Z7 Series
Treadmill
O w n e r ’s G u i d e
Thank You For Selecting A True Treadmill
In 1981, Frank Trulaske
launched True Fitness
Technology, Inc. and
began manufacturing
hand-crafted treadmills.
His team’s obsession with
quality has propelled True
to the top of the industry
and has created one of
America’s oldest, largest
and most respected fitness
equipment manufacturers.
Over the years, True has
designed, developed,
patented and fabricated
many new and cuttingedge innovations for
their products: including
advanced features, manufacturing components and
technological breakthroughs.
True is rapidly becoming the
choice for workouts among
beginners, rehab patients
and top athletes world-wide.
“Our original
goal was to build
the world’s best
treadmills, and
today we believe
we’re doing it!”
-Frank Trulaske
Intensive quality control standards
guarantee excellence in every phase
of production, resulting in the finest
products available in the marketplace.
True treadmills are consistently rated #1 for
their smooth, quiet and
comfortable performance.
Today, True is the choice for
workouts among beginners,
rehab patients and top
athletes world-wide.
Today True offers a full line
of treadmills, upright and
recumbent bikes, elliptical
trainers, strength and
flexibility equipment. True is
proud to “Deliver The Best!”
Table of Contents
1 - Introduction
2 - The Console
3 - Basic
Operation
Introduces key
features, as well as a
guide to where to go
next in this manual.
Describes each key
and display window.
page 3
page 9
page 17
4 - Operation in
Greater Detail
5 - Heart Rate
Control Workouts
6 - User Programs
How to get the treadmill
started and stopped,
as well as discussing
calories estimation and
heart rate monitoring.
You can record your
workout to play back
as a custom-designed
workout.
All the details of
manual and preset
programs.
Four different kinds of
treadmill-controlled
heart rate feedback
workouts.
page 27
page 35
page 47
7 - Designing an
Exercise Program
8 - Care and
Maintenance
9 - Important
Safety Instructions
Advice on various ways
to use your treadmill
in a rewarding exercise
regime.
Basic requirements,
as well as a simple
troubleshooting and
diagnostics guide.
Be sure to familiarize
yourself with this
section.
page 51
page 61
page 71
Appendix A - Target Heart Rate Chart: A guide to help you pick an
page 77
initial target heart rate.
Appendix B - METs Table: How speed and incline affect workload,
page 81
expressed in METs.
Appendix C - METs Explanation and Formulas: The metabolic
formulas behind energy expenditure estimates. page 85
Appendix D - Specifications: The physical attributes of your Z7
page 89
Series Treadmill.
Appendix E - Glossary: Fitness terms defined.
page 93
Bibliography - References, selected readings and credits.
page 101
Z 7 S e r i e s Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r s G u i d e
chapter one
In This Chapter:
INTRODUCTION
Introduction
Model Overview
Where to Go From Here
CHAPTER 1: Introduction
CHAPTER 2: The Console
CHAPTER 3: Basic Operation
CHAPTER 4: Operation in Greater Detail
CHAPTER 5: Heart Rate Control Workouts
CHAPTER 6: User Programs
CHAPTER 7: Designing an Exercise Program: The F.I.T. Concept
CHAPTER 8: Care and Maintenance
CHAPTER 9: Important Safety Instructions
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
3
Model Differences
ONE
: INTRODUCTION
Z7
MODEL
OVERVIEW
For Your
Safety
INTRODUCTION
Your new treadmill is part of the True treadmill line, which are all
built to the same heavy-duty standards. This owner’s guide covers
the Z7 model.
• Light-blue backlit LCD display with 7 x 20 progress matrix
• Four pre-set workout programs
• User programs
• Heart rate control
For your maximum safety and comfort, make sure you read
Chapter 10, Important Safety Instructions.
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
5
Top Features
INTRODUCTION
ONE
: INTRODUCTION
Chapter 1: Introduction. Introduces key features, as well as a guide
on where to go next in this manual.
Chapter 2: The Console. Describes each console key and display
window.
Chapter 3: Basic Operation. How to get the treadmill started and
stopped; calorie consumption estimates; heart rate monitoring.
Chapter 4: Operation in Greater Detail. All the details of manual and
pre-set programs.
Chapter 5: Heart Rate Control Workouts. Four different kinds of
treadmill-controlled heart rate feedback workouts.
Chapter 6: User Programs. You can record your workout to play
back as a custom-designed workout.
Chapter 7: Desiging an Exercise Program. Advice on various ways to
use your treadmill in a rewarding exercise regime.
Chapter 8: Care and Maintenance. Basic requirements, as well as a
simple troubleshooting and diagnostics guide.
Chapter 9: Important Safety Instructions. Make sure you familiarize
yourself with this section.
6
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
Where to
Go From
Here
Where to go from Here
ONE
: INTRODUCTION
Appendix B: METs Table. How speed and incline affect workload,
expressed in METs.
Appendix C: METs Explanation and Formulas. The metabolic
calculations behind energy expenditure estimates.
INTRODUCTION
Appendix A: Target Heart Rate Chart. A guide to help you pick an
initial target heart rate.
Appendix D: Specifications.
Bibliography: References and selected readings.
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
7
chapter two
The Console
In This Chapter:
Lower Console
Z7 Console
CHAPTER 1: Introduction
CHAPTER 2: The Console
CHAPTER 3: Basic Operation
CHAPTER 4: Operation in Greater Detail
CHAPTER 5: Heart Rate Control Workouts
CHAPTER 6: User Programs
CHAPTER 7: Designing an Exercise Program: The F.I.T. Concept
CHAPTER 8: Care and Maintenance
CHAPTER 9: Important Safety Instructions
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
9
Removable magnetic
key must be in place for
treadmill to operate.
Safety Key
Clears current
numeric entry.
Adjusts incline. Also
used to choose
programs.
Numeric Keys
Direct entry of
numeric data.
Grade Up/Down
Starts the belt in motion.
Also resets workout data
when held for 3 seconds.
Start/Reset
Adjusts speed in 0.1 mph
increments. Also used
to set weight and other
workout parameters.
Speed Slow/Fast
Stops the belt and pauses
workout. If held for 3
seconds, resets all workout
information.
Stop/Pause
Accepts workout
parameters, and
toggles the dual
function displays.
Select/Enter
Identical to Select/Enter
with additional function
when changing speed or
incline using numeric keys.
Enter
TWO
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
THE CONSOLE
Clear
Lower Console
Lower Console
: THE CONSOLE
11
12
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
Incline in percent grade
in 0.5% increments.
Grade
Time remaining in your
workout. (This is elapsed
time in default Manual
mode or Quick Start.)
Time
Time per mile
at current
speed.
Pace
Estimated
total calories
burned.
Calories
Energy
expenditure
rate. See
Appendix C.
METs
Miles per
hour in 0.10
increments.
Speed
Instantly change from program
to program.
Express Keys
The above console readout definitions describe workout information available in
the message center. These readouts can be toggled while exercising by pressing the
key.
Miles traveled in 0.01
mile increments up to
9.99 miles, or 0.10 mile
increments past 10
miles. Can also be set to
count down.
Distance
Shows workout progress.
Matrix Display
Z7 Console
THE CONSOLE
Z7 Console
TWO : THE CONSOLE
chapter three
Basic Operation
In This Chapter:
Starting Your Treadmill Safely
Speed and Incline Adjustment
Stopping Your Treadmill Safely
Setting Your Weight
A Note About Calorie Expenditure Calculations
Monitoring Your Heart Rate
Using the Heart Rate Transmitter Strap
The Treadmill’s Heart Rate Display
The S.O.F.T. Select System
CHAPTER 1: Introduction
CHAPTER 2: The Console
CHAPTER 3: Basic Operation
CHAPTER 4: Operation in Greater Detail
CHAPTER 5: Heart Rate Control Workouts
CHAPTER 6: User Programs
CHAPTER 7: Designing an Exercise Program: The F.I.T. Concept
CHAPTER 8: Care and Maintenance
CHAPTER 9: Important Safety Instructions
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
15
Starting Your Treadmill
THREE
STARTING
YOUR
TREADMILL
SAFELY
: BASIC OPERATION
Straddle the treadbelt by placing your feet on the straddle covers.
Attach the lanyard to your clothing at
roughly waist height.
Place the safety key on the key holder on
the console.
Set your weight using the
press
.
Press the
or…
keys or the numeric keys and
key for a quick start into a manual control workout,
to set up a manual workout, or…
keys or an Express Command Key to begin setting
Press the
up a different workout, as described in later sections.
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
BASIC OPERATION
Press
and
17
Adjusting Speed and Incline
THREE
: BASIC OPERATION
SPEED AND
INCLINE
ADJUSTMENT
Speed Control: use either the
and
keys by themselves to
change speed. Or, to quickly go to a specific speed...
BASIC OPERATION
...enter a target speed with the
numeric keys...
...then press the small Enter key...
...and then press either the
key to change to that speed.
18
or
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
Setting Your Weight
THREE
: BASIC OPERATION
Incline Control: use either the up
and down keys by themselves to
change incline. Or, enter a target
incline with the numeric keys,
then press the small Enter key
, and then press either the up
or down
key to change to
that incline.
Care should be taken when using the numeric keys to control your
treadmill's speed and incline, since large changes in those values are
possible with just a few keystrokes.
SETTING YOUR
WEIGHT
Your body weight must be entered so that the treadmill accurately
estimates your calorie expenditure. This weight must include your
workout clothing, too, which typically adds about three pounds.
The treadmill will work fine without your weight setting, but will be
unable to calculate your total calories.
Slow the treadmill to below 2 mph using the
key. Press
.
BASIC OPERATION
STOPPING
YOUR
TREADMILL
SAFELY
The treadmill will remember the last weight you entered.
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
19
Calorie Expenditure Calculations
THREE
: BASIC OPERATION
True treadmills use the calorie expenditure formula as described in
Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription from the American
College of Sports Medicine. This is the most widely
accepted formula for running and walking.
BASIC OPERATION
The ACSM guide says that running burns calories
twice as fast as walking, e.g., a 150-pound person
jogging at 5 mph requires 548 calories per hour, while
walking at 5 mph requires 274 per hour. See Appendix
C for more details.
(Other respected researchers such as David Costill think the ACSM
overstates the energy difference between running and walking.
Costill believes running requires 60% more energy than walking, not
100% as calculated by the ACSM. Using the same example, Costill's
calculations result in 496 cal/hour for running 5 mph, with 313 cal/
hour for walking 5 mph.)
One potential source of calorie estimate
error is that the treadmill doesn't know
if you are running or walking, so it has
to make some assumptions. It assumes
you are walking at 3 mph and slower,
and running at 5 mph and faster. Between those two speeds, the
treadmill combines the walking and running formulas to make its
best guess.
Variations in human exercise efficiency are another potential source
of error, with differences of plus or minus 10% common in the
population
20
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
A NOTE
ABOUT
CALORIE
EXPENDITURE
CALCULATIONS
Heart Rate Monitoring
THREE
MONITORING
YOUR HEART
RATE
: BASIC OPERATION
The Z7 can monitor your heart rate when
you wear the transmitter strap provided.
It will display it as a digital beats-perminute readout, and it is very accurate,
typically within one beat per
minute.
USING THE
HEART RATE
TRANSMITTER
STRAP
The transmitter strap should be worn directly
against your skin, about one inch below the pectoral
muscles/breast line.
BASIC OPERATION
Although the treadmill functions fine without using the heart rate
monitoring feature, this kind of monitoring gives you valuable
feedback on your effort level. It also allows you to use the most
advanced training system available on a treadmill: True's Heart Rate
Control, where the treadmill automatically adjusts your workout
level based on your heart rate. See the Heart Rate Control section of
this manual for details.
Women should be careful to place the transmitter
below their bra line.
Some moisture is necessary between the strap and
your skin. Sweat from your exercise works best,
but ordinary tap water may be used prior to your
workout if desired.
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
21
The Heart Rate Display
THREE
: BASIC OPERATION
BASIC OPERATION
THE
TREADMILL’S
HEART RATE
DISPLAY
Once you start your workout, your heart rate will be displayed in
beats per minute.
The contact heart rate system lets you monitor your heart rate
without wearing a strap.
Gently grasp the contact heart rate pads as shown below.
22
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
CONTACT
HEART RATE
(CHR)
Workout Setup
FOUR
STARTING
COOL-DOWN
: OPERATION IN GREATER DETAIL
Confirm that the body weight setting is correct. If it is not, adjust it
with the
or numeric keys and press
.
For a Quick Start, simply press
moving at 0.5 mph.
. The treadmill belt will start
During your workout, the treadmill will count down from your target time. When it reaches 0:00, it will enter a 2.5-minute cool-down
period, with the tread belt at the same speed it was at 0:00 and the
treadmill in Manual control mode. After 2.5 minutes, the treadbelt
will stop.
If you set a distance target in Manual mode, the cool-down period
will begin as soon as either time or distance reach zero.
MANUAL
Note: if you don't choose a time or distance target, Time will be
elapsed time instead of time remaining.
MAKING
TIME AND/OR
DISTANCE
COUNT DOWN
INSTEAD OF
UP
OPERATION IN GREATER
DETAIL
To use manual control, which is the first program suggested, press
. Adjust your workout parameters using the
or numeric
OPERATION
keys, then press
to accept each parameter. You can keep adjusting your workout setup by repeatedly pressing
. Your workout
won't begin until you press
.
After adjusting your weight if necessary, press
twice or until
the lights in the time and distance windows flash. Press
to set
distance and
to set time. When you press
, time and distance will begin counting down. When the time or distance reaches
zero, the treadbelt will continue to move and whichever readout
reached zero (time or distance) will begin counting up. No other
readouts will reset.
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
27
Pre-Set Program Details
FOUR
: OPERATION IN GREATER DETAIL
Press any Express Command
key to select a program. (To
get more program options,
including re-selecting Manual,
use the
keys.)...
OPERATION IN GREATER
DETAIL
...adjust the starting level using
keys...
the
...Press
when done.
After program and level have been selected, set time using the
or numeric keys, from 5 to 99 minutes.
To stop or pause your workout: slow machine to below 2 mph by
pressing , then press
. This will stop the treadmill and remain
in a Pause mode, saving your workout information. To restart your
.
workout, press
28
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
PRE -SET
PROGRAM
OPERATION
Tuning Your Workout
FOUR
: OPERATION IN GREATER DETAIL
To change level during your workout, press
. Press
keys
to change level, then press
. If a new program is selected, it will
join that program at the same point as the previously selected program.
To change to another pre-set program, press one of the Express
Command Keys, then press
. The treadmill joins the workout
in progress at the same elapsed time as the previous workout.
To reset distance, time, and calories during your workout, press and
hold
until zeros appear in the time, distance, calorie windows.
To reset the treadmill back to workout setup mode, press and hold
for three seconds.
Note: All workouts can be set from 5 to 99 minutes, with the timer
counting down from your chosen workout time. The default value
(if no time entered) is 30 minutes. When the timer reaches 0:00 it
will beep and begin counting up. You must press
to end your
workout.
Some users may prefer a minimal data display. When the treadbelt is
moving, pressing the Advanced Options key will remove the progress matrix, speed, and grade readouts. The data readouts will then
be Elapsed Time, Distance, and Pace (with heart rate displayed if
available).
Pressing
or
OPERATION IN GREATER
DETAIL
RUNNER’S
MODE
returns the display to normal operation.
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
29
Pre-Set Program Profiles
FOUR
: OPERATION IN GREATER DETAIL
Hill Interval Workout
Green is Incline
Red is Speed
OPERATION IN GREATER
DETAIL
Level
30
Speed (MPH)
Grade (%)
Min Max
Min
Max
1
1.4
2.6
0.0
2.0
2
1.6
2.8
0.5
3.0
3
1.8
3.0
0.0
4.0
4
2.0
3.2
1.0
5.0
5
3.4
3.4
1.5
6.0
6
2.4
3.6
2.0
7.0
7
2.6
3.8
2.5
8.0
8
2.8
4.0
3.0
9.0
9
3.0
4.2
3.5
10.0
Level
Speed (MPH)
Grade (%)
Min Max
Min
Max
1
2.0
2.4
1.0
4.0
2
2.2
2.8
1.5
5.0
3
2.6
3.2
2.0
6.0
4
3.0
3.6
3.0
7.0
5
3.4
4.2
4.0
8.0
6
3.8
4.6
5.0
9.0
7
4.0
5.0
6.0
10.0
8
4.4
5.4
7.0
11.0
9
4.8
6.0
8.0
12.0
Weight Loss Workout
Green is Incline
Red is Speed
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
Pre-Set Program Profiles
FOUR
Cardiovascular
Workout
Green is Incline
Red is Speed
Level
Speed (MPH)
Max
1
2.0
2.4
2.0
4.0
2
2.2
2.8
3.0
5.0
3
2.6
3.2
4.0
6.0
4
3.0
3.6
5.0
7.0
5
3.4
4.2
6.0
8.0
6
3.8
4.6
7.0
9.0
7
4.0
5.0
8.0
10.0
8
4.4
5.4
9.0
11.0
9
4.8
6.0
10.5
12.0
Level
Speed (MPH)
Grade (%)
Min Max
Min
Max
1
2.0
2.4
1.0
4.0
2
2.2
2.8
0.5
5.0
3
2.6
3.2
0.5
6.0
4
3.0
3.6
1.0
7.0
5
3.4
4.2
1.0
8.0
6
3.8
4.6
1.0
9.0
7
4.0
5.0
1.0
10.0
8
4.4
5.4
1.0
11.0
9
4.8
6.0
1.5
12.0
Speed Interval
Workout
Green is Incline
Red is Speed
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
OPERATION IN GREATER
DETAIL
Grade (%)
Min Max
Min
: OPERATION IN GREATER DETAIL
31
chapter five
Heart Rate Control
Workouts
In This Chapter:
HRC Workout Introduction
Four Kinds of Heart Rate Control Workouts
The Easy Steps to a Heart Rate Control Workout
More Details on Interval HRC
Tips on the Warm Up Stage
How the HRC System Controls Your Heart Rate
Examples of HRC Workouts
Cruise Control
Examples of Walking Workouts
Examples of Running Workouts
CHAPTER 1: Introduction
CHAPTER 2: The Console
Important Points About HRC
CHAPTER 3: Basic Operation
CHAPTER 4: Operation in Greater Detail
HRC Safety Features
CHAPTER 5: Heart Rate Control Workouts
CHAPTER 6: User Programs
CHAPTER 7: Designing an Exercise Program: The F.I.T. Concept
CHAPTER 8: Care and Maintenance
CHAPTER 9: Important Safety Instructions
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
33
HRC Introduction
FIVE : HEART RATE CONTROL WORKOUTS
HRC
True’s heart rate control (HRC) workouts let the treadmill monitor
WORKOUT your relative exercise intensity by way of your heart rate, then
INTRODUCTION automatically adjust the workload to keep you at your target heart
rate and thus your desired exercise intensity.
Your heart rate is a good measure of your body’s exercise stress
level. It reflects differences in your physical condition, how tired
you are, the comfort of the workout environment, even your diet
and emotional state. Using heart rate to control workload takes the
guesswork out of your workout settings.
Consult your physician before using heart rate
controlled workouts for advice on selecting a target
heart rate range. Also, it is important to use the
bike for several workouts in the manual mode while
monitoring your heart rate. Compare your heart rate
with how you feel to ensure your safety and comfort.
See Appendix A for a chart that may help you pick a target heart
rate.
You need to wear a heart rate monitoring chest strap to use heart
rate control. See the “Monitoring Your Heart Rate” section in
Chapter 3 for a guide to proper usage. It is not recommended
that you use the contact heart rate system for heart rate control
workouts.
HEART RATE CONTROL
WORKOUTS
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
35
HRC Types and a Workout Quick-Guide
FIVE
: HEART RATE CONTROL WORKOUTS
1 - Put on a Polar or compatible transmitter chest strap
as described on page 25.
2 - Pick the HRC workout.
3 - Enter your workout parameters. This includes target
heart rate, maximum treadbelt speed, workout time
or distance, and maximum incline.
4 - Press
.
5 - Warm up. At the beginning of an HRC workout, the
treadmill is in full Manual control mode. Gradually
increase your work level to slowly raise your heart
rate to within 10 beats per minute (bpm) of your
target heart rate.
6 - Heart rate control stage. Now the treadmill takes
control of speed and incline, keeping your heart rate
within a few bpm of your target.
7 - Cool-down. At the end of your workout time or
distance, the treadmill reduces workload by half and
goes back into Manual control mode, where you
directly control your cool-down.
 During workout setup, if you keep pressing
,
you will continue to scroll through the workout setup
at any time to accept
parameters. You can press
the current parameters and begin your workout.
or
will exit HRC
HEART RATE
CONTROL WORKOUTS
 Pressing any key other than
mode.
 Adjust your target heart rate at any time during your
workout by pressing
, using the
keys as
again. If you are lowering
needed, and pressing
your target, you are limited to a 5 bpm change.
36
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
THE EASY
STEPS TO A
HEART RATE
CONTROL
WORKOUT
DURING
WORKOUT
SETUP
Choices During Workout Setup
FIVE
: HEART RATE CONTROL WORKOUTS
 The time and distance accumulated during warmup
are not counted against your selected workout time or
distance; those values start at zero when the treadmill
reaches heart rate control mode. This time and
distance are accumulated into the workout summary
data, as is your cooldown exercise.
TIPS ON THE
WARM UP
STAGE
Increase speed and incline gradually to slowly increase your heart
rate to within 10 bpm of your target. For best results, you should
take about five minutes to get to that point.
The treadmill operates in a manual control mode during the warmup stage. You control both speed and incline. You may only increase
speed and incline to the preset maximum values entered.
It is important that you start at a low level of effort and gradually
increase your work load over several minutes until you approach
your target heart rate. This allows your body to adapt to your
workout. Increasing work load gradually will allow you to enter the
heart rate control stage without overshooting your target.
Warming up too fast may cause you to overshoot your target. If this
occurs, it may take several minutes before the computer software
can control your heart rate. You may overshoot and undershoot
your target for several minutes until stable control is achieved.
HEART RATE CONTROL
WORKOUTS
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
37
During Your Workout
FIVE
: HEART RATE CONTROL WORKOUTS
To raise your heart rate in HRC mode, speed will always increase
until maximum speed is attained, followed by incline (if incline is
used in the workout).
To lower your heart rate in the HRC mode, incline will always
decrease until zero incline is reached, followed by speed (if incline is
used in the workout).
HOW THE
HRC SYSTEM
CONTROLS
YOUR HEART
RATE
Speed changes are in 0.1 mph increments. Incline changes are in
0.5% incline increments. This is equal to between 0.10 and 0.15
METs.
1 - A user who physically cannot walk over 2.5 mph can
safely use heart rate control by entering maximum
speed of 2.5 in an HRC workout.
2 - A runner can run up to a speed of 10 mph, without
hills, by entering a maximum speed of 10 mph and a
maximum incline of 0%.
HEART RATE
CONTROL WORKOUTS
3 - A walker enters a maximum speed of 4.0 mph and
a maximum incline of 6%. The walker is limited to
a maximum speed of 4.0 mph and incline will be
used if required to elevate the heart rate up to a
maximum of 6%.
38
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
EXAMPLES OF
HRC
WORKOUTS
Tips and How HRC Works
FIVE
: HEART RATE CONTROL WORKOUTS
CRUISE
This is the simplest way to enter target heart rate training. While in
CONTROL manual or any program you can enter Target Heart Rate Control by
simply pressing the Target HRC/Cruise Control key. Your current
heart rate will be set as the target.
For best results, you should be at least five minutes into your
workout and warmed up. This will allow Cruise Control to more
accurately control your heart rate.
Remember, you must be wearing a chest strap, and your heart rate
should be displayed in the Heart Rate window.
To change your target heart rate press
. Edit the target using
and press
. If you are lowering your target, you are limited to
a 5 bpm change. It is important to note that if you are raising your
target, the speed and grade change safety limits (described next) may
prevent the treadmill from raising your heart rate to your desired
new target.
HOW CRUISE
CONTROL
DETERMINES
HOW TO
CHANGE YOUR
EXCERCISE
INTENSITY
If you enter the HRC stage below 5 mph, the speed you enter will
be the maximum speed of your workout. If you like to walk at a
maximum speed of 3.8 mph, you should enter HRC at 3.8 mph.
If you enter the HRC stage above 5 mph, you will have an additional
1 mph of speed. If you enter HRC at 6 mph, your maximum
attainable speed in the HRC stage will be 7 mph.
If you do not enter the HRC stage with incline, no incline will be
available during the HRC stage of your workout. Only speed will be
used to control your heart rate.
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
HEART RATE CONTROL
WORKOUTS
If at any time you enter the HRC stage with incline, you will have an
additional 4% of incline available in the HRC stage. If you enter the
HRC stage at 1% incline, your maximum attainable incline will be 5%.
39
Examples and Cruise Control
FIVE
: HEART RATE CONTROL WORKOUTS
1 - Enter HRC at 3.5 mph and 4% incline to allow a
maximum speed of 3.5 mph and 8% incline.
2 - Enter HRC at 4.2 mph and 6% incline to allow a
maximum speed of 4.2 mph and 10% incline.
1 - Enter HRC at 6 mph and 0% incline to allow a
maximum of 7 mph and 0% incline.
2 - Enter HRC at 5 mph and 2% incline to allow a
maximum of 6 mph and 6% incline.
The heart rate monitor transmitter strap provided with your
treadmill should be worn directly against your skin at about one
inch below the pectoral muscles/breast line. Women should be
careful to place the transmitter below their bra line.
Some moisture is necessary between the strap and your skin. Sweat
from your exercise works best, but ordinary tap water may be used
prior to your workout if desired.
HEART RATE
CONTROL WORKOUTS
If the transmitter strap is adjusted or moved while exercising,
communication may be temporarily affected.
40
If communication is lost for 30 seconds, the treadmill will
automatically shut off.
The transmitter strap sends a low-level radio signal to the treadmill,
so interference from other radio and sound waves (including
everything from cordless telephones to loudspeakers) is possible.
The good news is that interference is usually quite brief. If you
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
EXAMPLES
OF WALKING
WORKOUTS
USING CRUISE
CONTROL
EXAMPLES
OF RUNNING
WORKOUTS
USING CRUISE
CONTROL
GENERAL TIPS
More Examples
FIVE
: HEART RATE CONTROL WORKOUTS
continue to have intermittent heart rate display problems, consult
your local service technician, as the transmitter strap batteries may
be low.
Make sure you breath smoothly and regularly.
Talking during your workout usually causes heart rate spikes of five
beats per minute or more, so avoid talking as much as possible.
Maintain a smooth walking or running motion.
A grounded outlet is critical for the HRC system to
function properly. Use a dedicated 110 VAC, grounded
outlet to help prevent interference.
TECHNICAL
TIPS
Two users wearing the same kind of transmitter at the same time
and in close proximity may cause false heart rate display readings.
Use only the transmitter provided with your True HRC Treadmill or
a Polar brand standard transmitter.
True's Heart Rate Control is patented under USPTO #5,462,504.
If your heart rate exceeds your target by 12 beats, there will be a 30%
MET reduction in workload to reduce your heart rate.
If your heart rate exceeds your target by 20 beats, the unit will
automatically shut off as a precautionary measure. (Be cautious
when selecting your target heart rate so the 20 beat variance will not
exceed your maximum heart rate as determined by your physician).
HEART RATE CONTROL
WORKOUTS
HEART RATE
CONTROL
SAFETY
FEATURES
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
41
chapter six
User Programs
In This Chapter:
How to Record and Run User Programs
CHAPTER 1: Introduction
CHAPTER 2: The Console
CHAPTER 3: Basic Operation
CHAPTER 4: Operation in Greater Detail
CHAPTER 5: Heart Rate Control Workouts
CHAPTER 6: User Programs
CHAPTER 7: Designing an Exercise Program: The F.I.T. Concept
CHAPTER 8: Care and Maintenance
CHAPTER 9: Important Safety Instructions
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
43
How to Record and Run User Programs
SIX
: USER PROGRAMS
During a manually-controlled workout, the Z7 treadmill always
RECORD AND "records" the changes you make in speed or incline. Up to three of
RUN USER these recordings can be saved as User Programs that you can "play
PROGRAMS back" to use as custom-designed workouts.
Note that this workout recording only takes place when you use the
default manual mode settings; you cannot choose a target workout
time or distance. Time must be counting up during your workout in
order for it to be recorded.
USER PROGRAMS
HOW TO
Up to 36 changes in speed or incline can be recorded. Each speed/
incline pair of changes must be separated by at least 30 seconds.
To save a manual workout, press
your workout. Now press and hold
Save User 1.
as you normally would to end
until the display shows
You can save your workout in User 1, or press
or User 3. Press and hold
to
save the workout program you have
selected.
to select User 2
To use a User Program that you
have saved, simply select it from the
list of programs as described in "Pre-Set Program Operation" in the
previous section.
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
45
chapter seven
In This Chapter:
What is the F.I.T. Concept?
DESIGNING AN EXERCISE
PROGRAM
Designing an Exercise
Program
Using the F.I.T. Concept
Your Fitness Program
Determining Your Needs
Beginning Your Exercise Program
Establishing and Maintaining Aerobic Fitness
Managing Weight
Sports Training
CHAPTER 1: Introduction
CHAPTER 2: The Console
CHAPTER 3: Basic Operation
CHAPTER 4: Operation in Greater Detail
CHAPTER 5: Heart Rate Control Workouts
CHAPTER 6: User Programs
CHAPTER 7: Designing an Exercise Program: The F.I.T. Concept
CHAPTER 8: Care and Maintenance
CHAPTER 9: Important Safety Instructions
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
47
The F.I.T. Concept Defined
SEVEN
WHAT IS
THE F.I.T.
CONCEPT?
: DESIGNING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM
The workout portion of your exercise program consists of three
major variables: Frequency, Intensity, and Time.
Frequency: How Often You Exercise
Intensity: How Hard You Exercise
Intensity of exercise is reflected in your heart rate. Exercise must
be sufficiently rigorous to strengthen your heart muscle and condition your cardiovascular system. Only your doctor can prescribe the
target training heart range appropriate for your particular needs and
physical condition.
DESIGNING AN EXERCISE
PROGRAM
You should exercise three to five times a week to improve your
cardiovascular and muscle fitness. Improvements are significantly
smaller with less frequent exercise.
Start with exercise that stimulates you to breathe more deeply.
Alternate days of moderate and easy exercise to help your body
adapt to new levels of exertion without unnecessary strain.
If you are just beginning an exercise program, you may be most
comfortable walking at a speed of 1-2 mph. As you use your treadmill regularly, higher speeds may be more comfortable and more
effective.
Inability to maintain a smooth, rhythmic motion suggests that your
speed and/or elevation may be too great.
If you feel out of breath before you have exercised 12 minutes, you
are probably exercising too hard.
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
49
More F.I.T. Concept Overview
DESIGNING AN EXERCISE
PROGRAM
SEVEN
: DESIGNING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM
As your fitness level improves, you will need to increase your
workout intensity in order to reach your target heart rate. The first
increase may be necessary after two to four weeks of regular exercise. Never exceed your target heart rate zone. Increase the speed
and/or incline on the treadmill to raise your heart rate to the level
recommended by your doctor. The incline feature can be used to
greatly increase the workload without increasing speed. The chart
below indicates how much the effort changes with each percent of
incline at common speeds for a person weighing 155 pounds.
METs
One MET is the amount of energy your body uses when you're resting. If a physical activity has an equivalent of 6 METs, its energy
demands are 6 times that of your resting state. The MET is a useful
measurement because it accounts for differences in body weight. See
Appendix C for more details.
Time: How Long You Exercise
Sustained exercise conditions your heart, lungs, and muscles. The
longer you are able to sustain exercise within your target heart
range, the greater the aerobic benefits.
To begin, maintain two to three minutes of steady, rhythmic exercise
and then check your heart rate.
The initial goal for aerobic training is 12 continuous minutes.
Increase your workout time approximately one or two minutes per
week until you are able to maintain 20-30 continuous minutes at
your training heart rate.
50
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
Utilizing the F.I.T. Concept
SEVEN
: DESIGNING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM
The F.I.T. concept and chart are designed to help you begin a program tailored to your needs. You may wish to keep an exercise log to
monitor your progress.
YOUR FITNESS
PROGRAM
You can get valuable fitness benefits from your True Treadmill.
Using the treadmill regularly may increase the ability of your heart
and lungs to supply oxygen and nutrients to exercising muscles over
an extended period of time. The treadmill will also help you develop
added muscle endurance and balanced strength throughout your
body.
DETERMINING
YOUR NEEDS
Calculate your maximum heart rate as a first step in developing
your fitness program. The formula to calculate average maximum
heart rate for one minute is 220 beats per minute minus your age.
To find your pulse, locate a vein on your neck or inside your wrist,
then count beats for ten seconds, then multiply by six. (See chart in
Appendix A.)
DESIGNING AN EXERCISE
PROGRAM
USING THE
F.I.T. CONCEPT
It's also important to know your target training zone or target
heart rate. The American Heart Association (AHA) defines target heart rate as 60-75 percent of your maximum heart rate. This
is high enough to condition, but well within safe limits. The AHA
recommends that you aim for the lower part of the target zone (60
percent) during the first few months of your exercise program. As
you gradually progress you can increase your target to 75 percent.
According to the AHA, "Exercise above 75 percent of the maximum
heart rate may be too strenuous unless you are in excellent physical
condition. Exercise below 60 percent gives your heart and lungs little
conditioning."
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
51
Beginning Your F.I.T. Program
SEVEN
: DESIGNING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM
DESIGNING AN EXERCISE
PROGRAM
In addition to monitoring your heart rate as you exercise, be certain
of how quickly your heart rate recovers. If your heart rate is over 120
beats per minute five minutes after exercising, or is higher than normal the morning after exercising, your exertion may be too strenuous for your current level of fitness. Reducing the intensity of your
workout is recommended.
The age-adjusted target heart rates indicated in the chart in
Appendix A reflect averages. A variety of factors (including medication, emotional state, temperature, and other conditions) can affect
the exercise heart rate appropriate for you.
Warning: Consult your doctor to establish the exercise
intensity (target heart rate zone) appropriate for your age and condition before beginning any exercise program.
Warm-Up: Slow and Deliberate Exercise
You are not warmed up until you begin to perspire lightly and breath
more deeply. Warming up prepares your heart and other muscles
for more intense exercise and helps you avoid premature exhaustion.
Begin each workout by walking even if you plan to run. Start slowly,
exploring different speeds until you can comfortably sustain your
speed.
A good suggestion is a minimum of three minutes. Perspiration on
your brow is a good indicator of a thorough warm-up. The older you
are, the longer your warm-up period should be.
52
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
BEGINNING
YOUR EXERCISE
PROGRAM
Your F.I.T. Program Continued
SEVEN
: DESIGNING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM
Workout: Brisk and Rhythmic Exercise
Cool-Down: Slow and Relaxed Exercise
Cooling down relaxes your muscles and gradually lowers your heart
rate. Slowly reduce your workload until your heart rate is below 60
percent of your maximum heart rate. The cool down should last at
least five minutes, followed by some light stretching to enhance your
flexibility.
DESIGNING AN EXERCISE
PROGRAM
The workout trains and conditions your heart, lungs, and muscles to
operate more efficiently. Increase exercise in response to your heart
rate to train and strengthen your cardiovascular system. Concentrate
on moving your arms and legs smoothly. Walk naturally and avoid
jerking motions that can cause pulled muscles, sprained joints, and
loss of balance.
Beginning a Fitness Program
If you cannot sustain 12 continuous minutes in your target heart
rate zone, exercise several times a day to get into the habit of exercising.
Try to reach and maintain 60-65 percent of your maximum heart
rate. Alternate exercise with periods of rest until you can sustain 12
continuous minutes of exercise at 60-65 percent of your maximum
heart rate.
Begin exercising in three to five minute sessions.
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
53
Establishing and Maintaining Fitness
SEVEN
: DESIGNING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM
If you can sustain 12 but not 20 continuous minutes of
exercise in your target heart rate zone:
Exercise three to five days a week.
ESTABLISHING
AEROBIC
FITNESS
DESIGNING AN EXERCISE
PROGRAM
Rest at least two days per week.
Try to reach and maintain 60-75 percent of your maximum heart
rate with moderate rhythmic exercise.
Begin with 12 continuous minutes. Increase your time by one to two
minutes per week until you can sustain 20 continuous minutes.
If you can sustain 20 continuous minutes in your target heart rate
zone, begin to increase the length and intensity of your workout:
Exercise four to six days a week or on alternate days.
MAINTAINING
AEROBIC
FITNESS
Try to reach and maintain 70-85 percent of your maximum heart
rate with moderate to somewhat hard exercise.
Exercise for 20-30 minutes.
Consistent aerobic exercise will help you change your body composition by lowering your percentage of body fat. If weight loss is
a goal, combine an increase in the length of your workouts with a
moderate decrease in caloric intake. For weight control, how long
and how often you exercise is more important than how hard you
exercise.
Exercise four to five times a week.
54
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
MANAGING
WEIGHT
Weight and Sports Training Programs
SEVEN
: DESIGNING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM
Try to reach and maintain 60-75 percent of your maximum heart
rate with moderate exercise.
Exercise for 30-45 minutes at 60-65 percent of your target heart rate.
Here are some tips to achieving your weight management goal:
Exercise before meals. Moderate exercise will help suppress your
appetite.
Take exercise breaks throughout the day to help increase metabolism (calorie expenditure).
SPORTS
TRAINING
DESIGNING AN EXERCISE
PROGRAM
Consume most of your dietary calories at breakfast and lunch, and
eat a light dinner. Do not eat close to bedtime.
When you are training to improve strength and performance:
Exercise four to five days a week. Alternate exercise days and intervals of hard to very hard exercise with easy to moderate exercise.
Exercise for 30 minutes or longer.
Warning: these strategies are intended for average healthy adults.
If you have pain or tightness in your chest, an irregular heartbeat,
shortness of breath or if you feel faint or have any discomfort
when you exercise, stop! Consult your physician before continuing.
Remember, every workout should begin with a warm-up and finish
with a cool-down.
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
55
chapter eight
Care and
Maintenance
In This Chapter:
Treadbelt Lubrication
Regular Cleaning
Treadbelt Adjustment
Treadbelt Tension
CHAPTER 1: Introduction
CHAPTER 2: The Console
CHAPTER 3: Basic Operation
CHAPTER 4: Operation in Greater Detail
CHAPTER 5: Heart Rate Control Workouts
CHAPTER 6: User Programs
CHAPTER 7: Designing an Exercise Program: The F.I.T. Concept
CHAPTER 8: Care and Maintenance
CHAPTER 9: Important Safety Instructions
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
57
Maintenance Schedules
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
CAUTION
Servicing is to be done with appliance disconnected from the supply circuit.
To disconnect, turn all controls to the off position, then remove the plug from
the outlet.
DAILY CARE
AND SERVICE
To extend the life and appearance of your TRUE Z-Series treadmill, we
recommend that you perform the following steps daily:
1. Wipe clean your TRUE Z-Series Treadmill to remove perspiration. We
also recommend that you encourage your employees and clients to wipe
perspiration from the unit after each use. Use a damp soft towel or
cloth.
2. Unplug the unit during nonbusiness hours to prevent damage caused by
power surges.
WEEKLY CARE
AND SERVICE
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
NOTE: Do not wipe under the treadbelt when cleaning dust or debris off the
unit as this may damage the treadbelt and deck.
To extend the life and appearance of your TRUE Z-Series treadmill, we
recommend that you perform the following tests and inspections weekly:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
A test of all the keys including the Express Keys.
Inspection of the power cord for frayed or damaged areas.
Inspection of the power cord ground plug.
Inspection of the circuit breaker to see if it is tripped.
Inspection of the treadbelt for proper tension and alignment.
Check that the handrail screws are tight.
Check that the ON/OFF switch toggles on and off.
Check that the pedestal screws, pedestal hinge screws, and motor cover
screws are tight.
9. Check that the heart rate contacts are working.
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
59
Maintenance Schedules
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
To extend the life and appearance of your TRUE Z-Series treadmill, we
recommend that you monthly:
1. Clean the treadmill of dust and dirt that might accumulate under and
behind the treadmill. Vacuum small rubber particles from the soles of
running shoes that accumulate alongside the belt and behind the
machine.
2. Inspect the autowaxer for sufficient wax in the wax channel.
a. Lay treadmill on its side.
b. Pull back the treadbelt (on the bottom of the treadmill) to expose
the wax channel.
c. The wax channel should be at least ¼” thick at its thinnest point.
d. Feel along the full length of the wax channel for consistent
thickness.
e. Call authorized service technician to replace wax channel if it is
less than ¼” thick at any point.
NOTE: To prevent damage to the treadbelt, do not allow the treadmill to
run without sufficient wax in the wax channel.
Once every three (3) months we recommend that the motor cover be removed and the motor area vacuumed thoroughly to remove dust and particles. Only authorized service personnel should perform this procedure
as only authorized service technicians are allowed access to the area under
the motor hood. A thorough visual inspection should be performed at this
time as well. Have the technician check for tight wire harness connections,
damaged motor or power wires, tight motor and tensioner bolts, tight
ground screw connections and wire tie downs, properly attached incline
motor cotter pin and clevis pin, and tight motor controller and interface
screws.
Expert service and maintenance at a modest cost are available through your
factory trained authorized TRUE dealer. He maintains a stock of repair
parts and has the technical knowledge to meet your service needs.
60
MONTHLY
CARE AND
SERVICE
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
MONTHLY
CARE AND
SERVICE
Calibration
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
INCLINE
AND SPEED
CALIBRATION
The Incline and Speed Calibration mode is used to troubleshoot and calibrate the treadmill. Calibration will cause the treadmill to speed up to 15
mph and incline up to 15%.
CAUTION: Keep area under the treadmill free from obstructions because
the deck returns to 0% grade when the safety key is replaced. Failure to do so
could cause personal injury or damage to the machine.
NOTE:
Messages appear in the Message Center on the Z7.
1. Hold (up/down) while placing the SAFETY KEY onto the Keyboard to
enter the Calibration Mode.
The following messages will repeat themselves one at a time:
NOTE: While in this mode, (up/down) and (plus/minus) can be used to
change the treadmill incline and speed. The SPEED Window will display
actual speed.
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
CALIBRATION
PRESS START
2. Press (Start) to start calibration.
The treadmill will lower to zero incline and then start increasing incline to
15% and speed to 15 mph.
3. When the calibration is complete:
The following message will display in the Message Center:
CALIBRATION SUCCESSFUL
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
61
Error Codes
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
Or to indicate an error in speed or incline:
INVALID INCLINE DATA
INVALID SPEED DATA
CALIBRATION ABORTED:
NO SPEED SENSOR
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
4. Remove and replace Safety Key and exit Calibration Mode
62
The following Error Codes and Service Codes will follow a double “beep”
and show on the display. Service Codes provide preventative maintenance
reminders. A Service Code will repeat for the next five times you start the
treadmill. A Service Code will clear after any key has been pressed. When
an Error Code occurs, call an authorized service technician.
Z7
E1: MINIMUM
DESCRIPTION
Not used
This error occurs when the incline values on the
E1:RANGE
display do not match the values stored during calibration.
This error occurs when the incline motor does not
E1:STALL
move in response to an incline command.
This error occurs when the incline motor moved
E1:INCLINE
without an incline command.
This error occurs when acceleration exceeded design
E2:OVERSPEED
limits.
This error occurs when the speed displayed does not
E2:CAL
match the stored value from calibration.
This error occurs when a data error is detected at start
E2:RECAL
up. The Control Panel has reset to default values.
This error occurs when no speed sensor data has been
E5:SENSOR
detected at the Control Panel.
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
ERROR AND
SERVICE CODES
E6 Level and Blink Codes
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
E6 LEVEL AND
BLINK CODES
The failure code displayed will be “E-5 Sensor” when receiving the E5 Sensor error, enter diagnostic mode and check the error log. Below is a list of
status display codes. When the drive is faulted, the Status LED blinks out
the default code. The code will blink the proper number of times, pause
with the LED off, and then repeat the code.
DESCRIPTION
IMPLICATION
No Blink (Steady On)
No Faults
Running
Fast (Steady Blink)
No Faults
Ready
LED Off
AC Line Power
Insufficient
No or Low Voltage
1 Blink (E601)
100% Command
Runaway Command
2 Blink (E602)
Sensor Feedback Error
Sensor Error
3 Blink (E603)
Voltage Trip Error
Motor Issue
4 Blink (E604)
Output Over Current
High Motor Current
5 Blink (E605)
Control Supply Under
Voltage
Inadequate Power Line
6 Blink (E606)
Drive Over Temperature
MCB Over Temperature
7 Blink (E607)
AC Over Voltage
Line Voltage Too High
8 Blink (E608)
Output Short Circuit
Short Circuit to Motor
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
STATUS CODE
63
Diagnostics
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
Your TRUE Z-Series treadmill is equipped with built in diagnostic capabilities to assist in configuring, maintaining and servicing your treadmill. The
Field Diagnostic mode provides total hours, distance, average speed, ability
to change the units of measure, ability to set the “user not present” function, a list of service and error codes, the ability to set program time, and a
log of the last five errors.
NOTE: Messages appear in the Message Center on the Z7.
1. Hold the (minus/plus) while placing the Safety Key on the Keyboard.
The following messages will repeat themselves:
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
DIAGNOSTIC
PRESS START
2. Press (up arrow) to display total hours.
The following messages will display:
HOURS
No. of hours on the treadmill
3. Press (up arrow) to display total distance.
The following messages will display:
DISTANCE
No. of miles on the treadmill
4. Press (up arrow) to display average speed.
The following messages will display:
AVG SPEED
Average speed on the treadmill
5. Press (up arrow) to display units. Press (plus) or (minus) to toggle.
The following messages will display:
UNITS
64
ENG or MET
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
DIAGNOSTICS
Diagnostics (cont.)
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
6. Press (up arrow) to display User Not Present function.
The following messages will display:
CURRENT SHUT
No. of seconds until treadmill shuts off
with no user on treadbelt
7. Press (up arrow) repeatedly to display list of errors.
The service/error codes will be listed. See Error and Service Codes on
the previous page.
8. Press (up arrow) to display program time.
The following messages will display:
MAXTIME
9. Press (up arrow) repeatedly to display the error log.
The Error Log lists the five most recent Error Codes and the distance at
which each Error Code occurred.
The following messages will display:
ERROR CODE
Distance at which error code occurred
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
No. of minutes allowed in programmed
workouts
NOTE: If there are no errors in the error log, the following message will
be displayed:
LOG EMPTY
10. Remove SAFETY KEY to exit Diagnostics.
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
65
chapter nine
Important Safety
Instructions
In This Chapter:
Review for Your Safety
CHAPTER 1: Introduction
CHAPTER 2: The Console
CHAPTER 3: Basic Operation
CHAPTER 4: Operation in Greater Detail
CHAPTER 5: User Programs
CHAPTER 6: Heart Rate Control Workouts
CHAPTER 7: Designing an Exercise Program: The F.I.T. Concept
CHAPTER 8: Care and Maintenance
CHAPTER 9: Important Safety Instructions
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
67
Review for Your Safety
NINE
: IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
When using this treadmill, basic precautions should always be
followed, including the following:
Read all instructions before using this treadmill.
Consult your physician before beginning any exercise
program.
Danger: To reduce the risk of electric shock, always unplug this
treadmill immediately after use and before cleaning.
Warning - to reduce the risk of burns, fire and electric shock, and
injury to persons, follow these instructions:
IMPORTANT SAFETY
INSTRUCTIONS
Do not use if you have an acute cold or fever.
This treadmill should never be left unattended when plugged in.
Unplug it from the outlet when not in use and before any service is
performed.
Close supervision is necessary when this treadmill is being used by
or near children, invalids, or disabled persons.
Use this treadmill only for its intended use as described in this
manual.
Do not use attachments not recommended by the
manufacturer.
Never operate this treadmill if it has a damaged power cord or plug,
if it is not working properly, if it has been damaged or dropped, or if
it has been submerged in water. In these cases, the treadmill should
be examined by a qualified service technician.
Z 7 Tr e a d m i l l O w n e r ' s G u i d e
69
Review for Your Safety
NINE
: IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
Use a dedicated 110 volt, alternating current, 15 amp three-prong
grounded outlet.
Keep the power cord away from heated surfaces.
IMPORTANT SAFETY
INSTRUCTIONS
Never drop or insert any object into any opening.
To disconnect, turn the power switch to the OFF position, then
remove the plug from the outlet.
Do not allow animals on or near your treadmill.
Make sure the power cord has enough slack to allow the treadmill to
raise freely without being limited by the cord or caught in the incline
rack. Do not run the power cord under treadmill.
Use the treadmill indoors only.
Never use your treadmill near water or while wet. Using the
treadmill around a pool, hot tub or sauna will void the
warranty.
Do not operate where aerosol (spray) products are being used or
where oxygen is being administered.
Allow only trained personnel to service this equipment.
Keep the area under the treadmill free from obstruction, as the deck
will return to 0% grade when the safety key is placed on the console.
Avoid the possibility of bystanders being struck or caught between
moving parts by making sure that they are out of reach of the
treadmill while it is in motion.
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Review for Your Safety
NINE
: IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
Keep the space behind and on both sides of the treadmill clear
should you lose your balance.
Allow only one person at a time on your machine.
Always straddle the treadbelt and allow the belt to begin moving
before stepping onto the belt.
Use extreme caution when stepping onto moving treadbelt. Some
programs begin at speeds as high as 4.8 mph.
IMPORTANT SAFETY
INSTRUCTIONS
Do not operate treadmill without the safety key attached to the
console and the lanyard clipped to your clothing at approximately
waist height.
Gradually slow down the belt before stopping. This will minimize
the sensation of movement after you stop.
When making treadbelt adjustments, keep fingers, loose clothing,
jewelry, and long hair away from moving parts.
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71
appendix a
Target Heart Rate
Chart
A Guide to Help You Pick an Initial Target
Heart Rate
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APPENDIX A - TARGET HEART RATE CHART
CONTACT
HEART RATE
MONITORING
Contact heart rate monitoring (perhaps more accurately called handtouch heart rate monitoring) uses the same principles as chest strap
monitoring: electrically conductive pads detect the faint electrical
signals produced by a beating heart and are converted to a data signal
which can then be displayed digitally as a numeric beats per minute
value.
The only difference is that a chest strap is right next to the heart, so
the signals are relatively strong. Contact heart rate (CHR) using the
fingers and palms receives an inherently much fainter signal. This is
the sole reason for the performance differences between the two systems. This is also the reason why CHR systems must typically use two
pads per side for a total of four detection pads, while a chest strap
uses just one pad per side; the extra pads are required to help detect
the fainter signal.
The electrical signals detected by heart rate monitoring systems are a
side-effect of the electrical control signals the heart generates to fire
its muscles in the right sequence. The signals start in the top, or upper-right part of the heart (known as the sinoatrial node), then travel
down to the bottom, or lower-left part of the heart (known as the
Purkinje fibers). It is the fact that the heart is tilted in the chest cavity,
and thus these signals move from the right to the left side of the body,
that makes it possible for monitoring pads on each side of the body
to detect the heart rate. (The CHR pads correspond roughly to leads I
and III in a standard 12-lead ECG setup.)
If a person’s heart is tilted less than average, the signal is weaker.
(Note that this is not indicative of heart strength or health.) In some
people, their heart is nearly vertical in their chest, and even a chest
strap cannot pick up their heart rate signal. (12-pad medical ECG
systems still work well on such an individual.) Less than 1% of the
population are in this category.
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APPENDIX A - TARGET HEART RATE CHART
Because CHR is already trying to detect a fainter signal compared
to a chest strap, it takes less of a vertical heart position to cause it to
stop working. Depending on the CHR system, somewhere between
3% and 5% of the population cannot be picked up by any contact
heart rate monitoring system.
This heart-in-the-chest-cavity position is by far the leading cause of
CHR performance variation among individuals. Other factors which
negatively affect CHR performance are:
1. Dry or dirty hands.
2. Lotion or moisturizer on hands.
3. Excessive upper body motion, such as when using cross-trainer
ellipticals and in running.
4. Excessively tight grip.
5. Erratic or labored breathing or excessive talking.
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CAUSES
OF CHR
PERFORMANCE
VARIATION
Remember to check with your physician before beginning any exercise program. He can help
determine an appropriate target heart rate. Medications often affect heart rate.
APPENDIX A - TARGET HEART RATE CHART
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appendix b
METs Table
How Speed and Incline Affect Workload,
Expressed in METs
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79
APPENDIX B - METS TABLE
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81
appendix c
METs Explanation
and Formulas
The Metabolic Formulas Behind Energy
Expenditure Estimates
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83
APPENDIX C - METS EXPLANATION AND FORMULAS
METS
As stated earlier, the MET is a unit of exercise measurement that
EXPLANATION takes into account body weight. Since energy expenditure in a
AND weight-bearing exercise such as running, walking, or stairclimbing is
FORMULAS directly proportional to body weight, the formulas to calculate METs
are a bit simpler than for, say, an exercise bike. For example, 7 mph
running is always 11.7 METs, no matter who you are.
A MET is defined as 3.5 ml/min/kg of oxygen usage by the body,
where:
ml is milliliters, the actual measured volume of gaseous oxygen
min is minutes
kg is bodyweight in kilograms
This energy consumption rate corresponds to about 72 calories per
hour for a 150-pound person, which approximates the average basal
metabolic rate of the general population.
The best formulas for treadmill energy expenditure also use oxygen
usage by the body, or VO2. The two formulas are:
walking VO2 = (2.68 * speed) + (0.48 * speed * incline) + 3.5
running VO2 = (5.36 * speed) + (0.24 * speed * incline) + 3.5
To get METs, divide the result by 3.5.
(Noted exercise physiologist David Costill's speed constants for
walking and running are 3.06 and 4.86, respectively.)
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85
appendix d
Specifications
The Size and Performance Attributes of Your
550ZTX Treadmill
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87
APPENDIX D - SPECIFICATIONS
SPECIFICATIONS
Maximum speed: 12 mph;
Incline range: 0 to 15%
Drive motor: 3 hp.
Treadbelt area: 22” x 60”
Treadmill Weight: 310 Pounds
Maximum user weight: 400 pounds.
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89
appendix e
Glossary
Definitions of common terms used
throughout this document
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91
APPENDIX E - GLOSSARY
GLOSSARY
ACSM: the American College of Sports Medicine, probably the single
most-respected sports medicine and exercise physiology organization.
This doesn’t mean they’re always right, however, even on important
subjects, but if you don’t know better, you trust the ACSM. Their
Guidelines for Exercise Test and Prescription, now in it’s seventh edition,
is the universal reference handbook for the field. Their monthly journal, Medicine and Science in Sports, is one of the two big sports medicine journals (the other is the Journal of Exercise Physiology).
aerobic capacity: a measurement of an individual’s potential for intensity and duration of cardiovascular exercise which is primarily derived
from oxygen metabolism. This distinguishes it from anaerobic, or
non-oxygen metabolism exercise. The most common laboratory measurement is maximal oxygen uptake, or VO2max. The other big factor
affecting aerobic capacity is the lactate threshold, which is very difficult to measure and thus seldom used. (Number three on the aerobic
capacity factor list is biomechanical efficiency.) Non-laboratory measurements of aerobic capacity include submaximal fitness tests and
1.5-mile maximal runs.
basal metabolic rate (BMR): the rate of energy expenditure while at
rest, but not sleeping.
body weight: your unclothed weight, except for treadmills, where you
must include your clothing weight, too (typically 3 or 4 pounds).
bpm: beats per minute measurement of heart rate.
calorie, calorie expenditure: the calorie is a unit of measure of energy
quantity that is commonly used for expressing human energy expended and food energy consumed. This type of calorie is technically a
kilocalorie, or 1,000 calories of the strict physics definition. Calorie
expenditure is an energy rate, often expressed in calories per hour.
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APPENDIX E - GLOSSARY
chest strap, transmitter: use to detect heart rate, then transmit
using a 5 kHz radio signal to a receiver in fitness equipment (or
wristwatch). Originally invented by the Finnish company Polar in
the early 1980s, this technology is now widely available from other
sources.
CHR (contact heart rate) pads: stainless steel handgrips used to
detect ECG signals. Typically the two top pads are “hot” or positive,
while the two bottom pads are common. These pads are roughly
equivalent to lead I and lead III in a standard 12-lead ECG system.
constant power: a type of workload control system, most commonly
found on self-generating exercise bikes. Since power = torque x rpm,
a constant power system lowers torque when pedal rpm increases,
and increases torque when rpms decrease.
constant torque: a type of workload control system, most commonly
found on ellipticals and low-end plug-in exercise bikes. Unlike constant power, torque does not change when pedal rpm does.
contact heart rate (CHR): a system to acquire ECG data from handgrips, eliminating the need for a chest strap. A better name would be
hand touch heart rate. CHR is less accurate than chest strap monitoring, and doesn’t work well during high-intensity or strong-motion
exercise, such as running or upper-body exercise. Newer digital
CHR systems, are greatly improved in these areas.
CSAFE: Communications Specification for Fitness Equipment.
This poorly-acronymed spec was created by a consortium of fitness equipment manufacturers back in early 1997. It is intended
to be a general-purpose data communication protocol on top of
RS232. Later additions to the spec included a small voltage supply
to power an external controller, and commands to control volume
and channel in entertainment systems. The original consortium
was, in alphabetical order: Cardio Theater, Fitlinxx, On Base, Precor,
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APPENDIX E - GLOSSARY
Quinton, Schwinn, Stairmaster, Star Trac, Tectrix, and Trotter. See
fitlinxx.com/csafe/.
exercise: the different metabolic state during any activity greater
than rest. More commonly, the voluntary activity undertaken for
health and conditioning reasons.
exercise intensity: a measurement of the extra metabolism above
basal metabolic rate (BMR). Sometimes this measurement includes
BMR, but this is less desirable. This measurement is usually using
standardized formulas for different exercises. Direct measurement
requires oxygen uptake monitoring equipment. Typical units of
measurement are watts, calories per hour, METs, and VO2. Note
that this is not the same as the amount of power being applied to an
external machine, due the body’s efficiency of between 20% and 30%.
exercise, weight-bearing: where the body’s full weight must be
lifted and moved. With exercise equipment, only treadmills and
stairclimbers meet this requirement. (Ellipticals are not true weightbearing exercise, although riding style does affect this somewhat.)
The reason weight-bearing exercise is important to distinguish
from non-weight-bearing exercise is because in the former, calorie
consumption varies directly with body weight, whereas in the latter
(which includes exercise bikes) body weight does not affect calorie
consumption.
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APPENDIX E - GLOSSARY
fitness test, maximal: the only valid way to accurately determine
maximal oxygen uptake, using VO2 monitoring. Several protocols
exist, but in general a treadmill is used and the exercise intensity is
gradually increased over a five to eight minute period. The subject
is strongly encouraged to run to absolute exhaustion which, given
the psychological and safety difficulties of this, creates inevitable
variations in test results. This maximal effort is supposed to contain
within it some point where the subject is consuming the maximum
amount of oxygen.
fitness test, submaximal: a safer, easier, and more convenient way to
estimate maximal oxygen uptake, at the expense of a great deal of
accuracy. The best results from such tests is typically +/- 15% compared with “true” VO2max. These tests are usually staged extrapolation protocols, such as the YMCA bike protocol and some treadmill protocols. Non-extrapolation protocols include the AstrandRyhming bike protocol and the Gerkin treadmill protocol.
heart rate, maximum (HRmax): the heart rate at which the body will
allow no further increase. For healthy people, reaching maximum
heart rate is not unsafe. HRmax is usually an estimate based on age,
as it decreases with age.
heart rate reserve (HRR): the range of heart rate values between
maximum and resting heart rates. This is useful because it corresponds very closely to the VO2 range from resting to maximum.
%HRR reserve thus is a very good estimate of % VO2max.
heart rate, resting: most accurately measured when laying down in
the morning, with no food or caffeine ingestion for at least the previous three hours.
interval workout: consists of alternating periods of widely different
exercise intensities, usually called the work and rest intervals. (In
the origin of the phrase, interval referred only to the rest interval.)
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APPENDIX E - GLOSSARY
Interval workouts are popular because they are superior training for
sports activities, which almost always involve highly varying exercise intensities. Interval workouts are not optimal for weight loss or
weight control, since steady-state exercise is most efficient for maximal total energy expended for a given effort.
METs: unit of energy expenditure used for exercise prescriptions,
defined as the current energy expenditure rate divided by the basal
metabolic rate (BMR). In the case of METs, BMR is defined as a
VO2 of 3.5, meaning it varies directly with body weight. This is
incorrect, as BMR varies with the 2/3-root of body weight. See TMET.
oxygen uptake: also referred to as VO2, the rate of consumption of
oxygen, usually expressed as a rate per unit of body weight, or milliliters per kilogram per minute, or ml/kg/min, or ml/kg*min-1. This
is the best way to accurately measure energy expenditure during
aerobic exercise.
RJ-45: an 8-conductor locking connector used for the CSAFE system, also commonly used for Ethernet cables (where only four wires
are used). The RJ-45 is typically wired using the EIA/TIA-568 twisted-pair wiring standard.
rpm: revolutions per minute, the most common unit of measure
of angular motion in the non-scientific world. The International
System (SI) unit that is more useful is radians per second, which is
equal to 0.1047 rpm.
segment, work and rest: same as work and rest interval. See interval
training.
speed, estimated running: applies the measured energy expenditure
to walking and running equations, producing a more friendly or
familiar speed feedback.
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APPENDIX E - GLOSSARY
speed, simulated ground: applies the measured energy expenditure to an outdoor bike equation, producing a speed feedback more
applicable to an elliptical or exercise bike rider.
T-MET: a replacement for METs that properly takes body weight into
account. A T-MET = watts / kg2/3, where watts is power applied to
an external machine by the exerciser, and kg is the exerciser’s body
weight in kilograms. True’s marketing name for the T-MET concept
is Personal Power.
VO2: see oxygen uptake.
VO2max: maximal oxygen uptake, the single best way to measure
aerobic capacity (see).
watts: the International System unit of power measurement, defined
as Joules per second. One watt is roughly equal to 4.2 calories per
hour. Watts are commonly used to report workload on exercise
bikes, less so on ellipticals, and virtually never on treadmills.
workload: the amount of power being demanded of an exerciser,
manifesting itself in the exerciser as exercise intensity. Common
workloads are treadmill running belt speed, bike torque and pedal
rpm, or stairclimber vertical climbing speed.
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bibliography
Bibliography
References and Selected Readings
Z 7 T r e a d m i l l O w n e r ’s G u i d e
99
Bibliography
American College of Sports Medicine, ACSM's Guidelines for
Exercise Testing and Prescription. 6th edition. Philadelphia:
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2000.
Feynman, Richard P., The Feynman Lectures on Physics. Original
edition. Boston: Addison Wesley, 1970. ISBN: 0-201-02115-3.
Huszar, Robert J., Basic Dysrhythmias. Third Edition. St. Louis,
Missouri: Mosby, 2002.
McArdle, William D., Katch, Frank I., and Katch, Victor L., Exercise
Physiology, 5th edition. Baltimore: Lippincott Williams &
Williams, 2001.
McMahon, Thomas A. and Bonner, John T., On Size and Life.
New York: W. H. Freeman, 1985. ISBN: 0-716-75000-7.
Pollack, Michael L., Gaesser, Glenn A., Butcher, Janus D., et al.
(1998) The recommended quantity and quality of exercise
for developing and maintaining cardiorespiratory and muscular
fitness in healthy adults. (The ACSM Position Stand on Fitness.)
Medicine and Science in Sport and Exercise, 30(6): 975-991.
URL:
<ipsapp006.lwwonline.com/content/getfile/2320/20/1050/fulltext.
htm>
Other ACSM position stands are found here:
<www.acsm-msse.org>
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Z 7 T r e a d m i l l O w n e r ’s G u i d e
101
Bibliography
Robergs, Robert A. and Landwehr, Roberto. (2002) The Surprising
History of the "HRmax = 220 - age" Equation. Journal of Exercise
Physiology, 5(2). ISSN 1097-9751.2
Article URL:
<http://www.asep.org/Documents/Robergs2.pdf>
Journal URL:
<http://www.asep.org/FLDR/JEPhome.htm>
Starr, Robert M. and Doyle, Jay D., 550 ZTX Owner’s Guide,
Colophon edition. O’Fallon: True Fitness Technologies, 2003.
Swain, David P. and Leutholtz, Brian C., Metabolic Calculations Simplified. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins, 1997.
Tufte, Edward R, Visual Explanations. Chesire, Connecticut:
Graphics Press, 1997.
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Whitmore, Jack H. and Costill, David L., Physiology of Sport and
Exercise. 2nd edition. Champaign, Illinois: Human
Kinetics, 1999.
102
Whitt, Frank R. and Wilson, David G., Bicycling Science. Cambridge:
The MIT Press, 1982.
Z 7 T r e a d m i l l O w n e r ’s G u i d e
True offers a full line of leading
edge Cardiovascular and
Flexibility equipment.
Z Series Bikes
Z Series Treadmills
TrueStretch Flexibility Unit
F o u n d e d
1 9 8 1
865 Hoff Road
O’Fallon, MO 63366
800.426.6570
truefitness.com
©2005 TRUE FITNESS TECHNOLOGY, INC.
TRUE is a registered trademark of TRUE FITNESS.
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Revision: 8/2005
Part: 00345300
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