards are mounted on both sides of the backplane and
may be located either in the front of the Computer Module (even-numbered connectors)
or the rear (odd-numbered connectors). The local clusters of the backplane are colorcoded on the Computer Module, so that they can be easily identified. On the rear of the
backplane, to the left of connector 21, there is a triple-sized gap. This is the only place
where the dc-dc converter can be located.
The newer Computer Module (M1046B) has an integral power supply. As a result these
Computer Modules have additional function cards. These additional cards are described
in Table 1-10 Function Card Placement on page 1-23.
Introducing the CMS
1-21
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
Function Card Placement
Function Card Placement in the backplane of the Philips monitor is dependent upon the
following (“(S)” indicates the non-US-models):
1.The monitor model:
•CMS: Models 54 (S), 56 (S), 64 (S), 66 (S), 68 (S)
•ACMS: Models 74 (S), 76 (S), 84 (S), 86 (S), 88 (S)
•NCMS: Models 36 (S), 44 (S), 46 (S), 48 (S)
2.Type of processor cards used:
•10 MHz CPU cards M1054-66501
•15 MHz CPU cards M1051-66501
•40 MHz CPC card M1053-66515
3.Type and combination of display controllers used:
•M1066-66501 DSPC (Monochrome)
•M1066-66531 DSPC (Monochrome)
•M1066-66543 DSPC (Monochrome with integrated DSPC-lang)
•M1072-66521 CDSPC-CTRL (Color) together with M1072-66501 CDSPC-VIDEO
•M1072-66531 CDSPC (Color)
•M1072-66543 (Color with integrated DSPC-lang)
•M1074-66501 DSPC-FLAT (Flatscreen color)
•M1074-66502 DSPC-FLAT (Flatscreen color)
•M1074-66503 DSPC-FLAT (Flatscreen Color with integrated DSPC-lang)
•M1075-66503 XGA DSPC (XGA with integrated DSPC-lang)
1-22
Introducing the CMS
Front Slots
Rear Slots
1
Yellow
2
3
4
Gray
5
6
Red
7
8
Blue
9
10
Green
11
12
13
14
15
Red Strips
16
17
18
Blue Strips
19
20
21
22
Green Strips
DC-DC Converter
24
Use the following tables to determine the location of the function cards for your system.
Table 1-10 Function Card Placement
Software Release A
Using 15MHz Application CPUs
Using 10MHz Application CPUs
REAR
FRONT
BLANK or
CDSPC_CTRL
EPROM MASTER
CDSPC_CTRL #2
APP_CPU
1
2
3
4
5
APP_CPU
7
DSPC #2 or
CDSPC_VID #2
6
8
HDLC_IF
APP_CPU
(Model 68 only)
(If present)
10
CDSPC_CTRL #2
APP_CPU
(Model 68 only)
SRAM
11
EPROM SLAVE
BLANK or
CDSPC_CTRL
EPROM MASTER
9
SRAM
FRONT
DSPC or
CDSPC_VIDEO
1
2
3
4
EPROM SLAVE
9
HDLC_IF
11
APP_CPU
13
RS232_IF (if present)
(if present)
12
15
16
17
UTIL_CPU
18
RACK_IF
19
17
UTIL_CPU
19
SDN_IF (if present)
18
SDN_IF (if present)
20
20
21
21
22
24
DSPC #2 or
CDSPC_VID #2
10
15
APP_CPU
7
14
16
RACK_IF
APP_CPU
8
RS232_IF (if present)
14
5
6
APP_CPU
12
13
REAR
DSPC or
CDSPC_VIDEO
APP_CPU
DC/DC CONVERTER
22
24
DC/DC CONVERTER
Rel_a.mif
200 x 90
Introducing the CMS
1-23
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
Table 1-10 Function Card Placement
Software Release B
Using 10MHz Application CPUs
REAR
FRONT
FRONT
DSPC or
CDSPC_VIDEO
1
BLANK or
CDSPC_CTRL
2
3
DSPC_KANJI (if present)
4
EPROM MASTER
CDSPC_CTR #2
6
APP_CPU
8
SRAM
200 x 90
Using 15MHz Application CPUs
BLANK or
CDSPC_CTRL
5
APP_CPU
7
DSPC #2 or
CDSPC_VID #2
9
HDLC_IF
11
APP_CPU
(If present)
12
RS232_IF (if present)
13
APP_CPU
(Model 56 with #C10,
66 with #C10, or 68)
14
15
5
APP_CPU
7
DSPC #2 or
CDSPC_VID #2
9
HDLC_IF
11
APP_CPU
13
RS232_IF (if present)
15
ANALOG_IF (if present)
17
UTIL_CPU
19
SDN_IF (if present)
8
(if present)
10
12
ANALOG_IF (if present)
16
17
UTIL_CPU
18
RACK_IF
18
SDN_IF (if present)
19
20
20
21
APP_CPU
DSPC_KANJI (if present)
14
16
RACK_IF
3
6
APP_CPU
(Model 68 only)
EPROM SLAVE
DSPC or
CDSPC_VIDEO
4
CDSPC_CTR #2
SRAM
1
2
EPROM MASTER
10
EPROM SLAVE
REAR
21
22
APP_CPU
24
DC/DC CONVERTER
22
24
DC/DC CONVERTER
Software Release C (15 MHz APP_CPUs)
Models 54(S)/64(S) and Models 56(S)/66(S) without #C26
REAR
FRONT
BLANK or
CDSPC_CTRL #1
EPROM MASTER
CDSPC_CTRL #2
1
DSPC #1 or
CDSPC_VID #1
3
DSPC_LANG
2
(KANJI, TAI or PRC)
4
5
15 MHz APP_CPU
7
DSPC #2 or
CDSPC_VID #2
9
HDLC-IF
6
15 MHz APP_CPU8
SRAM
EPROM SLAVE
10
11
15 MHz APP_CPU
13
RS232_IF
15
ANALOG_IF
17
UTIL_CPU
19
SDN_IF
Models 56(S)/66(S) with #C26 and Model 68(S)
BLANK or
CDSPC_CTRL #1
2
EPROM MASTER
4
CDSPC_CTRL #2
14
SRAM
18
20
21
APP_CPU
DC/DC CONVERTER
200 x 90
1-24
DSPC_LANG.
5
15 MHz APP_CPU
7
DSPC #2 or
CDSPC_VID #2
9
RS232_IF #1
6
(KANJI, TAI or PRC)
10
11
15 MHz APP_CPU
13
RS232_IF #2 or
DSPC #3 (only 68(S))
15
ANALOG_IF
17
UTIL_CPU
19
SDN_IF
21
HDLC_IF
12
16
RACK_IF
18
20
15 MHz APP_CPU
22
22
24
3
15 MHz APU_CPU
14
16
RACK_IF
1
DSPC #1 or
CDSPC_VID #1
15 MHz APU_CPU8
EPROM SLAVE
12
REAR
FRONT
Introducing the CMS
24
DC/DC CONVERTER
Rel_b.mif
Table 1-10 Function Card Placement
Upgrade Backplane to Release C (without CPC)
The table below shows the slot locations and quantity of
10 MHz (M1054-66501) and 15 MHz (M1051-66501)
APP_CPUs for those Philips CMS Patient Monitoring System
that have been upgraded from software release A or B with
10 MHz CPU’s exclusively, to software release C without
CPC.
APP_CPU Slot Location and Quantity
Rel. C+ to Rel. G 15 MHz APP_CPU Requirements
Model
Slot 22
Slot 4
Standard CMS
A68(S)
Required
Extra card
a
Extra card
A56(S)/A66(S)
Required
A54(S)/A64(S)
Extra card Extra card
A54S/A66S
51, 8, 11, 14, 22
Anesthesia CMS (from Rel. Eß)
A56S,/A66S
51, 8, 11, 14, 22
A88(S)
Required
Required
Required
1,
162,
22
A76(S)/A86(S) (#C25)
Required
1,
161,
22
A76(S)/A86(S) without (#C25)
Extra card Extra card
5 8, 11, 14,
A56(S)/A66(S) (#C10)
5 8, 11, 14,
A56(S)/A66(S) (#C26)
1 This is a 15 MHz CPU.
2 The systems that have been upgraded from
software release B to software release C with
existing C10 will contain a 10 MHz processor in
slot 16. If C10 is added to a Software Release C
monitor, there will not be a 10 MHz processor in
slot 16.
A74(S)/A84(S) (#C24)
Required
A74(S)/A84(S) w/o (#C24)
Extra card Extra card
Extra card
Neonatal CMS (from Rel. F)
A36(S)/A46(S)/A48(S)
Required
Extra card
a. Not required in certain earlier releases.
Software Release C+ or D (40 MHz CPC)
200 X 90
Models 54(S)/64(S) and Models 56(S)/66(S)
FRONT
BLANK or
CDSPC_CTRL #1
15 MHz APP_CPU
*
1
2
3
4
REAR
DSPC #1 or
CDSPC_VID #1
DSPC_LANG
(KANJI, TAI or PRC)
6
7
FRONT
BLANK or
CDSPC_CTRL #1
15 MHz APP_CPU
5
CDSPC_CTRL #2
Models 56(S)/66(S) with #C26 and Model 68(S)
*
CDSPC_CTRL #2
RS232_IF
11
14
ANALOG_IF
UTIL_CPU
18
*
RACK_IF
19
SDN_IF
21
HDLC_IF
22
24
200 X 90
DSPC #2 or
CDSPC_VID #2
9
RS232_IF #1
13
RS232_IF #2 or
DSPC #3 (only 68(S))
15
ANALOG_IF
17
UTIL_CPU
19
SDN_IF
21
HDLC_IF
18
20
15MHz APP_CPU
DC/DC CONVERTER
12
16
20
15 MHz APP_CPU
7
14
16
17
6
11
40 MHz CPC
13
RACK_IF
DSPC_LANG
(KANJI, TAI or PRC)
10
12
15
3
4
8
10
40 MHz CPC
2
REAR
DSPC #1 or
CDSPC_VID #1
5
DSPC #2 or
CDSPC_VID #2
8
9
1
22
24
DC/DC CONVERTER
* An extra CPU may be left in for future use.
Introducing the CMS
1-25
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
Table 1-10 Function Card Placement
Software Release E or Eß
FRONT
BLANK or
CDSPC_CTRL #1
15 MHz APP_CPU
CDSPC_CTRL #2
40 MHz CPC
RACK_IF
15 MHz APP_CPU
Software Release F
REAR
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
19
21
FRONT
* BLANK
DSPC_LANG #1
(KANJI, TAI or PRC)
15 MHz APP_CPU
DSPC #2 or
CDSPC_VIDEO #2
CDSPC_CTRL #2
RS232_IF #1
40 MHz CPC
ANALOG_IF or
DSPC #3 (only model 88)
RS232 IF #2
100/140
UTIL_CPU
RACK_IF
SDN_IF
HDLC_IF
15 MHz APP_CPU
25
REAR
DSPC #1 or
CDSPC_VIDEO #1
DC/DC CONVERTER
bacone1.tif
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
DSPC #1 or
CDSPC #1 or DSPC_FLAT #1
19
21
SDN_IF
HDLC_IF
25
DC/DC CONVERTER
DSPC_LANG #1
(KANJI, TAI or PRC)
DSPC #2 or
CDSPC #2 or DSPC_FLAT #2
RS232_IF #1
ANALOG_IF or
DSPC #3 or DSPC_FLAT #3
or CDSPC #3
(only model 88)
RS232 IF #2
UTIL_CPU
* If upgraded (to F) may still have CDSPC_CTRL #1.
Software Release G
M1046B Computer Module
M1046A Computer Module
FRONT
* BLANK
15 MHz APP_CPU
CDSPC_CTRL #2
40 MHz CPC
100/140
RACK_IF
15 MHz APP_CPU
bacone1.tif
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
DSPC #1 or
CDSPC #1 or DSPC_FLAT #1
BLANK
DSPC_LANG #1
(KANJI, TAI or PRC)
15 MHz APP_CPU
19
21
SDN_IF
HDLC_IF
25
DC/DC CONVERTER
CDSPC_CTRL #2
DSPC #2 or
CDSPC #2 or DSPC_FLAT #2
REMOTE_SWITCH
RS232_IF #1
40 MHz CPC
ANALOG_IF or
DSPC #3 or DSPC_FLAT #3
or CDSPC #3
(only model 88)
RS232 IF #2
100/140
RACK_IF
UTIL_CPU
15 MHz APP_CPU
AUX_CONNECTOR
* If upgraded (to G) may still have CDSPC_CTRL #1.
1-26
FRONT
REAR
Introducing the CMS
bacone1.tif
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
REAR
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
DSPC_FLAT_NON_ASIA #1 or
DSPC_FLAT_ASIA #1
19
21
SDN_IF
HDLC_IF
25
DC/DC CONVERTER
DSPC #2 or
CDSPC #2 or DSPC_FLAT #2
RS232_IF #1
ANALOG_IF or
DSPC #3 or DSPC_FLAT #3
or CDSPC #3
(only model 88)
RS232 IF #2
UTIL_CPU
Table 1-10 Function Card Placement
Software Releases A.0 to C.0
M1046A Computer Module
M1046B Computer Module
Systems with M1066-66531 or M1066-66543** (DSPC) or
M1072-66531 or M1072-66543** (CDSPC) or
M1074-66501 (DSPC_FLAT) or
M1074-66502 (DSPC_FLAT)**
FRONT
40 MHz CPC #2
40 MHz CPC #1
100/140
RACK_IF
*
15 MHz APP_CPU
Systems with M1074-66501(DSPC_FLAT) or
M1074-66502 (DSPC_FLAT)
FRONT
REAR
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
*For future use – if upgraded
DSPC #1 or
CDSPC #1 or DSPC_FLAT #1
DSPC_LANG #1
(JAP, PRC, ROC, GRK, POL,
RUS, CZE)
40 MHz CPC #2
DSPC #2 or
CDSPC #2 or DSPC_FLAT #2
REMOTE
RS232_IF #1
ANALOG_IF or
DSPC #3 or CDSPC #3
or DSPC_FLAT #3(only model 88)
RS232 IF #2
40 MHz CPC #1
100/140
UTIL_CPU
RACK_IF
19
21
HDLC_IF
25
DC/DC CONVERTER
SDN_IF
*
** with these controllers no DSPC_LANG is required
15 MHz APP_CPU
AUX
40 MHz CPC #2
CDSPC_CTRL #2
40 MHz CPC #1
100/140
RACK_IF
*
15 MHz APP_CPU
* For future use – if upgraded.
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
11
13
15
17
DSPC_FLAT #1or DSPC #1
DSPC_LANG #1
(JAP, PRC, ROC, GRK,
POL, RUS, CZK)
DSPC #2 or CDSPC #2 or
DSPC_FLAT #2
RS232_IF #1
ANALOG_IF or
DSPC #3 or CDSPC #3
or DSPC_FLAT #3(only model 88)
RS232 IF #2
UTIL_CPU
19
21
HDLC_IF
25
DC/DC CONVERTER
SDN_IF
Systems with M1075-66503 (XGA_DSPC) or
M1074-66503 (DSPC_FLAT)
REAR
1
3
5
7
9
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
M1046B Computer Module
Systems with M1066-66501 (DSPC) or
M1072-66521 (CDSPC_CTRL) +
M1072-66501 (CDSPC_VIDEO)
CDSPC_CTRL #1
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
*For future use – if upgraded
M1046A Computer Module
FRONT
REAR
FRONT
DSPC #1 or
CDSPC_VIDEO #1
DSPC_LANG
(JAP, PRC, ROC)
40 MHz CPC #2
DSPC #2 or
CDSPC_VIDEO #2
REMOTE
RS232_IF #1
40 MHz CPC #1
ANALOG_IF or
DSPC #3 (only model 88)
RS232 IF #2
UTIL_CPU
100/140
RACK_IF
19
21
HDLC_IF
25
DC/DC CONVERTER
SDN_IF
*
15 MHz APP_CPU
AUX
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
REAR
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
XGA_DSPC #1 or DCPC_FLAT #1
XGA_DSPC #2 or DSPC #2 or
CDSPC#2 or DSPC_FLAT #2
RS232_IF #1
ANALOG_IF or XGA_DSPC or
DSPC #3 or CDSPC #3
or DSPC_FLAT #3(only model 88)
RS232 IF #2
UTIL_CPU
19
21
HDLC_IF
25
DC/DC CONVERTER
SDN_IF
* For future use – if upgraded.
Introducing the CMS
1-27
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
EEPROM Numbers
The part numbers listed in the table below are for cross-reference purposes only. Order a
blank EEPROM (1818-4869) and reprogram it using the relevant upgrade programming
tool.
Table 1-11 CMS EEPROM/CPU Matrix (M1059-85xxx)
Releases A to G
CMS Model XX
10MHz Monitors
15 MHz Monitors
40 MHz CPC Monitors
Rel A
Rel B
Rel C
Rel A
Rel B
Rel C
Rel C
Rel D
Rel E
Rel Eβ
Rel F
Rel G
A54(S)/A64(S)
`231
'251
'301
`241
`261
'341
'441
'541
‘641
‘741
‘841
‘943
A54(S)/A64(S) (C02)
`234
'254
'301
`244
`264
'341
'441
'541
‘641
‘741
‘841
‘943
A54(S)/A64(S) (C03)
'237
'257
-
'247
`267
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
A54(S)/A64(S) (C05)
-
-
'303
-
-
'343
'443
'543
‘643
‘743
‘843
‘943
A54(S)/A64(S) (C10)
-
'271
'304
-
`281
'344
'444
'544
‘644
‘744
‘844
‘949
A54(S)/A64(S) (C02,C10)
-
'274
'304
-
'284
'344
'444
'544
‘644
‘744
‘844
‘949
A54(S)/A64(S) (C03,C10)
-
'277
-
-
'287
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
A54(S)/A64(S) (C05,C10)
-
-
'309
-
-
'349
'449
'549
‘649
’749
‘849
‘949
‘963
A56(S)/A66(S)
`232
'255
'321
`242
`265
'361
'461
'561
‘661
‘761
‘861
A56(S)/A66(S) (C02)
`235
`255
'321
`245
`265
'361
'461
'561
‘661
‘761
‘861
‘963
A56(S)/A66(S) (C03)
'238
'258
'322
`248
`268
'362
'462
'562
‘662
‘762
‘862
‘966
A56(S)/A66(S) (C05)
-
-
'323
-
-
'363
'463
'563
‘663
‘763
‘863
‘963
A56(S)/A66(S) (C10)
-
'275
'324
-
`285
'364
'464
'564
‘664
‘764
‘864
‘969
A56(S)/A66(S) (C26)
-
-
'325
-
-
'365
'465
'565
-
-
-
-
A56(S)/A66(S) (C03,C05)
-
-
'326
-
-
'366
'466
'566
‘666
‘766
‘866
‘966
A56(S)/A66(S) (C03,C10)
-
'278
'327
-
'288
'367
'467
'567
‘667
‘767
‘867
‘971
A56(S)/A66(S) (C03,C26)
-
-
'328
-
-
'368
'468
'568
-
-
-
-
A56(S)/A66(S) (C05,C10)
-
-
'329
-
-
'369
'469
'569
‘669
‘769
‘869
‘969
A56(S)/A66(S) (C10,C26)
-
-
'330
-
-
'370
'470
'570
-
-
-
-
A56(S)/A66(S) (C03,C05,C10)
-
-
'331
-
-
'371
'471
'571
‘671
‘771
‘871
‘971
A56(S)/A66(S) (C03,C10,C26)
-
-
'332
-
-
'372
'472
'572
-
-
-
-
A68(S)
`233
'256
-
`243
`266
'381
'481
'581
‘681
‘781
‘881
‘981
A68(S) (C02)
`236
'256
-
`246
'266
'381
'481
'581
‘681
‘781
‘881
‘981
A68(S) (C03)
'239
'259
-
`249
`269
'382
'482
'582
‘681
‘781
‘881
‘981
A68(S) (C10)
-
'276
-
-
`286
'384
'484
'584
‘681
‘781
‘881
‘981
A68(S) (C03,C10)
-
'279
-
`289
'387
'487
'587
‘681
‘781
‘881
‘981
1-28
Introducing the CMS
Table 1-12 CMS EEPROM/CPU Matrix (M1059-xxxxx)
Releases A.0 to C.0
System Model
64/64S
56/56S and 66/66S
(Rel.B.0 and C.0)
68/68S
Options
Standard
C04
C12
C04, C12
C80
C04, C80
Standard
C04
C12
C04, C12
C80
C04, C80
J26
J26, C04
J26, C32
J26, C04, C32
J26, C12
J26, C04, C12
J26, C80
J26, C04, C80
Standard
C04
C12
C80
C04, C80
J28
J28, C04
J28, C32
J28, C04, C32
J28, C12
J28, C80
J28, C04, C80
Rel. A.0
-80040
-80041
—
—
-80042
-80043
-80060
-80061
—
—
-80062
-80063
-80070
-80071
—
—
—
—
-80072
-80073
-80080
-80081
—
—
-80083
-80090
-80091
—
—
—
-80092
-80093
Rel. B.0
-80140
-80141
-80142
-80143
-80140
-80141
-80160
-80161
-80162
-80163
-80160
-80161
-80170
-80171
—
—
-80172
-80173
-80170
-80171
-80180
-80101
-80182
—
-80101
-80190
-80111
—
—
-80192
-80190
-80111
Rel. C.0
-80242
-80243
-80242
-80243
-80242
-80243
-80262
-80263
-80262
-80263
-80262
-80263
-80272
-80273
-80274
-80275
-80272
-80273
-80272
-80273
-80282
-80283
-80282
-80282
-80283
-80292
-80293
-80294
-80295
-80292
-80292
-80293
Rel. C.1
-80342
-80343
-80342
-80343
-80342
-80343
-80362
-80363
-80362
-80363
-80362
-80363
-80372
-80373
-80374
-80375
-80372
-80373
-80372
-80373
-80382
-80383
-80382
-80382
-80383
-80392
-80393
-80394
-80395
-80392
-80932
-80393
Introducing the CMS
1-29
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
Table 1-13 ACMS EEPROM/CPU Matrix (M1059-87xxx)
Rel. E to G
ACMS Model XX
40 MHz CPC Monitors
Rel E
Introducing the CMS
Rel F
Rel G
A74(S)/A84(S)
‘641
‘741
‘841
‘943
A74(S)/A84(S) (C05)
‘643
‘743
‘843
‘943
A74(S)/A84(S) (C24)
‘644
‘744
‘844
‘949
A74(S)/A84(S) (C05,C24)
‘649
‘749
‘849
‘949
A76(S)/A86(S)
‘661
‘761
‘861
‘963
A76(S)/A86(S) (C03)
‘662
‘762
‘862
‘966
A76(S)/A86(S) (C05)
‘663
‘763
‘863
‘963
A76(S)/A86(S) (C25)
‘665
‘765
‘865
‘971
A76(S)/A86(S) (C03,C05)
‘666
‘766
‘866
‘966
A76(S)/A86(S) (C03,C25)
‘668
‘768
‘868
‘972
A76(S)/A86(S) (C05,C25)
‘671
‘771
‘871
‘971
A76(S)/A86(S) (C03,C05,C25)
‘672
‘772
‘872
‘972
A88(S)
‘681
‘781
‘881
‘981
-
‘880
‘980
A88(S) (C11)
1-30
Rel Eβ
Table 1-14 ACMS EEPROM/CPU Matrix (M1059-xxxxx)
Rel. A.0 to C.0
System Model
84/84S (Rel. C.0)
Options
Standard
C79
76/76S and 86/86S Standard
(Rel.B.0 and C.0) C79
C12
C12, C79
C80
C80, C79
J26
J26, C79
J26, C12
J26, C12, C79
J26, C80
J26, C79, C80
J26, C32
J26, C79, C32
88/88S
Standard
C79
C12
C12, C79
C80
C79, C80
J28
J28, C79
J28, C32
J28, C32, C79
J28, C12
J28, C12, C79
J28, C80
J28, C79, C80
J28, C11
J28, C11, C79
J28, C11, C80
J28, C11, C79, C80
Rel. A.0
—
—
-81060
-81061
—
—
-81062
-81063
-81070
-81071
—
—
-81072
-81073
—
—
-81080
-81081
—
—
-81082
-81083
-81090
-81091
—
—
—
—
-81092
-81093
-81095
-81096
-81097
-81098
Rel. B.0
—
—
-81160
-81161
-81162
-81163
-81160
-81161
-81170
-81171
-81172
-81173
-81170
-81171
—
—
-81180
-81181
-81182
-81183
-81180
-81181
-81190
-81191
—
—
-81192
-81193
-81190
-81191
-81190
-81191
-81190
-81191
Rel. C.0
-81242
-81243
-81262
-81263
-81262
-81263
-81262
-81263
-81272
-81273
-81272
-81273
-81272
-81270
-81274
-81275
-81282
-81283
-81282
-81283
-81282
-81283
-81292
-81293
-81294
-81295
-81292
-81293
-81292
-81293
-81292
-81293
-81292
-81293
Rel. C.1
-81342
-81343
-81362
-81363
-81362
-81363
-81362
-81363
-81372
-81373
-81372
-81373
-81372
-81370
-81374
-81375
-81382
-81383
-81382
-81383
-81382
-81383
-81392
-81393
-81394
-81395
-81392
-81393
-81392
-81393
-81392
-81393
-81392
-81393
Introducing the CMS
1-31
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
Table 1-15 NCMS EEPROM/CPU Matrix (M1059-85xxx)
Releases F and G
NCMS Model XX
40 MHz CPC Monitors
Rel F
Rel G
A36(S)/A46(S)
‘860
‘960
A36(S)/A46(S) (C10)
‘870
‘970
A48(S)
‘880
‘980
Table 1-16 NCMS EEPROM/CPU Matrix (M1059-xxxxx)
Releases A.0 to C.0
System
Model
Options
Rel.
A.0
Rel.
B.0
Rel.
C.0
Rel.
C.1
44/44S
Standard
—
—
-80220
-80320
C04
—
—
-80221
-80321
Standard
-80000
-80100
-80200
-80300
C04
-80001
-80101
-80201
-80301
C80
-80002
-80100
-80200
-80300
C04, C80
-80003
-80103
-80201
-80301
J28
-80010
-80110
-80210
-80310
J28, C04
-80011
-80111
-80211
-80311
J28, C80
-80012
-80110
-80210
-80310
J28, C04, C80
-80013
-80111
-80211
-80311
48/48S
1-32
Introducing the CMS
C32
—
—
-80214
-80314
C04, C32
—
—
-80215
-80315
Front Connectors
The front of the Computer Module contains two function cards with connectors, the Rack
Interface card connector in slot 18 and the CPC card connector in slot 12 in later releases.
The Rack Interface connector is used to collect output for the Computer Module from the
plug-in module rack (integral or blank) and the CPC Flash port is used by the CPC
Programming Tool for programming functions. Most models contain a Sheet Metal Cover
over the front function cards. The cover has two ports for access to the front connectors.
FRONT FUNCTION CARDS
SIT BEHIND SHEET METAL COVER
CPC FLASH
PORT
SHEET METAL
COVERING THE FRONT
FUNCTION CARDS
RACK INTERFACE
CONNECTOR PORT
INTEGRAL RACK
Figure 1-11 M1046A Computer Module Front Connectors
Introducing the CMS
1-33
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
Front Connectors on Computer Module M1046B
There are extra connectors on the front of the M1046B Computer Module with an integral
power supply.
Remote Switch
This connects the integral power supply to the backplane of the
computer module and allows the flatscreen display to control the
power for the Computer Module.
FE-Link &ECG
sync
These connectors are found on the AUX_CONNECTOR card in slot
24 to allow access to the RACK_IF card in slot 18 behind the power
supply. An ECG adapter allows you to connect to the ECG sync
connector through a hole in the front plastic cover.
CPC Connector
ECG Adaptor
FE-Link Connector
Remote_Switch
Connector
Rack-IF Connector
ECG Connector
FE-Link
Connector
Remote_Switch
Function Card
Rack_IF
Function Card
Figure 1-12 M1046B Computer Module Front Connectors
1-34
Introducing the CMS
Aux_Connector
Function Card
Rear Connectors
The rear panel of the Computer Module will have several connectors. The number and the
type of connectors present is dependent upon which function cards are fitted in the
Computer Module backplane. Any unused rear backplane function card slots are fitted
with blank slot covers. A typical Computer Module rear panel is shown below.
XGA or
Table 1-17 Computer Module Rear Connectors
Connector
Function
1
System Power Connector
(DC/DC Convertor)
15-pin “D”-type connector, used to input the 60V dc from either a Main CRT
Display Module or the Remote Power Supply Module if a flatscreen is used as the
main display.
For M1046B: The 60V dc is supplied from an integral power supply and a shorting
stub MUST be installed in this connector for the system to function correctly.
Note: Daisychaining is not permitted with the M1046B.
2
Equipotential Grounding
Terminal
Used to connect the Computer Module to the hospital's grounding system.
3
SDN Connectors
(SDN Interface)
Philips connectors, used to input/output information to/from a SDN network.
4
Human Interface Connector
(Utility CPU)
Human Interface Link (HIL) connector, used to input the information from the
Control Panel in the Main Display Module and the Handheld Keypad.
5
Nurse Paging Relay output
Mini-phone jack, used to connect to the hospital's Nurse Paging System.
6
Analog Interface Connector
37-pin “D” type connector configured as shown in Figure 1-13, used to output
information to analog devices.
Introducing the CMS
1-35
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
Table 1-17 Computer Module Rear Connectors
Connector
Function
7
RS232 Connectors
(RS232 Interface)
Two 25-pin “D” type connectors configured as shown in Figure 1-14, used to output
information to a printer or computer systems. Only the upper connector (port 2)
can be used to output RS232 information to printers.
8
HDLC Connector
Used to connect to a STRIP recorder, M1117A.
9
Video Out Connector
(CDSPC-Video or DSPC)
9-pin “D” type connector, used to output information to be displayed on the
Display Module. See Table 1-19 on page 1-37 lists the connector pinouts.
10
PS ON/OFF connector
(DSPC_Flat or CDSPC-XGA)
Used to control remotely the 60V DC output of the Remote Power Supply Module.
For M1046B with an integral power supply, this connector is not used except for
the XGA display configuration in which it is connected to the External Alarm
Device
11
Video Out Connector
(Flatscreen or XGA)
Used to output information to be displayed on the Flatscreen Display Module (25pin) or XGA Display (15-pin), and also to output 60V DC to the Flatscreen Display
Module. Table 1-19 Video / Power Connector on page 1-37 lists the connector
pinouts.
NOTE
No connection can be made to the following cards:
• APP_ CPU
• CDSPC_CRTL
• EPROM (including character set EPROMs, for example, Kanji)
• SRAM
Computer Module External Connector Pinouts
The following table lists the signals and appropriate notes for the pins on the Video Out
Connector (CRT).
Table 1-18 Video Out Connector
Pin\No
1-36
Introducing the CMS
Signal
Notes
1
Sync 1
(H sync - positive TTL level)
2
-
3
Red signal
(1 V peak positive)
4
Green signal
(1 V peak positive)
5
Blue signal
(1 V peak positive)
6
Sync 2
(L sync - positive TTL level)
7
-
8
-
9
Ground
The following table lists the signals for the pins on the Video Out connector (M1095A
Flatscreen). For the Video/Power input a male ‘SCSI’ connector with 25-pin pairs is used.
Note that an XGA display uses a standard 15-pin connector.
Table 1-19 Video / Power Connector
Pin Pair
Signal
1 / 26
Red 0
2 / 27
Red 1
3 / 28
Red 2
4 / 29
Red 3
5 / 30
Green 0
6 / 31
Green 1
7 / 32
Green 2
8 / 33
Green 3
9 / 34
Blue 0
10 / 35
Blue 1
11 / 36
Blue 2
12 / 37
Blue 3
13 / 38
HSYNC
14 / 39
VSYNC
15 / 40
BLANK
16 / 41
Backlight ON/OFF
17 / 42
ID_0 / ID_1
18 / 43
ID_2 / ID_GND
19 / 44
Pixel Clock
20 / 45
GND
21 / 46
free
22 / 47
23 / 48
FEPWR / FECOM (+60V)
24 / 49
FEPWR / FECOM (+60V)
25 / 50
Remote ON/OFF to Power Supply
Note: The shaded areas are differential signals.
Introducing the CMS
1-37
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
analog ground
37
analog ground
36
analog ground
35
analog ground
34
analog ground
33
analog ground
32
analog ground
31
analog ground
30
reserved
29
reserved
28
digital ground
27
digital ground
25
digital ground
24
digital ground
23
digital ground
22
digital ground
digital ground
shield (chassis ground)
18
analog channel 8
17
analog channel 7
16
analog channel 6
15
analog channel 5
14
analog channel 4
13
analog channel 3
12
analog channel 2
11
analog channel 1
10
reserved
9
digital port 7: low output = alarm recording active (for 20 sec.)
8
digital port 6: low output = no alarm recording
7
digital port 5: low output = no INOP
6
digital port 4: low output = no active alarm
5
digital port 3: low output = main alarms on
4
digital port 2: low output = no ECG INOP
3
digital port 1: low output = no active ECG alarm
2
digital port 0: low output = ECG alarms on
1
shield (chassis ground)
high output = alarm recording active (for 20 sec.)
26
digital ground
19
high output = no alarm recording
high output = INOP
high output = active alarm
high output = all alarms suspended
high output = ECG INOP
high output = active ECG alarm
21
20
high output = ECG alarms off
analcon.mif
25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14
Shield
Transmitter (TXD)
Receiver (RXD)
Request To Send (RTS)
Clear To Send (CTS)
Data Set Ready (DSR)
GND
Data Carrier Detect (DCD)
T422A
T422B
n/c
n/c
n/c
2 1
Figure 1-13 Analog Interface Connector
13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3
Introducing the CMS
Computer Module
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
R422B
n/c
Data Terminal Ready (DTR)
n/c
Ring Indicator (RI)
n/c
n/c
R422A
dtype.mif
Figure 1-14 RS232 Connector
1-38
Introducing the CMS
Mounting the CMS
For the latest mounting options available for your system, please refer to the following
website:
http://www3.medical.philips.com/resources/hsg/docs/en-us/custom/
pmd_ms_index_generic.asp
Connecting the CMS Cables
Once the CMS is mounted, the cables need to be connected. This section details the
procedures for connecting the terminated cable-ends to the local equipment and
faceplates as necessary.
The connections that can be made on the CMS are detailed for each component of the
system in turn.
The connections to
the Computer
Module and PlugIn Module Rack are
made using fully
terminated cables
from either other
equipment or from
Faceboxes/
Faceplates
To Connect the Computer Module and Plug-in Module Rack
The following figure shows all the possible connections to a Computer Module and the
Plug-in Module Rack. The rack has an input on the left (female 20-way LNL) and an output
on the right (male 20-way LNL).
Figure 1-15 Computer Module and Rack Cable Connections
Introducing the CMS
1-39
Introducing the CMS
Mounting the CMS
Introducing the CMS
Connecting the CMS Cables
NOTES
1. When the Computer Module and CRT Display Module are stacked together, only the ground
cable from the Display Module needs to be connected to the local grounding system.
2. The M1046B Computer Module allows access only to the Defib. Sync on the front cover. The
Satellite Rack is connected to the connector on the metal cover and a mains power cable is
connected to the integral power supply behind the plastic cover.
3. The M1046B Computer Module has standoffs for the feet and locking cam to allow space to
route the Satellite Rack and power cables under the Computer Module to the rear. See page 1-35.
1-40
Introducing the CMS
The connections
to the Master
Display Module
are made using
fully terminated
cables from either
other equipment
or from
Faceplates/
Faceboxes.
To Connect the CRT Display to the Computer Module
The following figure shows all the possible connections to the M1092A, M1094A, and
M1094B 14-inch Display Modules.
HIL to handheld keypad
M1092A and M1094A Display Units
M1094B Display Unit
U
U
U
U
DC/DC to
Computer Module
HIL from
Computer Module
Video to
Slave Display
To Mains
Power
Video to
Computer Module
DC/DC to
Computer Module
HIL from
Computer Module
To Mains Power
To local Ground
Video to
Computer Module
To local Ground
Video to
Slave Display
Figure 1-16 Display Module Cable Connections
NOTE
When a 14" Display is used as a slave, the connections for DC/DC and Philips-HIL are NOT
used.
Introducing the CMS
1-41
Introducing the CMS
Connecting the CMS Cables
Introducing the CMS
Connecting the CMS Cables
To Connect the Flatscreen Display to the Computer Module
Video/Power cable
HIL cable to Handheld Keypad
HIL cable to Computer Module
Figure 1-17 Flatscreen Display Module Cable Connections
The head of the 10m video cable is shrink-wrapped to facilitate passing through a narrow
conduit. To connect the video cable, remove the shrink-wrap and assemble the two halves
of the housing around the cable head, taking care to ensure that the cable hangs
downwards.
To Connect the XGA-Compatible Display to the Computer Module
Connect the video cable of the display to the Video Out Connector of the Computer
Module.
To Connect the Satellite Rack
Connect the male end of the cable to either the Computer Module or the Rack Output
connector on another Satellite Rack and connect the female end of the cable to the Rack
Input connector on this Satellite Rack.
To Connect the Strip Recorder
The handheld
keypad can only be
used with a Master
Display Module.
The connection to the strip recorder is made using a fully terminated cable connected to
either a faceplate or directly to the HDLC Interface card on the rear of the Computer
Module.
To Connect the Handheld Keypad to the CRT Display Module
Remove the small plastic insert on the Master Display Module (to the front right of the
brightness and contrast controls). This exposes the Philips-HIL connector.
Insert the handheld keypad connector (with prongs down) into the Philips-HIL connector
on the Master Display Module. This is located in the lower front right-hand corner. The
connector clicks into place.
1-42
Introducing the CMS
To Connect the Handheld Keypad to the External Alarm Device
HIL
cable
HIL to Keypad
Connect the HIL connector of the Keypad to the corresponding connector of the External
Alarm Device.
NOTE
To connect any of the three cables to the External Alarm Device, you must first remove
the connector cover. When the cables are plugged in, replace the cover.
To Connect the External Alarm Device to the Computer Module
Connect the Alarm Device’s Philips-HIL connector to the Philips-HIL connector of the
Computer Module using the HIL cable provided. Connect the Alarm Device’s On/Off
Switch connector to the On/Off Switch connector of the Computer Module using the
remote switch cable provided.
Consult the central
station service
manual for a list of
printers which can
be used at the
central station.
To Connect Printers and PCs
NOTE
Printers must only be connected to the Computer Module using the cable options (for
example, a 1.5m cable option M1181A #A50): all M1181A #A5** option numbers are for
RS232/422 cables.
The CMS can print reports locally or at the central station. The printers must support
Philips PCL Layer 3 Printer Commands. Local printers are connected to the RS-232 card in
the rear of the Computer Module. Printers without serial port require a serial-to-parallel
converter (Philips Part Number 5962-4340). This applies, for example, to the HP DeskJet
695C and the HP LaserJet 6P. Note that laser printers must contain at least 2 MB of RAM
in order to be used with the CMS.
For detailed information on how to configure local printers, please refer to “Local Jet
Printer Configurations” on page 3-37.
Introducing the CMS
1-43
Introducing the CMS
Connecting the CMS Cables
Introducing the CMS
Connecting the CMS Cables
Connecting External Computer Systems
An external personal computer can be connected to the CMS via the RS232 connector
(port 1): this option (#J13) is the Medical Computer Interface capability. If a second
RS232 card is supported in your monitor, the PC can then be connected through the
RS232 connector (port 3). Refer to the RS232 Computer Interface Programming Guide for
a comprehensive description of the option's capabilities.
With Option #J13, the following parameter module data can be accessed:
All wave, numeric and alarm data.
All external device data interfaced by the CMS through VueLink.
NOTE
1-44
Personal Computer Systems must only be connected to the RS232 connector on the
Computer Module using the cable options (for example, a 1.5m cable option M1181A
#A50).
Introducing the CMS
Configuring and Adjusting Displays
Introduction
When a new display is connected to the CMS, it needs to be adjusted so that all
information is visible. If you are connecting a standard XGA display, please refer to the
section entitled “XGA Display Adjustments” on page 1-46.
When a new touchscreen display is connected to the CMS, it needs to be configured and
calibrated. After the display has been configured and calibrated, a functionality test must
be performed. This procedure comprises of:
• RS-232 port configuration.
• Check and fine tuning of screen adjustment.
• Touch screen configuration and calibration.
If you are connecting a standard touchscreen display, please follow the instructions in
Configuring the RS-232 Port
To configure an appropriate RS-232 port for the Touch Screen
Step 1 Switch to Configuration Mode and press:
Monitor Setup
→
RS232
→
Touch
The following table shows the supported RS-232 configuration settings of one card:
Table 1-20 RS-232 Configuration Settings
Upper Port
Computer Off
AGM
Lower Port
Computer On
Upper Port
Touch
Lower Port
Computer On
Touch
Computer Off
Mouse
Mouse
AGM
AGM
VENT
VENT
Computer Off
VENT
Computer Off
Touch
Touch
Mouse
Mouse
VENT
AGM
Introducing the CMS
1-45
Introducing the CMS
Configuring and Adjusting Displays
Introducing the CMS
Configuring and Adjusting Displays
Step 2 Restart the CMS.
The RS-232 interface is now configured for Touch operation and the new Touch Setup
softkey is available from the Monitor Setup window when in Configuration Mode.
NOTE
Once Touch or Mouse configurations are made, the CMS Monitor must be restarted in
order to activate the new configuration settings.
NOTE
Multiple AGM, VENT, Touch or Mouse configurations are not supported.
XGA Display Adjustments
When setting up the M1097A XGA color flatscreen display, make sure that the whole
image (all pixels) is visible on the display.
To test this and to make any adjustments:
Step 1 Go to Service Mode by pressing
Monitor Setup
followed by Operating Modes .
Step 2 Enter the password and select Service , then press Confirm .
Step 3 When the main screen is displayed, press the fourth (middle) function key on the
keypad.
You should see lines on the display, showing a cross right through the middle of the
screen and a frame bordering the whole screen.
Step 4 If you do not see the whole frame, adjust the display accordingly.
1-46
Introducing the CMS
NOTE
If you are adjusting a touchscreen monitor, please do a new calibration to make sure that
the screen responds in the expected way.
Calibrating the Touch Screen
Once the RS-232 interface is configured for Touch operation, the CMS is able to
communicate with the touch screen. If there is a communication problem between the
CMS and the touch screen, the following message will be displayed:
Touch Operation Not Available - Check Setup
If communication is possible but the touch screen has not been calibrated, the following
message will be displayed:
Touch Operation Not Calibrated - Check Setup
To calibrate the touch screen:
Step 1 Switch to Configuration Mode and press:
Monitor Setup
→ Touch Setup
The Touch Screen Setup window is displayed with a list of the step to be followed.
Step 2 Press the Start Calibr key on the touch screen to start calibration of the
touch screen.
Step 3 Tap the active (bright) cross sign target. Each target will in turn become active.
Repeat the selection of each active target until all 5 targets have been selected.
Calibration will now be carried out internally.
Step 4 If calibration is successful, the following message is displayed:
Introducing the CMS
1-47
Introducing the CMS
Configuring and Adjusting Displays
Introducing the CMS
Configuring and Adjusting Displays
Calibration completed, press <store settings>
Step 5 Press the Store Settings softkey.
Performing the Functionality Test
After successfully calibrating the touch screen, complete the following test to check that
the performance of the touch screen is correct:
Step 1 Switch to Monitoring Mode. Icons for Silence/Reset, Suspend and Control should be seen on the screen.
Step 2 Touch the Suspend button repeatedly. The alarms should switch between
Alarms Switched ON and Alarms Suspended.
Step 3 Touch the Control Panel button. The Control Panel task window
should be displayed.
Step 4 In the Control Panel task window, repeatedly touch the
Suspend Alarms softkey. The alarms should switch between Alarms
Switched ON and Alarms Suspended.
Step 5 Touch outside the Control Panel task window should close the task window.
Step 6 Touch any location on the screen.
Step 7 Check to see that a sign (+ or x) is displayed at the location that was touched.
Step 8 Repeat calibration if the confirmation sign is not acceptably close to the location
that was touched and test again.
1-48
Introducing the CMS
Configuring the Mouse or Trackball
Introduction
When a new mouse or trackball is connected to the CMS, the RS-232 port it is connected
to, needs to be appropriately configured. After the RS-232 interface has been configured
the mouse or trackball is operational. However, the response speed of the mouse or
trackball can be adjusted.
Configuring the RS-232 Port
To configure an appropriate RS-232 port for the mouse or trackball
Step 1 Switch to Configuration Mode and press:
Monitor Setup
→
RS232
→
Mouse
Table 1-20 RS-232 Configuration Settings on page 1-45 shows the supported RS-232
configuration settings of one card:
Step 2 Restart the CMS.
The RS-232 interface is now configured for Mouse operation and the new
Mouse Setup softkey is available from the Monitor Setup window when in
Configuration Mode. Once Touch or Mouse configurations are made, the CMS Monitor
must be restarted in order to activate the new configuration settings.
NOTE
Multiple AGM, VENT, Touch or Mouse configurations are not supported.
Performing the Functionality Test
After connecting a mouse or trackball, complete the following test to check that the
performance of the mouse or trackball is correct:
Step 1 Switch to Monitoring Mode.
Icons for Silence/Reset, Suspend and Control should be seen on the
screen.
A cursor sign (+ or x) is displayed and should move when the mouse/trackball is
moved.
A black or white border should be visible on or around any accessible target.
Introducing the CMS
1-49
Introducing the CMS
Configuring the Mouse or Trackball
Introducing the CMS
Configuring the Mouse or Trackball
Step 2 Click the Suspend button repeatedly. The alarms should switch between
Alarms Switched ON and Alarms Suspended. There should also be a
“click” sound when clicking into this field.
Step 3 Click the Control Panel button. The Control Panel task window
should be displayed.
Step 4 In the Control Panel task window, repeatedly click the
Suspend Alarms softkey. The alarms should switch between Alarms
Switched ON and Alarms Suspended.
Step 5 Click outside the Control Panel task window should close the task window.
Step 6 Move the cursor to any location on the screen. The cursor sign should change
shape (+ or x) depending on whether or not it is placed over an active target.
Adjusting the Pointer Speed of the Mouse or Trackball (Optional)
Once the RS-232 interface is configured for Mouse operation, the CMS is able to
communicate with the mouse or trackball and normal operation is possible. The pointer
speed of the mouse or trackball can however be adjusted if desired.
To adjust the response of the mouse or trackball:
Step 1 Switch to Configuration Mode and press:
Monitor Setup
→ Mouse Setup
The Mouse Setup window is displayed with a list of the step to be followed.
Step 2 Adjust the speed of the mouse by use of the Select Speed up and down
arrows.
Step 3 Press the Store Settings softkey.
1-50
Introducing the CMS
Integral Power Supply - Computer Module (M1046B)
The M1046B Computer Modules use a flatscreen M1095A or XGA display as the main
display. The power supply previously located in the Remote Power Supply is replaced by
an Integral Power Supply located in this Computer Module (M1046B).
Note: Daisy-chaining is not permitted with the M1046B Computer Module.
Integral Power Supply - Connectors and Controls
Power
Indicator
(1)
Fuse Holders
(3)
Power
Connector
(4)
Remote_Switch
Card Connector
(2)
Figure 1-18 Integral Power Supply Connectors and Controls
Table 1-21 Integral Power Supply Controls and Connectors
Controls and Connectors
Function
1
LED mains power indicator
This indicates that the Integral Power Supply is connected to the local power.
2
REMOTE_SWITCH card connector
This is a cable-end connector, used to connect the Integral Power Supply to the
REMOTE_SWITCH card in the Computer Module.
3
Fuse Holders
Two fuse holders for the line protection fuses. (2 x 3.15 A H)
4
Local Power Connector
This is a 3-pin connector, used to input the local line voltage.
Introducing the CMS
1-51
Introducing the CMS
Integral Power Supply - Computer Module (M1046B)
Introducing the CMS
Remote Power Supply
Remote Power Supply
The CMS can use the flatscreen M1095A as the main display instead of a CRT display and
the M1046A Computer Module. For older CMS models (prior to the introduction of the
M1046B Module), the power supply located in the main CRT display is replaced by a
Remote Power Supply.
Front Panel Controls - Remote Power Supply
The controls on the front panel of the Remote Power Supply are shown below:
1
2
Figure 1-19 Remote Power Supply Front Panel
Table 1-22 Remote Power Supply Controls and Connectors
1-52
Controls
Function
1
ON/OFF Switch
Used to turn the Remote Power Supply ON/OFF.
2
Power ON indicator
Green LED which is lit when the power supply is switched ON.
Introducing the CMS
Remote Power Supply - Rear Controls and Connectors
The controls on the rear panel of the Remote Power Supply are shown below:
Figure 1-20 Remote Power Supply Rear Panel
Table 1-23 Remote Power Supply Rear Panel Controls and Connectors
Controls and Connectors
Function
1
Remote ON/OFF Input
This cable connects the Power Supply to the video interface board (located in
the CMS Computer Module). It is a female “modular jack” connector with 6pins, used to input the power supply output ON/OFF signal from the Flatscreen
Display.
2
60 V DC (120W max) Output
This is a female 15-pin Sub-D-Type connector, used to output the 60 V dc line
voltage to the Computer Module.
3
Fuse Holders
Two fuse holders for the line protection fuses.
4
Local Power Connector
This is a 3-pin connector, used to input the local line voltage.
5
Equipotential Grounding Terminal
This is a grounding stud connector, used to connect the system to an
equipotential grounding system.
Introducing the CMS
1-53
Introducing the CMS
Remote Power Supply
Introducing the CMS
Fuse Values
Fuse Values
All CRT Display Modules, main and slave, remote power supply and the integral power
supply, contain system fuses. The fuse values for each are recorded on a label near the
fuse holders. The following table gives the fuse values for the CRT Display Modules, the
Remote Power Supply, and the integral power supply located in the M1046B Computer
Module and refers you to the page number that contains an illustration showing the fuse
positions.
Table 1-24 CMS Fuses
Line Voltage
100-120 V
Line Voltage
200-240 V
CRT Display Type / Power Supply Type
Fuse Rating
Page
Location
Part Number
Part
Number
Fuse Rating
VDE
UL
M1092A Mono CRT Display (Main / Slave)
2 x T4.0 A
2110-0365
2 x T2.0 A
24220862
5096FMI
24220860
1266FMI
1-12 / 1-15
M1094A Color CRT Display (Main / Slave)
2 x T4.0 A
2110-0365
2 x T2.5 A
24220861
0219FMI
24220861
0009FMI
1-12 / 1-15
M1094B Color CRT Display (Main / Slave)
2 x T4.0 A
2110-0365
2 x T3.15 A H 242208610239FMI
1-12 / 1-15
M1047A Remote Power Supply
2 x T4.0 A
2110-0365
2 x T3.15 A H 242208610239FMI
1-53
M1046B Integral Power Supply
2 x T3.15 A H 2110-1025
2 x T3.15 A H 242208610239FMI
1-51
1-54
Introducing the CMS
Plug-in Module Racks
The Plug-in Module Rack of the CMS is the interface between the Plug-in Modules and the
Computer Module. The racks can be either integral, located in the M1046A Computer
Module or satellite, located in the patient vicinity connected by a cable to the rack
interface of the Computer Module (M1046A or M1046B). Satellite Racks can also be daisychained, depending on how many modules your system can support. Three plug-in
module racks are currently supported by the monitor: 8-slot integral rack, M1043A, 8-slot
Satellite Rack M1041A and 6-slot rack of the Philips Component Transport System,
M1276A.
A blank rack is also available for the M1046A Computer Module. The blank rack is used if
you do not require plug-in modules to be placed close to the Computer Module. The blank
rack acts as the connection between the Satellite Rack and the Computer Module.
Objective
In order to meet this section’s goals, you should be able to:
• Identify the connectors of the plug-in module racks.
• Be familiar with the function of the plug-in module racks.
Concepts
The plug-in module racks of CMS are not fitted with any controls, just connectors. The
function of the rack is to connect the plug-in modules to the Computer Module. A
standard CMS integral rack contains eight slots for plug-in modules. Modules can be
single-width modules or double-width modules so the number per rack depends on which
plug-in modules are being used. To accommodate more modules, you can daisy-chain
Satellite Racks to the rack in the Computer Module. The number of monitoring slots
supported depends on the model of your monitor.
Integral Rack
The integral rack is a plastic rack that sits in the front of the M1046A
Computer Module and connects the plug-in modules to the system. It
contains a rack interface connector, a defibrillator connector,
module connectors and a rear internal rack connector.
Satellite Rack
The Satellite Rack is a plastic rack that is remote to the Computer
Module and connects plug-in modules to the system. It connects by a
cable to a rack interface connector to route the data between the
plug-in modules and the Computer Module. It contains input and
output rack interface connectors and module connectors, but it does
not have a defibrillator connector.
Blank Rack
The blank rack is a plastic rack that sits in the front of the M1046A
Computer Module and provides connections for a defibrillator and
Introducing the CMS
1-55
Introducing the CMS
Plug-in Module Racks
Introducing the CMS
Plug-in Module Racks
Satellite Racks to the system. It is used if you do not require plug-in
modules to be placed close to the M1046A Computer Module.
Front and Rear Connectors
Internal Rack Connector (Rear)
(4)
Defibrillator
Connector
(2)
mar3a
Rack Interface
Connector
(1)
Module
Connectors
(3)
Figure 1-21 Integral Plug-in Module Rack M1043A
Table 1-25 Plug-in Module Rack Connectors
Connector
1-56
Function
1
Rack Interface
Connector
2
Defibrillator
Connector
0.25" phone socket, used to output an ECG wave to synchronize a
defibrillator and provide an input for the defibrillator marker signal. It is
also used as an output of ECG waveforms during the specification tests. See
Parts List for ECG-Sync Cables.
3
Module Connectors
Female plug-in module connectors, used to input the information from the
plug-in modules to the integral rack.
4
Internal Rack
Connector
Rack Interface connector (located on rear of the integral rack or blank
rack), used to output the information from the rack to the Rack Interface
function card placed in slot 18 of the Computer Module.
Introducing the CMS
Female interface connector, used to daisy-chain Satellite Racks.
93mm
(3.7")
Rack Input Connector (Rear)
(5)
Rack Output Connector (Rear)
(6)
138mm
(5.5")
418mm
(16.5")
Figure 1-22 Satellite Plug-in Module Rack M1041A with Parameter Modules
Table 1-26 Plug-in Module Rack Connectors
Connector
Function
5
Rack Input
Connector
Male Rack Interface Connector, used to connect the Satellite
Rack to the Computer Module or to the previous rack in the
chain.
6
Rack Output
Connector
Female Rack Interface Connector, used to connect the
Satellite Rack to the next rack in the chain.
Introducing the CMS
1-57
Introducing the CMS
Plug-in Module Racks
Introducing the CMS
Plug-in Modules
Plug-in Modules
The plug-in parameter modules of the CMS can be thought of as the specialists of the
monitor. Each module carries out a specific task and can be moved from one monitor to
another, depending upon the functionality of the respective monitors. Plug-in modules are
labeled with a symbol or the name of the measurement that they perform.
Objective
In order to meet this section’s goals, you should be able to:
• Identify the controls found on the front of plug-in modules.
• Be familiar with the function of the controls of the plug-in modules.
• Identify the connectors found on the front and rear of plug-in modules.
Concepts
The plug-in modules of CMS have one or more hardkeys on the front panel. The hardkey
labeled with the parameter name is the setup key, which lights up the setup indicator and
gets you directly into the Task Window for that parameter.
The connector socket on the front of each module varies, but it is the same color as the
corresponding connector plug on the transducer or patient cable for that module. The
connector on the rear panel of each plug-in module is a male connector, used to supply
power and allow communication from the module to the module rack.
Plug-in modules can be either single-width or double-width units. A single-width module
will occupy one slot in a module rack while a double-width module will require two-slots.
Therefore, you must consider the width of the plug-in modules and number of slots that
you have available to determine how many modules you can use in a single monitor. See
Appendix A Product Information for more module information.
1-58
Parameter
The parameter of the plug-in module is the specific clinical
measurement performed by the module. Some modules, like the
ECG/Resp module, are capable of monitoring more than one
parameter.
Single-width
Module
Double-width
Module
A module that occupies only one slot in the module rack.
Introducing the CMS
A module that occupies two slots in the module rack.
Plug-In Module Control Panel Keys and Indicators
The following drawings represent the types of controls, indicators and connectors found
on the front panels of the plug-in modules. The controls, indicators and connections are
described in the following table.
NBP
M1008B
CO2
T
(7)
NBP
STAT
START STOP
(1)
(5)
(6)
(3)
REC
(1)
(2)
(8)
(1)
M1006B
T
PRESS ZERO
(10)
12
PIN
12
PIN
TEMP M1029A T
ECG/RESP T
(16)
M1116B
(9)
CAL
CO 2
(15)
PRESS
T
(2)
(4)
(2)
M1016A
(16)
M1002A
(2)
(11)
RUN/
CONT
STOP
TEMP
M1006A
PRESS ZERO
VueLink
M1032A
AUXILIARY
T
A
(14)
(2)
VueLink
O2/CO2 CAL
5uv/V/mm Hg
TRANSDUCERS
ONLY
(19)
(2)
(1)
(1)
CAUTION: OUTPUT HAS
OFFSET ON 6 AND 10 SCALE
CAUTION:
(16)
(1)
12
PIN
(16)
M1018A
(2)
(18)
(17)
tcpO2/tcpCO 2 T
T
80x100
PRESS OUT
(1)
RESP
(12)
(13)
2
PIN
PRESS
(2)
ECG
(20)
(16)
Figure 1-23 Examples of the Plug-in Module Front Panels
Introducing the CMS
1-59
Introducing the CMS
Plug-in Modules
Introducing the CMS
Plug-in Modules
Table 1-27 Plug-in Module Controls and Connectors
General Controls
Function
1
Setup Key
Used to enter the module setup screen or Task Window.
2
Setup Indicator
Green LED lit when in the module setup screen.
3
Start Key
Used to start a measurement cycle.
4
Start Indicator
Green LED which will be lit when the measurement cycle is entered.
5
Stop Key
Used to stop the measurement cycle.
6
Stat Key
Used to start a Static measurement cycle.
7
Stat Indicator
Green LED lit when the static measurement cycle is entered.
8
CAL Key
Used to enter the module's calibration screen and initiate module calibration procedures.
9
CAL Indicator
Green LED lit during a module calibration procedure.
10
Zero Key
Used to zero a transducer without using the main display controls.
11
Continue LED
Lights if the current recording is continuous. The LED also blinks twice when the module is
first plugged in. This indicates that the recorder self-test has been completed successfully.
12
RUN/CONT Key
Used to start a Mode A continuous real-time recording, if the recorder is not running. If the
recorder is running, it makes the current recording continuous (if possible).
13
STOP Key
Stops the current recording.
14
Labels
Labels giving names of the external devices to which the VueLink module can be connected
and an LED beside each label, indicating the selected device.
15
NBP Connector
Standard NBP connector for connection to the cuff.
16
12-pin Connector
Standard 12-pin connector for use with Transducers. Refer to the tables on page 1-63.
17
2-pin Connector
Standard 2-pin connector for use with standard series temperature probes.
18
Analog Output Jack
Standard 1/4 inch phone jack used to provide analog signals to an intra-aortic balloon pump
on the M1006A Option #C01. The M1006B Option #C01 has 3.5mm phone jack socket,
supplied with adapter for those customers who have been using a 6.3mm (1/4 inch) phone
jack.
19
Calibration Chamber Calibration chamber, with gas inlet for tcpO2/tcpCO2 module.
20
20-pin Connector
1-60
20-pin connector for use with a tcpO2/tcpCO2 transducer.
Introducing the CMS
The following is the front panel of the SideStream CO2 module.
(2)
(3)
M1015A
(1)
(4)
(6)
(5)
Figure 1-24 Sidestream CO2 Module Controls and Connectors
Table 1-28 Sidestream CO2 Module
Connector
Function
1
Gas Outlet Connector
Lets out the gas after it has been sampled.
2
Gas Inlet Connector
Provides the connection for the sample tubing (and bacterial
filter) which receives the patient's gas sample.
3
Slide Cover
Protects the gas inlet connector when the module is not in
use.
4
Sample Cell
The CO2 transducer is mounted on the sample cell of the
sidestream module. The transducer plug is connected to the
M1016A CO2 Plug-in Module.
5
Switch
Activates the sidestream pump when the CO2 transducer is
mounted on the sample cell.
6
Mounting Clamp
Holds the CO2 transducer in place.
Introducing the CMS
1-61
Introducing the CMS
Plug-in Modules
Introducing the CMS
Plug-in Modules
The following are the front and rear panels of the Blood Analysis Module:
(2)
(3)
(1)
(5)
(4)
(6)
(7)
Figure 1-25 Blood Analysis Module
Table 1-29 Blood Analysis Module Controls and Connectors
1-62
Control/Connector
Function
1
Setup Key
Used to enter the Blood Analysis Setup or Results screen.
2
Setup Indicator
Green LED lit when in Blood Analysis screens.
3
Cartridge Locked Indicator
Green LED blinks when a cartridge is being processed; the
cartridge must be left in the slot until the blinking stops and
the light is off.
4
Cartridge Insertion Slot
The cartridge is inserted here for processing.
5
Identification Label
Contains product serial number and identification details.
6
Software Update Link Connector
For connecting to the Central Data Station (or other PC) to
perform software upgrades. During the upgrade process, the
module is powered via this link.
7
Parameter Module Connector
Connects the module to the rack.
Introducing the CMS
Plug-in Module Pin-outs
There are several types of connectors found on the front of the plug-in modules. The
following tables give the pin-out information for the plug-in modules that contain front
panel connectors.
Table 1-30 Parameter Module Connector Signals
Parameter Module
ECG
M1001A/B
ECG/Resp
M1002A/B
1
right arm
right arm + resp Shield
(M1006B)
2
right leg
right leg
-
Pin
#
Pressure
M1006A/B
C.O.
M1012A
CO2
M1016A
-
detector
signal
GND
FIO2
M1017A
SpO2/Pleth
M1020A
EEG
M1027A
-
signal
(photocurrent)
EEG1–
detector
bias
-
GND + shield
REF
3
-
-
-
injectate
temp
heater
return
-
resistor code 1
-
4
-
-
-
GND
drive coil
-
LED com
-
jumper to 8
blood
temp
sense coil
-
resistor code 2
EEG1+
5
chest
chest
6
left leg
left leg + resp
-
code
resistor
GND
-
LED com
EEG2–
7
left arm
left arm
-
GND
IR-source
-
LED 12
EEG2+
heater
power
-
LED 34
-
GND
-
8
-
-
jumper to 5
A
-
-
– excitation start key
(to C)
GND
feedback
resistor
B
-
-
+ input
GND
input
current
C
shield
D
-
shield
-
-
-
-
-
+ excitation start key
temp.
polarization
sense high voltage
-
shield
+ input
temp.
sense low
-
shorted to C
-
-
Introducing the CMS
1-63
Introducing the CMS
Plug-in Modules
Introducing the CMS
Plug-in Modules
Table 1-31 More Parameter Module Connector Signals
Parameter Module
Pin
Number
tcpO2/CO2 M1018A
VueLink M1032A
1
GND
Analog 1
2
Temp Sensor 1 (NTC1)
Analog 2
Analog RXD
3
Temp Sensor 1 (NTC2)
Analog 3-Ring Indicator
Analog GND
4
GND
Analog 4-Data carrier
Detected
n.a.
5
+5V
(transducer supply voltage)
Analog 5-Data Send Ready
n.a.
6
- 9V
(transducer supply voltage)
Analog 6-Data Terminal
Ready
+ 12V (heater regulator antinodal signal Amp.
supply voltage)
7
Polarization voltage
Analog 7-Clear to Send
- 9V (Analog Signal Amp.supply voltage)
8
O2 Input
Analog 8-Read to Send
n.a
9
GND
Digital ground
n.a.
10
Transducer Code (not used)
Transmit Data
+ 5V (Serial Comm. and EEPROM supply
voltage)
11
Heater current return
Receive Data
- 12 V (heater supply voltage)
12
Heater current send
Analog ground
SER GND (Power supply ground for Serial
Comm. and EEPROM)
13
CO2 Input
n.a.
Chip-Select-Signal EEPROM
14
Temp 2 Input
n.a.
Clock Signal EEPROM
n.a.
Serial Data In/Out (bi-directional)
15
-
n.a.
16
Transducer Code (O2)
n.a.
Current Diode A
17
GND
n.a.
Current Diode B
18
Transducer Code (CO2)
n.a.
Current Diode C
LED GND (ground for LED current lines)
19
-
n.a.
20
-
n.a.
11
12
1
10
2
9
3
4
8
7
1-64
Sv02 M1021A
Connector signals to and from the Abbott
Optical Module (50131-04)
Introducing the CMS
6
5
Pin numbers (frontal) of
the VueLink connector
-
Operating Modes
There are four operating modes for the CMS: Monitoring, Service, Demo, and
Configuration Mode. The only mode that supports monitoring is the Monitoring Mode. All
modes are entered through passwords to prevent unintentional mode changes. From Rel.
C.0 returning to monitoring mode is allowed without entering a password.
Objective
In order to meet this section’s goals, you should be able to:
• Identify the monitoring modes of CMS.
• Be familiar with the function of the monitoring modes of CMS.
Concepts
The operating modes of CMS are designed for specific tasks.
• Monitoring Mode is the standard operating mode that supports patient monitoring.
• Service Mode is used to perform service functions.
• Demo Mode is used to demonstrate the functions of the system.
• Configuration Mode is used to modify the behavior of the system.
Monitoring Mode is the only mode that should be used on a monitor that is attached to a
patient. To ensure that the operating mode is not changed by unauthorized personnel,
passwords are required to change operating modes.
When you change the operating mode of the monitor, you reset the patient database and
all temporary changes that you have made to the system. This is why the system will
always display a warning message “Patient data cleared - Settings reset” and ask you to
confirm the action before it changes operating modes.
Main Screen
This screen shows the waveforms and numerical readouts of the
parameters you have chosen to monitor: alarms, INOP messages,
bed label, date and time, and arrhythmia messages (when assigned).
Selection
Window
The Selection Window is the first operating level where you can
choose a specific activity or function. It is entered through a hardkey
on the Control Panel or the Handheld Keypad.
Task Window
The Task Window is the second operating level which allows you to
make changes or adjustments to the parameters and screen displays,
or to perform procedures. It is entered through a softkey in the
Selection Window or directly through the Control Panel of the plugin module.
Introducing the CMS
1-65
Introducing the CMS
Operating Modes
Introducing the CMS
Operating Modes
Status Message
The status message is a string of text displayed in the top center of
the screen below the date and time. A message is displayed in status
line to indicate the current operating mode if not Monitoring.
Operating Rules to Remember
• Pressing the Main Screen or Standard Display hardkey always returns you to the
main screen.
• To get into a Selection Window press a hardkey.
• Active softkeys are highlighted and/or look like “pushed-in” buttons (3-D effect).
• Softkeys only function in the Selection and Task Windows.
• The parameter module setup key gets you directly into a Task Window.
• The arrow keys and Confirm key are always illuminated when available for use.
• If after pressing a setup key the LED is not lit, the system is busy and the setup screen
cannot be entered. The setup key must be pressed again. If you continue to have
problems see the troubleshooting chapter.
• When an operating mode is entered or left, all monitoring settings are reset to the user
defaults and the database is cleared.
Identifying Monitoring Mode
Monitoring Mode is the standard mode and is used when the monitor is attached to a
patient. No other mode should be used when a patient is connected to a monitor. In this
mode you will have access to three types of screens: the Main Screen, the Selection
Windows and Task Windows. Through these screens you can make temporary changes to
customize the parameter settings and the monitor setup as well as perform all of the
monitoring tasks of CMS.
When you are in monitoring mode, you will see active messages on the screen indicating
the status of the patient and the monitor. INOP messages are displayed in the upper lefthand corner of the display and alarm message in the upper right. When the monitor is in
any mode other than Monitoring Mode, you will find a text message in the status line that
indicates the active mode.
The Demo Mode
does not support
patient monitoring
and should never be
active while a
patient is attached
to the monitor.
1-66
Identifying Demo Mode
Demo Mode is the mode used to demonstrate the monitoring functions of the system. It
provides the user with sample waves and screens but it does not support monitoring and
should not be used when a patient is attached to the monitor. All three levels of
monitoring screens are available in Demo Mode: Main Screen, Selection Window and Task
Window. Demo Mode demonstrates the modules that are currently plugged into the
monitor so don’t expect to see waves for modules that are not in the rack.
Introducing the CMS
To clearly identify the Demo mode, a text message is displayed in the status prompt. The
message reads “DEMO Mode Active - NO MONITORING”. If your monitor is running
Release E or later, the message “DEMO” is displayed in inverse low-intensity white
characters in the first wave channel underneath the status prompt line. This message is
alternatively displayed to two lines of normal characters in the same inverse block telling
the user “to exit: press CONFIRM”. To leave Demo Mode in systems running Release D or
earlier, you must use the standard procedure of using a password to change the operating
mode. Either way, leaving Demo Mode or any other mode causes the patient data to be
cleared and the settings to be reset.
Identifying Configuration Mode
The Config Mode
does not support
patient monitoring
and should never be
active while a
patient is attached
to the monitor.
The Configuration Mode is the operating mode used to change the monitoring behavior
and screen layout. This mode is used to customize the monitor to meet your hospital’s
monitoring protocols. When you make changes in the Config Mode, you are creating
permanent user settings to replace the standard factory settings that came with the
monitor. A cold start or operating mode change will clear the patient data and reset any
temporary changes you made in Monitoring Mode to the permanent user settings you
made in Config Mode.
To clearly identify the Config Mode, a text message is displayed in the status prompt. The
message reads “Config Mode Active - NO MONITORING”. No waveforms, INOPS or
alarms are displayed in Config Mode. Like the other operating modes, you must input a
password to enter and exit the Config Mode.
Identifying Service Mode
The Service Mode
does not support
patient monitoring
and should never be
active while a
patient is attached
to the monitor.
The service mode is the operating mode used by service personnel to access complete
error message listings and perform service related tasks, like specification tests. The
Service Mode is also used to troubleshoot the monitor.
To clearly identify the Service Mode, a text message is displayed in the status prompt. The
message reads “Service Mode Active - NO MONITORING”. No waveforms, INOPS or
alarms are displayed in Service Mode. Like the other operating modes, you must input a
password to enter and exit the Service Mode.
Introducing the CMS
1-67
Introducing the CMS
Operating Modes
Introducing the CMS
Operating Modes
Changing Operating Modes
Now that you know about the various operating modes of CMS, let’s look at how to move
between two operating modes. This requires operating mode-specific passwords. Modespecific passwords guard against unauthorized changes to the monitor.
The operating modes of CMS can be changed using the following sequence of keys and
passwords.
Note: From Rel. C.0, returning to monitoring mode is allowed without entering a
password. Just press Monitor Setup followed by Resume Monitor .
Table 1-32 Procedure to Change Operating Mode
Step
Action
Comment
1
Press
(or
2
Press
3
Press
4
Enter the password.
Configuration Mode: 1245
Demo Mode: 14432a
Service Mode: 4311
Master Password: 14432a
5
Press
6
Select the required Operating Mode.
Use the arrow keys or press the Change Opmode
softkey.
7
Press
The system performs a cold-start and switches
operating modes.
Monitor Setup
More Choices
Instrument Config
if available
Operating Modes softkey
Change OpMode
Confirm
.
)
The monitor setup or instrument configuration
Selection Window is displayed.
Shows additional choices for softkeys in this
Selection Window.
The Operating Mode Task Window displays the
current operating mode in words (for example,
“Operating Mode - Monitoring”) and prompts for the
password.
Use the keys labeled 1 to 5. If the password is
correct, then the Change OpMode softkey is
highlighted. If the password is incorrect, the system
returns to the Standard Display.
softkey
The Operating Mode Task Window displays both
Monitor and Config in reverse video, with the
current operating mode highlighted.
a. Note: Use of this password allows access to all operating modes
1-68
Introducing the CMS
The first section in this chapter describes the procedures required to ensure that the CMS
is in safe working order. The following sections describe recommended procedures for
maintaining the equipment. These procedures apply to all versions of the CMS. The
procedures are grouped as follows:
Mandatory Periodic Maintenance and Safety Checks
• Performance and Safety Test requirements
• Preventive Maintenance Procedure for the CMS Wall Mount Assembly
Recommended Maintenance Procedures
• General Inspections of the System
• Cleaning and Disinfecting Procedures for the CMS
See “Procedure Overview” on page 2-2 for a more detailed overview.
Objectives
In order to meet the chapter’s goals, you should be able to:
• Perform required safety checks and maintenance procedures.
• Perform a general inspection of the system.
• Clean the major units of the CMS.
Concepts
The Philips CMS Patient Monitoring System has different levels of preventive
maintenance and checks that should be performed on a periodic basis or as
recommended.
If you wish to perform more detailed tests on the plug-in parameter modules, please see
Chapter 4 “Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules”.
The procedures described in this chapter should be performed at the specified time
intervals to ensure effective preventive maintenance. The checklist may be photocopied,
completed by the maintainer, and filed for reference.
Testing & Maintaining the CMS 2-1
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Chapter 2 Testing & Maintaining the CMS
Procedure Overview
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Procedure Overview
Table 2-1 Mandatory Periodic Maintenance and Safety Checks
Procedure
Steps
Page
“Test and Inspection Requirements”
When to Perform Test Blocks
Tests and Inspection Requirements
Safety Tests
Safety Test Diagrams
2-3
2-5
2-11
2-12
“Preventive Maintenance Procedure for the
Philips M1180A #A01 and #A02 Wall Mount
Assembly”
Step 1: Inspect visible fasteners
Step 2: Check maximum tilt range
Step 3: Inspect mounting plate for movement
2-15
2-17
2-17
Table 2-2 Recommended Maintenance Procedures
Procedure
Steps
Page
“General Inspections of the System”
Inspect the System Hardware
Inspect the Cables
Inspect the Red Power Indicators (LEDs) of the System
Inspect the Display CRT / LCD
Inspect the Controls of the System
2-19
2-20
2-20
2-21
2-22
“Cleaning and Disinfecting Procedures”
General Cleaning of the System
General Disinfecting of the System
Cleaning the Recorder Module
Cleaning the Blood Analysis Module
2-24
2-25
2-26
2-27
2-2
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
Test and Inspection Requirements
NOTE
The Test and Inspections Procedures described in this section are mandatory requirements.
This section is intended primarily for Philips customer engineers and lists the mandatory
test requirements for CMS for servicing, installation and preventive maintenance. For
some tests it is required that the Philips engineer documents the results in a service
record.
Table 2-3 When to Perform Test Blocks explains when to perform the procedures.
Table 2-4 Tests and Inspection Requirements explains the procedures to be performed.
Table 2-5 CMS Test and Inspection Requirements – Safety and Table 2-6 Safety Test
Diagrams give full details of the Safety Tests.
NOTE
Note: Only Philips service engineers are required to report the results of the following
safety and performance tests back to the factory. Of the performance tests, only those for
NBP and Sidestream CO2 need to be reported. .
Table 2-3 When to Perform Test Blocks
Service Event
– When performing
Test Block(s) Required
Complete these tests
Installation of CMS with Medical equipment
connections (for example, AGM or Vuelink)
but with NO System (SDN)
Perform Visual and Power On test blocks (see page 2-5).
Installation of CMS that is connected to a
System (SDN)
Perform Visual and Power On test blocks. If the 78581A safety test (see
the 78581A service manual) has passed previously no further safety
tests are required. If the 78581A safety test has not been performed, it
must be completed.
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
2-3
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Test and Inspection Requirements
Test and Inspection Requirements
Table 2-3 When to Perform Test Blocks
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Service Event
– When performing
Installation of CMS that has connections to
non-medical devices (for example, XGA
Display, Laser Printer or PC)
Note:
If a non-medical device requires the use of
an isolation transformer in order to limit
the enclosure leakage current to meet the
requirements of IEC 601-1, the power cable
connecting the non-medical device to the
isolation transformer must be fixed. It must
not be possible to remove the power cable
without the use of appropriate tools.
Note:
If a non-medical device requires the use of
additional protective earthing in order to
limit the enclosure leakage current to meet
the requirements of IEC 601-1, the earthing
components must be securely fixed at both
ends and must not be removable without
the use of appropriate tools.
Test Block(s) Required
Complete these tests
Device type and
test required
Test results (where
appropriate)
Device is NOT IEC
601-1, IEC 60950 or
IEC 61010 compliant
Not applicable
Device is IEC 601-1
compliant
No tests required
Device acceptable.
No action required.
Device is IEC 60950
or IEC 61010
compliant
Compliant with IEC
601-1 Enclosure
Leakage Current
limitations
Device acceptable.
No action required.
Normal condition is
within the
requirements of IEC
601-1
Additional Protective
Earthing must be
provided for nonmedical device, and
must not be
removable without
the use of a
appropriate tools
Class I Equipment
(Protectively Earthed
Equipment)
Perform Visual and
Power On test blocks
(see page 5). Perform
Safety (1) test block
(see page 11).
Device NOT
acceptable.
DO NOT USE
Single fault condition
exceeds IEC 601-1
requirements
or
Non-medical device
must be connected to
the mains supply via
an Isolation
Transformer
Note:
Interface cables over 3.om are not to be
used.
Device is IEC 60950
or IEC 61010
compliant
Normal condition
exceeds IEC 601-1
requirements
Non-medical device
must be connected to
the mains supply via
an Isolation
Transformer
Normal condition
exceeds IEC 601-1
requirements
Non-medical device
must be connected to
the mains supply via
an Isolation
Transformer
Class II equipment
(Double Insulated
Equipment)
Perform Visual and
Power On test blocks
(see page 11).
Perform Safety (1)
test block (see page
11).
2-4
Action required
or
Non-medical device
must isolated from
the medical device by
use of a separation
device
Repairs where the power supply in the
M1094A/M1094B/M1092A/M1046B
assembly is replaced
Perform Power On and Safety (2) test blocks (see page 2-11).
Repairs where the monitor has been
dropped
Perform Power On and Safety (2) and (3) test blocks (see page 2-12).
All other CMS repairs, Hardware or
Software Upgrades
Perform Power On test block.
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
Test and Inspection Requirements
Service Event
– When performing
Test Block(s) Required
Complete these tests
Preventive Maintenancea
Perform the NBP and Sidestream CO2 Module Performance test blocks
every year (see page 2-6).
Perform the Preventive Maintenance Procedure for the M1180A #A01/
A02 Wall Mount Assembly every year (see page 2-15).
If an AGM is present, refer to the AGM (M1026A) test matrix.
For the BIS module no periodic preventive maintenance is required.
Performance Assurance and Safety Testsb
Perform all other Performance test blocks and all Safety test blocks
(1), (2) and (3) once every two years.
a. For Germany only: For modules that do not have the CE mark, contact the Customer Response
Center in Ratingen for information.
b. For the BIS module performance and safety testing is optional (Philips recommends yearly testing). However, safety testing (Safety test block (3)) is required if there is suspected liquid ingress
or after every time the case of any of the BIS components has been opened.
Table 2-4 Tests and Inspection Requirements
Test Block
Name
Visual Test
Test or “Inspection” to Perform
Inspect the system for obvious signs of damage. Also check
external leads and accessories.
Visual Test for Step 1: Inspect visible fasteners
M1180A #A01/ Step 2: Check maximum tilt range
Step 3: Inspect mounting plate for movement
A02
Power On Test
Expected Test Results
Step
Step
1
Switch on the monitor.
2
Plug in an ECG Module.
3
Observe whether the monitor boots up
successfully without displaying an error
code and if an ECG wave appears on the
display.
What to
Record on
Service
Record
The system does not have
any obvious signs of
damage = Pass.
V:P or V:F
Mounting is within Specs
as described on page 2-15
and following.
VM:P or
VM:F
where P =
Pass
and F = Fail
where P =
Pass
and F = Fail
Monitor boots up.
PO:P or
All Alarm LEDs light up
PO:F
shortly.
where P =
From release B.0, the
loudspeaker gives a series Pass
and F = Fail
of test sounds.
No error codes are
displayed.
An ECG wave is displayed.
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
2-5
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Table 2-3 When to Perform Test Blocks
Test and Inspection Requirements
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Table 2-4 Tests and Inspection Requirements(Continued)
Test Block
Name
Performance
Test NBP
Module
Performance
Test NBP
Module
(contd.)
2-6
Test or “Inspection” to Perform
Expected Test Results
Accuracy Test
Action
Value displayed on Monitor
= x1
Connect the manometer and the pump
with tubing and expansion chamber to the
NBP connector on the NBP Module.
If difference (<= 3mm)
2
Go to Service Mode.
Proceed to next test.
3
Press the NBP button on the NBP Module.
4
Press Start button in the task window to close
valves.
5
Raise the pressure to 280 mmHg with the
manometer pump.
6
Wait 10 sec for the measurement to
stabilize.
7
Compare the manometer values with the
displayed values.
8
Document the value displayed by the
Monitor.
If the difference is greater than 3 mmHg,
calibrate the module.
Step
1
Leakage Test
Step
Action
1
Press the NBP button on the Module.
2
Press the Start softkey in the task
window.
3
Pressurize the gauge to 280 mmHg.
4
Watch the pressure value for 60 seconds.
After 60 seconds the value should have
decreased by less than 6 mmHg.
5
Calculate and document:
Leakage test =
Accuracy – displayed value
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
Leakage test value = x2
(<= 6 mmHg)
Proceed to next test.
What to
Record on
Service
Record
Test and Inspection Requirements
Test Block
Name
Test or “Inspection” to Perform
Expected Test Results
What to
Record on
Service
Record
Linearity Test
Step
Action
1
Reduce the manometer pressure down to
150 mmHg.
Value displayed on Monitor
= x3
If difference
(<= 3 mmHg)
2
Wait 10 sec for the measurement to
stabilize.
Proceed to next test
3
Compare the manometer values with the
displayed values.
4
Document the value displayed by the
Monitor.
If the difference is greater than 3 mmHg
then calibrate the module.
Valve Test
Step
Action
1
Raise the pressure to 280 mmHg.
2
Press Stop on the module to open valves.
3
Wait 5 seconds then document the value.
Value displayed on Monitor PN:P/x1/
= x4
x2/x3/x4
(< 10 mmHg)
or
PN:F/x1/
x2/x3/x4
where P =
Pass
and F = Fail
Performance
Test
Sidestream
CO2
Flow Adjustment Procedure
Step
Action
1
Enter the CO2 Sidestream Task Window
by pressing Parameters followed by CO2
Sidestream.
2
Press Start Pump. The date and time of
the last flow adjustment are displayed.
3
Start the Flow Adjustment procedure by
connecting the flow meter and pressing
Start Pump. After about 5 seconds, the
flow in ml/min displays in the Task
Window.
4
Use the Adjust Flow to adjust the value
displayed in the Task Window to the value
displayed by the external flow meter.
5
Write down the value displayed by the
CMS (x1).
6
Press Confirm to store the readjusted
flow rate value. After about 5 seconds, the
message “Adjustment done” displays. The
flow is automatically set to 100 ml/min.
7
If the displayed value is not 100 ml/min,
repeat Steps 3 through 5.
Value displayed on CMS =
x1
(where x1 = 100 +/– 10 ml/
min)
Proceed to next test
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
2-7
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Table 2-4 Tests and Inspection Requirements(Continued)
Test and Inspection Requirements
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Table 2-4 Tests and Inspection Requirements(Continued)
Test Block
Name
Performance
Test
Sidestream
CO2 (contd.)
Performance
Test ECG
Performance
Test
Respiration
Performance
Test Cardiac
Output
2-8
Test or “Inspection” to Perform
Expected Test Results
What to
Record on
Service
Record
Barometric Pressure Adjustment Procedure
Step
Action
1
Press Barometer Pressure to adjust the
Barometric Pressure value. The Task
Window displays the stored barometric
pressure in mmHg.
2
If the displayed value is incorrect, use the
Barometer Pressure key to adjust the
value to atmospheric pressure.
3
Document the Difference (x2) between
the actual atmospheric pressure and the
value displayed by the CMS.
4
Press Confirm to store the displayed or
adjusted value. After about 5 seconds, the
message “Adjustment done” displays. The
barometric pressure is then set to the
value you entered.
5
Press Main Screen (or Standard
Display) to return to the standard display
in Service mode
Difference = x2
(<= 4 mmHg)
Step 1 Connect the patient simulator to the ECG Parameter
Module using the Patient cable.
Step 2 Configure the Patient simulator as follows:
ECG sinus rhythm
HR = 120 BPM (Amplitude 1 mV)
Step 3 Check displayed ECG wave and HR value against the
simulator configuration.
HR = 120 +/– 2 BPM
Step 1 Connect the patient simulator to the ECG/Resp
Module using the patient cable.
Step 2 Configure the patient simulator as follows:
Base impedance line 1500 Ohm
Delta impedance 0.5 Ohm
Respiration Rate 40/min
Step 3 Check displayed respiration rate against the
simulator configuration.
RPM = 40 +/– 2 /min
Step 1 Connect the patient simulator to the C.O. Module
using the patient cable.
Step 2 Configure the Patient simulator as follows:
Injection temperature: 2 °C
Computation Const: 0.542
(Edward's Catheter)
Flow 5 l/min
Step 3 Check displayed value against the simulator
configuration.
C.O. = 5 +/– 1 l/min.
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
PSC:P/x1/
x2
or
PSC:F/x1/
x2
where P =
Pass
and F = Fail
These
results do
not have to
be reported.
These
results do
not have to
be reported.
These
results do
not have to
be reported.
Test and Inspection Requirements
Test Block
Name
Test or “Inspection” to Perform
Expected Test Results
Note: This procedure applies for Service Tool M1012Performance
14232C and/or C.O. modules without option C10 and/or
Test Cardiac
Output (contd.) software revision B.0 and below.
Service Tool
procedure,
Version 1
Step 1 Make sure to be in Monitoring Mode.
Connect C.O. Interface Cable to module.
Step 2 Connect one side of the Service Tool to Injectate
receptacle of C.O. Interface Cable and the other side
to Catheter Cable receptacle.
Step 3 Enter Measure C.O. Task Window and check results.
Tblood = 37.0oC +/- 0.1oC
Tinj = 0.0oC +/- 0.1oC
Note: This procedure only applies for Service Tool M1012Performance
61601 in combination with C.O. modules with option C10
Test Cardiac
Output (contd.) and software revision C.0 and greater.
Service Tool
procedure,
Version 2
Performance
Test Invasive
Pressure
Performance
Test
Temperature
Step 1 Make sure to be in Monitoring Mode.
Connect C.O. Interface Cable to module.
Step 2 Connect one side of the Service Tool to Injectate
receptacle of C.O. Interface Cable and the other side
to Catheter Cable receptacle.
Step 3 Enter Setup C.O. Task Window and check results for:
Method of Measurement
Arterial Catheter Constant
Enter Measure C.O. Task Window and check results.
Step 4 Disconnect Catheter Cable receptacle from Service
Tool.
Step 5 Enter Module Setup Task Window.
Press Parameter On/Off.
Press On/Off Setup to switch Setup On
Step 6 Enter Setup C.O Task Window and change method of
measurement to “Right Heart”.
Step 7 Enter Measure C.O. Task Window and check results.
Step 1 Connect the patient simulator to the Pressure
module.
Step 2 Set patient simulator to 0 pressure.
Step 3 Make a Zero Calibration with the module.
Step 4 Configure the patient simulator for
P(static) = 200 mmHg.
Step 5 Wait for the display.
Step 6 Check displayed value against the simulator
configuration. If there is a difference, calibrate the
module.
Note: If the Module was calibrated with a dedicated reusable
catheter, check the calibration together with this catheter.
Step 1 Connect the patient simulator to the temperature
input.
Step 2 Configure the patient simulator to 40 °C or
alternatively 100 °F.
Step 3 Check displayed value against the simulator
configuration.
What to
Record on
Service
Record
These
results do
not have to
be reported.
These
results do
not have to
be reported.
Transpulmonary
341
Tblood = 37.0oC +/- 0.1oC
Tinj = 0.0oC +/- 0.1oC
These
results do
not have to
be reported.
P = 200 +/– 5 mmHg
These
results do
not have to
be reported.
+/– 0.2 °C
or +/– 0.4 °F
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
2-9
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Table 2-4 Tests and Inspection Requirements(Continued)
Test and Inspection Requirements
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Table 2-4 Tests and Inspection Requirements(Continued)
Test Block
Name
Test or “Inspection” to Perform
Expected Test Results
Performance
Test SpO2
Step 1 Connect the sensor to the SpO2 module.
Step 2 Measure the SpO2 value on your own finger (this
assumes that you are healthy).
Step 3 Check displayed value against the simulator
configuration.
This test is recommended for customer sites where ECG
Performance
Test ECG-Sync Sync is in use or is configured for potential use.
Step 1 Connect the patient simulator to the ECG input and
the defibrillator to the CMS ECG-Sync output.
Step 2 Configure the patient simulator as follows:
ECG sinus rhythm
HR = 100 BPM (Amplitude 1 mV)
Step 3 Switch defibrillator to simulation mode.
Step 4 Check that the marker pulse is displayed before the TWave begins.
This test is recommended for customer sites where the nurse
Performance
call is in use.
Test Nurse
The Nurse Call Relay performance test is performed at the
Call Relay
phone jack type connector.
This test checks the operation of the Nurse Call Relay. The
functionality of the Nurse Call depends on the configuration
of the relay (see the CMS Configuration Guide).
Tools required: Ohmmeter
Step 1 Plug a phono connector into the Nurse Call Relay
connector.
Step 2 Connect the Ohmmeter.
Step 3 Simulate an alarm-free and then an alarm condition.
Step 1 In Monitoring mode connect the Sensor Simulator
Performance
(for maximum usage please refer to the
Test BIS
documentation delivered with the Sensor Simulator)
to the Patient Interface Cable
PIC/DSC Test Step 2 Enter the BIS Task Window by pressing Module
Setup, followed by BIS.
Step 3 Start Impedance Check by pressing Start Check.
This brings up the BIS Cyclic Check Task Window.
Check the displayed results.
Performance
Test BIS
(continued)
DSC Test
2-10
Between 95 and 100%
These
results do
not have to
be reported.
Marker pulse is displayed
before T-Wave begins.
These
results do
not have to
be reported.
While no alarm occurs, the
relay contacts are open.
When an alarm occurs, the
relay contacts close
These
results do
not have to
be reported.
Electrode 1: 4-6 kΩ
Electrode 2: 8-12 kΩ
Electrode 3: 1-3 kΩ
Step 1 Enter Service Mode
Step 2 Enter the BIS Task Window by pressing Module
Setup, followed by BIS.
Step 3 Start Test by pressing Test DSC. Check the displayed
results.
Module: Test passed
BIS engine: Test passed
DSC: Test passed
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
What to
Record on
Service
Record
These
results do
not have to
be reported.
These
results do
not have to
be reported.
Test and Inspection Requirements
Safety Tests
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
For Europe and Asia-Pacific:
M1165A, M1166A, M1167A
according to IEC 601-1:1988+A1+1991+A2:1995 = EN60601-1:1990+A1:1991+A2:1995
For the US:
M1175A, M1176A according to UL 544
M1177A according to UL 2601-1
The test procedures outlined in this section are to be used only for verifying safe
installation or service of the product in question.
The set-ups used for these tests and the acceptable ranges of values are derived from
local and international standards but may not be equivalent.
These tests are not a substitute for local safety testing where it is required for an
installation or a service event.
If using the Metron Safety tester, use your local regulation to perform the test, for
example, in Europe IEC601-1/IEC601-1-1, and in the U.S. UL2601-1. The Metron Report
should print results with the names listed below, along with other data.
The Safety Tests required to ensure that the CMS is in safe working order are detailed in
the following tables.
Table 2-5 CMS Test and Inspection Requirements – Safety
Test Block
Name
Test or “Inspection” to Perform
Safety (1):
System Safety Test Enclosure Leakage Current /
Normal Condition:
Expected Test
Results
What to Record
on Service
Record
Normal Condition
S1:P/x1/x2 or
maximum leakage current S1:F/x1/x2
= x1.
x1 <= 100 µA
IEC601-1, UL2601-1
(UL544 test not required)
System Safety Test Enclosure Leakage Current /
Single Fault Condition
Safety (2):
Protective Earth
where P = Pass
and F = Fail
Single Fault maximum
leakage current = x2.
x2 is
<= 500 µA (IEC601-1)
or
<= 300 µA (UL2601-1)
or
<= 100 µA (UL544)
With mains cable:
S2:P/x or S2:F/x
Maximum impedance = x where P = Pass
<= 100 mOhms
and F = Fail
All authorities
(IEC601-1, UL2601-1,
UL544)
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
2-11
Test and Inspection Requirements
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Table 2-5 CMS Test and Inspection Requirements – Safety
Test Block
Name
Test or “Inspection” to Perform
Safety (3):
Patient Leakage Current AC
Expected Test
Results
What to Record
on Service
Record
Maximum leakage current S3:P/x or S3:F/x
=x
<= 50 µA @ 250V (IEC601- where P = Pass
1 or UL2601-1)
and F = Fail
or
<= 10 µA @ 120V
without patient leads
connected (UL544)
or
<= 20 µA @ 120V
with patient leads
connected (UL544)
Table 2-6 Safety Test Diagrams
Test Block Name
Test or Inspection to Perform
Safety(1)
System Enclosure
Leakage Current – NC
(normal condition)
Medical electrical system
Instrument under test
Signal parts
in- and/or
output
(**)
Signal parts
in- and/or
output
L (N)
Other
Instrument
S2
S1
Applied part
N (L)
S4
(*)
PE
MD
(*) Not present in Class 2.
(**) Can be multiple different connections to different equipment at same time.
Measures leakage current of exposed metal parts of Instrument under Test (IUT) and
between parts of the system within the patient environment; normal and reversed polarity
using S2.
Safety test according to IEC 601-1-1 (Clause 19.201.1). Report largest value.
2-12
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
Test and Inspection Requirements
Table 2-6 Safety Test Diagrams
Test or Inspection to Perform
Safety(1)
System Enclosure
Leakage Current – OE
(open earth)
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Test Block Name
Medical electrical system
Instrument under test
Signal parts
in- and/or
output
(**)
Signal parts
in- and/or
output
L (N)
Other
Instrument
S2
S1
Applied part
N (L)
S4
MD
PE
(**) Can be multiple different connections to different equipment at same time.
Measures leakage current of exposed metal parts of IUT with Protective Earth (PE) open
circuit (S4 = open) and between parts of the system within the patient environment;
normal and reversed polarity using S2. Safety test according to IEC 601-1-1 (clause based on
19.201.1). Report largest value.
Safety(2)
Protective Earth
Instrument under test
L (N)
N (L)
Ri
Applied part
PE
Ohm
6V
50 Hz
(*)
Insulating pad
25 A or 1.5 Ir
(*) If equipotential connection present : measure also
with yellow/green E.P. conductor connected.
Measures impedance of Protective Earth (PE) terminal to all exposed metal parts of IUT,
which are for safety reasons connected to the Protective Earth (PE). Max. 100 mOhm. Test
current 25 Amps applied for 5 to 10 seconds. The recommendation is to flex the main cable
during the test in order to identify potential bad contact or damage of the earth wire. Safety
test according to IEC 601-1 (Clause 18). Report largest value.
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
2-13
Test and Inspection Requirements
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Table 2-6 Safety Test Diagrams
Test Block Name
Safety(3)
Patient Leakage
Current – AC
Test or Inspection to Perform
(*) Not present in Class 2
Instrument under test
L (N)
S2
S1
Applied part
N (L)
S4
PE
(*)
MD
Signal part
in- and/or
output
Insulating pad
S5
L (N)
S6
R
N (L)
Measures patient leakage current from Applied Part to earth caused by external main voltage
on Applied Part with switch S5 open and closed. Each polarity combination possible is tested
using S2 and S6. This test is applicable for every listed module (ECG, ECG/Resp, Invasive
Pressure, Cardiac Output, CO2, SpO2, SvO2, FiO2, EEG, Temperature).
Safety test according to IEC 601-1 (Clause 19.4.h). Report largest value.
2-14
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
Preventive Maintenance Procedure for the Philips M1180A #A01 and
#A02 Wall Mount Assembly
Overview
The objective of this procedure is to inspect the mounting hardware for proper operation.
NOTE
The Preventive Maintenance Procedure described in this section is a mandatory
requirement, which has to be performed once a year. All fasteners should be
checked and tightened or replaced as necessary.
The procedure consists of the following steps:
Step 1
Inspect all visible mounting-related fasteners
Step 2
Check maximum tilt range
Step 3
Inspect mounting plate for movement
Step 1: Inspect visible fasteners
Please refer to the diagrams on page 2-16 and 2-17 for mounting component identification.
1. Inspect gold and silver stabilizing clips viewable from the rear of the monitor.
If a clip is missing, install new clips to ensure safety of the mount (See picture below).
The Kit M1180-60504 contains the three clips and the necessary screws.
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
2-15
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Preventive Maintenance Procedure for the Philips M1180A #A01 and #A02 Wall Mount Assembly
Preventive Maintenance Procedure for the Philips M1180A #A01 and #A02 Wall Mount Assembly
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
2. Refer to the diagram on page 2-16, inspect all visible fasteners and tighten as required.
If a fastener is broken or missing, install new fasteners. The Kit M1180-60504 contains
the three clips and the necessary screws.
Gold Spring clip to locate Cam
Handle
Silver Spring clips to stabilize
rails and housing
Figure 2-7. Wall Mount Components Diagram
M4 X 8mm PHMS (4)
through tapped hole
into square hole
Display Screen or
Computer Module/
Integral Rack
M4 X 8mm PHMS (4)
Adaptor Plate into
Spanning Rail
Plunger Clearance Hole
Spanning Rail
HPMR
Tilt / Swivel Head
Spring Clip
042 - 10 (2)
Spring Plunger
Mounting Plate
MP13P
Adaptor Plate
M3 X 12mm
PHMS - SS (4)
M4 X 12mm PHMS (2)
through mounting plate
into tapped holes in
adaptor plate
15” Support Arm
Wall Channel
Slide with 1/4 - 20 X 3/4”
Nylon Stop Screw
2-16
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
Diagonal Brace
Preventive Maintenance Procedure for the Philips M1180A #A01 and #A02 Wall Mount Assembly
Please refer to the diagrams above and on page 2-17 for mounting component
identification.
1. Rotate Tilt Knob counterclockwise until the knob stops. This is the maximum forward
tilt angle. The maximum forward tilt range should not exceed 25° or 55mm (2.16”).
(Refer to diagram below for reference angle). If the tilt range exceeds these
specifications, the wall mount must be replaced.
25º Maximum Tilt
=55mm (2.16”)
Mounting Plate
Support Arm
Step 3: Inspect mounting plate for movement
1. With monitor set at desired tilt angle, apply pressure to the front of the monitor in an
attempt to move it in a “rocking” motion. If the Mounting Plate “rocks”, or movement
is observed between the mounting plate and tilt bar, the wall mount assembly must be
replaced. Note: Minor “flexing” movement of the entire mounting assembly is normal.
2. If no “rocking” is detected, the mounting assembly is functioning properly, and the
inspection procedure is complete.
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
2-17
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Step 2: Check maximum tilt range
Preventive Maintenance Procedure for the Philips M1180A #A01 and #A02 Wall Mount Assembly
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Figure 2-8. Wall Mount Assembly Diagram
2-18
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
General Inspections of the System
The CMS is designed to withstand the stresses of the Clinical Care environment. Each
module of the system is encased in plastic and all of the cables and cords of the CMS are
tested for patient safety. To keep your system in good physical condition, Philips
recommends that you perform an annual inspection of the modules and cables of the
CMS.
Objective
In order to meet the chapter’s goals, you should be able to perform a general inspection of
the CMS.
Concepts
The CMS is composed of various modules: the Display Module, the Computer Module, the
plug-in modules, the plug-in module rack, the Handheld Keypad, and, in certain
configurations, the remote power supply (for the flatscreen display module) or the
External Alarm Device (used with an XGA-compatible display). Each module contains
connectors, controls or cables that should be checked annually to ensure that they are in
good condition and functioning normally.
Since the CMS is used in situations where the modules may come in contact with human
fluids, you should follow all of the procedures of your department for dealing with
contaminated equipment before proceeding with any maintenance procedures.
Inspect the System Hardware
Inspecting the
system on an
annual basis will
help you keep track
of your system and
identify potential
parts that need to be
replaced.
No tools are required to perform this inspection.
Step 1
Examine the exterior of the unit for cleanliness and general physical condition.
Check that the plastic housings are intact, that all hardware is present and tight,
and that there are no signs of spilled liquids or other serious abuse.
Step 2
Check fuse values and type against that marked on the chassis, and ensure that a
spare is provided.
Step 3
Inspect connectors of the module rack and ensure that the plug-in modules are
locked into place and do not slide out without first releasing the locking plate on
the bottom of the module.
Step 4
Ensure all labeling is present and legible.
Step 5
Inspect all accessories external to the system such as transducers, referring to
the manufacturer’s documentation.
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
2-19
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
General Inspections of the System
General Inspections of the System
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Inspect the Cables
Cables and
electrical cords
could be potential
hazards if they are
not kept in good
working condition.
A screwdriver may be required to complete this inspection.
Step 1
Examine the line/power plug for damage. Ensure that the prongs of the plug do
not move in the casing. Shake the plug and listen for loose screws. If any damage
is suspected, open the plug and inspect it.
Step 2
Inspect the line/power cord for signs of damage. If damaged, replace the entire
cord or, if the damage is near one end, cut out the defective portion. Ensure that
any new line/power cord or plug is fitted with the same polarity as the old one.
Step 3
Examine the strain reliefs at both ends of the line/power cord; be sure that they
hold the cord securely.
Step 4
Inspect the interconnecting cables between the Display Module and the Computer Module for general condition. Examine them carefully to detect breaks in
the insulation. Ensure that the cable connectors are properly engaged and that
any connector screws are fully tightened.
Step 5
Inspect the patient cables and leads and their strain reliefs for general condition.
Examine cables carefully to detect breaks in the insulation and to ensure that
they are gripped securely in the connectors of each end to prevent rotation or
other strain.
Step 6
Flex the patient cable near each end to verify that there are no intermittent
faults.
Inspect the Red Power Indicators (LEDs) of the System
The power
indicators light up
every time the
system is switched
ON. This procedure
is not applicable for
the flatscreen.
(Red LEDs are
located inside the
separate power
supply.)
2-20
No tools are required to perform this inspection.
Step 1
Turn the System On by pressing the power switch in the lower left-hand corner
of the CRT display.
Step 2
The system will click and light up the LEDs on the display. After several seconds,
the LEDs will go off and the display will start showing waveforms and numerics
if the monitor is in the monitoring or demo mode. If the system fails to boot, see
the Troubleshooting chapter in this manual.
Step 3
Check the rear of the display module and compare the red LEDs that are visible
to those in Figure 2-9.
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
General Inspections of the System
!
Red Power
LEDs
!
!
!
M1094B
Figure 2-9. Red LEDs on the Rear Panel of the M1094B Display Module
Inspect the Display CRT / LCD
Inspecting the
integrity of the
display will help
you verify that the
display is working
correctly.
A fixed rate simulator is required to perform the inspection.
Step 1
Note the positions of all of the shift, contrast and brightness controls (only
brightness for the LCD display) so they are returned to their previous positions
(assuming they are correct) at the end of the testing procedure.
Step 2
Set up an ECG signal on the screen from a fixed rate simulator. Check the baseline. It should stay in focus across the CRT and it should be horizontal, not
noticeably sloped or bowed.
Step 3
Check the ECG complexes. They should be regularly spaced. Uneven spacing
indicates a sweep non-linearity. All portions of a simulated ECG waveform
should be clear and visible, including the P wave and QRS.
Figure 2-10. A Standard ECG Wave
Step 4
Using the V SHIFT control on the bottom rear of the CRT Display, vary the vertical position of the baseline. It should be possible to move the baseline through
all of the vertical height of the CRT. There should be no distortion on the baseline
as it is moved up or down on the screen.
Step 5
Adjust the contrast and brightness controls so that they are at the maximum settings and then adjust them so that they are at the minimum setting. (For the CRT,
the phosphor may “burn”: check the condition of the phosphor on the CRT by
noting if any “burn” spots [discoloration] are visible.)
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
2-21
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
General Inspections of the System
NOTE
Step 6
With the ECG simulator attached, check to see if any noise (interference) is
superimposed on the baseline. Baseline interference may be apparent as a thick
baseline at high gain settings (using V AMP, H AMP and EAST WEST controls on
bottom rear of Display), but should not be visible throughout the lower twothirds of the gain control range.
Step 7
Apply an external 1 mV pulse. The trace should exhibit a leading edge with minimal rounding and a spike (or overshoot) of less than 10%. After 1 second, the
pulse should have decayed no more than half of its original amplitude.
Step 8
Return the controls to their previous positions (assuming they are correct).
Refer to the Troubleshooting section if any problems were identified.
The fluorescent tube (“backlight”) in the Flatscreen Display module will darken over
time, resulting in a dimmer display. As a preventive maintenance procedure, it is
recommended that the tube be replaced after a certain time of continuous use or if an
unacceptable decrease in backlight intensity is noted. Please refer to “M1095A Backlight
Removal and Replacement Procedures” in Chapter 5 “Repairing the CMS”
Inspect the Controls of the System
2-22
Step 1
Examine all controls (hardkeys, softkeys, arrow keys, ON/OFF switch, contrast
and brightness controls as shown in Chapter 1 “Introducing the CMS” (Figure 13) for physical condition. During the course of this examination, ensure that the
controls perform their proper function as stated.
Step 2
Check the module LEDs, see that they light up as expected. Pressing a module
setup key should light up the setup indicator above the key.
Step 3
Press the ECG key on the front of the ECG module in a system that is turned On.
This brings up the ECG Task Window and verifies that the computer module and
integral rack are communicating with the plug-in module. If the ECG module
does not respond, perform the module self-test or check the troubleshooting
chapter.
Step 4
Confirm that the green LED of the Power indicator on the lower left-hand corner
of the display is functioning.
Step 5
Ensure correct operation (visually and audibly) of all Alarms using, if required,
the User Guide and a Patient Simulator (Neurodyne Nevada Inc. Model 217A or
medSim 300 or similar).
Step 6
If possible connect the ECG parameter module of the unit to an ECG simulator
and verify that an adequate trace is received at each patient lead selection.
Step 7
If your system uses a handheld keypad, check the integrity of the adhesive on the
mounting bracket. It is important to note that adhesives are more prone to failure in hostile (warm, humid) environments.
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
Cleaning and Disinfecting Procedures
This section details the cleaning procedures for the System as a whole and for the
Recorder and Blood Analysis Modules in particular.
Objective
In order to meet the chapter’s goals, you should be able to understand which cleaning and
disinfecting agents you should use to safely clean a CMS.
Concepts
The CMS is composed of various different modules: the Display, the Computer Module,
the Plug-In Modules, the Module Rack, the Flatscreen Power Supply and the Handheld
Keypad. Each module contains connectors, controls or cables that should be cleaned
regularly to ensure that they are in good condition and functioning normally.
Since the CMS is used in situations where its modules may come in contact with human
fluids, you should follow all of the procedures of your department for dealing with
contaminated equipment.
WARNING
Philips makes no claims regarding the efficacy of the listed chemicals or methods
as a means for controlling infection. Consult your hospital’s Infection Control
Officer or Epidemiologist.
For comprehensive details on cleaning agents and their efficacy, refer to “Guidelines for
Prevention of Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus to
Health Care and Public-Safety Workers.” issued by the U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia,
February 1989.
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
2-23
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Cleaning and Disinfecting Procedures
Cleaning and Disinfecting Procedures
General Cleaning of the System
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
• The CMS should be kept free of dust and dirt.
• Exterior cleaning of the case and screen is recommended. Clean it with a lint-free cloth,
moistened with either warm water (40°C/104°F. max) and soap, a diluted non-caustic
detergent or one of the approved cleaning agents listed below:
Soaps
Tensides (dishwasher
detergents)
CAUTION
mild soaps
Edisonite Schnellreiniger, Alconox
Ammonias
Dilution of Ammonia <3%, Window cleaner
Alcohol
Ethanol 70%, Isopropanol 70%, Window cleaner
To avoid damage to the product, observe the following general precautions for
cleaning. You should only deviate when this is explicitly described in the cleaning
instruction for the individual transducer or accessory.
• Do not use strong solvents such as acetone or trichloroethylene.
• Always dilute according to the manufacturers instructions, or use lowest possible
concentration.
• Never use abrasive material (such as steel wool or silver polish).
• Do not allow liquid to enter into the product.
• Never submerge any part of the system.
• Do not pour liquid onto the system during cleaning.
• Do not allow cleaning agent to remain on any of the equipment surfaces - wipe it off
immediately with a cloth dampened with water.
CAUTION
2-24
If you want to clean a touch enabled display such as the M1097A #A02 Flatscreen
Display, the touch operation has to be disabled during the cleaning procedure.
If you use a mouse and want to clean it, mouse operation has to be disabled
during the cleaning procedure.
For more detailed information on how to perform these actions, please refer to
the User’s Reference Manual.
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
Cleaning and Disinfecting Procedures
We recommend that you disinfect the product only when necessary as determined by
your hospital’s policy, to avoid long term damage to the product.
We also recommend that the products being disinfected be cleaned first, as described
under “General Cleaning of the System” on page 2-24.
Use the recommended disinfecting substances listed below:.
Alcohol based






Kodan Tinktur forte, Sagrosept , Spitacid , Sterilium fluid .
Ethanol 70%, Isopropanol 70%, Cutasept , Hospisept ,
1
only Ethanol 70% and Isopropanol 70% are tested and qualified


Aldehyde
Dilution of formaldehyde (3-5%), Cidex , Gigasept .
based
2
Bleach
Dilution of sodium hypochlorite (laundry bleach): concentration
only Cidex is tested and qualified
ranging from 500ppm (1:100 dilution of household bleach) to
5000ppm (1:10 dilution of household bleach),
Hydrogen peroxide 3%, Chlorox
 (1:10 dilution),
Dakin’s Solution.
Phenol based
CAUTION


Wofasept , Sporicidin .
To avoid damage to the product, observe the following general precautions for
disinfection. You should only deviate when this is explicitly stated in the
disinfecting instruction of a specific product.
• Do NOT use Povodine®, Sagrotan®, Mucocit® disinfecting agents or strong solvents e.g.
acetone.
• Always dilute according to the manufacturer’s instructions or use lowest possible
concentration.
• Do not allow any liquid to enter the case.
• Never submerge any part of the system.
• Do not pour liquid onto the system during cleaning.
• Never use abrasive material (such as steel wool or silver polish).
• Do not allow any disinfecting agent to remain on any of the equipment surfaces – wipe it
off immediately with a cloth dampened with water.
CAUTION
If you want to disinfect a touch enabled display such as the M1097A #A02
Flatscreen Display, the touch operation has to be disabled during the cleaning
procedure.
If you use a mouse and want to disinfect it, mouse operation has to be disabled
during the cleaning procedure.
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
2-25
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
General Disinfecting of the System
Cleaning and Disinfecting Procedures
Cleaning the Recorder Module
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
The paper roller and paper out sensors should be cleaned periodically.
CAUTION
The paper roller is
cleaned to prevent
paper slippage and
to keep the
recordings clean.
Step 1
Open the recorder door and remove the roll of paper, if present.
Step 2
Use a lint free cloth and Isopropyl Alcohol to wipe the roller. Be sure to clean all
sides of the roller.
To avoid damage to the roller, do NOT use any of the following cleaning agents:
" Dilute sodium hypochloride (laundry bleach)
" Dilute formaldehyde
" Hydrogen peroxide
Step 3
Use the same cloth to clean the inside casing of the Recorder Module.
Step 4
Use a bottle of compressed air to clean the paper out sensor that is located just
below the paper roller.
reclean
An optical sensor is
used to detect when
the recorder is out
of paper. If an
excessive amount of
dust or dirt
particles builds up
around the sensor,
the recorder will
“think” it is out of
paper even though
this may not be the
case.
Compressed Air
Figure 2-11. Cleaning the paper out sensor
If very slow speed
(1 or 2 cm/min)
recordings are run
for extended
periods of time,
deposits of paper
debris may collect
on the printhead.
Symptoms of this
are recordings that
are printed
unevenly (have
faint horizontal
stripes).
2-26
The print head should also be cleaned periodically.
Step 5
Thread a cleaning strip (included in the Recorder Module Cleaning Kit P/N
M1116-60201) around the roller as in shown in diagram (A) below.
Step 6
Close the recorder door, with both ends of the strip and the paper extending over
the top of the door.
Step 7
Grasp the top end of the strip as shown in diagram (B) below, and pull the strip
out.
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
Cleaning and Disinfecting Procedures
Open the door, re-thread the paper, and resume normal operation. (For best
results use only Philips Recorder Paper - P/N 40477A/B.)
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Step 8
recln1
A
120mm H X 150mm W
B
Figure 2-12. Cleaning the Printhead of the Recorder Module
Cleaning the Blood Analysis Module
The filter for the ventilator fan should be cleaned periodically.
Step 1
Slide the filter cover on the underside of the module to the left and remove.
Step 2
Remove the filter from the cover.
Step 3
Rinse the filter under running water to remove any dust or debris.
Step 4
Shake the filter and leave to dry before replacing in the cover.
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
2-27
Testing & Maintaining
the CMS
Cleaning and Disinfecting Procedures
2-28
Testing & Maintaining the CMS
Chapter 3 Troubleshooting the CMS
This chapter describes how to troubleshoot the CMS as a system. Once a fault has been
isolated to either the display module or computer module, this chapter tells you how to
further isolate faults to the field replaceable assemblies. All references to the CMS also
refer to ACMS or NCMS unless specifically stated.
Objectives
• Recognize a properly operating CMS.
• Identify symptoms of improper operation for the CMS.
• Use any symptoms or indications to identify a fault as being in the display module,
computer module, or the plug-in parameter modules.
• Further isolate faults down to field replaceable assemblies.
Concepts
This chapter uses visual indications, error codes, and other operational symptoms to help
you diagnose problems with the CMS. Symptoms have been grouped to form
troubleshooting modules.
Each troubleshooting module contains procedures for isolating faults based on the
symptoms, any supporting theory as to why you are being told to do a certain procedure,
and any additional rationale that will help you to isolate faults. The following table lists
the troubleshooting modules.
Troubleshooting the CMS 3-1
Troubleshooting the
CMS
This chapter shows you how to:
Procedure Overview
Procedure Overview
Table 3-1 Troubleshooting Procedure Overview
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Topic
3-2
Page
General System Troubleshooting
3-3
Troubleshooting Module 1 - Fixing Display / Power Supply Problems
3-7
Troubleshooting Module 2 - Computer Module Faults
3-14
Troubleshooting Module 3 - Fixing Recorder Problems
3-35
Troubleshooting Module 4 - Fixing Handheld Keypad Problems
3-36
Troubleshooting Module 5 - Fixing Printing Problems
3-37
Troubleshooting Module 6 - Using the Service Mode
3-39
Troubleshooting the CMS
General System Troubleshooting
General System Troubleshooting
The following flowcharts are a good place to begin troubleshooting the CMS. Each bold
box represents a general symptom of the monitor. After identifying the appropriate
symptom, follow the arrow from the box to the possible corrective actions. If the first
action listed does not resolve your problem, then proceed to the next box. If you need
more help, proceed to the appropriate Troubleshooting Module.
Troubleshooting the
CMS
The letter with a box around it is a guide to help you through the flowchart. The
corresponding letter on the following page marks your place in the chart.
Blank Display; no picture; no error messages.
Contrast and/or brightness controls set too low. Turn to right to obtain
maximum brightness or contrast.
For M1095A, if necessary exchange backlight.
Power lead disconnected or switched off. Connect lead/switch on.
Display fuses open. Verify fuse values and replace.
DC/DC cable or video cable disconnected or faulty. Check/exchange
cables as necessary.
Blue HIF connector of monochrome display inside CRT bezel
improperly connected (M1092A display only). Check/reconnect HIF.
For M1095A: Change video cable. Check/exchange flatscreen
assembly. (Also applicable to XGA flatscreen displays.)
A
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-3
General System Troubleshooting
A
Blank Display; no picture; no error messages.
Card placement in backplane incorrect or Faulty Function Card.
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Check if CPU Cards are in correct slots, as shown in Table 1-10
Switch monitor off/on and examine LEDs on function cards.
Only one green LED on each CPU Card keeps blinking. No red LED
stays on.
- If system is connected to any external tools, disconnect tool.
- Check backplane for correct EPROM.
- Check backplane for correct Cards/CPC Card (See Table 1-10).
- Check EEPROM, re-program if necessary.
Red LEDs on ALL CPU cards stay on.
- Exchange CPC Card with another CPC Card.
- Remove one APP_CPU after the other. If LED behavior changes,
exchange the last card removed.
- Exchange Utility CPU.
- Remove all cards except DC/DC Converter and Utility CPU. Then
insert one APP_CPU after the other. When a red LED stays on,
exchange the last CPU inserted.
B
3-4
Troubleshooting the CMS
General System Troubleshooting
B
- If the card with red LED is the UTIL_CPU, ensure that the firmware HI
byte and LO byte OTPs are in the correct locations, and are properly
oriented.
- If CPU with red LED is only card in cluster, exchange it.
All green LEDs on each CPU start blinking after 10-20 seconds.
- Exchange Display Controller Card.
- Check/ exchange Display.
No LEDs on Function cards illuminated. Check SMPS LED(s).
- M1092A/94A - SMPS LED on, or
- M1094B - all 4 SMPS LEDs on:
Reconnect/exchange Line Filter (M1094A color display only)
Reconnect/exchange DC/DC Converter.
Exchange SMPS.
- M1092A/94A - SMPS LED off: Exchange SMPS
- M1094B - one or more SMPS LEDs off: Exchange SMPS.
- M1047A - one green LED off: Exchange unit.
- M1109A - one green LED off: Exchange part or unit.
- M1046B Internal Power Supply - Green LED off: exchange fuse or
unit.
Unidentified illumination sequence. Remove EPROM Cards.
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-5
Troubleshooting the
CMS
All three LEDs on each function card on for < 1 second. On one
function card the red LED stays on (5 seconds).
General System Troubleshooting
Keyboard and front panel switches not operating.
Computer Module resets itself periodically.
HIL cable between Display or External Alarm Device and Computer
Module is reversed. Reconnect cable, matching the dot indicators.
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Faulty HIL cable. Exchange HIL cable.
Faulty HIF board or blue HIF connector in Display bezel. Exchange
HIF board.
Faulty Utility CPU Card. Exchange Utility CPU.
System resets and all Patient Data is lost.
SRAM checksum error on start-up. In Service Mode, perform the
Extended Test. If the test indicates a faulty card, replace it.
Some or all waves/numerics missing.
Plug-in Module(s) or Module Rack problem. See Chapter 4
“Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules” for the module(s) in question.
Overview (SDN) user default settings automatically reset to
factory defaults.
For CMS Releases A - C: SDN connection has been interrupted (either
through SCC power down, or SDN cable disconnection). In
Configuration Mode, reconfigure the user defaults for all Overview.
3-6
Troubleshooting the CMS
Objectives
Troubleshooting Module 1 - Fixing Display / Power
Supply Problems
Troubleshooting the
CMS
This module shows you how to troubleshoot problems based on symptoms given by a
faulty display. Use this module when your CMS display is blank, showing incorrect data,
or if you are referred to this module from another procedure.
Objectives
In order to meet this chapter’s goal, you should be able to:
• Identify faulty conditions.
• Determine if your fault lies in the display or in the computer module.
• Know the likely causes of the fault and the likely remedy of the fault.
Concepts
The display monitors (M1092A - monochrome, M1094A/94B - color, M1095A - color
flatscreen, or XGA-compatible display) use basically the same signal path to display
patient data on the screen. The big difference is in the type of display controller cards
used. The M1092A uses a display controller card called the DSPC. Both the M1094A and
M1094B use a color display controller card called the CDSPC. Older versions of the
CDSPC did not have enough RAM and two CDSPC cards had to be used. However, the
newer versions of the CDSPC contain the necessary RAM and only one is needed.
The Application CPU in the computer module produces the data to be displayed. The
DSPC and CDSPC cards control the mechanism of displaying the information on the
screen. All of the inputs to the CRT displays come through a 9-pin D-type video-in plug on
the rear of the display.
The Flatscreen uses one display controller card called DSPC_FLAT. All the inputs to the
display come through a 25-pin twisted pair cable plugged in at the rear of the Flatscreen.
The XGA-compatible display uses one display controller card called CDSPC_XGA. All the
inputs to the display come through a standard 15-pin cable.
To troubleshoot a faulty display condition perform the following procedure.
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-7
Procedures
Procedures
If the CRT display is blank...
Check power LED.
❏ If the display is blank, the first thing to check is the green LED near the power switch
on the front of the display module. When the CMS is plugged into a correct power
source and the power switch is pressed to ON, this LED should illuminate GREEN.
Troubleshooting the
CMS
When you verify the two conditions are true (CMS plugged in and power switch ON)
and the LED is not GREEN, check the fuse. If the fuse is blown, replace the fuse. If
fuse continues to blow, there is a problem in the display, and the display should be
replaced.
If the fuse is good and the LED is not GREEN, it is possible that the low-voltage
output from the Switch Mode Power Supply is not present. Proceed to the next step.
If the LED is GREEN, and the fuse is good, and the display is blank, proceed to the
next step.
Check contrast and
brightness
controls.
❏ The contrast or brightness controls may have been turned down too low. Turn both
controls fully to the right and see if this fixes your problem. If nothing at all happens
to the screen when you turn the controls to the right, the high voltage output from
the SMPS may not be present and the display might need to be replaced. Proceed to
the next step.
If when you turn the controls to the right a raster appears, the fault could be in the
DC-to-DC converter in the computer module. Look at the rear of the Computer
Module and locate the Utility CPU board. The Utility CPU board should have three
green LEDs illuminated. If it does not, replace the DC-to-DC converter. If the LEDs
are illuminated green, refer to the section CMS System Hardware/Software Problems
on page 3-27.
Check video cable.
❏ The video cable from the Computer Module to the Display is not connected correctly.
Check the connection and reconnect if necessary. If the connection is correct, the
cable may be faulty. Replace the cable and see if this corrects the problem.
Check HIF
connector.
Check DSPC
Card(s).
❏ The blue human interface connector of the monochrome display in the front
assembly is improperly connected. Remove the front assembly and check the
connector and reconnect if required.
❏ The wrong display controller (DSPC) card is in the Computer Module. If the wrong
DSPC Card is in the backplane or the DSPC is missing from the backplane, the
display may be blank. Check that the DSPC Card(s) is/are CMS display controller
card(s) and that it is in the correct slot.
If the monitor is color, ensure that the DSPC_Color Card (or both a CDSPC_VIDEO
and CDSPC_CTRL Card) is plugged into the correct slot(s) in the backplane.
Check Functional
Cards.
3-8
❏ The card placement in backplane is incorrect/faulty function card is present. If the
corrective actions in General System Troubleshooting on page 3-3 did not resolve the
symptom, refer to section Procedures on page 3-14.
Troubleshooting the CMS
Procedures
If there is poor display quality, inverse video, incorrect colors, faded image,
ghosting, a scrambled picture, or missing information on the CRT display...
Check video
termination.
Check video cable.
❏ The video termination switch on the rear of the display may be improperly set. If only
a main display is being used, the main switch should be placed to Switch ON (in). If a
second (remote) display is connected to the main display, the switches should be set
as follows:
Main: Switch OFF (out)
Slave: Switch ON (in)
❏ The video cable from the Computer Module to the Display is not connected correctly.
Check degaussing
coils.
Check display
controller.
❏ If you have a color display, there is a chance the de-gaussing coils of the CRT are
faulty. These coils de-magnetize the CRT using two positive temperature coefficient
thermistors. The current flow (maximum when cold, minimal when hot) changes as
the thermistors heat up. Turn the unit off and wait 30 minutes for the thermistors to
return to room temperature. Then turn the unit on. If the problem goes away and
then returns after several minutes, suspect the de-gaussing circuit and replace the
display.
❏ The display controller in the computer module may be faulty. You can check this by
re-booting the unit and checking the Status Log for any error codes concerning the
display controller. If so, replace the display controller.
If you suspect the display controller is faulty, but there is no error code in the status
log, refer to Procedures on page 3-14 to further isolate the problem.
Another condition can exist where you have a color monitor connected to a
monochrome display controller or vice-versa. Check you have a match between your
monitor and the display controller card. Refer to Procedures on page 3-14 to check
the exact placement of your display controller.
Check blue HIF
connector.
Check plug-in
modules.
Go to...
❏ The blue human interface connector in the front assembly is improperly connected.
A way to check this is by turning the brightness and contrast controls to both the left
and the right. If the screen remains unaffected, remove the front assembly and check
the connector and reconnect if required. If the connector is intact, suspect the
Human Interface board in the display bezel and replace it.
❏ If you have known waves or numerics missing from the screen but the screen is
behaving normally, refer to Troubleshooting Module 3 - Plug-In Module Faults.
If you have come this far and have not fixed your problem, go to Procedures on page 3-14.
That module tells you how to check to see if the Computer Module Unit is working
correctly. If the Computer Module Unit is working correctly, replace the display.
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-9
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Check the connection and reconnect if necessary. If the connection is correct, the
cable may be faulty. Replace the cable and see if this corrects the problem.
Procedures
If the (M1095A) Flatscreen Display is blank...
❏ If the Flatscreen Display (M1095A) is blank, the first step is to check the green LEDs
on the front of the display and on the power supply. The power supply is one of the
following: M1047A Power Supply, a CRT Display (M1092A, M1094A or M1094B), or
the M1046B Integral Power Supply. When the CMS is plugged into a correct power
source and the power switches on the display and power supply are pressed to ON,
both LEDs should illuminate GREEN.
Troubleshooting the
CMS
When you verify that the two conditions are true and that the LEDs are not GREEN,
check the fuses at the rear of the module that is supplying power, the Power Supply
M1047A, CRT Display, or M1046B. Replace any blown fuses. If fuses continue to
blow, there is a problem in the Display and/or the Computer Module.
❏ Video/Power Cable
Check the video/power cable connection and reconnect if necessary. If the
connection is correct, the cable may be faulty. Replace the cable to see if this
corrects the problem. Check the video/power cable if: the LED on the M1047A
Remote Power Supply is green, the LED on the Flatscreen is blank, and the red LEDs
in the Computer Module are inactive.
❏ M1047A Power Supply
If you suspect the M1047A Power Supply, test the Remote Control Board to
determine whether this board or the Switch-Mode Power Supply itself is faulty. The
Remote Control Board has a 12V(AC) input and outputs 12V(DC) to an optocoupler
on the SMPS. Output from the SMPS is 60V(DC). Exchange part number for the
Remote Control Board is 31192086411FMI. If the SMPS is faulty, replace the complete
Power Supply.
If the LEDs are green and the fuses are good but the display is blank, proceed to the
next step.
❏ Computer Module
Check that the correct cards are located in the correct slots in the Computer Module.
In particular check that the Flatscreen Display Controller Board is correctly located.
Look at the rear of the Computer Module. The Utility CPU board should have three
green LEDs illuminated plus one green blinking LED and the Flatscreen Display
Controller Board should have one green blinking LED. Note that the Flatscreen
Display Controller Board outputs 60V via the video/power cable to the Flatscreen
Display. This board is protected with an SMT fuse.
❏ Flatscreen Display
If you suspect the Flatscreen Display, check whether the backlight is defective. See
Chapter 5 “Repairing the CMS” for this procedure. Alternatively, the LCD or the video
board may be defective. If the LCD is defective, exchange the complete display.
3-10
Troubleshooting the CMS
Procedures
If there is poor display quality on a Flatscreen Display...
❏ Check video cable
Check the video cable connection and reconnect if necessary. If the connection is
correct, the cable may be faulty. Replace the cable to see if this corrects the problem.
❏ Flatscreen Display Controller
If you suspect that the display controller is faulty but there is no error code in the
status log, refer to Troubleshooting Module 2 - Computer Module Faults to further
isolate the problem.
❏ Verify the integrity of the display
Go to demo mode to verify the integrity of the display. The ECG complexes should be
regularly spaced and all portions of the ECG waveform should be clear and visible.
(A small number of missing pixels is normal with all LCD displays but, if the ECG
waveform is not clear, this is an indication of an unacceptable number of pixel
failures.)
It may be useful to use the white test picture in service mode.
If the display exhibits other quality problems such as misalignment or jitter, and you
have checked the Video/Power cable and the Flatscreen Display Controller Card, this
means that there is a problem in the Flatscreen Display itself and the display should
be replaced. (For board-level troubleshooting, sound or control problems indicate
that the HIF board is faulty; problems with the picture indicate that the video board
is faulty.)
❏ Display Brightness
The brightness control may be turned too low or the flatscreen display may not be
angled for optimum viewing. If the display is still too dim with the brightness control
at maximum, change the backlight. See Chapter 5 “Repairing the CMS” for this
procedure.
❏ Check plug-in modules
If you have known waves or numerics missing from the screen but the screen is
behaving normally, refer to Troubleshooting Module 3 - Plug-In Module Faults.
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-11
Troubleshooting the
CMS
The Flatscreen Display Controller Board in the Computer Module may be faulty. You
can check this by re-booting the unit and checking the Status Log for any error codes
concerning the display controller.
Procedures
If an XGA Display is blank...
❏ If the XGA Display is blank, the first step is to check the green LEDs on the front of
the display and power supply. When the CMS is plugged into a correct power source
and the power switches on the display and power supply are pressed to ON, both
LEDs should illuminate GREEN.
When you verify that the two conditions are true and that the LEDs are not GREEN,
check the fuses at the rear of the display, power supply and the computer module.
Replace any blown fuses. If fuses continue to blow, there is a problem in the Display
and/or the Computer Module.
Troubleshooting the
CMS
❏ Video/Power Cable
Check the video/power cable connection and reconnect if necessary. If the
connection is correct, the cable may be faulty. Replace the cable to see if this
corrects the problem.
❏ Power Supply
If you suspect the Power Supply, test the Remote Control Board to determine
whether this board or the Switch-Mode Power Supply itself is faulty. The Remote
Control Board has a 12V(AC) input and outputs 12V(DC) to an optocoupler on the
SMPS. Output from the SMPS is 60V(DC). Exchange part number for the Remote
Control Board is 991920864111FMI. If the SMPS is faulty, replace the complete Power
Supply.
If the LEDs are green and the fuses are good but the display is blank, proceed to the
next step.
❏ Computer Module
Check that the correct cards are located in the correct slots in the Computer Module.
In particular check that the Flatscreen Display Controller Board is correctly located.
Look at the rear of the Computer Module. The Utility CPU board should have three
green LEDs illuminated plus one green blinking LED and the Flatscreen Display
Controller Board should have one green blinking LED. Note that the Flatscreen
Display Controller Board outputs 60V via the video/power cable to the Flatscreen
Display. This board is protected with an SMT fuse.
❏ Flatscreen Display
If you suspect the Flatscreen Display, check whether the backlight is defective. See
Chapter 5 “Repairing the CMS” for this procedure. Alternatively, the LCD or the video
board may be defective. If the LCD is defective, exchange the complete display.
NOTE
3-12
Note: For the XGA display, the switch on the External Alarm Device operates the
computer module; the green LED on the Alarm Device shows whether it is on.
If there are technical problems with the XGA display, consult the display device’s own
service documentation.
Troubleshooting the CMS
Procedures
If the TouchScreen operation is malfunctioning...
❏ Check cable connection between the RS232 connectors of the display and the
function box. Reconnect, if necessary.
❏ Perform a visual inspection of the overlay. If the overlay is visibly damaged, it has to
be replaced.
❏ Check the RS232 configuration:
Step 1
Enter Config Mode and press Monitor Setup .
Step 2
Press
Step 3
Make sure that the entries behind Port 1-4 show the correct devices. If not,
select the correct devices for each port.
Step 4
If you had to change the configuration, save it and switch power off and on.
Step 5
If the problem still exists, proceed with the next step.
❏ Perform a Touch Screen calibration:
Step 1
Enter Config Mode and press Monitor Setup .
Step 2
Press Touch Setup . This leads you to the Touch Screen Setup window.
Step 3
Perform the calibration procedure. Follow the steps as shown on the screen.
If the font appears to be incorrect...
After installing a display controller card, if the font appears to be incorrect, it may be
because the Font ROM Switch setting for the language is incorrect. See “Configuring the
Display Controller Card” in Chapter 5 “Repairing the CMS” for details.
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-13
Troubleshooting the
CMS
RS 232 . This leads you to the RS232 setup window.
Objectives
Troubleshooting Module 2 - Computer Module Faults
This module shows you how to troubleshoot problems based on symptoms given by a
faulty Computer Module. Use this module when you suspect you have a problem in your
Computer Module, or when you are referred to this module from another procedure.
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Objectives
In order to meet this chapter’s goal, you should be able to:
• Identify faulty conditions.
• Verify the correct function card locations in the Computer Module.
• Know what are the likely causes of the fault and what are the likely remedies.
• Use the Status Log to check for error codes, and other service information.
• Interpret error codes and how to use them to isolate faults.
Concepts
Each function card in the CMS comes with a red LED that illuminates to indicate a fault
with the card. There are also green LEDs on each function card that show the normal
operation of the system. Also associated with most fault conditions are Error Codes that
can be viewed in the Status Log of the operating modes. This module uses each of these
items to isolate faults and to determine the health of the Computer Module.
Error Codes
The first line of fault isolation is the Error Codes. Whenever one of the function cards is
unable to perform an operation, an error code is generated. Error codes can be for fatal
and non-fatal errors. Fatal errors are errors which cause the CMS to re-start. Non-fatal
errors are general errors that are not significant enough to affect normal CMS operation.
Fatal error codes can be found in the Status Log while in any of the four operating modes.
In the Service Mode, the Status Log also displays Non-fatal error messages. If an error
occurs when the CMS is starting up, a start-up error code is generated and displayed at the
top of the screen. Start-up error codes give similar information to that of the Status Log
entries, except the codes are given are in hexadecimal notation.
3-14
Troubleshooting the CMS
Using Error Codes
What an Error Code Tells You
When you look at an error code in the Status Log, you can see the following information:
Table 3-2 Error Code Description
Description
H, W, C or F
H, W, and C denote fatal errors which have caused a Hot, Warm,
or Cold start. F denotes a Fatal error without deference to the
type of restart caused.
Card Name
RACK_IF, for example
Part Number of function card
M1088-66501, for example
Device ID Code
The number referring to a hardware device or software module
and used to indicate the location of a fault.
Slot number
Position of the faulty or reporting card in the computer module
unit.
Error code
Number describing the type of fault identified. The error code
tables in this module give more details.
Date\Time
Date and time the error occurred.
Using Error Codes
This section includes procedures on how to access the Status Log in the various operating
modes, and what actions to take when a fatal error is encountered. This module includes
error code lists for the errors reported by the CMS, grouped by Device ID, and the
recommended course of action for each fault.
Two possible conditions may occur in which the CMS generates error code information.
These conditions are:
• A fault causing the system to restart occurs, but upon restarting the fault clears. If this
happens, begin with the first step of this procedure.
• A fault causing the system to repeatedly restart occurs. If this occurs, go to the segment
of this procedure that explains Using Start-up Error Codes.
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-15
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Field
Using Error Codes
Using Status Log Error Codes
❏ Access the Status Log. You do this by:
Step 1
From any of the operating modes, press
to bring up to the Selection Window.
Step 2
Use the ARROW keys to move the highlighting to the row of softkeys that
include Status Log.
Step 3
Press the Status Log softkey. The screen displays the Status Log.
Monitor Setup
(or
Instrument Config
)
Troubleshooting the
CMS
❏ Once in the Status Log, check it for entries that have an H, W, C, or F entered in their
first field. This identifies fatal errors. We are only concerned with fatal errors
because these are the errors which are significant enough to affect the CMS
operation. Each fatal error shows you the following:
•
The Function card which has reported the fault,
•
The part number of the functions card,
•
The device ID code which indicates the hardware device or software piece
which caused the fault,
•
Slot number of the function card reporting the fault,
•
The error code describing the fault identified,
•
The date and time the fault occurred. This is important because the status
log contains the fourteen most recently occurring errors, with the most
recent errors at the top.
❏ If you have more than one error message for a single incident, deal with the first
occurring error message (error messages are listed chronologically by date and time)
before dealing with the others pertaining to the incident.
❏ If you have fatal error codes in the Status Log, and you proceed with an EndCase
(discharge from the monitor), the monitor will not enter Standby Mode. Instead, the
monitor will go to Monitoring Mode. That is why it is a good practice to purge the
Status Log after you have dealt with or recorded each error.
Using Start-up Error Codes
❏ If your CMS is re-starting repeatedly, a start-up error code may appear at the top of
the screen. The start-up error code gives information similar to that displayed in the
status log, except the start-up error codes are listed in hexadecimal notation. These
codes are identified by an “H” at the end of the code.
❏ Start-up Error Messages require the same corrective action as the error messages
found in the status log. The Error Code Listings at the end of this module contain the
hexadecimal equivalent for each error code and device ID.
3-16
Troubleshooting the CMS
Using Error Codes
How Device ID Codes and Error Codes Relate to Each Other
For troubleshooting the CMS, the device ID code and the error code portions of the error
message have an important relationship. Each device ID has a block of error codes
assigned to it. A separate Error Code Listing has been setup for CMS’s operating system,
device ID code 16400, since most fatal errors occur in this area.
• For some device ID 16400 (4010H) corrective actions:
•
See “CMS System Hardware Configuration Problems” on page 3-23.
•
See “CMS System Hardware/Software Problems” on page 3-27.
•
See “CMS System RAM Problems” on page 3-27.
• For all other device IDs, specific corrective action depends on the type of error
encountered. The error code listing gives you detailed instructions for each situation.
Identifying the Slot Number Using the Error Code Chart
For error codes in the range 1000 to 1999 (03E8Hto 07CFH) with Device ID 16400 (4010H),
you can directly identify the slot number of the faulty board, using the hexadecimal error
code and the following chart.
Use the error code chart as follows:
Step 1
Locate the first three digits of the hex error code in the columns across the top of
the chart.
Step 2
Locate the last digit of the hex error code down the left-hand row of the chart.
Step 3
Read the number at the point in the chart where the row and column intersect.
This represents the slot number of the faulty board in the Computer Module.
These error codes will normally be provided in hexadecimal at system start-up as
part of a start-up error message. For most start-up errors, replace the card in the
slot identified by this chart.
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-17
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Refer to the Error Code Listing in this module for the device ID indicated by the error
code. There are two tables in this module. The first is for device ID code 16400 (4010H).
The second is for all other device IDs. The corrective actions listed in these tables are
listed in one of the follow ways:
Using Error Codes
Table 3-3 Error Code Chart for Slot Location (Device ID 16400 or 4010H)
Device ID 16400 (4010H) Only
First Three Digits (Hex Error Code)
Last Digit of Hex Error Code
Troubleshooting the
CMS
03E
03F
040
041
042
043
044
045
046
047
048
049
04A
04B
04C
04D
04E
04F
050
051
052
053
054
055
056
057
058
059
05A
05B
05C
05D
05E
05F
060
061
062
063
064
065
066
067
068
069
06A
06B
06C
06D
06E
06F
070
071
072
073
074
075
076
077
078
079
07A
07B
07C
0
8
24
8
24
8
24
8
24
8
24
8
24
8
24
8
24
8
1
9
25
9
25
9
25
9
25
9
25
9
25
9
25
9
25
9
2
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
3
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
4
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
5
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
6
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
7
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
8
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
9
1
17
1
17
1
17
1
17
1
17
1
17
1
17
1
17
1
17
A
2
18
2
18
2
18
2
18
2
18
2
18
2
18
2
18
2
18
B
3
19
3
19
3
19
3
19
3
19
3
19
3
19
3
19
3
19
C
4
20
4
20
4
20
4
20
4
20
4
20
4
20
4
20
4
20
D
5
21
5
21
5
21
5
21
5
21
5
21
5
21
5
21
5
21
E
6
22
6
22
6
22
6
22
6
22
6
22
6
22
6
22
6
22
F
7
23
7
23
7
23
7
23
7
23
7
23
7
23
7
23
7
23
Device ID 16400 (or 4010H) Error Code Lists
The first table gives the error code listing for device ID 16400 (4010H). Each error code
entry provides the following information:
Status Log Errors - the decimal number range the error code gives in its status log entry.
Start-up Error - the hexadecimal number range of the start up error code.
Possible Cause - the possible cause for the error code report.
Corrective Action - actions which are designed to isolate the fault to a replaceable
assembly.
3-18
Troubleshooting the CMS
Using Error Codes
Status Log
Errors
Start-up
Errors
Possible
Cause
Corrective
Action
1 - 99
0001H - 0063H
Hardware test failure in the first boot
stage.
RAM problem- refer to the corrective action
on page 3-27.
100 - 199
0064H - 00C7H
Microprocessor interrupts due to a
Hardware or Software problem in given
slot or cluster.
Hardware/Software problem- refer to the
corrective action on page 3-27.
200
00C8H
MPB chip errors: Can be caused by
Hardware/Software problem- refer to the
hardware defects on the indicated CPU
corrective action on page 3-27.
as well as hardware defects on any other
MPB participant (Master Cards: for
example Util CPU, APP_CPU, DSPC Ctrl,
and others) in the system.
201 - 202
00C9H - 00CAH
System configuration problem or invalid
contents of the Util_CPU EEPROM.
System Configuration problem - refer to the
corrective action on page 3-23.
203 - 239
00CBH - 00EFH
Same as error 200
Hardware/Software problem- refer to the
corrective action on page 3-27.
240
00F0H
Message transmission problem.
System Configuration problem - refer to the
corrective action on page 3-23.
241
00F1H
Same as errors 203 - 239.
Hardware/Software problem- refer to the
corrective action on page 3-27.
242
00F2H
Message transmission problem.
System Configuration problem - refer to the
corrective action on page 3-23.
243 - 299
00F3H - 012BH
Same as errors 203 - 239.
Hardware/Software problem- refer to the
corrective action on page 3-27
300 - 301
012CH - 012DH
EPROM checksum incorrect.
With 10 and/or 15 MHz APP_CPU's in
backplane, replace the EPROM in the cluster
of the given slot.
With 40 MHz CPC with Daughter Card in
backplane, replace the Daughter Card.
With 40 MHz CPC with Flash EPROM in
backplane, reprogram Flash EPROM. If you
still have a problem, replace CPC Card.
305 - 307
0131H - 0133H
Boot errors on CPC Card - software
Switch the System off, re-insert the Upgrade
upgrade problem (for example: Flash
Tool and switch the System on again.
Card corrupt). Will only occur when CPC
Programming Tool is connected.
Replace the Flash Card.
Replace the CPC Card in slot 12.
310 - 315
0136H - 013BH
EPROM version and EEPROM version
not compatible.
System Configuration problem - refer to the
corrective action on page 3-23.
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-19
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Table 3-4 Error Code Listing for Device ID 16400 (or 4010H)
Using Error Codes
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Table 3-4 Error Code Listing for Device ID 16400 (or 4010H)
Status Log
Errors
Start-up
Errors
Possible
Cause
Corrective
Action
330, 335
014AH, 014FH
Only detected by the APP_CPU in slot 5 - Hardware/Software problem- refer to the
indicates that another MPB participant
corrective action on page 3-27.
(Master Card) does not boot up as
required. There is no error in the
indicated slot.
340, 356, 370
0154H, 0164H,
0172H
Indication of communication problems
between the APP_CPU in slot 5 and
another MPB participant. The slot code
may be incorrect.
Hardware/Software problem- refer to the
corrective action on page 3-27.
380
017CH
Firmware revision is incompatible with
current Software revision.
System Configuration problem - refer to the
corrective action on page 3-23.
390
0186H
Indication of a communication problem
between the CPC in slot 12 and another
MPB participant. The slot code may be
incorrect.
Hardware/Software problem- refer to the
corrective action on page 3-27.
Exchange the Utility CPU Card.
391, 392
0187H, 0188H
Out of memory on the CPC Card.
Replace CPC Card.
393
0189H
Plugged CPC isn't compatible with the
Philips CMS Patient Monitoring System.
Ensure that the correct Software is loaded on
the CPC Card (check SW Part Number).
400 - 409
0190H - 0199H
Out of memory.
With 10MHz and/or 15MHz APP_CPU's in
backplane:
Check Data Management Option and SRAM
board compatibility. (See Parts Lists).
Replace RAM Card, if present in same cluster.
Replace CPU Card in indicated slot.
With a 40MHz CPC in backplane, replace the
CPU Card in indicated slot.
410 - 419
019AH - 01A3H
Missing file errors.
System Configuration problem - refer to the
corrective action on page 3-23.
420 - 449
01A4H - 01C1H
Utility CPU / EEPROM error.
System Configuration problem - refer to the
corrective action on page 3-23.
500 - 699
01F4H - 02BBH
Indicates a Software problem that cannot Check that the installed software is a
be solved by hardware exchange.
released version. Contact your local
Response Center. Install released software.
700 - 799
02BCH - 031FH
Communication problem between two
CPUs.
System Configuration problem - refer to the
corrective action on page 3-23.
Hardware/Software problem- refer to the
corrective action on page 3-27.
800 - 899
3-20
0320H - 0383H
Configuration problem.
Troubleshooting the CMS
System Configuration problem - refer to the
corrective action on page 3-23.
Using Error Codes
Status Log
Errors
Start-up
Errors
Possible
Cause
Corrective
Action
900 - 914
0384H - 0392H
Something within the System memory
has changed unexpectedly. This is
usually caused by a RAM problem.
RAM problem- - refer to the corrective action
on page 3-27.
One or more pins on a Function Card
may be bent.
Remove and replace the affected Function
Card.
915
0393H
One of the CPUs has failed to send a test
message to the next CPU. The reported
slot code will not identify the defective
CPU Card.
Swap/replace APP_CPU's one by one until
the faulty card is found. Replace faulty card.
916 - 919
0394H - 0397H
Something within memory has changed
unexpectedly (see error range 900-914).
RAM problem- - refer to the corrective action
on page 3-27.
920
0398H
Indicates a missing 32 ms interrupt on
the CPU in the reported slot. This could
be caused by a poor connection (CPU,
backplane, etc.) or a failure on the Util
CPU.
Inspect backplane connectors.
RAM problem- - refer to the corrective action
on page 3-27.
Swap/replace APP_CPU Card in given slot.
Swap/Replace UTIL_CPU Card.
921 - 999
0399H - 03E7H
Something within memory has changed
unexpectedly (see error range 900-914).
1000 - 1031
03E8H - 0407H
1032 - 1063
0407H - 0427H
Missing mandatory card in slot indicated. Consult the Error Code Chart in Table 3-3 on
page 3-18 to determine the slot of the
Wrong boot firmware revision on
misplaced CPU Card - place the CPU Card in
APP_CPU in slot indicated.
the correct slot.
Check backplane in Table 1-10 Function
Card Placement on page 1-23 for correct
Function Card placement.
System Configuration problem - refer to the
corrective action on page 3-23.
1064 - 1095
0428H - 0447H
Insufficient MPB RAM on CPU in slot
indicated.
Hardware/Software problem- refer to the
corrective action on page 3-27.
1096 - 1127
0448HH - 0467H
No Extended Test result due to Hardware Consult the Error Code Chart in Table 3-3 on
problem.
page 3-18 to determine the slot of the
defective CPU Card. Exchange the defective
card.
1128 - 1159
0468H - 0487H
Extended Test failed.
Consult the Error Code Chart in Table 3-3 on
page 3-18 to determine the slot of the
defective CPU Card. Exchange the defective
card.
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-21
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Table 3-4 Error Code Listing for Device ID 16400 (or 4010H)
Using Error Codes
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Table 3-4 Error Code Listing for Device ID 16400 (or 4010H)
Status Log
Errors
Start-up
Errors
Possible
Cause
1160 - 1191
0488H - 04A7H
RAM Card size not compatible with
backplane configuration.
1192 - 1223
04A8H- 04C7H
1224 - 1255
04C8H - 04E7H
Wrong CPU type in slot indicated.
1256 - 1287
04E8H - 0507H
CPU is too slow in slot indicated.
Corrective
Action
Ensure the correct RAM Card is installed in
the backplane, and check backplane on
Table 1-10 Function Card Placement on
EEPROM configuration of the card in the page 1-23 for correct Function Card
slot indicated is not compatible to the
placement.
Hardware configuration.
Consult the Error Code Chart on page 3-18 to
determine the slot of the defective CPU Card.
Exchange the cards in cluster one by one.
Check backplane on Table 1-10 Function
Card Placement on page 1-23 for correct
Function Card placement.
Consult the Error Code Chart on page 3-18 to
determine the slot of the defective CPU Card.
Exchange the defective card.
2100
0834H
Unused card in the System (non-fatal
error).
Check backplane on Table 1-10 Function
Card Placement on page 1-23 for correct
Function Card placement, remove unused
card.
2110 - 2152
083EH - 0866H
Unreleased Software installed (non-fatal
error).
Contact your local response center - install
released Software.
2160
0870H
An extra CPU is present in indicated slot
(non-fatal error).
Remove unused CPU Card in indicated slot.
2170 - 3300
087AH - 0C54H
Hardware problem.
With 10 and/or 15MHz APP_CPU's in
backplane, replace the EPROM boards.
With 40MHz CPC in backplane:
1. Replace the CPC Card.
2. Exchange the card in the indicated slot.
3. Exchange all other APP_CPUs one by one.
3-22
Troubleshooting the CMS
CMS System Hardware Configuration Problems
CMS System Hardware Configuration Problems
This section tells you how to deal with hardware configuration problems. These problems
generally occur when a function card is placed in the wrong slot or if a function card is
incompatible with the CMS configuration.
Types of Function Cards
There are two basic types of function card: Master Cards and Local Cards.
The RS232_IF may
be installed in any
slot of the
Computer Module
as it has no
connection to the
Local Bus. The DC/
DC Converter also
has no connection
to the Local Bus
but must be
inserted to the left
of slot 21 of the
Computer Module,
because it may
damage the system
if placed in
another slot.
• Master Cards - The master cards are those cards that have both a Central Processing
Unit (CPU) and a Message Passing Bus interface (MPB_IF). These cards may also
communicate with local cards (for example SRAM, EPROM and CDSPC_VIDEO) over
the Local Bus. Only one of each master card type may be used in the same Computer
Module, with the exception of the Application CPU and the display controllers.
• Local Cards - The Local Cards have no MPB_IF and can only communicate with the
master card via the Local Bus within a cluster of connectors. These cards may be used
on every cluster containing a master board within the Computer Module. All the Local
Cards may be used more than once in the Computer Module, with the exception of the
SDN_IF and the Rack_IF S-Ram, and more than one Local Card may used by a master
card. Therefore, an identifier is used so the master card can tell the Local Card type and
position in the cluster. This may also be used to test the board for compatibility with the
master card.
Interconnections
Three types of card in the backplane interconnect. The types are as follows:
• Master Cards. These cards are connected to both the MPB and the local bus.
In addition,
system interfaces
and local cards
may be interfaces
to systems outside
the CMS.
• System Interfaces. These are master cards that are connected to the MPB but have no
connection to the local bus.
• Local Cards. As the name suggests, these cards are only connected to the local bus and
have no MPB connection.
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-23
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Concepts
CMS System Hardware Configuration Problems
Rules for Card Placement
The rules governing where particular function cards may be positioned in the backplane
are as follows:
• The DC/DC converter must be placed in the unnumbered slot (cluster 1).
• The Rack Interface card must be placed in slot 18.
• If required, the DSPC_Lang card must be placed in slot 3.
Troubleshooting the
CMS
• If present, a 40MHz CPC card must be inserted in slot 12.
• Master Cards can only be used once within any local cluster.
• Local Cards must be located in the same cluster as their associated master card.
Therefore, the following cards must be clustered as indicated:
•
SDN Interface and Rack Interface with Util_CPU
•
CDSPC_Video with CDSPC_Control
•
EPROM with an APP_CPU
•
SRAM with an APP_CPU
• The following cards, which have external connections, must be inserted in the rear of
the backplane:
•
UTIL_CPU
•
RS-232 Interface
•
SDN Interface
•
HDLC Interface
•
Analog Interface
•
Display Controller
The end of this section gives the delivered configurations for the different releases of the
CMS.
3-24
Troubleshooting the CMS
CMS System Hardware Configuration Problems
Procedures
The procedures for fixing CMS configuration problems vary depending upon your
configuration and the type of APP_CPU or CPC you have. In general, the procedure for
your configuration requires you to perform some visual checks, verify you are operating
with the proper software revision for your CMS, and then perform fault isolation
procedures based on the hardware configuration.
For Monitors with
10 MHz and 15
MHz APP_CPU
Cards, the
APP_CPU in slot 5
of the System's
backplane is the
Master CPU.
For Monitors with
the CPC Card (40
MHz), the card in
slot 12 of the
System's backplane
configuration is the
Master CPU.
The Master CPU
reports errors in the
System to the Status
Log.
The reported CPU is
not necessarily the
defective CPU or
Function Card.
❏ If the Monitor reboots continuously, examine the LEDs of the Function Cards:
❏
Step 1
If the red LED of the Master CPU Card stays on, check if another CPU Card
is plugged in the same cluster - there should be only one CPU per cluster.
Otherwise exchange the CPU Card in the reported slot.
Step 2
If the red LED on the Master CPU does not stay on, refer to Table 3-5
General Error Code Listing for Other Device IDs on page 3-28 to identify the
faulty card.
For monitors with 10MHz or 15MHz APP_CPUs:
Step 1
Verify that the Master and Slave EPROM Cards are plugged in the correct
slots, and make sure they belong to the same software release.
Step 2
Verify the correct EEPROM part number by:
• checking the number displayed in the “Monitor Revision” screen or
• using the appropriate cloning tool if the monitor is rebooting continuously
or the display is blank.
Step 3
If the part number is correct, reprogram the EEPROM to the factory defaults
using the appropriate cloning tool.
❏ If the preceding actions do not correct the configuration problem, try the following:
Step 1
Replace the EEPROM.
Step 2
Replace the Utility CPU.
Step 3
Replace EPROM Cards.
❏ For monitors with a 40MHz CPC (Flash EPROM):
Step 1
Verify the correct EEPROM part number by:
• checking the number displayed in the “Monitor Revision” screen or,
• using the CPC cloning tool if the monitor is rebooting continuously or the
display is blank.If the part number is correct, reprogram the EEPROM to
the factory defaults using the CPC programming tool.
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-25
Troubleshooting the
CMS
The LED behavior
on the 40 MHz CPC
Card is the same as
the behavior on the
10 and 15 MHz
Master CPU Cards.
CMS System Hardware Configuration Problems
Step 2
Reprogram the Software on the CPC Card using the CPC Programming Tool.
Step 3
If the preceding actions do not correct the problem:
• Replace the EEPROM.
• Replace the Utility CPU.
• Replace CPC Card in slot 12.
❏ For monitors with a 40MHz CPC and Daughter Card (UV-EPROM):
Step 1
Verify the correct EEPROM part number by:
Troubleshooting the
CMS
• checking the number displayed in the “Monitor Revision” screen or,
• using the CPC programming tool if the monitor is rebooting continuously
or the display is blank.
Step 2
If the part number is correct, reprogram the EEPROM to the factory defaults
using the CPC programming tool.
Step 3
If the preceding actions do not correct the problem:
• Replace the EEPROM.
• Replace the Utility CPU.
• Replace CPC Card in slot 12 with a CPC Flash Card.
3-26
Troubleshooting the CMS
CMS System Hardware/Software Problems
CMS System Hardware/Software Problems
This section shows you how to fix problems that are of a hardware/software nature. The
procedure for fixing these types of problem depends on the type of error code received.
Procedures
extended test (see “Power On Modes” on page 3-44). If the test identifies a faulty
card, replace it.
❏ If the CMS reboots continuously, replace the card in the slot identified by the start-up
error message.
❏ Replace/swap the APP_CPU Cards (or CPC Cards if present), one by one.
Loudspeaker Test at Power On
From Release B.0, at every CMS cold or warm start the loudspeaker gives a series of test
sounds in Monitoring and Demo mode. These sounds reassure you that the loudspeaker is
functioning correctly. The sounds are in the following sequence:
• Yellow Alarm Sound
• Red Alarm Sound
• Yellow Alarm Sound
Each sound lasts about three seconds. During this short space of time the alarm manager
functionality in terms of processing parameter alerts is disabled.
CMS System RAM Problems
This section shows you how to fix problems that occur in the CMS RAM. The procedure
for fixing these types of problem depends on the type of error code received.
❏ If you get an error code in the Status Log, go to the Service Mode and execute the
extended test. If the test identifies a faulty card, replace it.
❏ If the CMS reboots continuously:
Step 1
Exchange the APP_CPU Card in the slot indicated by the start-up error message.
Step 2
Exchange other cards in the same cluster one by one.
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-27
Troubleshooting the
CMS
❏ If you get an error code in the Status Log, go to the Service Mode and execute the
CMS System RAM Problems
Error Code Lists for Other Device IDs
This table lists the general error codes for other devices. If the Device ID is not listed,
then the source of the problem is not dependent on the Device ID.
Table 3-5 General Error Code Listing for Other Device IDs
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
10000 to 10999
2710H - 2AF7H
Software internal warning.
This is a non-fatal error and can be ignored.
11000 to 11999
2AF8H - 2EDFH
Buffered data either lost or
corrupted by the APP_CPU Card.
The reporting APP_CPU Card
may be defective.
Continuous Rebooting:
Allow the system to reboot as many times as
the number of APP_CPU Cards fitted. (For a
system with 5 APP_CUP cards, reboot 5 times.)
If the error code recurs, replace the reporting
APP_CPU.
Replace the RAM Card if it is in the cluster of
the reporting CPU Card.
During Run-time:
If occurrence is transient, ignore.
If error code recurs often, perform the
extended test in Service Mode. If the test
identifies a faulty APP_CPU or RAM Card,
replace it.
12000 to 12999
2EE0H - 32C7H
EEPROM access failure.
Try to reprogram the EEPROM using the
cloning tool.
Replace the EEPROM on the UTIL_CPU Card.
Replace probable defective UTIL_CPU Card.
Find the slot code, and replace that card.
13000 - 13999
32C8H - 36AFH
System internal configuration
related errors. This refers to the
structure of the various software
modules.
The structure of the various software modules
cannot be changed in the field. These error
codes do not relate to the system field
configuration.
32709 or 7FC5H
20120 - 20128
4E98H - 4EADH
Data Transfer Module failed.
Troubleshoot Data Transfer Module.
32744 or 7FE8H
21035 or 522BH
21107 or 5273H
24138 or 5E4AH
24088 or 5E18H
24155 or 5E5BH
Internal time-handling problem.
This error does not imply
defective behavior.
Ignore.
32747 or 7FEBH
11200 or 2BC0H
Battery on the S-RAM board
(M1055-66501 or M1056-66501) is
low or defective.
OR
CPC board in slot 12 is defective
(Release C and later.)
Exchange the S-RAM board or replace the
battery on the S-RAM board (1420-0375).
OR
Exchange the CPC board in slot 12 (Release C
and later.)
32747 or 7FEBH
3733 or 0E95H
20004 or 4E24H
20133 or 4EA5H
24088 or 5E18H
24155 or 5E5BH
Internal time handling problem.
This error does not imply
defective behavior.
Ignore.
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Device ID
3-28
Error Codes
Troubleshooting the CMS
CMS System RAM Problems
Device ID
Error Codes
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
32747 or 7FEBH
64026 or FA1AH
Monitor reboots intermittently.
Possible problem with SRAM
Card.
In Service Mode, execute the extended test. If
the test identifies a faulty card, replace it.
32752 or 7FF0H
22300 or 571CH
Monitor reboots intermittently.
Philips-HIL connection problem.
Check connection of Philips-HIL cable and
replace if necessary.
Check connection of black wire between bezel
and display. Replace if faulty.
Check HIF board in display and replace if
faulty.
Check UTIL_CPU and replace if faulty.
22400 or 5780H
No response from display
controller card (DSPC or
CDSPC_CTRL).
Replace DSPC or CDSPC card.
22401 or 5781H
Missing or defective DSPC_Lang
Card.
Insert a DSPC_Lang Card if missing from the
backplane.
Replace the defective DSPC_Lang Card.
20300 or 4F4CH
Rack_IF communication
problem.
Check Rack_IF connection.
Replace Rack_IF Card.
Check pins on backplane - replace the
backplane if necessary.
50497 or C541H
SDN communication problem or
temporary SCC power failure.
Check SDN connection - restart the monitor
after reconnecting.
Check/exchange SDN cable.
Check/exchange SDN_IF Card.
Check pins on backplane - replace the
backplane if necessary.
32766 or 7FFEH
3212 or 0C8CH
Out of memory.
Check Data Management Option and SRAM
board compatibility.
Replace RAM Card, if present in same cluster.
Replace CPU Card in indicated slot.
32767 or 7FFFH
90 or 005AH
Internal Software problem.
Ignore.
32753 or 7FF1H
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-29
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Table 3-5 General Error Code Listing for Other Device IDs (Continued)
CMS System RAM Problems
Error Code List for Specific Device IDs other than 16400 (4010H)
The following table lists error codes with specific Device IDs other than 16400 (4010H).
The source of the fault, and meaning of the error codes listed can only be determined by
the identification of the error code’s specific Device ID.
If the system reboots every 4 minutes, check the HIL cable connection before
troubleshooting the System.
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Table 3-6 Error Code List for Specific Device IDs other than 16400 (4010H)
3-30
Device
ID
Error
Code
Possible cause Fault
1897
(2005H)
18995
(4A33H)
SDN communication
problem. (Could be
caused by temporary
SCC power Failure).
1. Check SDN connection - Restart the
monitor after reconnecting.
2. Check/exchange SDN_IF cable.
3. Check/exchange SDN_IF card.
4. Check pins on backplane - replace the
backplane if
necessary.
8199
(2007H)
8200
(2008H)
2049
(0801H)
DSPC Video Card
missing.
1. Check Function card placement in
backplane.
2. Insert a DSPC card if missing.
Old Display Controller
Cards used with
release B.0 Software
1. Check if the Software version used is B.0.
2. Check if the Display Controller Card has
one of the following part numbers: M1066-66501
or M1072-66521. If so, proceed with the
following steps:
3. For a Monochrome Display, replace the old
Display Controller Card M1066-66501 with the
new version M1066-66531.
4. For a Color Display, replace the old Display
Controller Card M1072-66521 together with the
Video Board M1072-66501 with the new version
M1072-66531.
8203
(200BH)
1, 20
(0001H,
0014H)
Overload on the RS232 board due to
accessing/sending too
much data using the
protocol with a remote
computer.
Verify the external program against interface/
RS-232 bandwidth limitations. Refer to RS-232
Computer Interface
Programming Guide.
8203
(200BH)
6 (0006H)
RS-232 F/W problem
(large OTP).
Replace the large F/W OTP on the RS-232 card.
8203
(200BH)
7 (0007H)
RS-232 F/W problem
(small OTP).
Replace the small F/W OTP on the RS-232 card.
17000
(4268H)
46146
(B442H)
Non-fatal error
reported by the
recorder module.
1. Ensure that there is paper in the module.
2. Ensure that the recorder
module door is firmly shut.
Troubleshooting the CMS
Corrective Action
CMS System RAM Problems
Table 3-6 Error Code List for Specific Device IDs other than 16400 (4010H)
Device
ID
Error
Code
Possible cause Fault
17099
(42CBH)
29113
(71B9H)
Overload of the RS-232
board due to
accessing/sending too
much data using the
protocol with a remote
computer.
Verify the external program against interface
RS-232 bandwidth limitations. Refer to the RS232 Computer Interface
Programming Guide.
32744
(7FE8H)
21035
(522BH)
21107
(5273H)
24138
(5E4AH)
24088
(5E18H)
24155
(5E5BH)
Internal time handling
problem. This error
does not imply
defective behavior.
Ignore.
32747
(7FEBH)
11200
(2BC0H)
13561
(34F9H)
Battery on S-RAM
board (M1055-66501 or
M1056-66501) is low or
defective.
OR
CPC board in slot 12
may be defective
(Release C or later).
Exchange the S-RAM board or replace the
battery on the
S-RAM board (1420-0375).
OR
Exchange CPC board in slot 12 (Release C or
later).
32747
(7FEBH)
3733
(0E95H)
20004
(4E24H)
20133
(4EA5H)
24088
(5E18H)
24155
(5E5BH)
Internal time handling
problem. This error
does not imply
defective behavior.
Ignore.
32747
(7FEBH)
64026
(FA1AH)
Monitor reboots
intermittently.
Possible problem with
SRAM
In Service Mode, execute the extended test. If
the test
identifies faulty card, replace it.
32752
(7FF0H)
22300
(571CH)
Monitor reboots
intermittently.
Philips_HIL
connection problem.
1. Check connection of Philips_HIL cable and
replace if
necessary.
2. Check ground connection between bezel
and display. Replace if necessary.
3. Check HIF board in display and replace if
necessary.
4. Check UTIL_CPU and replace if necessary.
No response from
display controller card
(DSPC or
CDSPC_CTRL).
Replace DSPC or CDSPC card.
22400
32752
(7FF0Hv) (5780H)
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Corrective Action
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-31
CMS System RAM Problems
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Table 3-6 Error Code List for Specific Device IDs other than 16400 (4010H)
3-32
Device
ID
Error
Code
Possible cause Fault
Corrective Action
32752
(7FF0H)
22401
(5781H)
Missing or defective
DSPC_Lang function
card.
1. Insert a DSPC_Lang card if missing from
the backplane.
2. Replace the defective DSPC_Lang card.
32753
(7FF1H)
20300
(4F4CH)
Rack_IF
communication
problem.
1. Check Rack_IF connection.
2. Replace Rack_IF card.
3. Check pins on backplane - replace the
backplane if
necessary.
32753
(7FF1H)
50497
(C541H)
SDN communication
problem (could be
caused by temporary
SCC power failure).
1. Check SDN connection - Restart the
monitor after reconnecting.
2. Check/exchange SDN cable.
3. Check/exchange SDN_IF card.
4. Check pins on backplane - replace the
backplane if
necessary.
32766
(7FFEH)
3212
(0C8CH)
Out of memory.
1. Check Data Management Option and SRAM
board compatibility. (see Parts List)
2. Replace RAM card if present in same
cluster.
3. Replace CPU card in
indicated slot.
32767
(7FFFH)
90
(005AH)
Internal Software
problem.
Ignore.
Troubleshooting the CMS
CMS System RAM Problems
Device ID Codes for Software
The following tables lists all the available Device ID Codes, with the corresponding
device. The first table is for software devices and the second table is for Computer
Module or Processor ID Codes.
Table 3-7 Software Device ID Codes
Software Device
Decimal
Hexadecimal
16400
4010H
CMS’s Operating System
16500
4074H
Global Information Handler
16501
4075H
Operating Mode Handler
17000
4268H
Strip Recorder Software
17001
4269H
FE-Link Recorder Software
17002 - 17004
426AH - 426CH
Recorder Management Software
17020
427CH
Analog Output
17021 - 17023
427DH - 427FH
VueLink
17024
4280H
Ohmeda 7800/7810 Ventilator interface
17025
4281H
Anesthetic Gas Module
17027
4283H
Ohmeda 7900/Aestiva3000 Ventilator interface
17028
4284H
Loops Application
17029
4285H
Loops Application
17099 - 17102
42CBH - 42CEH
RS232 Interface Related Software
17105
42D1
Touch Calibration
18002
4652H
CRG Software
18003
4653H
Blood Analysis Module Software
18004
4654H
EEG Module Software
18005
4655H
Neonatal Event Review Application
18006
4656H
Blood Review Application
18007
4657
BIS Module Software
32700 - 32708
7FBCH
Patient Data Management
32709
7FC5H
Data Transfer Module Software
32710 - 32711
7FC6H - 7FC7H
Patient Data Management
32712
7FC8H
Tabular Trends on Recorder
32713
7FC9H
Printing Applications
32714
7FCA
Configuration Screen Printout
32744 - 32748
7FE8H - 7FECH
Patient Data Management
32733
7FDDH
SvO2 Module Software
32734
7FDEH
ST Segment Software
32735
7FDFH
SpO2 Module Software
32736
7FE0H
Delta Temperature Software
32737
7FE1H
Prompt/Message Management Software
Troubleshooting the CMS
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Device ID Code
3-33
CMS System RAM Problems
Table 3-7 Software Device ID Codes
Device ID Code
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Decimal
Hexadecimal
Software Device
32738
7FE2H
Error Management Software
32739 - 32740
7FE3H - 7FE4HH
Display Management Software
32741
7FE5H
Date & Time Management Software
32742
7FE6H
Cardiac Output Module Software
32744 - 32748
7FE8H - 7FECH
Patient Data Management
32750
7FEEH
Alarm Management Software
32751
7FEFH
Heart Rate Management Software
32752
7FF0H
Display Management Software
32753
7FF1H
Front-end Management Software
32754
7FF2H
Invasive Pressure Module Software
32755
7FF3H
Wedge/CPP Software
32756
7FF4H
NBP Module Software
32757
7FF5H
Temperature Module Software
32759
7FF7H
tcpO2/tcpCO2 Module Software
32762
7FFAH
CO2 Module Software
32763
7FFBH
O2 Module Software
32765
7FFDH
ECG/RESP Module Software
32766
7FFEH
SDN Management Software
Table 3-8 Processor Device ID Codes - Computer Module ID Codes
Device ID Code
3-34
Processor Device
Decimal
Hexadecimal
8193
2001H
Real-time Clock (on Util_CPU Card)
8194
2002H
EEPROM (on Util_CPU Card)
8195
2003H
Alarm Relay (on Util_CPU Card)
8196
2004H
Philips HIL Controller (on Util_CPU Card)
8197
2005H
SDN Interface (on Util_CPU Card)
8198
2006H
FE-Link (on Util_CPU Card)
8199
2007H
DSPC Card
8200
2008H
Color DSPC Card
8202
200AH
Application CPU Card
8203
200BH
RS-232 Interface Card
8204
200CH
HDLC Interface Card
8205
200DH
Analog Interface Card
Troubleshooting the CMS
CMS System RAM Problems
Troubleshooting Module 3 - Fixing Recorder Problems
The CMS uses the M1116A and M1116B Recorder Modules to make hard-copy recordings
of the patient data which is displayed on the screen. The method for troubleshooting is
the same for either recorder: identify the physical or functional problem, then find it in
the accompanying table and follow the corrective action that is recommended.
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
System thinks that door
is open when it is not.
Module out of paper.
Insert new paper roll.
Defective door switch.
Replace door switch. Exchange module.
System thinks that the
recorder is out of paper
when it is not.
Paper-out sensor dirty.
Clean paper-out sensor.
Recorder not
communicating with
System.
Poor connection to the
front-end rack.
Unplug the module. Plug it back in and
try it again in a few seconds. (Watch for
the LED to flash.)
Only one recorder module
may be used with each
monitor.
Remove one of the recorder modules.
System not configured
properly.
Check the configuration of the
connected monitor.
Too many modules
connected.
Check and remove the extra modules.
Recorder won't run.
Recorder interface not
working correctly.
Unplug the module. Plug it back in and
try it again in a few seconds. (Watch for
the LED to flash.)
Poor print quality.
Printhead dirty.
Clean the Printhead as described in
“Cleaning the Recorder Module” on
page 2-26 of this manual.
Printhead failure.
Exchange the module.
Paper not feeding
properly.
Module does not lock
into rack.
Paper roll off center.
Center paper roll on roller guides.
Dirty roller.
Clean roller.
Locking plates defective.
Remove and exchange the locking
plates.
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-35
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Symptom
CMS System RAM Problems
Troubleshooting Module 4 - Fixing Handheld Keypad
Problems
This module shows you how to troubleshoot problems based on symptoms given by a
faulty Handheld Keypad. Use this module when your CMS Handheld Keypad is not
functioning correctly or if you are referred to this module from another procedure.
Troubleshooting the
CMS
All CMS 2000 models come with a Handheld Keypad. The Handheld Keypad is used to
interact with the drug calculator and patient data management. Except for the option of
an XGA-compatible main display, it is connected to the Main Display through the human
interface connector. With the XGA-compatible display option, the Handheld Keypad is
connected to the External Alarm Device which is connected to the Computer Module
(HIL connector).
Symptom
Possible Cause
Keypad not
communicating with
system.
HIL cable reversed.
Reconnect the HIL cable, making sure
that the dot indicators match.
Keypad cable loose or
defective.
Check keypad cable. Exchange keypad if
necessary.
Loose connection between
logic board and switch
board.
Check connection.
Keypad defective.
Replace Keypad.
Keys or LEDs not active in
current screen.
Use keypad specification test to test the
keys in the proper screen.
Loose connection between
the logic board and switch
board.
Check connection.
Keypad defective.
Replace Keypad.
Overlay not correctly
aligned.
Upgrade to a new interface.
Keypad generates
system reset and
erroneous error code in
the system log.
Some keys or LEDs not
functioning.
3-36
Troubleshooting the CMS
Corrective Action
CMS System RAM Problems
Troubleshooting Module 5 - Fixing Printing Problems
External printers can be connected to the CMS through the RS-232 Connector. This
module shows you how to troubleshoot problems based on symptoms given by a printer.
Use this module if your printer is causing a malfunction of the CMS or if you are referred
to this module from another procedure.
Table 3-9 Troubleshooting the External Printer
“No Printer Available”
or “Printer Malfunction”
status message.
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
Printer not connected to
monitor or central station.
Check printer interface cable.
Printer out of paper.
Check paper.
Printer off.
Check printer power cord and switch.
Printer configured
incorrectly.
Check printer settings.
Wrong printer set-up in
Configuration Mode.
Check printer configuration settings in
Configuration Mode (under Trends/Calc
or Patient Data).
Printer malfunction.
Consult service manual supplied with
printer.
RS-232 Interface Card
defective.
Exchange RS-232 Interface Card.
Local Jet Printer Configurations
While color HP DeskJet printers are compatible with the CMS, color printouts are not
supported. Some printers require the following switch settings in order to be used with
the CMS.
Table 3-10 Printer Switch Settings
HP QuietJet Printer
The switches used to set the configuration are arranged in two banks
of eight. Switch positions required to print locally are:
A
B
HP DeskJet Printers
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
DN Up DN DN DN DN DN DN
DN Up DN DN DN Up DN DN
The switches used to set the configuration are arranged in two banks
of eight. Switch positions required to print locally are:
HP Desk Jet 500
A
B
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
DN DN DN Up DN DN DN DN
DN Up DN DN Up DN DN Up
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-37
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Symptom
CMS System RAM Problems
Table 3-10 Printer Switch Settings
HP DeskJet 550C
The switches used to set the configuration are arranged in two banks
of eight. Switch positions required to print locally are:
A
B
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
DN DN DN Up DN DN DN DN
DN Up DN DN DN Up DN DN
For Bank A, switch 6 varies depending upon the paper size:
Up: A4 (metric) DN: Letter size (US Format)
Note that HP DeskJet 400 and 600 configure internally.
Troubleshooting the
CMS
HP ThinkJet Printer
The switches used to set the configuration are on the rear. Switch
positions required to print locally are:
A
B
HP LaserJet Printers
Switch positions required to print locally are:
S1
S2
S3
S4
3-38
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
DN DN DN DN DN DN DN DN
Up DN DN DN Up -- -- --
1
Off
all
all
all
2
3
On On
off
off
off
4
5
6
7 8
Off Off Off On On
HP LaserJet II/III/IV/
V/VI Printers
Set the printer off line and enter the configuration menu by pressing
the MENU key and holding it down until SYM SET =ROMAN-8* is
displayed. Step through the menu items by pressing the MENU key.
The items are set as follows:
SYM SET=ROMAN-8
AUTO CONT=OFF
I/O=SERIAL
BAUD RATE=19200
ROBUST XON=ON
DTR POLARITY=HI
Press + or - to alter the item settings. Press ENTER RESET MENU to
store the new setting. (The “*” indicates that the setting is saved.) Set
the printer on line when configuration is completed.
HP 2673A Printer
The configuration for printing locally to a Philips 2673A Printer is as
follows:
BAUD RATE: 19200
PARITY: NONE
HANDSHAKES: XON/XOFF HARDWARE
DATA BITS: 8
STOP BITS: 1
STRIP NULL/DEL: OFF
Troubleshooting the CMS
Accessing & Leaving Service Mode
Troubleshooting Module 6 - Using the Service Mode
This section gives you details on how to use the functions of the service mode to check
the operation of the CMS and to test specific functions. This section includes a
description of the power on modes.
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Accessing & Leaving Service Mode
The Service Mode of the CMS is entered and exited using the following instructions.
Note: From Rel. C.0, returning to monitoring mode is allowed without entering a
password. Just press Monitor Setup followed by Resume Monitor .
Table 3-11 Changing Operating Modes
Step
Action
1
Press
2
Press
3
Press
4
Enter the password.
Service Mode: 4311
5
Press
6
Select the required Service Mode.
Use the arrow keys or press the Change Opmode softkey.
7
Press
The system performs a cold-start and switches operating
modes.
8
Press
NOTE
Comment
Monitor Setup
(or
More Choices
Instrument Config
if available.
Operating Modes softkey.
.
Monitor Setup
Instrument Config
.
Shows additional choices for softkeys in this selection window.
The Operating Mode task window displays the current
operating mode in words (for example, “Operating Mode Monitoring”) and prompts for the password.
Use the keys labeled 1 to 5. If the password is correct, then the
Change OpMode softkey is highlighted. If the password is
incorrect, the system returns to the Standard Display.
Change OpMode
Confirm
). The monitor setup or instrument configuration selection
window is displayed.
or
softkey.
The Operating Mode task window displays both Monitor and
Config in reverse video, with the current operating mode
highlighted.
Displays the Service Mode task window.
When Service Mode is entered or left, all monitor settings are reset to the user defaults
and the database is cleared.
In the Service Mode, the display becomes blank and the message “Service Mode active NO MONITORING!” appears at the top of the screen.
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-39
Facilities Available in the Service Mode
Facilities Available in the Service Mode
The following facilities are available in Service Mode and are described in the following
paragraphs:
• Global Switches including Line Frequency, Settings Transfer and Altitude (applicable to
software Release C and later releases) and French Homologation (applicable to
software Releases A and B only)
Troubleshooting the
CMS
• Date & Time
• Status Log
• Monitor Revision
• Power On Modes
• Display alignment patterns
• Network Test
Changing the Global Switches
The Global Switches facility can be used to change the global configuration of the system.
The global configuration is the same for all configuration sets.
To enter the Global Switches task window:
Step 1
Press the
Monitor Setup
Step 2
Press the
Global Switches
Step 3
Change the global configuration of the system as required.
(or
Instrument Config
) hardkey.
softkey.
Line Frequency
The line frequency is used to switch between 50 Hz and 60 Hz for the ECG filtering
frequency.
CAUTION
3-40
Ensure that the Line Frequency is set correctly for the country option ordered.
The factory default is 60 Hz for all units.
Troubleshooting the CMS
Facilities Available in the Service Mode
Control Panel Software
Step 1
Press the Monitor Setup (or Instrument Config) hard key.
Step 2
Press the Global Switches softkey.
Step 3
For the Standard keypad without Help key, the text should read: <Help>key: No.
For the Classic keypad with Help key, the text should read: <Help>key:Yes.
(Note: The Classic keypad is not available with Release B.0 or later.)
Settings Transfer
The patient-related settings of each parameter module can be stored in the EEPROM of
the modules. During monitoring, changes in the active settings are recognized and saved.
This allows the module to retain all settings, even if transported from one system to
another. The Settings Transfer feature can be configured to “Yes” or “No”.
The parameter module stores its settings in the EEPROM until they are changed, either by
modifying them in the parameter task window, or by resetting all parameter settings to
user-configured default values while in Monitoring Mode. All parameter settings are reset
to the user defaults when doing one of the following:
• Changing Operating Mode by pressing Monitor Setup (or Instrument Config ), then
Global Switches , More Choices, and then the Operating Modes softkey.
• Changing the Configuration Set by pressing Monitor Setup
then the Config Sets or Adult/Pedi/Neo softkey.
NOTE
(or
Instrument Config
), and
Both actions result in a “Restart”, in which the instrument is rebooted and the user default
settings of the parameter module are stored in the EEPROM of the module.
The following types of modules support Settings Transfer:
• All modules with T marked on the front panel
• The Pressure, CO, CO2 and Temperature Modules (also without the T mark)
The Heart and ST applications have settings stored in the ECG and ECG/RESP modules
respectively.
The Philips Monitor retains the labels of the multiple parameters, such as Temperature or
Pressure. The identity labels such as ABP, PAP, Temp 1, and Temp 2, are transferred when
the module is positioned in any slot on the same or other system. This Label Tracking
feature is only active if Settings Transfer is set to Yes.
The parameter application software stores a label identifier. This allows the system to
match the stored label with the parameters’ set default label.
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-41
Troubleshooting the
CMS
A global switch is used to load software that is compatible with the Control Panel
(Standard or Classic).
Facilities Available in the Service Mode
Setting the Altitude
An adjustment for altitude must be entered before using the CO2, AGM, and tcpO2/CO2
Modules. This is because the algorithm adjusts the measurement according to altitude.
The altitude setting is made in the Global Switches task window.
Setting the Date and Time
This facility allows you to set the system date and time. If the equipment is connected to
the SDN Network, the date and time are set automatically by the Network.
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Set the date and time as follows:
There is no
option to
configure the
system to meet
French
Homologation
requirements for
software Release
C, D or E. French
Homologation is
achieved in these
releases by using
specific French
Homologation
software.
Step 1
Press
Monitor Setup
Step 2
Press
Date & Time
Step 3
Enter the new date and time.
(or
Instrument Config
).
.
French Homologation (French language CMS only)
An option to configure the system to meet French Homologation requirements is
available for software Release A, B, F and later releases. The French Homologation
setting (ON or OFF) is the same for all configuration sets.
The default setting is: “Fr. Hom. Behavior: NO”
Displaying the Status Log
The Status Log contains error messages reported by the monitor either during the boot
process or during operation. This information can be accessed in either Monitoring Mode
or Service Mode. The Service Mode Status Log displays both fatal and non-fatal error
codes. The Monitoring Mode Status Log displays fatal error codes only.
RS-232 Interface
Any RS232
configuration
alterations made
in Service Mode
will affect the
configuration
settings made in
Configuration
Mode.
3-42
An external personal computer can be connected to the CMS via the RS-232 connector.
Refer to the RS-232 Computer Interface Programming Guide for a comprehensive
description of the capabilities of the interface.
The RS-232 Task Window is available to allow you to perform the RS-232 Loopback test.
Refer to Maintaining the CMS, Specification Tests, in this manual for a full description of
this test.
Troubleshooting the CMS
Facilities Available in the Service Mode
Checking the Hardware and Software Revisions
The System has a revision log facility which provides information on the revision status of
the hardware and software. These revision screens can be accessed in all operating
modes.
The following information is contained in the header of the Monitor Revision Task
Window:
• EEPROM Number: (for example: M1059-85781)
Troubleshooting the
CMS
• Serial Number: (for example: 2916A02425)
Displaying the Software or Hardware Revision
Step 1
Press
Monitor Setup
Step 2
Press
Monitor Revision .
Step 3
Press the key corresponding to the required revision screen. (
Show HW Rev ).
(or
Instrument Config
).
Show SW Rev
or
Hardware Revision
• Subsystem (for example, System)
• Part Number (hardware – for example, M1085-66501)
• Firmware Revision (for example, 6)
Software Revision
The software revision screen lists the contents of the EPROM Cards as follows:
For each EPROM Card
• Slot Number
• EPROM Package
• Part Number (software)
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-43
Facilities Available in the Service Mode
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Power On Modes
The power on
modes are
provided for
service purposes
only. They do not
influence the
monitoring
power on
behavior, which
is not
configurable.
This facility enables the service engineer to perform a power on reset of the system. Use
the Power On facility as follows:
Step 1
Press
Monitor Setup
Step 2
Press
Power On Modes .
Step 3
Type in the service password. The
word is entered correctly.
Step 4
Press
Step 5
Select Cold, Warm, Hot or Ext Test and press
(or
Instrument Config
).
Change Op Mode
key is highlighted if the pass-
Change Op Mode .
Confirm
.
Overview of the Power On Modes
The type of Power On Mode executed depends on the system down-time or the detection
of a fatal error by the operating system:
System Down Time
Power On Mode
< 1 minute
Hot Start
- patient data and active user settings are
recovered on restart.
≤ 3 hours
Warm Start
- patient data is recovered.
Default configurations are restored.
> 3 hours
Cold Start
- patient data is lost.
Default configurations are restored.
System performs extended test.
Display Alignment Patterns
This facility enables the service engineer to check whether the display patterns are in any
way distorted. Use the Display Alignment Patterns facility as follows:
3-44
Step 1
Press
Step 2
Press any of the softkeys to display varying patterns on the screen.
Troubleshooting the CMS
Monitor Setup
(or
Instrument Config
).
Facilities Available in the Service Mode
Network Test
The test provides information about every SDN Device which is connected to the
Other Patient
Overview
network. To start the Network Test, press the
(or
hardkey, then press the softkey marked Network Test .
)
The Network Test information is presented on the screen in tabular format. The devices
on each connected branch of the network are detailed in the table rows. Up to 15 rows of
information are displayed at one time.
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Scroll Page
Next Page
Use the
and
softkeys to scroll through the table,
highlighting the items in the table. An example of the information displayed for one
branch of the Network is provided below.
Table 3-12 Example of the Network Information
LBN
03
UNIT
REL
ERR
STATUS
CMS/24
0
X2
00
SDN, ON, NET, ST
PIC6M
6R
X2
00
SDN, ON, NET
PIC6M
6C
X2
00
SDN, ON, NET
Column: LBN
Lists the Branch Numbers to which each of the devices are connected. Central stations
are always shown at Branch 0, even if they are connected to, for example, Branch 31.
Column: UNIT
Lists codes for the names of each device on each branch of the network. The codes, and
the devices to which they refer, are as follows:
CARPO
78580A
CLOVER
78534 Patient Monitor
CMS/24
CMS Patient Monitoring System
COMP1
Computer
COMP2
Computer
COMP3
Computer
COMP4
Computer
DIAG
Diagnostic computer
MINI
783XX Series Patient Monitors
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-45
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Facilities Available in the Service Mode
NOTE
PIC4C
Patient Information Center (4-Bed Computer)
PIC4M
78504 Patient Information Center (4-Bed Monitoring) M2350/60 Philips
Component Central Monitor
PIC6M
78560 Patient Information Center (6-Bed Monitoring) M2350/60 Philips
Component Central Monitor
PIC8C
Patient Information Center (8-Bed Computer)
PIC8M
78508 Patient Information Center (8-Bed Monitoring) M2350/60 Philips
Component Central Monitor
POGO
78532 Patient Monitor
REC_D
Dedicated Recorder
REC_S
Shared Recorder (at Central Station)
TELEM
Telemetry
PIC, AIC
or VIC
Philips Information Center
?????
Unknown (new) device
Each UNIT code is followed by a number. This number is a private subcode, used for
internal purposes on the central station (Patient Information Center). It is not significant
for service purposes.
Additional lines are displayed below the device line when a device is assigned to a central
station (as in the previous example). This does not signify that the central station is
physically connected to the same branch as the device.
When a device is assigned to a central station, the letter “C” or “R” is displayed between
the UNIT and REL columns for the central station.
• A C indicates that the device is also assigned to an arrhythmia system.
• An R indicates that recordings can be made at the central station.
Column: REL
Displays the protocol release of each device on each branch.
3-46
Troubleshooting the CMS
Facilities Available in the Service Mode
Column: ERR
Lists hexadecimal error codes for each device on the network. If the code is “00”, no
errors are present. Otherwise, interpret the error codes as follows:
Step 1
Convert the two-digit hexadecimal error code to an eight-digit binary code.
Step 2
Compare the resulting binary code with the error code chart below. Note the
extreme left digit of the binary code is digit number “7”, the second from the left
is number “6”, and so on. Each “1” in the binary code corresponds to an error.
Digits
7
6
1
.
1
Troubleshooting the
CMS
Table 3-13 Error Code Chart
Error Indicated
5
.
.
1
4
.
.
.
3
.
.
.
1
.
1
2
1
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
1
1
0
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
1
False SPS Event Flag
Fatal Control Error Flag
Recoverable Control Flag
Error
Physical Data Error Flag
Logical Data Error Flag
Poll Cycle Overflow Flag
Command Response Fail Flag
System Cycle Failure Flag
Column: STATUS
This column provides information about the SDN state of each device. An example status
line would be:
SDN, ON, NET, T
Which can be interpreted as follows:
SDN
Device is connected to the SDN Network.
NET
Network is active.
ON
Device is on-line.
T
Test Mode is active.
If the device has only just been connected to the network, or has only just been poweredup, the letters “ST” (for “START”) are also displayed.
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-47
Description of the Boot Process
Description of the Boot Process
Overview
The boot process takes place in the following four stages:
1.Hardware self test.
2.File transfer.
Troubleshooting the
CMS
3.Software initialization - phase 1.
4.Software initialization - phase 2.
When all tests are successful and no hardware failures are detected, the boot process
lasts between 12 and 15 seconds before ECG monitoring can begin. These tests are
described in detail in the following subsections.
All start modes of the system (hot, warm, and cold starts) follow these four stages. Only
the status of the system at the last power down, and the time elapsed before the system is
powered on again, determine the start mode. In all start modes the ECG parameter screen
is displayed 12–15 seconds after the start-up is requested.
The actions performed in each start mode also differ in the extent to which the system
components are tested. For example, a cold start runs more extensive memory tests than
warm or hot starts.
An extended test can be activated in the Service Mode to run an extensive test of the
Monitor. When selected, the extended test takes over the system after the hardware
configuration has been determined in Stage 2 of the boot process.
Stage 1: Hardware Self-Tests
During the first stage of the boot process all boards in the computer module run their selftests. The success of the tests is indicated by the red LEDs on the System Boards.
At the start of the self test, the red LEDs are lit for 1 second, and then the SDN LED is
turned off and the other two LEDs blink during normal operation.
Immediately following this stage, the system checks whether an external tool is
connected, for example, a cloning tool. If an external tool is detected, then it is given full
control of the self-tested system hardware; none of the system software is activated.
3-48
Troubleshooting the CMS
Description of the Boot Process
Stage 2: File Transfer and System Configuration
Four to six seconds after the boot request, information about the system board
configuration is read from the central EEPROM. This information indicates what software
must be present, and identifies which boards are mandatory and which are optional.
Stage 3: Software Initialization -- Phase 1
Any problems are reported to the Status Log. If software on one Application CPU reports
a problem, the operating system will try to clear this buffered data by rebooting. This will
usually solve all problems.
Stage 4: Software Initialization -- Phase 2
At this stage the different parts of the software check whether other optional hardware or
software is available in that particular system.
After the second software initialization phase, the Monitoring Mode is activated.
Summary of the Power On Modes
The type of Power On selected by the CMS depends on the down-time of the unit as
follows:
System Down Time
Start Mode
< 1 minute
Hot Start.
< 3 hours
Warm Start.
> 3 hours
Cold Start.
NA
Extended Start can only be selected in the Service Mode.
NA
X-Start (occurs when changing operating Modes and configuration sets).
Hot Start
The Monitor makes a hot start when it has been powered down for a period less than one
minute. The active user default values, including parameter module settings are
recovered and retained on restart.
Warm Start
During a warm start the System behaves as during a cold start, but an abbreviated version
of the self-test is carried out. The system database for patient data management is
checked and recovered. All active settings are lost.
Troubleshooting the CMS
3-49
Troubleshooting the
CMS
In the first software initialization phase, each software module initializes its buffers. A
check of the local buffer data is also made. If a hot start is made, the data should be
correct in the local buffer on the CPU.
Description of the Boot Process
Cold Start
CAUTION
During a cold start the CPU Cards run a detailed test of memory which erases the
system database for patient data management. All active settings and patient
data are lost.
All user default values for configurable items including parameter module settings are
restored and an extensive self-test is carried out.
Troubleshooting the
CMS
When Settings Transfer is configured to ON, patient-related settings are recovered from
the module front-end's non-volatile memory. The system database for patient data
management is cleared. Leaving the Demo Mode causes a cold start.
A cold start usually requires between 12 and 15 seconds before the Monitoring Mode is
activated.
Extended Test
CAUTION
During the extended self-test the CPU Cards run a detailed memory test that
erases the system database for patient data management. All patient data is lost
as the memory test is equivalent to a cold start.
This test is not performed during the standard boot process but is a software switch that
can be selected in the Service Mode.
When all components are tested successfully, the extended test takes between 2 and 2.5
minutes to complete, and the upper limit is 255 seconds. An error message is directly
displayed at the top of the screen when problems occur during the Extended test. After
the test, inspect the Status Log for any device IDs and error codes generated.
X-Start
During an X-start, the system reacts as after a cold start, the only difference being that the
user default settings of the Monitor are downloaded to the EEPROM of the modules. An
X-start occurs after changing operating mode or configuration set.
NOTE
3-50
Modules that are plugged in the System within 30 seconds after an “X- Start” is initiated,
will receive the user default settings of the Philips Monitor.
Modules that are plugged in 30 Seconds after an X-Start is initiated will transfer the stored
patient settings to the Philips CMS Patient Monitoring System.
Troubleshooting the CMS
Chapter 4 Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
This chapter tells you how to troubleshoot problems that come from faults within the
plug-in modules or the associated circuitry within the rest of the CMS. The modules use
visual indications, error messages, and INOP messages to indicate a fault. All references
to the CMS also refer to the ACMS unless specifically stated.
See “Procedure Overview” on page 4-2 for a more detailed overview.
Objectives
This chapter shows you how to:
• Recognize a properly operating Plug-in Module.
• Identify symptoms of improper operation of the Plug-in Modules.
• Further isolate faults down to field-replaceable assemblies.
Concepts
This chapter uses visual indications, Inops, error messages and other operational
symptoms to help you diagnose problems with the Philips Plug-in Modules. Symptoms
have been grouped based on the measurement performed by the Plug-in Module.
Each troubleshooting section contains procedures for isolating faults based on the
symptoms, any supporting theory as to why you are being told to do a certain procedure,
and any additional rationale that will help you to isolate faults.
• Inops – Inops are messages displayed on the screen when the CMS cannot measure or
process signals properly. This could be due to patient-related or equipment-related
problems. This section deals only with those Inops which are equipment related.
• Task Window – The task window is an operating level of the CMS which allows you to
make changes or adjustments to the parameters or screen displays, or to perform
procedures. Each parameter has a series of task windows which can be accessed by
pressing the setup key on the parameter module. This section uses the task windows for
each parameter to check for error messages.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules 4-1
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
• Use any symptoms or indications to identify a fault as being in the Plug-in Modules.
Procedure Overview
Procedure Overview
Table 4-1 Troubleshooting and Self-Test Procedures
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Topic
4-2
Page
Troubleshooting tcpO2/tcpCO2 Problems
4-3
Troubleshooting ECG and ECG/RESP Problems
4-9
Troubleshooting Pressure Problems
4-11
Troubleshooting NBP Problems
4-13
Troubleshooting Cardiac Output Problems
4-17
Troubleshooting SpO2/Pleth Problems
4-22
Troubleshooting SvO2 Problems
4-24
Troubleshooting FIO2 Module Problems
4-28
Troubleshooting Temperature Module Problems
4-30
Troubleshooting CO2 Module Problems
4-32
Troubleshooting Blood Analysis Module Problems
4-35
Troubleshooting EEG Module Problems
4-40
Troubleshooting BIS Module Problems
4-43
Troubleshooting VueLink Module Problems
4-52
“Self-Test Procedure Overview”
4-55
“Performing the ECG or ECG/RESP Module Self-Test”
4-57
“Performing the M1006A/B Pressure Module Self-Test”
4-57
“Performing the NBP Module Self-Test”
4-58
“Performing the SpO2/Pleth Module Self-Test”
4-58
“Performing the Cardiac Output Module Self-Test”
4-59
“Performing the tcpO2/tcpCO2 Module Self-Test”
4-59
“Performing the SvO2 Module Self-Test”
4-60
“Performing the SvO2 Optical Stability Check”
4-60
“Performing the CO2 Module Self-Test”
4-61
“Performing the Temperature Module Self-Test”
4-62
“Performing the Blood Analysis Module Self-Test”
4-62
“Performing the Recorder Module Self-Test”
4-63
“Performing the VueLink Module Self-Test”
4-63
“Performing the Data Management Database Self-Test”
4-63
“Performing the RS-232 Card Loopback Test”
4-64
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting tcpO2/tcpCO2 Problems
Troubleshooting tcpO2/tcpCO2 Problems
This section describes how to troubleshoot and correct faults associated with the tcpO2/
tcpCO2 module. The procedures for recognizing, isolating, and correcting faults using this
module are as follows:
• Identifying a problem based on visual indications or repeated INOPS.
• Checking the tcpO2/tcpCO2 task window for specific error messages and performing the
corrective actions suggested in the table given with this module.
• Calibrating the module as required.
To Troubleshoot the Module
❏ If neither numerics nor a -?- are displayed for the tcpO2/tcpCO2 module,
Step 1
Make sure there is a transducer connected to the module. If no transducer is
connected, connect one.
Step 2
Make sure the tcpO2/tcpCO2 parameter is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 3
Make sure the tcpO2/tcpCO2 numeric is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 4
Make sure you don’t have more than one tcpO2/tcpCO2 module plugged into
the module racks you are using. If more than one tcpO2/tcpCO2 module is
plugged in, the supernumerary modules are ignored and should be removed.
Step 5
Check the connection on the module and the rack interface.
1. Unplug and re-plug the tcpO2/tcpCO2 module and check if the green LED
on the tcpO2/tcpCO2 module lights up after re-plugging. If it does not,
proceed with the following:
2. Put the tcpO2/tcpCO2 module into another slot and check the LED once
again. If it lights up now, the connector for the previous slot is faulty and
the rack needs to be replaced. If it does not, proceed with the following:
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-3
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
perform the following actions:
Troubleshooting tcpO2/tcpCO2 Problems
3. Note: this procedure applies only for setups, in which the tcpO2/tcpCO2
module is located in a Satellite Rack. If this does not apply for your
situation, proceed with 4.
Replace the cable from the Satellite Rack to the function box. Again
unplug and re-plug the tcpO2/tcpCO2 module and check if the LED lights
up. If it does not, proceed with the following:
4. Plug any other (not faulty) module into the same slot and check if the
LED lights up. If the LED of the alternative module lights up, the tcpO2/
tcpCO2 module is defect and has to be replaced. If it does not, either the
rack or the rack interface card is defect. Proceed with the following:
5. Replace the rack and plug in the tcpO2/tcpCO2 module into the new
rack. If the LED on the module does not light up, replace the rack
interface card in the function box.
❏ If a -?- instead of a numeric and one or more INOP messages are displayed for
the tcpO2/tcpCO2 module, perform the following actions:
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Please note that for proceeding to the next steps a transducer must be connected to
the module.
4-4
Step 1
Perform a module self-test (See “Performing the tcpO2/tcpCO2 Module SelfTest” on page 4-59). If the tcpO2 test numeric reads exactly 60 mmHg (8.0
kPa) and the tcpCO2 test numeric reads exactly 40 mmHg (5.3 kPa), proceed
to the next step, if not, replace the module.
Step 2
Enter the tcpO2/tcpCO2 Task Window by pressing the setup key on the
tcpO2/tcpCO2 module. The Task Window displays messages dealing with the
tcpO2/tcpCO2 module failures. The following table describes the messages
and corrective actions to take.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting tcpO2/tcpCO2 Problems
Table 4-2 Task Window messages for the tcpO2/tcpCO2 Module
TC Equip Malf, with
prompt: module
malfunction.
Possible Cause
Module is faulty.
Unplug then re-plug the Module. if the
error prompt reappears within 10 seconds, exchange the Module.
Transducer has been
inserted and removed
into/from calibration
chamber too frequently.
Unplug, then re-plug the module.
Microswitch in Calibration chamber is intermittent.
TC Equip Malf, with
prompt: equipment
malfunction. The
transducer is
plugged in.
Unplug and re-plug the module. If the
error prompt reappears any time after 10
seconds, replace the Calibration chamber.
Polarization voltage or
transducer supply voltage is out of range.
Disconnect the transducer. If the prompt
changes to module malfunction,
exchange the module. Otherwise replace
the transducer.
Heating malfunction in
the transducer.
Swap transducers to verify prompt message. If necessary, replace transducer.
Heating control in module is defective.
No numeric values,
and no -?- in standard display when
transducer is
plugged in, but not
inserted in the Calibration chamber.
Corrective Action
Swap transducers to verify prompt message. If necessary, exchange module.
Microswitch in Calibration chamber is faulty.
Replace the Calibration chamber.
Prompt: insert trans- Microswitch in Calibraducer in chamber
tion chamber is faulty.
appears when the
transducer is in the
chamber and the calibration is started.
Replace the Calibration chamber.
Calibration has
passed, but readings fluctuate more
than 2.0 mmHg
(0.3kPa)/30 seconds.
Re-membrane the transducer and restart
the calibration. If the values still fluctuate more than 2.0 mmHg (0.3kPa)/30 seconds, replace the transducer.
Membrane/electrolyte
worn out.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-5
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Message
Troubleshooting tcpO2/tcpCO2 Problems
Step 3
Refer to the following table. Correct the possible cause identified by the
INOP message and verify that the INOP disappears.
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Table 4-3 INOP Messages for the tcpO2/tcpCO2 Module
4-6
INOP Message
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
tc UN-PLUGGED
Parameter is ON and unplugged
from rack.
Perform Step 5 on page 4-3.
tc EQUIP MALF
Malfunction in the transducer or
the module.
Refer to the related Task Window
messages in Table 4-2 on page 4-5.
tc NO TRANSDUC
No transducer is connected to
the module.
Connect transducer to module.
tc CHANGE SITE
The site timer in the module has
expired.
Change application site and restart
timer.
tc CAL FAILED
Calibration failed due to out of
range or unstable signal during
calibration.
For more information on the calibration of the module, refer to
tcpO2/tcpCO2 Module section of
the User’s Reference Manual
tc CAL REQUIRD
Calibration is required before
applying the transducer to the
patient.
Run a Calibration as described in
tcpO2/tcpCO2 Module section of
the User’s Reference Manual.
Note: if the message is still displayed after calibration, run the calibration again. If you get the same
message again, replace the module.
tc CAL RUNNING
A calibration is running.
Wait until calibration is finished.
tc STABILIZING
The transducer has not yet
reached the selected temperature and/or the skin is not ready
to be measured.
Wait until measurement site has
warmed up and values become stable.
tc CHECK TIME
Site timer due to expire in 15
minutes or less.
Change application site and restart
timer.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting tcpO2/tcpCO2 Problems
❏ If tcpO2/tcpCO2 readings are questionable, perform the following actions:
Perform a tcpO2 zero check and tcpCO2 gain check for the transducer. These checks tell
you whether the tcpO2/tcpCO2 transducer is working correctly.
Test Equipment
The following list gives you the test equipment recommended to perform the specification
test on the tcpO2/tcpCO2 plug-in:
• 1 Calibration Unit (Philips 15210B or Radiometer TCC3)
• 1 Calibration gas bottle of Cal 1 gas (20.9% O2, 5% CO2) (see Chapter 6 “Parts List for
CMS”)
• 1 Calibration gas bottle of Cal 2 gas (0% O2, 10% CO2) (see Chapter 6 “Parts List for
CMS”)
• 1 tcpO2/CO2 transducer (Philips M1918A or Radiometer transducer)
• 1 Calibration Tubing (M2205A)
Procedure
Step 1
Ensure correct function of the Calibration Unit (See “Gas Flow Performance
Check” on page C-6 for Philips 15210B and Radiometer Service Documentation
for Radiometer calibration unit TCC3).
Step 2
Make sure that you are not in Service mode.
Step 3
Set the transducer temperature to 43.0o C.
Step 4
Using a calibration unit (Philips M1918A or Radiometer calibration unit TCC3)
and Cal 1 gas, calibrate the module as described in the tcpO2/tcpCO2 Module
section of the User’s Reference Manual.
Step 5
Check and note down the displayed values for tcpO2 and tcpCO2. The values
should not fluctuate more than 2 mmHg (0.3kPa) in 30 seconds.
Step 6
If the readings fluctuate more than 2 mmHg (0.3kPa), re-membrane the transducer ensuring that the old electrolyte is thoroughly removed and check wether
you need to activate the transducer. The tcpO2/tcpCO2 Module section of the
User’s Reference Manual tells you how to do this.
Step 7
Repeat steps 4 and 5. If the test fails again, the transducer has unacceptable drift
and has to be replaced. Repeat steps 4 and 5 with new transducer.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-7
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
• 1 Accessory Kit (15209-60010)
Troubleshooting tcpO2/tcpCO2 Problems
Step 8
Replace the Cal 1 gas cylinder on the calibration unit with the Cal 2 gas cylinder.
Turn on the gas supply of your calibration unit.
Step 9
Check the values displayed on the screen. The displayed tcpO2 must be < 6
mmHg (0.8kPa) within 10 minutes. The displayed tcpCO2 value must be within
the range listed in the table within 10 minutes. If the tcpO2 is not < 6 mmHg
(0.8kPa), and/or tcpCO2 values are not within the acceptance range listed in the
tables given, the transducer does not measure correctly and needs to be
replaced.
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Table 4-4 Calibration Values
4-8
tcpCO2 at CAL1 gas
Min. tcpCO2 at CAL2
gas
39 mmHg
5.2 kPa
74 mmHg
9.9 kPa
88 mmHg
11.7 kPa
38 mmHg
5.1 kPa
72 mmHg
9.7 kPa
86 mmHg
11.5 kPa
37 mmHg
5.0 kPa
70 mmHg
9.5 kPa
84 mmHg
11.3 kPa
36 mmHg
4.9 kPa
68 mmHg
9.3 kPa
81 mmHg
11.1 kPa
35 mmHg
4.8 kPa
66 mmHg
9.1 kPa
79 mmHg
10.8 kPa
34 mmHg
4.7 kPa
64 mmHg
8.9 kPa
77 mmHg
10.6 kPa
33 mmHg
4.6 kPa
62 mmHg
8.7 kPa
75 mmHg
10.4 kPa
32 mmHg
4.5 kPa
60 mmHg
8.5 kPa
72 mmHg
10.2 kPa
31 mmHg
4.4 kPa
59 mmHg
8.3 kPa
70 mmHg
9.9 kPa
30 mmHg
4.3 kPa
57 mmHg
8.1 kPa
68 mmHg
9.7 kPa
29 mmHg
4.2 kPa
55 mmHg
7.9 kPa
66 mmHg
9.5 kPa
28 mmHg
4.1 kPa
53 mmHg
7.7 kPa
63 mmHg
9.3 kPa
27 mmHg
4.0 kPa
51 mmHg
7.5 kPa
61 mmHg
9.1 kPa
26 mmHg
3.9 kPa
49 mmHg
7.4 kPa
59 mmHg
8.8 kPa
25 mmHg
3.8 kPa
47 mmHg
7.2 kPa
57 mmHg
8.6 kPa
24 mmHg
3.7 kPa
45 mmHg
7.0 kPa
55 mmHg
8.4 kPa
23 mmHg
3.6 kPa
43 mmHg
6.8 kPa
52 mmHg
8.2 kPa
22 mmHg
3.5 kPa
41 mmHg
6.6 kPa
50 mmHg
7.9 kPa
21 mmHg
3.4 kPa
39 mmHg
6.4 kPa
48 mmHg
7.7 kPa
20 mmHg
3.3 kPa
37 mmHg
6.2 kPa
46 mmHg
7.5 kPa
19 mmHg
3.2 kPa
35 mmHg
6.0 kPa
43 mmHg
7.3 kPa
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Max. tcpCO2 at CAL2 gas
Troubleshooting ECG and ECG/RESP Problems
Troubleshooting ECG and ECG/RESP Problems
This section describes how to troubleshoot and correct faults associated with the ECG/
RESP module. The procedures for recognizing, isolating, and correcting faults using this
module are as follows:
• Identifying a problem based on visual indications or repeated INOPS.
To Troubleshoot the Module
❏ If neither numerics nor a -?- are displayed for the ECG/RESP module,
Step 1
Make sure there is a trunk cable with lead set connected to the module. If
not, connect one.
Step 2
Make sure the ECG and RESP parameters are turned on. If they are not, turn
them on.
Step 3
Make sure the ECG (HR) and RESP numerics are turned on. If they are not,
turn them on.
Step 4
Make sure you don’t have more than one ECG/RESP module plugged into
the module racks you are using. If more than one ECG/RESP module is
plugged in, the supernumerary modules are ignored and should be removed.
Step 5
Check the connection on the module and the rack interface.
1. Unplug and re-plug the ECG/RESP module and check if the green LED
on the ECG/RESP module lights up after re-plugging. If it does not,
proceed with the following:
2. Put the ECG/RESP module into another slot and check the LED once
again. If it lights up now, the connector for the previous slot is faulty and
the rack needs to be replaced. If it does not, proceed with the following:
3. Note: this procedure applies only for setups, in which the ECG/RESP
module is located in a Satellite Rack. If this does not apply for your
situation, proceed with 4.
Replace the cable from the Satellite Rack to the function box. Again
unplug and re-plug the ECG/RESP module and check if the LED lights
up. If it does not, proceed with the following:
4. Plug any other (not faulty) module into the same slot and check if the
LED lights up. If the LED of the alternative module lights up, the ECG/
RESP module is defect and has to be replaced. If it does not, either the
rack or the rack interface card is defect. Proceed with the following:
5. Replace the rack and plug in the ECG/RESP module into the new rack. If
the LED on the module does not light up, replace the rack interface card
in the function box.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-9
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
perform the following actions:
Troubleshooting ECG and ECG/RESP Problems
❏ If a -?- instead of a numeric and one or more INOP messages are displayed for
the ECG/RESP module, perform the following actions:
Please note that for proceeding to the next steps a trunk cable with lead set must be
connected to the module.
Step 1
Perform a module self-test (See “Performing the ECG or ECG/RESP Module
Self-Test” on page 4-57). If the ECG/RESP test numerics read exactly the
listed values, proceed to the next step, if not, replace the module.
Step 2
Refer to the following table. Correct the possible cause identified by the
INOP message and verify that the INOP disappears. If the problem still
exists, replace the module.
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Table 4-5 INOP Messages for ECG and ECG/Resp
4-10
INOP Message
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
LEADS OFF
Not all required leads are
attached or electrodes have
been displaced.
With activated EASITM option
the wrong lead set is used.
Lead set or ECG Module may
be defective.
Make sure all electrodes are correctly attached.
With activated EASITM option
make sure you are using the correct (5 electrode) lead set.
If INOP still is displayed, change
lead set.
If INOP persists, replace module.
LEADS OFF XX
Single electrode from lead xx
detached.
Attach the missing electrode.
If INOP still is displayed, see Corrective Action for “LEADS OFF”
LEADS OFF (EL.X)
Single electrode from lead E,S
or I is detached (EASITMlead
set).
Attach the missing electrode.
If INOP still is displayed, see Corrective Action for “LEADS OFF”
ECG/RESP
UNPLUGGED
ECG/RESP module is
unplugged from the rack.
Perform Step 5 on page 4-9.
ECG EQUIP MALF
Malfunction in ECG hardware.
Replace module.
ECG/RESP
UNPLUGGED
ECG/RESP module is
unplugged from the rack.
Perform Step 5 on page 4-9.
RESP LEAD OFF
RESP lead is off, electrode
detached, or patient cable
unplugged.
Make sure all electrodes are correctly attached.
If INOP still is displayed, change
lead set.
If INOP persists, replace module.
RESP EQUIP MALF
Malfunction in RESP hardware.
Replace module.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting Pressure Problems
Troubleshooting Pressure Problems
This section describes how to troubleshoot and correct faults associated with the M1006A
and M1006B Pressure plug-in modules. The procedures for recognizing, isolating, and
correcting faults with this module are as follows:
• Identifying a problem based on visual indications or repeated INOPS.
To Troubleshoot the Module
❏ If neither numerics nor a -?- are displayed for the PRESSURE module,
Step 1
Make sure there is a transducer connected to the module. If no transducer is
connected, connect one.
Step 2
Make sure the PRESSURE parameter is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 3
Make sure the PRESSURE numeric is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 4
If you want to measure CPP, make sure that one PRESSURE parameter is
labeled ICP and both pressures display valid numerics.
Step 5
Make sure you don’t have too many PRESSURE module plugged into the
module racks you are using. If too many PRESSURE modules are plugged in,
you get two status messages: “Too many modules of the same type
connected” and “Currently ignored module in rack position x.x”. The last
message enables you to identify the supernumerary module.
These modules are ignored and should be removed. See Appendix A
“Product Information” for specific information concerning your model of the
CMS.
Step 6
Check the connection on the module and the rack interface.
1. Unplug and re-plug the PRESSURE module and check if the green LED
on the PRESSURE module lights up after re-plugging. If it does not,
proceed with the following:
2. Put the PRESSURE module into another slot and check the LED once
again. If it lights up now, the connector for the previous slot is faulty and
the rack needs to be replaced. If it does not, proceed with the following:
3. Note: this procedure applies only for setups, in which the PRESSURE
module is located in a Satellite Rack. If this does not apply for your
situation, proceed with 4.
Replace the cable from the Satellite Rack to the function box. Again
unplug and re-plug the PRESSURE module and check if the LED lights
up. If it does not, proceed with the following:
4. Plug any other (not faulty) module into the same slot and check if the
LED lights up. If the LED of the alternative module lights up, the
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-11
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
perform the following actions:
Troubleshooting Pressure Problems
PRESSURE module is defect and has to be replaced. If it does not, either
the rack or the rack interface card is defect. Proceed with the following:
5. Replace the rack and plug in the PRESSURE module into the new rack.
If the LED on the module does not light up, replace the rack interface
card in the function box.
❏ If a -?- instead of a numeric and one or more INOP messages are displayed for
the PRESSURE module, perform the following actions:
Please note that for proceeding to the next steps a transducer must be connected to
the module.
Step 1
Perform a module self-test (See “Performing the M1006A/B Pressure Module
Self-Test” on page 4-57). If the PRESSURE test numerics read exactly the
listed values, proceed to the next step, if not, replace the module.
Step 2
Refer to the following table. Correct the possible cause identified by the
INOP message and verify that the INOP disappears. If the problem still
exists, replace the module.
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Table 4-6 INOP Messages for Pressure
INOP Message
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
<Px> UNPLUGGED
Pressure module is
unplugged from the rack.
Perform Step 6 on page 4-11.
<Px> NO TRANSDUCER
No transducer connected
to the module.
Connect transducer to module.
<Px> EQUIP MALF
Malfunction in the pressure hardware.
Replace module.
<Px> ZERO + CHECK CAL Occurs when new transZero the PRESSURE module.
ducer attached to module, or when the power is
off for longer than one
minute and settings transfer is off.
4-12
<Px> OVERRANGE
Measured pressure >361
mmHg, <-41 mmHg.
Replace transducer.
If the INOP persists, replace module.
CPP CHECK SOURCES
Occurs for one minute if
either the arterial or the
intracranial pressure
sources are switched off,
or the front end modules
are removed.
Connect module properly to rack
and make sure that the PRESSURE
parameter is turned on.
Make sure you get valid numerics for
ICP and the other pressure. Make
sure that the preselected pressure
label in the CPP source window is
the same as for the second pressure.
CPP CHECK UNITS
Occurs if two pressure
sources have different
units.
Use the same unit for all PRESSURE
modules.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting NBP Problems
Troubleshooting NBP Problems
To ensure accurate NIBP measurements, the NBP plug-in module can be calibrated.
Philips recommends that the module is calibrated once every 12 months.
This section describes how to troubleshoot and correct faults associated with the NBP
module. The procedures for recognizing, isolating, and correcting faults with this module
are as follows:
• Identifying a problem based on visual indications or repeated INOPS.
• Checking the NBP task window for specific error messages and performing the
corrective actions suggested in the table given with this module.
• Calibrating the module as required.
To Troubleshoot the Module
❏ If neither numerics nor a -?- are displayed for the NBP module, perform the
following actions:
Step 1
Make sure the NBP parameter is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 2
Make sure the NBP numeric is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 3
Make sure you don’t have more than one NBP module plugged into the
module racks you are using. If more than one NBP module is plugged in, the
supernumerary modules are ignored and should be removed.
Step 4
Check the connection on the module and the rack interface.
1. Unplug and re-plug the NBP module and check if the green LED on the
NBP module lights up after re-plugging. If it does not, proceed with the
following:
2. Put the NBP module into another slot and check the LED once again. If it
lights up now, the connector for the previous slot is faulty and the rack
needs to be replaced. If it does not, proceed with the following:
3. Note: this procedure applies only for setups, in which the NBP module
is located in a Satellite Rack. If this does not apply for your situation,
proceed with 4.
Replace the cable from the Satellite Rack to the function box. Again
unplug and re-plug the NBP module and check if the LED lights up. If it
does not, proceed with the following:
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-13
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Philips uses
invasive pressure
as reference for
NBP. Diastolic
measurements
can be up to 8
mmHg lower
than pressure
measured by
auscultatory
(Korotkoff)
method.
Troubleshooting NBP Problems
4. Plug any other (not faulty) module into the same slot and check if the
LED lights up. If the LED of the alternative module lights up, the NBP
module is defect and has to be replaced. If it does not, either the rack or
the rack interface card is defect. Proceed with the following:
5. Replace the rack and plug in the NBP module into the new rack. If the
LED on the module does not light up, replace the rack interface card in
the function box.
❏ If a -?- instead of a numeric and one or more INOP messages are displayed for
the NBP module, perform the following actions:
Step 1
Refer to the following table. Correct the possible cause identified by the
INOP message and verify that the INOP disappears. If the problem still
exists, replace the module.
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Table 4-7 INOP Messages for the NBP Module
4-14
INOP Message
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
NBP UNPLUGGED
NBP is unplugged from
rack.
Perform Step 4 on page 4-13.
NBP EQUIP MALF
Hardware problem in
module or tubing.
Exchange the tubing and restart measurement.
If the INOP reoccurs and the message in
the NBP task window reads “Pressure
values of transducers different”, attempt
a calibration (See “Performance Test NBP
Module” on page 2-6). If this fails, replace
the module.
NBP INTERRUPTED
Strong patient movement or
Make sure the patient does not move
strongly and restart measurement.
Inflation/deflation timeout – pump problem.
Check wether cuff is connected. Check
tubing and cuff for leakages and restart
measurement.
NBP CUFF OVERPRESS
Strong patient movement or
defect in pneumatic
control.
Restart measurement making sure that
patient does not move strongly. If INOP
reoccurs, replace module.
NBP INCORRECT
CUFF
Neonatal cuff used for
adult patient size setting.
Make sure the patient size configuration
is set to PEDI/NEO and restart measurement.
CUF NOT
DEFLATED
Hardware problem in
module or tubing.
Exchange the tubing and restart measurement.
If the INOP reoccurs, replace module.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting NBP Problems
Using the Calibration Mode
This task window is displayed after pressing the Cal Frontend softkey in the NBP
manometer task window.
The keys Start , Stop , and Save Values are displayed at the bottom of the
Calibration Mode Task Window. The Start key is used to close the valves, the Stop
key opens the valves and the Save Values key is used to store the calibration factor.
Step 1 Press
Start .
Step 2 Pressurize the gauge as precisely as possible to 220 or 280 mmHg. One of these values (depending on the module) is shown in the NBP manometer task window.
Step 3 Now press one of the following keys:
Save Values : to store the calibration factor.
or
Stop : to abandon the calibration procedure.
WARNING
Consult technical support before changing the NBP measurement characteristic
in adult or pediatric mode. Changing the NBP measurement characteristic will
significantly change the NBP readings, especially in the elevated pressure range.
WARNING
The NBP measurement characteristic has to be set and stored individually for
each configuration set. The same setting must be selected for all configuration
sets.
NOTE
This setting changes the NBP measurement characteristic in adult and pediatric mode. It
has no influence on the NBP measurement characteristic in neonatal mode. In neonatal
mode the intra-arterial method is always used as a reference standard to validate overall
accuracy.
1.Go into service mode
2. Enter the NBP Task Window and press the ‘Change Refernce” key
3. Select desired NBP measurement characteristic (1, 2, or 3) according to the table below
4. Press “Confirm” to store new setting
5.Go into Config mode and select next Config Set
6.Repeat Steps 1 to 5 for all Config Sets
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-15
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Selecting NBP Measurement Characteristic
Troubleshooting NBP Problems
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Selection
Description
Reference Standard for Validation
1
NBP measurement
characteristic of CMS/V24/
V26 Rel. B.0 and earlier.
Recommended only in mixed
installations with Rel. B.0 or
earlier.
Intra-arterial according to ANSI/AAMI SP10-1987.
The blood pressure measurements determined with this
device and measurement characteristic set to “1” comply
with the American National Standard for Electronic or
Automated Sphygmomanometers (ANSI/AAMI SP-101987) in relation to mean error and standard deviation,
when compared to intra-arterial measurements in a
representative patient population.
2
NBP measurement
characteristic of M3/M4 Rel.
B and earlier (higher
diastolic values than 1).
Recommended if customer
prefers calibration against
manual auscultatory
reference method.
Auscultatory according to ANSI/AAMI SP10-1992. The
blood pressure measurements determined with this
device and measurement characteristic set to “2” comply
with the American National Standard for Electronic or
Automated Sphygmomanometers (ANSI/AAMI SP-101992) in relation to mean error and standard deviation,
when compared to auscultatory measurements in a
representative patient population. For the auscultatory
reference the 5th Korotkoff sound was used to determine
the diastolic pressure.
3
(Factory
Default)
NBP measurement
characteristic of CMS/V24/
V26 Rel. C.0 and later
Recommended in all other
cases than described above.
Intra-arterial according to ANSI/AAMI-SP10-1992.
The blood pressure measurements determined with this
device and measurement characteristic set to “3” comply
with the American National Standard for Electronic or
Automated Sphygmomanometers (ANSI/AAMI SP101992) in relation to mean error and standard deviation,
when compared to intra-arterial measurements in a
representative patient population.
The setting of NBP measurement characteristic is stored in the monitor and can be cloned
with the cloning tool.
4-16
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting Cardiac Output Problems
Troubleshooting Cardiac Output Problems
This section describes how to troubleshoot and correct faults associated with the Cardiac
Output plug-in module. The procedures for recognizing, isolating, and correcting faults
with this module are as follows:
• Identifying a problem based on visual indications or repeated INOPS.
To Troubleshoot the Module
❏ If neither numerics nor a -?- are displayed for the C.O. module, perform the
Step 1
Make sure there is a C.O. Interface Cable and a catheter connected to the
module. If not, connect them.
Step 2
Make sure the C.O. parameter is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 3
Make sure the C.O. numeric is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 4
Make sure you don’t have more than one C.O. module plugged into the
module racks you are using. If more than one C.O. module is plugged in, the
supernumerary modules are ignored and should be removed.
Step 5
Check the connection on the module and the rack interface.
1. Unplug and re-plug the C.O. module and check if the green LED on the
C.O. module lights up after re-plugging. If it does not, proceed with the
following:
2. Put the C.O. module into another slot and check the LED once again. If it
lights up now, the connector for the previous slot is faulty and the rack
needs to be replaced. If it does not, proceed with the following:
3. Note: this procedure applies only for setups, in which the CO module is
located in a Satellite Rack. If this does not apply for your situation,
proceed with 4.
Replace the cable from the Satellite Rack to the function box. Again
unplug and re-plug the CO module and check if the LED lights up. If it
does not, proceed with the following:
4. Plug any other (not faulty) module into the same slot and check if the
LED lights up. If the LED of the alternative module lights up, the C.O.
module is defect and has to be replaced. If it does not, either the rack or
the rack interface card is defect. Proceed with the following:
5. Replace the rack and plug in the C.O. module into the new rack. If the
LED on the module does not light up, replace the rack interface card in
the function box.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-17
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
following actions:
Troubleshooting Cardiac Output Problems
❏ If a -?- instead of a numeric and one or more INOP messages are displayed for
the C.O. module, perform the following actions:
Please note that for proceeding to the next steps a C.O. Interface Cable plus catheter
and Injectate Temperature Probe or the Service Tool (M1012-61601) must be
connected to the module.
Step 1
Refer to the following table. Correct the possible cause identified by the
INOP message and verify that the INOP disappears. If the problem still
exists, proceed to the next step.
Table 4-8 INOP Messages for the C.O. Module
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
C.O. UNPLUGGED
C.O. module is
unplugged from
the rack.
Perform Step 5 on page 4-17.
Tblood NO TRANSDUC
or
CCO/Tbl NO TRANSD
No C.O. Interface
Cable attached to
the module. Catheter not connected to C.O.
Interface Cable or
cable broken.
Make sure that all cables are properly connected and the connectors are free from dirt.
Connect Service Tool M1012-61601 to C.O.
Interface Cable1. The Tblood numeric must
read exactly 37.0 +/- 0.1oC, otherwise the module or C.O. Interface Cable is defect and has to
be replaced.
If you get the correct reading from the Service
Tool and the INOP still appears, replace the
catheter.
If the INOP still appears, replace the C.O. Interface Cable.
If the INOP still appears, replace the module.
C.O. EQUIP MALF
Malfunction in the
C.O. hardware.
Perform Step 5 on page 4-17.
If INOP is still displayed, replace module.
CCO NOT SUPPORTED
User has changed
the Transpulmonary Catheter to a
Right Heart Catheter.
Defective catheter
or cable broken.
Make sure that you use a CO module with
option C10 and a Transpulmonary Catheter.
If INOP remains, connect Service Tool1 (M101261601) and enter the Setup C.O. Task Window
by pressing the SETUP key on the module.
Check if the entry behind “Method of Measurement” reads “Transpulmonary” and the entry
behind “Arterial Catheter Constant” reads
“341”.
If INOP remains with connected Service Tool,
perform corrective actions listed for CCO/Tbl
NO TRANSD.
CCO NO ABP2
The pressure
source which is
selected for CCO
Pulse Contour
Calculation is not
available.
Make sure that the pressure, which is used for
the CCO Pulse Contour Calculation is labeled
as selected in the CCO Setup Task Window.
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
INOP Message
4-18
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting Cardiac Output Problems
Table 4-8 INOP Messages for the C.O. Module
INOP Message
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
CCO ABPa INVALID
The pressure for
CCO Pulse Contour Calculation is
not valid.
Make sure you get valid numerics for ABPa.
For more information refer to the Pressure
Module section in the User’s Reference Manual.
CCO NO CAL.
No valid calibration for CCO.
Perform C.O. measurement and CCO calibration.
CCO BAD PRESS SIGN
The pressure
wave for CCO
Pulse Contour calculation cannot
be analyzed.
Make sure to get a proper, undamped pressure
wave.
For more information refer to the C.O. Module
section in the User’s Reference Manual.
Step 2
Enter the Measure C.O. Task Window by pressing the START key on the C.O.
module. The Measure C.O. Task Window displays messages dealing with
C.O. module failures. The following table describes the messages and
corrective actions to take.
Table 4-9 Task Window messages for the C.O. Module
Task Window
Message
Possible
Cause
no Tinj transducer
connected
Cable of Injectate Temperature Probe is
not connected
or broken.
Faulty module.
Corrective Action
Make sure that cable of the Injectate Temperature
Probe is properly connected to the C.O. Interface
Cable and the connector is free from dirt.
Connect Service Tool M1012-61601 to C.O. Interface
Cable1.
If you use the C.O. module without option C10 you
must get the following results, otherwise the module
or C.O. Interface Cable are defect and have to be
replaced:
• Tinj numeric reads exactly 0.0oC
• No prompt message “Tinj transducer connected”
appears in the Measure C.O. Task Window.
If you use the C.O. module with option C10 you must
get the following results, otherwise the module or C.O.
Interface Cable are defect and have to be replaced:
• No prompt message “Tinj transducer connected”
appears in the Measure C.O. Task Window.
If you get the correct results from the Service Tool and
the Task Window message still appears, replace the
Injectate Temperature Probe.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-19
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
1. For correct use of the Service Tool, see “Performance Test Cardiac Output” on
page 2-8
2. ABP is only a placeholder. Always the selected pressure label is shown in the string.
Troubleshooting Cardiac Output Problems
Table 4-9 Task Window messages for the C.O. Module
Task Window
Message
Possible
Cause
Unexpected catheter, check catheter constant2
The C.O. module is not able
to identify the
Transpulmonary Catheter
type.
Faulty C.O.
Interface Cable,
module or catheter.
Corrective Action
Note: the following procedure applies only for C.O.
modules with option C10:
Make sure that catheter and C.O. Interface Cable are
properly connected and the connector is free from
dirt.
Connect Service Tool M1012-61601 to C.O. module1
and enter the Setup C.O. Task Window by pressing the
SETUP key on the module.
The entry behind “Method of Measurement” must read
“Transpulmonary”. The entry behind “Arterial Catheter Constant” must read “341”.
If you don’t get these results, replace the C.O. Interface Cable and check the readings again. If they are
still wrong, the module is defect and has to be
replaced.
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
If you get the correct results from the Service Tool and
the Task Window message still appears, replace the
catheter.
Unknown catheter
Faulty C.O.
Interface Cable,
module or catheter.
Make sure that catheter and C.O. Interface Cable are
properly connected and the connector is free from
dirt.
Connect Service Tool M1012-61601 to C.O. module1.
If Task Window message now has disappeared,
replace catheter.
If Task Window message still appears, replace C.O.
Interface Cable.
If Task Window message still appears, replace module.
1. For correct use of the Service Tool, see “Performance Test Cardiac Output” on
page 2-8
2. #C10 modules only
4-20
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting Cardiac Output Problems
❏ If a small -?- in addition to a numeric and one or more INOP messages are
displayed for the C.O. module, the values are questionable. Correct the
possible cause identified by the INOP message and verify that the INOP
disappears.
Table 4-10 INOP Messages with questionable values for the C.O. Module
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
CCO CHECK CAL
CCO calibration
is older than 8
hours.
Perform C.O. measurement and CCO calibration.
SVR MISSING
CVP
No valid CVP
available at the
moment. CVP is
automatically
set to 0 mmHg
for the continuous SVR calculation
If you need an accurate continuous SVR measurement, perform a CVP measurement and make sure
that the pressure which is used for the CVP measurement is labeled “CVP”.
Make sure you get valid numerics for CVP.
For more information refer to the Pressure Module
section in the User’s Reference Manual.
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
INOP Message
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-21
Troubleshooting SpO2/Pleth Problems
Troubleshooting SpO2/Pleth Problems
This section describes how to troubleshoot and correct faults associated with the SpO2/
Pleth plug-in module. The procedures for recognizing, isolating, and correcting faults with
this module are as follows:
• Identifying a problem based on visual indications or repeated INOPS.
To Troubleshoot the Module
❏ If neither numerics nor a -?- are displayed for the SpO2/Pleth module,
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
perform the following actions:
Step 1
Make sure there is a transducer connected to the module. If no transducer is
connected, connect one.
Step 2
Make sure the SpO2/Pleth parameter is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 3
Make sure the SpO2/Pleth numeric is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 4
Make sure you don’t have too many SpO2/Pleth module plugged into the
module racks you are using. If too many SpO2/Pleth modules are plugged in,
you get two status messages: “Too many modules of the same type
connected” and “Currently ignored module in rack position x.x”. The last
message enables you to identify the supernumerary module.
These modules are ignored and should be removed. See Appendix A
“Product Information” for specific information concerning your model of the
CMS.
Step 5
Check the connection on the module and the rack interface.
1. Unplug and re-plug the SpO2/Pleth module and check if the green LED
on the SpO2/Pleth module lights up after re-plugging. If it does not,
proceed with the following:
2. Put the SpO2/Pleth module into another slot and check the LED once
again. If it lights up now, the connector for the previous slot is faulty and
the rack needs to be replaced. If it does not, proceed with the following:
3. Note: this procedure applies only for setups, in which the SpO2/
PlethSpO2/Pleth module is located in a Satellite Rack. If this does not
apply for your situation, proceed with 4.
Replace the cable from the Satellite Rack to the function box. Again
unplug and re-plug the SpO2/Pleth module and check if the LED lights
up. If it does not, proceed with the following:
4. Plug any other (not faulty) module into the same slot and check if the
LED lights up. If the LED of the alternative module lights up, the SpO2/
Pleth module is defect and has to be replaced. If it does not, either the
rack or the rack interface card is defect. Proceed with the following:
4-22
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting SpO2/Pleth Problems
5. Replace the rack and plug in the SpO2/Pleth module into the new rack. If
the LED on the module does not light up, replace the rack interface card
in the function box.
❏ If a -?- instead of a numeric and one or more INOP messages are displayed for
the SpO2/Pleth module, perform the following actions:
Please note that for proceeding to the next steps a transducer must be connected to
the module.
Step 1
Perform a Self-Test (See “Performing the SpO2/Pleth Module Self-Test” on
page 4-58). If the SpO2/Pleth test numerics read exactly the listed values,
proceed to the next step, if not, replace the module.
Step 2
Refer to the following table. Correct the possible cause identified by the
INOP message and verify that the INOP disappears. If the problem still
exists, replace the module.
INOP Message
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
SpO2 /PLETH NO
TRANSDUCER
No transducer is connected to
the module
Connect transducer to module.
SpO2 /PLETH
EQUIP MALF
Malfunction in the transducer
or module.
Replace transducer. If INOP persists,
replace module
SpO2 /PLETH
UNPLUGGED
SpO2 /PLETH module is
unplugged from the rack.
Perform Step 5 on page 4-22
SpO2 ERRATIC
Erratic SpO2 measurements,
often due to a faulty transducer,
or invalid SpO2 measurements;
often due to the transducer
being incorrectly positioned.
Reposition transducer. If the INOP
persists, replace transducer.
SpO2/PLETH
NOISY SIGNAL
Patient movement or electrical
interference are causing irregular pulse patterns.
Make sure that patient does not
move strongly. If INOP persists,
move cable away from power cords.
SpO2/PLETH
INTERF
Level of ambient light and/or
cable induced electrical interference is so high, that the SpO2
transducer cannot measure
pulse rate.
Cover transducer against ambient
light and move cable away from
power cords.
SpO2/PLETH
NON-PULSATILE
Pulse is too weak or not detectable.
Move transducer to another application site.
PLETH
REDUCE SIZE
Transducer displaced or strong
vasodilation after automatic
wave fixing.
Press Optimize Size softkey in
PLETH Task Window to restore the
PLETH wave.
SpO2 TRANSD
MALF or
PLETH TRANSD
MALF
SpO2 transducer is defective
due to inadequate diode output.
Replace the transducer.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Table 4-11 INOP Messages for the SpO2/Pleth Module
4-23
Troubleshooting SvO2 Problems
Troubleshooting SvO2 Problems
This section describes how to troubleshoot and correct faults associated with the SvO2
plug-in module. The procedures for recognizing, isolating, and correcting faults with this
module are as follows:
• Identifying a problem based on visual indications or repeated INOPS.
To Troubleshoot the Module
❏ If neither numerics nor a -?- are displayed for the SvO2 module, perform the
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
following actions:
Step 1
Make sure there is a Abbott optical module and catheter connected to the
module. If not, connect one.
Step 2
Make sure the SvO2 parameter is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 3
Make sure the SvO2 numeric is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 4
Make sure you don’t have more than one SvO2 module plugged into the
module racks you are using. If more than one SvO2 module is plugged in, the
supernumerary modules are ignored and should be removed.
Step 5
Check the connection on the module and the rack interface.
1. Unplug and re-plug the SvO2 module and check if the green LED on the
SvO2 module lights up after re-plugging. If it does not, proceed with the
following:
2. Put the SvO2 module into another slot and check the LED once again. If
it lights up now, the connector for the previous slot is faulty and the rack
needs to be replaced. If it does not, proceed with the following:
3. Note: this procedure applies only for setups, in which the SvO2 module
is located in a Satellite Rack. If this does not apply for your situation,
proceed with 4.
Replace the cable from the Satellite Rack to the function box. Again
unplug and re-plug the SvO2 module and check if the LED lights up. If it
does not, proceed with the following:
4. Plug any other (not faulty) module into the same slot and check if the
LED lights up. If the LED of the alternative module lights up, the SvO2
module is defect and has to be replaced. If it does not, either the rack or
the rack interface card is defect. Proceed with the following:
5. Replace the rack and plug in the SvO2 module into the new rack. If the
LED on the module does not light up, replace the rack interface card in
the function box.
4-24
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting SvO2 Problems
❏ If a -?- instead of a numeric and one or more INOP messages are displayed for
the SvO2 module, perform the following actions:
Please note that for proceeding to the next steps a Abbott optical module and
transducer must be connected to the module.
Step 1
Perform a Self-Test (See “Performing the SvO2 Module Self-Test” on page 460). If the SvO2 test numeric reads exactly the listed value, proceed to the
next step, if not, replace the module.
Step 2
Refer to the following table. Correct the possible cause identified by the
INOP message and verify that the INOP disappears. If the problem still
exists, replace the module.
Symptom
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
SvO2
UNPLUGGED
SvO2 module is unplugged
from the rack
Plug SvO2 module into rack.
SvO2 NO OPTMOD
Abbott Optical Module not
connected.
Loose or broken connection between Abbott Optical Module and M1021A
Check set-up (described in Reference Manual).
Replace Abbott Optical Module.
SvO2 CONFIGURATION
Abbott Optical Module has
been used with Abbott
monitor (Oximetrix 3) and
configured to SaO2 Computation Mode.
Reconfigure the Abbott Optical Module to
SvO2 Computation Module using the Abbott
OximetrixR3 monitor.
SvO2 CAL
REQUIRED
No valid calibration data in
the Abbott Optical Module.
Perform Pre-insertion Calibration if the catheter is still in the Optical Reference or In-Vivo
Calibration if the catheter has been inserted
into the patient.
SvO2
CONNCT
OPTMOD
Abbott Optical Module
became disconnected during storage of data.
Reconnect the Optical Module for at least 20
seconds.
SvO2 OPTMOD
DEFECT
Abbott Optical Module or
M1021A memory defect calibration and patient data
cannot be stored for transport.
Try different Abbott Optical Module.
If problem persists try different M1021A.
SvO2 EQUIP
MALF
M1021A or Abbott Optical
Module is defective.
Unplug Abbott Optical Module from M1021A
and perform a self-test under the Monitor
Setup Key. If INOP remains, replace the SvO2
module. If INOP disappears, replace Abbott
Optical Module then consult local Abbott representative for information relating to the
Abbott Optical Module.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-25
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Table 4-12 INOP Messages for SvO2 Module
Troubleshooting SvO2 Problems
Table 4-12 INOP Messages for SvO2 Module
Symptom
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
SvO2 WARM
UP
Initial one minute Abbott
Optical Module warm-up/
connection period.
Inop is displayed for minimum time required.
However, prior to performing Pre-Insertion or
In-Vivo Calibration, Abbott recommends a full
15 minute warm-up period.
SvO2 LOW
LIGHT
Unusually low level of light
is being received by the system from the catheter due
to:
Check setup and connections. Ensure that
fiber-optic interfaces of Abbott Optical Module and catheter are clean.
If no catheter is connected to Abbott Optical
Module, close Optical Module door and shield
from room light. If message persists, try, in
turn, different Optical Modules and M1021A to
isolate the source.
If catheter is connected to Abbott Optical
Module and catheter tip has been removed
from the Optical Reference but has not yet
been inserted into the patient, the SvO2 LOW
LIGHT INOP is displayed until the catheter is
inserted into the patient.
If catheter is still in tray, ensure that the catheter tip is correctly positioned in the Optical
Reference. If INOP persists, disconnect catheter, close Abbott Optical Module door and
shield from room light. If INOP disappears, try
a different catheter. If INOP remains, either
the optical Module or M1021A is at fault. Isolate accordingly as above.
If catheter is inserted into patient, review light
intensity signals. Check catheter positioning,
patency and catheter clamping to ensure optimal signal. If INOP persists, replace Abbott
Optical Module (perform In-Vivo calibration if
INOP disappears). If INOP still persists,
replace catheter and recommence measurement procedure.
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Catheter tip or Abbott Optical Module exposed to
room light.
Damaged catheter fiberoptics.
Poor catheter connection
to Abbott Optical
Module.
Poor connection between
Abbott Optical
Module and M1021A.
Defective Abbott Optical
Module.
Defective M1021A.
4-26
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting SvO2 Problems
Table 4-12 INOP Messages for SvO2 Module
Symptom
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
SvO2 LIGHT
INTENS
Intensity changed considerably since last Light Intensity Calibration.
Check Light Intensity trend using most
detailed time frame.
Low Intensities:
Damaged catheter
Inadequate blood flow past
catheter tip.
Poor optical interface
between the catheter and
Abbott Optical
Module
Damped or Erratic Intensities:
Catheter tip clotting
Spontaneous catheter
wedging.
Confirm proper catheter position by examination of pressure waveforms.
Check for kinks in the catheter or excessive
catheter clamping.
Check for distal lumen patency.
Check for clean and secure connection.
Check pressure waveform for damping and
ensure distal lumen patency.
Check pressure waveform and ensure catheter is correctly positioned.
After making all efforts to obtain a normal
Light Intensity, perform a Light Intensity Calibration. (An In-Vivo Calibration may also be
required.)
Run a Calibration as described in SvO2 Module section of the User’s Reference Manual.
SvO2 CAL
FAILED
Light Intensity signal drift
has occurred after completion of Pre-insertion Calibration and before
insertion of catheter into
patient.
Allow optimum warm-up time before any calibration procedure (minimum 15 minutes).
If INOP appears prior to removing catheter tip
from Optical Reference, repeat Pre-insertion
Calibration.
If INOP is noted after the catheter tip is
removed from the Optical Reference, insert
the catheter into patient, ensure optimal light
intensity signal, then perform In-Vivo Calibration.
SvO2 UNABLE
TO MEASURE
Signal received is outside
normal range such that
SvO2 values cannot be
derived.
Check for problems associated with LOW
LIGHT or LIGHT INTENS INOPs.
Check catheter position, patency and clamping, ensure optimal Light Intensity signal and
perform Light Intensity and In-Vivo Calibrations.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-27
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
High Intensities:
Catheter tip against vessel
wall
Troubleshooting FIO2 Module Problems
Troubleshooting FIO2 Module Problems
This section describes how to troubleshoot and correct faults associated with the FIO2
module. The procedures for recognizing, isolating, and correcting faults using this module
are as follows:
• Identifying a problem based on visual indications or repeated INOPS.
To Troubleshoot the Module
❏ If neither numerics nor a -?- are displayed for the FIO2 module, perform the
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
following actions:
Step 1
Make sure there is a transducer connected to the module. If no transducer is
connected, connect one.
Step 2
Make sure the FIO2 parameter is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 3
Make sure the FIO2 numeric is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 4
Make sure you don’t have more than one FIO2 module plugged into the
module racks you are using. If more than one FIO2 module is plugged in, the
supernumerary modules are ignored and should be removed.
Step 5
Check the connection on the module and the rack interface.
1. Unplug and re-plug the FIO2 module and check if the green LED on the
FIO2 module lights up after re-plugging. If it does not, proceed with the
following:
2. Put the FIO2 module into another slot and check the LED once again. If
it lights up now, the connector for the previous slot is faulty and the rack
needs to be replaced. If it does not, proceed with the following:
3. Note: this procedure applies only for setups, in which the FIO2 module
is located in a Satellite Rack. If this does not apply for your situation,
proceed with 4.
Replace the cable from the Satellite Rack to the function box. Again
unplug and re-plug the FIO2 module and check if the LED lights up. If it
does not, proceed with the following:
4. Plug any other (not faulty) module into the same slot and check if the
LED lights up. If the LED of the alternative module lights up, the FIO2
module is defect and has to be replaced. If it does not, either the rack or
the rack interface card is defect. Proceed with the following:
5. Replace the rack and plug in the FIO2 module into the new rack. If the
LED on the module does not light up, replace the rack interface card in
the function box.
❏ If a -?- instead of a numeric and you find INOP messages displayed for the
FIO2 module, perform the following actions:
4-28
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting FIO2 Module Problems
Please note that for proceeding to the next steps a transducer must be connected to
the module.
Step 1
Perform a Self-Test (See “Performing the FIO2 Module Self-Test” on page 461). If the FIO2 test numerics read exactly the listed values, proceed to the
next step, if not, replace the module.
Step 2
Refer to the following table. Correct the possible cause identified by the
INOP message and verify that the INOP disappears. If the problem still
exists, replace the module.
INOP Message
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
FIO2 UNPLUGGED
FIO2 module is
unplugged from the
rack.
Perform Step 5 on page 4-28
FIO2 EQUIPM MALF
Internal test or offset
values out of range or
transducer lead C cable
break.
Change electrolyte and membrane
If INOP persists, replace transducer.
If INOP persists, replace module.
FIO2 NO TRANSDUCER
Transducer not connected or transducer
lead cable A or B cable
break.
Make sure that transducer is connected
properly.
If INOP persists, replace transducer lead
cables.
FIO2 FAILED CAL
Signal out of range or it
drifts during calibration.
If electrolyte and membrane have been
changed before, wait at least 4 hours,
before restarting calibration. For detailed
information on how to perform a calibration please refer to the User’s reference
Manual.
If 100% calibration failed, check gas supply.
If INOP persists, change electrolyte and
membrane, wait 4 hours and restart calibration.
FIO2 CAL RUNNING
The 21% or 100% calibration is running.
Wait until calibration has finished.
FIO2 OUT OF RANGE
FIO2 <0.10, >1.10 due
Re-calibrate transducer. For detailed inforto incorrect calibration. mation on how to perform a calibration
please refer to the User’s reference Manual.
FIO2 CHECK CAL
Transducer not calibrated since last start.
Perform calibration.For detailed information on how to perform a calibration please
refer to the User’s reference Manual.
FIO2 BATTERY
Module battery is not
charged or is defective.
Wait 2 hours until battery has been
recharged.
If INOP still is displayed, replace module.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-29
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Table 4-13 INOP Messages for the FIO2 Module
Troubleshooting Temperature Module Problems
Troubleshooting Temperature Module Problems
This section describes how to troubleshoot and correct faults associated with the
Temperature plug-in module. The procedures for recognizing, isolating, and correcting
faults using this module are as follows:
• Identifying a problem based on visual indications or repeated INOPS.
To Troubleshoot the Module
❏ If neither numerics nor a -?- are displayed for the TEMP module, perform the
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
following actions:
Step 1
Make sure there is a TEMP probe connected to the module. If not, connect
one.
Step 2
Make sure the TEMP parameter is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 3
Make sure the TEMP numeric is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 4
Make sure you don’t have too many TEMP module plugged into the module
racks you are using. If too many TEMP modules are plugged in, you get two
status messages: “Too many modules of the same type connected” and
“Currently ignored module in rack position x.x”. The last message enables
you to identify the supernumerary module.
These modules are ignored and should be removed. See Appendix A
“Product Information” for specific information concerning your model of the
CMS.
Step 5
Check the connection on the module and the rack interface.
1. Unplug and re-plug the TEMP module and check if the green LED on the
TEMP module lights up after re-plugging. If it does not, proceed with the
following:
2. Put the TEMP module into another slot and check the LED once again. If
it lights up now, the connector for the previous slot is faulty and the rack
needs to be replaced. If it does not, proceed with the following:
3. Note: this procedure applies only for setups, in which the TEMP
module is located in a Satellite Rack. If this does not apply for your
situation, proceed with 4.
Replace the cable from the Satellite Rack to the function box. Again
unplug and re-plug the TEMP module and check if the LED lights up. If it
does not, proceed with the following:
4. Plug any other (not faulty) module into the same slot and check if the
LED lights up. If the LED of the alternative module lights up, the TEMP
module is defect and has to be replaced. If it does not, either the rack or
the rack interface card is defect. Proceed with the following:
4-30
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting Temperature Module Problems
5. Replace the rack and plug in the TEMP module into the new rack. If the
LED on the module does not light up, replace the rack interface card in
the function box.
❏ If a -?- instead of a numeric and a INOP message is displayed for the TEMP
module, perform the following actions:
Please note that for proceeding to the next steps a transducer must be connected to
the module.
Step 1
Perform a Self-Test (See “Performing the Temperature Module Self-Test” on
page 4-62). If the TEMP test numeric reads exactly the listed value, proceed
to the next step, if not, replace the module.
Step 2
Refer to the following table. Correct the possible cause identified by the
INOP message and verify that the INOP disappears. If the problem still
exists, replace the module.
INOP Message
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
<Tx> UNPLUGGED
TEMP module is unplugged from
the rack.
Perform Step 5 on page 4-30.
<Tx> NO TRANSDUC
Temperature probe disconnected
from the module.
Connect Temperature probe
to module.
<Tx> OVERRANGE
Temperature out of range <-1oC or
>45oC.
Replace Temperature probe.
If problem still persists,
replace module.
<Tx> EQUIP MALF
Malfunction in the TEMP module
hardware
Replace module.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-31
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Table 4-14 INOP Messages for the Temp Module
Troubleshooting CO2 Module Problems
Troubleshooting CO2 Module Problems
This section describes how to troubleshoot and correct faults associated with the CO2
plug-in module. The procedures for recognizing, isolating, and correcting faults with this
module are as follows:
• Identifying a problem based on visual indications or repeated INOPS.
To Troubleshoot the Module
❏ If neither numerics nor a -?- are displayed for the CO2 module, perform the
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
following actions:
Step 1
Make sure there is a transducer connected to the module. If no transducer is
connected, connect one.
Step 2
Make sure the CO2 parameter is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 3
Make sure the CO2 numeric is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 4
Make sure you don’t have more than one CO2 module plugged into the
module racks you are using. If more than one CO2 module is plugged in, the
supernumerary modules are ignored and should be removed.
Step 5
Check the connection on the module and the rack interface.
1. Unplug and re-plug the CO2 module and check if the green LED on the
CO2 module lights up after re-plugging. If it does not, proceed with the
following:
2. Put the CO2 module into another slot and check the LED once again. If it
lights up now, the connector for the previous slot is faulty and the rack
needs to be replaced. If it does not, proceed with the following:
3. Note: this procedure applies only for setups, in which the CO2 module
is located in a Satellite Rack. If this does not apply for your situation,
proceed with 4.
Replace the cable from the Satellite Rack to the function box. Again
unplug and re-plug the CO2 module and check if the LED lights up. If it
does not, proceed with the following:
4. Plug any other (not faulty) module into the same slot and check if the
LED lights up. If the LED of the alternative module lights up, the CO2
module is defect and has to be replaced. If it does not, either the rack or
the rack interface card is defect. Proceed with the following:
5. Replace the rack and plug in the CO2 module into the new rack. If the
LED on the module does not light up, replace the rack interface card in
the function box.
❏ If a -?- instead of a numeric and one or more INOP messages are displayed for
the CO2 module, perform the following actions:
4-32
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting CO2 Module Problems
Please note that for proceeding to the next steps a transducer must be connected to
the module.
Step 1
Perform a Self-Test (See “Performing the CO2 Module Self-Test” on page 461). If the CO2 test numerics read exactly the listed values, proceed to the
next step, if not, replace the module.
Step 2
Refer to the following table. Correct the possible cause identified by the
INOP message and verify that the INOP disappears. If the problem still
exists, replace the module.
INOP Message
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
CO2 UNPLUGGED
CO2 module is unplugged
from the rack.
Perform Step 5 on page 4-32.
CO2 EQUIPM MALF
Malfunction in the transducer
or module.
Replace transducer. If INOP persists replace module.
CO2 NO TRANSDUCER
No Transducer is connected
to the module.
Connect transducer to module.
Run a calibration as described in
CO2 Module section of the User’s
Reference Manual.
(If the transducer is replaced, the
new transducer must be re-calibrated.)
CO2 FAILED CAL
Calibration aborted due to
power failure, unstable signal
during calibration, or transducer being placed on the
wrong cal cell.
Run a calibration as described in
CO2 Module section of the User’s
Reference Manual.
Make sure that calibration cell is
changed when prompted.
If INOP persists replace module.
CO2 SENSOR WARM
UP
The transducer has not
reached operating temperature.
Wait until transducer has warmed
up.
CO2 CAL RUNNING
The CO2 calibration is running.
Wait until calibration is finished.
CO2 CAL MODE
Cal mode is set but the calibration has not been initiated.
Perform accuracy check or start a
calibration as described in CO2
Module section of the User’s Reference Manual.
CO2 CHECK CAL
CO2 value <-2mmHg,
>150mmHg.
Perform accuracy check for low
and high calstick cell as described
in CO2 Module section of the User’s
Reference Manual.
CO2 REDUCE SIZE
ETCO2 >60mmHg in 40mmHg
wave scale.
Select the 60 mmHg scale. This
enables the full wave to be displayed.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-33
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Table 4-15 INOP Message for CO2 Module
Troubleshooting CO2 Module Problems
Table 4-15 INOP Message for CO2 Module
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
CO2 LOW FLOW
Sidestream flow between 5080 ml for up to 10 minutes.
CO2 values may not be accurate.
Replace tubing.
CO2 OCCLUSION
Sidestream flow between 50Replace tubing.
80 ml for more than 10 minutes or
Tubing locked in pump system, tubing or filter to patient.
CO2 SIDESTRM
MALF
Sidestream malfunction in the
transducer or module.
Replace module.
CO2 SIDESTRM OFF
Pump automatically has
turned off after 60 min of C02
< 3 mmHg or apnea.
Restart Sidestream in CO2 setup.
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
INOP Message
4-34
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting Blood Analysis Module Problems
Troubleshooting Blood Analysis Module Problems
This section describes how to troubleshoot and correct faults associated with the Blood
Analysis plug-in module. The procedures for recognizing, isolating, and correcting faults
with this module are as follows:
• Identifying a problem based on repeated INOPS.
• Checking the Blood Analysis task window for specific error messages and performing
the corrective actions suggested in the table given with this module.
To Troubleshoot the Module
❏ If you are unable to access the Blood Analysis module Task Window, perform
Step 1
Make sure the Blood Analysis parameter is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 2
Make sure you don’t have more than one Blood Analysis module plugged
into the module racks you are using. If more than one Blood Analysis
module is plugged in, the supernumerary modules are ignored and should be
removed.
Step 3
Check the connection on the module and the rack interface.
1. Unplug and re-plug the Blood Analysis module and check if the 2 green
LEDs on the Blood Analysis module light up after re-plugging. If they do
not, proceed with the following:
2. Put the Blood Analysis module into another slot and check the LEDs
once again. If they light up now, the connector for the previous slot is
faulty and the rack needs to be replaced. If they do not, proceed with the
following:
3. Note: this procedure applies only for setups, in which the Blood
Analysis module is located in a Satellite Rack. If this does not apply
for your situation, proceed with 4.
Replace the cable from the Satellite Rack to the function box. Again
unplug and re-plug the Blood Analysis module and check if the LEDs
light up. If they do not, proceed with the following:
4. Plug any other (not faulty) module into the same slot and check if the
LEDs light up. If the LEDs of the alternative module light up, the Blood
Analysis module is defect and has to be replaced. If it does not, either the
rack or the rack interface card is defect. Proceed with the following:
5. Replace the rack and plug in the Blood Analysis module into the new
rack. If the LEDs on the module do not light up, replace the rack
interface card in the function box.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-35
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
the following actions:
Troubleshooting Blood Analysis Module Problems
❏ If INOP messages are displayed for the Blood Analysis module, perform the
following actions. More detailed information relating to the cause of some of
the INOPs can be found in the Blood Analysis Task Window (see Table 4-17
on page 4-37). Correct the possible cause identified by the INOP message and
verify that the INOP disappears.
Table 4-16 INOP Messages for Blood Analysis Module
INOP Message
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
BLOODANL
UNPLUGGED
Blood Analysis module has
been unplugged from the
rack.
Perform Step 3 on page 4-35.
BLOODANL EQU.
MALF
Permanent malfunction in
the module.
Refer to the related Task Window
messages in Table 4-17 on page 4-37.
BLOODANL CONFIG A configuration problem has
been detected.
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
BLOODANL ROOM
TEMP?
Refer to the related Task Window
messages in Table 4-17 on page 4-37.
Module environment is too
Refer to the related Task Window
warm or too cold - operating messages in Table 4-17 on page 4-37.
range 16 to 30°C (64 to 86°F).
❏ If a measurement is unsuccessful or parameters are missing, perform the
following actions:
4-36
Step 1
Note: This step only applies for customers, who preselected the <Result
Selection> ON in Configuration Mode.
Make sure that all parameter results you intended to display are switched on
in the Results Selection Task Window.
If you have already confirmed the measurement, perform a new measurement to check, if the error still exists. If you haven’t confirmed the measurement yet, the change will be visible immediately.
Step 2
The Task Window displays messages dealing with Blood Analysis module
failures. The following table describes the messages and corrective actions
to take.
If errors occur repeatedly, make a note of the error codes as these can be
used for diagnostic purposes at the factory and must be documented when a
module is exchanged.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting Blood Analysis Module Problems
Table 4-17 Task Window messages for the Blood Analysis Module
Temperature
out of range
INOP or
prompt
message
BLOODANL
ROOM
TEMP
Error
Code
2
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
The room temperature is too cold or
warm - operating
range is 16 to 30°C
(64 to 86°F).
Ensure that ambient
temperature is within
the operating limits and
leave time for the module to acclimatize after
transport or storage.
The filter is blocked
or the ventilator fan
in the module malfunctions.
Inspect the filter and
clean it if necessary.
If the message still
appears, call your service representative.
New Software
Installed, Use
Simulator
3
The software or
CLEW was recently
updated.
Run the electronic simulator.
Analysis Interrupted, Use
Other Cartridge
4, 8
Module has been
pulled out of the rack
during a measurement and then
replaced.
Wait for the locked
LED to go off then
remove the cartridge
and start the measurement again with a new
cartridge.
Invalid Date,
Check clock
BLOODANL
CONFIG
11
Implausible date in
CMS.
Check date settings in
the CMS and make sure
they are correct.
Invalid or
Expired CLEW,
See Manual
BLOODANL
CONFIG
12, 13
Invalid date code in
CMS.
Check date settings in
the CMS and make sure
your date settings are
correct.
CLEW version maybe
expired.
Refer to the application
note of the current
CLEW version.
CLEW update has not
been successfully finished.
Reinstall the current
CLEW version.
Invalid Customization Data
BLOODANL
CONFIG
14
Customization
update unsuccessful
Reinstall the current
Customization version.
Invalid Software Detected
BLOODANL
CONFIG
53
Wrong software type
installed.
Update System with
correct type of software.
Incompatible
Language
BLOODANL
CONFIG
297
CMS language and
module language are
not compatible.
Call your service representative.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-37
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Message in
Task Window
Troubleshooting Blood Analysis Module Problems
Table 4-17 Task Window messages for the Blood Analysis Module
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Message in
Task Window
INOP or
prompt
message
Error
Code
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
Module Error,
Use Electronic
Simulator
Blood Analysis failed
48, 50-52,
58-62, 70
A cartridge or electronic simulator was
inserted at an angle
or
the simulator is malfunctioning.
If the error occurs
when using a cartridge,
run the electronic simulator.
If the error occurs
when running the simulator, use another simulator.
If the error recurs, the
module or simulator
may need repair - call
your service representative.
Module Error,
See Manual
BLOODANL
EQU. MALF
1, 23, 63,
65-68, 7274, 76-78,
82, 85,
86, 89,
90, 91-94,
256-296,
298-299
May have various
malfunction causes
located in the module.
Use an electronic simulator twice then use a
cartridge with sample
or control solution.
If an error condition
occurs, call your service representative.
Cartridge Not
Inserted Properly
Blood Analysis failed
47
Cartridge or simulaReinsert the cartridge
tor is probably not
or electronic simulator.
pushed in completely.
Cartridge was
removed after starting a measurement.
Start measurement
with a new cartridge.
If error recurs, call
your service representative.
4-38
Cartridge Preburst, Use Other
Cartridge
Blood Analysis failed
21
The module detected
fluid on the Sensors
before it should have.
Cartridge was probably either pressed in
the centre bursting the
calibration pack or was
stored in conditions too
warm or too cold. Try
another cartridge.
Unable to Position Sample
Blood Analysis failed
31, 34
No movement of
sample detected, possibly due to a clot in
sample, not closing
the sample well cover
or an aberrant cartridge.
Perform a new measurement making sure
that you fill the cartridge properly.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting Blood Analysis Module Problems
Message in
Task Window
INOP or
prompt
message
Error
Code
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
Sample Positioned Short of
Fill Mark
Blood Analysis failed
35, 36
The cartridge was
underfilled, the sample must reach the fill
mark.
Perform a new measurement making sure
that you fill the cartridge properly.
Sample Positioned Beyond
Fill Mark
Blood Analysis failed
30, 37
Cartridge was overfilled. The sample
was past the fill
mark.
Perform a new measurement making sure
that you fill the cartridge properly.
Insufficient
sample
Blood Analysis failed
38, 39
Either not enough
sample in the sample
well or there are bubbles in the sample.
Perform a new measurement making sure
that you fill the cartridge properly and
without bubbles.
Cartridge Error,
Use Other Cartridge
Blood Analysis failed
20, 22,
24-29, 32,
33, 40-43,
45, 46,
79, 80,
81, 87
Can be caused by
sample related problems, cartridge or
module. Single or
sporadic errors are
most likely a samplerelated problem (an
interference), an
aberrant cartridge or
a user-induced situation such as touching
contacts or pressing
on center of cartridge.
Try another cartridge.
If error recurs repeatedly, call your service
representative.
Cartridge Type
Not Recognized
Blood Analysis failed
69
Either the cartridge
type is not compatible with the software
revision, or the module is at fault.
If this is a new type of
cartridge being used,
arrange a software
upgrade.
If not, call your service
representative.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-39
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Table 4-17 Task Window messages for the Blood Analysis Module
Troubleshooting EEG Module Problems
Troubleshooting EEG Module Problems
This section describes how to troubleshoot and correct faults associated with the EEG
plug-in module. The procedures for recognizing, isolating, and correcting faults using this
module are as follows:
• Identifying a problem based on visual indications or repeated INOPS.
• Using an EEG Module accessory, the EEG Test Device (see Chapter 6 “Parts List for
CMS”).
To Troubleshoot the Module
❏ If neither numerics nor a -?- are displayed for the EEG module, perform the
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
following actions:
Step 1
Make sure there is a EEG transducer connected to the module. If not, connect one.
Step 2
Make sure the EEG parameter is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 3
Make sure the EEG numeric is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 4
Make sure you don’t have more than one EEG module plugged into the
module racks you are using. If more than one EEG module is plugged in, the
supernumerary modules are ignored and should be removed.
Step 5
Check the connection on the module and the rack interface.
1. Unplug and re-plug the EEG module and check if the green LED on the
EEG module lights up after re-plugging. If it does not, proceed with the
following:
2. Put the EEG module into another slot and check the LED once again. If
it lights up now, the connector for the previous slot is faulty and the rack
needs to be replaced. If it does not, proceed with the following:
3. Note: this procedure applies only for setups, in which the EEG module
is located in a Satellite Rack. If this does not apply for your situation,
proceed with 4.
Replace the cable from the Satellite Rack to the function box. Again
unplug and re-plug the EEG module and check if the LED lights up. If it
does not, proceed with the following:
4. Plug any other (not faulty) module into the same slot and check if the
LED lights up. If the LED of the alternative module lights up, the EEG
module is defect and has to be replaced. If it does not, either the rack or
the rack interface card is defect. Proceed with the following:
5. Replace the rack and plug in the EEG module into the new rack. If the
LED on the module does not light up, replace the rack interface card in
the function box.
4-40
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting EEG Module Problems
❏ If a -?- instead of a numeric and one or more INOP messages are displayed for
the EEG module, perform the following actions:
Step 1
Check the performance of the module with the EEG test device (if available).The test device enables you to compare the module electrode impedance values with the expected values. This information enables you to
isolate a problem either to the module or to the cable.
The EEG Test Device looks like a connector cable. One end plugs into the
12-pin connector at the front of the EEG Module. The other end of the Test
Device cable is a BNC connector.
The BNC connector of the EEG Test Device can be plugged into a function
generator (for example, the Philips 33120A) to generate a simulated EEG signal on the CMS monitor.
Perform the following actions:
2. Plug the Test Device into the EEG Module, leaving the BNC connector
end unconnected.
3. Press the EEG hardkey on the module.
4. Press the “Electrode Impedance” softkey on the CMS.
5. Check that the observed values in the task window match the following
values within ±2 kΩ.
Table 4-18 Expected Impedance Values for EEG Electrodes
Electrode
Expected Value
EEG1+
5 kΩ
EEG1–
10 kΩ
EEG2+
12 kΩ
EEG2–
15 kΩ
6. If any value is outside the expected value range (±2 kΩ), please replace
your EEG Module.
NOTE
The Attenuation Factor of the Test Device is 10,000. In testing with a function generator,
you must divide the generator amplitude reading by 10,000 or 5,000, depending on the
generator used, to match the value on the CMS monitor.
7. If the problem persists, perform step 2 below.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-41
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
1. Select monitoring mode on the CMS.
Troubleshooting EEG Module Problems
Step 2
Refer to the following table. Correct the possible cause identified by the
INOP message and verify that the INOP disappears. If the problem still
exists, replace the module.
Table 4-19 INOP Messages for the EEG Module
INOP Message
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
EEG UNPLUGGED
EEG module is unplugged
from the rack.
Perform Step 5 on page 4-40.
EEG EQUIP MALF
Malfunction in the EEG module hardware
Replace module.
EEG NO TRANSDUCER EEG trunk cable disconnected
from the module.
EEG1 LEADS OFF
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
EEG1 LEAD OFF XXX
EEG2 LEADS OFF
EEG2 LEAD OFF XXX
4-42
Connect EEG trunk cable to module.
If INOP persists, replace EEG trunk
cable.
If INOP still persists, replace module.
Lead electrodes of channel
Connect channel 1 electrodes.
EEG1 are not connected to or
have fallen off the patient’s
Connect specified electrode (e.g. F3).
head.
If a single lead electrode is disconnected, the INOP is shown
with the electrode location
label (e.g. F3).
Lead electrodes of channel
Connect channel 2 electrodes.
EEG2 are not connected to or
have fallen off the patient’s
Connect specified electrode (e.g. F3).
head.
If a single lead electrode is disconnected, the INOP is shown
with the electrode location
label (e.g. F3)
EEG LEADS OFF
If multiple lead electrodes are
not connected, this INOP is
issued.
Connect electrodes properly (start
with reference electrodes).
If INOP is still displayed, replace
leads.
If INOP is still displayed, replace
module.
EEG1 LINE NOISE
EEG2 LINE NOISE
Excessive Line noise in channel EEG1 or EEG2
Keep all EEG cables together and
away from metallic bodies, other
cables and radiated fields.
EEG LINE NOISE
Excessive Line Noise in both
channels at the same time.
Keep all EEG cables together and
away from metallic bodies, other
cables and radiated fields.
EEG1 OVERRANGE
EEG2 OVERRANGE
Input signal is too high. This is
usually caused by interfering
signals such as line noise or
electrosurgery.
Perform corrective action for INOP
“EEG LINE NOISE”.
If INOP is still displayed, make sure
that all electrodes are correctly
attached.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting BIS Module Problems
Troubleshooting BIS Module Problems
This section describes how to troubleshoot and correct faults associated with the BIS
components. The procedures for recognizing, isolating, and correcting faults using these
components are as follows:
• Identifying a problem based on visual indications or repeated INOPS.
Sensor
PIC
DSC
BIS Engine
M1034A
BIS Module
BIS Components Overview
To Troubleshoot the Module
❏ If neither numerics nor a -?- are displayed for the BIS module, perform the
following actions:
Step 1
Make sure that BIS Engine, DSC and BIS Sensor are connected to the module. If not, connect the missing devices.
Step 2
Make sure the BIS parameter is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 3
Make sure the BIS numeric is turned on. Turn it on, if it is not.
Step 4
Make sure you don’t have more than one BIS module plugged into the
module racks you are using. If more than one BIS module is plugged in, the
supernumerary modules are ignored and should be removed.
Step 5
Check the connection on the module and the rack interface.
1. Unplug and re-plug the BIS module and check if the green LED on the
BIS module lights up after re-plugging. If it does not, proceed with the
following:
2. Put the BIS module into another slot and check the LED once again. If it
lights up now, the connector for the previous slot is faulty and the rack
needs to be replaced. If it does not, proceed with the following:
3. Note: this procedure applies only for setups, in which the BIS module is
located in a Satellite Rack. If this does not apply for your situation,
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-43
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Module Cable
Troubleshooting BIS Module Problems
proceed with 4.
Replace the cable from the Satellite Rack to the function box. Again
unplug and re-plug the BIS module and check if the LED lights up. If it
does not, proceed with the following:
4. Plug any other (not faulty) module into the same slot and check if the
LED lights up. If the LED of the alternative module lights up, the BIS
module is defect and has to be replaced. If it does not, either the rack or
the rack interface card is defect. Proceed with the following:
5. Replace the rack and plug in the BIS module into the new rack. If the
LED on the module does not light up, replace the rack interface card in
the function box.
❏ If a -?- instead of a numeric and one or more INOP messages or a small -?- in
addition to a numeric are displayed for the BIS module, perform the following
actions:
Please note that for proceeding to the next steps a BIS Engine, DSC and BIS Sensor
must be connected to the module.
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Step 1
Refer to the following table. Correct the possible cause identified by the
INOP message and verify that the INOP disappears.The order of the possible
causes reflects their likelihood. Always start with the first to troubleshoot.
Table 4-20 INOP Messages for the BIS Module
INOP Message
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
BIS UN-PLUGGED
BIS module is
unplugged from the
rack.
Perform Step 5 on page 4-43
BIS MODULE MALFUNC
Malfunction in the BIS
module hardware.
Enter BIS Task Window1.
Look for the message “BIS Engine or
DSC overcurrent”. If it is not displayed, replace BIS module.
Overcurrent situation.
If it is displayed, perform the following procedure:
Disconnect the BIS Engine from module and replug BIS module. If INOP
persists, replace module.
If INOP disappears, reconnect BIS
Engine without DSC to module. If
INOP persists, replace BIS Engine.
If INOP disappears, reconnect DSC to
BIS Engine. If INOP persists, replace
DSC.
If INOP disappears, replace Module
Cable.
BIS Engine not connected.
Make sure that the Module Cable is
properly connected.
Module Cable defective.
If INOP persists replace Module
Cable.
BIS ENGINE DISCONN
4-44
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting BIS Module Problems
INOP Message
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
BIS ENGINE INCOMPAT
BIS Engine Software is
not supported.
A software upgrade may be required.
Enter BIS Task Window1 and write
down the Revision numbers displayed for “Module FW Rev” and “BIS
Eng SW Rev”. Check the latest version of the compatibility matrix provided either on page 4-51 or in the
latest Service Note, whichever is
more recent.
BIS ENGINE MALFUNC
Malfunction in the BIS
Engine hardware.
Replace BIS Engine.
BIS DSC DISCONN
DSC is not properly
connected
Make sure that the DSC is properly
connected to the adjacent devices.
Either DSC cable or BIS
Engine may be faulty.
If INOP persists replace DSC2.
If INOP persists replace BIS Engine.
Electrocautery used
during self-test.
Make sure not to use electrocautery
during the self-test procedure.
Malfunction in the BIS
DSC hardware.
Perform a PIC/DSC Test as
described under “General Test Procedures for the BIS components” on
page 4-48. If it fails replace DSC2.
PIC may be faulty.
If INOP persists replace PIC.
BIS DSC INCOMPAT
DSC is not supported
by the BIS Engine or
new DSC connected to
an old BIS Engine.
A software upgrade may be required.
Enter BIS Task Window1 and note the
Revision number displayed for “BIS
Eng SW Rev” and the DSC ID. Check
the latest version of the compatibility
matrix provided either on page 4-51
or in the latest Service Note, whichever is more recent.
BIS SENSOR MALFUNC
Malfunction in the Sensor hardware, most
often caused by liquids
permeating into the
connectors.
Replace Sensor.
Enter BIS Task Window1 and press
“START CHECK” to initiate a Cyclic
Impedance Check. Make sure all
leads have passed the test.
Make sure that the PIC connector
(between PIC and Sensor) is dry. If
you are not sure that the connector is
dry, replace PIC until it has dried.
PIC or short cable of
the DSC may be faulty.
If INOP persists perform the PIC/
DSC Test as described under “General Test Procedures for the BIS
components” on page 4-48.
BIS DSC MALFUNC
If it fails replace PIC.
If INOP persists replace DSC2.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-45
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Table 4-20 INOP Messages for the BIS Module
Troubleshooting BIS Module Problems
Table 4-20 INOP Messages for the BIS Module
INOP Message
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
BIS SENSOR DISCONN
Sensor not properly
connected to PIC and/
or PIC not properly
connected to DSC.
Make sure that the BIS Sensor is
properly connected to the PIC and
the PIC is properly connected to the
DSC.
Sensor or PIC or short
cable of DSC faulty.
If INOP persists, perform a PIC/DSC
Test as described under “General
Test Procedures for the BIS components” on page 4-48. If it fails replace
Sensor.
If INOP persists replace PIC.
If INOP persists replace DSC2.
BIS SENSOR INCOMP
Unsupported Sensor
connected or Sensor
type unknown.
Make sure to use only Philips supported Sensors.
PIC or short cable of
the DSC may be faulty.
Perform the PIC/DSC Test as
described under “General Test Procedures for the BIS components” on
page 4-48.
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
If it fails replace PIC.
If INOP persists replace DSC2.
BIS SENSOR USAGE
Sensor expired due to
too often usage.
Replace Sensor.
Enter BIS Task Window. Make sure
all leads have passed the Cyclic
Impedance Check, which has been
automatically performed.
PIC or short cable of
the DSC may be faulty.
Perform the PIC/DSC Test as
described under “General Test Procedures for the BIS components” on
page 4-48.
If it fails replace PIC.
If INOP persists replace DSC2.
BIS SQI < 15%
4-46
The signal quality is
below 15% and the BIS
value cannot be caculated. This may occur
as a result of artifact
such as those generated
from motion or the
presence of electrocautery devices.
Make sure the Sensor is properly
attached to the patient: Enter BIS
Task Window1 and press “START
CHECK” to initiate a Cyclic Impedance Check. Make sure all leads have
passed the test.
BIS IMPEDANCE CHCK
The Cyclic Impedance
check is running.
Wait until Cyclic Impedance Check
has finished or press “STOP CHECK”
in the Cyclic Check Task Window.
BIS LEAD OFF
One or more leads
(electrodes) have no
skin contact.
Press the electrode pads firmly.
If INOP persists, replace Sensor providing proper skin preparation.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Make sure the patient is completely
relaxed (even small motions of the
facial muscles affect the signal quality).
Troubleshooting BIS Module Problems
Table 4-20 INOP Messages for the BIS Module
INOP Message
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
BIS HIGH IMPEDANCE
Impedance of one or
more electrode(s) is
above the valid range,
most often caused by
bad skin preparation.
Press the electrode pads firmly.
If INOP persists, replace Sensor providing proper skin preparation.
PIC or short cable of
the DSC faulty.
If INOP persists perform a PIC/DSC
Test as described under “General
Test Procedures for the BIS components” on page 4-48. If it fails replace
BIS ISOELECTRC EEG
No discernible EEG
activity is detected for
longer than 1 minute.
Check the patient. Check the leads
for proper connection.
BIS SQI < 50%
The signal quality is
below 50%. This may
occur as a result of artifact such as those generated from motion or
the presence of electrocautery devices.
Make sure the Sensor is properly
attached to the patient: Enter BIS
Task Window1 and press “START
CHECK” to initiate a Cyclic Impedance Check. Make sure all leads have
passed the test.
Make sure the patient is completely
relaxed (even small motions of the
facial muscles affect the signal quality).
1. To enter BIS Task Window press (in Monitoring Mode) MODULE SETUP followed by BIS
2. Before ordering a new DSC, try another one of the same type, if available.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-47
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
PIC.
If INOP persists replace DSC2.
Troubleshooting BIS Module Problems
General Test Procedures for the BIS components
PIC/DSC Test
TEST
In Monitoring mode connect the Sensor Simulator (for maximum usage
please refer to the documentation delivered with the Sensor Simulator) to
the Patient Interface Cable (for part numbers please refer to Table 6-17 on
page 6-26).
Enter the BIS Task Window by pressing
BIS .
Module Setup
, followed by
Start Impedance Check by pressing Start Check . This brings up the BIS
Cyclic Check Task Window. Check the displayed results.
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
RESULTS
PIC and DSC are functioning correctly and the test is passed, if the
following results are displayed:
Electrode
Expected Value
1
4-6 kΩ
2
8-12 kΩ
3
1-3 kΩ
If the test fails, firstly replace PIC with a known good one. Perform test
again. If it fails again, DSC is faulty and has to be replaced.
NOTE
If the DSC/PIC Test alternately passes and fails, this indicates a broken DSC cable. In this
case you also have to replace the DSC.
DSC Self-Test
If the correct functioning of the DSC is in doubt, perform the DSC self-test.
NOTE
The DSC and long cable only are covered by this test, not the short cable (which can be
tested by the PIC/DSC Test described above).
This test is not available directly after connecting the DSC. Wait at least 10 seconds until
the DSC has stabilized.
Do not run this test while electrocautery equipment is in use. This will cause a failure.
TEST
Enter Service Mode
Enter the BIS Task Window by pressing
BIS .
Start Test by pressing Test DSC
RESULTS
4-48
Module Setup
, followed by
.
DSC is functioning correctly and the test is passed with the following
results displayed:
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting BIS Module Problems
Module: Test passed
BIS Engine: Test passed
DSC: Test passed
The small table located right of the “DSC Test passed / failed” entry lists
more detailed results of the DSC Self-Test.
Additional information available in the Service Mode Task Window
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
The Service Mode Task Window provides additional information, which is explained in
the following section. To enter the window, change to Service Mode and press
followed by BIS . Please wait at least 10 seconds until all results
Module Setup
are valid.
If the connected sensor has a malfunction (indicated by “Test failed” in the Sensor section
of the Service Mode Task Window), in some cases it is necessary that you disconnect the
sensor and un- and replug the module before continuing.
Note: the screen shown above is only an example and does not show real data.
For an explanation of the individual entries see next page.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-49
Troubleshooting BIS Module Problems
Module
DSC
FW Rev
Installed Firmware Revision of the BIS
module.
ID
Type of DSC used.
Supported types:
9 (DSC-3) & 10 (DSC-XP)
S/N1
Serial Number of the BIS module used.
FW Rev
Installed Firmware Revision of the DSC.
Test passed /
failed
2
Result of the automatic BIS Self-Test .
Gain
Detailed results of the DSC Self-Test.
High Pass blocked
High Pass normal
Noise
BIS Engine
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Test passed / failed Result of the automatic BIS Self-Testb as
well as the manually started DSC SelfTest, described on page 4-46
S/N
Serial Number of the BIS Engine used.
PIC
SW Rev
Installed Software Revision of the BIS
Engine.
ID
Prot Rev
Protocol Revision of the BIS Engine
used. Required for compatibility check
between BIS Engine and BIS module.
With Sensor connected, the ID identifies
the class of Sensors used.
Supported classes: 7
Sensor
FW Rev
Installed Firmware Revision of the BIS
Engine.
S/N
Serial Number of the BIS Sensor used.
HW Rev
Hardware Revision of the BIS Engine
used.
Code
Production related information.
Test passed /
failed
Result of the automatic BIS Self-Testb.
Type
Type of Sensor used.
Supported types:
1 (Adult Patient Sensor Plus)
2 (Adult Patient Sensor XP)
3 (Pediatric Patient Sensor)
8 (Sensor Simulator - 1 channel)
9 (Sensor Simulator - 2 channel)
Diag data
Information for internal use only.
Test passed / failed Result of the automatic BIS Self-Testb.
1. If no number is shown behind S/N, please refer to the rear side of the BIS module.
2. Initiated by entering the Service Mode, switching Power On/Off or un-, replugging the BIS module.
4-50
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting BIS Module Problems
Compatibility Matrix
The following table indicates the revisions of the BIS Module and BIS Engine that are
allowed to be used with the various DSC, PIC and Sensor types. Only the fields marked
with a $ indicate a valid combination. Due to the low update frequency of this manual it is
likely that a more recent version of this matrix has already been issued via a Service Note.
Always refer to the latest version.
Module FW Rev
BIS Engine SW Rev
A.01.xx
1.xx
2.xx
DSC-3 ID
9
$
$
$
DSC-XP ID
10
$
--
$
PIC ID
7
$
$
$
Plus
1
$
$
$
XP
2
$
$
$
Pediatric
3
$
$
$
Simulator (1 Channel)
8
$
$
$
Simulator (2 Channel)
9
$
$
$
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Sensor type:
4-51
Troubleshooting VueLink Module Problems
Troubleshooting VueLink Module Problems
NOTE
For detailed troubleshooting information on the VueLink module, please refer to the
documentation delivered with your external device driver.
For general testing of the VueLink module the following test procedure can be performed:
M1032A VueLink Tests using VueLink Test Module
The VueLink Test Module (part number M1186-60510) is a plug-in module used to test
M1032A VueLink modules in the Philips CMS Patient Monitoring System.
Test Procedure
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
The following steps are the procedure for testing a VueLink module using the VueLink
Test Module. In order to run the test, the Test Module must be preselected ON in Config
Mode. This means that the Test Module must be one of the devices made available for
selection during configuration of the VueLink Module.
The test itself is carried out in Monitoring Mode. For information concerning the
configuration of VueLink modules see the M1032A VueLink Module Handbook (part
number M1032-9000B).
4-52
Step 1
Plug the VueLink module into the module rack on the CMS.
Step 2
Press the Setup key on the front of the VueLink module.
Step 3
Press
Step 4
In the window that appears, select “Test Module” using the Next Device softkey. It is important to note which device driver was previously selected, in order
to be able to reset it at the end of the test. (It will be labeled on the front of the
VueLink Module.)
Step 5
Confirm
Press
to store the selection and wait for the message
“Switched to new device”.
Step 6
Plug in the Test Module.
Step 7
Connect the modules by plugging one end of the cable (part number M103261661) into the connector on the front of the VueLink Module, and the other end
into the connector on the front of the Test Module.
Step 8
Press Setup VueLink to make the Test Module Task Window appear on the
screen.
Note: The Scale Wave key is hollow and therefore cannot be selected.
Select Device .
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Troubleshooting VueLink Module Problems
The test module acts in the same way as an external device would, and sends signals to
the VueLink module in both analog and digital form. The computer module checks these
signals for validity, and then displays “passed” or “failed” on the screen.
The Task Window displays two waveforms, a triangular one and a rectangular one. These
are displayed alternately and for a period of ten seconds each. The expected curve type is
indicated below the wave.
There are two pairs of gridlines that indicate the permitted range for the max/min values
of these waves. If all the data received by the test module is correct, the waves will lie
within the specified ranges. If either limit of either wave falls outside the respective
gridlines, then the module being tested is faulty regardless of the passed/failed messages.
The Freeze Values and Update Values softkeys are of no use in this test since
Freeze Values would inhibit the update of the “Passed/Failed” messages.
NOTE
Step 1
Disconnect the cable that joins the Test Module to the VueLink module.
Step 2
In Config Mode, ensure that the Test Module is set OFF, and the preselected
devices are the same ones as before the test. Also, verify the settings for these
devices.
Step 3
Return to Monitoring Mode.
Step 4
Press the Setup key on the front of the VueLink module and select the required
device using the Next Device softkey.
It is important to ensure that the preselected device drivers are configured exactly the
same as they were before the test (including default settings).
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-53
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
When the test is complete:
Performing Plug-In Module Self-Tests
Performing Plug-In Module Self-Tests
The CMS contains auto-tests and self-tests that are designed to demonstrate that the
monitor is interacting with the plug-in modules.
Objective
In order to meet the chapter’s goals, you should be able to perform a plug-in module selftest and identify the normal outputs of a self-test.
Concepts
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
This Philips patient monitor has a module self-test which generates and displays test
waveforms and corresponding numerics for all the modules that are connected through a
rack and turned on. The test signals are displayed for about 30 seconds and then the
display returns to the normal monitoring mode.
The self-test ensures
that the system is
functioning
correctly; it does
not troubleshoot the
system.
The test signal will be displayed only if the system power-on sequence was successful and
the module is plugged into a rack in the system and turned ON. Perform the following
quick system check to verify that computer module, integral rack and plug-in modules are
communicating properly before verifying the individual parameter modules.
Performing a Quick System Check
You can verify that the System board, integral rack and modules are communicating
properly by completing the following test.
TEST
Press the ECG key on the front of the ECG module in a system that is
turned ON.
RESULT
Pressing the ECG key brings up the ECG Task Window and verifies that
the System board and integral rack are communicating with the plug-in
module.
If the plug-in module Task Window, waveform or numeric is missing from the display, the
module may not be turned ON. Try pushing the key on the plug-in module to see if the
system is communicating with the module. If the ECG module does not respond, perform
the module self-test.
To turn a parameter ON, press the following key sequence:
Module Setup or
Parametr On/Off
Pts
Reference
Select Parametr
Pts
Reference
On/Off Setup
Pts
Reference
4-54
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Parameters
(if using Classic Control Panel)
Performing Plug-In Module Self-Tests
Self-Test Procedure Overview
Step 1
Choose a patient category (Adult/Pedi/Neo) by pressing the following key
sequence:
Module Setup or Instrument Config (if using Classic Control Panel
Config Sets
Pts
Reference
Change Pat Categ
Pts
Reference
Step 2
Display 30 seconds of the waveforms and numerics of all connected modules by
pressing:
Monitor Setup
(or Instrument Config )
Test Signals
Pts
Reference
Signals
Repeat Step 2 as necessary to check the individual test waveforms and numerics
for the category.
Step 4
Use Step 1 to choose a new patient category and repeat Steps 2 and 3.
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Step 3
See the following table for test values.
Table 4-21 System Self-Test Values
Module
Test Numeric
Test Waveform
ECG
100 bpm in ADULT mode
125bpm in NEO/PED mode
Simulated Square Wave
RESP
15 rpm in ADULT mode
30 rpm in PEDI mode
55 rpm in NEO mode
Simulated Wave
Pressure Systolic
120 mmHg ADULT
60 mmHg PEDI/NEO
Simulated squarewave
Pressure Diastolic
0 mmHg ADULT
0 mmHg PEDI/NEO
Simulated squarewave
SpO2
100%
No Wave
Pleth
Wave on display
Simulated wave
Cardiac Output
Blood Temp
Inj Temp
5 l/min (+0.1 l/min)
37°C
0°C
No wave
tcpO2
60 mmHg (8.0 kPa)
No wave
tcpCO2
40 mmHg (5.3 kPa)
No wave
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-55
Performing Plug-In Module Self-Tests
Table 4-21 System Self-Test Values
Module
Test Numeric
Test Waveform
ETCO2
40 mmHg (6.0 kPa)
Simulated squarewave
IMCO2
0 mmHg (0.0 kPa)
Simulated squarewave
AWRR
25 rpm
Temperature
40°C (104°F)
No wave
BED 17 Adult 23 FEB 89 18:19
II
HR
Test Signals active - No monitoring!
Non-paced mode
HR
100
M HR
1mV
ABP
ABP
120
120/O (60)
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
0
PAP
PAP
120
120/0 (58)
0
CO2
ETCO2
40
40
IMCO2
0
SpO2
PLETH
0
NBP
100
0/0
(0)
RESP
C.O.
AWRR
18:19
SpO2 SQI
RESP
15
5.00
25
Tblood
37.0
10nm
Example of an extended Self-Test display showing all possible waveforms
NOTE
4-56
The following self-tests give the key sequence for the Standard Control Panel. If you are
using a Classic Control Panel then you will use the Instrument Config hardkey instead
of the
hardkey.
Monitor Setup
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Performing Plug-In Module Self-Tests
Performing the ECG or ECG/RESP Module Self-Test
Auto Check: None.
The pressure
waveform provided
is not the same as
the waveform which
would be expected
from a patient.
Self-Test: The ECG and ECG/RESP self-test may be performed at any time as the lead
selector and pace pulse detection are inhibited during the check. The module will
produce ECG test signals at the beginning of the processing circuitry, and process the test
signals in the same way patient signals are processed. The test signals last about 30
seconds and then the display returns to the normal monitoring mode.
TEST
Press
RESULT
If the module is functioning correctly, the following heart rate and
respiration are displayed without the alarms being activated:
Monitor Setup
Test Signals
ECG
100 bpm in ADULT mode
125 bpm in NEO/PEDI mode
RESP
15 rpm in ADULT mode
30 rpm in PEDI mode
55 rpm in NEO mode
Performing the M1006A/B Pressure Module Self-Test
Auto Check: The check for these modules is started every time the system is switched ON
and checks the complete module circuitry, including the sensitivity detection circuit.
Self-Test: The test signals last about 30 seconds and then the display returns to the normal
monitoring mode.
The M1006A Pressure self-test may be performed at any time as the input switch switches
the CAL divider to 0 mmHg, and the pressure test signals bypass the sensitivity detection
circuit. From here, the signals are processed in the same way as the patient signals.
The M1006B Pressure self-test may be performed at any time, as the signal is output from
a microcontroller. From here, the test signal is processed in the same way as a patient
signal, testing the complete signal path from the module to the display.
TEST
Press
RESULT
If the module is functioning correctly, the following systolic and diastolic
pressures are displayed without the alarms being activated:
Monitor Setup
Systolic
Diastolic
Test Signals
120 mmHg ADULT
60 mmHg PEDI/NEO
0 mmHg ADULT
0 mmHg PEDI/NEO
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-57
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
ECG test signals
are rectangular
pulses, which
represent beat-tobeat heart rate, and
are not the same as
the ECG signals
expected from a
patient.
Performing Plug-In Module Self-Tests
CAUTION
For the M1006A/B Pressure modules with analog output (Option #CO1), do not
attempt defibrillation unless pump cable is connected at both ends or
disconnected entirely. The signal to the balloon pump stops when a self-test is in
progress or in Demo, Configuration or Service Modes.
This module has no
test waves or
numerics.
Performing the NBP Module Self-Test
Auto Check: The NBP module performs a check periodically during operation.
Self-Test: None.
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
The SpO2/Pleth test
waveform is a Pleth
rectangular wave
which represents
the signal from the
photo-diode in the
SpO2 transducer
assembly.
4-58
Performing the SpO2/Pleth Module Self-Test
Auto Check: None.
Self-Test: The SpO2/Pleth module self-test may be performed at any time. The integral
waveform generator in the module produces test signals using the current driver at the
beginning of the processing circuitry. The test signals are processed in the same way as
patient signals are processed. The test signals last about 30 seconds and then the display
returns to the normal monitoring mode.
TEST
Press
RESULT
If the module is functioning correctly, the following derived values and
waveform are displayed without the alarms being activated:
Monitor Setup
Test Signals .
SpO2
100%
Pleth
Wave height after auto gain is 100% of scale height
Pulse Rate
100 bpm in ADULT mode
125 bpm in NEO/PEDI mode
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Performing Plug-In Module Self-Tests
This module only
displays numerics.
Performing the Cardiac Output Module Self-Test
Auto Check: None.
Self-Test: The Cardiac Output module test may be performed at any time. The test signal
lasts about 30 seconds and then the display returns to the normal monitoring mode.
Press
RESULT
If the module is functioning correctly, the following derived values will be
displayed without the alarms being activated:
Test Signals
Monitor Setup
C.O.
5.0 liters/min (+0.1 liters/min)
TBlood
37C + 0.1C
Tinj
0C + 0.1C
Performing the tcpO2/tcpCO2 Module Self-Test
Auto Check: The check is performed automatically when the system is switched on,
during calibration, and continuously when no transducer is connected. When the auto
check fails, the INOP message: Equipment Malfunction is given (refer to the
Troubleshooting Chapter in this manual for troubleshooting details).
Self-Test: The tcpO2/tcpCO2 module self-test may be performed at any time. The test
signal lasts about 30 seconds and then the display returns to the normal monitoring mode.
CAUTION
TEST
Press
RESULT
If the module is functioning correctly, the following numerics are
displayed without the alarms being activated:
Monitor Setup
Test Signals
tcpO2
60 mmHg (8.0 kPa)
tcpCO2
40 mmHg (5.3 kPa)
Radiated immunity: If operating under conditions according to EN 60601-1-2 up
to 1 V/m electrical field strength, the following deviations in the measurements
could occur: tcpO2 2 mmHg or less, tcpCO2 1 mmHg or less. It is recommended to
avoid the use of electrically radiating devices in close proximity to a tcpO2/
tcpCO2 monitor.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-59
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
This module only
displays numerics.
TEST
Performing Plug-In Module Self-Tests
This module only
displays a numeric.
Performing the SvO2 Module Self-Test
Auto Check: None.
Please refer to the
Abbott equipment
documentation if a
more detailed
description of this
procedure is
required.
Self-Test: The module check may be performed at any time (on the Philips CMS Patient
Monitoring System with Release D software and later releases) except during a
calibration procedure. The test signals last about 30 seconds and then the display returns
to the normal monitoring mode.
No SvO2 test signal will be displayed if the Optical Module is disconnected from the plugin module, or the main alarms are suspended.
TEST
Press
RESULT
If the module is functioning correctly, the following value is displayed
without the alarms being activated:
Monitor Setup
SvO2
Test Signals .
70%
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Performing the SvO2 Optical Stability Check
Do not perform this
check in an area of
high level
fluorescent lighting
and avoid
movement of the
Optical Module
during this
procedure.
Fluorescent lighting
or movement could
invalidate the
stability check.
4-60
The following stability check procedure ensures the proper operation of Abbott’s Optical
Module (50131-04). Abbott recommends that this procedure is performed once a month.
Although the Optical Module requires very little warm-up time to reach a stable operating
temperature (for application purposes), Abbott recommends a warm-up time of
approximately 15 minutes to ensure accurate stability check results.
Step 1
The following equipment set up is required: Philips CMS Patient Monitoring System with the SvO2 module plugged into the system rack and Abbott's 50131-04
Optical Module connected to the SvO2 module.
Step 2
Place the Optical Module out of direct light (for example, by covering it with a
towel or drape). Ensure that the lid on the Optical Module is closed and that the
“LOW LIGHT” INOP message is not displayed.
Step 3
Press the
dow.
Step 4
Press Pre-Ins. Calibr. and Confirm .
Step 5
The message CAL RUNNING will now be displayed for up to 1 minute. After 1
minute, this message is replaced by CAL MODE.
Step 6
The check is successful if the CAL MODE message remains displayed for 2
hours.
Step 7
The check is unsuccessful if the CAL MODE message is replaced with the CAL
FAILED message within the 2-hour period.
Step 8
Repeat if the check was unsuccessful. If the check fails again, replace the Optical
Module or contact your local Abbott service representative.
CAL
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
key on the SvO2 module to enter the calibration Task Win-
Performing Plug-In Module Self-Tests
Performing the FIO2 Module Self-Test
Auto Check: A continuous check of the OFFSET and TEST values is executed to ensure
that they are within the specified limits. If one of these values is found to be outside its
limit, a FIO2 EQUIP MALF message is displayed.
If the BATTERY values go outside the specified range, a FIO2 BATTERY? message is
displayed. FIO2 monitoring continues, but the backup feature of the module cannot be
guaranteed, leading to a possible drift of the FIO2 numeric.
Self-Test The manual check may be performed at any time. The check takes
approximately 30 seconds, after which time the display automatically returns to the
normal monitoring mode.
TEST
Press
RESULT
If the module is functioning correctly the following numeric will be
displayed without the alarms being activated:
More Choices
Monitor Setup
0.21 (if no errors from the Auto-Test)
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
FIO2
Test Signals .
Performing the CO2 Module Self-Test
Auto Check: None.
The simulated CO2
wave is provided on
the display with the
numerics.
Self-Test: The self-test may be performed at any time. The test signals last about 30
seconds, and then the display returns to the normal monitoring mode.
TEST
If a transducer is connected to the module, the following conditions must
be met:
•
•
The motor in the transducer is running.
No heater malfunction is reported.
Press
RESULT
Test Signals .
Monitor Setup
If the module is functioning correctly the values will be displayed without
the alarms being activated and should read as follows:
ET CO2
40 mmHg (6.0kPa)
IMCO2
0 mmHg (0.0kPa)
AWRR
25 rpm
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-61
Performing Plug-In Module Self-Tests
Performing the Temperature Module Self-Test
Auto Check: None.
This module only
displays a numeric.
Self-Test: The Temperature module self-test may be performed at any time as the switch
network switches to the reference resistors for the duration of the check. The system
connects the reference resistors to the beginning of the processing circuitry, and
processes this test value in the same way as the patient values are processed. The test
signals last about 30 seconds and then the display returns to the normal monitoring mode.
TEST
Press
RESULT
If the module is functioning correctly, the following temperature will be
displayed without the alarms being activated:
Monitor Setup
Temp
Test Signals .
40 C (+0.1C)
Performing the Blood Analysis Module Self-Test
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
Auto Check: The Blood Analysis module performs a check when the system is switched
on.
Self-Test: The Self-Test with the External Simulator M3634A may be performed at any
time.
4-62
TEST
Insert the External Simulator into the cartridge slot of the module.
RESULT
Either PASS or FAIL will be displayed on the Monitor to indicate whether
the module has passed the self-test or not. If the module fails the self-test,
try the procedure again. If it fails again, wait half an hour and then try the
procedure again. If the module continues to fail the self-test the module
should be replaced.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Performing Plug-In Module Self-Tests
Performing the Recorder Module Self-Test
Auto Check: The Recorder module performs a check when it is plugged in to the front-end
rack of the system.
Refer to M1032A
VueLink Module
Handbook for
further service
details on the
VueLink Modules.
Self-Test: The Recorder module check may be performed at any time.
TEST
Turn on the system power and plug in the recorder module.
RESULT
The LED on the front panel indicates whether the module has passed the
self-test by flashing.
Two flashes
Module has passed check.
One flash
Module failed self-test. Take the module out and try
the procedure again to make sure there is a good
connection.
No flash
Module processors are not working properly and the
module should be replaced.
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
The recorder
module produces a
sequence of LED
flashes when tested.
Performing the VueLink Module Self-Test
Auto Check: The VueLink module performs an automatic check when the module is
plugged in to the module rack of the system.
Self-Test: None.
Performing the Data Management Database Self-Test
The data management database is tested during system start-up with an SRAM checksum
procedure. If there is an error found in the SRAM checksum, the system will restart (cold
start) and all patient data will be lost.
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
4-63
Performing Plug-In Module Self-Tests
Performing the RS-232 Card Loopback Test
An RS-232 Transmit/Receive (loopback) test can be performed to check both the transmit
and the receive capabilities of the RS-232 ports. The test is performed as follows:
Step 1
Change to Service Mode.
Step 2
Connect the RS-232 cable (M1181A #A50 or #A51) directly from one of the RS232 ports to the other on the same card.
Step 3
Ensure that all other connections to host computers are removed.
Step 4
Press
Monitor Setup
Step 5
Press
RS232
Step 6
Using the softkeys, configure both ports to:
Troubleshooting the
Plug-in Modules
•
•
•
(or Instrument Config ).
.
“Comp On”
the same baud rate (for example: 19200)
the same Tx/Rx byte order (for example: High/Low).
Step 7
Press Store Settings
and then press
Step 8
Press
to initiate the loopback test.
Perform Test
Confirm
.
NOTE
The message “RS232 port receive and transmit test passed” appears with “Port #1 <-> Port
#2” if the test is successful; if not, the message “RS232 port transmit and receive test
failed” appears. If the test is unsuccessful, both the cable and the RS-232 card should be
examined and/or exchanged.
NOTE
If you have two RS-232 boards in the monitor, you can also cross connect between the RS232 boards. The message that appears could be “Port #1 <-> Port #4” if ports 1 and 4 are
connected for the test.
4-64
Troubleshooting the Plug-in Modules
Chapter 5 Repairing the CMS
This chapter explains how to remove and replace the assemblies that make up the CMS.
Generally, you will be referred to this chapter to remove an assembly that is suspected to
be faulty, or to replace an assembly as part of a hardware revision. In any event, this
chapter describes how to disassemble the CMS to the point required to replace a selected
assembly, gives any special tools required to do the job, and gives any cautions or
warnings associated with the removal and replacement procedures.
Objective
In order to meet the chapter’s goals, you should be able to locate and understand the
removal and replacement procedures for the CMS.
Concepts
The CMS contains the following major units:
• Slave/Independent Display Modules – Slave/Independent displays are 10.4” Flatscreen
color, off-the-shelf XGA display1, 14” Mono, 14” Color or 21” Color, and contain no
control panel.
• Handheld Keypad (optional, except for M1167A/77A Option H03) – The handheld
keypad is an input device used with the main display to interact with patient data
management and drug calculator software.
• Computer Module – The computer module contains the hardware and software for the
processing functions of the monitor. Most of the external connections of the monitor are
in the rear of the computer module.
• Plug-in Module Rack (Integral or Satellite) – The plug-in module rack is the interface
between the plug-in modules and the computer module. Module racks can be integrated
in the computer module or remotely located in the patient vicinity.
• Plug-in Modules – The plug-in modules are the interface between the patient cables and
the plug-in module rack. Each module is responsible for specific measurements. The
number and type of modules used will depend on the monitoring situation.
1. Disassembly and repair of any off-the-shelf XGA display are outside the scope of this book. Refer to the manual that comes with
the display. For details of the appropriate Safety Tests, see Chapter 2.
Repairing the CMS 5-1
Repairing the CMS
• Main Display Module – Main displays are 14” Mono, 14” Color or 10.4” Flatscreen color
and provide a control panel for the human interface. Alternatively, you can have a
15” XGA-compatible display1 as your main display (M1167A/77A Option H03) in which
case the control panel is the separate Handheld Keypad with External Alarm Device.
Procedure Overview
Procedure Overview
This chapter contains the following procedures:
Table 5-1 Procedure Overview for Removing and Replacing Parts
Assembly
Page
Display Module Overview
5-2
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
5-3
M1094B Removal and Replacement Procedures
5-22
M1095A Backlight Removal and Replacement Procedures
5-32
Handheld Keypad
5-39
External Alarm Device
5-40
Computer Module Removal and Replacement
5-44
Module Rack
5-61
Plug-in Modules
5-63
Repairing the CMS
Each section that covers an assembly contains its own procedure overview.
Display Module Overview
Differences Between Models
The CMS is available under model numbers 54 through 68, the ACMS is available under
model numbers 74 through 88 and the NCMS is available under model numbers 36
through 48.
The CMS / ACMS / NCMS models 3x, 5x and 7x use the M1092A Monochrome display.
Model numbers 4x, 6x and 8x use the M1094B 14” Color display (or M1094A in older
models), M1095A Flatscreen, or XGA-compatible display.
The procedures in this chapter are split into sections. The first section deals with the
M1092A and M1094A displays modules, identifying differences as necessary. The second
section deals with the M1094B display module. The third section deals with the M1095A
Flatscreen display module.
5-2
Repairing the CMS
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
This section’s procedures are listed in the following table. The procedures apply to both
the M1092A (monochrome) and M1094A (color) monitors. Any differences are noted.
Table 5-2 Replaceable Parts for the CRT Display Module
M1092A
go to Page
M1094A
go to Page
M1094B
go to Page
Rear Cover
5-4
5-4
5-22
Power Fail Relay (French ICU Option)
5-5
5-5
-
Power Fuses
5-6
5-6
5-23
-
5-8
-
Rear Enclosure
5-9
5-9
5-24
Locking Cam
5-10
5-10
5-25
Front Assembly
5-11
5-11
5-26
Human Interface Board
5-12
5-12
5-27
Membrane Switch
5-13
5-13
5-29
Metal Cover
5-14
5-14
5-30
Fuse Assembly
5-16
5-16
-
Switch-Mode Power Supply (M1092A)
5-18
-
-
Switch-Mode Power Supply (M1094A)
-
5-20
-
Switch-Mode Power Supply
-
-
5-31
5-22
5-22
-
Line Power Filter (M1094A Display)
Video/Philips-HIL Connector PCA
Repairing the CMS
Repairing the CMS
Replaceable Part
5-3
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
Rear Cover
To Remove the Rear Cover
Repairing the CMS
No other assemblies need to be removed to remove the rear cover.
Step 1
Slide the two spring locks toward the center of the cover and lift the lower edge
of the cover.
Step 2
Raise the cover so it is horizontal and slide the cover directly out of the rear of
the display.
Step 3
Lean the cover against the side of the display such that you can see the ground
connection to the case.
Step 4
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, remove the large grounding screw from the
inside of the display's left panel. Make sure that you retain the two washers.
To replace the Rear Cover
5-4
Step 1
Lean the cover against the rear of the display such that you can connect the
ground wire to the case of the display.
Step 2
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, replace the large grounding screw on the
inside of the display's left panel. Make sure that you replace the two washers on
either side of the cable eyelet.
Step 3
Holding the cover horizontally, slide the cover into the top of the display and
lower the free edge of the cover to the vertical.
Step 4
Push the bottom of the cover firmly into place and the two spring locks click to
lock the cover into place.
Repairing the CMS
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
Power Fail Relay (French ICU Option)
To remove the Power-fail Relay (French ICU Option)
The work-flow for removing the power-fail relay is as follows:
Uncouple
Display
Remove
Rear
Cover
Remove
Power Fail
Relay
Step 1
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, remove the screw from the bottom of the relay.
This secures the relay to the metal top cover.
Step 2
Use the flange of metal to pull the relay directly out of the IEC power connector
on the rear of the display.
To replace the Power-fail Relay (French ICU Option)
Locate the relay in the cavity by the IEC power connector on the rear of the display and push firmly home.
Step 2
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, replace the screw on the bottom of the relay.
This secures the relay to the metal top cover.
Repairing the CMS
Step 1
Repairing the CMS
5-5
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
Repairing the CMS
Power Fuses
The power fuses
provide overvoltage protection
to the input line
voltage circuitry.
They are
generally
removed for
inspection. If the
fuses are bad
(blown), they can
only be replaced
by the same type
of fuse with an
identical rating.
Table 1 shows the
fuse ratings.
5-6
To Remove the Power Fuses
No other assemblies need to be removed to remove the Power Fuses.
Step 1
Using a flat-bladed screwdriver, turn the fuse cap a quarter turn counter-clockwise. The fuse cap should spring slightly from the rear of the display.
Step 2
Pull the fuse cap and fuse clear of the display.
Step 3
Pull the fuse out of the fuse cap and inspect it for a blown condition. If you are
unsure, use an ohmmeter to measure the resistance of the fuse. If the fuse reads
anything other than a short, the fuse is bad and needs to be replaced.
Step 4
Repeat steps 1 through 3 for the other fuse.
Repairing the CMS
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
Table 5-3 Fuse Ratings for M1092A and M1094A Displays
Display
Fuse
Part Number
M1092A
T4A, UL 110V
242208601263FMI
M1092A
T2A, VDE 220V
242208625096FMI
M1092A
T2A, UL 220V
242208601266FMI
M1094A
T4A, UL 110V
242208601263FMI
M1094A
T2.5A, UL 220V
242208610009FMI
M1094A
T2.5A, VDE 220V
242208610219FMI
To replace the Power Fuses
Only use a fuse of the correct rating.
Place one end of the fuse, of the correct value, into the fuse cap.
Step 2
Place the fuse and fuse cap into the receptacle in the rear of the display.
Step 3
Using a flat-tipped screwdriver, gently push the fuse cap into the display.
Step 4
Hold the fuse cap into the display and turn the fuse cap a quarter-turn clockwise.
Step 5
Repeat for the other fuse.
Repairing the CMS
Step 1
Repairing the CMS
5-7
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
Line Power Filter (M1094A Display)
To remove the Line Power Filter (M1094A Display)
WARNING
LETHAL HAZARD FROM ELECTRIC SHOCK
This is part of a filtered power supply. This filter can store lethal voltage levels
for several minutes after the power is removed. You must allow the filter to rest
for at least 10 minutes without power applied before removing it.
You must use a screwdriver with an insulated shaft.
Repairing the CMS
Uncouple
Display
Remove
Rear
Cover
Remove
Line Power
Filter
Step 1
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, remove the two screws from the top and the
bottom of the filter cover.
Step 2
Remove the filter cover to expose the filter and its connections. Make a note or
sketch of the connections for installing the replacement.
Step 3
Remove the filter connections to the line voltage and the integral switch-mode
power supply.
Step 4
While supporting the filter, use the cross-tipped screwdriver to remove the four
screws that secure the filter to the display rear enclosure.
Step 5
Lift the filter clear of the display rear enclosure.
To replace the Line Power Filter (M1094A Display)
5-8
Step 1
Place the power filter over the four holes on the display rear panel.
Step 2
Support the filter and locate the top screw on each side of the filter.
Step 3
Replace the other two screws and tighten to secure it to the display rear panel.
Step 4
Replace the filter connections as you noted them during the removal.
Step 5
Locate the filter cover over the two holes on the display rear cover.
Step 6
Replace the two screws and tighten to secure the cover in place.
Repairing the CMS
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
Rear Enclosure
To remove the Rear Enclosure
Uncouple
Display
Remove
Rear
Cover
Remove
Rear
Enclosure
.
Step 1
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, remove the two screws securing the Rear
Enclosure to the display rear panel.
Step 2
Grip the sides of the Rear Enclosure and slide it toward the rear of the display
until it stops.
Step 3
Grip the inside lower edges of each side of the Rear Enclosure and spring them
outward and lift the Rear Enclosure clear of the display.
To Replace the Rear Enclosure
Step 1
Grip inside the lower edges of each side of the Rear Enclosure, with the back
towards you, and spring them outward.
Step 2
Lower the Rear Enclosure over the top of the display module so it is an inch
away from the Front Assembly.
Step 3
Grip the sides of the Rear Enclosure and slide it toward the front of the display
module until it clicks into place.
Step 4
Using the cross-tipped screwdriver, replace the two screws securing the Rear
Enclosure to the display rear panel.
Repairing the CMS
5-9
Repairing the CMS
.
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
Locking Cam
This is the locking cam which holds the display to the computer module or to a mount.
No other assemblies need to be removed to remove the Locking Cam.
To remove the Locking Cam
Repairing the CMS
REMOVE
Step 1
Lay the display face down on a soft surface.
Step 2
Remove the mounting screw using a number 1 Pozidrive screwdriver. The locking cam can now be removed from the display.
To replace the Locking Cam
5-10
Step 1
Lay the display face down on a soft surface.
Step 2
Place the locking cam over the mounting hole so it points toward the rear of the
unit.
Step 3
Using a number 1 Pozidrive screwdriver, secure the locking cam to the display
with the mounting screw.
Repairing the CMS
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
Front Assembly
To remove the Front Assembly/Plastic Bezel
Uncouple
Display
Step 1
Place the display module on its back, with its feet toward you.
Step 2
Using the cross-tipped screwdriver, slacken the two securing screws on the bottom edge of the Front Assembly.
Step 3
Using a flat-blade screwdriver, spring the plastic tabs toward you and tilt the
front of the Front Assembly an inch clear of the screen.
Step 4
Remove the ribbon cable connector from the human interface board in the bottom of the Front Assembly. If present, remove the GND cable clamp from the
metal cabinet.
Step 5
Lift the Front Assembly clear of the screen.
To replace the Front Assembly
Step 1
Place the display module on its back, with its feet towards you.
Step 2
Locate the four plastic tabs at the top of the Front Assembly into the holes in the
top of the display module. Lower the bottom edge of the Front Assembly to
within two edges of the screen.
Step 3
Connect the ribbon cable to the human interface board in the bottom of the
Front Assembly, noting the orientation of the keyed connector.
Step 4
If present, connect the GND cable clamp to the metal cabinet.
Step 5
Lower the Front Assembly on to the screen, making sure to align the hole in the
Front Assembly with the plastic stud of the power switch. Push firmly so the
plastic lugs snap on to the display module.
Step 6
Using the cross-tipped screwdriver, tighten the two securing screws on the bottom edge of the Front Assembly.
Step 7
Lower the front of the display so that it stands upright.
Repairing the CMS
5-11
Repairing the CMS
Retain Front
Assembly/Plastic
Bezel if sending
CRT back to the
factory.
Remove
Front Assy
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
Human Interface Board
To remove the Human Interface Board
Uncouple
Display
Remove
Front Assy
Remove
Human
Interface
Board
PLASTIC SHIELD
WIRE TO ARROW KEY
HUMAN INTERFACE BOARD
Repairing the CMS
RIBBON CABLE
5-12
Step 1
Remove the plastic shield by pushing the two plastic tabs through the retaining
holes on the Human Interface Board.
Step 2
Remove the ribbon connector from the Membrane Switch.
Step 3
Lean over to view the other side of the board and find the three square holes in
the board that accept the plastic securing lugs.
Step 4
Using a flat-tipped screwdriver, lightly spring each lug in turn while gently pulling the top edge of the board.
Step 5
Disconnect the wire from the ARROW key.
Step 6
When the lugs are free, lift the board vertically out of the Front Assembly, clear
of the Membrane Switch.
Repairing the CMS
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
To replace the Human Interface Board
Step 1
Locate the lower edge of the interface board into the slots on either side of the
Front Assembly.
Step 2
Align the LED with the hole in the Front Assembly, as you place the board into
the slots.
Step 3
Push the board firmly so the three plastic lugs engage.
Step 4
Reconnect the ribbon connector into the Membrane Switch.
Step 5
Reconnect the wire to the ARROW key.
Step 6
Align the plastic tabs of the plastic shield with the retaining holes on the Human
Interface Board and push the plastic shield until it snaps into place.
Membrane Switch
To remove the Membrane Switch
Remove
Front
Assembly
Remove
Human
Interface
Board
Remove
Membrane
Switch
Repairing the CMS
Uncouple
Display
SIX PUSH-IN RETAINERS
MEMBRANE
KEYPAD
Repairing the CMS
5-13
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
Step 1
Remove the ribbon cable from the keypad.
Step 2
Lay the Front Assembly flat on a table with the back of the Front Assembly
uppermost.
Step 3
Using the screwdriver, remove the six push-in retainers.
Step 4
While pushing on the central threaded post, lift the Front Assembly clear of the
keypad.
To replace the Membrane Switch
Step 1
Lay the keypad on a table with the threaded post facing up.
Step 2
Lower the threaded posts through the holes in the Front Assembly.
Step 3
Replace the six push-in retainers. These secure the keypad to the Front Assembly.
Step 4
Connect the ribbon cable to the keypad.
Metal Cover
The Metal Cover is not a field replaceable assembly. Its removal and replacement is
included here because it must be removed to remove other assemblies internal to the
display.
Repairing the CMS
To remove the Metal Cover
Uncouple
Display
5-14
Repairing the CMS
Remove
Rear
Cover
Remove
Rear
Enclosure
Remove
Metal
Cover
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
Step 1
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, remove the eight screws securing the metal
cover to the display.
Step 2
For the M1094A (color) display, lift the top of the cover and pass the connector
to the line filter through the holes in the rear of the cover.
Step 3
Lift the cover from the display.
Step 1
For the M1094A (color), support the cover to the rear of the display and pass the
connectors to the line filter through the holes in the rear of the cover. The three
connectors from the main inlet connector are passed through the left hole and
the two load connectors to the SMPS are passed through the lower right hole.
Step 2
Locate the cover on the display so the holes in the cover and display are aligned.
Step 3
Replace the eight screws to secure the cover to the display.
Repairing the CMS
5-15
Repairing the CMS
To replace the Metal Cover
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
Fuse Assembly
To remove the Fuse Assembly
For the M1092A
Display, the power
connector and the
power switch are
part of the fuse
assembly. They are
removed when the
fuse assembly is
removed. The
power connector is
not a field
replaceable item so
there is no further
maintenance on it.
Uncouple
Display
Remove
Rear
Cover
Remove
Rear
Enclosure
Remove
Metal
Cover
Remove
Fuse
Assembly
Repairing the CMS
REMOVE 2
SCREWS
.
5-16
Step 1
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, remove the two screws securing the two green
and yellow striped wires from the switch-mode power supply and deflection
board to the common ground point on the plate of the assembly. Note there are
two washers for each lead, one below and one above the lead.
Step 2
Remove the screw securing the single grounding wire to the common ground
point.
Step 3
For the M1092A (monochrome) display only, remove the power connection from
the rear of the SMPS.
Step 4
For the M1092A (monochrome) display only, go to the front of the display and,
using a cross-tipped screwdriver, remove the two screws securing the power
switch to the left of the display front panel.
Repairing the CMS
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
Step 5
Pass the power switch into the body of the display and pull it out from the rear of
the display.
Step 6
Remove the screw on the left of the grounding post on the rear of the SMPS. This
secures the assembly to the power supply.
Step 7
Slide the assembly out of the slot in the side of the power supply.
To replace the Fuse Assembly
Slide the assembly into the two slots on the right side of the SMPS.
Step 2
Secure the assembly to the SMPS using one screw.
Step 3
For the M1092A (monochrome) display only, pass the power switch from the
rear of the display to the left of the front panel.
Step 4
For the M1092A (monochrome) display only, at the front of the display, use a
cross-tipped screwdriver to secure the power switch to the display front panel
using two screws.
Step 5
For the M1092A (monochrome) display only, connect the power connector to the
rear of the SMPS.
Step 6
Secure the single grounding wire to the common ground point using one screw.
Step 7
Secure the two green and yellow wires from the SMPS and the deflection board
to the common ground point using one screw and two washers for each lead.
One washer goes above the lead and one washer goes beneath the lead.
Repairing the CMS
Step 1
Repairing the CMS
5-17
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
Switch-Mode Power Supply (M1092A)
To remove Switch-Mode Power Supply (SMPS)
Repairing the CMS
Uncouple
Display
5-18
Remove
Rear
Cover
Remove
Rear
Enclosure
Remove
Metal
Cover
Remove
SMPS
Step 1
Remove the power connector (red and black wires) for the human interface
board from the top of the SMPS.
Step 2
Remove the power connector (orange and black wires) for the deflector board
from the top of the SMPS.
Step 3
Remove the black wire for from the plug-in spade terminals on the SMPS cover.
Step 4
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, remove the two screws from the outside of the
display’s left panel. These screws secure the SMPS to the display module.
Step 5
Slide the SMPS toward the rear of the display to access the power connector on
the front of the SMPS. Disconnect the connector.
Step 6
Lift the SMPS from the display.
Repairing the CMS
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
To replace the SMPS
Hold the SMPS with the 15-pin D-type connector toward you and the open part of
the SMPS case to your left.
Step 2
Place the SMPS into the display module so that you can make the power connection on the front side of the SMPS.
Step 3
Connect the connector to the plug on the front side of the SMPS.
Step 4
Slide the SMPS into the slot on the left side of the main casing of the display
module. The holes in the SMPS and the left panel of the display module should
be aligned.
Step 5
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, secure the SMPS to the display’s left panel
using two screws.
Step 6
Connect the black wires to the plug-in spade terminals on the SMPS.
Step 7
Connect the power connector (orange and black wires) for the deflector board
to the top of the SMPS.
Step 8
Connect the power connector (red and black wires) for the human interface
board to the top of the SMPS.
When you remove or replace a power supply, you MUST perform the required
safety test(s) before the equipment is used again for monitoring.
See Chapter 2 for details of the safety tests.
Repairing the CMS
WARNING
Step 1
Repairing the CMS
5-19
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
Switch-Mode Power Supply (M1094A)
To remove Switch-Mode Power Supply (SMPS)
Uncouple
Display
Remove
Rear
Cover
Remove
Rear
Enclosure
Remove
Metal
Cover
Remove
SMPS
Video/Philips-HIL PCA
Repairing the CMS
Switch Mode Power Supply
(front side)
Step 1
Remove the power connector (red and black) wires for the human interface
board from the top of the SMPS.
Step 2
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, remove the two screws from the outside of the
display’s left panel. These screws secure the SMPS to the display module.
Step 3
Slide the SMPS toward the far end of the display to access the connectors on the
rear of the SMPS.
Step 4
With the top connector being number 1, remove connectors 1 and 3 by pulling
them out. Remove connector 2 by pressing the two flaps on either side of the
cable-end connector and pull out. Spring the locking flap of connector 4 to allow
the connector to be removed.
Lift the SMPS clear of the display module.
5-20
Repairing the CMS
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
To Replace the SMPS
Hold the SMPS with the 15-pin D-type connector toward you and the open part of
the SMPS case to your left.
Step 2
Place the SMPS into the display module so that you can make the connection on
the front side of the SMPS.
Step 3
Replace the connectors by pushing them in receptacles of the correct color and
shape.
Step 4
Place the SMPS in the display so the holes in both the SMPS and the left panel of
the display are aligned.
Step 5
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, secure the SMPS to the display’s left panel
using two screws.
Step 6
Connect the power connector (red and black wires) for the human interface
board to the top of the SMPS.
When you remove or replace a power supply, you MUST perform the required
safety test(s) before the equipment is used again for monitoring.
See Chapter 2 for details of the safety tests.
Repairing the CMS
WARNING
Step 1
Repairing the CMS
5-21
M1092A and M1094A Removal and Replacement Procedures
Video/Philips-HIL Connector PCA
To remove the Video/Philips-HIL Connector PCA
Uncouple
Display
Remove
Rear
Cover
Remove
Rear
Enclosure
Remove
Metal
Cover
Remove
Video/Philips-HIL
See previous graphic to locate the Video/Philips-HIL Connector PCA
Step 1
Unplug the two connectors from the video card.
Step 2
Using a socket driver, remove the four hex studs from the plate.
Step 3
Lift the connector plate clear of the display.
To replace the Video/Philips-HIL Connector PCA
Place the connector plate over the four mounting holes.
Step 2
Using a socket driver, secure the plate using the four hex studs.
Step 3
Plug the two connectors to the video card.
Repairing the CMS
Step 1
5-22
Repairing the CMS
M1094B Removal and Replacement Procedures
M1094B Removal and Replacement Procedures
The following procedures apply for the M1094B (color) monitor.
Rear Cover
To remove the Rear Cover
Remove
Rear
Cover
Repairing the CMS
Uncouple
Display
You do not need any special tools to remove the rear cover. It can be removed using a
cross-tipped screwdriver.
No other assemblies need to be removed to remove the rear cover.
Step 1
Slide the two spring locks toward the center of the cover and lift the lower edge
of the cover.
Step 2
Raise the cover so it is horizontal and slide the cover directly out of the rear of
the display.
Step 3
Lean the cover against the side of the display such that you can see the ground
connection to the case.
5-23
M1094B Removal and Replacement Procedures
Step 4
Lean the cover against the side of the display such that you can see the ground
connection to the case.Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, remove the large
grounding screw from the inside of the display's left panel. Make sure that you
retain the two washers.
To replace the Rear Cover
Step 1
Lean the cover against the rear of the display such that you can connect the
ground wire to the case of the display.
Step 2
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, replace the large grounding screw on the
inside of the display's left panel. Make sure that you replace the two washers on
either side of the cable eyelet.
Step 3
Holding the cover horizontally, slide the cover into the top of the display and
lower the free edge of the cover to the vertical.
Step 4
Push the bottom of the cover firmly into place and the two spring locks “click” to
lock the cover into place.
Power Fuses
Repairing the CMS
To Remove the Power Fuses
The power fuses
provide overvoltage protection
to the input line
voltage circuitry.
They are
generally
removed for
inspection. If the
fuses are bad
(blown), they can
only be replaced
by the same type
of fuse with an
identical rating.
Table 2 shows the
fuse ratings for
the M1094B.
FUSES
The power fuses provide over-voltage protection to the input line voltage circuitry. They
are generally removed for inspection purposes. If the fuses are bad (blown), they can only
be replaced by the same type of fuse with an identical rating. The fuses are removed using
a flat-bladed screwdriver.
5-24
M1094B Removal and Replacement Procedures
Step 1
Using a flat-bladed screwdriver, turn the fuse cap a quarter turn counter-clockwise. The fuse cap should spring slightly from the rear of the display.
Step 2
Pull the fuse cap and fuse clear of the display.
Step 3
Pull the fuse out of the fuse cap and inspect it for a blown condition. If you are
unsure, use an ohmmeter to measure the resistance of the fuse. If the fuse reads
anything other than a short, the fuse is bad and needs to be replaced.
Step 4
Repeat steps 1 through 3 for the other fuse.
To replace the Power Fuses
Table 5-4 Fuse Ratings for M1094B Display
Display
Fuse
Part Number
M1094B
T4A, UL 110V
242208601263FMI
M1094B
T3.15A, VDE or UL 220V
242208610239FMI
Only use a fuse of the correct rating.
Locate one end of the fuse of the correct value into the fuse cap.
Step 2
Locate the fuse and fuse cap into the receptacle in the rear of the display.
Step 3
Using a flat-tipped screwdriver, gently push the fuse cap into the display.
Step 4
Hold the fuse cap into the display and turn the fuse cap a quarter-turn clockwise.
Step 5
Repeat for the other fuse.
Repairing the CMS
Step 1
5-25
M1094B Removal and Replacement Procedures
Rear Enclosure
To remove the Rear Enclosure
Repairing the CMS
Uncouple
Display
Remove
Rear
Cover
Remove
Rear
Enclosure
Step 1
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, remove the two screws securing the Rear
Enclosure to the display rear panel.
Step 2
Grip the sides of the Rear Enclosure and slide it towards the rear of the display
until it stops.
Step 3
Grip the inside lower edges of each side of the Rear Enclosure and spring them
outward and lift the Rear Enclosure clear of the display.
To replace the Rear Enclosure
5-26
Step 1
Grip inside the lower edges of each side of the Rear Enclosure, with the back
towards you, and spring them outward.
Step 2
Lower the Rear Enclosure over the top of the display module so it is an inch
away from the front Front Assembly.
Step 3
Grip the sides of the Rear Enclosure and slide it toward the front of the display
module until it clicks into place.
Step 4
Using the cross-tipped screwdriver, replace the two screws securing the Rear
Enclosure to the display rear panel.
M1094B Removal and Replacement Procedures
Locking Cam
This is the locking cam which holds the display to the computer module or to a mount.
To remove the Locking Cam
Step 1
Lay the display face down on a soft surface.
Step 2
Remove the mounting screw using a number 1 Pozidrive screwdriver. The locking cam can now be removed from the display.
To replace the Locking Cam
Step 1
Lay the display face down on a soft surface.
Step 2
Place the locking cam over the mounting hole so it points towards the rear of the
unit.
Step 3
Using a number 1 Pozidrive screwdriver, secure the locking cam to the display
with the mounting screw.
5-27
Repairing the CMS
REMOVE
M1094B Removal and Replacement Procedures
Front Assembly
To remove the Front Assembly
Uncouple
Display
Remove
Front Assy
Step 1
Place the display module on its back, with its feet towards you.
Step 2
Using the cross-tipped screwdriver, slacken the two securing screws on the bottom edge of the Front Assembly.
Step 3
Using a flat-blade screwdriver, spring the plastic tabs towards you and tilt the
front of the Front Assembly an inch clear of the screen.
Step 4
Remove the ribbon cable connector from the human interface board in the bottom of the Front Assembly. If present, remove the GND cable clamp from the
metal cabinet.
Step 5
Lift the Front Assembly clear of the screen.
Repairing the CMS
To replace the Front Assembly
5-28
Step 1
Place the display module on its back, with its feet towards you.
Step 2
Locate the four plastic tabs at the top of the Front Assembly into the holes in the
top of the display module. Lower the bottom edge of the Front Assembly to
within two edges of the screen.
Step 3
Connect the ribbon cable to the human interface board in the bottom of the
Front Assembly, noting the orientation of the keyed connector.
Step 4
If present, connect the GND cable clamp to the metal cabinet.
Step 5
Lower the Front Assembly onto the screen, making sure to align the hole in the
Front Assembly with the plastic stud of the power switch. Push firmly so the
plastic lugs snap on to the display module.
Step 6
Using the cross-tipped screwdriver, tighten the two securing screws on the bottom edge of the Front Assembly.
Step 7
Lower the front of the display so that it stands upright.
M1094B Removal and Replacement Procedures
Human Interface Board
To remove the Human Interface Board
Uncouple
Display
Remove
Front Assy
Remove
Human
Interface
Board
PLASTIC SHIELD
WIRE TO ARROW KEY
HUMAN INTERFACE BOARD
Step 1
Remove the plastic shield by pushing the two plastic tabs through the retaining
holes on the Human Interface Board.
Step 2
Lay the Front Assembly face-down so you have the Human Interface Board
toward you.
Step 3
Remove the ribbon connector from the Membrane Switch.
Step 4
Lean over to view the other side of the board and find the two square holes in the
board that accept the plastic securing lugs.
Step 5
Using a flat-tipped screwdriver, lightly spring each lug in turn while gently pulling the top edge of the board.
Step 6
Disconnect the wire from the ARROW key.
Step 7
When both lugs are free, lift the board vertically out of the Front Assembly.
5-29
Repairing the CMS
RIBBON CABLE
M1094B Removal and Replacement Procedures
To replace the Human Interface Board
Step 1
Locate the lower edge of the interface board into the slots on either side of the
Front Assembly.
Step 2
Align the LED with the hole in the Front Assembly, as you place the board into
the slots.
Step 3
Push the board firmly so that the two plastic lugs engage.
Step 4
Reconnect the ribbon connector into the Membrane Switch.
Step 5
Reconnect the wire to the ARROW key.
Step 6
Align the plastic tabs of the plastic shield with the retaining holes on the Human
Interface Board and push the plastic shield until it snaps into place.
Membrane Switch
To remove the Membrane Switch
Uncouple
Display
Remove
Front
Assembly
Remove
Human
Interface
Board
Remove
Membrane
Switch
Repairing the CMS
SIX PUSH IN RETAINERS
MEMBRANE
KEYPAD
5-30
Step 1
Remove the ribbon cable from the keypad.
Step 2
Lay the Front Assembly flat on a table with the back of the Front Assembly
uppermost.
M1094B Removal and Replacement Procedures
Step 3
Using the screwdriver, remove the six push-in retainers.
Step 4
While pushing on the central threaded post, lift the Front Assembly clear of the
keypad.
To replace the Membrane Switch
Lay the keypad on a table with the threaded post facing up.
Step 2
Lower the Front Assembly so that the threaded posts pass through the holes in
the Front Assembly.
Step 3
Replace the six push-in retainers. These secure the keypad to the Front Assembly.
Step 4
Connect the ribbon cable to the keypad.
Repairing the CMS
Step 1
5-31
M1094B Removal and Replacement Procedures
Top Metal Cover and SMPS Cover
The Top Metal Cover and the SMPS Cover are not field replaceable assemblies. Their
removal and replacement are included here because they must be removed to remove
other assemblies internal to the display.
Repairing the CMS
To remove the Metal Cover
expmetal.mif
Step 1
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, remove the 11 screws securing the metal cover
and the SMPS cover to the display.
Step 2
Remove the Top Metal and SMPS covers from the display.
To replace the Top Metal Cover and the SMPS Cover
5-32
Step 1
Insert the SMPS cover over the rear of the display. Slide the bottom and sides
into place and align the 2 screw holes on the cover’s top edge with holes in the
top frame of display.
Step 2
Insert the three tabs on the top metal cover into slots on top of the display, and
align the cover’s screw holes with holes in the display frame and bottom cover.
Step 3
Secure the Top Metal Cover and SMPS cover to the display using 11 screws.
M1094B Removal and Replacement Procedures
Switch-Mode Power Supply
To remove Switch-Mode Power Supply (SMPS)
Step 1
Disconnect the line switch assembly on the lower right of the SMPS by pressing
its top and removing its bottom tab from the connector slot. Push the assembly
and cable through the hole in the SMPS.
Step 2
Disconnect the remaining four cables entering the rear of the SMPS.
Step 3
Remove the six screws securing the SMPS to the rear of the display.
Step 4
Remove the ground wire from the bottom front of the SMPS by removing one
screw.
Step 5
Using a flat-bladed screwdriver, press the two white tabs (top center and right
center), tilt the SMPS forward, and remove the SMPS.
To Replace the SMPS
WARNING
Step 1
Place the SMPS tab holes over the two white tabs and snap into place.
Step 2
Secure the ground wire to the bottom front of the SMPS using one screw.
Step 3
Align the screw holes and secure the SMPS to the rear of the display using six
screws.
Step 4
Connect the four cables to the rear of the SMPS.
Step 5
Connect the line switch assembly to the SMPS.
When you remove or replace a power supply, you MUST perform the required
safety test(s) before the equipment is used again for monitoring.
See Chapter 2 for details of the safety tests.
5-33
Repairing the CMS
DEPRESS TABS
M1095A Backlight Removal and Replacement Procedures
M1095A Backlight Removal and Replacement Procedures
NOTE
It is recommended that the fluorescent tube (“backlight”) in the display module be
replaced after a certain time, which depends on the type of display (see Table below)
If an unacceptable decrease in backlight intensity is noted the fluorescent tube has to be
replaced as well.
Repairing the CMS
Table 5-5 M1095A Flatscreen Display Backlight Lifetimes
M1095A
s/n prefix
LCD Type
(inside)
Backlight
p/n
Lifetime
(months)
< 3805G
AC33-10
2090-0546
14
3805G
AC33-24
2090-0360
34
3923G
AC33-29
2090-0381
64
CAUTION
If dirt or dust gets on the fluorescent lamp in the lamp holder during
replacement, brightness variations might occur. Therefore, we recommend the
use of a clean room or clean bench (at the class C level).
In addition, the LCD module can be destroyed by static electricity. Therefore, we
recommend the use of an ionizer (ion shower).
NOTE
There are two different backlight replacement procedures depending on what type of
M1095A Display you have.
The first procedure applies for the Old-Color type display and starts from page 5-35.
The second procedure for the New-Color type display starts from page 5-38.
5-34
M1095A Backlight Removal and Replacement Procedures
Backlight replacement procedure for M1095A Old-Color Version
To remove rear housing
Separate display from mounting hardware and place the display face down on
the bench.
Step 2
Remove the four screws holding the rear housing in place using a number 1
Pozidrive screwdriver.
Step 3
Lift the left-hand side of the rear housing and open carefully, pivoting on the
right-hand side (where the On/Off switch is).
Step 4
Before placing the rear housing on the bench, remove the ribbon cable connector (gray) from the socket (black) on the board in the bottom of the front assembly.
Step 5
Disconnect the remaining connector from the rear housing, pushing the clips to
the side to release the connector.
Repairing the CMS
Step 1
5-35
M1095A Backlight Removal and Replacement Procedures
To remove screen assembly from front housing
NOTE
Step 1
Using a number 1 Pozidrive screwdriver, remove the four screws holding the
metal plate.
Step 2
Holding the metal plate in place, lift the entire assembly and place it face up on
the bench.
For all further steps, wear gloves to avoid skin contact with the screen surface.
Step 3
Repairing the CMS
CAUTION
5-36
Lift the front housing off the screen assembly.
Do not touch the screen surface.
Step 4
Using a Pozidrive number 1 screwdriver, remove the four large screws holding
the screen onto the metal plate.
Step 5
Lift the screen assembly off the metal plate and lay it face down on the clean
bench.
M1095A Backlight Removal and Replacement Procedures
Step 1
Pull out cable holder to release flat cable and disconnect.
Step 2
Using round-tipped tweezers, release the lamp cables from the cable channel.
Step 3
Using a small cross-tipped screwdriver, remove the two screws holding the
inverter board.
Step 4
Slip the inverter board out from beneath the two plastic retaining tabs.
Step 5
Unplug lamp cables from inverter board.
Step 6
Using a small cross-tipped screwdriver, remove retaining screw on backlight.
Step 7
Using the lamp cables, pull gently and in a straight line on the backlight assembly
to remove it.
5-37
Repairing the CMS
To remove backlight assembly
M1095A Backlight Removal and Replacement Procedures
Backlight replacement procedure for M1095A New-Color Version
To remove rear housing
Separate display from mounting hardware and place the display face down on
the bench.
Step 2
Remove the four screws holding the rear housing in place using a number 1
Pozidrive screwdriver.
Step 3
Lift the left-hand side of the rear housing and open carefully, pivoting on the
right-hand side (where the On/Off switch is).
Step 4
Before placing the rear housing on the bench, remove the ribbon cable connector (gray) from the socket (black) on the board in the bottom of the front assembly.
Step 5
Remove the two crosshead screws securing the ferrite bead clamp and lift it
clear of the video cable.
Step 6
Disconnect the video cable from the connector on the video board.
Repairing the CMS
Step 1
5-38
M1095A Backlight Removal and Replacement Procedures
To remove LCD panel from front housing
Step 1
Using a number 1 Pozidrive screwdriver, remove the four screws holding the
metal plate.
Remove
screws
Step 2
For all further steps, wear gloves to avoid skin contact with the screen surface.
Step 3
CAUTION
Lift the front housing off the screen assembly.
Do not touch the screen surface.
Step 4
Using a Pozidrive number 1 screwdriver, remove the two right-hand screws and
loosen the two left-hand screws that hold the screen onto the metal plate.
Remove screws
Loosen screws
5-39
Repairing the CMS
NOTE
Holding the metal plate in place, lift the entire assembly and place it face up on
the bench.
M1095A Backlight Removal and Replacement Procedures
To remove backlight assembly
Step 1
Move the LCD panel 5cm to the left to expose the inverter board.
Backlight connector
Repairing the CMS
Inverter board
Step 2
Unplug backlight connector from inverter board.
Step 3
Look on the edge of the LCD panel and raise the locking clip to release the backlight.
Step 4
Using the lamp cables, pull the backlight gently and in a straight line out of the
LCD panel.
Locking Clip
Backlight
Lamp cables
5-40
Handheld Keypad
Handheld Keypad
The following is a list of replaceable parts for the handheld keypad.
Replaceable Part
Housing Assembly (includes top cover, bottom cover, magnet, rubber feet, and screws)
Board Assembly (includes switch board and logic board assembly)
Repairing the CMS
Cable Assembly
Housing Assembly
To Remove the Housing Assembly
Step 1
Place the handheld keypad face down on a table.
Step 2
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, remove the 7 screws from the bottom cover.
Step 3
Remove the keypad bottom cover.
5-41
Handheld Keypad
Step 4
To remove the rubber feet, push the feet through the holes in the bottom cover
from the inside.
Step 5
Lift the printed circuit boards out of the housing assembly to expose the top
cover.
Repairing the CMS
To Replace the Housing Assembly
5-42
Step 1
If the rubber feet have been removed, replace them by pushing the stubs through
the holes in the bottom cover from the outside.
Step 2
Place the bottom cover on a table with the magnet side down.
Step 3
Place the printed circuit boards (with the keys facing up) in the bottom cover,
such that the standoffs on the bottom cover fit through the holes in the logic
board.
Step 4
Dress the cable through the strain relief and out through the bottom cover.
Step 5
Replace the top cover and turn the keypad over.
Step 6
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, replace the 7 screws.
Step 7
If you are replacing the housing assembly with a new one, peel the serial number
off of the old housing assembly and affix it to the new one.
External Alarm Device
External Alarm Device
The following is a list of replaceable parts for the External Alarm Device.
Replaceable Part
Front Cover (including light diffusers and light pipe)
Handheld Keypad Bracket
HIF Board (including ribbon cable)
LED Carrier Board
Loudspeaker
Protection Flap for HIL Connectors
Remote On/Off Cable
Step 1
Remove the four long screws at the back of the device.
Step 2
Remove the front and rear covers.
Step 3
Remove internal components by removing the short screws as appropriate.
Repairing the CMS
To Disassemble the External Alarm Device
5-43
Computer Module Removal and Replacement
Computer Module Removal and Replacement
Repairing the CMS
The following is a list of replaceable parts for the Computer Module. These descriptions
apply equally to the M1046A Computer Module and the new M1046B Computer Module.
Where a procedure or certain steps within a procedure apply to only either the M1046A or
M1046B it will be labeled as either M1046A only or M1046B only.
5-44
Replaceable Part
Page
Rear Cover
5-45
DC/DC Converter
5-46
Integral Rack - M1046A only
5-47
Front Plastic Cover - M1046B only
5-48
Integral Power Supply - M1046B only
5-49
Sheet Metal Cover - M1046B only
5-51
Front Function Card
5-51
Rear Function Cards
5-54
Side Cover
5-56
Top Cover
5-57
Backplane Board Assy
5-58
Plastic Feet
5-59
Locking CAM
5-60
Computer Module Removal and Replacement
Rear Cover
To Remove the Rear Cover
Step 1
Slide the two spring locks toward the center of the cover and lift the cover clear
of the computer module.
To replace the Rear Cover
Step 1
Locate the bottom edge of the cover in the back of the computer module.
Step 2
Push the cover toward the computer module until the two spring locks click to
lock the cover into place.
5-45
Repairing the CMS
The rear cover is
removed to gain
access to the rear
connectors and
function boards.
Computer Module Removal and Replacement
DC/DC Converter
The DC/DC
Converter is
secured to the top
cover of the outer
casing and must
be removed to
gain access to the
centre plane of
the computer
module.
The work-flow for removing the DC/DC converter is as follows:
Remove
Rear Cover
Remove
DC/DC
Converter
RDCDC
Repairing the CMS
To Remove the DC/DC Converter
Step 1
Remove the power input cable (60 V) from the rear of the DC/DC converter.
Step 2
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, remove the screw that secures the top edge of
the DC/DC converter to the computer module.
Step 3
Grip the metal heat sink of the DC/DC converter and slide it out horizontally until
it is completely clear of the computer module.
To Replace the DC/DC Converter
NOTE
5-46
Step 1
Locate the card-edge of the DC/DC converter into the far left slot in the rear of
the computer module.
Step 2
Slide the DC/DC converter into the computer module until it locates into the connector on the centre board and firmly seat it into the connector.
Step 3
Replace the screw on the top edge of the DC/DC converter and tighten using a
cross-tipped screwdriver.
When you replace the DC/DC converter on a M1046B, the shorting stub from the old one
MUST be replaced in the connector or the system will not function correctly.
Computer Module Removal and Replacement
Integral Rack - M1046A only
The integral rack
holds the plug-in
modules. It must
be removed to
gain access to the
CPC Flash
connector and the
other front
function cards.
INTEGRAL RACK
To Remove the Integral Rack
Step 1
Stand in front of the computer module with the integral rack facing you.
Step 2
Press the tabs on the lower side edge of the integral rack and slide the rack gently towards you until it clears the computer module.
Step 1
Locate the two large tabs inside the cavity of the computer module.
Step 2
Gently slide the integral rack into the computer module until the securing tabs
on either side of the computer module engage. Check that the rack is secure.
5-47
Repairing the CMS
To Replace the Integral Rack
Computer Module Removal and Replacement
Front Plastic Cover - M1046B only
To Remove the Plastic Front Cover
Step 1
Stand in front of the computer module with the integral rack facing you.
Step 2
Grip the Plastic Cover firmly on each side and pull directly towards you.
Repairing the CMS
To Replace the Plastic Front Cover
Step 1
Align the four posts on the inside of the plastic cover with those on the computer
module.
Step 2
Firmly push the plastic cover, on each side, so that the cover posts fit over the
computer module posts.
Power Fuses
The power fuses
provide overvoltage protection
to the input line
voltage circuitry.
They are
generally
removed for
inspection. If the
fuses are bad
(blown), they can
only be replaced
by the same type
of fuse with an
identical rating.
Table
6-3 shows the
fuse ratings.
5-48
To Remove the Power Fuses
The plastic front cover needs to be removed to remove the Power Fuses.
Step 1
Using a flat-bladed screwdriver, turn the fuse cap a quarter turn counter-clockwise. The fuse cap should spring slightly from the rear of the display.
Step 2
Pull the fuse cap and fuse clear of the display.
Step 3
Pull the fuse out of the fuse cap and inspect it for a blown condition. If you are
unsure, use an ohmmeter to measure the resistance of the fuse. If the fuse reads
anything other than a short, the fuse is bad and needs to be replaced.
Step 4
Repeat steps 1 through 3 for the other fuse.
Computer Module Removal and Replacement
Table 5-6 Fuse Ratings for the M1046B
Display
Fuse
Part Number
M1046B
T3.15H, 250V
2110-1025
To replace the Power Fuses
Only use a fuse of the correct rating.
Step 1
Place one end of the fuse, of the correct value, into the fuse cap.
Step 2
Place the fuse and fuse cap into the receptacle in the rear of the display.
Step 3
Using a flat-tipped screwdriver, gently push the fuse cap into the display.
Step 4
Hold the fuse cap into the display and turn the fuse cap a quarter-turn clockwise.
Step 5
Repeat for the other fuse.
Repairing the CMS
Integral Power Supply - M1046B only
To Remove the Integral Power Supply
Step 1
Use a cross-tipped screwdriver to undo the two captive screws that secure the
power supply to the computer module, slide the power supply to the right and
remove from the sheet metal cover.
5-49
Computer Module Removal and Replacement
The integral power supply has two hooks on the left of its casing allowing it to be
operated in the Service Mode position for software upgrades.
ECG
Adapter
Remote Switch
Connector
Upgrade
Connector
Power Cable
Step 2
Rack Interface
Cable
Unplug the cable-end connector from the REMOTE_SWITCH function card.
Repairing the CMS
To Replace the Integral Power Supply
WARNING
Step 1
Place the power supply close to the aperture in the metal cover.
Step 2
Connect the cable-end connector to the REMOTE_SWITCH function card.
Step 3
Locate the power supply into position in the aperture on the sheet metal cover of
the computer module and slide the power supply to the left. Tighten the two captive screws to secure the power supply to the computer module.
When you fit a new integral power supply, you MUST perform the required safety
test(s) on the M1046B Computer Module before it is used again for monitoring.
When you move the integral power supply (for example, for an upgrade or to
clone settings), you MUST perform the required safety test(s) on the M1046B
Computer Module before it is used again for monitoring.
See Chapter 2 for details of the safety tests.
5-50
Computer Module Removal and Replacement
Sheet Metal Cover - M1046B only
To Remove the Sheet Metal Cover
Step 1
Remove Plastic Cover, power cord, integral power supply and unplug the Satellite Rack cable and the ECG Adapter.
Step 2
Use a cross-tipped screwdriver to remove the 4 screws that secure the cover to
the computer module and remove the cover.
To Replace the Sheet Metal Cover
WARNING
Step 1
Locate the cover into position in the front of the computer module. Replace and
tighten the 4 screws to secure the sheet metal cover to the computer module.
Step 2
Replace the integral power supply and plug in the power cord, Satellite Rack
cable and the ECG Adapter. Replace the Plastic Cover.
When you replace/refit the integral power supply in the M1046B Computer
Module, a safety test MUST be performed on the Computer Module before it is
used again for monitoring. See Chapter 2 for details of the safety tests.
The front
function cards
are in even slots
2-24. An
individual face
plate or one sheet
metal cover will
cover the function
cards.
The work-flow diagram for removing function cards is as follows. The function card can
be removed using a board extractor tool (M1046-44901).
Remove
Integral
Rack
Remove
Sheet
Metal
Cover
Remove
Function
Card
5-51
Repairing the CMS
Front Function Card
Computer Module Removal and Replacement
To Remove a Front Function Card
M1046B COMPUTER MODULE with integral power supply
M1046A COMPUTER MODULE with integral rack
FUNCTION CARD
LOCKING PLATE
SHEET METAL
COVER
SHEET METAL
COVER
CPC FLASH
CARD COVER
INTEGRAL POWER SUPPLY
INTEGRAL RACK
PLASTIC FRONT COVER
If the computer module has a sheet metal cover over the function cards, use a
cross-tipped screwdriver to remove the 4 screws that secure the cover to the
computer module and remove the cover.
Step 2
For M1046B only
Loosen the two screws for the metal function card lock and slide it to the left to
allow cards to be removed.
If you are removing a function card in front slots 18, 20, 22, or 24, remove the
AUX_CONNECTOR card’s jumper card from the RACK_IF connector.
Repairing the CMS
Step 1
LOOSEN SCREWS
SLIDE LEFT
AUX
CONNECTOR
JUMPER
CARD
Step 3
Using the board extractor tool attached to the rear of the computer module,
firmly grip the card and slide it out horizontally until the card is completely clear
of the computer module.
To Replace a Front Function Card
5-52
Computer Module Removal and Replacement
Locate the card-edge into the appropriate slot in the computer module.
Step 2
Slide the card into the computer module until it locates into the connector center
plane, then seat the card firmly into the connector.
Step 3
For M1046B only
Slide the metal function card lock to the right so the function cards cannot be
removed and tighten the two screws.
Replace the AUX_CONNECTOR card’s jumper card to the RACK_IF connector.
Step 4
If the computer module has a sheet metal cover, locate the cover into position in
the front of the computer module. Ensure that the CPC Flash port in slot 12 is
accessible through the access window in the cover. Replace and tighten the 4
screws to secure the cover to the computer module.
Step 5
For M1046B only
Replace the ECG_sync adapter so that you can connect to it through the Plastic
Cover.
Step 6
If the function card has a face plate, use a cross-tipped screwdriver to tighten the
captive screw on the top of the face plate to secure the card to the computer
module.
When you replace/refit the integral power supply in the M1046B Computer
Module, a safety test MUST be performed on the Computer Module before it is
used again for monitoring. See Chapter 2 for details of the safety tests.
Repairing the CMS
WARNING
Step 1
5-53
Computer Module Removal and Replacement
Rear Function Cards
Rear function
cards are in odd
slots 1-21.
The work-flow diagram for removing function cards is as follows. The function card can
be removed using a board extractor tool (M1046-44901).
Remove
Rear
Cover
Remove
any
attached
cables
Remove
Function
Card
Repairing the CMS
To Remove a Rear Function Card
Step 1
Using a flat-tipped screwdriver, remove any cables connected to the rear edge of
the card.
Step 2
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, back-out the captive screw on the top of the
face plate that secures the card to the computer module.
Step 3
Using the board extractor tool attached to the rear of the computer module,
firmly grip the metal plate at the rear of the card and slide it out horizontally until
it completely clears the computer module.
To Replace a Function Card with a Face Plate
5-54
Step 1
For M1046B only
If you are replacing any DSPC controller card with the Asian/Eastern Europe language option fitted, then you need to set the DIP switches on the function card to
select the correct language.
Step 2
Locate the card-edge into the appropriate slot in the computer module.
Computer Module Removal and Replacement
Step 3
Slide the card into the computer module until it locates into the connector on the
backplane, then seat the card firmly into the center plane.
Step 4
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, tighten the captive screw on the top of the card
to secure the card to the computer module.
Configuring the Display Controller Card
For each type of display there are two types of display controller card: Roman alphabetbased and other languages. For part numbers see the Parts List chapter. The non-Romanbased controller card contains a Font ROM with four switches for selecting the language.
If you are replacing the display controller card with an Eastern Europe or Asian language
option fitted, then you need to ensure that the DIP switches are set to the correct
language. See the following figure and table for the language settings.
Factory Default
Chinese (PRC)
Repairing the CMS
Japanese
Taiwanese (ROC)
EUR-EAST (Pol, Rus, Gre, Tur)
DIP-Switch Settings
Language
1
Factory Default
(Font ROM disabled)
2
3
4
closed
closed
closed
closed
Japanese
open
open
open
open
Chinese (PRC)
closed
open
open
open
Taiwanese (ROC)
open
closed
open
open
EUR-EAST (Polish,
Russian, Greek, Turkish)
open
open
closed
open
5-55
Computer Module Removal and Replacement
Side Cover
The work-flow diagram for the removal of the side cover is as follows.
Repairing the CMS
The side covers
must be removed
to gain access to
the screws
attaching the top
cover to the
computer
modules.
Remove
Integral
Rack
Remove
Side
Cover
To Remove the Side Covers
Step 1
Grip the side cover and slide it horizontally towards the front of the computer
module.
Step 2
Lift the cover so the tabs on the bottom of the cover slide out of the slots and
clear of the computer module.
To Replace the Side Covers
5-56
Step 1
Locate the tabs on the bottom of the side cover into the slots on the side of the
computer module and align it vertically to the computer module.
Step 2
Slide the cover horizontally toward the back of the computer module so that the
tabs lock the side cover in place.
Computer Module Removal and Replacement
Top Cover
The work flow diagram for removal of the top cover is as follows.
Remove all
function
cards
Remove
DC/DC
Convertor
Remove
Side
Cover
Remove
Top
Cover
To Remove the Top Cover
Step 1
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, remove the 6 screws (3 on each side) that
secure the top cover to the computer module.
Step 2
Lift the top cover clear of the computer module.
Repairing the CMS
The top cover
must be removed
to gain access to
the center board
of the computer
module.
To Replace the Top Cover
Step 1
Locate the top cover onto the computer module.
Step 2
Using the cross-tipped screwdriver, replace and tighten the 6 screws (three each
side).
5-57
Computer Module Removal and Replacement
Backplane Board Assy
The work flow diagram for removal the backplane is as follows
Repairing the CMS
The backplane
holds the
connectors for the
front and rear
function cards.
Remove all
function
cards
Remove
DC/DC
Convertor
Remove
Side and
Top Cover
Remove
Backplane
To Remove the Backplane Board Assy
Step 1
Grip the uppermost edge of the backplane and lift it directly out of the computer
module.
To Replace the Backplane Board Assy
5-58
Step 1
Stand to the rear of the computer module and hold the backplane by its uppermost edge with the large space between the connectors on the left.
Step 2
Locate and seat the backplane in the slot in the center of the computer module.
Computer Module Removal and Replacement
Plastic Feet
The plastic feet
are removed for
various
mounting
solutions.
To Remove the Plastic Feet
Step 1
Place the computer module upside-down on a suitable plain table.
Step 2
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, remove the screw securing each of the plastic
feet.
CAUTION
Step 1
Locate the 4 feet over the 4 holes on the base of the computer module so that the
slot it forms with the base faces the rear of the computer module.
Step 2
Replace and tighten the screws to secure the feet in place.
M1046B Computer Module only:
When you remove the plastic feet you may find there are standoffs to increase
the height under the computer module. You must refit these standoffs with the
plastic feet or use shorter screws to refit the feet alone.
5-59
Repairing the CMS
To Replace the Plastic Feet
Computer Module Removal and Replacement
Locking CAM
The locking cam
secures the
computer module
to mounts.
To Remove the Locking Cam
Step 1
Place the computer module upside-down on a suitable plain table.
Step 2
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, remove the single mounting screw securing
the locking cam to the computer module.
Repairing the CMS
To Replace the Locking Cam
CAUTION
5-60
Step 1
Locate the locking cam over the hole in the base of the computer module so the
locking cam points towards the rear of the unit.
Step 2
Using the cross-tipped screwdriver, replace and tighten the single mounting
screw to secure the locking cam to the computer module.
M1046B Computer Module only:
When you remove the locking cam you may find there is a standoff to increase
the height under the computer module. You must refit this standoff with the
locking cam or use a shorter screw to refit the locking cam alone.
Module Rack
Module Rack
The following is a list of replaceable parts for the module rack.
Replaceable Part
Page
Plug-In Module
5-61
Mounting Clamp
5-62
Plug-In Module
The plug-in
modules can be
used in integral
racks and
Satellite Racks.
To Remove the Plug-in Module from the Rack
Step 1
Grip the plug-in module and lift the snaplock at the bottom of the module. Then
pull the module directly out of the rack.
To Replace the Plug-in Module in the Rack
Step 1
Locate the plug-in module into a vacant slot in the rack. Push the plug-in module
into the integral rack slot until the module locks into place.
5-61
Repairing the CMS
wmer16.mif
Module Rack
Repairing the CMS
Mounting Clamp
To Remove the Mounting Clamp
Step 1
Remove the Satellite Rack from the rail or pole by loosening the clamp.
Step 2
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, remove the two screws securing the clamp to
the rack.
To Replace the Mounting Clamp
5-62
Step 1
Align the holes in the mounting clamp with one pair of holes on the back of the
Satellite Rack, depending on whether it is to be mounted on a horizontal rail or
vertical pole.
Step 2
Using a cross-tipped screwdriver, replace and tighten the screws.
Step 3
Attach the mounting clamp and Satellite Rack to either the rail or the pole.
Plug-in Modules
Plug-in Modules
Replaceable Parts
Page
Snap Lock
5-64
Plug-In Module Disassembly
5-65
NBP Inlet Connector Insert
5-67
NBP Pump
5-68
tcpO2/tcpCO2 Calibration Chamber Kit
5-69
Recorder Module Paper
5-71
Repairing the CMS
The following is a list of replaceable parts for the plug-in modules.
5-63
Plug-in Modules
Snap Lock
The snap lock
holds the plug-in
module in the
integral or
Satellite Rack.
rsnaplck.mif
`
rsnapcth.mif
Repairing the CMS
To Remove the Snap Lock
Step 1
Grip the module firmly in one hand and using your thumb, pull the front edge of
the snap lock away from the plug-in module so that the lug on the snap lock
clears the retaining edge of the module.
Step 2
Push on the rear edge of the snap lock to move the snap lock through the slot
toward the front of the module until it is clear.
To Replace the Snap lock
5-64
Step 1
Locate the snap lock into the slot on the bottom of the module.
Step 2
Slide the snap lock toward the rear of the module until the lock snaps into position.
Plug-in Modules
Plug-In Module Disassembly
The work-flow for plug-in module disassembly is as follows.
Disassembly of
the parameter
module enables
replacement of
the front
assembly,
overlay, middle
frame, LEDs,
switches and
connectors.
Remove
Front
Housing
Remove
Module
Housing
Remove
Frame
Replace
Parts
Module Housing
Remove
Front
Housing
2
Remove
Module
Housing
PRESS
Front Housing
3
Remove
Frame
PRESS
4
Replace
Parts
Repairing the CMS
1
PRESS
PRESS
PRESS
WARNING
Frame
When you disassemble/assemble a plug-in module a patient leakage current test
must be performed before it is used again for monitoring. See Chapter 2 for
details.
5-65
Plug-in Modules
To Disassemble a Plug-In Module
Step 1
Remove the Front Housing.
• Place the module on a flat surface and insert a card (similar to a credit or cheque
type card) into one side of the module to disengage the 2 tabs securing the front
housing to the module housing.
• Pull the edge of the front housing away from the module housing.
• Carefully turn the module over so the free edge does not reengage and repeat the
first two steps on the other side of the module. The front housing should now be free
of the module housing.
Step 2
Press the 4 tabs on the front rim of the module housing and remove the module
housing from the internal frame and PCB.
Step 3
Press the 2 tabs on the top and 2 tabs on the bottom of the frame and pull the
frame clear of the PCB.
Step 4
Replace the appropriate connector, switches and LEDs on the module.
Repairing the CMS
To Reassemble a Plug-in Module
5-66
Step 1
Seat the connectors and PCBs into position in the frame.
Step 2
Carefully snap-lock the frame together with the module PCB inside.
Step 3
Re-insert and snap-fit the frame into the module case so the front and rear connectors align with the module case.
Step 4
Snap-fit the front housing onto the front of the module case so the openings in
the front housing match the LEDs and keys.
Plug-in Modules
NBP Inlet Connector Insert
oplevel.mif
The NBP Inlet
Connector is
replaced without
opening the
module. Do not
remove the
transparent cover
on the connector.
Step 1
Use a 6-mm Allen key to unscrew the defective connector insert from the inlet of
the NBP module.
Step 2
Verify that the connector insert contains 4 metal balls in the transparent cover. If
a ball is missing, it may have fallen into the module tubing. Damage could result
necessitating exchange of the module.
To Replace the NBP Connector Insert
Step 1
Using a torque wrench, screw the replacement connector insert into the NBP
module, applying a torque of 10 Ncm (14 oz inches).
Step 2
Perform the NBP module specification test as described in this manual.
5-67
Repairing the CMS
To Remove the NBP Inlet Connector Insert
Plug-in Modules
NBP Pump
The NBP pump
inflates the
pressure cuff
Disassemble
the module
down to the
frame
Remove the
Pump
Replace
Parts
1
2
Repairing the CMS
To Remove the NBP Pump
Step 1
Using a small screwdriver or similar tool, unplug the white 4-pin connector from
the socket through the access hole on the top rear module casing.
Step 2
Grip and pull the red pump block assembly from the air inlet connector and the
module assembly.
To Replace the NBP Pump
5-68
Step 1
Remove the protective cap from the air inlet connector on the pump module.
Step 2
Facing the front of the module, locate the pump assembly into the left side of the
module assembly. Ensure the air inlet tube fits properly into the air inlet connector of the pump.
Step 3
Using a small screwdriver or similar tool, plug the white 4-pin connector into the
socket on the module assembly. To gain access to the connector, carefully lift the
PCB on the opposing side of the module assembly.
Step 4
Once the pump is in place, locate the PCB into its original position and reassemble the module. Perform the NBP module specification test in this manual. Calibration is required if the test fails.
Plug-in Modules
tcpO2/tcpCO2 Calibration Chamber Kit
tcpO2 /tcpCO2
T
M1018A
80x100
O2/CO2
CAL
CALIBRATION
CHAMBER
To Remove the Calibration Chamber
Step 1
Using a flat-tipped screwdriver, remove the screw holding the calibration chamber in place on the front of the plug-in module.
Step 2
Lift the chamber off the plug-in module. Ensure that the white plastic switch tip
located in the module is not lost.
Step 1
Ensure the white plastic switch tip is in place in the plug-in module.
Step 2
Place the calibration chamber in the allocated position on the plug-in module.
Step 3
Insert and tighten the screw into the calibration chamber, securing it to the plugin module.
5-69
Repairing the CMS
To Replace the Calibration Chamber
Plug-in Modules
FIO2 Battery Replacement
Disassemble
module down
to the printed
circuit board
Remove and
replace
battery
Calibrate
module
Charge for 20
hours in
powered-on
CMS
Repairing the CMS
To Replace the FIO2 Battery
5-70
Step 1
Remove the printed circuit boards from the frame by releasing the two catches.
Step 2
Unsolder the battery.
Step 3
Discard the battery according to local regulations.
Step 4
Solder the new battery into place.
Step 5
Reassemble the module, being careful to snap-lock all catches back into place.
Step 6
Perform 21% and 100% calibration, as described in the User’s Reference Manual.
Step 7
Leave the module in a powered-on CMS for 20 hours to charge battery.
Plug-in Modules
Recorder Module Paper
The recorder will not run when the door is open or when the recorder is out of paper. To
prevent damage to the recorder module, use only Philips approved paper (Philips re-order
number 40477A/B)
STEP
3
STEP
5
PAPER
ROLLER
PLASTIC
SHELF
6
To Load Paper into the Recorder Module
Step 1
Remove the empty core from the previous roll of paper.
Step 2
Cut off and discard the first few inches of paper to eliminate any traces of adhesive.
Step 3
Pull out several inches of paper from the new roll, holding the roll with the loose
end hanging over the top toward you.
Step 4
Open the door and push the paper roll into the holders in the recorder.
Step 5
Thread the paper under the roller and over the plastic shelf far enough so it goes
around the roller and comes out above it.
Step 6
Drape the paper over the end of the door and close the door. The paper should be
visible and draped down in front of the door.
5-71
Repairing the CMS
STEP
Repairing the CMS
Plug-in Modules
5-72
Chapter 6 Parts List for CMS
This chapter provides the replacement and exchange part numbers (if available) for the
Philips CMS Patient Monitoring System. Exploded views of the Computer Module and
Display Module are provided to assist in identifying certain parts.
Objective
To provide you with a list of available parts for the CMS.
Concepts
Parts List for CMS
The circuit boards used in the monitor contain Surface Mounted Devices (SMD) which
can only be repaired with special equipment, not available in the field. For this reason, the
majority of the parts used in the system can only be replaced at board level.
Parts List for CMS 6-1
Overview
Overview
Table 6-1 Overview of Replaceable Parts for the Monitor
Parts List for CMS
Topic
6-2
Page
14” CRT Displays
6-3
Flatscreen Displays
6-10
External Alarm Device
6-14
Fuses
6-14
Computer Module
6-15
Upgrade Tools and Miscellaneous Parts
6-22
Plug-In Modules
6-25
Plug-in Module Racks
6-32
Handheld Keypad
6-32
Patient Connectors and Accessories
6-34
General
6-34
ECG & ECG/Respiration Module Accessories
6-34
Pressure Module Accessories
6-37
Non-Invasive Pressure Module Accessories
6-38
Cardiac Output Module Accessories
6-40
CO2 Module Accessories
6-41
Sidestream CO2 Module Accessories
6-42
SvO2 Module Accessories
6-42
FIO2 Module Accessories
6-43
SpO2 Module Accessories
6-44
Temperature Module Accessories
6-44
tcpO2/tcpCO2 Module Accessories
6-45
Thermal Array Recorder Module Accessories
6-45
Blood Analysis Module Accessories
6-45
EEG Module Accessories
6-46
VueLink Test Module Parts
6-46
Parts List for CMS
14” CRT Displays
14” CRT Displays
The color-dependent parts that can can be replaced on the 14” CRT Displays are listed in
the following table:
NOTE
Along with all Membrane Switches always order a Retaining Clip (p/n 0510-1637)
Table 6-2 CRT Display - Color-dependent Replaceable Parts
New (Lighter) Color
Exchange
New
Part
Part Number
Number
M1094-68004 M1094-60004
M1092-68004 M1092-60004
M1105-60511
M1104-60511
M1104-61760
M1104-61758
M1104-61757
M1104-61755
M1104-61953
M1104-61753
M1104-61952
M1104-61752
M1104-61951
M1104-61751
M1104-61950
M1104-61750
M1104-61949
M1104-61749
M1104-61948
M1104-61748
M1104-61947
M1104-61747
M1104-61946
M1104-61746
M1104-61945
M1104-61745
M1104-61944
M1104-61744
M1104-61943
M1104-61743
Description (see exploded views)
M1094B MONITOR 14” COLOR
M1092A MONITOR 14” MONO
FRONT ASSY DISP M1094A/M1094B
FRONT ASSY DISP M1092A
STANDARD MEMBRANE SWITCH
POLISH
STANDARD MEMBRANE SWITCH
CZECH
STANDARD MEMBRANE SWITCH
RUSSIAN
STANDARD MEMBRANE SWITCH
GREEK
STANDARD MEMBRANE SWITCH
SIMPLIFIED CHINESE
STANDARD MEMBRANE SWITCH
TRADITIONAL CHINESE
STANDARD MEMBRANE SWITCH
KANJI, JAPANESE
STANDARD MEMBRANE SWITCH
DANISH
STANDARD MEMBRANE SWITCH
NORWEGIAN
STANDARD MEMBRANE SWITCH
FINNISH
STANDARD MEMBRANE SWITCH
SWEDISH
STANDARD MEMBRANE SWITCH
ITALIAN
STANDARD MEMBRANE SWITCH
SPANISH
STANDARD MEMBRANE SWITCH
DUTCH
STANDARD MEMBRANE SWITCH
GERMAN
Parts List for CMS
2
2
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
6-3
Parts List for CMS
Old (Darker) Color
Exchange
New
Part
Part Number
Number
M1094-68002 M1094-60002
M1092-68001 M1092-60001
M1105-60501
M1104-60501
14” CRT Displays
Table 6-2 CRT Display - Color-dependent Replaceable Parts
Old (Darker) Color
Exchange
New
Part
Part Number
Number
M1104-61942
M1104-61941
M1104-61933
M1104-61932
M1104-61931
M1104-61930
M1104-61929
M1104-61928
M1104-61927
M1104-61926
M1104-61925
M1104-61924
M1104-61923
M1104-61922
M1104-61921
M1104-61911
M1104-61907
Parts List for CMS
M1104-61906
M1104-61905
M1104-61904
M1104-61903
M1104-61902
M1104-61901
6-4
Parts List for CMS
New (Lighter) Color
Exchange
New
Part
Part Number
Number
M1104-61742
M1104-61741
Description (see exploded views)
STANDARD MEMBRANE SWITCH
FRENCH
STANDARD MEMBRANE SWITCH
ENGLISH
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
SIMPLIFIED CHINESE
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
TRADITIONAL CHINESE
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
KANJI, JAPANESE
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
DANISH
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
NORWEGIAN
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
FINNISH
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
SWEDISH
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
ITALIAN
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
SPANISH
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
DUTCH
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
GERMAN
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
FRENCH
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
ENGLISH
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
KANJI, JAPANESE (w/o SUSPEND
KEY)
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
SWEDISH (w/o SUSPEND KEY)
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
ITALIAN (w/o SUSPEND KEY)
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
SPANISH (w/o SUSPEND KEY)
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
DUTCH (w/o SUSPEND KEY)
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
GERMAN (w/o SUSPEND KEY)
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
FRENCH (w/o SUSPEND KEY)
CLASSIC MEMBRANE SWITCH
ENGLISH (w/o SUSPEND KEY)
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
14” CRT Displays
Table 6-2 CRT Display - Color-dependent Replaceable Parts
New (Lighter) Color
Exchange
New
Part
Part Number
Number
089094877MOL
089094878MOL
089094879MOL
089094880MOL
089094881MOL
089094882MOL
089094883MOL
089094884MOL
089094885MOL
089094886MOL
089094887MOL
089094888MOL
089094889MOL
089095185MOL
089095476MOL
089095475MOL
089095474MOL
89092814MOL
89092993MOL
89092994MOL
89092995MOL
89092996MOL
89092997MOL
89092998MOL
89092999MOL
89093171MOL
89093173MOL
89093174MOL
89093175MOL
Description (see exploded views)
STANDARD BEZEL OVERLAY
ENGLISH
STANDARD BEZEL OVERLAY
FRENCH
STANDARD BEZEL OVERLAY
GERMAN
STANDARD BEZEL OVERLAY DUTCH
STANDARD BEZEL OVERLAY
SPANISH
STANDARD BEZEL OVERLAY
ITALIAN
STANDARD BEZEL OVERLAY
TRADITIONAL CHINESE
STANDARD BEZEL OVERLAY
SWEDISH
STANDARD BEZEL OVERLAY
FINNISH
STANDARD BEZEL OVERLAY
NORWEGIAN
STANDARD BEZEL OVERLAY
SIMPLIFIED CHINESE
STANDARD BEZEL OVERLAY
DANISH
STANDARD BEZEL OVERLAY KANJI,
JAPANESE
STANDARD BEZEL OVERLAY
PORTUGUESE
STANDARD BEZEL OVERLAY GREEK
STANDARD BEZEL OVERLAY
RUSSIAN
STANDARD BEZEL OVERLAY POLISH
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY ENGLISH
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY FRENCH
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY GERMAN
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY DUTCH
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY SPANISH
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY ITALIAN
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY SWEDISH
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY FINNISH
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY
NORWEGIAN
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY JAPANESE
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY
TRADITIONAL CHINESE
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY
SIMPLIFIED CHINESE
Parts List for CMS
Parts List for CMS
Old (Darker) Color
Exchange
New
Part
Part Number
Number
6-5
14” CRT Displays
Table 6-2 CRT Display - Color-dependent Replaceable Parts
Old (Darker) Color
Exchange
New
Part
Part Number
Number
89093870MOL
New (Lighter) Color
Exchange
New
Part
Part Number
Number
89093871MOL
89093872MOL
89093873MOL
89093874MOL
89093875MOL
89093876MOL
89093877MOL
M1104-00301
311920407511FMI
311920808962FMI
31192013074FMI
Parts List for CMS
M1104-47402
M1104-47401
M1104-44101
M1104-44102
M1104-00201
311920406672FMI
6-6
Parts List for CMS
M1104-47412
M1104-47411
M1104-44111
Description (see exploded views)
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY ENGLISH
(w/o SUSPEND KEY)
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY FRENCH
(w/o SUSPEND KEY)
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY GERMAN
(w/o SUSPEND KEY)
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY DUTCH
(w/o SUSPEND KEY)
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY SPANISH
(w/o SUSPEND KEY)
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY ITALIAN
(w/o SUSPEND KEY)
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY SWEDISH
(w/o SUSPEND KEY)
CLASSIC BEZEL OVERLAY JAPANESE
(w/o SUSPEND KEY)
ROTARY KNOB HIF (THUMBWHEEL)
KNOB POWER
COVER CONNECTOR
CLEAR PLASTIC SHIELD
PANEL BLANK
REAR ENCLOSURE M1094B/M1094A/
M1092A DISPLAY
REAR COVER
5
6
4
15
14
14” CRT Displays
The color-independent parts that can be replaced on the 14” CRT Displays are listed in
this table:
Table 6-3 CRT Display Module - Color-independent Replaceable Parts
M1092-68501
New
Part Number
311920809500FMI
991920860092FMI
311920809471FMI
M1094-74001
M1094-60111
311920809490FMI
991920863401FMI
991920863381FMI
991920863391FMI
311920809530FMI
991920857901FMI
M1105-88400
M1105-88410
M1104-61602
M1104-85051
1820-7777
M1104-66505
M1104-44102
5041-4264
5041-4265
2110-0365
242208625096FMI
242208601266FMI
242208610219FMI
242208610009FMI
242208610239FMI
2110-1025
2110-0567
2110-0565
1990-1259
0510-1637
311920809661FMI
311920809660FMI
311920851940FMI
311920809640FMI
311920809633FMI
311920809630FMI
311920880721FMI
311920809620FMI
240325723322FMI
991920712201FMI
Description (see exploded views)
M1094A SMPS
M1094A CRT BOARD ASSY
M1094A DEFLECTION ASSY (For S/N > 3014I07762)
M1094A DEFLECTION ASSY & CRT Board (For S/N < 3014I07762)
AC DELAY LINE RELAY FOR 220-240V
M1094A INTERFACE ASSY
M1094B SMPS
M1094B VIDEO ASSY
M1094B DEFLECTION ASSY
M1092A SMPS
M1092A DEFLECTION & VIDEO ASSY
LOCKING CLIP
CLIP, COMPONENT MONITORING SYSTEM BEZEL, PK=100
CABLE ASSEMBLY (without TONE MODULATION)
HIF CPU F/W (without TONE MODULATION)
HIF CPU F/W (inc. TONE MODULATION)
BOARD ASSY HIF
CLEAR PLASTIC SHIELD
FOOT
CAM, LOCKING
FUSE T4A M1092A/M1094A/B (UL, 110V POWER SUPPLY)
FUSE T2A M1092A (VDE, 220V POWER SUPPLY)
FUSE T2A M1092A (UL, 220V POWER SUPPLY)
FUSE T2.5A M1094A (VDE, 220V POWER SUPPLY)
FUSE T2.5A M1094A (UL, 220V POWER SUPPLY)
FUSE T3.15A M1094B (VDE or UL, 220V POWER SUPPLY)
Fuse T3.15A M1046B Power Supply
FUSE HOLDER (220V) & M1046B Power Supply
FUSE HOLDER (110V)
POWER LED (on HIF)
RETAINING CLIP (Bezel)
POWER SWITCH ASSY M1094A (for S/N > 2950I07333)
POWER SWITCH ASSY M1094A (for S/N < 2950I07333)
LINE FILTER ASSY M1094A
FUSE ASSEMBLY M1094A
POWER SWITCH ASSY M1092A (for S/N > 2950I07633)
POWER SWITCH ASSY M1092A (for S/N < 2950I07633)
POWER SWITCH ASSY M1094B
VIDEO/Philips-HIL CONNECTOR PCA
LOUDSPEAKER
M1094B REAR COVER SERVICE KIT
Parts List for CMS
1
1
1
3
7
8
9
9
9
9
9
9
10
10
11
12
10
10
13
6-7
Parts List for CMS
Exchange
Part
Number
14” CRT Displays
disex1.mif
15
REAR ENCLOSURE
(31192040667FMI)
195 x 150
9
FUSES (see listing)
14
REAR COVER
311920808962FMI
7
FOOT
5041-4264
Parts List for CMS
8
LOCKING CAM
5041-4265
1
M1094B SMPS
991920863401FMI
Figure 6-1 Display Module Exploded View M1094B
6-8
Parts List for CMS
14” CRT Displays
4
MEMBRANE SWITCH
OR BLANK PANEL
(SEE LISTING)
2
FRONT ASSY DISP M1094A/M1094B (M1105-60501)
FRONT ASSY DISP M1092A (M1104-60501)
15
REAR ENCLOSURE M1092A/M1094A DISPLAYS
(31192042435FMI)
14
REAR ENCLOSURE M1092A/
M1094A DISPLAYS
(31192042435FMI)
13
VIDEO/Philips-HIL
PCA
CONNECTOR
6
COVER CONNECTOR
(M1104-44101)
2
11
LINE FILTER ASSY M1094A
(311920809640FMI)
10
POWER SWITCH ASSEMBLY
(see listing)
12
FUSE ASSEMBLY M1094A
(311920809640FMI)
5
KNOB POWER
(M1104-47401)
8
CAM, LOCKING
(5041-4265)
7
FOOT
(5041-4264)
Parts List for CMS
3
BOARD ASSY HIF
(M1104-66505)
9
FUSES
(see listing)
1
M1094A SMPS (311920809500FMI)
M1092A SMPS (311920809471FMI)
Figure 6-2 Display Module Exploded View M1092A/M1094A
Parts List for CMS
6-9
Flatscreen Displays
Flatscreen Displays
The parts that can be replaced on Old Color M1095A Flatscreen Displays are listed in this
table.
Table 6-4 Old Color M1095A Flatscreen Display - Replaceable Parts
New
Part Number
Description
M1095-68001
M1095-60001
Flatscreen Assembly (English)
M1095-68002
M1095-60002
Flatscreen Assembly (French)
M1095-68003
M1095-60003
Flatscreen Assembly (German)
M1095-68004
M1095-60004
Flatscreen Assembly (Dutch)
M1095-68005
M1095-60005
Flatscreen Assembly (Spanish)
M1095-68006
M1095-60006
Flatscreen Assembly (Italian)
M1095-68007
M1095-60007
Flatscreen Assembly (Swedish)
M1095-68008
M1095-60008
Flatscreen Assembly (Finnish)
M1095-68009
M1095-60009
Flatscreen Assembly (Norwegian)
M1095-68010
M1095-60010
Flatscreen Assembly (Danish)
M1095-68011
M1095-60011
Flatscreen Assembly (Kanji, Japanese)
M1095-68012
M1095-60012
Flatscreen Assembly (Trad. Chinese)
M1095-68013
M1095-60013
Flatscreen Assembly (Sim. Chinese)
M1095-68014
M1095-60014
Flatscreen Assembly (Portuguese)
M1095-68000
M1095-60000
Flatscreen Assembly (Blank)
M1095-68501
M1095-66501
Video Board
M1095-61941
Keypad (English)
M1095-61942
Keypad (French)
M1095-61943
Keypad (German)
M1095-61944
Keypad (Dutch)
Parts List for CMS
Exchange
Part Number
6-10
Parts List for CMS
M1095-61945
Keypad (Spanish)
M1095-61946
Keypad (Italian)
M1095-61947
Keypad (Swedish)
M1095-61948
Keypad (Finnish)
M1095-61949
Keypad (Norwegian)
M1095-61950
Keypad (Danish)
M1095-61951
Keypad (Kanji, Japanese)
M1095-61952
Keypad (Trad. Chinese)
M1095-61953
Keypad (Sim. Chinese)
M1095-61954
Keypad (Portuguese)
0510-1637
Push-on clips for keypad
M1095-65201
Housing kit (front, back and lightpipe)
Flatscreen Displays
Table 6-4 Old Color M1095A Flatscreen Display - Replaceable Parts
Exchange
Part Number
New
Part Number
Description
M1095-68300
Loudspeaker (including cable)
M1104-66551
HIF Board
2090-0546
Backlight (for Preventive Maintenance)
Note: only for M1095A serial numbers with prefix less
than 3805G.
M1095-44101
Plastic cover for HIL input
M1104-47402
Brightness control (thumbwheel)
M1095-02303
Cable holder video cable
M1095-04602
Anti-glare screen
0590-0199
2 x Nuts for video cable
The parts that can be replaced on M1095A Flatscreen Displays with the new
lighter color exterior plastic parts, identified with the CMS logo on the bezel, are
listed in this table:
Table 6-5 CMS New Color M1095A Flatscreen - Replaceable Parts
New
Part
Number
Description
M1095-68101
M1095-60101
Flatscreen Assembly (English)
M1095-68102
M1095-60102
Flatscreen Assembly (French)
M1095-68103
M1095-60103
Flatscreen Assembly (German)
M1095-68104
M1095-60104
Flatscreen Assembly (Dutch)
M1095-68105
M1095-60105
Flatscreen Assembly (Spanish)
M1095-68106
M1095-60106
Flatscreen Assembly (Italian)
M1095-68107
M1095-60107
Flatscreen Assembly (Swedish)
M1095-68108
M1095-60108
Flatscreen Assembly (Finnish)
M1095-68109
M1095-60109
Flatscreen Assembly (Norwegian)
M1095-68110
M1095-60110
Flatscreen Assembly (Danish)
M1095-68111
M1095-60111
Flatscreen Assembly (Kanji, Japanese)
M1095-68112
M1095-60112
Flatscreen Assembly (Trad. Chinese)
M1095-68113
M1095-60113
Flatscreen Assembly (Sim. Chinese)
M1095-68114
M1095-60114
Flatscreen Assembly (Portuguese)
M1095-68115
M1095-60115
Flatscreen Assembly (Greek)
M1095-68117
M1095-60117
Flatscreen Assembly (Russian)
M1095-68120
M1095-60120
Flatscreen Assembly (Polish)
Parts List for CMS
Parts List for CMS
Exchange
Part
Number
6-11
Flatscreen Displays
Parts List for CMS
Table 6-5 CMS New Color M1095A Flatscreen - Replaceable Parts
6-12
Parts List for CMS
Exchange
Part
Number
New
Part
Number
Description
M1095-68100
M1095-60100
Flatscreen Assembly (Blank)
M1095-61741
Keypad (English)
M1095-61742
Keypad (French)
M1095-61743
Keypad (German)
M1095-61744
Keypad (Dutch)
M1095-61745
Keypad (Spanish)
M1095-61746
Keypad (Italian)
M1095-61747
Keypad (Swedish)
M1095-61748
Keypad (Finnish)
M1095-61749
Keypad (Norwegian)
M1095-61750
Keypad (Danish)
M1095-61751
Keypad (Kanji, Japanese)
M1095-61752
Keypad (Trad. Chinese)
M1095-61753
Keypad (Sim. Chinese)
M1095-61754
Keypad (Portuguese)
M1095-61755
Keypad (Greek)
M1095-61757
Keypad (Russian)
M1095-61760
Keypad (Polish)
M1095-61758
Keypad (Czech)
M1095-65211
Housing kit (front, back and lightpipe)
M1095-44111
Plastic cover for HIL input
2090-0360
Backlight (for Preventive Maintenance)
Note: only for M1095A serial numbers with prefix
equal to 3805G.
2090-0381
Backlight (for Preventive Maintenance)
Note: only for M1095A serial numbers with prefix
greater than or equal to 3923G.
M1095-04602
Anti-glare screen
0590-0199
2 x Nuts for video cable
Flatscreen Displays
The parts that can be replaced on the M1097A Flatscreen Displays are:
Table 6-6 CMS M1097 XGA Flatscreen Display (15”)- Replaceable Parts
Part Number
Description
M1097-68001
15” Flatscreen Display Non-Touch version
M1097-68002
15” Flatscreen Display Touch capable version
M1097-60005
15” Flatscreen Display AC/DC adapter
The parts that can be replaced on the Remote Power Supply are:
Table 6-7 Remote Power Supply (M1047A) - Replaceable Parts
Part Number
Description
242208601263FMI
Fuse (4 A for 11 0V)
242208610239FMI
Fuse (3.15 V for 220/240 V)
2110-0565
Fuse holder (110 V)
2110-0567
Fuse holder (220 V) & M1046B
991920864111FMI
Remote control board
1990-1259
Power LED
311920880721FMI
Power switch assy
311920130301FMI
Rear cover
5041-4264
Feet
5041-4265
Cam lock
Table 6-8 Miscellaneous - Replaceable Parts
Description
Trackball (wireless)
M1046-60070
Trackball
M1181-61659
Power Supply Remote On/Off cable (kit)
M1181-61655
Video/DC cable (3m)
M1181-61656
Video/DC cable (10m)
M1095-65121
Tilt & swivel mount (supplied with C-Clamp)
M1180-60031
Fixed mount (supplied with C-Clamp)
M1180-60146
Flexible Mount (For Ohmeda equipment with dovetail
connection
M1180-60147
Swing Arm Mount (For Ohmeda equipment with dovetail
connection)
M1041-23201
C-Clamp
Parts List for CMS
Parts List for CMS
Part Number
M1046-60060
6-13
External Alarm Device
External Alarm Device
The External Alarm Device (only with Option H03/4 – the XGA-compatible display
configuration) has the following replaceable parts:
Table 6-9 External Alarm Device (M1109A) - Replaceable Parts
New part number
M1104-64100
M1106-00210
M1104-66551
M1104-66511
M1095-68300
M1104-64110
M1181-61659
Description
Housing Assembly
Handheld Keypad Bracket
HIF Board (including ribbon cable)
LED Carrier Board
Loudspeaker
Protection Flap for HIL Connectors
Remote On/Off Cable
Fuses
Table 6-10 CMS Fuses
Line Voltage
100-120 V
Line Voltage
200-240 V
CRT Display Type / Power Supply Type
Parts List for CMS
Fuse Rating
6-14
Part Number
Part
Number
Fuse Rating
VDE
UL
M1092A Mono CRT Display (Main / Slave)
2 x T4.0 A
2110-0365
2 x T2.0 A
24220862
5096FMI
24220860
1266FMI
M1094A Color CRT Display (Main / Slave)
2 x T4.0 A
2110-0365
2 x T2.5 A
24220861
0219FMI
24220861
0009FMI
M1094B Color CRT Display (Main / Slave)
2 x T4.0 A
2110-0365
2 x T3.15 A H 242208610239FMI
M1047A Remote Power Supply
2 x T4.0 A
2110-0365
2 x T3.15 A H 242208610239FMI
M1046B Integral Power Supply
2 x T3.15 A H 2110-1025
2 x T3.15 A H 242208610239FMI
Parts List for CMS
Computer Module
Computer Module
The parts that can be replaced on either computer module are found in Table 6-11
Computer Module M1046A - Replaceable Parts. Parts exclusively for the existing
computer module are marked M1046A only.
Parts exclusively for the new computer module M1046B are found in Table 6-12 Computer
Module M1046B - Replaceable Parts.
Table 6-11 Computer Module M1046A - Replaceable Parts
Exchange
Part Number
New
Part Number
Description
M1127-68LLR
M1127-66LLR
EPROM ASSY #2
M1126-68LLR
M1126-66LLR
EPROM ASSY #1
LL: Language
13 = SIMPLIFIED CHINESE
12 = TRADITIONAL CHINESE
11 = DANISH (Rel. C only)
10 = JAPANESE, KANJI
09 = FINNISH (Rel. C only)
08 = SWEDISH
07 = NORWEGIAN (Rel. C only)
06 = ITALIAN
05 = SPANISH
04 = DUTCH
03 = GERMAN
02 = FRENCH (International)
01 = ENGLISH
R = Release
E = Rel. A (Rel. 2.0)
F = Rel. B (Rel. 2.5)
Parts List for CMS
G = Rel. C (Rel. 3.0) Most languages
H = Japanese, Trad. Chinese, Simpl. Chinese Rel. C
I = French Homologated Rel. C
M1088-68501
M1088-66501
Rack Interface Board
M1086-68501
M1086-66501
HDLC Interface Board
M1085-68501
M1085-66501
RS-232 Interface Board
M1084-68501
M1084-66501
Analog Interface Board
M1082-68501
M1082-66501
SDN Interface Board (OLD)
M1082-68502
M1082-66502
SDN Interface Board (NEW) M1059-85025/85005 required.
M1066-68531
M1066-66531
MONO DISPLAY Controller Board a (M1046A only)
Parts List for CMS
6-15
Computer Module
Table 6-11 Computer Module M1046A - Replaceable Parts
Exchange
Part Number
New
Part Number
Description
M1066-68543
M1066-66543
MONO Display Controller Board (Western, Eastern Europe and
Asian languagesb) (M1046A only)
M1072-68531
M1072-66531
COLOR Display Controller Board a (M1046A only)
M1072-68543
M1072-66543
COLOR Display Controller Board (Western, Eastern Europe and
Asian languagesb) (M1046A only)
M1074-68502
M1074-66502
DSPC_FLAT Flatscreen controller board (Western languagesb)
M1074-68503
M1074-66503
DSPC_FLAT_ASIA Flatscreen controller board (Eastern Europe
and Asian languageb, c)
DSPC TRADITIONAL CHINESE ASSY- (M1046A only)
M1070-66502
DSPC SIMPLIFIED CHINESE ASSY- (M1046A only)
M1069-66502
DSPC JAPANESE, KANJI ASSY- (M1046A only)
M1067-66502
DSPC EASTERN EUROPE ASSY- (M1046A only)b
M1059-68501
M1059-66501
BOARD ASSY UTIL.CPU
M1056-68501
M1056-66501
SRAM HI (Data Management #C03 - Database extension)
M1055-68501
M1055-66501
SRAM LO (Standard database)
M1054-68501
M1054-66501
APP_CPU (10MHz)
M1053-68515
M1053-66515
CPC (40MHz) WITH FLASH EPROM, NO SOFTWARE LOADED
M1051-68501
M1051-66501
APP_CPU (15MHz)
M1088-85051
FE.IF CPU F/W
M1086-85022
HDLC F/W HI BYTE
M1086-85002
HDLC F/W LO BYTE
1821-1505
RS232 F/W Computer Interface Capability (large OTP)
M1085-85003
RS232 F/W Computer Interface Capability (small OTP)
1420-0375
BATTERY FOR S-RAM BOARD (M1055-66501 OR m1056-66501)
Parts List for CMS
M1071-66502
6-16
Parts List for CMS
M1084-85051
ANALOG IF F/W
M1084-85001
ANALOG IF CPU F/W
M1072-85021
CPSPC CTRL F/W HIGH BYTE
M1072-85001
CDSPC CTRL F/W LOW BYTE
M1066-85021
DSPC.MONO F/W HIGH BYTE
M1066-85001
DSPC.MONO F/W LOW BYTE
M1059-85025
UTIL.CPU F/W HIGH BYTE
M1059-85005
UTIL.CPU F/W LOW BYTE
M1054-85021
CPU F/W HIGH BYTE (10MHz)
M1054-85001
CPU F/W LOW BYTE (10MHz)
M1051-85022
CPU F/W HIGH BYTE (15MHz)
M1051-85002
CPU F/W LOW BYTE (15MHz)
M1046-66501
BOARD ASSY BACKPLANE
1
M1046-64101
INSERT INDENT
2
M1046-60101
F.BOX COMMON UNIT
Computer Module
Table 6-11 Computer Module M1046A - Replaceable Parts
M1043-68101
New
Part Number
Description
M1046-44112
COVER REAR
3
M1046-44111
COVER SIDE
4
M1046-04151
COVER TOP
7
M1046-43101
GUIDE PCB
5
M1046-04110
COVER SLOT BLANK
6
M1046-04108
COVER FRONT PLATE (10MHz & 15MHz CPU systems)
M1053-00015
COVER FRONT PLATE (40MHz CPC based systems)
M1053-00014
CPC CONNECTOR COVER
M1046-01202
BRACKET RIGHT
8
M1046-01201
BRACKET LEFT
9
M1046-00201
CHASSIS BOTTOM
10
16
M1043-60101
INTEGRAL RACK
M1043-60102
BLANK RACK
M1043-40211
BLANK FRONT COVER
5001-1320
R.F.I SPRING
0950-1954
DC/DC CONVERTER
12
5041-4264
FOOT
13
5041-4265
CAM LOCKING
14
1818-4869
BLANK EEPROM (32K x 8 250NS)
2110-0830
FUSE 1.25A, 250V (For Utility CPU, New Revision)
2110-0517
FUSE 2A, 125 V (For Utility CPU, Old Revision)
1400-1589
POWER CORD RETAINER
0515-0842
POWER CORD RETAINER SCREW
11
8120-2961
EXTERNAL GROUND CABLE ASSY (Crocodile clip)
8120-4808
EXTERNAL GROUND CABLE ASSY (ground lug connector)
M1046-44901
CARD EXTRACTOR TOOL
M1046-44301
LABEL FOR COMPUTER MODULE SLOTS
a. Requires: M1067-66502 for use with Eastern European languages
M1069-66502 for use with Japanese
M1071-66502 for use with Chinese Traditional
M1070-66502 for use with Chinese Simplified
b. Language groups for Display Controllers:
Western: English, German, Dutch, Italian, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Eastern Europe: Russian, Greek, Polish, Czech
Asian: Japanese, Chinese traditional, Chinese simplified
c. See “Configuring the Display Controller Card” on page 5-55
Parts List for CMS
6-17
Parts List for CMS
Exchange
Part Number
Computer Module
7
COVER TOP
(M1046-04151)
2
INSERT INDENT
(M1046-64101)
11
R.F.I SPRING
(5001-1320)
12
DC/DC CONVERTER
(0950-1954)
5
GUIDE PCB
(M1046-43101)
1
BOARD ASSY BACKPLANE
(M1046-66501)
3
COVER REAR
(M1046-44112)
4
COVER SIDE
(M1046-44111)
6
COVER SLOT BLANK
(M1046-04110)
4
COVER SIDE
(M1046-44111)
8
BRACKET RIGHT
(M1046-01202)
9
BRACKET LEFT
(M1046-01201)
Parts List for CMS
10
13
16
INTEGRAL RACK CHASSIS BOTTOM FOOT
(M1046-00201) (5041-4264)
(M1043-68101)
14
CAM LOCKING
(5041-4265)
Figure 6-3 Computer Module M1046A - Exploded View
6-18
Parts List for CMS
Computer Module
The replacement parts exclusively for the Computer Module M1046B are:
Table 6-12 Computer Module M1046B - Replaceable Parts
Exchange
Part Number
New
Part Number
M1046-60004
M1046-68053
Description
Kit Spacer Assembly including
5 Screws M3*14 - (0515-1280)
Standoff for Locking Cam - (M1046-44702)
4 Standoffs for Feet - (M1046-44701)
1
2
3
M1046-02301
Function Card Locking Plate
4
M1046-60002
Metal Sheet Cover Assembly including,
ECG sync adaptor retainer, and
ECG sync adaptor retainer screw
5
8
9
M1046-60053
Integral Power Supply and heat sink assembly
6
M1046-64102
Plastic Front Cover incl. light
7
M1046-63202
ECG sync adaptor
M1046-66502
REMOTE_SWITCH function card - (Slot 8)
10
11
M1046-66503
AUX_CONNECTOR function card - (Slot 24)
M1046-00151
Chassis Bottom
M2300-61625
Shorting Stub for DC / DC converter
M1075-68502
M1075-66502
CDSPC_XGA Display controller board (Western languagesa)
M1075-68503
M1075-66503
CDSPC_XGA Display controller board (Eastern Europe and
Asian languagesa, b)
2110-1025
Fuse (T3.15A)
2110-0567
Fuse holder
8120-1703
Power Cord with 90-degree angle
Parts List for CMS
a. Language Groups for Display Controllers:
Western: English, German, Dutch, Italian, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Finnish
Eastern Europe: Russian, Greek, Polish, Czech
Asian: Japanese, Chinese traditional, Chinese simplified
b. See “Configuring the Display Controller Card” on page 5-55
Parts List for CMS
6-19
Computer Module
1
2
3
Parts List for CMS
Figure 6-4 Computer Module M1046B - Standoffs for Feet and Locking Cam
6-20
Parts List for CMS
Computer Module
4
5
6
7
8
9
Figure 6-5 Computer Module M1046B - Exploded View
Parts List for CMS
10
11
Figure 6-6 Computer Module M1046B - Remote Switch & Aux Connector Function Cards
Parts List for CMS
6-21
Upgrade Tools and Miscellaneous Parts
Upgrade Tools and Miscellaneous Parts
Table 6-13 Upgrade Tools & Miscellaneous Parts
Exchange
Part Number
New
Part Number
Description
M2300-67100
CPC PROGRAMMING TOOL KIT
M2300-67200
SERVICE PORT RIBBON CABLE
M2300-67210
GROUND CABLE
M1130-80LLR
M1130-10LLR
CPC PROGRAMMING CARD (PHILIPS INTERNAL USE ONLY)
Only for CMS Releases up to Rel. B.0 (Rel. 9.0)
M1130-81LLR
M1130-11LLR
CPC PROGRAMMING CARD only for CMS Releases up to Rel. B.0 (Rel. 9.0)
LL: Language
20 = POLISH
17 = RUSSIAN
15 = GREEK
14 = PORTUGUESE
13 = SIMPLIFIED CHINESE (PRC)
12 = TRADITIONAL CHINESE (TAIWAN)
11 = DANISH
10 = JAPANESE, KANJI
09 = FINNISH
08 = SWEDISH
07 = NORWEGIAN
06 = ITALIAN
05 = SPANISH
04 = DUTCH
03 = GERMAN
02 = FRENCH (International)
01 = ENGLISH
R: Release
Parts List for CMS
G = Rel. C (Rel. 3.0) Most languages
H = Japanese, Trad. Chinese, Simpl. Chinese Rel. C
I = French Homologated Rel. C
K = Rel. D (Rel. 4.0)
L = Rel. E (Rel. 5.0)
M = Rel. Eβ (Rel. 5.5)
P = Rel. F (Rel. 6.0)
U = Rel. G (Rel. 7.0)
V = Rel. A.0 (Rel. 8.0)
W = Rel. B.0 (Rel. 9.0)
6-22
Parts List for CMS
Upgrade Tools and Miscellaneous Parts
Table 6-13 Upgrade Tools & Miscellaneous Parts
Exchange
Part Number
New
Part Number
M1130-82LLR
M1130-12LLR
CPC PROGRAMMING CARD (PHILIPS INTERNAL USE ONLY)
ONLY FOR CMS RELEASE C.0 AND GREATER
M1130-83LLR
M1130-13LLR
CPC PROGRAMMING CARD
Only for CMS Release C.0 and greater
Description
LL: Language
18 = CZECH
20 = POLISH
17 = RUSSIAN
15 = GREEK
14 = PORTUGUESE
13 = SIMPLIFIED CHINESE (PRC)
12 = TRADITIONAL CHINESE (TAIWAN)
11 = DANISH
10 = JAPANESE, KANJI
09 = FINNISH
08 = SWEDISH
07 = NORWEGIAN
06 = ITALIAN
05 = SPANISH
04 = DUTCH
03 = GERMAN
02 = FRENCH (International)
01 = ENGLISH
R: Release
M1186-6601G
UPGRADE TOOL “ORANGE” - REV C (Philips INTERNAL USE ONLY)
M1186-6611G
CLONING TOOL “ORANGE” - REV C (BIOMED)
M1186-45001
EEPROM REMOVAL TOOL
M1046-44901
CARD EXTRACTOR TOOL
M1181-66501
HIL EXTENDER BOARD “F-BOX” (White connector)
M1181-66502
HIL EXTENDER BOARD “Display” (Black connector)
5962-4340
Serial-to-Parallel Converter for connecting 25-pin serial RS-232 printer cable to
parallel port
0515-1146
Screw for PC board
Parts List for CMS
6-23
Parts List for CMS
A = Rel. C.0 (rel. 10.0)
Upgrade Tools and Miscellaneous Parts
Table 6-14 Overview
of C.0./C.1 Software Release
Exchange
Part Number
New
Part Number
M1130-80LLR
M1130-12LLR
CPC PROGRAMMING CARD (PHILIPS INTERNAL USE ONLY)
ONLY FOR CMS RELEASE UP TO REL. C.0 AND GREATER
M1130-81LLR
M1130-13LLR
CPC PROGRAMMING CARD (FOR BIOMED USE)
ONLY FOR CMS RELEASE C.0 AND GREATER
Description
LL: Language
20 = POLISH
18 = CZECH
17 = RUSSIAN
15 = GREEK
14 = PORTUGUESE
13 = SIMPLIFIED CHINESE (PRC)
12 = TRADITIONAL CHINESE (TAIWAN)
11 = DANISH
10 = JAPANESE, KANJI
09 = FINNISH
08 = SWEDISH
07 = NORWEGIAN
06 = ITALIAN
05 = SPANISH
04 = DUTCH
03 = GERMAN
02 = FRENCH (International)
01 = ENGLISH
Parts List for CMS
R: Release
A = Rel. C.0 (rel. 10.0)
M1046A-071, M1046B-014
B = Rel. C.0 (rel. 17.36)
M1046A-072, M1046B-15
C = Rel. C.0 (rel. 17.37)
M1046A-073/5, M1046B-016/18
D = Rel. C.0 (rel. 17.52)
M1046A-079, M1046B-022, M1046A-076A,
M1046B-19A, M1020A-013, M1001A-005,
M1002-008, M1001B-002, M1002B-005,
M1012A-004A, M1046A-071
E = Rel. C.1 (rel. 17.62)
6-24
Parts List for CMS
Service Notes
Plug-In Modules
Plug-In Modules
The following table shows the part-numbers of the plug-in modules that can be replaced.
Find the right number for your language combining the P/N-Prefix with the languagespecific suffix for the wanted module. E.g.: To order a TEMP module for a French
language CMS, the correct order number would be M1029-68801.
Table 6-15 Plug-In Modules - Replaceable Modules (New Color)
Danish
511
511
511
511
511
511
511
511
602
602
602
602
602
602
602
602
602
M1116A or M1116B
THERMAL ARRAY
RECORDER
M1116-68
521
521
522
523
521
525
526
528
528
528
530
521
533
VUELINK
AUXILIARY #A01
M1032-68
701
801
801
801
801
801
801
801
801
801
801
801
801
VUELINK
VENTILATOR #A02
M1032-68
702
802
802
802
802
802
802
802
802
802
802
802
802
VUELINK
GAS ANALYZER #A03
M1032-68
703
803
803
803
803
803
803
803
803
803
803
803
803
VUELINK
ANESTHESIA MACHINE
#A04
M1032-68
704
804
804
804
804
804
804
804
804
804
804
804
804
VUELINK
AUXILIARY PLUS #A05
M1032-68
705
805
805
805
805
805
805
805
805
805
805
805
805
TEMP
M1029-68
701
801
801
801
801
801
801
801
801
709
710
801
713
EEG
M1027-68
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
610
601
601
BLOOD ANALYSIS
See Table 6-16 on page 6-26
SvO2
M1021-68
551
551
551
551
551
551
551
551
551
551
551
551
551
SpO2/PLETH
M1020-68
603
603
603
603
603
605
605
605
605
605
610
605
613
tcpO2/tcpCO2
M1018-68
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
610
601
601
FIO2
M1017-68
603
603
603
603
603
603
603
603
603
603
610
603
613
CO2
M1016-68
601
701
701
701
701
701
701
701
701
701
610
701
613
SIDESTREAM CO2
M1015-68
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
C.O.
M1012-68
601
701
602
603
701
605
606
701
701
701
610
701
613
C.O. #C10
M1012-68
631
631
632
633
631
635
636
631
631
631
641
631
643
NBP Venous Puncture
M1008-68
803
811
812
811
814
815
816
817
818
811
820
811
823
NBP (Non-VP)
M1008-68
503
603
512
603
514
515
516
517
518
603
520
603
523
M1006B INV. PRESSURE
M1006-68
621
721
632
633
634
635
721
637
638
639
640
721
643
M1006B Option #C01
IABP
M1006-68
625
725
662
663
664
665
666
667
668
669
670
725
673
ECG (M1001A)
M1001-68
603
703
703
653
703
703
703
657
657
657
670
703
673
ECG (M1001B)
M1001-68
611
611
611
613
611
611
611
617
617
617
620
611
623
ECG/RESP (M1002A)
M1002-68
603
703
703
653
703
703
703
657
657
657
670
703
673
ECG/RESP (M1002B)
M1002-68
611
611
611
613
611
611
611
617
617
617
620
611
623
ECG/RESP Option #CO1
M1002-68
625
625
625
633
625
625
625
625
625
625
625
625
625
BIS
M1034-68
500
500
500
500
500
500
500
500
500
500
500
500
500
6-25
Parts List for CMS
Chinese
Japanese
511
602
Finish
Swedish
511
602
Italian
511
601
Spanish
511
601
Dutch
511
M1235-68
German
M1180-64
DATA TRANSFER
French
BLANK MODULE
English
Module Type
Norwegian
US English
Language Suffixes
P/N
Prefix
Plug-In Modules
Table 6-16 Blood Analysis Plug-In Module - Replaceable Modules
Exchange P/N
M1022-68531
M1022-68532
M1022-68533
M1022-68534
M1022-68535
M1022-68536
M1022-68537
M1022-68538
M1022-68539
M1022-68540
M1022-68541
M1022-68542
M1022-68543
M1022-68544
M1022-68551
M1022-68552
M1022-68553
M1022-68554
M1022-68555
New P/N
M1022-60531
M1022-60532
M1022-60533
M1022-60534
M1022-60535
M1022-60536
M1022-60537
M1022-60538
M1022-60539
M1022-60540
M1022-60541
M1022-60542
M1022-60543
M1022-60544
M1022-60551
M1022-60552
M1022-60553
M1022-60554
M1022-60555
Country
USA
France
Austria/Germany
Netherlands
Spain
Italy
Norway
Sweden
Finland
Japan
Denmark
Traditional Chinese
Simplified Chinese
Portuguese
UK
Canada
Austria
Switzerland
Latin America and others
Table 6-17 Plug-In Modules - Replaceable Parts
Parts List for CMS
Part Number
M1008-47201
M1008-60003
M1018-67901
M1018-67911
M1022-68000
M1022-68070
M1027-61601
M1032-44111
M1032-45211
M1116-40041
M1116-40240
M1116-60201
M1116-60400
M1116-83002
M1235-60010
1252-2655
1252-2708
1252-2655
1252-2708
3101-3021
6-26
Description
NBP INLET CONNECTOR INSERT
NBP PUMP
tcpO2/CO2CALIBRATION CHAMBER KIT - Old Color
tcpO2/CO2CALIBRATION CHAMBER KIT - New Color
FOAM FILTER FOR VENTILATOR FAN for M1022A (PACK OF 5)
COVER FOR VENTILATOR FILTER for M1022A (PACK OF 5)
EEG MODULE TEST DEVICE
VUELINK MODULE LED COVER
VUELINK MODULE FRONT FRAME
TOP HOUSING (FITS M1116 A & M1116 B MODELS)
FRONT HOUSING, M1116 B (DOOR)
M1116B RECORDER CLEANING KIT
REAR CONNECTOR (M1116A, M1116B)
LABEL, INSIDE DOOR, TRANSPARENT, M1116 B (LOAD PAPER)
DTM MAIN BOARD AND FRONT PANEL ASSBLY
C.O. #C10 CONNECTOR
C.O. #C10 CONNECTOR BEZEL (ORANGE)
C.O. CONNECTOR
C.O. CONNECTOR BEZEL (ORANGE)
CHERRY SWITCH (DOOR OPEN SENSOR, M1116A ONLY)
9
11
9
11
Plug-In Modules
Table 6-17 Plug-In Modules - Replaceable Parts (Continued)
Description
CO2 CONNECTOR
CO2 CONNECTOR BEZEL (LIGHT GREY)
ECG or ECG/RESP CONNECTOR
ECG or ECG/RESP CONNECTOR BEZEL (WHITE)
FIO2 BATTERY
FIO2 CONNECTOR
FIO2 CONNECTOR BEZEL (BLUE)
FRAME KIT
FRAME MIDDLE
HOUSING FRONT, DOUBLE MODULE
HOUSING FRONT, SINGLE MODULE
HOUSING, DOUBLE MODULE
HOUSING, SINGLE MODULE
IABP HOUSING FRONT, DOUBLE (M1006A #C01)
LED PARAM MODULE
M1006A PRESS CONNECTOR
M1006B PRESS CONNECTOR
MODULE REAR CONNECTOR
MODULE REAR CONNECTOR (M1006B, M1032A)
MODULE REAR CONNECTOR (NEW)
MODULE REAR CONNECTOR (OLD)
NBP CONNECTOR BEZEL (RED)
PHONE JACK SOCKET for M1006B #C01
PRESS CONNECTOR BEZEL (RED)
SNAP LOCK SINGLE
SpO2 CONNECTOR
SpO2 CONNECTOR BEZEL (BLUE)
SWITCH PARAM MODULE
tcpO2/CO2 CONNECTOR BEZEL (BLACK)
TEMP CONNECTOR
TEMP CONNECTOR BEZEL (BROWN)
VUELINK CONNECTOR
VUELINK CONNECTOR BEZEL (DARK GREY)
9
11
9
11
9
11
4&5
6
3
2
7
9
9
11
10
9
11
8
11
9
11
9
11
Table 6-18 BIS Module - Replaceable Parts
Part Number
M1034-61630
M1034-61650
M1034-68520
M1034-68530
M1034-61610
M1034-61620
Description
BIS PIC (PATIENT INTERFACE CABLE)
BIS SENSOR SIMULATOR
BIS ENGINE
BIS DSC-3
BIS MODULE CABLE (0.8 m)
BIS MODULE CABLE (2.0 m)
14
12
13
11
11
6-27
Parts List for CMS
Part Number
1252-2657
1252-2706
1252-2656
1252-2709
1420-0374
1252-2661
1252-2712
5061-8310
5041-4254
5040-4256
5040-4250
5041-8135
5040-4249
5041-9702
1990-0698
1252-2659
1252-5681
1252-2663
1252-5618
1252-5618
1252-2663
1252-2714
1252-2702
1252-2715
5040-4247
1252-2654
1252-2707
3101-2990
1252-4606
1252-2660
1252-2711
1252-4604
1252-4605
Plug-In Modules
Parts include:
(also shown on next page)
1. Typical overlay label
2. Housing front single
3. Housing front double
4. Frame right (Part of Frame Kit)
5. Frame left (Part of Frame Kit)
6. Frame middle
7. LED parameter module
8. Switch parameter module
9. Typical connector
10. Snap lock single
11. Typical Connector bezel
4
2
10
1
7
8
5
9
11
Parts List for CMS
Figure 6-7 Single-width Plug-in Module Exploded View
6-28
Plug-In Modules
Parts include:
1. Typical overlay label
2. Housing front single
3. Housing front double
4. Frame right (Part of Frame Kit)
5. Frame left (Part of Frame Kit)
6. Frame middle
7. LED parameter module
8. Switch parameter module
9. Typical connector
10. Snap lock single
11. Typical Connector bezel
4
10
10
3
1
6
5
7
8
11
Figure 6-8 Double-width Plug-in Module Exploded View
14
13
Sensor +
PIC
DSC-3
12
BIS Engine
M1034A
Parts List for CMS
15
Module Cable
11
Figure 6-8 BIS Module Components
6-29
Plug-In Modules
NOTE
Module labels are not available for all of the languages available for the CMS.
Parts List for CMS
6-30
New (Light)
Color
Italian
Spanish
French
English
Dutch
Danish
German
Finnish
Norwegian
Swedish
VueLink
Temp
EEG
SvO2
SpO2/Pleth
tcpO2/tcpCO2
FIO2
CO2
C.O.
C.O. #C10
NBP B
Ven Puncture.
NBP B
IABP A
IABP B
Pressure A
Pressure B
ECG/Resp (A)
ECG/Resp (B)
ECG/Resp #C01
ECG (A)
ECG (B)
Data Transfer
Blood Analysis
BIS
Old (Dark)
Color
Japanese
Module
Chinese
Table 6-16 Plug-In Module Label Part Numbers with T
M1032-443xx
M1029-443xx
—
M1021-443xx
M1020-443xx
M1018-443xx
M1017-443xx
M1016-443xx
M1012-443xx
—
—
M1032-444xx
M1029-444xx
M1027-443xx
M1021-444xx
M1020-444xx
M1018-444xx
M1017-444xx
M1016-444xx
M1012-444xx
M1012-444xx
M1008-444xx
'01
'82
‘71
'82
'71
'82
'82
'82
‘12
‘82
'01
'81
‘81
'71
'81
'81
'81
'81
'81
‘11
‘81
'01
'71
‘71
'71
'75
'71
'71
'71
'76
‘06
‘76
'01
'71
‘71
'71
'75
'71
'71
'71
'75
‘05
‘75
'01
'71
‘71
'71
'71
'71
'71
'71
'72
‘02
‘72
'01
'71
‘71
'71
'71
'71
'71
'71
'71
‘01
‘71
'01
'71
‘71
'71
'71
'71
'71
'71
'71
‘01
‘74
'01
'71
‘71
'71
'71
'71
'71
'71
'71
‘01
–
'01
'71
‘71
'71
'71
'71
'71
'71
'73
‘03
‘73
'01
'78
‘71
'71
'71
'71
'77
'77
'71
‘01
‘71
'01
'71
‘71
'71
'71
'71
'71
'71
'71
‘01
‘79
'01
'71
‘71
'71
'75
'71
'71
'71
'71
‘01
‘77
M1008-443xx
M1006-443xx
M1006-444xx
M1006-443xx
M1006-444xx
M1002-443xx
—
M1002-443xx
M1001-443xx
—
M1235-830xx
—
—
M1008-444xx
—
M1006-445xx
—
M1006-445xx
M1002-444xx
M1002-44xxx
M1002-444xx
M1001-444xx
M1001-44xxx
M1235-831xx
M1022-444xx
M1034-444xx
'52
'70
‘32
'82
'12
'82
‘502
‘21
'82
‘502
‘00
‘52
‘01
'51
'68
‘31
'81
'11
'81
‘501
‘21
'81
‘501
‘00
‘50
‘01
'46
'66
‘26
'71
'01
'71
‘491
‘21
'71
‘491
‘00
‘46
‘01
'45
'65
‘25
'75
'05
'71
‘491
‘21
'71
‘491
‘00
‘45
‘01
'42
'62
‘22
'72
'02
'71
‘491
‘21
'71
‘491
‘00
‘42
‘01
'41
'70
‘21
'71
'01
'71
‘491
‘21
'71
‘491
‘01
‘41
‘01
'44
'64
'24
'74
'04
'71
'91
‘21
'71
'91
‘00
‘44
‘01
'41
'70
'71
'01
'71
'91
‘21
'71
'91
‘00
‘51
‘01
'43
‘63
‘23
'73
'03
'73
'93
‘23
'73
'93
‘00
‘43
‘01
'41
'70
‘28
'78
'08
'77
'97
‘21
'77
'97
‘00
‘49
‘01
'49
'69
‘29
'79
'09
'77
'97
‘21
'77
'97
‘00
‘47
‘01
'47
'70
‘27
'77
'07
'77
'97
‘21
'77
'97
‘00
‘48
‘01
Plug-In Modules
'60
'26
'05
'01
'27
'07
'07
'07
'50
'29
'05
'01
'26
'06
'01
'01
'40
'24
'05
'01
'25
'05
'01
'01
'20
'23
'01
'01
'24
'04
'01
'01
'10
'25
'01
'01
'22
'02
'01
'01
'00
'21
'01
'01
'21
'01
'01
'01
Chinese
English
French
German
'20
'23
'01
'01
'23
'03
'03
'03
--‘27
-------------
Parts List for CMS
'90
'28
'11
'11
'31
'11
'11
'11
Dutch
M1116-830xx
M1116-830xx
M1020-443xx
M1017-443xx
M1008-443xx
M1008-443xx
M1002-443xx
M1001-443xx
Spanish
Recorder A
Recorder B
SaO2/Pleth
FIO2
NBP B
NBP A
ECG/Resp
ECG
Italian
Old (Dark)
Color
Swedish
Module
Japanese
Table 6-17 Plug-In Module Label Part Numbers without T
6-31
Plug-in Module Racks
Plug-in Module Racks
The parts that can be replaced on either the integral module rack or the satellite module
rack are listed in the following table:
Table 6-18 Module Racks - Replaceable Parts
Exchange
Part Number
M1043-68101
M1041-68101
New
Part Number
M1043-60101
M1041-60101
M1043-60102
M1043-40211
M1041-44911
M1041-44112
Description
INTEGRAL RACK
SATELLITE RACK
BLANK RACK
BLANK FRONT COVER (for Blank Rack)
HANDLE EXT.RACK
COVER CONNECT (EXT RACK)
MOUNTING CLAMP (EXT RACK)
Handheld Keypad
The following table lists the replaceable parts for the:
• M1106A Classic Handheld Keypad (without Suspend Key)
• M1106B Classic Handheld Keypad
• M1106C Standard Handheld Keypad (available in two colors)
Table 6-19 Handheld Keypad - Replaceable Parts
M1106A
Parts List for CMS
M1106-66000
M1106-66001
M1106-66002
M1106-66003
M1106-66004
6-32
M1106C
M1106C
Old (Darker)
New (Lighter)
Color
Color
M1106-66100
M1106-66101
M1106-66102
M1106-66103
M1106-66104
M1106-66105
M1106-66106
M1106-66200
M1106-66201
M1106-66202
M1106-66203
M1106-66204
M1106-66205
M1106-66206
M1106-66400
M1106-66401
M1106-66402
M1106-66403
M1106-66404
M1106-66405
M1106-66406
M1106-66109
M1106-66108
M1106-66116
M1106-66209
M1106-66208
M1106-66216
M1106-66409
M1106-66408
M1106-66414
M1106-66111
M1106-66211
M1106-66412
M1106-66411
M1106B
Description
HANDHELD KEYPAD (ENGLISH)
HANDHELD KEYPAD (FRENCH)
HANDHELD KEYPAD (GERMAN)
HANDHELD KEYPAD (DUTCH)
HANDHELD KEYPAD (SPANISH)
HANDHELD KEYPAD (ITALIAN)
HANDHELD KEYPAD (TRADITIONAL
CHINESE)
HANDHELD KEYPAD (JAPANESE)
HANDHELD KEYPAD (SWEDISH)
HANDHELD KEYPAD (SIMPLIFIED
CHINESE)
HANDHELD KEYPAD (PORTUGUESE)
HANDHELD KEYPAD (NORWEGIAN)
Handheld Keypad
Table 6-19 Handheld Keypad - Replaceable Parts
M1106A
M1106-60200
M1106C
M1106C
Old (Darker)
New (Lighter)
Color
Color
M1106-66100
M1106-66210
M1106-60300
M1106-60300
M1106-66410
M1106-66413
M1106-66415
M1106-66416
M1106-66417
M1106-60400
M1106-00110
M1106-60200
M1106-00110
M1106-60200
M1106-00210
M1106-60200
M1106B
Description
HANDHELD KEYPAD (FINNISH)
HANDHELD KEYPAD (GREEK)
HANDHELD KEYPAD (RUSSIAN)
HANDHELD KEYPAD (POLISH)
HANDHELD KEYPAD (CZECH)
HOUSING ASSEMBLY, TOP AND
BOTTOM
MOUNTING BRACKET
CABLE ASSEMBLY
Table 6-20 Handheld Keypad - Overlay Part Numbers
Description
KEYPAD OVERLAY (ENGLISH)
KEYPAD OVERLAY (FRENCH)
KEYPAD OVERLAY (GERMAN)
KEYPAD OVERLAY (DUTCH)
KEYPAD OVERLAY (SPANISH)
KEYPAD OVERLAY (ITALIAN)
KEYPAD OVERLAY (TRADITIONAL CHINESE)
KEYPAD OVERLAY (SWEDISH)
KEYPAD OVERLAY (JAPANESE)
KEYPAD OVERLAY (FINNISH)
KEYPAD OVERLAY (NORWEGIAN)
KEYPAD OVERLAY (SIMPLIFIED CHINESE)
Parts List for CMS
M1106C
M1106-43100
M1106-43101
M1106-43102
M1106-43103
M1106-43104
M1106-43105
M1106-43106
M1106-43108
M1106-43109
M1106-43110
M1106-43111
M1106-43116
6-33
Patient Connectors and Accessories
Patient Connectors and Accessories
General
Table 6-21 General Accessories
New Part Number
M2281A
Description
Patient Cable Organizer (pack of 8 hooks)
ECG & ECG/Respiration Module Accessories
Parts List for CMS
The cabling and associated parts that can be ordered for the ECG and ECG/Respiration
modules are:
mrx-ecg1
M1510A
6-34
M1520A
Patient Connectors and Accessories
Table 6-22 ECG & ECG/Respiration Trunk Cables
3 lead, 2.7m
3 lead, 0.4m
5 lead, 2.7m
5 lead, 0.4m
US Standard
M1500A
M1540C
M1520A
M1560A
IEC Standard
M1510A
M1550C
M1530A
M1570A
3-lead set
Snap
Grabber
5-lead set
Connector to
Clip
trunk cable
Table 6-23 ECG & ECG/Respiration One Piece Cables
IEC Standard
M1980A
---M1981A
M1985A
---M1986A
Parts List for CMS
3 lead, OR, 1.9m
3 lead, ICU (Snap), 1.9m
3 lead, ICU (Grabber), 1.9m
5 lead, OR, 2.5m
5 lead, ICU (Snap), 2.5m
5 lead, ICU (Grabber), 2.5m
US Standard
M1970A
M1972A
---M1975A
M1977A
----
Table 6-24 ECG & ECG/Respiration OR Lead Sets
OR 3 lead, 0.7m, Grabber
OR 5 lead, 0.7m 1.3m leg, Grabber
US Standard
M1601A
M1621A
IEC Standard
M1611A
M1631A
Table 6-25 ECG & ECG/Respiration Shielded Lead Sets
Shielded 3 lead, 0.7m, Grabber
Shielded 3 lead, 0.7m, Snap
Shielded 5 lead, 0.7m (1.3m leg), Grabber
US Standard
M1603A
M1605A
M1623A
IEC Standard
M1613A
M1615A
M1633A
6-35
Patient Connectors and Accessories
Table 6-25 ECG & ECG/Respiration Shielded Lead Sets
Shielded 5 lead, 0.7m (1.3m leg), Snap
US Standard
M1625A
IEC Standard
M1635A
Table 6-26 ECG & ECG/Respiration Unshielded Lead Sets
Unshld. 3 lead, 0.45m, Mini Clip
Unshld. 3 lead, 0.7m, Mini Clip
Unshld. 5 lead, 0.7m (1.3m leg), Mini Clip
US Standard
M1608A
M1609A
M1629A
IEC Standard
M1618A
M1619A
M1639A
Table 6-27 ECG & ECG/Respiration Single Leads
New Part
Number
M1511A
M1512A
M1513A
M1514A
M1515A
M1516A
M1517A
M1518A
M1519A
M1521A
M1522A
M1523A
M1524A
M1525A
M1526A
M1527A
M1528A
M1529A
M1541A
M1542A
M1543A
Description
Grabber, OR, 0.7m, Black
Grabber, OR, 0.7m, Green
Grabber, OR, 0.7m, Red
Grabber, OR, 0.7m, White
Grabber, OR, 0.7m, Yellow
Grabber, OR, 0.7m, Brown
Grabber, OR, 1.3m, Black
Grabber, OR, 1.3m, Green
Grabber, OR, 1.3m, Red
Grabber, STD, 0.7m, Black
Grabber, STD, 0.7m, Green
Grabber, STD, 0.7m, Red
Grabber, STD, 0.7m, White
Grabber, STD, 0.7m, Yellow
Grabber, STD, 0.7m, Brown
Grabber, STD, 1.3m, Black
Grabber, STD, 1.3m, Green
Grabber, STD, 1.3m, Red
Snap, STD, 0.7m, Black
Snap, STD, 0.7m, Green
Snap, STD, 0.7m, Red
New Part
Number
M1544A
M1545A
M1546A
M1547A
M1548A
M1549A
M1581A
M1582A
M1583A
M1584A
M1585A
M1586A
M1587A
M1588A
M1589A
M1591A
M1592A
M1593A
M1594A
M1595A
Description
Snap, STD, 0.7m, White
Snap, STD, 0.7m, Yellow
Snap, STD, 0.7m, Brown
Snap, STD, 1.3m, Black
Snap, STD, 1.3m, Green
Snap, STD, 1.3m, Red
Clip, Uns, 0.7m, Black
Clip, Uns, 0.7m, Green
Clip, Uns, 0.7m, Red
Clip, Uns, 0.7m, White
Clip, Uns, 0.7m, Yellow
Clip, Uns, 0.7m, Brown
Clip, Uns, 1.3m, Black
Clip, Uns, 1.3m, Green
Clip, Uns, 1.3m, Red
Clip, Uns, 0.45m, Black
Clip, Uns, 0.45m, Green
Clip, Uns, 0.45m, Red
Clip, Uns, 0.45m, White
Clip, Uns, 0.45m, Yellow
Parts List for CMS
Table 6-28 ECG & ECG/Respiration Cabling Accessories
Combiner block
Cable organizer (shielded and OR cables)
Cable organizer (unshielded cables)
Bedsheet clip, repositionable
for 3 lead sets
M1501A
M1503A
M1505A
M1509A
for 5 lead sets
M1502A
M1504A
M1506A
US
5967-2090
Non-US
5967-2084
Table 6-29 EASI Accessories
EASI Stickers
6-36
Patient Connectors and Accessories
Pressure Module Accessories
The following accessories can be ordered for the Pressure Module:
1290C
1295CK
mrx-prs1
Table 6-30 PRESS Transducers & Adapter Cables
New Part Number
1290C #J06
1290C #J99-11
1295CK
Description
Pressure Transducer with 3m cable & 12-pin connector
Pressure Transducer with 1m cable & 12-pin connector
Sterile domes
1292C
DO
NOT
PULL
(TRANSDUCER)
CABLES
mrx-prs2
New Part Number
1292C
1293C
1294C
Parts List for CMS
Table 6-31 PRESS Transducer Accessories
Description
Holder for two 1290C Transducers
Holder for three 1290C Transducers
Holder for four 1290C Transducers
Table 6-32 M1006B Pressure Module with Analog Output - Cables
New Part Number
M1181A #A61
M1181A #A6B
Description
3 m IABP Cable
25 m IABP Cable
6-37
Patient Connectors and Accessories
Non-Invasive Pressure Module Accessories
The following accessories can be ordered for the Non-Invasive Pressure Module:
NBP - Accessories
40400B
40401E
40401E
E
40401D
40401C
40401D
40401B
40401C
40401A
40401B
40401A
A
B
C
D
A B
C
D
A
B
C
D
A B
C D
mrx-nbp
Table 6-33 Pressure Cuffs & Interconnection Cables
Parts List for CMS
New Part Number
40401A
40401B
40401C
40401D
40401E
40400A
40400B
M1571A
M1572A
M1573A
M1574A
M1575A
M1576A
M1577A
M1578A
M1579A
M1874A
M1875A
M1808A/M1876A
6-38
Description
Reusable pressure cuff, infant, 10-19cm
Reusable pressure cuff, pediatric, 18-26cm
Reusable pressure cuff, adult, 25-35cm
Reusable pressure cuff, large arm, 33-47cm
Reusable pressure cuff, thigh, 46-66cm
Reusable pressure cuff kit, includes 40401B/C/D
Reusable pressure cuff kit, includes 40401A/B/C/D/E
Reusable Pressure cuff, infant, 12-17.5cm
Reusable Pressure cuff, pediatric, 17-24cm
Reusable Pressure cuff, small adult, 22-32cm
Reusable Pressure cuff, adult, 27-37.5cm
Reusable Pressure cuff, large adult, 37-51cm
Reusable Pressure cuff, thigh size, 45-60cm
Reusable Pressure cuff, kit, includes M1571/2/3/4A
Reusable Pressure cuff, kit, includes M1573/4/5/6A
Reusable Pressure cuff, kit, includes M1571/2/3/4/5/6A
Non-sterile disposable pressure cuff, infant,12.0-17.5cm
Non-sterile disposable pressure cuff, pediatric,17-24cm
Sterile/Non-sterile disposable pressure cuff, adult, 22-32cm
Patient Connectors and Accessories
Table 6-33 Pressure Cuffs & Interconnection Cables
Description
Sterile/Non-sterile disposable pressure cuff, adult, 27-37.5cm
Sterile/Non-sterile disposable pressure cuff, adult, 37-51cm
Non-sterile disposable pressure cuff, thigh, 45-60cm
Sterile/Non-sterile disposable neonatal cuff, size 1, 3.1-5.7cm
Sterile/Non-sterile disposable neonatal cuff, size 2, 4.3-8.0cm
Sterile/Non-sterile disposable neonatal cuff, size 3, 5.8-10.9cm
Sterile/Non-sterile disposable neonatal cuff, size 4,7.1-13.1cm
Neonatal interconnect cable, 3m
Neonatal interconnect cable, 1.5m
Adult interconnect cable, 3m
Adult interconnect cable, 1.5m
Cap for liquid seal
Parts List for CMS
New Part Number
M1809A/M1877A
M1829A/M1078A
M1879A
M1867A/M1866A
M1869A/M1868A
M1879A/M1870A
M1873A/M1872A
M1597
M1596
M1599
M1598
40401-40010
6-39
Patient Connectors and Accessories
Cardiac Output Module Accessories
The following accessories can be ordered for the Cardiac Output Module:
14455A
23002A
23001A
Table 6-34 Cardiac Output Temperature Probes & Accessories
Part
Number
Description
14454A
14455A
15244A
23001A
23001B
M1646A
23002A
M1642A
M1643A
IV pole mount
Ice bucket for Cardiac Output; styrofoam
Hand switch
Reusable Injectate Temp. Probe for Baxter C.O. Set 2.4m
Reusable Injectate Temp. Probe for Baxter C.O. Set 0.5m
Reusable Injectate Temp. Probe for Pulsion Set
Ice bath reusable static temp.probe
Cardiac Output cable, 2.7m + 0.2m
Enhanced Cardiac Output interface cable, 2.4m + 2.4m
Used with
Right
Transpul
Heart
monary
method
methoda
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
a. only available with Option C10
Parts List for CMS
Table 6-35 General Cardiac Output Accessories
Part Number
M1012-61601
6-40
Description
Cardiac Output Service Tool
to check proper function of M1012A, M1042A, M1043A
Patient Connectors and Accessories
CO2 Module Accessories
The following accessories can be ordered for the CO2 Module:
mrx-co2
To Patient
Inspiratory
Limb
Y-Piece
To Anesthesia
Machine
Expiratory
Limb
To Anesthesia
Machine
14360A
14363A
14365A
Parts List for CMS
14373C
Table 6-36 CO2 Gas Monitoring Accessories
New Part Number
14360A
M1460A
14363A
14365A
14373B
14373C
Description
Airway CO2 transducer with calstick (obsolete)
Airway CO2 transducer with calstick
Reusable pediatric airway adapter
Reusable adult airway adapter
Disposable 15mm airway tubing couplers (IEC)
Disposable 15mm airway tubing couplers (Non-IEC)
6-41
Patient Connectors and Accessories
Sidestream CO2 Module Accessories
The following accessories can be ordered for the Sidestream CO2 Module:
Table 6-37 Sidestream CO2 Gas Monitoring Accessories
New Part Number
13901A
13902A
1612AA
13904A
13905A
Description
Sample tube, 2.4 m Nafion
Elbow airway adaptor, 15 mm
Straight airway adaptor
Bacterial Filter
Hybrid Sample Tube
SvO2 Module Accessories
All SvO2 Module accessories are available from Abbott.
Table 6-38 SvO2 Monitoring Accessories
Parts List for CMS
Abbott Part Number
50131-04
P7110-EH
P7110-E
P7110-EP-H
P7110-EP8-H
P7110-EP8
P7110-PZ8-H
P575-EH10CM
P575-EH
6-42
Description
Optical Module
Opticath Fiber-Optic Catheters
Patient Connectors and Accessories
FIO2 Module Accessories
The following accessories can2 be ordered for the FIO2 Module:
mrx-fio2
To Patient
Connects
to Module
Inspiratory
Limb
Y-Piece
To Anesthesia
Machine
Expiratory
Limb
To Anesthesia
Machine
Parts List for CMS
15203A
Table 6-39 FIO2 Gas Monitoring Accessories
New Part Number
15203A
Description
Inspired air oxygen transducer
6-43
Patient Connectors and Accessories
SpO2 Module Accessories
The following accessories can be ordered for the SpO2 Module:
Table 6-40 SpO2 Monitoring Accessories
New Part Number
M1190A
M1191A
M1192A
M1193A
M1194A
M1195A
M1904A
M1903A
M1902A
M1901A
M1907A
M1906A
M1940A
M1900B
Description
Adult SpO2 transducer, no adapter cable required.
Adult SpO2 transducer, requires M1940 adapter cable.
Small Adult/Pediatric SpO2 transducer, requires M1940 adapter cable.
Neonatal SpO2 transducer, requires M1940 adapter cable.
Adult/Pedi SpO2 transducer, requires M1940 adapter cable.
Infant SpO2 transducer, requires M1940 adapter cable.
Disposable NELLCOR® OxisensorIITM adult digit sensor, sterile.
Disposable NELLCOR® OxisensorIITM pediatric digit sensor, sterile.
Disposable NELLCOR® OxisensorIITM infant digit sensor, sterile.
Disposable NELLCOR® OxisensorIITM neonatal foot sensor, sterile.
Semi-disposable NELLCOR® Oxiband adult/neonatal sensor, non-sterile
Semi-disposable NELLCOR® Oxiband pediatric/infant sensor, non-sterile
Adapter cable for use with HP/Agilent/Philips Transducers.
Adapter cable for use with NELLCOR® Transducers.
Temperature Module Accessories
The following accessories can be ordered for the Temperature Module:
Table 6-41 Temperature Probes - Disposable
Parts List for CMS
New Part Number
21082A
21082B
21090A
21091A
21093A
21094A
21095A
21096A
21097A
Description
Extension cable for disposable temp. probes, 3m
Extension cable for disposable temp. probes, 1.5m
Disposable general purpose temp. probe
Disposable skin surface temp. probe
Disposable esophageal/stethoscope temp. probe, 12fr
Disposable esophageal/stethoscope temp. probe, 18fr
Disposable esophageal/stethoscope temp. probe, 24fr
Disposable Foley Catheter temp. probe, 16fr
Disposable Foley Catheter temp. probe, 18fr
Table 6-42 Temperature Probes - Reusable
New Part Number
21075A
21075B
21076A
21076B
21078A
21078B
6-44
Description
General purpose temp. probe; reusable
General purpose temp. probe; reusable (Germany)
Small flexible temp. probe; reusable
Small flexible temp. probe; reusable (Germany)
Skin surface temp. probe; tape-on; reusable
Skin surface temp. probe; tape-on; reusable (Germany)
Patient Connectors and Accessories
tcpO2/tcpCO2 Module Accessories
The following accessories can be ordered for the tcpO2/tcpCO2 Module:
Table 6-43 tcpO2/tcpCO2 Monitoring Accessories
New Part Number
M15209-60010
M15210-60010
M15210-64010
M15210-60020
M15210-64020
M1918A
M2205A
Description
Accessory Kit
CAL 1 gas (6 bottles - U.S.A. only)
CAL 1 gas (6 bottles)
CAL 2 gas (6 bottles - U.S.A. only) Contains: 0% O2, 10% CO2
CAL 2 gas (6 bottles) Contains: 0% O2, 10% CO2
tcpO2/CO2 Transducer
Calibration Tubing (5x)
Thermal Array Recorder Module Accessories
The following accessories can be ordered for the Recorder Module:
Table 6-44 Thermal Array Recorder Accessories
New Part Number
40477A
40477B
Description
10 ROLLS THERMAL RECORDER PAPER
80 ROLLS THERMAL RECORDER PAPER
Blood Analysis Module Accessories
The following accessories can be ordered for the Blood Analysis Module.
Table 6-45 Blood Analysis Cartridges
Description
EG7+ Cartridge
EG6+ Cartridge
G3+ Cartridge
EC8+ Cartridge
6+ Cartridge
EC6+ Cartridge
EC4+ Cartridge
G Cartridge
E3+
Creatinine Cartridge
CG4+ Cartridge
Parts List for CMS
Part Number
order from Abbott
order from Abbott
order from Abbott
order from Abbott
order from Abbott
order from Abbott
order from Abbott
order from Abbott
order from Abbott
order from Abbott
order from Abbott
Table 6-46 Blood Analysis Accessories
Part Number
order from Abbott
order from Abbott
Description
Level 1 Control
Level 3 Control
6-45
Patient Connectors and Accessories
Table 6-46 Blood Analysis Accessories (Continued)
Part Number
M3630A
M3636A
M3634A
M3663A
Description
Calibration Verification Set
Capillary Tubes (65 µl)
Electronic Simulator
PC to RS232 Adapter cable for upgrading modules using IBMcompatible PC
EEG Module Accessories
The following accessories can be ordered for the EEG Module.
Table 6-47 EEG Module Accessories
Part Number
M2268A
M2269A
M1931A
M1932A
M1934A
M1935A
M2271A
M2272A
M1027-88000
Description
EEG 2.7 m trunk cable
EEG 1.0 m trunk cable
Reusable 80-cm-long 5-lead cables with 10-mm silver/silverchloride
leadwired cup electrodes (adult)
Reusable 80-cm-long 5-lead cables with 6-mm silver/silverchloride
leadwired cup electrodes (Pediatric/Neonatal)
Reusable 80-cm-long 5-lead cables with miniclip connectors
Disposable, gel electrodes (50)
Skin preparation paste
Conductive paste
EEG Test Device
VueLink Test Module Parts
The VueLink Test Module is a plug-in module used to test M1032A VueLink Modules. The
following parts can be ordered.
Table 6-48 VueLink Test Module Parts
Parts List for CMS
Part Number
M1186-60510
M1032-61661
6-46
Description
VueLink Test Module
Cable
Product Information
Appendix A Product Information
CMS Release E Beta
Display Module
Mono / Color
Number of Channels
Supported Remote Displays
Plug-in Modules
Maximum Number of Parameter Modules
Supported Modules
M1001A/B ECG (1)
M1002A/B ECG/RESP (1)
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure
M1008A/B NBP
M1012A Cardiac Output
M1015A Sidestream CO2
M1016A CO2
M1017A FiO2
M1018A tcpO2/tcpCO2
M1020A SpO2/Pleth
M1021A SvO2
M1029A Temperature
M1032A VueLink Type A
M1032A VueLink Type B
M1116A/B Recorder Module
M1235A Data Transfer Module
Patient Data Management (Standard)
Data Storage
1 min. resolution
12 sec. resolution
Trends
Clinical Calculations
Software Applications
Extended Data Management
1 min. resolution
Option A54
Option A64
Option A56
Option A66
Mono (Option A54) Color
(Option A64)
4
3
Mono (OptionA56)
Color (Option A66)
6
3
8
3
8
12
16
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2 (1 Delta Temp.)
2
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
2
2
1
1
1
1
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
3
2
1
1
16 parameters / 24 hours
16 parameters / 24 hours
16 parameters / 4 hours
16 parameters / 4 hours
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
32 parameters / 24 hours
(16 parameters / 48 hours)
32 parameters / 4 hours
(16 parameters / 9 hours)
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
—
Option C03
32 parameters / 24 hours
(16 parameters / 48 hours)
32 parameters / 4 hours
(16 parameters / 9 hours)
Option C05
Option C10
12 sec. resolution
Drug Calculator
ST Segment Analysis
(1)
Option C05
Option C10
Option A68
Color
Standard
Standard
Standard
M1001A/B and M1002A/B cannot be used simultaneously in a system.
Product Information A-1
Product Information
CMS Release E Beta
Interfacing and Networking Capabilities
8-Channel Analog Interface
Philips Network Interface (Standard in US)
1st RS232 Interface
2nd RS232 Interface
Digital Recorder Interface
1st additional Display Interface
2nd additional Display Interface
Peripherals
Remote Keypad (Standard US)
4 Channel Recorder
8-Slot Satellite Rack
6-Slot Satellite Rack
14 Inch Monochrome Display
14 Inch Color Display
21 Inch Color Display
Substitute Options
Substitute 8-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack
Substitute Classic HIF for Standard HIF(2)
Substitute short System Cable
Substitute 3 meter System Cable
Substitute 1.5 meter System Cable
Substitute 0.75 meter System Cable
(1)
Option A54
Option A64
Option A56
Option A66
Option A68
—
Option J12
Option J13
—
Option J14
—
-—
Option J11
Option J12
Option J13
—
Option J14
Option J15 (color) or
Option J16 (mono)
—
Option J11
Option J12
Option J13
Option J13
Option J14
Option J15 (color) or
Option J16 (mono)
Option J16 (mono)(1)
M1106C
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
—
—
—
M1106C
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Option A03)
M1094B (Option A03)
M1234B
M1106C
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Option A03)
M1094B (Option A03)
M1234B
Option H50
Option H50
Option H50
Option H52
Option H52
Option H52
Option H60
Option K01
Option K02
Option K03
Option K04
Option H60
Option K01
Option K02
Option K03
Option K04
Option H60
Option K01
Option K02
Option K03
Option K04
A 2nd independent monochrome display controller (option J16) and the 8-channel analog interface are not supported
simultaneously.
(2)
The M1106B Handheld keypad must be ordered separately.
A-2
Product Information
ACMS Release E Beta
Option A74
Option A84
Option A76
Option A86
Mono (Option A74)
Color (Option A84)
4
3
Mono (Option A76)
Color (Option A86)
6
3
8
3
8
12
16
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2 (1 Delta Temp.)
1 (2 with Option C24)
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
1 (2 with Option C25)
1 (2 with Option C25)
1
1
1
1
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
16 parameters / 24 hours
16 parameters / 24 hours
16 parameters / 4 hours
16 parameters / 4 hours
32 parameters / 24 hours
(16 parameters / 48 hours)
32 parameters / 4 hours
(16 parameters / 9 hours)
Trends
Tabular / Graphic
Tabular / Graphic
Tabular / Graphic
Clinical Calculations
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
• Hemodynamic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Display Module
Mono / Color
Number of Channels
Supported Remote Displays
Plug-in Modules
Max. Number of Parameter Modules
Supported Modules
M1001A/B ECG (1)
M1002A/B ECG/RESP (1)
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure
M1008A/B NBP
M1012A Cardiac Output
M1015A Sidestream CO2
M1016A CO2
M1017A FiO2
M1020A SpO2/Pleth
M1021A SvO2
M1029A Temperature
M1032A VueLink Type A
M1032A VueLink Type B(2)
M1116A/B Recorder Module
M1235A Data Transfer Module
Anesthesia Gas Monitoring
M1026A Anesthetic Gas Module
Patient Data Management
Data Storage
1 min. resolution
12 sec. resolution
(1)
(2)
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Option A88
Color
M1001A/B and M1002A/B cannot be used simultaneously in a system.
The ACMS does not support VueLink Option #A02.
Software Applications
Extended Data Management
1 min. resolution
12 sec. resolution
—
Option C03
32 parameters / 24 hours
(16 parameters / 48 hours)
Standard
32 parameters / 4 hours
(16 parameters / 9 hours)
Product Information
A-3
Product Information
ACMS Release E Beta
Product Information
ACMS Release E Beta
Option A74
Option A84
Option A76
Option A86
Option A88
Drug Calculator
Option C05
Option C05
Standard
ST Segment Analysis
Interface Accelerator
Standard
Option C24
Standard
Option C25
Standard
Standard
• Supports 1 additional
VueLink Module
(Type A)
• Supports Philips Network
capability
• Supports independent
display controller
• Supports 2 additional
VueLink Modules
(Type A, Type B)
• Supports Philips Network
capability
Interfacing and Networking Capabilities
8-Channel Analog Interface
Philips Network Interface
1st RS232 Dual Interface(2)
2nd RS232 Dual Interface
Delete 1st RS232 Dual Interface(2)
Digital Recorder Interface
1st additional Display Interface
—
Option J12 with Option C24
Standard
Option J13
Option D13
Option J14
—
Option J11(1)
Option J12
Standard
Option J13
Option D13
Option J14
Option J15 (color) or
Option J16 (mono)
2nd additional Display Interface
—
Option J11
Option J12 with Option C25
Standard
Option J13
Option D13
Option J14
Option J15 (color) or
Option J16 (mono) both with
Option C25
—
M1106C
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
—
—
—
M1106C
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Option A03)
M1094B (Option A03)
M1234B
M1106C
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Option A03)
M1094B (Option A03)
M1234B
Option H50
Option H50
Option H50
Option H52
Option H52
Option H52
Option K01
Option K02
Option K03
Option K04
Option K01
Option K02
Option K03
Option K04
Option K01
Option K02
Option K03
Option K04
Peripherals
Remote Keypad (Standard US)
4 Channel Recorder
8-Slot Satellite Rack
6-Slot Satellite Rack
14 Inch Monochrome Display
14 Inch Color Display
21 Inch Color Display
Substitute Options
Substitute 8-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack
Substitute short System Cable
Substitute 3.0 meter System Cable
Substitute 1.5 meter System Cable
Substitute 0.75 meter System Cable
(1)
(2)
A-4
A 2nd independent monochrome display controller (option J16) and an 8-channel analog interface are not supported
simultaneously.
Includes a 3.0 meter RS232 cable.
Product Information
Option J16 (mono) (1)
CMS Release F
Display Module
Mono / Color
Number of Channels
Supported Remote Displays
M1175A Option A54
M1176A Option A64
M1175A Option A56
M1176A Option A66
Mono (Option A54) Color
(Option A64)
4
3
Mono (Option A56)
Color (Option A66)
6
3
8
3
M1176A Option A68
Color
Plug-in Modules
Maximum Number of Parameter Modules
Supported Modules
M1001A/B ECG (1)
M1002A/B ECG/RESP (1)
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure
M1008A/B NBP
M1012A Cardiac Output
M1015A Sidestream CO2(2)
M1016A CO2
M1017A FIO2
M1018A tcpO2/tcpCO2
M1020A SpO2/Pleth
M1021A SvO2
M1029A Temperature
M1032A VueLink Type A
M1032A VueLink Type B
M1116A/B Recorder Module
M1235A Data Transfer Module
8
12
16
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2 (1 Delta Temp.)
2
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
2
2
1
1
1
1
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
3
2
1
1
Patient Data Management (Standard)
Data Storage
1 min. resolution
16 parameters / 24 hours
16 parameters / 24 hours
16 parameters / 4 hours
16 parameters / 4 hours
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
32 parameters / 24 hours
(16 parameters / 48 hours)
32 parameters / 4 hours
(16 parameters / 9 hours)
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
—
Option C03
32 parameters / 24 hours
(16 parameters / 48 hours)
32 parameters / 4 hours
(16 parameters / 9 hours)
Option C05
Option C10
12 sec. resolution
Trends
Clinical Calculations
Software Applications
Extended Data Management
1 min. resolution
12 sec. resolution
Drug Calculator
ST Segment Analysis
(1)
Option C05
Option C10
Standard
Standard
Standard
M1001A/B and M1002A/B cannot be used simultaneously in a system.
(2)Pending FDA clearance.
Product Information
A-5
Product Information
CMS Release F
Product Information
CMS Release F
M1175A Option A54
M1176A Option A64
M1175A Option A56
M1176A Option A66
M1176A Option A68
Interfacing and Networking Capabilities
8-Channel Analog Interface
Philips Network Interface
1st RS232 Interface
2nd RS232 Interface
Digital Recorder Interface
1st additional Display Interface
—
Standard
Option J13
—
Option J14
—
2nd additional Display Interface
1st additional Flatscreen Display Interface
—
—
Option J11
Standard
Option J13
----Option J14
Option J15 (color) or
Option J16 (mono)
—
Option J25 (M1095A)
Option J11
Standard
Option J13
Option J13
Option J14
Option J15 (color) or
Option J16 (mono)
Option J16 (mono)(1)
Option J25 (M1095A)
Peripherals
Remote Keypad
4 Channel Recorder
8-Slot Satellite Rack
6-Slot Satellite Rack
14 Inch Monochrome Display
14 Inch Color Display
10.4 Inch Flatscreen Color Display
21 Inch Color Display(2)
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
—
—
—
—
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Option A03)
M1094B (Option A03)
M1095A (Option A03)
M1175/6A (Option H71)
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Option A03)
M1094B (Option A03)
M1095A (Option A03)
M1175/6A (Option H71)
—
Option H50
Option H01
Option H50
Option H01
Option H50
Option H52
Option H52
Option H52
Option H60
Option K01
Option K02
Option K03
Option H60
Option K01
Option K02
Option K03
Option H60
Option K01
Option K02
Option K03
Substitute Options
Substitute Flatscreen Display
Substitute 8-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack
Substitute Classic HIF for Standard HIF
Substitute short System Cable
Substitute 3 meter System Cable
Substitute 1.5 meter System Cable
(1)
A 2nd independent monochrome display controller (option J16) and the 8-channel analog interface are not supported simultaneously.
(2)
Includes isolation transformer.
A-6
Product Information
ACMS Release F
Display Module
Mono / Color
Number of Channels
Supported Remote Displays
M1175A Option A74
M1176A Option A84
M1175A Option A76
M1176A Option A86
M1176A Option A88
Mono A74 / Color A84
4
3
Mono A76 / Color A86
6
3
Color
8
3
Plug-in Modules
Max. Number of Parameter Modules
Supported Modules
M1001A/B ECG (1)
M1002A/B ECG/RESP (1)
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure
M1008A/B NBP
M1012A Cardiac Output
M1015A Sidestream CO2
M1016A CO2
M1017A FIO2
M1020A SpO2/Pleth
M1021A SvO2
M1029A Temperature
M1032A VueLink Type A
M1032A VueLink Type B
M1116A/B Recorder Module
M1235A Data Transfer Module
8
12
16
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2 (1 Delta Temp.)
1 (2 with Option C24)
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
1 (2 with Option C25)
1 (2 with Option C25)
1
1
1
1
6
1
1
1
1
1
1 (2 with Option C11)
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
3
2
1
1
Anesthesia Gas Monitoring
M1026A Anesthetic Gas Module
1
1
1
Patient Data Management
Data Storage
1 min. resolution
16 parameters / 24 hours
16 parameters / 24 hours
12 sec. resolution
16 parameters / 4 hours
16 parameters / 4 hours
Trends
Tabular / Graphic
Tabular / Graphic
32 parameters / 24 hours
(16 parameters / 48 hours)
32 parameters / 4 hours
(16 parameters / 9 hours)
Tabular / Graphic
Clinical Calculations
• Hemodynamic
• Hemodynamic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
—
Option C03
32 parameters / 24 hours
(16 parameters / 48 hours)
Standard
Software Applications
Extended Data Management
1 min. resolution
12 sec. resolution
32 parameters / 4 hours
(16 parameters / 9 hours)
Drug Calculator
Option C05
Option C05
Standard
Dual SpO2
—
—
Option C11
Standard
Standard
(1) M1001A/B
and M1002A/B cannot be used simultaneously in a system.
ST Segment Analysis
Standard
Product Information
A-7
Product Information
ACMS Release F
Product Information
ACMS Release F
Interface Accelerator
Interfacing and Networking Capabilities
8-Channel Analog Interface
Philips Network Interface
1st RS232 Dual Interface (2)
2nd Dual RS232 Dual Interface
Delete 1st RS232 Dual
Interface
Digital Recorder Interface
1st additional Display Interface
2nd additional Display Interface
1st additional Flatscreen Display
Interface
Peripherals
Handheld Keypad
4 Channel Recorder
8-Slot Satellite Rack
6-Slot Satellite Rack
14 Inch Monochrome Display
14 Inch Color Display
10.4 Inch Flatscreen Color Display
21 Inch Color Display(3)
Substitute Options
Substitute Flatscreen display
Substitute 8-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack
Substitute 3 meter System Cable
Substitute 1.5 meter System Cable
(1)
(2)
(3)
A-8
M1175A Option A74
M1176A Option A84
M1175A Option A76
M1176A Option A86
M1176A Option A88
Standard
Option C24
Option C25
• Supports 1 additional
VueLink Module
(Type A)
• Supports Philips Network
capability
• Supports independent
display controller
• Supports 2 additional
VueLink Modules
(Type A, Type B)
• Supports Philips Network
capability
—
Option J12 with Option C24
Standard
Option J13
Option D13
Option J11
Option J12 with Option C25
Standard
Option J13
Option D13
Option J11(1)
Option J12
Standard
Option J13
Option D13
Option J14
—
Option J14
Option J15 (color) or
Option J16 (mono) both with
Option C25
—
Option J25 (M1095A)with Option
C25
Option J14
Option J15 (color) or
Option J16 (mono)
—
—
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
—
—
—
—
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Option A03)
M1094B (Option A03)
M1095A (Option A03)
M1175/6A (Option H71)
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Option A03)
M1094B (Option A03)
M1095A (Option A03)
M1175/6A (Option H71)
—
Option H50
Option H01
Option H50
Option H01
Option H50
Option H52
Option H52
Option H52
Option K02
Option K03
Option K02
Option K03
Option K02
Option K03
A 2nd Independent Monochrome Display Controller (Option J16) and an 8-channel Analog interface are not supported
simultaneously.
Includes a 3.0 meter (9.8 ft.) RS232 cable.
Includes Isolation Transformer.
Product Information
Option J16 (mono) (1)
Option J25 (M1095A)
NCMS Release F
M1175A Option A36
M1176A Option A46
Display Module
Mono / Color
Number of Channels
Plug-in Modules
Maximum Number of Parameter Modules
Supported Modules
M1001A/B ECG (1)
M1002A/B ECG/RESP (1)
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure
M1008A/B NBP
M1012A Cardiac Output
M1015A Sidestream CO2(2)
M1016A CO2
M1017A FIO2
M1018A tcpO2/tcpCO2
M1020A SpO2/Pleth
M1021A SvO2
M1029A Temperature
M1032A VueLink Type A
M1032A VueLink Type B
M1116A/B Recorder Module
M1235A Data Transfer Module
Patient Data Management (Standard)
Data Storage
1 min. resolution
12 sec. resolution
Trends
Clinical Calculations
Software Applications
Drug Calculator
ST Segment Analysis
(1)
M1176A Option A48
Mono (Option A36)
Color (Option A46)
6
Color
12
16
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
2
2
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
3
2
1
1
16 parameters / 24 hours
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
32 parameters / 24 hours
(16 parameters / 48 hours)
32 parameters / 4 hours
(16 parameters / 9 hours)
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Standard
Option C10
Standard
Standard
16 parameters / 4 hours
8
M1001A/B and M1002A/B cannot be used simultaneously in a system.
(2)
Pending FDA clearance.
Product Information
A-9
Product Information
NCMS Release F
Product Information
NCMS Release F
Interfacing and Networking Capabilities
8-Channel Analog Interface
Philips Network Interface
1st RS232 Interface
2nd RS232 Interface
Digital Recorder Interface
Peripherals
Remote Keypad
4 Channel Recorder
8-Slot Satellite Rack
6-Slot Satellite Rack
Substitute Options
Substitute Flatscreen Display
Substitute 8-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack
Substitute short System Cable
Substitute 3 meter System Cable
Substitute 1.5 meter System Cable
A-10
Product Information
M1175A Option A36
M1176A Option A46
M1176A Option A48
Option J11
Standard
Option J13
----Option J14
Option J11
Standard
Option J13
Option J13
Option J14
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
Option H01
Option H50
Option H01
Option H50
Option H52
Option H52
Option K01
Option K02
Option K03
Option K01
Option K02
Option K03
CMS Release G
Display Module
Mono / Color
Number of Channels
Supported Remote Displays (CRT)
Plug-in Modules
Maximum Number of Parameter Modules
Supported Modules
M1001A/B ECG (A)
M1002A/B ECG/RESP (A)
M1002A ECG/RESP with Analog
Respiration Output (A) (B)
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure with
Analog Pressure Output
M1008A/B NBP (B)
M1012A Cardiac Output
M1015A Sidestream CO2
M1016A CO2
M1017A FIO2
M1018A tcpO2/tcpCO2 (B)
M1020A SpO2/Pleth
M1021A SvO2
M1022A Blood Analysis (B)
M1029A Temperature
M1032A VueLink Type A
M1032A VueLink Type B
M1116A/B Recorder Module (B)
M1235A Data Transfer Module
Patient Data Management (Standard)
Data Storage
1 min. resolution
12 sec. resolution
Trends
Clinical Calculations
Software Applications
Extended Data Management
1 min. resolution
M1175A Option A54
M1176A Option A64
M1177A Option A64
M1175A Option A56
M1176A Option A66
M1177A Option A66
Mono (Option A54)
Color (Option A64)
4
3
Mono (OptionA56)
Color (Option A66)
6
3
8
3
8
12
16
1
1
1 (with Option C01)
1
1
1 (with Option C01)
1
1
1 (with Option C01)
3
3 (with Option C01)
5
5 (with Option C01)
6
6 (with Option C01)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2 (1 Delta Temp.)
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
3
2
1
1
16 parameters / 24 hours
16 parameters / 24 hours
16 parameters / 4 hours
16 parameters / 4 hours
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
32 parameters / 24 hours
(16 parameters / 48 hours)
32 parameters / 4 hours
(16 parameters / 9 hours)
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
—
Option C03
32 parameters / 24 hours
(16 parameters / 48 hours)
32 parameters / 4 hours
(16 parameters / 9 hours)
Standard
Option C10
12 sec. resolution
Drug Calculator
ST Segment Analysis
Standard
Option C10
M1176A Option A68
M1177A Option A67
Color
Standard
Standard
Standard
Product Information
A-11
Product Information
CMS Release G
Product Information
CMS Release G
Interfacing and Networking Capabilities
8-Channel Analog Interface
Philips Network Interface
1st RS232 Interface
2nd RS232 Interface
Digital Recorder Interface
1st additional Display or Flatscreen
Interface
Peripherals
Remote Keypad
4 Channel Recorder
8-Slot Satellite Rack
6-Slot Satellite Rack
14 Inch Monochrome Display
14 Inch Color Display
10.4 Inch Flatscreen Color Display
21 Inch Color Display(1)
Substitute Options
Substitute Flatscreen display
(Japan only) (2) (3)
Substitute 8-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack (3)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack (3)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for 8-slot
Satellite Rack (M1177A only)
Substitute 3 meter System Cable (3)
Substitute 1.5 meter System Cable (3)
(A)
M1175A Option A54
M1176A Option A64
M1177A Option A64
M1175A Option A56
M1176A Option A66
M1177A Option A66
M1176A Option A68
M1177A Option A67
—
Standard
Option J13
—
Option J14
—
Option J11
Standard
Option J13
----Option J14
Option J15 (color) or
Option J16 (mono) or
Option J25 (Flatscreen)
Option J11
Standard
Option J13
Option J13
Option J14
Option J15 (color) or
Option J16 (mono) or
Option J25 (Flatscreen)
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
—
—
—
—
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Option A03)
M1094B (Option A03)
M1095A (Option A03)
M1175/6A (Option H71)
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Option A03)
M1094B (Option A03)
M1095A (Option A03)
M1175/6A (Option H71)
Option H01
Option H01
Option H01
Option H50
Option H50
Option H50
Option H52
Option H52
Option H52
Option H53
Option H53
Option H53
Option K02
Option K03
Option K02
Option K03
Option K02
Option K03
M1001A/B and M1002A/B cannot be used simultaneously in a system.
(B)
Each module requires 2 slots in the integral and/or Satellite Rack.
(1)Includes isolation transformer.
(2)Not available with Model M1175A.
(3)
Not available with Model M1177A.
A-12
Product Information
ACMS Release G
Display Module
Mono / Color
Number of Channels
Supported Remote Displays (CRT)
Plug-in Modules
Max. Number of Parameter Modules
Supported Modules
M1001A/B ECG (1)
M1002A/B ECG/RESP (1)
M1002A ECG/RESP with Analog
Respiration Output (1) (2)
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure with
Analog Pressure Output
M1008A/B NBP (2)
M1012A Cardiac Output
M1015A Sidestream CO2
M1016A CO2
M1017A FIO2
M1018A tcpO2/tcpCO2 (2)
M1020A SpO2/Pleth
M1021A SvO2
M1022A Blood Analysis (2)
M1029A Temperature
M1032A VueLink Type A
M1032A VueLink Type B
M1116A/B Recorder Module (2)
M1235A Data Transfer Module
Anesthesia Gas Monitoring
M1026A Anesthetic Gas Module
Anesthesia Machine Ventilators
Ohmeda 7800/7810
M1175A Option A74
M1176A Option A84
M1175A Option A76
M1176A Option A86
M1177A Option A86
M1176A Option A88
M1177A Option A88
Mono A74 / Color A84
4
3
Mono A76 / Color A86
6
3
Color
8
3
8
12
16
1
1
1 (with Option C01)
1
1
1 (with Option C01)
1
1
1 (with Option C01)
3
3 (with Option C01)
5
5 (with Option C01)
6 (5 with Option C11)
5 (with Option C01)
1
1
1
1
1
—
1
1
1
2 (1 Delta Temp.)
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1 (with Option C25)
1
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
1 (2 with Option C25)
1 (2 with Option C25)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1 (2 with Option C11)
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
2 (1 with Option C11)
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Patient Data Management
Data Storage
1 min. resolution
16 parameters / 24 hours
16 parameters / 24 hours
12 sec. resolution
16 parameters / 4 hours
16 parameters / 4 hours
Trends
Tabular / Graphic
Tabular / Graphic
32 parameters / 24 hours
(16 parameters / 48 hours)
32 parameters / 4 hours
(16 parameters / 9 hours)
Tabular / Graphic
Clinical Calculations
• Hemodynamic
• Hemodynamic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Option C03
32 parameters / 24 hours
(16 parameters / 48 hours)
Standard
(1)
(2)
M1001A/B and M1002A/B cannot be used simultaneously in a system.
Each module requires 2 slots in the integral and/or Satellite Rack.
Software Applications
Extended Data Management
1 min. resolution
12 sec. resolution
—
32 parameters / 4 hours
(16 parameters / 9 hours)
Product Information
A-13
Product Information
ACMS Release G
Product Information
ACMS Release G
M1175A Option A74
M1176A Option A84
M1175A Option A76
M1176A Option A86
M1177A Option A86
M1176A Option A88
M1177A Option A88
Drug Calculator
Standard
Standard
Standard
Dual SpO2
—
—
Option C11
ST Segment Analysis
Interface Accelerator
Standard
Option C24
Supports Philips Network
capability.
Standard
Option C25
Supports a 2nd independent display, tcgas measurement, 2nd
Vuelink type A&B module and Philips Network capability
Standard
Standard
—
Option J12 with Option C24
Standard
Option J13
Option D13
Option J11
Option J12 with Option C25
Standard
Option J13
Option D13
Option J11(1)
Option J12
Standard
Option J13
Option D13
Option J14
—
Option J14
Option J15 (color) or
Option J16 (mono) or
Option J25 (Flatscreen)
—
Option J14
Option J15 (color) or
Option J16 (mono) or
Option J25 (Flatscreen)
(only with Option C25)
—
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
—
—
—
—
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Option A03)
M1094B (Option A03)
M1095A (Option A03)
M1175/6A (Option H71)
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Option A03)
M1094B (Option A03)
M1095A (Option A03)
M1175/6A (Option H71)
Option H01
Option H01
Option H01
Option H50
Option H50
Option H50
Option H52
Option H52
Option H52
Option H53
Option H53
Option H53
Option K02
Option K03
Option K02
Option K02
Option K03
Option K03
(3) Includes a 3.0 meter (9.8 ft.) RS232 cable.
(4) Includes Isolation Transformer.
(5) Not available with Model M1175A Option A74 and A76.
Interfacing and Networking Capabilities
8-Channel Analog Interface
Philips Network Interface
1st RS232 Dual Interface (3)
2nd RS232 Dual Interface
Delete 1st RS232 Dual
Interface
Digital Recorder Interface
1st additional independent Display or
Flatscreen Interface
2nd additional independent Display or
Flatscreen Interface(2)
Peripherals
Handheld Keypad
4 Channel Recorder
8-Slot Satellite Rack
6-Slot Satellite Rack
14 Inch Monochrome Display
14 Inch Color Display
10.4 Inch Flatscreen Color Display
21 Inch Color Display(4)
Substitute Options
Substitute Flatscreen display
(Japan only) (5) (6)
Substitute 8-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack (6)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack (6)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for 8-slot
Satellite Rack (M1177A only)
Substitute 3 meter System Cable (6)
Substitute 1.5 meter System Cable (6)
(1) A 2nd Independent Display Controller and an 8-channel Analog interface are
not supported simultaneously.
(2) The 2nd additional Display can only be a Flatscreen if the 1st additional Display is a CRT.
A-14
Product Information
Option J16 (mono) or
Option J15 (color) or
Option J25 (Flatscreen))(1)
NCMS Release G
M1175A Option A36
M1176A Option A46
M1177A Option A46
Display Module
Mono / Color
Number of Channels
Plug-in Modules
Maximum Number of Parameter Modules
Supported Modules
M1001A/B ECG (1)
M1002A/B ECG/RESP (1)
M1002A ECG/RESP with Analog
Respiration Output (1) (2)
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure with
Analog Pressure Output
M1008B NBP (2)
M1012A Cardiac Output
M1015A Sidestream CO2
M1016A CO2
M1017A FIO2
M1018A tcpO2/tcpCO2 (2)
M1020A SpO2/Pleth
M1021A SvO2
M1022A Blood Analysis (2)
M1029A Temperature
M1032A VueLink Type A
M1032A VueLink Type B
M1116A/B Recorder Module (2)
M1235A Data Transfer Module
Patient Data Management (Standard)
Data Storage
1 min. resolution
12 sec. resolution
Trends
Clinical Calculations
Software Applications
Drug Calculator
ST Segment Analysis
(1)
M1176A Option A48
M1177A Option A48
Mono (Option A36)
Color (Option A46)
6
Color
12
16
1
1
1 (with Option C01)
1
1
1 (with Option C01)
3
3 (with Option C01)
4
4 (with Option C01)
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
3
2
1
1
16 parameters / 24 hours
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
32 parameters / 24 hours
(16 parameters / 48 hours)
32 parameters / 4 hours
(16 parameters / 9 hours)
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Standard
Option C10
Standard
Standard
16 parameters / 4 hours
8
M1001A/B and M1002A/B cannot be used simultaneously in a system.
(2)
Each module requires 2 slots in the integral and/or Satellite Rack.
Product Information
A-15
Product Information
NCMS Release G
Product Information
NCMS Release G
Interfacing and Networking Capabilities
8-Channel Analog Interface
Philips Network Interface
1st RS232 Interface
2nd RS232 Interface
Digital Recorder Interface
Peripherals
Remote Keypad
4 Channel Recorder
8-Slot Satellite Rack
6-Slot Satellite Rack
Substitute Options
Substitute Flatscreen display (Japan only) (1) (2)
Substitute 8-slot Satellite Rack for Integral Rack (2)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for Integral Rack (2)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for 8-slot
Satellite Rack (M1177A only)
Substitute Short System Cable (2)
Substitute 3 meter System Cable (2)
(1)
Not available with Model M1175A.
(2)
Not available with Model M1177A.
A-16
Product Information
M1175A Option A36
M1176A Option A46
M1177A Option A46
M1176A Option A48
M1177A Option A48
Option J11
Standard
Option J13
----Option J14
Option J11
Standard
Option J13
Option J13
Option J14
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
Option H01
Option H50
Option H52
Option H53
Option H50
Option H52
Option H53
Option K01
Option K02
Option K01
Option K02
Option H01
CMS Release A.0
M1176A (Color)
M1177A (Color)
M1175A (Mono)
Option A56
Option A64
Option A68
Display Module
Mono / Color
Number of Channels
Supported Remote Displays
Mono
6
3
Color
4
3
Color
8
3
8 (12 with Opt. J26)
8
12 (16 with Opt. J28)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3 (5 with Opt. J26)
3 (5 with Opt. J26)
3
3
5 (6 with Opt. J28)
5 (6 with Opt. J28)
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2 (1 Delta Temp.)
4 (2 Delta Temp. with Opt. J26)
2
1 (2 with Opt. J26)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2 (1 Delta Temp.)
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard with Opt. J26
Standard with Opt. J26
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Opt. C04
Opt. C80
—
—
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Opt. C04
Opt. C80
Standard with Opt. J28
Standard with Opt. J28
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Opt. C04
Opt. C80
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Opt. J11
Opt. J11
Opt. J11
Plug-in Modules
Maximum Number of Parameter Modules
Supported Modules
M1001A/B ECG (1)
M1002A/B ECG/RESP (1)
M1002A ECG/RESP with Analog
Respiration Output (with Opt. C01)(1)(2)
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure with
Analog Pressure Output (with Opt. C01)
M1008A/B NBP (2)
M1012A Cardiac Output
M1015A Sidestream CO2
M1016A CO2
M1017A FiO2
M1018A tcpO2/tcpCO2 (2)
M1020A SpO2/Pleth
M1021A SvO2 (2)
M1022A Blood Analysis (2)
M1029A Temperature
M1032A VueLink Type A
M1032A VueLink Type B
M1116A/B Recorder Module (2)
M1235A Data Transfer Module
Patient Data Management
Standard Data Management
12 sec. resolution
1 min. resolution
Extended Data Management
12 sec. resolution
1 min. resolution
Trends
Clinical Calculations
Neonatal Event Review
Respiratory Loops (for selected ventilators and
Vuelink)
(1) M1001A/B and M1002A/B cannot be used simultaneously in a system.
(2) These modules require 2 slots in the integral and/or Satellite Rack.
Software Applications
Drug Calculator
ST Segment Analysis
Interfacing and Networking Capabilities
8-Channel Analog Interface
Product Information
A-17
Product Information
CMS Release A.0
Product Information
CMS Release A.0
M1176A (Color)
M1177A (Color)
M1175A (Mono)
Option A56
Philips Network Interface
1st RS232 Interface
2nd RS232 Interface
Digital Recorder Interface
1st additional Display or Flatscreen
Interface
Option A64
Option A68
Opt. J12
Opt. J13
—
Opt. J14
With Opt. J26 ==>
Opt. J15 (color) or
Opt. J16 (mono) or
Opt. J25 (Flatscreen)
Opt. J12
Opt. J13
—
Opt. J14
—
Opt. J12
Opt. J13
Opt. J13 and Opt. J28
Opt. J14
Opt. J15 (color) or
Opt. J16 (mono) or
Opt. J25 (Flatscreen)
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Opt. A03)
M1094B (Opt. A03)
M1095A (Opt. A03)
M1165/66A (Opt. H71)
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
—
—
—
—
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Opt. A03)
M1094B (Opt. A03)
M1095A (Opt. A03)
M1165/66A (Opt. H71)
Opt. H01
Opt. H01
Opt. H01
Opt. H50
Opt. H50
Opt. H50
Opt. H52
Opt. H52
Opt. H52
Opt. H53
Opt. H53
Opt. H53
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
Peripherals
Remote Keypad
4 Channel Recorder
8-Slot Satellite Rack
6-Slot Satellite Rack
14 Inch Monochrome Display
14 Inch Color Display
10.4 Inch Flatscreen Color Display
21 Inch Color Display(1)
Substitute Options
Substitute Flatscreen display
(Japan only) (2) (3)
Substitute 8-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack (3)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack (3)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for 8-slot
Satellite Rack (M1177A only)
Substitute 3 meter System Cable (3)
Substitute 1.5 meter System Cable (3)
(1) Includes isolation transformer.
(2)Not available with Model M1175A.
(3)Not available with Model M1177A.
A-18
Product Information
ACMS Release A.0
M1175A (Mono)
M1176A (Color)
M1177A (Color)
Option A76
Option A88
Display Module
Mono / Color
Number of Channels
Supported Remote Displays (CRT)
Mono
6
3
Color
8
3
8 (12 with Opt. J26)
12 (16 with Opt. J28)
1
1
1
1
1
1
3 (5 with Opt. J26)
3 (5 with Opt. J26)
5 (6 with Opt. J28)
5 (6 with Opt. J28)
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2 (1Delta Temp.)
4 (2 Delta Temp.) with Opt. J26
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2 (1 with Opt. J28, without Opt. C11)
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
1
1
Standard
Opt. C79
Opt. C80
Standard
Opt. C79
Opt. C80
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
12 second resolution
1 min. resolution
Trends
Standard with Opt. J26
Standard with Opt. J26
Standard with Opt. J28
Standard with Opt. J28
Tabular / Graphic
Tabular / Graphic
Clinical Calculations
• Hemodynamic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Plug-in Modules
Max. Number of Parameter Modules
Supported Modules
M1001A/B ECG (1)
M1002A/B ECG/RESP (1)
M1002A ECG/RESP with Analog
Respiration Output (with Opt. C01) (1) (2)
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure with
Analog Pressure Output (with Opt. C01)
M1008A/B NBP (2)
M1012A Cardiac Output
M1015A Sidestream CO2
M1016A CO2
M1017A FiO2
M1018A tcpO2/tcpCO2 (2)
M1020A SpO2/Pleth
M1021A SvO2 (2)
M1022A Blood Analysis (2)
M1029A Temperature
M1032A VueLink Type A
M1032A VueLink Type B
M1116A/B Recorder Module (2)
M1235A Data Transfer Module
2 (1 with Opt. C11)
2
1
1
Anesthesia Gas Monitoring
M1026A Anesthetic Gas Module
Anesthesia Ventilators
Ohmeda 7800/7810
Ohmeda 7900
Respiratory Loops (for selected ventilators &Vuelink)
Patient Data Management
Standard Data Management
12 second resolution
1 min. resolution
Extended Data Management
(1) M1001A/B and M1002A/B cannot be used simultaneously in a system.
(2) These modules require 2 slots in the integral and/or Satellite Rack.
Product Information
A-19
Product Information
ACMS Release A.0
Product Information
ACMS Release A.0
M1175A (Mono)
M1176A (Color)
M1177A (Color)
Option A76
Option A88
Software Applications
Drug Calculator
Standard
Standard
Dual SpO2
Standard
With Opt. J28 you need Opt. C11
ST Segment Analysis
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Opt. J13
Opt. D13
Opt. J14
With Opt. J26 ==>
Opt. J16 (mono) or
Opt. J25 (Flatscreen)
—
Standard
Standard
Standard
Opt. J13
Opt. D13
Opt. J14
Opt. J15 (color) or
Opt. J25(Flatscreen)
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Opt. A03)
M1094B (Opt. A03)
M1095A (Opt. A03)
M1165/6A (Opt. H71)
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Opt. A03)
M1094B (Opt. A03)
M1095A (Opt. A03)
M1165/6A (Opt. H71)
Opt. H01
Opt. H50
Opt. H52
Opt. H53
Opt. H01
Opt. H50
Opt. H52
Opt. H53
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
Interfacing and Networking Capabilities
8-Channel Analog Interface (1)
Philips Network Interface
1st RS232 Dual Interface (2)
2nd RS232 Dual Interface
Delete 1st RS232 Dual Interface
Digital Recorder Interface
1st additional independent Display or Flatscreen Interface
2nd additional independent Display or Flatscreen
Interface (1)
With Opt. J28 ==>
Opt. J15 (color) or
Opt. J25(Flatscreen)
Peripherals
Handheld Keypad
4-Channel Recorder
8-Slot Satellite Rack
6-Slot Satellite Rack
14” Monochrome Display
14”Color Display
10.4” Flatscreen Color Display
21” Color Display(3)
Substitute Options
Substitute Flatscreen display (Japan only) (4) (5)
Substitute 8-slot Satellite Rack for Integral Rack (5)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for Integral Rack (5)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for 8-slot. Satellite Rack (M1177A
only)
Substitute 3 meter System Cable (5)
Substitute 1.5 meter System Cable (5)
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
2nd Independent Display Controller & an 8-channel Analog interface are not supported simultaneously.
Includes a 3.0 meter (9.8 ft.) RS232 cable.
Includes Isolation Transformer.
Not available with Model M1175A.
Not available with Model M1177A.
A-20
Product Information
NCMS Release A.0
M1176A (Color)
M1177A (Color)
Option A48
Display Module
Color
Number of Channels
Color
8
Plug-in Modules
Maximum Number of Parameter Modules
Supported Modules
M1001A/B ECG (1)
M1002A/B ECG/RESP (1)
M1002A ECG/RESP with Analog Respiration Output (with Opt. C01) (1) (2)
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure with Analog Pressure Output (with Opt. C01)
M1008B NBP (2)
M1012A Cardiac Output
M1015A Sidestream CO2
M1016A CO2
M1017A FiO2
M1018A tcpO2/tcpCO2 (2)
M1020A SpO2/Pleth
M1021A SvO2 (2)
M1022A Blood Analysis (2)
M1029A Temperature
M1032A VueLink Type A
M1032A VueLink Type B
M1116A/B Recorder Module (2)
M1235A Data Transfer Module
12 (16 with Opt. J28)
1
1
1
5 (6 with Opt. J28)
5 (6 with Opt. J28)
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
2
2
1
1
Patient Data Management
Standard Data Management
12 second resolution
1 min. resolution
Extended Data Management
12 second resolution
1 min. resolution
Trends
Clinical Calculations
Neonatal Event Review
Respiratory Loops (for selected ventilators and Vuelink)
Standard
Standard
With Opt. J28
With Opt. J28
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Opt. C04
Opt. C80
Software Applications
Drug Calculator
ST Segment Analysis
Standard
Standard
(1) M1001A/B and M1002A/B cannot be used simultaneously in a system.
(2) These modules require 2 slots in the integral and/or Satellite Rack.
Interfacing and Networking Capabilities
8-Channel Analog Interface
Philips Network Interface
1st RS232 Interface
2nd RS232 Interface
Opt. J11
Opt. J12
Opt. J13
Opt. J13 and J28
Product Information
A-21
Product Information
NCMS Release A.0
Product Information
NCMS Release A.0
M1176A (Color)
M1177A (Color)
Option A48
Digital Recorder Interface
Opt. J14
Interfacing and Networking Capabilities
Remote Keypad
4 Channel Recorder
8-Slot Satellite Rack
6-Slot Satellite Rack
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
Substitute Options
Substitute Flatscreen display (Japan only) (1)
Substitute 8-slot Satellite Rack for Integral Rack (1)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for Integral Rack (1)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for 8-slot Satellite Rack
(M1177A only)
Substitute Short System Cable (1)
Substitute 3 meter System Cable (1)
Substitute 1.5 meter System Cable (1)
(1) Not available with Model M1177A.
A-22
Product Information
Opt. H01
Opt. H50
Opt. H52
Opt. H53
Opt. K01
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
CMS Release B.0
M1166A / 76A (Color)
M1167A / 77A (Color)
M1165A / 75A (Mono)
Option A56
Option A66
Option A68
Display Module
Mono / Color
Number of Channels
Supported Independent Displays
Mono
6
1 (2 with Option J26)
Color
6
1 (2 with Option J26)
Color
8
2
8 (12 with Opt. J26)
8 (12 with Opt. J26)
12 (16 with Opt. J28)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3 (6 with Opt. J26)
3 (6 with Opt. J26)
1
3 (6 with Opt. J26)
3 (6 with Opt. J26)
1
5 (6 with Opt. J28)
5 (6 with Opt. J28)
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2 (1 Delta Temp.)
4 (2 Delta Temp. with Opt. J26)
2
1 (2 with Opt. J26)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2 (1 Delta Temp.)
4 (2 Delta Temp. with Opt. J26)
2
1 (2 with Opt. J26)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
With Opt. J26
With Opt. J26
Tabular / Graphic
Hemodynamic
Oxygenation
Ventilation
Opt. C04
Standard
With Opt. J26
With Opt. J26
Tabular / Graphic
Hemodynamic
Oxygenation
Ventilation
Opt. C04
Standard
With Opt. J28
With Opt. J28
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
—
Standard
Standard
Standard
Option C12
Standard
Standard
Standard
Option C12
Standard
Standard
Standard
Option C12
Standard
Plug-in Modules
Maximum Number of Parameter Modules
Supported Modules
M1001A/B ECG (1)
M1002A/B ECG/RESP (1)
M1002A ECG/RESP with Analog
Respiration Output (with Opt. C01)(1)(2)
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure with
Analog Pressure Output (with Opt. C01)
M1008A/B NBP (2)
M1012A Cardiac Output
M1015A Sidestream CO2
M1016A CO2
M1017A FiO2
M1018A tcpO2/tcpCO2 (2)
M1020A SpO2/Pleth
M1021A SvO2 (2)
M1022A Blood Analysis (2)
M1027A EEG (3)
M1029A Temperature
M1032A VueLink Type A
M1032A VueLink Type B
M1116A/B Recorder Module (2)
M1235A Data Transfer Module
2
2
1
1
Patient Data Management
Standard Data Management
12 sec. resolution
1 min. resolution
Extended Data Management
12 sec. resolution
1 min. resolution
Trends
Clinical Calculations
Neonatal Event Review
Respiratory Loops (for selected ventilators and
Vuelink)
(1) M1001A/B and M1002A/B cannot be used simultaneously in a system.
(2) These modules require 2 slots in the integral and/or satellite rack.
(3) Not yet available in the U.S. and Canada.
Software Applications
Drug Calculator
ST Segment Analysis
EASI™ 12-lead ECG with five electrodes
CSA (with M1027A EEG Module)
Interfacing and Networking Capabilities
Product Information
A-23
Product Information
CMS Release B.0
Product Information
CMS Release B.0
M1166A / 76A (Color)
M1167A / 77A (Color)
M1165A / 75A (Mono)
Option A56
8-Channel Analog Interface
Philips Network Interface(4)
1st RS232 Dual Interface
2nd RS232 Dual Interface
Digital Recorder Interface
1st additional independent Display or Flatscreen
Interface
Option A66
Option A68
Opt. J11
Opt. J12
Opt. J13
Opt. J13 and Opt. J26
Opt. J14
Requires Opt. J26 with
Opt. J15 (color) or
Opt. J16 (mono) or
Opt. J25 (Flatscreen)
Opt. J11
Opt. J12
Opt. J13
Opt. J13 and Opt. J26
Opt. J14
Requires Opt. J26 with
Opt. J15 (color) or
Opt. J16 (mono) or
Opt. J25 (Flatscreen)
Opt. J11
Opt. J12
Opt. J13
Opt. J13 and Opt. J28
Opt. J14
Opt. J15 (color) or
Opt. J16 (mono) or
Opt. J25 (Flatscreen) or
Opt. J17 (XGA display)3
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Opt. A03)
M1094B (Opt. A03)
M1095A (Opt. A03)
—
Opt. H71
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Opt. A03)
M1094B (Opt. A03)
M1095A (Opt. A03)
M1097A #A01
Opt. H71
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Opt. A03)
M1094B (Opt. A03)
M1095A (Opt. A03)
M1097A #A01
Opt. H71
Opt. H50
Opt. H50
Opt. H50
Opt. H52
Opt. H52
Opt. H52
Opt. H53
Opt. H53
Opt. H53
Opt. K02
Opt. K02
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
Opt. K03
Opt. K03
Peripherals
Handheld Keypad
4-Channel Recorder
8-Slot Satellite Rack
6-Slot Satellite Rack
14 “ Monochrome Display
14 “ Color Display
10.4 “ Flatscreen Color Display
15 “ XGA Flatscreen Color Display (1) (3)
21 “ Color Display (1)
Substitute Options
Substitute 8-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack (2)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack (2)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for 8-slot
Satellite Rack (M1177A only)
Substitute 3 meter System Cable (2)
Substitute 1.5 meter System Cable (2)
(1) Includes isolation transformer.
(2) Not available with Model M1167A / 77A.
(3) Only with Model M1167A / 77A.
(4)) Included in standard configuration for US Models
A-24
Product Information
ACMS Release B.0
M1166A / 76A (Color)
M1167A / 77A (Color)
M1165A / 75A (Mono)
Option A76
Option A86
Option A88
Display Module
Mono / Color
Number of Channels
Supported Independent Displays
Mono
6
1 (2 with Option J26)
Color
6
1 (2 with Opt. J26)
Color
8
2 (3 with Opt. J28)
8 (12 with Opt. J26)
8 (12 with Opt. J26)
12 (16 with Opt. J28)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3 (6 with Opt. J26)
3 (6 with Opt. J26)
3 (6 with Opt. J26)
3 (6 with Opt. J26)
5 (6 with Opt. J28)
5 (6 with Opt. J28)
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2 (1 Delta Temp.)
4 (2 Delta Temp.) with Opt. J26
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
2
1 (2 with Opt. J26)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2 (1 Delta Temp.)
4 (2 Delta Temp.) with Opt.
J26
2
1 (2 with Opt. J26)
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
Standard
Opt. C79
Standard
Standard
Opt. C79
Standard
Standard
Opt. C79
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Extended Data Management12 second resolution
1 min. resolution
Trends
With Opt. J26
With Opt. J26
With Opt. J26
With Opt. J26
Standard
Standard
With Opt. J28
With Opt. J28
Tabular / Graphic
Tabular / Graphic
Tabular / Graphic
Clinical Calculations
• Hemodynamic
• Hemodynamic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Plug-in Modules
Max. Number of Parameter Modules
Supported Modules
M1001A/B ECG (1)
M1002A/B ECG/RESP (1)
M1002A ECG/RESP with Analog
Respiration Output (with Opt. C01) (1) (2)
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure with
Analog Pressure Output (with Opt. C01)
M1008A/B NBP (2)
M1012A Cardiac Output
M1015A Sidestream CO2 (2)
M1016A CO2
M1017A FiO2
M1018A tcpO2/tcpCO2 (2)
M1020A SpO2/Pleth
M1021A SvO2 (2)
M1022A Blood Analysis (2)
M1027A EEG (3)
M1029A Temperature
M1032A VueLink Type A
M1032A VueLink Type B
M1116A/B
M1235A
Recorder Module (2)
Data Transfer Module
Anesthesia Gas Monitoring
M1026A Anesthetic Gas Module
Anesthesia Ventilators
Ohmeda 7800/7810
Ohmeda 7900
Respiratory Loops (for selected ventilators &Vuelink)
Patient Data Management
Standard Data Management
12 second resolution
1 min. resolution
(1) M1001A/B and M1002A/B cannot be used simultaneously in a system.
(2) These modules require 2 slots in the integral and/or satellite rack.
(3) Not yet available in the U.S. and Canada.
Product Information
A-25
Product Information
ACMS Release B.0
Product Information
ACMS Release B.0
M1166A / 76A (Color)
M1167A / 77A (Color)
M1165A / 75A (Mono)
Option A76
Option A86
Option A88
Software Applications
Drug Calculator
Standard
Standard
Standard
Dual SpO2
Standard
Standard
Standard
ST Segment Analysis
Standard
Standard
Standard
EASI™ 12-lead ECG with five electrodes
Option C12
Option C12
Option C12
CSA (with M1027A EEG Module)
Standard
Standard
Standard
Opt. J11
Opt. J12
Standard
Opt. J13
Opt. D13
Opt. J14
Requires Opt. J26 with
Opt. J16 (mono)
Opt. J11
Opt. J12
Standard
Opt. J13
Opt. D13
Opt. J14
Opt. J15 (color) or
Opt. J25 (Flatscreen) or
Opt. J17 (XGA display) (6)
Opt. J11
Opt. J12
Standard
Opt. J13
Opt. D13
Opt. J14
Opt. J15 (color) or
Opt. J25 (Flatscreen) or
Opt. J17 (XGA display)
Requires Opt. J28 with
Opt. J15 (color) or
Opt. J25 (Flatscreen) or
Opt. J17 (XGA display) (6)
Requires Opt. J28 with
Opt. J15 (color) or
Opt. J25 (Flatscreen) or
Opt. J17 (XGA display)
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Opt. A03)
—
—
—
Opt. H71
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Opt. A03)
M1094B (Opt. A03)
M1095A (Opt. A03)
M1097A(6)
Opt. H71
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Opt. A03)
M1094B (Opt. A03)
M1095A (Opt. A03)
M1097A(6)
Opt. H71
Opt. H50
Opt. H52
Opt. H53
Opt. H50
Opt. H52
Opt. H53
Opt. H50
Opt. H52
Opt. H53
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
Interfacing and Networking Capabilities
8-Channel Analog Interface (1)
Philips Network Interface (2)
1st RS-232 Dual Interface (3)
2nd RS-232 Dual Interface
Delete 1st RS-232 Dual Interface
Digital Recorder Interface
1st additional independent Display or Flatscreen Interface
2nd
additional independent Display or Flatscreen Interface(1)
—
(6)
(6)
Peripherals
Handheld Keypad
4-Channel Recorder
8-Slot Satellite Rack
6-Slot Satellite Rack
14” Monochrome Display
14” Color Display
10.4” Flatscreen Color Display
15” XGA Flatscreen Color Display (4) (6)
21” Color Display (4)
Substitute Options
Substitute 8-slot Satellite Rack for Integral Rack (5)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for Integral Rack (5)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for 8-slot Satellite Rack
(M1167A / 77A only)
Substitute 3 meter System Cable (5)
Substitute 1.5 meter System Cable (5)
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
2nd additional Independent Display Controller & an 8-channel Analog interface are not supported simultaneously.
Standard in USA.
Includes a 3.0 meter (9.8 ft.) RS-232 cable.
Includes Isolation Transformer.
Not available with Model M1167A / 77A.
Only with Model M1167A / 77A.
A-26
Product Information
NCMS Release B.0
M1166A, M1167A, M1176A, M1177A
Option A48
Display Module
Color
Number of Channels
Supported Independent Displays
Color
8
2
Plug-in Modules
Maximum Number of Parameter Modules
Supported Modules
M1001A/B ECG (1)
M1002A/B ECG/RESP (1)
M1002A ECG/RESP with Analog Respiration Output (with Opt. C01) (1) (2)
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure with Analog Pressure Output (with Opt. C01)
M1008B NBP (2)
M1012A Cardiac Output
M1015A Sidestream CO2
M1016A CO2
M1017A FiO2
M1018A tcpO2/tcpCO2 (2)
M1020A SpO2/Pleth
M1021A SvO2 (2)
M1022A Blood Analysis (2)
M1027A EEG
M1029A Temperature
M1032A VueLink Type A
M1032A VueLink Type B
M1116A/B Recorder Module (2) (3)
M1235A Data Transfer Module
12 (16 with Opt. J28)
1
1
1
5 (6 with Opt. J28)
5 (6 with Opt. J28)
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
2
2
1
1
Patient Data Management
Standard Data Management
12 second resolution
1 min. resolution
Extended Data Management
12 second resolution
1 min. resolution
Trends
Clinical Calculations
Neonatal Event Review
Respiratory Loops (for selected ventilators and Vuelink)
Standard
Standard
With Opt. J28
With Opt. J28
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Opt. C04
Standard
Software Applications
Drug Calculator
ST Segment Analysis
CSA (with M1027A EEG Module)
Standard
Standard
Standard
(1) M1001A/B and M1002A/B cannot be used simultaneously in a system.
(2) These modules require 2 slots in the integral and/or satellite rack.
(3) M1116A does not support recording of continuous oxyCRG or oxyCRG episodes.
Interfacing and Networking Capabilities
Product Information
A-27
Product Information
NCMS Release B.0
Product Information
NCMS Release B.0
M1166A, M1167A, M1176A, M1177A
Option A48
8-Channel Analog Interface
Philips Network Interface
1st RS232 Dual Interface
2nd RS232 Dual Interface
Digital Recorder Interface
Additional Independent Display Interface
Opt. J11
Opt. J12
Opt. J13
Opt. J13 and J28
Opt. J14
Opt. J15 (color CRT) or
Opt. J25 (Flatscreen) or
Opt. J17 (XGA display)
Peripherals
Handheld Keypad
4-Channel Recorder
8-Slot Satellite Rack
6-Slot Satellite Rack
14 Inch Color Display
10.4 Inch Flatscreen Color Display
14 Inch XGA Flatscreen Color Display (2) (3)
21 Inch Color Display (2)
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1094B (Opt. A03)
M1095A (Opt. A03)
M1097A
Opt. H71
Substitute Options
Substitute 8-slot Satellite Rack for Integral Rack (1)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for Integral Rack (1)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for 8-slot Satellite Rack (M1167A / 77A only)
Substitute Short System Cable (1)
Substitute 3 meter System Cable (1)
Substitute 1.5 meter System Cable (1)
(1) Not available with Model M1167A / 77A.
(2) Includes isolation transformer.
(3) Only with Model M1167A / 77A.
A-28
Product Information
Opt. H50
Opt. H52
Opt. H53
Opt. K01
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
CMS Release C.0
M1165A / 75A
(Mono)
M1166A (Color)
M1167A (Color)
Option A56
Option A64
M1166A / 76A (Color)
M1167A / 77A (Color)
Option A66
Option A68
Display Module
Mono / Color
Number of Channels
Supported Independent Displays
Mono
6
1 (2 with Option J26)
Color
4
1
Color
6
1 (2 with Option J26)
Color
8
2
8 (12 with Opt. J26)
8
8 (12 with Opt. J26)
12 (16 with Opt. J28)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3 (6 with Opt. J26 (3))
1
3
1
3 (6 with Opt. J26 (3))
1
5 (6 with Opt. J28 (3))
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2 (1 Delta Temp.)
4 (2 Delta Temp. with
Opt. J26)
2
2 (3 with Opt. J26 and
C32 (3))
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2 (1 Delta Temp.)
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2 (1 Delta Temp.)
4 (2 Delta Temp. with
Opt. J26)
2
2 (3 with Opt. J26 and
C32 (3))
1
1
1
Standard Data Management
Extended Data Management
Standard
Standard with Opt. J26
Standard
---
Standard
Standard with Opt. J26
Trends
Clinical Calculations
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Opt. C04
Standard
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Opt. C04
Standard
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Opt. C04
Standard
Plug-in Modules
Maximum Number of Parameter Modules
Supported Modules
M1001A/B ECG (1)
M1002A/B ECG/RESP (1)
M1002A ECG/RESP with Analog
Respiration Output (with Opt. C01)(1)(2)
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure without or
with Analog Pressure Output (Opt.C01)
M1008A/B NBP (2)
M1012A Cardiac Output without or with
Option C10
M1015A Sidestream CO2(2)(4)
M1016A CO2
M1017A FiO2
M1018A tcpO2/tcpCO2 (2)
M1020A SpO2/Pleth
M1021A SvO2 (2)
M1022A Blood Analysis (2)
M1027A EEG
M1029A Temperature
M1032A VueLink Type A
M1032A VueLink Type B
M1034A BIS
M1116A/B Recorder Module (2)
M1235A Data Transfer Module
2
2
2
2 (3 with Opt. J28 and
C32 (3))
1
1
1
Patient Data Management
Neonatal Event Review
Respiratory Loops (for selected ventilators and
Vuelink)
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
Standard
Standard with Opt.
J28
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Opt. C04
Standard
M1001A/B and M1002A/B cannot be used simultaneously in a system.
These modules require 2 slots in the integral and/or satellite rack.
Only 5 M1006A/B Invasive Pressure modules are supported if 3 Vuelink Type B modules are used.
Requires CO2 Module
Product Information
A-29
Product Information
CMS Release C.0
Product Information
CMS Release C.0
M1165A / 75A
(Mono)
M1166A (Color)
M1167A (Color)
Option A56
Option A64
M1166A / 76A (Color)
M1167A / 77A (Color)
Option A66
Option A68
Software Applications
Drug Calculator
Dual SpO2
ST Segment Analysis
EASI™ 12-lead ECG with five electrodes
CSA (with M1027A EEG Module)
Interfacing and Networking Capabilities
8-Channel Analog Interface
Philips Network Interface(4)
1st RS232 Dual Interface
2nd RS232 Dual Interface(5)
Digital Recorder Interface
1st additional independent Display or Flatscreen
Interface
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Opt. J11
Opt. J12
Opt. J13
Opt. J13
Opt. J14
Requires Opt. J26 with
Opt. J16 (mono)
Opt. J11
Opt. J12
Opt. J13
Opt. J13
Opt. J14
Opt. J11
Opt. J12
Opt. J13
Opt. J13
Opt. J14
Requires Opt. J26 with
Opt. J15 (color) or
Opt. J16 (mono) or
Opt. J17 (XGA display)
or
Opt. J25 (Flatscreen)
Opt. J11
Opt. J12
Opt. J13
Opt. J13
Opt. J14
Opt. J15 (color) or
Opt. J16 (mono) or
Opt. J25 (Flatscreen)
or
Opt. J17 (XGA display)3
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Opt. A03)
M1094B (Opt. A03)
M1095A (Opt. A03)
—
Opt. H71
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Opt. A03)
M1094B (Opt. A03)
M1095A (Opt. A03)
M1097A #A02
Opt. H71
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Opt. A03)
M1094B (Opt. A03)
M1095A (Opt. A03)
M1097A #A02
Opt. H71
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Opt. A03)
M1094B (Opt. A03)
M1095A (Opt. A03)
M1097A #A02
Opt. H71
Opt. H50
Opt. H50
Opt. H50
Opt. H50
Opt. H52
Opt. H52
Opt. H52
Opt. H52
Opt. H53
Opt. H53
Opt. H53
Opt. H53
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
Peripherals
Handheld Keypad
4-Channel Recorder
8-Slot Satellite Rack
6-Slot Satellite Rack
14 “ Monochrome Display
14 “ Color Display
10.4 “ Flatscreen Color Display
15 “ XGA Touchscreen Color Display (1) (3)
21 “ Color Display (1)
Substitute Options
Substitute 8-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack (2)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for
Integral Rack (2)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for 8-slot
Satellite Rack (M1177A only)
Substitute 3 meter System Cable (2)
Substitute 1.5 meter System Cable (2)
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
Includes isolation transformer.
Not available with Model M1167A / 77A.
Touchscreen operation available only when used as main display with models M1167A/77A.
Included in standard configuration for US Models.
For M1167A/77A, 2nd RS232 Interface is not available with Option H05.
A-30
Product Information
ACMS Release C.0
M1165A / 75A
(Mono)
M1166A (Color)
M1167A (Color)
Option A76
Option A84
M1166A / 76A (Color)
M1167A / 77A (Color)
Option A86
Option A88
Display Module
Mono / Color
Number of Channels
Supported Independent Displays
Mono
6
1 (2 with Opt. J26)
Color
4
1
Color
6
1 (2 with Opt. J26)
Color
8
2 (3 with Opt. J28)
8 (12 with Opt. J26)
8
8 (12 with Opt. J26)
12 (16 with Opt. J28)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3 (6 with Opt. J26 (4))
3
3 (6 with Opt. J26(4))
5 (6 with Opt. J28(4))
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2 (1 Delta Temp.)
4 (2 Delta Temp.) with
Opt. J26
2
2 (3 with Opt. J26 and
C32 (4))
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2 (1 Delta Temp.)
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2 (1 Delta Temp.)
4 (2 Delta Temp.) with
Opt. J26
2
2 (3 with Opt. J26 and
C32(4))
1
1
1
2
2 (3 with Opt. J28
and C32(4))
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Standard
Opt. C79
Standard
Standard
Opt. C79
Standard
Standard
Opt. C79
Standard
Standard
Opt. C79
Standard
Standard Data Management
Standard
Standard
Standard
Extended Data Management
Trends
Clinical Calculations
With Opt. J26
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
--Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
With Opt. J26
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Standard
With Opt. J28
Tabular/Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Plug-in Modules
Max. Number of Parameter Modules
Supported Modules
M1001A/B ECG (1)
M1002A/B ECG/RESP (1)
M1002A ECG/RESP with Analog
Respiration Output (with Opt. C01) (1) (2)
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure without or
with Analog Pressure Output (Opt.C01)
M1008A/B NBP (2)
M1012A Cardiac Output without or with Option
C10
M1015A Sidestream CO2 (2) (3)
M1016A CO2
M1017A FiO2
M1018A tcpO2/tcpCO2 (2)
M1020A SpO2/Pleth
M1021A SvO2 (2)
M1022A Blood Analysis (2)
M1027A EEG
M1029A Temperature
M1032A VueLink Type A
M1032A VueLink Type B
M1034A BIS
M1116A/B Recorder Module (2)
M1235A Data Transfer Module
2
2
Anesthesia Gas Monitoring
M1026A Anesthetic Gas Module
Anesthesia Ventilators
Ohmeda 7800/7810
Ohmeda 7900
Respiratory Loops (selected ventilators &Vuelink)
Patient Data Management
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
M1001A/B and M1002A/B cannot be used simultaneously in a system.
These modules require 2 slots in the integral and/or satellite rack.
Requires CO2 Module
Only 5 M1006A/B Invasive Pressure modules are supported if 3 Vuelink Type B modules are used.
Product Information
A-31
Product Information
ACMS Release C.0
Product Information
ACMS Release C.0
M1165A / 75A
(Mono)
M1166A (Color)
M1167A (Color)
Option A76
Option A84
M1166A / 76A (Color)
M1167A / 77A (Color)
Option A86
Option A88
Software Applications
Drug Calculator
Dual SpO2
ST Segment Analysis
EASI™ 12-lead ECG with five electrodes
CSA (with M1027A EEG Module)
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Opt. J11
Opt. J12
Standard
Opt. J13
Opt. D13
Opt. J14
Requires Opt. J26 with
Opt. J16 (mono)
Opt. J11
Opt. J12
Standard
Opt. J13
Opt. D13
Opt. J14
Opt. J11
Opt. J12
Standard
Opt. J13
Opt. D13
Opt. J14
Opt. J15 (color) or
Opt. J16 (mono)
Opt. J25 (Flatscreen)
or
Opt. J17 (XGA display)
Opt. J11
Opt. J12
Standard
Opt. J13
Opt. D13
Opt. J14
Opt. J15 (color) or
Opt. J16 (mono) or
Opt. J25 (Flat) or
Opt. J17 (XGA) (6)
Interfacing and Networking Capabilities
8-Channel Analog Interface (1)
Philips Network Interface (2)
1st RS-232 Dual Interface (3)
2nd RS-232 Dual Interface (4)
Delete 1st RS-232 Dual Interface
Digital Recorder Interface
1st additional independent Display or Flatscreen Interface
(6)
2nd
additional independent Display or Flatscreen Interface(1)
—
—
—
Requires Opt. J28
with
Opt. J15 (color) or
Opt. J25 (Flat) or
Opt. J17 (XGA) (6)
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Opt. A03)
—
—
—
Opt. H71
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Opt. A03)
M1094B (Opt. A03)
M1095A (Opt. A03)
M1097A # A02(6)
Opt. H71
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Opt. A03)
M1094B (Opt. A03)
M1095A (Opt. A03)
M1097A # A02(6)
Opt. H71
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1092A (Opt. A03)
M1094B (Opt. A03)
M1095A (Opt. A03)
M1097A # A02(6)
Opt. H71
Opt. H50
Opt. H52
Opt. H53
Opt. H50
Opt. H52
Opt. H53
Opt. H50
Opt. H52
Opt. H53
Opt. H50
Opt. H52
Opt. H53
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
Peripherals
Handheld Keypad
4-Channel Recorder
8-Slot Satellite Rack
6-Slot Satellite Rack
14” Monochrome Display
14” Color Display
10.4” Flatscreen Color Display
15” XGA Touchscreen Color Display (5) (6)
21” Color Display (5)
Substitute Options
Substitute 8-slot Satellite Rack for Integral Rack (7)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for Integral Rack (7)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for 8-slot Satellite Rack
(M1167A / 77A only)
Substitute 3 meter System Cable (7)
Substitute 1.5 meter System Cable (7)
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
2nd additional Independent Display Controller & an 8-channel Analog interface are not supported simultaneously.
Standard in USA.
Includes a 3.0 meter (9.8 ft.) RS-232 cable.
For M1167A/77A, 2nd RS232 Interface is not available with Option H05.
Includes Isolation Transformer.
Touchscreen operation available only when used as main display with models M1167A/77A.
Not available with Model M1167A / 77A.
A-32
Product Information
NCMS Release C.0
M1166A (Color)
M1167A (Color)
M1166A, M1167A, M1176A,
M1177A
Option A44
Option A48
Display Module
Color
Number of Channels
Supported Independent Displays
Color
4
1
Color
8
2
8
12 (16 with Opt. J28)
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
5 (6 with Opt. J28 (5))
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2 (1 Delta Temp.)
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
4 (2 Delta Temp.)
2
2 (3 with Opt. J28 and C32(5))
1
1
1
Standard
Standard
----Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Opt. C04
Standard
Standard
Standard
With Opt. J28
With Opt. J28
Tabular / Graphic
• Hemodynamic
• Oxygenation
• Ventilation
Opt. C04
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Plug-in Modules
Maximum Number of Parameter Modules
Supported Modules
M1001A/B ECG (1)
M1002A/B ECG/RESP (1)
M1002A ECG/RESP with Analog Respiration Output (with Opt.
C01) (1) (2)
M1006A/B Invasive Pressure without or with Analog Pressure
Output (Opt.C01)
M1008B NBP (2)
M1012A Cardiac Output without or with Option C10
M1015A Sidestream CO2 (2) (3)
M1016A CO2
M1017A FiO2
M1018A tcpO2/tcpCO2 (2)
M1020A SpO2/Pleth
M1021A SvO2 (2)
M1022A Blood Analysis (2)
M1027A EEG
M1029A Temperature
M1032A VueLink Type A
M1032A VueLink Type B
M1034A BIS
M1116A/B Recorder Module (2) (4)
M1235A Data Transfer Module
Patient Data Management
Standard Data Management
Extended Data Management
12 second resolution
1 min. resolution
12 second resolution
1 min. resolution
Trends
Clinical Calculations
Neonatal Event Review
Respiratory Loops (for selected ventilators and Vuelink)
Software Applications
Drug Calculator
Dual SpO2
ST Segment Analysis
CSA (with M1027A EEG Module)
(1) M1001A/B and M1002A/B cannot be used simultaneously in a
system.
(2) These modules require 2 slots in the integral and/or satellite rack.
(3) Requires CO2 Module
(4) M1116A does not support recording of continuous oxyCRG or
oxyCRG episodes.
(5) Only 5 M1006A/B Invasive Pressure modules are supported if 3
Vuelink Type B modules are used.
Product Information
A-33
Product Information
NCMS Release C.0
Product Information
NCMS Release C.0
M1166A (Color)
M1167A (Color)
M1166A, M1167A, M1176A,
M1177A
Option A44
Option A48
Interfacing and Networking Capabilities
8-Channel Analog Interface
Philips Network Interface(1)
1st RS232 Dual Interface
2nd RS232 Dual Interface(2)
Digital Recorder Interface
Additional Independent Display Interface
Opt. J11
Opt. J12
Opt. J13
Opt. J13
Opt. J14
Opt. J11
Opt. J12
Opt. J13
Opt. J13
Opt. J14
Opt. J15 (color CRT) or
Opt. J25 (Flatscreen) or
Opt. J17 (XGA display)
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1094B (Opt. A03)
M1095A (Opt. A03)
M1097A #A02
Opt. H71
Standard
M1117A
M1041A
M1276A
M1094B (Opt. A03)
M1095A (Opt. A03)
M1097A #A02
Opt. H71
Opt. H50
Opt. H52
Opt. H53
Opt. H50
Opt. H52
Opt. H53
Opt. K01
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
Opt. K01
Opt. K02
Opt. K03
Peripherals
Handheld Keypad
4-Channel Recorder
8-Slot Satellite Rack
6-Slot Satellite Rack
14 Inch Color Display
10.4 Inch Flatscreen Color Display
15” XGA Touchscreen Color Display (3) (4)
21 Inch Color Display (3)
Substitute Options
Substitute 8-slot Satellite Rack for Integral Rack (5)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for Integral Rack (5)
Substitute 6-slot Satellite Rack for 8-slot Satellite Rack (M1167A / 77A
only)
Substitute Short System Cable (5)
Substitute 3 meter System Cable (5)
Substitute 1.5 meter System Cable (5)
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
Included in standard configuration for US Models.
For M1167A/77A, 2nd RS232 Interface is not available with Option H05.
Includes isolation transformer.
Touchscreen operation available only when used as main display with models M1167A/77A.
Not available with Model M1167A / 77A.
A-34
Product Information
Tables
Appendix B Conversion Charts
Conversion Charts
Tables
Table B-1 Common Conversions
Measure
Metric Conversion
English Conversions
Length
1 meter = 3.28 feet
1 centimeter = 0.39 inches
1 millimeter = 0.04 inches
1 foot = 0.305 meters
1 inch = 2.54 centimeters
1 inch = 25.40 millimeters
Mass and Weight
1 kg = 2.21 lbs
1 gram = 0.35 ounces
1 lb. = 0.45 kgs
1 ounce = 28.35 grams
Volume
1 liter = 0.26 gallons
1 liter = 2.12 pints
1 gallon = 3.79 liters
1 pint = 0.47 liters
Pressure
1 mmHg = 0.15 kPa
1 kPa = 6.67 mmHg
Temperature
F = 1.8*oC + 32o
C = 0.56* (oF - 32o)
Table B-2 Weight Conversions
English
Metric
English
Metric
Table B-3 Length Conversions
English
Metric
English
Metric
100 lbs
45 kgs
170 lbs
77 kgs
4’ 5”
135 cm
5’ 7”
170 cm
105 lbs
47 kgs
175 lbs
80 kgs
4’ 6”
137 cm
5’ 8”
173 cm
110 lbs
50 kgs
180 lbs
82 kgs
4’ 7”
140 cm
5’ 9”
175 cm
115 lbs
52 kgs
185 lbs
84 kgs
4’ 8”
142 cm
5’ 10”
178 cm
120 lbs
55 kgs
190 lbs
86 kgs
4’ 9”
145 cm
5’ 11”
180 cm
125 lbs
57 kgs
195 lbs
88 kgs
4’ 10”
147 cm
6’
183 cm
130 lbs
59 kgs
200 lbs
90 kgs
4’ 11”
150 cm
6’ 1”
185 cm
135 lbs
61 kgs
205 lbs
92 kgs
5’
152 cm
6’ 2”
188 cm
140 lbs
64 kgs
210 lbs
95 kgs
5’ 1”
155 cm
6’ 3”
191 cm
145 lbs
66 kgs
215 lbs
97 kgs
5’ 2”
157 cm
6’ 4”
193 cm
150 lbs
68 kgs
220 lbs
99 kgs
5’ 3”
160 cm
6’ 5”
196 cm
155 lbs
70 kgs
225 lbs
101 kgs
5’ 4”
163 cm
6’ 6’
198 cm
160 lbs
73 kgs
230 lbs
104 kgs
5’ 5”
165 cm
6’ 7”
201 cm
165 lbs
74 kgs
235 lbs
106 kgs
5’ 6”
168 cm
6’ 8”
203 cm
Conversion Charts
B-1
Tables
Conversion Charts
Table B-4 Altitude Switch Settings
SW Set
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
B-2
Conversion Charts
Alt (Meters)
0-50
51-150
151-250
251-350
351-450
451-550
551-650
651-750
751-850
851-950
951-1050
1051-1150
1151-1250
1251-1350
1351-1450
1451-1550
1551-1650
1651-1750
1751-1850
1851-1950
1950-2050
2051-2150
2151-2250
2251-2350
2351-2450
2451-2550
2551-2650
2651-2750
2751-2850
2851-2950
2951-3050
3051-3150
3151-3250
3251-3350
3351-3450
3451-3550
3551-3650
3651-3750
3751-3850
3851-3950
3951-4050
4051-4150
4151-4250
4251-4350
4351-4450
4451-4550
4551-4650
4651-4750
4750-4850
4851-4950
Alt (Feet)
0-164
165-492
493-820
821-1148
1149-1475
1476-1803
1804-2131
2132-2459
2460-2787
2788-3115
3116-3443
3444-3771
3772-4098
4099-4426
4427-4754
4755-5082
5083-5410
5411-5738
5739-6066
6067-6395
6396-6723
6724-7051
7052-7378
7379-7706
7707-8034
8035-8364
8365-8690
8691-9018
9019-9846
9347-9673
9674-10000
10001-10328
10329-10656
10627-10984
10985-11311
11312-11639
11640-11967
11968-12295
12296-12623
12624-12951
12952-13279
13280-13607
13608-13934
13935-14262
14263-14590
14591-14918
14919-15246
15247-15574
15575-15904
15905-16066
Bar Press/mmHg
760-756
755-747
746-729
736-729
728-720
719-712
711-703
702-694
693-685
694-677
676-669
668-660
659-653
652-644
643-636
635-628
627-619
619-612
611-605
604-597
596-590
589-580
579-574
573-567
566-559
558-553
552-545
544-537
536-530
529-523
522-516
515-509
508-503
502-496
495-489
488-483
482-476
475-470
469-463
462-456
455-450
449-444
443-438
437-432
431-426
425-420
419-414
413-408
407-403
402-399
Appendix C Philips 15210B Calibration Unit
Installation
Description
This section provides the necessary information for you to install and service the
Philips 15210B.
Calmod.tif
Unpacking the Instrument
If external damage to the shipping carton is evident, ask the carrier’s agent to be present
when the unit is unpacked.
Initial Inspection
Check the instrument for any external damage such as dents and scratches on panel
surfaces. If the shipping carton is not damaged, check the cushioning material and note
any signs of severe stress as an indication of rough handling in transit. Retain the
packaging material for possible repacking.
Claims for Damage
If physical damage is evident when the Calibration Unit is received or the unit does not
meet the specified operational requirements, please notify the carrier and the nearest
Philips Sales/Service office immediately. The Sales/Service office will arrange for repair
or replacement without waiting for settlement of the claim against the carrier.
Philips 15210B Calibration Unit C-1
Philips 15210B
Calibration Unit
The Philips 15210B Calibration Unit consists of a gas cylinder connected to a gas outlet
via a time controlled valve. The valve is normally closed, ensuring that no gas is lost when
the unit is not in use. When the unit is set up for use and the timer control knob is turned,
gas is directed to the calibration chamber on the tcpO2/tcpCO2 module (Philips M1018A)
for a period of up to 20 minutes. After this time the valve automatically closes.
Installation
Repacking for Shipment or Storage
If the Calibration Unit is to be shipped to a Philips Sales/Service office, securely attach a
tag showing the name and address of the owner, the model and serial number, and the
repair required or symptoms of the fault. If available and reusable, the original shipping
carton and packaging material should be used to provide adequate protection during
shipping. The Philips Sales/Service office will provide information and recommendations
on materials to be used if the original material is not available or reusable.
Instrument Identification
Philips 15210B
Calibration Unit
Philips uses a nine character sequence for instrument identification. The serial number is
located on a plate attached to the rear panel of the instrument.
Specification
NOTE
C-2
Gas Supply:
1 low pressure cylinder.
Gas Flow:
8 ml +4/-2 ml per minute for 15210-64010,
12 ml +4/-2 ml per minute for 15210-60010.
Cylinder Pressure:
Indicated by an integral pressure manometer.
Timer Period:
20 minutes.
Dimensions:
90mm (35.4in) high x 220mm (86.6in) wide x 235mm (92.5in)
deep, (without cylinder).
Weight:
2.4 kg (5.3lbs), (without cylinder).
The 15210B is intended for use with Philips “CAL 1” gas cylinders (part number 1521060010 or 15210-64010 for Europe and Japan).
Philips 15210B Calibration Unit
Installation
Operating Environment
The environment where the Philips 15210B will be used should be reasonably free from
vibration, dust, corrosive or explosive gases, extremes of temperature, humidity, etc. The
Philips 15210B operates within specifications at ambient temperatures between 0°C and
55°C. The maximum operating relative humidity is 95% at 40°C. Ambient temperatures or
humidities which exceed these limits could affect the accuracy of the calibration unit and
cause damage to components.
Each Philips 15210B is delivered with a multilanguage collection of stick-on operating
labels. Each label summarizes day-to-day operating procedures using the Calibration
Unit. It is intended to be stuck to the top surface of the Unit; however, it may be attached
to any flat, grease-free surface.
To attach label: Clean the surface where the label is to be placed with soapy water to
remove any dirt or grease. Dry the surface thoroughly. Peel off the paper backing and
carefully place the label in the required position. Press down firmly with a clean dry cloth,
paying particular attention to the edges.
Fitting the Gas Cylinders
When the Calibration Unit is delivered, no gas cylinder is fitted. Before putting the unit
into service, screw the cylinder into the opening in the rear panel (See “Routine
Maintenance” on page C-4, next section).
When new, the calibration unit will contain a small amount of normal air. To expel this air
before use and thus prevent inaccurate calibration, turn the timer control fully clockwise
after fitting the gas cylinders and allow it to run for the full period. The calibration unit is
now ready for use.
Storage of Gas Cylinders
New gas cylinders should be stored in a cool place and not exposed to direct sunlight.
Disposal of Used Gas Cylinders
Do not crush or incinerate used gas cylinders. They may be disposed of as scrap metal.
Philips 15210B Calibration Unit
C-3
Philips 15210B
Calibration Unit
Operating Information
Routine Maintenance
Routine Maintenance
Changing the Gas Cylinders
Philips 15210B
Calibration Unit
Before each calibration the gas pressure indicator on the Philips 15210B front panel
should be read. If the indicator is in the “black” zone, change the gas cylinder as follows:
Step 1
From the rear of the unit turn the empty gas cylinder anti-clockwise until the cylinder is free (3-6 turns).
Step 2
Withdraw the empty cylinder.
Step 3
Take a full gas cylinder and insert it squarely into the rear of the unit. Turn clockwise until hand tight.
Step 4
Check that the pressure indicator is no longer in the “black” zone.
Care and Cleaning
Keep the surfaces of the calibration unit clean and free of dust and dirt. Clean regularly
with a lint-free cloth or sponge dampened in soapy water. Avoid using alcohol or
ammonia based cleaners which may damage the Calibration Unit. Other strong cleaners
such as Povidine RR, Lysol R and Mikroklene R are not recommended since they may
stain the unit. Do not pour any liquid on the instrument while cleaning. Never use an
abrasive material such a steel wool or metal polish. Cleaning agents and disinfectants
should only be used in cases of stubborn dirt. If used, carefully remove any remaining
traces of cleaning agent or disinfectant with clean water.
NOTE
Do not allow water to enter the gas outlet.
To clean the gas outlet: Use cotton wool soaked in soapy water to remove any deposits
which may collect in the outlet. Dry the outlet thoroughly after cleaning. In the case of
severe blockages, a thin length of wire may be used to free the outlet pipe.
C-4
Philips 15210B Calibration Unit
Theory of Operation
Theory of Operation
CAL
Gas Cylinder
Manometer
CONTROL
BLOCK
Philips 15210B
Calibration Unit
Timer Valve
Gas Flow Regulator
REGULATOR BLOCK
Restriction
Calibration
Chamber
Figure C-1 Block diagram - Internal Components
The gas cylinder is screwed directly into a pressure regulator block. This block ensures
that, in combination with the restriction, the gas flow remains constant as the pressure in
the cylinders falls with use. From the regulation block the gas is channelled to the control
block. The gas passes into the control block via an opening in the side sealed with an “O”
ring and filter. The control block acts as a switch.
A restriction piece is fitted in the tubing connecting the control block to the gas outlet.
The restriction helps to regulate the gas flow.
Philips 15210B Calibration Unit
C-5
Gas Flow Performance Check
Gas Flow Performance Check
Philips recommends that the following gas flow check is conducted once a year.
Philips 15210B
Calibration Unit
Test Procedure
Step 1
Check that the pressure indicator is not in the black zone (i.e. that there is an
adequate supply of gas in the cylinder).
Step 2
Fit gas tubing to the gas outlet, then take the free end and fit it to a water-filled
syringe in a glass of water.
Step 3
Turn the timer control fully clockwise and note the volume of water displaced
after 60 seconds.
Tubing
Syringe
Figure C-2 Test Procedure
C-6
Philips 15210B Calibration Unit
Gas Flow Performance Check
Action if outside specification
The volume of water displaced in 60 seconds should be 8ml (4/-2ml) for the 15210-64010
gas cylinder or 12ml (+4/-2ml) for the 15210-60010 gas cylinder. If the displacement is
within the appropriate one of these ranges, the supply of gas in within specification.
If the gas flow is less that the permitted minimum, remove the Calibration Unit cover (see
Cover Removal in the next section) and look for an occlusion or leakage.
Step 1
Replace the gas cylinder with a new cylinder.
Step 2
Turn the Gas flow adjuster screw on the underside of the unit to reduce the gas
flow (see next figure to locate the gas flow adjuster).
x
x
x
x
x
A
x
B
Gas Flow Adjuster
B
x
x
x
A
x
x
x
Figure C-3 Calibration Unit viewed from underneath
Step 3
Repeat the gas flow performance check described above. If the gas flow is still
significantly greater than the permitted maximum, remove the cover following
the procedure (Cover Removal) below.
Step 4
Remove the flow restriction by pulling the tubing off (see Figure 3-4), select a
new restriction from the set of restriction pieces (part number 15210-68703) and
fit in the unit.
Step 5
Reassemble the unit and repeat the gas flow performance check.
Step 6
Turn the gas flow adjuster screw as necessary.
Step 7
If the gas flow is still greater that the specified rate, repeat the above steps,
inserting a longer restriction.
Philips 15210B Calibration Unit
C-7
Philips 15210B
Calibration Unit
If the gas flow is greater than the permitted maximum, follow the procedure below:
Disassembly
Disassembly
Philips 15210B
Calibration Unit
Tools Required: Pozidrive screwdriver, size GN1, Normal screwdriver, size 1/7, Hex-key
(Allen-key), size SW 3mm.
Step 1
Cover Removal
1. Remove the gas cylinder from the calibration unit.
2. Remove the four screws on the base of the unit (labeled A – see figure).
3. Slide the cover off towards the rear of the unit.
Step 2
Timer Control Knob
1. The timer control know is secured with a “grub-screw” located in the
side of the knob. Loosen this screw approximately 2 turns. The knob can
now be pulled off.
Step 3
Regulator / Control Block Removal
1. Complete operations 1 and 2 above.
2. Remove the connection pipe from the rear of the Calibration Chamber.
3. Unscrew the four remaining screws on the unit base (labeled B in the
figure) to release the Regulator / Control Block.
4. The two screws on the regulator block side can now be removed to
separate the regulator block from the control block. Be careful not to
misplace the “O” ring and filter which are fitted between the two
blocks.
Flow Restriction
15210-23711
Valve Control Block
15210-67711
Plate
15210-04114
Regulator Block
15210-67202
Clock
15210-62401
regexpl1.hpg
Figure C-4 Exploded view - Regulator and Control Blocks
C-8
Philips 15210B Calibration Unit
Parts List
Parts List
Table C-1 Replaceable Parts for the 15210B
Part Number
Description
Flat sealing ring (to seal gas bottle)
15210-47106
Membrane foil
15210-62401
Clock
15201-67711
Valve control block
15210-67202
Regulator block left
15210-23711
Flow regulator restriction
0905-0678
8mm ring - between valve control block and regulator block
15210-27401
Timer control knob
0515-0777
Screw M6x8 (for timer control knob)
15210-04111
Cover - bottom
15210-04102
Cover - top
15210-24702
Spacer - hexagonal nut for mounting regulator bloc
15210-62302
Gas outlet block
15210-68703
Set of restrictions for adjusting gas flow
M2205A
Calibration tubing (set of 5)
Philips 15210B
Calibration Unit
15210-47101
Philips 15210B Calibration Unit
C-9
Philips 15210B
Calibration Unit
Parts List
C-10
Philips 15210B Calibration Unit
Appendix D CPC Programming Tool Manual
Introducing the CPC Programming Tool
The CPC Programming Tool provides a means of servicing and upgrading Philips
products which utilize Flash memory technology. The tool interfaces to devices that have
a human interface via a service port connector, and in the future will use an RS232
connector for devices without a human interface. The service port cable which is
provided is a 20-wire ribbon cable and is 18 inches long.
CPC Programming Tool
Manual
This manual provides the functional description and troubleshooting procedures of the
Philips CPC Programming Tool. Programming procedures are found in the installation
note for the specific product being programmed.
Figure D-1 Philips CPC Programming Tool connected to a Service Port.
Parts Checklist
The Philips CPC Programming Tool Kit (M2300-67100) contains the following parts:
• Philips CPC Programming Tool (ET-36733)
• Service Port Ribbon Cable (M2300-67200)
• Ground Cable (M2300-67210)
CPC Programming Tool Manual D-1
Introducing the CPC Programming Tool
Power Requirements
The CPC Programming Tool draws +5 Vdc from the host product to arm the internal Vpp
converter and power the internal circuitry.
Host Product Compatibility
The following products can use the CPC Programming Tool:
• CMS Patient Monitoring System (all models)
• Anesthesia CMS Patient Monitoring System (all models)
• Component Central Monitor (all models)
• Component Transport System
Accessories
CPC Programming Tool
Manual
To use the tool, you will also need a product-specific Programming Card, which is ordered
separately from the Philips Support Materials Organization (SMO) or Philips Parts Center
Europe (PCE).
There are two types of Programming Cards for most products; one is intended for the
customer and the other for Philips internal personnel performing warranty functions. For
example, the Philips CMS Patient Monitoring System has the CPC Programming Card and
the CPC Programming Card – Philips Internal Only. Both cards are programmed for the
same basic functions but the Philips Internal Only card can perform warranty-specific
functions and is available only to Philips personnel.
D-2
CPC Programming Tool Manual
CPC Programming Tool Functional Description
CPC Programming Tool Functional Description
The Philips CPC Programming Tool consists of a protective case housing a single printed
circuit board (PCB) and the Programming Card slot. The host product specific
Programming Card is inserted into the programming tool by sliding the card into the tool
until it snaps into place. The card can be removed by pressing the card eject button.
All of the functional circuits of the programming tool are contained on the PCB. The PCB
can be broken down into the following functional areas:
• Programming Card Interface
• Internal tool EEPROM
• VPP converter
• DIP switches
CPC Programming Tool
Manual
• Service Port connector
• RS-232 connector
• LED indicators
Programming Card Interface
The main component of the programming tool is the Programming Card interface. The
Programming Card is specific for each host product. The Programming Card contains the
current or new version of the host product software and boot program to provide the
programming functionality. The speed of the data transfer from the Programming Card to
the host product is dictated by the speed at which the host product updates its internal
ROM. This varies from product to product. Upgrade data is downloaded to the host
product at boot up when the dip switches on the programming tool are configured
properly and the Programming Card is inserted properly. This inserts a boot signal on the
host product, causing the host product to change its address map and boot from the
Programming Card. The host product then copies appropriate routines to its RAM and
executes the routines from there, with additional accessing of the Programming Card for
byte reads of the upgrade code.
Internal EEPROM
The programming tool contains two separate 32K x 8 EEPROM.
CPC Programming Tool Manual
D-3
CPC Programming Tool Functional Description
VPP Converter
The VPP converter is a 5VDC to 12VDC converter that supplies power to program four
Flash chips at 12VDC at 120 mA. If the host product supplies 12VDC, the VPP converter is
turned off by the tool's internal software.
DIP Switches
The programming tool contains eight DIP switches that are read during programming tool
operation. The switches are set specifically to interface with the software running in the
host product.
Service Port Interface
CPC Programming Tool
Manual
The service port interface is a 32 Kbyte address space extension allowing the host
product read/write access to the programming tool. A signal from the tool indicates to the
host product hardware to remap the service port. When this is active, the host product
maps the programming tool's 32 K address space. The CPC vectors and boot routine are
now accessed from the Programming Card through the service port. Because the service
port address space is limited, the addressing of the Programming Card is done through
bank switching. A bank is defined as continuous blocks of 8 Kbytes. The service port is
set up as four banks.
Data
Transfer
Byte wide bus transfers are completed between the tool and the host
product. The data transfer can be in either direction.
Boot Up
The boot routine is inserted by the programming tool upon the host
product power up if DIP switches are set properly and a Programming
Card is properly inserted into the tool. The boot routine causes the host
product to boot from the Programming Card instead of the host product
boot code.
RS232
Interface
The RS-232 interface is not yet supported, but in the future it will provide
several functions for the tool. For a host product without a human
interface, a PC will be connected to the product through the tool. In this
setup, the host product will be upgraded by moving data directly from a
floppy to the Flash ROM of the product.
LED
Indicators
Three LED indicators (one red, two green) provide visual indications of
the status of the programming tool and the status of the function being
performed.
These LEDs are labeled on the programming tool as follows:
• STATUS (green)
• PASS (green)
• FAIL (red)
D-4
CPC Programming Tool Manual
Before Using the CPC Programming Tool
Before Using the CPC Programming Tool
CAUTION
To prevent damage, do not handle the Philips CPC Programming Tool until the following
conditions are met:
• An anti-static mat must be used.
• In addition to the table mat, the person performing the upgrade operation should either:
• Wear a conductive wrist strap attached to the host product chassis by the wire included
with the strap, or
• Stand on a floor mat with leather-soled shoes. The floor mat also has an isolation
resistor in series with its ground lead for personnel protection.
• To protect CMOS integrated circuits (ICs), never transport them loose since it may
result in damaging them by a static discharge or in damaging or misaligning their pins.
• When transporting PCB’s, carry them in their shipping containers.
• To protect CMOS integrated circuits (ICs), never transport them loose since it may
result in damaging them by a static discharge or in damaging or misaligning their pins
• Before handling any PCBs, firmly touch the exposed metal on the case of the tool to
equalize the ground potentials. This prevents static discharge and protects CMOS logic
components.
• Handle PCBs by the edges only. Avoid touching PCB surfaces unless replacing
components. Contaminants such as skin-oil cause dust to accumulate which can retain
moisture and damage the circuits.
NOTE
Before using the CPC Programming Tool on any Philips product, make a list of the user
configuration settings that will be set to default values when performing a standard
upgrade.
CPC Programming Tool Manual
D-5
CPC Programming Tool
Manual
• When transporting PCBs, carry them in their shipping containers.
Using the CPC Programming Tool
Using the CPC Programming Tool
The following procedures describe the general uses of the CPC Programming Tool.
NOTE
Before using the Philips CPC Programming Tool on any monitor make a list of the user
configuration settings that will be set to default values when performing a standard
upgrade.
Before connecting the CPC Programming Tool the monitor must be turned off. Failure to
do this could cause the CPC Programming Card in the tool to be corrupted.
The monitor must always be connected to AC power during the upgrade operations.
Connecting the unit to AC power insures the unit is connected to earth ground,
decreasing the likelihood of damage to the unit due to ESD.
CPC Programming Tool
Manual
Connect the Tool
To connect the CPC programming tool to a monitor, perform the following procedure:
Step 1
Turn the monitor OFF.
Step 2
Expose the Flash Upgrade service port on the monitor. The location of the port is
monitor dependent.
Step 3
Attach the ground wire to the CMS.
Step 4
Attach either end of the ribbon cable to the tool, then plug the other end of the
cable into the Flash Upgrade service port.
Step 5
Insert the appropriate CPC Programming Card into the tool.
Step 6
Check the switch settings on the CPC Programming Tool.
Step 7
CMS
All switches down
ACMS
Switch 2 is up, all other switches down
CTS
All switches down
CCM
Switch 1 is up, all other switches down
Turn the monitor ON. The screen displays the status message Config Mode
Active - NO MONITORING! accompanied by text which identifies the version
of the programming tool being used.
If the system does not respond as expected, see the Troubleshooting section at
the end of this note.
D-6
CPC Programming Tool Manual
Using the CPC Programming Tool
Step 8
Monitor Setup
Press Instrument Config or
to display the Instrument Configuration or setup screen. The screen displays the softkeys that are specific to the
monitor’s software. To provide security against unauthorized use, some of the
softkeys are disabled (darkened) until the password is entered.
Enter the Password
To enter the password, select the
The default password is 1175.
softkey followed by the password.
Make sure to keep the password in a secure place, or remember it. The password should
not be given out to people who are not authorized to perform upgrades.
The password is stored in memory in the tool and does not reside in the CPC
Programming Card.
For more information on using the tool to perform an upgrade, see the Installation Note
for the specific release of your monitor.
Create or Change the Password for the Tool
Once the password is changed, it cannot be changed back to the default password.
Step 1
Select the Password Entry
softkey followed by the default password (1175)
or the current password if the password has already been set. Read the security
Monitor Setup
message and press Instrument Config or
.
Step 2
Select the Password Entry
softkey again and enter the desired password. A
password can be between five and nine digits.
Step 3
Re-enter the password to confirm it and then press Instrument Config
Monitor Setup
to leave the password task window.
or
Edit the Monitor Serial Number (Philips Internal Only)
Edit Serial No
The
softkey is available if a new (empty) EEPROM has been added
on that board. Unauthorized changes to the serial number could affect the product
warranty.
Step 1
Edit Serial No
Select the
softkey, if available, to display he Edit Serial
Number screen. Read the security message and press Instrument Config or
Monitor Setup
.
Step 2
Use the keyboard to type in the correct serial number.
Step 3
Press Confirm . The screen displays the message Please check again to
make sure serial number is correct.
CPC Programming Tool Manual
D-7
CPC Programming Tool
Manual
NOTE
Password Entry
Using the CPC Programming Tool
The settings are
stored in the tool
and not in the
programming card.
Step 4
Verify that the serial number has been entered correctly and press Confirm . The
screen displays the message New serial number stored in EEPROM.
Step 5
Press Instrument Config
task window.
or
Monitor Setup
to return to the monitor setup
Clone User Settings with the Tool
CPC Programming Tool
Manual
The CPC Programming Tool can be used to clone user settings onto new monitors of the
same model and configuration (same EEPROM number). For example, if a customer has
a 6-wave monitor, you can use the CPC Programming Tool to clone the user settings of
that monitor onto another 6-wave monitor of the same model. To perform this procedure,
you need a CPC Programming card that contains the EEPROM number of both monitors.
Step 1
Press EEPROM Cloning
Step 2
Read Settings
Press
followed by
tings on the CPC Programming Tool.
Step 3
The message...Reading EEPROM is displayed, followed by the message...Settings stored in local memory when the read process is
complete.
Step 4
Go to the receiving monitor and attach the tool to the appropriate Flash port.
Step 5
Press EEPROM Cloning
Step 6
Press Program Settings
followed by Confirm to program the monitor with
the configuration settings you stored on the CPC Programming Tool.
Step 7
The message...EEPROM programming in progress is displayed, followed
by the message... Programming done when the cloning process is complete.
Step 8
Press
Instrument Config
to display the EEPROM cloning window.
Confirm
to store the monitor's user set-
to display the EEPROM cloning window.
or
Monitor Setup
to return to setup screen.
Perform Upgrades with the Tool
The CPC Programming Tool is also used to perform monitor upgrades.There are two
different types of procedure that need to be performed to complete a successful upgrade:
a Software Upgrade and an EEPROM Upgrade. (The Central Station has an additional
upgrade called the Arrthymia upgrade.) The installation note included with the CPC
Programming card will give detailed information on how to perform these procedures.
The monitor will also prompt you with text messages as you perform the upgrade. In
general you perform the Software upgrade and then the EEPROM upgrade. CCM finishes
with the Arrthymia upgrade.
D-8
CPC Programming Tool Manual
Troubleshooting the Tool through Tool LED Patterns
Troubleshooting the Tool through Tool LED Patterns
PASS
Fail
OFF
Condition/Corrective Action
ON
OFF
Initial condition of product
ON
Blinking OFF
Flash upgrade in progress
ON
ON
OFF
Flash upgrade completed
ON
ON
ON
Interconnection failure: no communication between CPC and host;
1. Check connection of programming tool to host product
2. Check that Programming Card is properly inserted in
programming Tool
3. Suspect bad programming tool or cable
4. Suspect bad CPC Card
OFF
OFF
ON
Checksum Error: process has been interrupted during
programming; Repeat upgrade procedure; if same error occurs:
1. Suspect CPC Card
2. Suspect Programming Card
ON
OFF
ON
Programming Error: hardware configuration is incorrect for the
software you are programming;
1. Check Programming Card part number
2. Check that you are using the correct CPC port
Troubleshooting the Tool through Monitor Error Messages
Error Message Displayed
Possible Cause/Corrective Action
SOFTWARE INCOMPLETE
This message may be displayed in the alarm field at the top right of your
screen after booting up. Possible causes include:
•
•
•
•
Interrupted Flash ROM programming
Corrupt data in the Flash ROM
Blank Flash ROM
Hardware failure on CPC Card
...Memory card failure, upgrade
not allowed
Check that the Programming Card being used is correct.
Check that the Programming Card has not been physically damaged.
...Wrong Memory Card for this
instrument
Check that the Programming Card being used is correct.
Check that the CPC is in the correct slot
...Change of memory Card not
allowed
This message will be displayed if the Programming Card is exchanged
within the programming tool during an operation.
CPC Programming Tool Manual
D-9
CPC Programming Tool
Manual
STATUS
CPC Programming Tool
Manual
Troubleshooting the Tool through Monitor Error Messages
Error Message Displayed
Possible Cause/Corrective Action
...Tool disconnected, connect
and try again
Check that the tool has not disconnected from the service port during
operation.
Check the connections of the 20-wire ribbon cable to the tool and CPC
port.
Check the physical condition of the 20-wire ribbon cable. The signal
continuity of the cable (Philips M2300-67210) may deteriorate with
repeated use. Philips recommends that you replace this cable
approximately every three months, or more frequently if the cable displays
signs of deterioration.
..Memory Card ejected, insert
and try again
This message will be displayed if the Programming Card is ejected from the
programming tool during an operation.
...Programming failed, please
retry
Retry the operation; if this condition is not corrected upon retrying 5 times,
the message...Software upgrade failed, upgrade not possible will
be displayed (see below).
...Software upgrade failed,
upgrade not possible
Possible defective Flash ROM or CPC; CPC must be replaced.
...Software incomplete, upgrade
software first
This message will be displayed during an EEPROM Upgrade operation if
the Flash ROM software of the current CPC is incomplete. You must
perform a Software Upgrade before the EEPROM Upgrade can be
performed.
...Software not upgraded,
upgrade software first
This message will be displayed during an EEPROM Upgrade operation if
the current software release and the selected EEPROM part number do not
match. You must perform a Software Upgrade before the EEPROM
Upgrade can be performed.
D-10
CPC Programming Tool Manual
Glossary
A
E
Alphanumeric Keys - These are single press keys used
to input patient information and drug calculations into
the monitor.
Error Codes - Whenever one of the function cards is
unable to perform an operation, an error code is
generated. Error codes can be for fatal and non-fatal
errors.
B
Backplane - The backplane of the Computer Module
contains the connections for the front and rear
function cards.
Blank Rack - The blank rack is used to cover the front
of the Computer Module when a Satellite Rack is
being used. It is the interface for Satellite Racks to the
system and contains a rear connector that outputs
information from the rack to the Computer Module.
C
Classic Control Panel - The hardkeys, softkeys and
alarm indicators of the Classic human interface
(Release D or earlier). Available with and without the
SUSPEND key (See Chapter 6 “Parts List for CMS”).
Cold Start - During a cold start the CPU Cards run a
detailed test of memory which erases the system
database for patient data management. All active
settings and patient data is lost.
Computer Module - The Computer Module contains
the hardware and software for the processing
functions of the monitor. Most of the external
connections of the monitor are in the rear of the
Computer Module.
CPC Flash Port - This port is located on the
Configurable Processor Card (CPC) in slot 12 and is
the connector for the CPC Programming Tool.
D
Double-width Module - The term double-width is used
to designate that the module occupies two slots in the
module rack.
Extended Test - During the extended self-test the CPU
Cards run a detailed memory test erases the system
database for patient data management. All patient
data is lost as the memory test is equivalent to a cold
start.
F
Fatal Errors - Fatal errors are errors which cause the
CMS to re-start.
Front Panel -The plastic bezel on the front of the
monitor that contains controls and connectors,
including the control panel and CRT adjustments.
G
Grounding Terminal - The Computer Module and
Display Module of the CMS each have a ground
terminal stud which allows connection to an
equipotential grounding system.
H
Handheld Keypad - The Handheld Keypad is an input
device used on the Main Display to interact with
patient data management and drug calculator
software.
Hardkeys - These are single press keys with labels
used as selection controls. Typically, hardkeys access
the Selection Window of its label.
HIF Connector - The Human Interface Connector is a
Human Interface Link (HIL) connector used on a main
display to attach the Handheld Keypad.
Hot Start - The Monitor makes a hot start when it has
been powered down for a period less than one minute.
The active user default values, including parameter
Glossary-1
module settings are recovered and retained on restart.
Philips Network - The Serial Distribution Network of
the CMS (also known as CareNet or SDN).
I
INOP - Inops are messages displayed on the screen
when the CMS cannot measure or process signals
properly. This could be due to patient-related or
equipment-related problems.
Instrument Grounding - The detachable three-wire
power cable grounds the instrument to the power line
ground when plugged into an appropriate three-wire
receptacle. This cable protects both the patient and
the hospital staff.
Integral Plug-in Module Rack - The integral plug-in
module rack fits in the front of the Computer Module
and hold plug-in modules. It contains a rear connector
that is used to output information from the rack to the
Computer Module.
L
Line Voltage Selection - Switch-mode power supply
automatically selects the necessary line voltage for
the system. The fuse values corresponding to the
switch-mode power supply are listed in Chapter 5
“Repairing the CMS”.
Local Bus - This is the local communication system. It
is a buffered processor bus that allows access to local
memory cards, SRAM and EPROM that contain
software for the exclusive use of the master
processor.
Local Clusters - The local bus is connected to all the
connectors in the backplane but it is interrupted to
form clusters that share a connection to the same local
bus. There are 10 local clusters in the backplane with
varying numbers of connectors.
Locking Cam - A Locking Cam is a plastic latch used to
lock the Display Module or Computer Module into
place.
Glossary-2
M
Main Display Module - Main Displays are 14" CRT
(Mono or Color) or 10.4" Flatscreen with integrated
Control Panel for the human interface, or XGA
display.
Main Screen - This screen shows the waveforms and
numerical readouts of the parameters you have
chosen to monitor, alarms, INOP messages, bed label,
date and time, and arrhythmia messages (when
assigned).
Membrane Keypad - The plastic bezel on the front of
the Handheld Keypad that contains the controls and
connectors, including the control panel and
alphanumeric keypad.
Message Passing Bus - This is the global
communication bus for the system, and is used for
communications between CPU cards as well as to
intelligent interface cards. This bus appears on all the
connectors.
Mounting Plate - The Mounting Plate is a metal plate
with slots used to attach a Display Module or
Computer Module with feet to a flat surface.
N
Non-fatal Errors - Non-fatal errors are general errors
that are not significant enough to affect normal CMS
operation.
P
Parameter - The parameter of the plug-in module is the
specific clinical measurement performed by the
module. Some modules, like the ECG/Resp module,
are capable of monitoring more that one parameter.
Plug-in Module Rack (Integral or Satellite) - The Plugin Module Rack is the interface between the plug-in
modules and the Computer Module. Module racks can
be integrated in the Computer Module or remotely
located in the patient vicinity.
Plug-in Modules - The plug-in modules are the
interface between the patient cables and the Plug-in
Module Rack. Each module is responsible for specific
measurements. The number and type of modules used
will depend on the monitoring situation.
Specification Tests - Specification tests are test which
a hospital biomedical engineer can use to check the
performance of parameter modules with general,
special and manufactured test equipment.
R
Standard Control Panel - The hardkeys, softkeys and
alarm indicators of the Standard human interface
(Release E or later).
Rear Panel - The panel on the rear of the display that
contains the CRT controls and power, HIL and video
connectors.
Start-Up Error Codes - Start-up error codes give
similar information to the Status Log entries, except
the codes are given are in hexadecimal notation.
Remote Display Module - Remote displays are 14"
Mono, 14" Color or 21" Color without Control Panels.
Status Message - The status message is a string of text
displayed in the top center of the screen below the
date and time. A message is displayed in status line to
indicate the current operating mode if not Monitoring.
Remote Power Supply - The Remote Power Supply
provides the power for the Flatscreen Display,
Function Box and Frontend Modules.
S
Satellite Rack - An external rack, which is mounted
separately from the CMS. It is used to provide expanded
space for your plug-in modules.
Selection Window - The Selection Window is the first
operating level where you can choose a specific
activity or function. It is entered through a hardkey on
the control panel or the remote keypad.
Self-Test - This Philips monitor has a module self-test
which generates and displays test waveforms and
corresponding numerics for all the modules that are
connected through a rack and turned on.
Single-width Module - The term single-width module is
used to designate that the module occupies only one
slot in the module rack.
Softkeys - These are single-press keys used as
selection controls to enter Task Windows and they
correspond to the softkey labels displayed above them
on the screen.
Spanning Rails - The spanning rails are metal rails that
can be attached to the bottom of a Display Module or
Computer Module to provide a mounting surface for
an adapter plate. The spanning rails are attached to
the module using the mounting feet holes.
T
Task Window - The task window is the second
operating level which allows you to make changes or
adjustments to the parameters and screen displays, or
to perform procedures.
U
Utility Bus - This includes functions required by the
whole system, for example, power and clock signal
distribution. This bus appears on all the connectors.
V
Video Termination - The video termination switch on
the Display Module is switched ON if only one display
is used. If slave displays are used, the switch is turned
OFF on all displays except the last display in the chain.
W
Wall Channel - The wall channel is a metal channel
that attaches to a wall and allows mounting options to
be adjusted vertically to the desired height.
Glossary-3
Wall Hanger - The Wall Hanger is a metal bracket that
is used to hang the Computer Module below a
mounting arm.
Warm Start - During a warm start the System behaves
as during a cold start, but an abbreviated version of
the self-test is carried out. The system database for
patient data management is checked and recovered.
All active settings are lost.
X
X-Start - During an X-start, the system reacts as after
a cold start, the only difference being that the user
default settings of the Monitor are downloaded to the
EEPROM of the modules. An X-start occurs after
changing operating mode or configuration set
Glossary-4
INDEX
A
I
Accessing & Leaving Service Mode, 39
Accuracy and Calibration Procedures
SvO2 Optical Stability Check, 60
Touch Screen, 47
XGA Display, 46
Integral Rack,
L
Loudspeaker Test,
27
M
B
Boot Process,
55
Main Display Module, 4
Maintaining CMS, 1
Maintenance Procedure Overview,
Mouse
Adjusting Pointer Speed, 50
Configuration, 49
48
C
Changing Operation Modes, 68
Classic Control Panel Controls, 10
Cleaning Procedures, 23
Cleaning the Blood Analysis Module,
Computer Module, 19
Brief Functional Overview, 20
Delivered Configurations, 21
External Connector Pinouts, 36
Function Cards, 21
O
27
Operating Mode
Configuration Mode, 67
Demo Mode, 66
Monitoring Mode, 66
Service Mode, 67
Operating Rules to Remember,
D
Device ID Codes, 17
Operating System 16400 (or 4010H),
Processor Device ID Codes, 34
Software ID Codes, 33
Display Fuse Values, 54
Display Module with Dimensions, 7
EEPROM/CPU Matrix (M1059-85xxx), 28
EEPROM/CPU Matrix (M1059-87xxx), 30, 32
Error Code Lists for Other Device IDs, 28
Error Codes
Using Start-up Error Codes, 16
Using Status Log Error Codes, 16
What an Error Code Tells You, 15
Exploded View
Computer Module Exploded View, 18
Display Module Exploded View M1092A/
M1094A, 9
Display Module Exploded View M1094B, 8
Double-width Plug-in Module Exploded View, 29
Single-width Plug-in Module Exploded View, 28
F
Front Panel Controls and Connectors, 7, 8
Function Cards of the Computer Module, 21
General Inspections of the System,
19
H
Hardware Configuration Problems,
Hardware/Software Problems, 27
23
66
P
18
E
G
2
Plug-in Module Accessories
Cardiac Output Module, 40
CO2 Module, 41
ECG & ECG/Respiration Module, 34
FIO2 Module, 43
Non-Invasive Pressure Module, 38
Pressure Module, 37
Sidestream CO2 Module, 42
SpO2 Module, 44
SvO2 Module, 42
tcpO2/tcpCO2 Module, 45
Temperature Module, 44
Thermal Array Recorder Module, 45
Plug-In Module Control Panel Keys and Indicators,
Plug-in Module Pin-outs, 63
Plug-In Module Self-Tests, 54
Printers
Local Jet Printer Configurations, 37
59
R
RAM Problems, 27
Remote Display Front Panel Controls, 14
Remote Display Module, 13
Remote Display Rear Panel Controls and Connectors,
Remote Keypad, 16
Remove/Replace
Computer Module
Centre Plane Board Assy, 58
DC/DC Converter, 46
Front Function Card, 51
Integral Rack, 47
Locking CAM, 60
Plastic Feet, 59
Rear Cover, 45
14
Index-1
Rear Function Cards, 54
Side Cover, 56
Top Cover, 57
M1092A and M1094A
Front Assembly, 11
Fuse Assembly, 16
Human Interface Board, 12
Line Power Filter (M1094A Display), 8
Locking Cam, 10
Membrane Switch, 13
Metal Cover, 14
Power Fail Relay (French ICU Option), 5
Power Fuses, 6, 48
Rear Cover, 4
Rear Enclosure, 9
Switch-Mode Power Supply (M1092A), 18
Switch-Mode Power Supply (M1094A), 20
Video/Philips-HIL Connector PCA, 22
M1094B
Front Assembly, 28
Human Interface Board, 29
Locking Cam, 27
Membrane Switch, 30
Power Fuses, 24
Rear Enclosure, 26
Switch-Mode Power Supply, 33
Top Metal Cover and SMPS Cover, 32
Plug-in Module
FIO2 Battery, 70
NBP Inlet Connector Insert, 67
NBP Pump, 68
Plug-In Module Disassembly, 65
Recorder Module Paper, 71
Snap Lock, 64
tcpO2/tcpCO2 Calibration Chamber, 69
Plug-in Module Rack
Mounting Clamp, 62
Plug-In Module, 61
Remote Keypad
Housing Assembly, 41
Replacable Parts - Display Module, 3, 7
Replaceable Parts - Computer Module, 11, 13, 15, 19
Replaceable Parts - External Alarm Device, 14
Replaceable Parts - Handheld Keypad, 32, 33
Replaceable Parts - Module Racks, 32
Replaceable Parts - Plug-In Modules, 25, 26
Replaceable Parts for the Display Module, 3
RS-232 Port Configuration, 45
Rules for Card Placement, 24
S
Safety Test Diagrams,
Safety Tests, 11
Satellite Rack, 55
Service Mode
Index-2
Changing the Global Switches, 40
Checking the Hardware and Software Revisions,
Displaying the Status Log, 42
French Homologation, 42
Line Frequency, 40
Network Test, 45
Power On Modes, 44
RS232 Interface, 42
Setting the Altitude, 42
Setting the Date and Time, 42
Settings Transfer, 41
Standard Control Panel, 5
Standard Control Panel Controls, 9
43
T
Test and Inspection Matrix, 5
Test and Inspection Matrix - Safety, 11
Test and Inspection Requirements, 3
Testing the CMS, 1
Touch Screen
Calibration, 47
Trackball
Adjusting Pointer Speed, 50
Configuration, 49
Troubleshooting
General System Troubleshooting, 3
Procedure Overview, 2
Troubleshooting Module 1 - Fixing Display
Problems, 7
Troubleshooting Module 2 - Computer Module
Faults, 14
Troubleshooting Module 3 - Fixing Recorder
Problems, 35
Troubleshooting Module 4 - Fixing Remote Keypad
Problems, 36
Troubleshooting Module 5 - Fixing Printing
Problems, 37
Troubleshooting Module 6 - Using the Service
Mode, 39
Troubleshooting Plug-in Modules
Blood Analysis Module Problems, 35, 52
Cardiac Output Problems, 17
CO2 Module Problems, 32
ECG and ECGRESP Problems, 9
EEG Module Problems, 40
NBP Problems, 13
Pressure Problems, 11
SpO2/Pleth Problems, 22
Sv02 Problems, 24
tcpO2/tcpCO2 Problems, 3
Temperature Module Problems, 28
12
U
Upgrade Tools & Miscellaneous Parts,
22, 24
V
Video / Power Connector,
37
X
XGA Display
Adjustments,
46
Index-3
Index-4
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