VENTURER OFFICERS` SEMINAR

VENTURER
OFFICERS’
SEMINAR
SYLLABUS
December 2005
VENTURER OFFICERS’ SEMINAR
Why Hold an Officers Seminar
The purpose for this seminar is to give the Venturer officers the basic tools needed to succeed
in their job. It provides them with and understanding of:
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how the leadership of a crew works
their personality and leadership style
the basic leadership skills
their crews next years program
meeting management
The better we prepare our youth leaders, the better our crew will run. Over the years the
crews who elect officers and properly train them to run their crew were the most successful.
Who Should Attend
The Seminar is intended for the newly elected crew officers and their adult advisor mentors.
You may also wish to invite the outgoing officers and any prospective youth leaders in your
crew. A visit by the head of your participating organization would be appreciated by the
Venturers.
Time Required for Seminar
This seminar can be held in one day (about 10 hours with breaks and meals) if you have held
your crews Program Development Meeting to layout your years program schedule prior to
the seminar. If not you will need and additional 3-4 hours to develop your crew program
calendar for the coming year.
The seminar is training intense for both the adults and youth leaders. It is suggested that the
seminar be held over two days with some additional fun activities included. This will also
permit the advisors and officers to learn more about each other as a leadership team.
Seminar Site
The seminar should be held in a comfortable site for training, which has typical training
equipment. (white boards, flip charts, video projector and VCR, etc.) It would be preferable
that the group could be housed overnight for one night to permit more time to work together.
You will also need to be able to feed the group a minimum of two meals during the Seminar.
Corporate training centers, schools or churches are usually ideal for the seminar.
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VENTURER OFFICERS’ SEMINAR
Materials Required
You will need a large room with tables and chairs, a VCR, monitor and extension cord.
Several sessions require a white board and markers or a flipchart stand, pad and markers.
You should bring tablets or note paper and pencils for the Venturers.
You will need to reproduce a copy of each of these handouts for each participant in you
Officers Seminar.
Venturing/BSA Mission Statement
Personality Style Inventory
Personality Style Inventory Score Sheet
Personality Style Preference Categories
The 16 Personality Style Types
Sensing/Intuitive Style Chart
Venturing Leadership Questionnaire
Determining Leadership Style
Determining Style Adaptability
Situational Leadership
Helpful hints for Involvement
Venturing Leadership Skills
Little Things to Look for in Activity Planning
Crew Meeting Agenda
Crew Officers Seminar Certificate
In addition you will need to provide the following for each participant in your Crew Officers’
Seminar
Your crew’s program calendar for the coming year
Your crew’s Bylaws and any operating rules.
Venturing Leader Handbook
(from Venturing Leader Handbook)
Program Capability Inventory
Venturer Activity Interest Survey
Sample Crewt ByLaws
How to Plan a Superactivity
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VENTURER OFFICERS’ SEMINAR
Prior to the Seminar
Before you hold your Officers’ Seminar several actions must be completed:
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Conduct Officers elections.
Brief newly elected officers on their immediate job and invite them to Officers’
Seminar
Arrange for meeting site and for feeding the officers and adult leaders
participating in the Officers’ Seminar.
Reproduce one copy of each material from the appendix of this syllabus for each
person participating in seminar
Reproduce a copy of your crew’s bylaws and year crew’s program for each
participant in the Seminar.
Obtain a copy of the Venturing Leader Handbook for each participant
Hold crew program development meeting and the associated Program Capability
Inventory (for every adult) and Venturer Interest Survey (for every Venturer).
Instruction Staff
This Seminar is designed to be run by the crew advisor team with help from the outgoing
crew officers. Prior to the meeting you should hold a meeting of the instructors to go over
the Seminar syllabus, assign teaching session, etc.
Make sure that all of instructors for the Officers Seminar have a copy of this syllabus and
understand how to lead their assigned section. There are six separate sections to this seminar
each could be taught by a different instructor (advisor or past officer)
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VENTURER OFFICERS’ SEMINAR
Seminar Time Schedule
A typical schedule for a one day Seminar is shown here. You should modify the schedule to
fit your local situation and preferences of your group. For instance you could do this over
two days or on a single day.
Evening Prior to Seminar (Only if Crew Program Development Meeting has not already been
held)
Layout Years Program Calendar (180 minutes)
7:30 PM – 10:30 PM
Day of Seminar
Session One: Crew Goals (30 Minutes)
Crew Mission Statement
Review Crew ByLaws
9:00 AM
Session Two: Officers’ Duties (45 Minutes)
Officer Job Descriptions
Who Does What?
Break
9:30 AM
Session Three: You as a Leader (180 min)
Personality Style (60 min)
Lunch 60 min
Leadership Styles (60 min)
Leadership Skills (60 min)
Break
10:30 AM
10:15 AM
11:30 AM
12:30 PM
1:30 PM
2:30 PM
Session Four: Involving Crew Members (30 min)
2:45 PM
Session Five: Crew Program Review (120 min)
Program Calendar Development or Review (60 min)
and Backdate Calendar for Year
Plan a Crew activity (30 min)
Superactivity (30 min)
3:15 PM
4:15 PM
4:45 PM
Dinner
5:15 PM
Session Six: Meeting Planning (20 Minutes)
Crew Meeting
Officers’ Meeting
6:15 PM
Closing (10 Minutes)
Personal Commitment
Challenge
6:35 PM
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VENTURER OFFICERS’ SEMINAR
Developing Your Years Calendar
You will need to develop a program calendar. Either at an annual Crew Activities
Development Meeting or as part of the Officers’ Seminar (The first evening) have the crew
officers layout a crew program calendar for the coming year. The process is simple:
Prior to laying out the calendar
1. Using the Program Capability Inventory form from the appendix have your crew
committee survey the crew committee, advisors, members parents or any other adult
that could help your crew. This provides a directory of resources available for your
crew program.
2. Using the Venturer Activity Interest Survey form from the appendix have each
Venturer fill out a form indicating their interests. The Vice President – Program
should tally up the survey prior to the Officers Seminar.
Layout the Calendar
3. The crew officers (with guidance from the advisors) now layout a years calendar
including a minimum of two crew meetings each month, an officers meeting each
month and a least one other activity each month. The goal is to just schedule a date,
subject and time. You will of course need to make sure the specialty technical
activities your crew does are placed on the calendar. You should obtain school
calendars, council and national Venturing activity information for consideration by
the crew officers.
4. Finally have both the adult crew committee and the Venturers approve the calendar.
This calendar is your goal. Do not be afraid to modify it as the situation dictates during the
coming year.
This calendar will be reviewed later during the Officers’ Seminar.
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VENTURER OFFICERS’ SEMINAR
Session One: Setting Your Crews Goals
Mission Statement: Handout the Boy Scouts of America’s Mission Statement from the
Appendix. Discuss with your officers the mission and vision of your crew. Have the officers
develop a one sentence vision statement for you crew. (If your crew already has a mission or
vision statement, review it with the crew officers.) Your crew’s vision statement should be
the preamble to your crew’s bylaws.
Crew ByLaws: Hand out a copy of your crew bylaws. Review the crew bylaws with your
crew officers and decide if they are still applicable to the crew. If any changes are needed
prepare the changes in accordance with the procedures for make changes to your bylaws.
If your crew does not have bylaws pass out the typical crew bylaws and discuss how to
develop bylaws for your crew. Assign an action item to the officers to recruit an activity
committee to develop a set of bylaws for consideration by the crew members and advisors.
Your Crews Unique Rules, and Policies: Review any rules, policies, guidelines, etc.
developed by you crew or participating organization. Be clear with the officers how they are
enforced and what the officers participation in the enforcement will be.
This is the opportunity to get the “buy in” from the officers and youth input to your crew
operating materials.
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VENTURER OFFICERS’ SEMINAR
Session Two: Officer’s Duties
Our goal in Venturing is to show the officers how to run the crew and then mentor them
while they run the crew. We should gradually turn over more and more responsibilities to
the crew officers as they demonstrate the capability to lead the crew. Of course, we as
advisors still have the standards and safety responsibility on our shoulders and cannot
delegate this to the youth officers..
Hand out Venturing Leader Guide to the officers.
Show video AV03V013 New Crew Fast Start (Revisedt. Using Venturing Leader Guide
review the duties of each officer. Be sure to include the duties of any other officers (such as
newsletter editor, quartermaster, training, etc,) that your crew may have. Make sure that each
officer understands his/her job and what he/she is to do.
Make sure that you resolve, with your crew officers, who is going to do what. For instance,
all of the officers will want to plan and run the program activities of the crew. However; the
Vice President for Program is the one responsible for managing the program. You may have
other conflicts that you need to discuss with your officers.
Remind the officers that they are the one’s who set the standards. They have to “walk their
talk”.
Review the typical crew organization chart in the Venturing Youth Leader Guide.
Explain that the crew committee (adults on right side of chart) work to provide program
resources and help recruit adult help and facilities for use by the crew.
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VENTURER OFFICERS’ SEMINAR
The Advisor and Associate Advisors (adults in the middle of the chart) work directly with the
officers and other Venturers in the crew. Note that each officer has a corresponding adult
advisor as a mentor. Make sure that any other officers that your crew may have, also have
adult mentors (advisors, parents, committee members)
The crew officers are elected by the crew members to lead the crew for the next year, (left
side of the chart)
Activity committee chairmen and consultants are the Venturer/adult team which (along with
and Venturer manned activity committee) plan and run the activity for the crew. The activity
committee chairman is appointed by the crew president (after consulting with the crew
Advisor). The adult consultant is an individual who is an expert in running the activity and
has the ability to obtain the resources needed to run the activity.
Break
Let’s take a 15 minute break.
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VENTURER OFFICERS’ SEMINAR
Session Three: You as a Leader
Each of us has a way we approach things depending on our developed skills, experiences and
just natural ability. It is important that we understand what our personally style and what our
leadership style are.
First let consider our
Ask the group what a manger is? Write the results on a white board or flip chart. Get an
agreement on the definition of a manager.
In truth: “A manager is a person who does things right”
Ask the group If a manger does things right, what is a leader? Again write the results down
on a white board or flip chart. Get an agreement on the definition of a leader.
In truth: “A leader is a person who does the right things”
Each officer and advisor should take the personality style and leadership style exercises.
Personality Style
Pass out the Personality Style Inventory question sheet and the Personality Style Inventory
Score Sheet. Tell the group to answer the questions putting their results on the score sheet.
(they enter an ‘a’ or a ‘b’ in the respective question location on the score sheet) After they
have competed putting their answers on the sheet, have them count the number of a’s in each
column and the number of b’s in each column putting the counts in the respective place in the
column. Next place the letter for the higher ‘a’ or ‘b’ I or E, S or N, T or F or J or P. in the
I/E, S/N, T/F, or J/P location of the second page of the score sheet. This will give each of
your officers a four letter description of their personality.
Pass out Personality Style Preference Categories and The 16 Personality Style Types.
Review with each of the officers their personality style. You should share your style so they
understand how you approach both other people and problem solving.
Pass out Sensing/Intuitive Type chart from Appendix. This chart provides further
information about the traits of the 16 personality styles. We want to use all of the skills of
the officer and for that matter the Venturers in the crew. Consider the innate traits of your
officers when considering who should do a particular task.
Leadership Style
Knowing each others personality trait is important to your leadership team. Equally
important is the leadership style of the leader. Each of us has a leadership style that we fall
back on when we approach our job as and officer or advisor.
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VENTURER OFFICERS’ SEMINAR
Hand out the Leadership Style Questionnaire and ask the advisors and officers to answer the
twelve questions by selecting one of the four options as a solution to the situation. Tell them
to circle the option (A, B, C or D) they choose on their questionnaire form. Their answer
should be what they would do without a long consideration on what may be the best solution.
It is important that the advisors also do this exercise.
When they have completed their form give then a copy of Determining Leadership Style and
have them follow the instructions to fill out the tables in Figures 1 and 2.
While they are filling out the table draw a copy of Figure 4 from Determining Leadership
Style on the white board or flipchart pad.
After the officers and advisors have completed figures 1 and 2 explain to the group that the
quadrant with the highest score in Figure 1 is their normal dominant style of leadership. The
four styles can be place on a table where two type of leadership action are considered. The
first type is Task Behavior or the extent to which the leader organizes and defines what the
group is to do. He second is Relationship Behavior or the extent to which the leader engages
in personal relationships with the members. The relative score between the four styles
indicate the degree that you support the particular style when solving a situation.
Hand out Determining Style Adaptability and Situational Leadership. Have everyone fill out
the table in Figure 3 and yes do the math and calculate the total. Warn them to be careful
signs count +1 + -1 = 0 not 2. The total figure is a measure of how easy it is for the leader to
adapt their style to the situation. Form their total score they can determine their degree of
adaptability as ineffective (-1 to -24) or effective (+1 to +24). An indication of an ineffective
score does not mean the individual can’t be a good manager, but rather that they should think
about their management actions rather than just following their “gut” instinct. In table 3 the
alternative with the +2 is the most effective way to approach the situation and the one with -2
the least effective.
Obviously to be an effective leader your style should fit the situation. This is indicated in
Figure 4, When the groups ability to do the task at hand is poor (low maturity) your style
should be Low Relationship and High Task (tell them what to do), If on the other hand the
group is very experience in doing the task (high maturity) then you don’t need to manage
them. Your style should then be low relationship and low task (join the group). As the group
learns how to do the job you can gradually “release the reins” (i.e move from quadrant to
quadrant in Figure 4.).
Break
Let’s take a 15 minute break.
Leadership Skills
Hand out Venturing Leadership Skills from the Appendix. Review each of the skill points
with your leadership team. Most crews identify the skills of communicating, Planning and
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VENTURER OFFICERS’ SEMINAR
Controller to be their areas they need to work on most. Therefore spend some additional
time discussing how you will handle these leadership skills as a leadership team.
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VENTURER OFFICERS’ SEMINAR
Session Four: Involving Crew Members
The key to a successful crew is to have everyone engaged in the crew and its “hands on”
activities. Venturers and advisors “vote with their feet” and leave when the crew is no longer
relative to them.
Ask the group how your crew leaders can improved the involvement of the crew member.
Write the suggestions down on a white board or flip chart pad. Review the suggestions for
the officers and advisors making a new list of thing you actually intend to do during the next
year.
Hand out Helpful Hints for Involvement from the Appendix. Review these suggestion from
other Venturer crews from around the country.
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VENTURER OFFICERS’ SEMINAR
Session Five: Crew Program Review
Program Calendar Review
During this section the crew secretary should be documenting your program calendar
development activities.
Hand out copies of your planned next calendar for the next year. Review the calendar item
by item with the advisors and crew officers. You should be looking for the following:
1. Is the calendar complete
a. Are there any meetings or activities missing
b. Do we need to add additional training or practice activities in order to do any
of the scheduled activities? (For instance do you need to learn a skill before
doing any of your activities? If you do, skill instruction will need to be added
to the calendar.)
2. Does everyone agree that this is the calendar that crew should be running.
Crew Calendar Backdating
Next have the officers and advisors review the final calendar and make a list of the following
items on a flipchart pad.
1. For each activity on the calendar figure when planning needs to start for the activity.
2. For each activity decide if the activity needs to be planned by one of the officer, one
of the advisors, or by and activity committee of adults and Venturers. Write down the
assignments.
3. For the activities that need committees look over the results from your Adult
Resource Survey and see if you can identify a consultant to work with the activity
committee. Make up two lists:
a. A list of consultant that you already know about for your activities.
b. A list of activities that the crew committee will need to recruit consultants for.
Plan One of Your Crew’s Activities
Pick one of the activities on your calendar that needs to be planned and make a preliminary
plan for the activity using the following technique:
First take a copy of the Venturing Activity Planner found in the Venturing Leaders Manual.
Fill out the form down through the Date and Location of the activity.
Second develop an initial plan for the activity. Consider the following:
1. Define what the activity will be, including a plan “B” for the activity.
2. Determine the location for the activity
3. Develop a plan to accomplish the activity considering:
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VENTURER OFFICERS’ SEMINAR
a. Transportation
b. Food
c. Lodging
d. Equipment needs and how to obtain
e. Program activity costs
f. Permits required
4. Write down the action assignment for this activity and who will be responsible on the
Venturing Activity Planner.
5. Consider what would be needed for a plan “B” if needed.
At this stage the activity should be ready to do have the assignment accomplished in order to
pull off the activity. The activity should now be passed off to an activity committee fro final
planning and execution.
Activity Committees
Explain to the group that each of the crews activities should have an activity committee
assigned with an activity chairman and an adult consultant. The activity chairman and the
adult consultant are responsible for seeing that the activity is a success. This is the way the
Venturers in crew who are not officers are involved in the management of the crew.
Six Evaluation Questions
After the activity has been run the activity committee should evaluate the success of the
activity. The committee should use the following evaluation questions to review the success
of the activity:
The following are six simple questions that can be used to evaluate an activity, program or
project. The first three questions relate to the job, the last three questions relate to the groups
involvement.
1. Did the job get done?
2. Was the job done right?
3. Was the job done on time?
4. Did everyone take part?
5. Did everyone enjoy themselves
6. Do they want more?
If any of these questions are answered “no” or if there is any doubt, the evaluation should list
what should be done next time to improve the situation.
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VENTURER OFFICERS’ SEMINAR
Finally the activity committee should complete the Venturing Activity Planner after-action
evaluation section. The activity planner is then returned to the crew officers for review and
filing.
Explain that the crew officers will track the planning of activities by the activity committees
at your monthly officers’ meetings.
Superactivity
Discuss with your officer what your big activity of the year is going to be. It will take
additional planning, preparation, fund raising, training, etc. A superactivty could be a trip to
your crews Venturing Cluster national conference, a big trip, a long term service activity, etc.
Refer the officers to How to Plan Your Superactivity in the Venturing Leader Guide. Review
the steps to plan a superactivity.
Now is the time to begin by selecting a superactivity committee chairman and committee.
Have the officers prepare a Venturer Activity Planner form for your superactivty.
Break for Dinner.
Let’s break for dinner.
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VENTURER OFFICERS’ SEMINAR
Session Six: Meeting Planning
Hand out Little Things to Look for in Planning an Activity from Appendix. Explain to your
leadership team that the little think can make or break an activity or meeting. This sheet is a
reminder sheet of some of the things we tend to forget to do. Review the points in the
handout with your officers and advisors.
Venturers join your crew to do things, not to sit in meetings, or do business. Meetings are
better and more effective when they are well run and involve the group attending. The first
step in this process is to have an agenda for the meeting. Hand out Crew Meeting Agenda
from the appendix and review the main items that make up a crew meeting. Remind the
officers that the business portion of the meeting should be short. Most business in the crew
should be accomplished in your officers meetings. Conversely the largest portion of the
meeting should be the “hands on” Crew Career Opportunities portion of the program.
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VENTURER OFFICERS’ SEMINAR
Closing
Give each Venturer a blank sheet of paper and a pencil. Ask them to take 10 minutes and
write down the three most critical things they plan to do in their office during the next three
months. Have them turn in a copy of this contract with themselves and you to you. The two
of you are the only ones who will see this document.
Ask the committee chairman and the head of your organization to join you in challenging the
crew officers to do their absolute best in running the crew for the coming year.
Present each of the officers and Advisors attending a crew officers seminar completion
certificate (prototype may be found in Appendix).
After the Seminar
Your crew officers meetings are the place to provide continuing education for the crew
officers’ leadership training. Review how they are doing against their contract and provide
some short training on any of the skills of leadership that need tuning in your crew.
Don’t forget to thank everyone who has helped you put on your Officers Seminar.
On behalf of your Venturers we Thank You for everything you do in Venturing.
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VENTURER OFFICERS SEMINAR - APPENDIX
APPENDIX
Boy Scouts of America Mission Statement
Personality Style Inventory
Personality Style Inventory Score Sheet
Personality Style Preference Categories
The 16 Personality Style Types
Sensing/Intuitive Style Chart
Venturing Leadership Questionnaire
Determining Leadership Style
Determining Style Adaptability
Situational Leadership
Helpful hints for Involvement
Venturing Leadership Skills
Little Things to Look for in Activity Planning
Crew Meeting Agenda
Crew Officers Seminar Certificate
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VENTURER OFFICERS SEMINAR - APPENDIX
Boy Scouts of America
Mission Statement
“The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young
people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by
instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law.”
Vision Statement
The Boy Scouts of America is the nation's foremost youth program of
character development and values-based leadership training. In the
future Scouting will continue to
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Offer young people responsible fun and adventure;
Instill in young people lifetime values and develop in them
ethical character as expressed in the Scout Oath and Law;
Train young people in citizenship, service, and leadership;
Serve America's communities and families with its quality,
values-based program
The Venturer Oath
“As a Venturer, I promise to do my duty to God and
help strengthen America, to help others, and to seek
truth, fairness, and adventure in our world.”
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VENTURER OFFICERS SEMINAR - APPENDIX
PERSONALITY STYLE INVENTORY
(please answer the questions as carefully, honestly and quickly as possible, and remember
there are no right answers, only your best answers) Put your answer on the score sheet.
1. When you come to a new situation you usually
a. try it right away, and learn from doing
b. like to watch first and try it later
2. Do you think people should be more
a. sensible and practical
b. imaginative and inspired
3. When you come to an uncertain situation
a. you usually trust your feelings more
b. you usually trust your thinking more
4. Would you say you are
a. a little more serious
b. a little more easy-going
5. Do you spend most of your time
a. often in bigger groups and seldom alone
b. in smaller groups or alone
6. It is better to
a. be able to accept things
b. want to change things
7. Is it worse to
a. do mean things
b. do unfair things
8. Do you prefer when things are
a. planned and structured
b. spontaneous and unplanned
9. After a day spent with a lot of people do you
a. feel energized and stimulated
b. feel drained and like being alone
10. When you need to get something important done, you prefer to
a. do it the way that has worked before
b. do it a new way that you just thought of
11. Which is a bigger compliment?
a. "he/she is really nice"
b. "he/she is really smart"
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VENTURER OFFICERS SEMINAR - APPENDIX
12. When it comes to time, are you more likely to
a. usually be on time
b. be pretty flexible
13. When you are in a group do you usually
a. do a lot of the talking
b. mostly listen and talk a little
14. Are you more interested in
a. what really is
b. what can be
15. When you look at two things, you mostly notice
a. how they are the same
b. how they are different
16. Do you tend to get along better with
a. people who are a lot like you
b. lots of different types of people
17. Most other people seem to see you as
a. kind of out-going
b. kind of shy and reserved
18. When it comes to work that is very exact and detailed
a. it comes pretty easily to you
b. you tend to lose interest in it quickly
19. When your friends disagree, it is more important to you
a. to help them agree and come together
b. to help them come to the right answer
20. When you get-up in the morning
a. you know pretty much how your day will go
b. it seems every day is pretty different
21. When it comes to using the phone
a. you use it a lot and make most of the calls
b. you use it most when others call you
22. When you work on group projects, do you prefer
a. helping make sure the project gets done and works
b. helping come up with the ideas and plans
23. Others often describe you as a
a. warm-hearted person
b. cool-headed person
24. Which is more your way
a. to "do the right thing"
b. to "just do it"
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VENTURER OFFICERS SEMINAR - APPENDIX
25. When you talk to strangers you've just met you
a. talk pretty easily and at length
b. run out of things to say pretty quickly
26. When it comes to work you
a. prefer steady effort and a regular routine
b. work in spurts, really "on" then really "off"
27. Is it worse to be
a. too critical
b. too emotional
28. Would you rather have things
a. finished and decided
b. open to change
29. When it comes to news at school, you seem
a. to find it out quickly
b. to be one of the last to know
30. Are you more likely to trust
a. your experience
b. your hunches
31. I prefer teachers who are more
a. caring and supportive
b. knowledgeable and expect a lot
32. Is it more your way to
a. finish one project before you start a new one
b. have lots of projects going at once
33. Which is more true of you? do you
a. too often act and talk without thinking much first
b. spend too much time thinking and not enough doing
34. Games would be more fair if kids
a. would just follow the rules
b. would just use "good sportsmanship"
35. Is it usually easier for you to tell
a. how someone else is feeling
b. what someone else is thinking
36. Which is the more useful ability
a. to be able to organize and plan
b. to be able to adapt and make do
37. At a party or gathering
a. you do more of the introducing of others
b. others introduce you more
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VENTURER OFFICERS SEMINAR - APPENDIX
38. Do you think more about
a. what is going on right now
b. what will happen in the future
39. It is more your way to
a. usually show what you are feeling
b. usually not show your feelings
40. You are the kind of person who
a. needs to have things a certain way
b. does it any old way
41. When you get done with an assignment
a. you feel like showing it to someone
b. you like to keep it to yourself
42. Things would be better if people were
a. more realistic
b. more imaginative
43. Would you say you are more concerned with
a. being appreciated by others
b. achieving something important
44. It is better that people
a. know what they want
b. keep an open-mind
45. Friday night after a long week you usually
a. feel like going to a party or going out
b. feel like renting a movie or relaxing
46. When you do a job, it's usually your approach to
a. start from the beginning, and go step-by-step
b. start anywhere, and figure it out as you go
47. When you tell a story, you mostly talk about
a. how the people involved were effected
b. what went on in general
48. You feel most comfortable when things are more
a. planned and you know what to expect
b. unplanned and flexible
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VENTURER OFFICERS SEMINAR - APPENDIX
PERSONALITY STYLE INVENTORY SCORE SHEET
Place your answer of either "a" or "b" from the PSI test questions next to the same
numbers on this sheet.
(answer the questions as honestly and quickly as possible, and remember there are no
right or better answers, only your best answer)
1.
5.
9.
13.
17.
21.
25.
29.
33.
37.
41.
45.
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2.
6.
10.
14.
18.
22.
26.
30.
34.
38.
42.
46.
--------------
3.
7.
11.
15.
19.
23.
27.
31
35.
39.
43.
47.
--------------
4.
8.
12.
16.
20.
24.
28.
32.
36.
40.
44.
48.
---------------
a's _______ a's _______ a's_______ a's _______
extrovert or E score
sensate or S score feeler or F score
Judger or J score
b's _______ b's _______ b's _______ b's _______
introvert or I score intuitive or N score thinker or T score perceiver or Pscore
NOW TOTAL EACH COLUMN BELOW THE RED DOTTED LINE
24
VENTURER OFFICERS SEMINAR - APPENDIX
After you are finished answering the questions, total the letters in each column. Count the
total number of"a"s, and the total of "b"s. Place that number at the bottom of the column next
to the same letter so it looks like this:
a's- 9
b's- 3
Putting your answers together (place the dimension with the highest total in the spaces
below)
______ INTROVERT/EXTROVERT (first column)
______ SENSATE/INTUITIVE (second column)
______
THINKER/FEELER (third column)
______ JUDGER/PERCEIVER (fourth column)
NOW YOU SHOULD HAVE A 4 LETTER LEARNING STYLE TYPE (for example:
ESTJ, INFP, ISFJ, or ENFP). It is time to learn more about what your preference
means.
25
VENTURER OFFICERS SEMINAR - APPENDIX
PERSONALITY STYLE PREFERENCE CATEGORIES
Most people fall more on one side of each of these four pairs. After taking the PSI
indicator 48 item survey, your scores likely illustrated your preference for working out
of one mode or the other. Check your score with the list to confirm your preference.
EXTROVERT (@60% of pop.)
INTROVERT (@40% of pop.)
learns best from doing
is more at ease and confident socially
likes to know how others are doing it
gets energized from socializing
readily volunteers and offers opinions
ideas start from the outside in
likes to watch before doing
prefers working alone or with one other
sets own standards when possible
likes quiet space to work
seems "deep" and hard to understand
ideas start from inside out
SENSATE (@65% of pop.)
INTUITIVE (@35% of pop.)
is more realistic and practical
is more imaginative and abstract
is more patient and steady
likes new challenge, works in spurts
uses his/her experience and common sense trusts what makes sense to her/him
likes routines and order
dislikes routine and detail work
looks more for what is actual and sensible looks more for what is possible
lives in the here and now
lives toward her/his vision of the future
FEELER (@65% of females: 45% of males) THINKER (@55% of males: 35% of females)
is more interested in people than ideas
focuses more on personal relationships
likes harmony dislikes conflict
is tuned in to others' feelings
is warm and arouses enthusiasm
makes decisions based on his/her heart
is more interested in fascinating ideas
wants things to be fair and reasonable
stands-up for what he/she thinks
is tuned in to logical consistency
is cool-headed and impartial in conflict
makes decisions based on rational thought
PERCEIVER (@55% of pop.)
JUDGER (@45% of pop.)
is more decisive than curious
likes planned and scheduled activities
has very set opinions
feels good when things are completed
likes order and organization
may make decisions too quickly
is more curious than decisive
likes the spontaneous and unplanned
is flexible, adaptable, and tolerant
like to keep options open
seeks more to understand than manage things
may have trouble making up her/his mind
26
VENTURER OFFICERS SEMINAR - APPENDIX
All of us are uniquely different and special, and all of us are the same in that we are human
beings with feelings, and the ability to think and choose. But most people fall on one side or
the other on each of these four categories. And while all of us are at least a little of both, the
more one list seems to you to be most like you, and the higher you scored in that area of your
test, the more you will probably work and be comfortable in that style.
Put all the 4 areas together and it helps you understand your preferences for learning and
acting in general. All 16 combinations (or types) are just as valuable and necessary. Each
contributes special gifts we all need. We require all types to make things work and balance
out.
The more we can understand one another's differences the better we can
understand and get along with each other.
27
VENTURER OFFICERS SEMINAR - APPENDIX
The 16 Personality Style Types
From your answers on the PSI you scored as one of these 16 types
CHARACTERISTICS OF EACH OF THE 16 PERSONALITY STYLES
ISTJ
Serious, quiet, earn success by concentration and thoroughness. Practical, orderly, matter-offact, logical, realistic, dependable. See to it that everything is well organized. Take
responsibility. Make up their minds as to what should be accomplished and work toward is
steadily, regardless of protests or distractions
ISFJ
Quiet friendly, responsible, and conscientious. Work devotedly to meet their obligations.
Lend stability to any project or group. Thorough, painstaking, accurate. Their interests are
usually not technical. Can be patient with necessary details. Loyal, considerate, perceptive,
concerned with how other people feel
INFJ
Succeed by perseverance, originality, and desire to do whatever is needed or wanted. Put
their best efforts into their work. Quietly forceful, conscientious, concerned for others.
Respected for their firm principles. Likely to be honored and followed for their clear
convictions as to how best to serve the common good.
INTJ
Usually have original minds and great drive for their own ideas and purposes. In fields that
appeal to them, they have a fine power to organize a job and carry it out with or without help.
Skeptical, critical, independent determined, sometimes stubborn. Must learn to yield less
important points in order to win the most important
ISTP
Cool onlookers. Quiet, reserved, observing and analyzing life with detached curiosity and
unexpected flashes of original humor. Usually interested in cause and effect-how and why
mechanical things work, and in organizing facts use logical principles.
ISFP
Retiring, quiet, sensitive, kind, and modest about their abilities. Shun disagreements; do not
force their opinions or values on others. Usually do not care to lead but are often loyal
followers. Often relaxed about getting things done, because they enjoy the moment and do
not want to spoil it by undue haste or exertion.
INFP
Full of enthusiasm and loyalties, but seldom talk of these until they know you well. Care
about learning ideas, language, and independent projects of their own. Tend to undertake too
much, then somehow get it done. Friendly, but often too absorbed in what they are doing to
be sociable. Little concerned with possessions or physical surroundings.
28
VENTURER OFFICERS SEMINAR - APPENDIX
INTP
Quiet and reserved. Especially enjoy theoretical or scientific pursuits. Like solving problems
with logic and analysis. Usually interested mainly ideas, with little liking for parties or small
talk. Tend to have sharply defined interests. Need careers where some strong interests can be
used and useful.
ESTP
Good at on the spot problem solving. Do not worry-enjoy whatever comes along. Tend to
like mechanical things and sports, with friends on the side. Adaptable, tolerant, generally
conservative in values. Dislike long explanations. Are best with real things that can be
worked, handled, taken apart, or put together.
ESFP
Outgoing, easygoing, accepting, enjoy everything and make things more fun for others by
their enjoyment. Like sports and making things happen. Know what is going on and join in
eagerly. Find remembering facts easier than mastering theories. Are best in situations that
need sound common sense and practical ability with people as well as with things.
ENFP
Warmly enthusiastic, high spirited, ingenious, imaginative. Able to do almost anything that
interests them. Quick with a solution for any difficulty and ready to help anyone with a
problem. Often rely on their ability to improvise instead of preparing in advance. Can usually
find compelling reasons for whatever they want.
ENTP
Quick, ingenious, good at many things. Stimulating company alert and outspoken. May argue
for fun on either side of question. Resourceful in solving new and challenging problems but
may neglect some routine assignments. Apt to turn to one new interest after another. Skillful
in finding logical reasons for what they want.
ESTJ
Practical, realistic, matter of fact with a natural head for business and mechanics. Not
interested in subjects they see no use for, but can apply themselves when necessary. Like to
organize and run activities. May be good administrators, especially if they remember to
consider others' feelings and points of view.
ESFJ
Warm-hearted, talkative, popular, conscientious, born cooperators, active committee
members. Need harmony and may be good at creating it. Always doing something nice for
someone. Work best with encouragement and praise. Main interest is in things that directly
and practically help people's lives
ENFJ
Responsive and responsible. Generally feel real concern for what others think or want, and
try to handle things with due regard for the other person's feelings. Can present a proposal or
lead a group discussion with ease and tact. Sociable, popular, sympathetic. Responsive to
praise and criticism.
ENTJ
Hearty, frank, decisive leaders in activities. Usually good in anything that requires reasoning
and intelligent talk, such as public speaking. Are usually well informed and enjoy adding to
their fun of knowledge. May sometimes appear more positive and confident than their
experience in the area warrants.
29
VENTURER OFFICERS SEMINAR - APPENDIX
Sensing Types
Introverts
Extroverts
Intuitive Types
ISTJ
ISFJ
INFJ
INTJ
Serious, quiet, earn success by
concentration and thoroughness.
Practical, orderly, matter-of-fact,
logical, realistic, dependable. See
to it that everything is well
organized. Take responsibility.
Make up their minds as to what
should be accomplished and work
toward is steadily, regardless of
protests or distractions.
Quiet friendly, responsible,
and conscientious. Work
devotedly to meet their
obligations. Lend stability to
any project or group.
Thorough, painstaking,
accurate. Their interests are
usually not technical. Can be
patient with necessary details.
:Loyal, considerate,
perceptive, concerned with
how other people feel
Succeed by perseverance,
originality, and desire to do
whatever is needed or wanted.
Put their best efforts into their
work. Quietly forceful,
conscientious, concerned for
others. Respected for their
firm principles. Likely to be
honored and followed for their
clear convictions as to how
best to serve the common
good.
Usually have original minds and
great drive for their own ideas
and purposes. In fields that
appeal to them, they have a fine
power to organize a job and carry
it out with or without help.
Skeptical, critical, independent
determined, sometimes stubborn.
Must learn to yield less important
points in order to win the most
important
ISTP
ISFP
INFP
INTP
Cool onlookers. Quiet, reserved,
observing and analyzing life with
detached curiosity and unexpected
flashes of original humor. Usually
interested in cause and effect-how
and why mechanical things work,
and in organizing facts use logical
principles.
Retiring, quiet, sensitive, kind,
and modest about their
abilities. Shun disagreements;
do not force their opinions or
values on others. Usually do
not care to lead but are often
loyal followers. Often relaxed
about getting things done,
because they enjoy the
moment and do not want to
spoil it by undue haste or
exertion.
Full of enthusiasm and
loyalties, but seldom talk of
these until they know you
well. Care about learning
ideas, language, and
independent projects of their
own. Tend to undertake too
much, then somehow get it
done. Friendly, but often too
absorbed in what they are
doing to be sociable. Little
concerned with possessions or
physical surroundings.
Quiet and reserved. Especially
enjoy theoretical or scientific
pursuits. Like solving problems
with logic and analysis. Usually
interested mainly ideas, with
little liking for parties or small
talk. Tend to have sharply
defined interests. Need careers
where some strong interests can
be used and useful.
ESTP
ESFP
ENFP
ENTP
Good at on the spot problem
solving. Do not worry-enjoy
whatever comes along. Tend to
like mechanical things and sports,
with friends on the side.
Adaptable, tolerant, generally
conservative in values. Dislike
long explanations. Are best with
real things that can be worked,
handled, taken apart, or put
together.
Outgoing, easygoing,
accepting, enjoy everything
and make things more fun for
others by their enjoyment.
Like sports and making things
happen. Know what is going
on and join in eagerly. Find
remembering facts easier than
mastering theories. Are best in
situations that need sound
common sense and practical
ability with people as well as
with things.
Warmly enthusiastic, high
spirited, ingenious,
imaginative. Able to do almost
anything that interests them.
Quick with a solution for any
difficulty and ready to help
anyone with a problem. Often
rely on their ability to
improvise instead of preparing
in advance. Can usually find
compelling reasons for
whatever they want.
Quick, ingenious, good at many
things. Stimulating company
alert and outspoken. May argue
for fun on either side of question.
Resourceful in solving new and
challenging problems but may
neglect some routine
assignments. Apt to turn to one
new interest after another.
Skillful in finding logical reasons
for what they want.
ESTJ
ESFJ
ENFJ
ENTJ
Practical, realistic, matter of fact
with a natural head for business
and mechanics. Not interested in
subjects they see no use for, but
can apply themselves when
necessary. Like to organize and
run activities. May be good
administrators, especially if they
remember to consider others’
feelings and points of view.
Warm-hearted, talkative,
popular, conscientious, born
cooperators, active committee
members. Need harmony and
may be good at creating it.
Always doing something nice
for someone. Work best with
encouragement and praise.
Main interest is in things that
directly and practically help
people’s lives.
Responsive and responsible.
Generally feel real concern for
what others think or want, and
try to handle things with due
regard for the other person’s
feelings. Can present a
proposal or lead a group
discussion with ease and tact.
Sociable, popular,
sympathetic. Responsive to
praise and criticism.
Hearty, frank, decisive leaders in
activities. Usually good in
anything that requires reasoning
and intelligent talk, such as
public speaking. Are usually well
informed and enjoy adding to
their fun of knowledge. May
sometimes appear more positive
and confident than their
experience in the area warrants.
30
VENTURER OFFICERS SEMINAR - APPENDIX
VENTURING LEADERSHIP QUESTIONNAIRE
For each question below circle the letter that represents how you would respond to the situation given in the question, if you were the crew
president.
1. The crew members no longer respond to your friendly conversation and obvious concern for the crew
program and what the members want to do.
A.
B.
C.
D.
Emphasize the use of uniform procedures and the need to accomplish the program.
Be available to talk with crew members but do not push your ideas with the members.
Talk with the crew members and then set goals for the crew.
Intentionally do not interfere with hoe the crew is running
2. The crew’s program planning and activities are obviously improving. You have been making sure that
the crew members are aware of their responsibilities and what performance is expected of them.
A. Engage in friendly interaction but continue to make sure that all crew members are aware of their
responsibilities and what level of performance is expected.
B. Take no definite action.
C. Do what can be done to make the crew members feel important and involved.
D. Emphasize the importance of deadlines and getting the program running.
3. The crew members are unable to solve a program problem by themselves. The crew officers usually let
them work it out by themselves. The crew program and relations among the members have not been
good.
A.
B.
C.
D.
Work with the crew members and start solving the problem together.
Let the crew members work out the problem themselves.
Act quickly and firmly to correct the problem and redirect the crew members efforts.
Encourage the crew members to work on the problem and be supportive of their efforts.
4. The officers are considering a major change in how the crew runs. The crew members have a fine
record of accomplishment.
A.
B.
C.
D.
Allow the crew members to be involved in making the change but o not give too much direction.
Announce the changes and implement them by closely supervising the members.
Allow the crew members to decide on their own plan of action.
Include crew members recommendation but direct how the change will be made.
5. The quality of the crew program and members involvement has been dropping during the last few
months. Members have been unconcerned with making the crew program work. Changing activity
chairman and committee chairmen has helped in the past. The crew members continually need
reminding to have their tasks done on time.
A.
B.
C.
D.
Allow the crew members to decide on their own plan of action.
Incorporate crew members suggestions by see that the crew program runs.
Change who is in charge of the activities and supervise them carefully.
Allow the crew members to determine who plans and runs the activities but do not give them too much
direction
6. The crew officers took over a well run crew program, which the previous officers tightly controlled.
The officers want ot maintain the quality crew program but would like to begin making the crew more
friendly to its members.
A.
B.
C.
D.
Do what can be done to make the crew members feel important and involved.
Emphasize the important of getting things done on time
Intentionally do not interfere in how the crew runs.
Get the crew members involved in the decision making but see that the program runs.
31
VENTURER OFFICERS SEMINAR - APPENDIX
7. The crew officers are considering changing the crew organization in a way that would be new to the
crew members. Members of the crew have made suggestions about needed change. The crew has been
productive and demonstrated flexibility in its operation.
A. Define the change and supervise carefully.
B. Participate with the crew members in developing the change but allow them to organize how it will be
done
C. Be willing to make changes which are recommended but maintain control of how it will be done.
D. Avoid confrontation, leave them alone.
8. The crews performance and the interaction among pot members are good, but the officers feel
somewhat unsure about the lack of direction they have been giving the group.
A.
B.
C.
D.
Leave the crew operations alone.
Discuss the situation with the crew members and then implement necessary changes.
Take steps to direct the crew members toward working in a well defined manner.
Be supportive in discussing the situation with the crew members but do not over direct the crew
members.
9. You are the superactivity committee chairman. Your committee is not clear on what it is to do.
Attendance at committee meetings has been poor and meeting have turned into social gatherings. You
feel that potentially the committee can do the job.
A.
B.
C.
D.
Let the committee work out the problem.
Incorporate committee member recommendations but see that objectives are met.
Redefine what the committee is to accomplish and supervise their efforts carefully.
Allow involvement of the committee members in deciding what they are to accomplish but do not
push.
10. Crew members, usually able to take responsibility, are not responding to the crew’s recent redefining
of standards.
A.
B.
C.
D.
Allow the crew members to be involved in redefining standards but do not take control.
Redefine standards and supervise carefully.
Avoid confrontation by not applying pressure, leave the situation alone.
Incorporate crew members recommendations but see that new standards are met.
11. You have just been elected crew president. The previous president was uninvolved in the affairs of
the crew. The crew members have been running the program without a lot of pushing by the officers.
A.
B.
C.
D.
Take steps to direct crew members toward working in a well defined manner.
Involve crew members in decision making and reinforce good contributions.
Discuss crew performance with the crew members and then examine the need for new practices.
Continue to leave the group alone.
12. The crew members seem unhappy, The crew has a remarkable record of accomplishments. The crew
members have effectively maintained long-range goals. They have worked together for past year. All
crew members are well qualified for the task to be performed.
A.
B.
C.
D.
Try out a solution with the crew members and examine the need for new practices.
Allow crew members to work it out themselves.
Act quickly and firmly to correct situation and redirect members.
Participate in problem discussion while providing support for crew members.
32
CREW OFFICERS’S SEMINAR - APPENDIX
DETERMINING LEADERSHIP STYLE
In the chart below, circle the letter of the alternative you choose for each situation (question).
Then count the number of times and alternative was selected in each of the four columns.
Write the count for each column in the quadrant score row. The alternate action choices for
each situation (question) are not distributed alphabetically, but according to the style of
leadership a particular alternative represents.
SITUATION
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Quadrant
Score
ALTERNATE ACTIONS
Quadrant 1 Quadrant 2 Quadrant 3
A
D
C
B
C
B
A
C
C
B
A
C
C
A
A
D
B
D
C
B
B
D
C
A
B
C
D
A
D
A
B
D
D
A
B
D
Quadrant 4
D
B
B
C
A
C
D
A
A
C
D
B
Figure 1. Determining Leadership Style
Quadrant scores from Figure 1 can be transferred to the basic leadership style chart in Figure
2. The quadrant numbers in Figure 1 correspond to the quadrant numbers in the basic
leadership behavior styles as follows:
Quadrant 1- High Task and Low Relationship
Quadrant 2 - High Task and High Relationship
Quadrant 3 - Low Task and High Relationship
Quadrant 4 - Low Task and Low Relationship
33
CREW OFFICERS’S SEMINAR - APPENDIX
DETERMINING LEADERSHIP STYLE
(Low) < ---------------------TASK BEHAVIOR-------------------------- >(High)
(High)
|
|
|
R
E
L
A
T
I
O
N
S
H
I
P
|
|
|
|
(Low)
QUADRANT 3
QUADRANT 2
HIGH RELATIONSHIP
and
LOW TASK
HIGH RELATIONSHIP
and
HIGH TASK
QUADRANT 4
QUADRANT 1
LOW RELATIONSHIP
and
LOW TASK
LOW RELATIONSHIP
and
HIGH TASK
Figure 2. Basic Leadership Styles
TASK BEHAVIOR is the extent in which the leader organizes and defines what the group is
to do. It is further characterized by the extent to which the leader defines how it is to be
done.
RELATIONSHIP BEHAVIOR is the extent to which a leader engages in personal
relationships with the members. Socio-emotional support and psychological strokes are also
provided by the leader.
Your dominate (natural) style is defined as the quadrant in which the most responses fall.
Your supporting style (or styles) is the leadership style that you tend to use on occasion. The
frequency of responses in quadrants other than that of your dominate style suggests the
number and degree of support styles as you perceive them. At least two responses in a
quadrant are necessary for a style to be considered a supportive style.
34
CREW OFFICERS’S SEMINAR - APPENDIX
DETERMINING STYLE ADAPTABILITY
The degree of style adaptability or effectiveness that you indicate for yourself as a leader can
be determined theoretically in Figure 3. Circle the score given for the alternative that you
selected for each situation (question). Then add the circled numbers (being careful of signs
+1 + +1 =2, -1 + +1 = 0) for each column and then total the score as indicated.
ALTERNATE ACTIONS
SITUATIONS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
SUB TOTAL
A
+2
B
-1
C
+1
D
-2
+2
-2
+1
-1
+1
-1
-2
+2
+1
-2
+2
-1
-2
+1
+2
-1
-1
+1
-2
+2
-2
+2
-1
+1
+2
-1
-2
+1
-2
+1
+2
-1
+1
-2
-1
+2
-2
+2
-1
+1
-1
+2
-2
-1
+
+
+
=
TOTAL
Figure 3. Determining Style Adaptability
35
CREW OFFICERS’S SEMINAR - APPENDIX
SITUATIONAL LEADERSHIP
For each situation the leadership behavior with the highest probability of success is always
weighted a +2 in Figure 3. The behavior with the least probability of success is weighed a -2.
The second best alternative is weighed a +1 and the third a -1 After determining your total
score on Style Adaptability you can determine the degree of your adaptability as ineffective
(-1 to -24) or effective (+1 to +24). An ineffective style means it is harder for you to change
your style with the situation.
Crew members in any situation are important, not only because individually they accept or
reject the leader, but because as a group they determine the personal power of the leader.
The maturity of the group (ability to accomplish the specific task) is important to how you
approach leading the group. Thus an immature group does not know how to accomplish the
task. As you work with various groups on various tasks you may need to change your
approach. Figure 4 gives the most effective style for the various levels of group maturity.
(HIGH)
|
|
R
E
L
A
T
I
O
N
S
H
I
P
|
|
|
|
(LOW)
(LOW) < ----------TASK BEHAVIOR------------------(HIGH)
QUADRANT 2
QUADRANT 3
HIGH RELATIONSHIP
and
LOW TASK
HIGH RELATIONSHIP
and
HIGH TASK
QUADRANT 4
QUADRANT 1
LOW RELATIONSHIP
and
LOW TASK
LOW RELATIONSHIP
and
HIGH TASK
HIGH
MODERATE
LOW
< ----------------------------MATURITY--------------------------- >
Figure 4. Effective Styles
36
CREW OFFICERS’S SEMINAR - APPENDIX
Helpful Hints for Involvement
• Often people don’t get involved simply because nobody ever really asks them! So, ask people to
help — Let them know that you really want and need their assistance.
• Don’t recruit to a position title — recruit to a task. A person might hesitate to become a “chairman”
of an event but would be willing to “plan what we’ll do” at the event.
• People don’t like to fail. Start new members off with simple jobs that you know they can do. Then
be sure that they succeed. They are then more willing to take on larger jobs.
• Avoid asking people to accept assignments at an open meeting. See them in advance, explain what
the job is, tell them that you know they can do it, their help is needed, and you hope they’ll think it
over. They can then express concerns and ask questions before they are asked to commit themselves.
• Find out what your crew members really want to do. A crew interest survey is a great way to do
this. Venturers who are the most interested in a project are the best prospects for helping plan and
carry it out.
• Make a special effort to get to know the new crew members. Learn their names. Don’t be too busy
to be friendly. Seek them out for a real conversation and find out what they expect from the crew.
You’ll make a new friend and develop an active crew member.
• A year’s difference in age is real “generation gap” in high school New members are a little in awe
of the “upper classmen,” the “big kids.” Recognize this and make a special effort to include younger
members in all of the crew’s affairs. Sometimes the crew officers look like a “closed corporation” to
the younger new member.
• When asking someone to help with a project, be sure that they know exactly what they are to do.
Spend a moment to sit with them, talk about it, and help them make a list of what the job involves.
You can quickly learn if they know how to proceed. If not, you can offer suggestions.
• Follow-up carefully with people who have accepted assignments. Don’t try to make them do the job
exactly like you would do it. This limits imagination. Just be sure that they are making progress and
have all the help they need.
• Be a “HE-WHO” (or a “SHE-WHO”). He who can get ten people to work is greater than he who
can do the work of ten people. Let crew members know that you need their help and value their
suggestions. Follow some of their suggestions even if they aren’t the greatest. It will encourage them
to participate.
• When someone goofs, you accept the responsibility. “Gosh, I guess I didn’t explain things to you
very well. Now, let’s see what we can do.” Then, assist the member through the crisis. The leader’s
job is to make his or her people successful.
• Recognize people who help. Everybody likes to be thanked. Make it sincere, however.
• Lead by example. If you are really enthusiastic about your crew’s program and accept
responsibility, your crew members will do the same.
37
CREW OFFICERS’S SEMINAR - APPENDIX
Venturing Leadership Skills
Many years of experience in Venturing have shown that good leadership is a result of the
careful application of 11 skills that any crew member in a leadership position can learn to
use. With practice, these skills become a part of the adults’ or youth members’ leadership
style and will not only positively impact their Venturing experience, but also, all other
leadership opportunities they may have.
Understanding and Meeting the Needs of the Crew Members
Through conversation and informal surveys of crew members try to find out:
♦ Why they join.
♦ What they expect from the crew’s program.
♦ What they would like to see the crew do.
♦ What their major interests are.
♦ How they make decisions for future plans.
♦ What range of choices they see for themselves in the future.
Knowing and Using Resources
♦ Keep the crew’s program capability inventory up to date and use it in planning.
♦ Understand the purpose and resources of your chartered organization. Ask them
for help.
♦ Survey the members’ parents; include them in your program capability inventory.
♦ Survey the crew members to determine skills, interests, and resources.
♦ Survey the possible involvement of community organizations in your crew’s
program.
Communicating
To improve your skills in getting information:
♦ Pay attention and listen carefully.
♦ Take notes and sketches to help you remember what was said.
♦ Ask questions to clarify and repeat your understanding of what was said.
To improve your skills in giving information:
♦ Be sure others are listening before you speak.
♦ Speak slowly, distinctly, and clearly.
♦ Draw diagrams, if needed. Ask those receiving information to make notes.
♦ Have the listeners repeat their understanding of what was said. Encourage
questions.
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Planning
The best procedure for planning an activity by your crew is:
♦ Consider the task and objective. What do you want to accomplish? What are the
desired outcomes?
♦ Consider the resources. Who can help? Where can you get equipment,
transportation, or facilities?
♦ Brainstorm with the crew for ideas.
♦ Consider the alternatives with the group.
♦ Reach a decision through group concensus.
♦ Write it down and review it with the crew.
♦ Execute the plan.
Controlling
When working with crew members, do the following:
♦ Continually observe the group. Know what is happening and the mood of the
group.
♦ Make your instructions clear and pertinent.
♦ Pitch in and help when necessary.
♦ Encourage crew members to take the lead.
♦ Quickly deal with disruption. Guide the crew toward self-discipline.
Evaluating
After any event or activity, help the crew members to reflect on the meaning of their
experience.
♦ Review the experience. Did the members like it?
♦ Share reactions to the experience. Encourage members to describe their feelings,
thoughts, concerns, and ideas about what they thought happened.
♦ Process the experience by asking “how, what, and why” questions, such as:
Were the objectives reached? The task accomplished?
Was the activity worth the effort?
Would members recommend that the crew do it again?
What made it fun?
Was everyone involved?
What did the members learn from participating in the event?
Were the objectives of your crew, its chartered organization, and Venturing
met?
How can the results of this experience relate to other situations in life?
Setting the Example
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♦ As leader you should live up to the standards of the crew and Venturing. You were
selected with this in mind.
♦ Actions speak louder than your words. Your attitude and behavior are a great
influence on your crew.
♦ Treat members with respect.
Sharing Leadership
Good leadership will produce the following results:
♦ A spirit of cooperation and teamwork.
♦ A feeling that members are valuable, needed and wanted.
♦ You will need to change how your lead the group depending on how well the group
can get the job done.
♦ Involve the group in making decisions.
Counseling
A good leader takes an interest in and supports the personal development of individual
members. You may need to spend time to help disruptive or apathetic members:
How to counsel:
♦ Seek a location where there’s privacy.
♦ Give the person your undivided attention.
♦ Make them feel at ease.
♦ Listen-encourage him or her to talk about the problem.
♦ Try to understand what is being said. Ask questions to clarify points.
♦ Do not offer advice. He or she may reject your suggestions until the problem is
fully discussed.
♦ Encourage him or her to discuss alternatives.
♦ Instead of advice, offer additional information that may be helpful.
♦ Ask what he or she thinks should be done. The person with the problem often may
have the solution without knowing it.
♦ Decide on a plan-perhaps the problem could be solved one step at a time.
Representing the Crew
You were elected by your crew to make decisions on their behalf and represent their
interests. You will need to:
♦ Solicit and analyze members’ views.
♦ Attempt to represent these views within the framework of the objectives of the
crew, chartered organization, and Venturing.
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Where do you represent the crew?
Advisor:
President:
Crew committee
Chartered organization
Advisors’ meetings
Officers’ meetings
EOA meetings
Planning conferences
Effective Teaching
Effective Teaching is a way of teaching that deeply involves the Venturer in the learning
experience. The techniques are to:
♦ Help the person discover what he or she already knows. The Venturer will feel
good about this.
♦ Help the person discover what he or she needs to know.
♦ Encourage the person to relearn job skills.
♦ Teach the subject or skill using a variety of methods.
♦ Provide opportunities for members to try out the new knowledge or skill.
♦ Evaluate. See if the learner learned and the teacher taught.
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LITTLE THINGS TO LOOK FOR
IN PLANNING AN ACTIVITY
For some reason people are able to handle the big disaster but get frustrated and irritated over minor
flaws and oversights. Here are some of the little things that often are overlooked in an activity,
meeting or event:
Whose supposed to come and how are they invited?
Is all the information in the invitation or announcement?
What should I bring? How do I find the place? A map is always a good idea.
Is the street address given in case I can’t read a map?
Is there parking? Where? Is there a charge? How much? Is parking validated?
Who unlocks the door, turns on the lights, and sets up the meeting room?
Has the meeting room or facility been checked out WELL BEFORE the date?
If the event is in a large facility, which entrance? Is there a sign?
Once inside the facility, where do I go? Are there signs, a function board, or someone to direct
me?
Is the meeting room or activity area clearly marked?
Is someone on hand to greet me AS SOON as I arrive?
Is the meeting room or activity chairman and staff on hand at least 30 minutes before the meeting is
open?
Does the meeting start on time? End on time?
Does the chairman take charge of the meeting and do things appear to be organized?
Is the seating comfortable? How is the lighting, heat, cooling, ventilation?
Will there be any breaks? Where are the rest rooms, drinking fountains, soft drinks, coffee?
Can everyone hear? If a sound system is used, can volume be adjusted?
If materials are used, can the lights be dimmed? Is someone assigned to do this?
Is the audiovisual set. framed, and previewed so that it’s ready to go.
Was it worth my time to participate in this meeting or activity?
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Crew Meeting Agenda
Call to Order and Introduction of Guests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Crew
President
Old Business
•
Reading of the minutes from the previous meeting
•
Treasurer’s report
•
Crew officers’ reports
New Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Crew
President
•
Discussion by Venturers on matters that need a decision
•
Enrollment of new youth attending the meeting .............Vice President-Administration
•
Promotion of upcoming events...........................................Vice President-Program
•
Reminder of the next meeting and about any materials needed, other requirements, or what to
bring and wear, etc. ...................................................Activity Chair
•
Crew Advisor’s comments
Crew Career Opportunities Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Youth Activity
Chair
Next Meeting Announcement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Crew President
Closing Reflection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Crew Officer
After the meeting, the vice president—program follows up with the activity chair to double-check
all arrangements for the next crew meeting.
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_______________________________________
For Completing
CREW
OFFICERS’ SEMINAR
DATE
_____________________________
_____________________________
Committee Chairman
Crew Advisor
NOTES:
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