Installation Manual Installation Manual

Installation
Manual
MN1274 06/2001
Copyright Baldor (c) 2001. All rights reserved.
This manual is copyrighted and all rights are reserved. This document or attached software may not, in whole or in
part, be copied or reproduced in any form without the prior written consent of Baldor.
Baldor makes no representations or warranties with respect to the contents hereof and specifically disclaims any
implied warranties of fitness for any particular purpose. The information in this document is subject to change
without notice. Baldor assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document.
Mintt is a registered trademark of Baldor.
Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows ME, Windows NT and Windows 2000 are registered
trademarks of the Microsoft Corporation.
Limited Warranty
For a period of two (2) years from the date of original purchase, Baldor will repair or replace without charge
controls and accessories which our examination proves to be defective in material or workmanship. This warranty
is valid if the unit has not been tampered with by unauthorized persons, misused, abused, or improperly installed
and has been used in accordance with the instructions and/or ratings supplied. This warranty is in lieu of any
other warranty or guarantee expressed or implied. Baldor shall not be held responsible for any expense (including
installation and removal), inconvenience, or consequential damage, including injury to any person or property
caused by items of our manufacture or sale. (Some countries and U.S. states do not allow exclusion or limitation
of incidental or consequential damages, so the above exclusion may not apply.) In any event, Baldor’s total
liability, under all circumstances, shall not exceed the full purchase price of the control. Claims for purchase price
refunds, repairs, or replacements must be referred to Baldor with all pertinent data as to the defect, the date
purchased, the task performed by the control, and the problem encountered. No liability is assumed for
expendable items such as fuses. Goods may be returned only with written notification including a Baldor Return
Authorization Number and any return shipments must be prepaid.
Baldor UK Ltd
Mint Motion Centre
6 Bristol Distribution Park
Hawkley Drive
Bristol, BS32 0BF
Telephone: +44 (0) 1454 850000
Fax:
+44 (0) 1454 850001
Email:
technical.support@baldor.co.uk
Web site:
www.baldor.co.uk
Baldor Electric Company
Telephone: +1 501 646 4711
Fax:
+1 501 648 5792
Email:
sales@baldor.com
Web site:
www.baldor.com
Baldor ASR GmbH
Telephone: +49 (0) 89 90508-0
Fax:
+49 (0) 89 90508-492
Baldor ASR AG
Telephone: +41 (0) 52 647 4700
Fax:
+41 (0) 52 659 2394
Australian Baldor Pty Ltd
Telephone: +61 2 9674 5455
Fax:
+61 2 9674 2495
Baldor Electric (F.E.) Pte Ltd
Telephone: +65 744 2572
Fax:
+65 747 1708
Baldor Italia S.R.L
Telephone: +39 (0) 11 56 24 440
Fax:
+39 (0) 11 56 25 660
iii
Safety Notice
Only qualified personnel should attempt the start-up procedure or troubleshoot this equipment.
This equipment may be connected to other machines that have rotating parts or parts that are controlled by this
equipment. Improper use can cause serious or fatal injury. Only qualified personnel should attempt to start-up,
program or troubleshoot this equipment.
Precautions
iv
WARNING:
Do not touch any circuit board, power device or electrical connection before you first ensure
that no high voltage is present at this equipment or other equipment to which it is connected.
Electrical shock can cause serious or fatal injury. Only qualified personnel should attempt to
start-up, program or troubleshoot this equipment.
WARNING:
Be sure the system is properly grounded before applying power. Do not apply AC power
before you ensure that grounds are connected. Electrical shock can cause serious or fatal
injury.
WARNING:
Be sure that you are completely familiar with the safe operation and programming of this
equipment. This equipment may be connected to other machines that have rotating parts or
parts that are controlled by this equipment. Improper use can cause serious or fatal injury.
Only qualified personnel should attempt to program, start-up or troubleshoot this equipment.
WARNING:
Be sure all wiring complies with the National Electrical Code and all regional and local codes.
Improper wiring may result in unsafe conditions.
WARNING:
The stop input to this equipment should not be used as the single means of achieving a
safety critical stop. Drive disable, motor disconnect, motor brake and other means should be
used as appropriate. Only qualified personnel should attempt to program, start-up or
troubleshoot this equipment.
WARNING:
Improper operation or programming of the drive may cause violent motion of the motor shaft
and driven equipment. Be certain that unexpected motor shaft movement will not cause
injury to personnel or damage to equipment. Peak torque of several times the rated motor
torque can occur during control failure.
WARNING:
The motor circuit might have high voltages present whenever AC power is applied, even
when the motor is not rotating. Electrical shock can cause serious or fatal injury.
WARNING:
If a motor is driven mechanically, it might generate hazardous voltages that are conducted to
its power terminals. The enclosure must be grounded to prevent possible shock hazard.
WARNING:
When operating a motor with no load coupled to its shaft, remove the shaft key to prevent it
flying out when the shaft rotates.
WARNING:
A regeneration resistor may generate enough heat to ignite combustible materials.
To avoid fire hazard, keep all combustible materials and flammable vapors away from the
brake resistors.
CAUTION:
To prevent equipment damage, be certain that the input power has correctly sized protective
devices installed.
CAUTION:
To prevent equipment damage, be certain that input and output signals are powered and
referenced correctly.
CAUTION:
To ensure reliable performance of this equipment be certain that all signals to/from the drive
are shielded correctly.
CAUTION:
Suitable for use on a circuit capable of delivering not more than the RMS symmetrical short
circuit amperes listed here at rated voltage.
Horsepower
RMS Symmetrical Amperes
1-50
5,000
CAUTION:
Avoid locating the drive immediately above or beside heat generating equipment, or directly
below water or steam pipes.
CAUTION:
Avoid locating the drive in the vicinity of corrosive substances or vapors, metal particles and
dust.
CAUTION:
Do not connect AC power to the drive terminals U, V and W. Connecting AC power to these
terminals may result in damage to the drive.
CAUTION:
Baldor does not recommend using “Grounded Leg Delta” transformer power leads that may
create ground loops and degrade system performance. Instead, we recommend using a four
wire Wye.
CAUTION:
Drives are intended to be connected to a permanent main power source, not a portable
power source. Suitable fusing and circuit protection devices are required.
CAUTION:
The safe integration of the drive into a machine system is the responsibility of the machine
designer. Be sure to comply with the local safety requirements at the place where the
machine is to be used. In Europe these are the Machinery Directive, the ElectroMagnetic
Compatibility Directive and the Low Voltage Directive. In the United States this is the National
Electrical code and local codes.
CAUTION:
Drives must be installed inside an electrical cabinet that provides environmental control and
protection. Installation information for the drive is provided in this manual. Motors and
controlling devices that connect to the drive should have specifications compatible to the
drive.
CAUTION:
Violent jamming (stopping) of the motor shaft during operation may damage the motor and
drive.
CAUTION:
Do not tin (solder) exposed wires. Solder contracts over time and may cause loose
connections. Use crimp connections where possible.
CAUTION:
Electrical components can be damaged by static electricity. Use ESD (electro-static
discharge) procedures when handling this drive.
v
vi
CAUTION:
Ensure that resolver or encoder wires are properly connected. Incorrect installation may
result in improper rotation or incorrect commutation.
CAUTION:
The threaded holes in the top and bottom of the enclosure are for cable clamps. Be sure to
use a M4 bolt no longer than 12mm in length. Longer bolts might short circuit the electrical
components inside the drive.
CAUTION:
Removing the cover will invalidate UL certification.
Contents
1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
1.1
MintDrive features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
1.2
Receiving and inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
1.2.1 Identifying the catalog number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
MintDrive indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
1.3.1
1.3.2
1.3.3
1.3.4
3
3
3
3
1.3
1.4
2
Monitor LED display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CAN 1 and 2 LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ready LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DB On (Regeneration Load) LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Units and abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
Basic Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
2.1
Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
2.1.1
2.1.2
2.1.3
2.1.4
2.1.5
5
7
7
7
7
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
Hardware requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RS485 / RS422 systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tools and miscellaneous hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other information needed for installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mechanical installation and location requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8
2.2.1 Dimensions and mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
Power connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10
2.3.1
2.3.2
2.3.3
2.3.4
2.3.5
2.3.6
2.3.7
2.3.8
2.3.9
2.3.10
11
12
12
14
15
15
16
16
17
18
Grounding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Input power conditioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power disconnect and protection devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wire sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single phase connection to package size A or B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single phase connection to package size C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Three phase connection to package size C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24V control supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DC Bus power connections from package size C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power supply filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Motor connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19
2.4.1 Motor circuit contactors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.2 Regeneration resistor (Dynamic Brake resistor) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20
21
Feedback connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22
2.5.1 Resolver option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5.2 Encoder option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23
25
Drive enable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
26
vii
3
Input / Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1
Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27
3.2
Analog I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27
3.2.1
3.2.2
3.2.3
3.2.4
3.2.5
28
29
30
32
33
3.3
3.4
4
Analog Input, Single Ended - X11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analog Input, Differential - X11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analog Inputs, Differential - X5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analog Outputs, Bipolar - X11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analog Outputs, Bipolar - X5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
34
3.3.1
3.3.2
3.3.3
3.3.4
35
37
39
40
Digital Inputs - X13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital Inputs - X5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital Outputs - X13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital Outputs - X5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
41
3.4.1
3.4.2
3.4.3
3.4.4
3.4.5
3.4.6
3.4.7
3.4.8
41
42
44
45
46
47
48
48
Simulated encoder output - X3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Master (auxiliary) encoder input - X6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Serial port - X7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using RS232 cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multidrop using RS485 / RS422 cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting Baldor HMI Operator Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Optional breakout board for connector X5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CAN peripherals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tuning and Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
viii
27
49
Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
49
4.1.1 Connecting the MintDrive to the PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1.2 Installing the software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1.3 Starting the MintDrive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
49
49
50
Mint Configuration Tool Startup Wizard - coarse tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
51
MCT Startup Wizard - fine-tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
54
4.3.1
4.3.2
4.3.3
4.3.4
4.3.5
54
56
57
59
60
An introduction to closed loop control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fine-tuning the speed loop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fine-tuning the position loop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Jog test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Completing the Startup Wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MCT Wizard - hardware configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
61
4.4.1
4.4.2
4.4.3
4.4.4
4.4.5
4.4.6
4.4.7
61
62
63
63
64
64
65
Digital input configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital output configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Axis0 parameter configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Axis0 error configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Axis0 tuning configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Miscellaneous configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Completing the configuration wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
Mint WorkBench . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
6
7
Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
67
5.1.1 Completing configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
67
Using WorkBench . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
68
5.2.1 Selecting the controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.2 Menus and buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
68
68
Watch window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
70
5.3.1
5.3.2
5.3.3
5.3.4
70
71
72
73
Quick Watch tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Speed Loop tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Position Loop tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Capture tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editor windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
74
5.4.1
5.4.2
5.4.3
5.4.4
5.4.5
74
74
75
75
77
Configuration window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terminal window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Useful commands for testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Firmware update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.1
79
Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
79
6.1.1
6.1.2
6.1.3
6.1.4
6.1.5
6.1.6
6.1.7
79
80
81
81
82
82
83
General specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rectifier and regeneration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resolver feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Encoder feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Control signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.1
67
85
Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
85
7.1.1
7.1.2
7.1.3
7.1.4
7.1.5
7.1.6
7.1.7
85
86
87
89
90
91
94
Problem diagnosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mint gains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ready LED is red . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ix
Appendices
A
Tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.1
A.1.2
A.1.3
A.1.4
A.1.5
A.1.6
A.1.7
A.1.8
A.1.9
B
Closed loop control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Position loop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Speed loop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Current loop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MintDrive operational modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tuning the position loop for a velocity servo drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tuning the position loop for a servo drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tuning the position loop for a torque servo drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving tuning information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
97
97
99
100
101
101
101
102
102
105
105
CAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
B.1
Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
107
B.1.1 MintDrive capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
B.2
B.3
x
CAN 1 (CANopen) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
109
B.2.1 CAN 1 (CANopen) - X9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.2 What is CANopen? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.3 Configuring nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.4 Network manager - node 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.5 Scanning nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.6 Connecting to nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.7 Monitoring CAN events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.8 Controller nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.9 I/O nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.2.10 HMI Operator Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
109
110
111
111
111
112
113
114
115
117
CAN 2 (Baldor CAN) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
119
B.3.1 CAN 2 (Baldor CAN) - X8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3.2 Preparing the MintDrive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3.3 Preparing the CAN peripheral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3.4 Connecting the PC, MintDrive and CAN peripheral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3.5 Node IDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3.6 Static configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3.7 Adding the node to the network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3.8 Monitoring CAN Bus communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3.9 Controlling the CAN peripheral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3.10 Normal operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3.11 KeypadNode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3.12 ioNode 24/24 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3.13 Example CAN network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3.14 Mint CAN related keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
119
120
120
120
121
121
122
123
123
123
124
125
126
127
C
CE Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
C.1
D
Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
129
C.1.1
C.1.2
C.1.3
C.1.4
C.1.5
C.1.6
129
130
130
130
131
132
Declaration of Conformity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EMC Conformity and CE marking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use of CE compliant components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EMC wiring technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EMC installation suggestions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wiring of shielded (screened) cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessories and options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
D.1
Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
135
D.1.1
D.1.2
D.1.3
D.1.4
D.1.5
135
136
137
139
140
Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resolver feedback cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EMC mains filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Regeneration resistors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Breakout board - X5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
xi
xii
1
1.1
Introduction
1
MintDrive features
The MintDrive combines a powerful fully featured motion controller and brushless servo amplifier into a
compact package. This provides a flexible and powerful motion control solution for almost any single
axis positioning system. Programmable in Mintt, applications can be quickly realized. Using the
onboard CAN bus, drives can be connected together for loosely coupled multi-axis systems.
Features include:
H Single axis AC brushless drive with integrated Mint controller
H 2.5A to 15A continuous current ratings (model dependent)
H Direct on line connection to 115V or 230V single input or 230V three phase input (model dependent)
H Programmable in Mint
H Point to point moves, software cams and gearing
H 18 optically isolated digital inputs
H 9 optically isolated digital outputs
H 4 general purpose analog inputs
H 4 general purpose analog outputs
H CANopen protocol for peer-to-peer communications with other Mint v4 controllers, and other third
party devices.
H Proprietary CAN protocol for control of Baldor remote I/O devices
H RS232 and RS485 communications
H Flash memory for program and data storage.
MintDrive will operate with a large number of brushless servo motors. For information on selecting
Baldor servo motors, please see the sales catalog BR1202.
This manual is intended to guide you through the installation of MintDrive, whether you are a novice in
the field of motion control or an experienced engineer.
The chapters should be read in sequence.
The Basic Installation section describes the mechanical installation of the MintDrive, the power supply
connections and motor connections. The following sections require knowledge of the low level
input/output requirements of the installation and an understanding of computer software installation.
If you are not qualified in these areas you should seek assistance before proceeding.
1
1.2
Receiving and inspection
When you receive your MintDrive, there are several things you should do immediately:
1. Check the condition of the shipping container and report any damage immediately to the carrier that
delivered your MintDrive.
2. Remove the MintDrive from the shipping container and remove all packing material. The container and
packing materials may be retained for future shipment.
3. Verify that the catalog number of the MintDrive you received is the same as the catalog number listed
on your purchase order. The catalog/part number is described in the next section.
4. Inspect the MintDrive for external damage during shipment and report any damage to the carrier that
delivered your MintDrive.
5. If MintDrive is to be stored for several weeks before use, be sure that it is stored in a location that
conforms to the storage humidity and temperature specifications shown on page 83.
1.2.1
Identifying the catalog number
MintDrives are available with different current ratings and package sizes.
The catalog number describing the model is marked on a label on the side of the unit.
It is a good idea to look for the catalog number (sometimes shown as ID/No: ) and write it in the space
provided below.
Catalog number:
Installed at:
MD_____________-_______
___________________________
Date:
______
A description of a catalog number is shown below, using the example number MD1A05TB-RC23:
Meaning
Alternatives
MD
The unit is a member of the MintDrive family.
-
1
Requires an AC supply voltage of 115 Volts.
2=230V
Continuous current rating of 5.0A.
A02=2.5A; A07=7.5A;
A10=10A; A15=15A
T
Built in mains power supply.
S=Built in mains power supply with
DC out for powering other drives
B
Dynamic Brake with a built in transistor and resistor
(available on 2.5A and 5A models only).
R=Requires external braking resistor
R
Feedback option is a resolver.
E=Encoder
C
CAN Bus option (MintDrive is always fitted with CAN).
-
2
Serial port type is combined RS232 / RS485.
-
3
Additional 24VDC supply is required to power the
internal MintDrive logic*.
0=Self generated internal 24VDC
logic supply*
A05
* An external 24VDC supply will always be required to operate the enable input and digital inputs on
connectors X13 and X5. See pages 26, 35 and 37.
2
1.3
MintDrive indicators
1.3.1
Monitor LED display
The 7-segment Monitor LED display indicates general MintDrive status information:
1.3.2
Drive Disabled
Drive in error (see section 7)
Drive Enabled
Follow mode
Jogging
Local (see troubleshooting guide)
Positional Move i.e. MOVEA, MOVER
Flying shear
Homing
Cam
Incremental move i.e. INCA, INCR
Speed Demand
Torque mode
Firmware being updated by WorkBench
CAN 1 and 2 LEDs
The CAN 1 and 2 LEDs refer to the independent CAN buses CAN1 and CAN2.
1.3.3
Green
The bus is operational
Red/
Green
The bus is passive (see page 94)
Red
The bus is OFF (see page 94)
Off
No primary power to the MintDrive
Ready LED
The front panel Ready LED indicates the general status of the MintDrive.
1.3.4
Green
The MintDrive is operating normally
Red
An error condition exists (see page 91)
Off
No primary power to the MintDrive
DB On (Regeneration Load) LED
The front panel DB On LED indicates regeneration activity.
Yellow
Power is being dissipated into the regeneration resistor
Off
No regeneration occurring
3
1.4
Units and abbreviations
The following units and abbreviations are used in this manual:
V ............
W ............
A ............
Ω ............
pF . . . . . . . . . . .
mH . . . . . . . . . . .
Volt (also VAC and VDC)
Watt
Ampere
Ohm
picofarad
millihenry
φ ............
ms . . . . . . . . . . .
µs . . . . . . . . . . . .
ns . . . . . . . . . . . .
phase
millisecond
microsecond
nanosecond
Kbaud . . . . . . . .
MB . . . . . . . . . . .
CDROM . . . . . .
CTRL+E . . . . . .
kilobaud (the same as Kbit/s in most applications)
megabytes
Compact Disc Read Only Memory
on the PC keyboard, press Ctrl then E at the same time.
mm . . . . . . . . . .
m ............
” .............
ft . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lbin . . . . . . . . . . .
Nm . . . . . . . . . . .
millimeter
meter
inch
feet
pound-inch (torque)
Newton-meter (torque)
ADC . . . . . . . . . . Analog to Digital Converter
AWG . . . . . . . . . American Wire Gauge
4
2
2.1
Basic Installation
2
Outline
You must read all the sections in Basic Installation.
It is important that the correct steps are followed when installing the MintDrive. This section covers the
mechanical and electrical installation of the MintDrive, including the following steps:
H Location considerations
H Mounting the MintDrive
H Connecting the power supply
H Connecting the optional control supply
H Connecting the motor
H Installing a regeneration resistor
H Connecting the feedback signal
H Connecting the drive enable signal.
Each step should be followed in sequence.
2.1.1
Hardware requirements
The components you will need to complete the basic installation are described below:
H Under some applications, such as those with high deceleration rates, there may be a requirement
for a dynamic brake (or regeneration) resistor.
Note: Without the braking resistor, the drive may produce an overvoltage fault.
All MintDrives have overvoltage sensing circuitry, but only the 2.5A and 5A units have an
integral regeneration resistor. For 7.5A, 10A and 15A units a regeneration resistor must be
purchased separately if required. See Appendix D.
H A PC that fulfills the following specification:
Minimum specification
Recommended specification
Intel Pentium 133MHz
Intel Pentium 200MHz or faster
RAM
32MB
64MB
Hard disk space
40MB
60MB
Processor
CD-ROM
Screen
Mouse
Operating system
A CD-ROM drive is required
800 x 600, 256 colors
1024 x 768, 256 colors
A mouse or similar pointing device is required
Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows ME, Windows NT or Windows 2000
5
H The servo motor that will be connected to the MintDrive.
H The appropriate motor cable. For easier installation it is recommended that a color-coded Baldor
motor power cable is used. A description of a Baldor motor power cable catalog number is shown
below, using the example number CBL030SP-MHM:
Meaning
Alternatives
CBL
The item is a cable.
-
030
Indicates the length, in this example 3.0 meters.
Various lengths are available
SP
The cable is a Servo motor Power cable.
-
M
Current rating of 10A.
F=20A; E=30A
H
8-pin connector
-
M
Metric style threaded connector
CE=CE connector
Motor power cables are also available without connectors, in which case the last two letters (HM in
the example above) are not used.
H A resolver 9-core cable, 15-core if the MintDrive is fitted with the encoder option. A description of a
feedback cable catalog number is shown below, using the example number CBL030SF-ALM.
Meaning
Alternatives
CBL
The item is a cable.
-
030
Indicates the length, in this example 3.0 meters.
Various lengths are available
SF
The cable is a Servo motor Feedback cable.
-
A
Suitable for resolver feedback
K=Suitable for Encoder / Hall
feedback
L
12-pin connector
-
M
Metric style threaded connector
CE=CE connector
If you are not using a Baldor cable with your chosen feedback device, be sure to obtain a cable that
is a shielded twisted pair 22 AWG (0.34mm2) wire minimum, with an overall shield. Ideally, the cable
should not exceed 66ft (20m) in length. Maximum wire-to-wire or wire-to-shield capacitance is 50pF
per foot (300mm) (maximum of 7500pF for 150ft).
H An RS232 cable (Baldor order code CBL023-501), or the components to build one yourself.
Note: As the RS232 connector is shared with the RS485 port, a standard serial cable must not be
used as this may result in damage to the unit. See pages 44 and 45.
H (Optional) A break-out board (catalog number OPT017-501) for input/output from connector X5.
H A mains cable.
6
2.1.2
RS485 / RS422 systems
If your PC does not have an RS485 / RS422 connector, an RS232 to 4-wire RS485 / RS422 converter
will be required. This allows signals from the RS232 port to be converted to the signals necessary for
RS485 / RS422 communications. Appropriate converters are available from KK Systems Ltd
(www.kksystems.com).
Note: If this is the first time you are installing a MintDrive then it is strongly recommended that you
use RS232 to get started and use RS485 later. This will avoid any potential problems
involving the RS232-RS485 converter.
Also, MME (Mint Motion Engine) firmware can only be updated over RS232.
2.1.3
Power sources
If the MintDrive requires an external 24VDC for the logic supply then this must be a regulated power
supply with a minimum current supply capability of 1.6A. A 24V filter may be required to comply with
the CE directive for which the MintDrive was tested (see page 18).
A 24VDC power supply is required for the drive enable input, the digital outputs and the digital inputs;
24V cannot be sourced from the MintDrive unit itself.
A mains source (installation over-voltage category III or less) in the installation area is required.
This will need to be single or three phase depending upon the type of MintDrive. A mains filter is
required to comply with the CE directive for which the MintDrive was tested (see page 18).
2.1.4
Tools and miscellaneous hardware
H
H
H
H
2.1.5
Your PC operating system user manual might be useful if you are not familiar with Windows
A small screwdriver with a blade width less than 1/8” (3.5mm)
Screws or bolts (depending on your own mounting requirements) with an M5 fixing
Soldering equipment with suitable soldering tips.
Other information needed for installation
You will need the following information to complete the installation:
H The data sheet or manual provided with your motor, describing the wiring information of the motor
cables/connectors
H Whether digital inputs/outputs will be ’Active Low’ or ’Active High’ to meet the requirements and
specification of the system you are going to build.
7
2.2
Mechanical installation and location requirements
It is essential that you read and understand this section before beginning the installation.
CAUTION:
To prevent equipment damage, be certain that the input power has correctly rated
protective devices installed.
CAUTION:
To prevent equipment damage, be certain that input and output signals are
powered and referenced correctly.
CAUTION:
To ensure reliable performance of this equipment be certain that all signals to/from
the MintDrive are shielded correctly.
CAUTION:
Avoid locating the MintDrive immediately above or beside heat generating
equipment, or directly below water steam pipes.
CAUTION:
Avoid locating the MintDrive in the vicinity of corrosive substances or vapors,
metal particles and dust.
The safe operation of this equipment depends upon its use in the appropriate environment.
The following points must be considered:
H The MintDrive must be installed indoors, permanently fixed and located so that it is not accessible
by the operator and can only be accessed by service personnel using tools.
H The maximum suggested operating altitude is 3300ft (1000m).
Above 3300ft (1000m) de-rate output current 2% per 1000ft (300m).
H The MintDrive must be installed in an ambient temperature of 32°F to 104°F (0°C to 40°C).
De-rate output current 2.5% per 1.8°F (1°C) from 104°F (40°C) to 122°F (50°C) maximum.
H The MintDrive must be installed in relative humidity levels of less than 80% for temperatures up to
87°F (31°C) decreasing linearly to 50% relative humidity at 104°F (40°C) (non-condensing).
H The MintDrive must be installed where the pollution degree according to IEC664 shall not exceed 2.
H For MintDrives that require an external 24VDC for the logic supply, it must be installed so that the
24VDC supplied to the unit is isolated from the mains using double or reinforced insulation.
H The inputs and outputs of the control circuit must be confined to Safety Extra Low Voltage circuits.
H Both the mains supply and the external 24VDC supply must be fused.
H The atmosphere shall not contain flammable gases or vapors.
H There shall not be abnormal levels of nuclear radiation or X-rays.
H The MintDrive must be secured by the slots in the flange, with the protective earth stud bonded to a
safety earth by either a 25A conductor or a conductor of three times the peak current rating whichever is the greater.
H For effective cooling and maintenance, the MintDrive should be mounted on a smooth,
non-flammable vertical surface. The power handling capability is affected by the temperature of the
left hand side of the unit. Ensure a free flow of air is available to maintain the control electronics at a
suitable temperature.
H At least 2” (50mm) top and bottom clearance of the MintDrive must be provided for airflow.
8
H If multiple units are being mounted side by side, a spacing of 0.5” (13mm) must be provided
between the units and from the unit to the side of the cabinet / enclosure.
H To comply with CE directive 89/336/EEC an appropriate mains filter must be installed.
For MintDrives requiring the external 24VDC logic supply, a 24V filter must also be installed.
See page 18.
Dimensions and mounting
Ensure you have read and understood page 8. Mount the MintDrive on its rear side, the side opposite
to the front panel. The MintDrive must be mounted upright to ensure adequate cooling (you can check
this by ensuring that the Hazardous Voltages warning information is clearly readable to you). M5 bolts
or screws should be used to mount the unit.
H2
H3
W1
Package A
2.5A
H1
2.2.1
W2
W3
W4
D
Package C
10A / 15A
Package B
5A / 7.5A
Dimensions inches (mm)
Weight
Package
Current
H1
H2
H3
W1
W2
W3
W4
D
lb (kg)
A
2.5A
6.81
(173)
7.67
(195.5)
8.07
(205)
0.6
(15)
0.6
(15)
1.57
(40)
3.31
(84)
6.00
(152)
4.89
(2.22)
B
5A /
7.5A
6.81
(173)
7.67
(195.5)
8.07
(205)
0.9
(23)
0.9
(23)
1.57
(40)
4.29
(109)
6.00
(152)
5.31
(2.41)
C
10A /
15A
14.05
(357)
15.12
(384)
15.75
(400)
1.1
(27.5)
0.37
(9.5)
1.42
(36)
2.17
(55)
10.43
(265)
9.92
(4.5)
Figure 1 - Package dimensions
9
2.3
Power connections
This section provides instructions for connecting the mains supply. It is important that you refer to the
correct front panel for your MintDrive package.
The installer of this equipment is responsible for complying with NEC (National Electric Code)
guidelines or CE (Conformite Europeene) directives and application codes that govern wiring
protection, grounding, disconnects and other current protection.
WARNING:
Electrical shock can cause serious or fatal injury. Do not touch any power
device or electrical connection before you first ensure that power has been
disconnected and there is no high voltage present from this equipment or
other equipment to which it is connected.
The power supply module within the MintDrive provides rectification, smoothing, regeneration capability
(built-in on 2.5A and 5A models only) and current surge protection.
The power stage is internally fused and therefore self protected, but fuses or circuit breakers may be
used in the input lines for cable protection.
A power disconnect should be installed between the mains supply and the input of the MintDrive for a
fail safe method to disconnect power. The MintDrive will remain in a powered condition until all input
power is removed from the MintDrive and the internal bus voltage is depleted.
On units without the self generated internal 24VDC logic supply (catalog number ends with 3), you
might wish the external 24VDC logic supply to remain connected to retain position and I/O information.
The MintDrive with package size C can accept either single phase direct (115V or 230V depending on
model) or 3 phase with transformer (250VAC max).
Note: A Residual Current Device (RCD) must not be used for fusing the drive.
All interconnection wires should be in metal conduits between the MintDrive, AC power source, motor,
host controller and any operator interface stations. Use UL listed closed loop connectors that are of
appropriate size for the wire gauge being used. Connectors are to be installed using only the crimp tool
specified by the manufacturer of the connector. Only class 1 wiring should be used.
Baldor drives are designed to be powered from standard single and three phase lines (depending on
model) that are electrically symmetrical with respect to ground. Due to the importance of system
grounding for increased reliability, grounding methods are shown in the following sections.
10
2.3.1
Grounding
Single phase units
AC Mains
Supply
L
Note:
MintDrive
L N
N
Wiring shown for clarity of
grounding method only.
Not representative of actual
terminal block location.
U V W
Earth
Safety Ground
Driven Earth
Ground Rod
(Plant Ground)
Circuit breaker
or fuses.
See section
2.3.3.
Route all 3 wires L, N, and
Earth (Ground) together in
conduit or cable. Power
wires must be kept separate
from control signal wires.
Ground as per
NEC and local codes.
Figure 2 - Recommended single phase system grounding
Note: For CE compliance, a 3-phase mains filter must be connected between the mains supply
and the MintDrive. The MintDrive and motor earths should be connected to the enclosure
backplane. (The enclosure backplane should be connected to the earth at the mains source.
There should be a separate connection from the earth at the mains source to the plant
ground rod).
Three phase units
L1
AC Mains
Supply
L2
Four Wire
“Wye”
Note:
MintDrive
L1 L2 L3
U
V W
Wiring shown for clarity of
grounding method only.
Not representative of actual
terminal block location.
L3
Earth
Safety
Ground
Driven Earth
Ground Rod
(Plant Ground)
Circuit breaker
or fuses.
See section
2.3.3.
Route wires L1, L2, L3 and
Earth (Ground) together in
conduit or cable. Power wires
must be kept separate from
control signal wires.
Ground as per
NEC and local codes.
Figure 3 - Recommended 3-phase system grounding
Note: For CE compliance, a 3-phase mains filter must be connected between the mains supply
and the MintDrive. The MintDrive and motor earths should be connected to the enclosure
backplane. (The enclosure backplane should be connected to the earth at the mains source.
There should be a separate connection from the earth at the mains source to the plant
ground rod).
11
Ungrounded distribution systems
To avoid equipment damage an isolation transformer with a grounded secondary is recommended.
This provides three phase AC power that is symmetrical with respect to ground.
2.3.2
Input power conditioning
Baldor drives are designed for direct connection to standard single and three phase lines that are
electrically symmetrical with respect to ground. Certain power line conditions must be avoided;
an AC line reactor, an isolation transformer or a step up/step down transformer may be required for
some power conditions.
H If the feeder or branch circuit that provides power to the MintDrive has permanently connected
power factor correction capacitors, an input AC line reactor or an isolation transformer must be
connected between the power factor correction capacitors and the MintDrive.
H If the feeder or branch circuit that provides power to the MintDrive has power factor correction
capacitors that are switched on line and off line, the capacitors must not be switched while the drive
is connected to the AC power line. If the capacitors are switched on line while the drive is still
connected to the AC power line, additional protection is required. A Transient Voltage Surge
Suppressor (TVSS) of the proper rating must be installed between the AC line reactor (or isolation
transformer) and the AC input to the MintDrive.
2.3.3
Power disconnect and protection devices
A power disconnect should be installed between the input power service and the MintDrive for a
fail-safe method to disconnect power. The MintDrive will remain in a powered condition until all input
power is removed from the drive and the internal bus voltage has depleted.
The MintDrive must have a suitable input power protection device installed. Recommended circuit
breakers are thermal magnetic devices (1 or 3 phase as required) with characteristics suitable for heavy
inductive loads (D-type trip characteristic). Recommended time delay fuses are Buss FRN on 230VAC
or equivalent, following the UL 508C recommendation of a fuse size of four times the continuous output
current of the drive. Dual element, time delay fuses should be used to avoid nuisance trips due to inrush
current when power is first applied.
For CE installations the Gould Shawmut Cat. No. ATMR15 may be suitable, up to 15A.
L
N
Earth
Circuit
Breaker
L
L
N
L
N
Fuse
Connection
N
MintDrive
Circuit breaker and fuse not supplied.
For CE Compliance, see Appendix C.
Figure 4 - Circuit breaker and fuse, single phase, package size A or B
12
L
N
Earth
Circuit
Breaker
L1
L2
L3
L
N
L1
L2
Fuse
Connection
PE
MintDrive
Circuit breaker and fuse not supplied.
For CE Compliance, see Appendix C.
Figure 5 - Circuit breaker and fuse, single phase, package size C
L1
L2
L3
Earth
Circuit
Breaker
L1
L2
L3
MintDrive
PE
L1
L2
L3
L1
L2
L3
Fuse
Connection
Circuit breaker and fuse not supplied.
For CE Compliance, see Appendix C.
Figure 6 - Circuit breaker and fuse, three phase, package size C
Note: Metal conduit or shielded cable should be used. Connect conduits so the use of a Reactor
or RC Device does not interrupt EMI/RFI shielding. If local codes do not specify different
regulations, use the same gauge wire for Earth ground as is used for L and N.
Connect earth to the backplane of the enclosure.
13
2.3.4
Wire sizes
Input and output wire size is based on the use of copper conductor wire rated at 167°F (75°C).
The following tables describe the wire size to be used for power connections and the ratings of the
protection devices.
g Number
Catalog
MD1A02xx-xxxx
MD2A02xx-xxxx
MD1A05xx-xxxx
MD2A05xx-xxxx
MD1A07xx-xxxx
MD2A07xx-xxxx
MD1A10xx-xxxx
MD2A10xx-xxxx
MD1A15xx-xxxx
MD2A15xx-xxxx
Incoming Power
Input
Fuse
Wire Gauge
Nominal
Input
Voltage
Continuous
Output
Amps (RMS)
D-Type
D
Type
Input
Breaker
(A)
Time
Delay
(A)
AWG
mm2
115V (1φ)
230V (1φ)
115V (1φ)
230V (1φ)
115V (1φ)
230V (1φ)
115V (1φ)
230V (3φ)
115V (1φ)
230V (3φ)
2.5A
2.5A
5A
5A
7.5A
7.5A
10A
10A
15A
15A
6
6
10
10
16
16
20
20
32
32
6
6
10
10
16
16
20
20
32
32
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
12
12
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
Note: All wire sizes are based on 75°C copper wire. Higher temperature smaller gauge wire may
be used per NEC and local codes. Recommended fuses/breakers are based on 77°F (25°C)
ambient, maximum continuous control output current and no harmonic current.
14
2.3.5
Single phase connection to package size A or B
Location Connector X1, single or 2-part connector
E
Part number MD1A...
L
N
Input voltage 115VAC, 1φ line to neutral
Range 97-125VAC
MD2A...
230VAC, 1φ line to neutral
220-250VAC
Note: For single phase connection, the voltage ripple on the DC-bus is 25Vp-p for 5A (the peak
current for a 2.5A MintDrive) and 50Vp-p for 10A (the peak current for a 5A MintDrive).
This can limit the maximum speed of the motor.
Tightening torque for terminal block connections is 4.4~5.3 lbin (0.5~0.6Nm).
The threaded holes in the top and bottom of the enclosure are for cable clamps (provided).
The holes are threaded for M4 bolts no longer than 0.47” (12mm) in length. Longer bolts
may short circuit the electrical components inside the MintDrive.
2.3.6
Single phase connection to package size C
or
E
L
N
Earth stud
Location Connector X1, single or 2-part connector
Part number MD1A...
Input voltage 115VAC, 1φ line to neutral
Range 97-125VAC
MD2A...
230VAC, 1φ line to neutral
220-250VAC
Note: For single phase connection, the voltage ripple on the DC-bus is 25Vp-p for 5A (the peak
current for a 2.5A MintDrive) and 50Vp-p for 10A (the peak current for a 5A MintDrive). This
can limit the maximum speed of the motor.
Tightening torque for terminal block connections is 4.4~5.3 lbin (0.5~0.6Nm).
The threaded holes in the top and bottom of the enclosure are for cable clamps (provided).
The holes are threaded for M4 bolts no longer than 0.47” (12mm) in length. Longer bolts
may short circuit the electrical components inside the MintDrive.
15
2.3.7
Three phase connection to package size C
or
Earth stud
E
L1
L2
L3
Location Connector X1, single or 2-part connector
Part number MD2A...
Input voltage 230VAC, 3φ line to line
Range 220-250VAC
Note: Tightening torque for terminal block connections is 4.4~5.3 lbin (0.5~0.6Nm).
The threaded holes in the top and bottom of the enclosure are for cable clamps (provided).
The holes are threaded for M4 bolts no longer than 0.47” (12mm) in length. Longer bolts
may short circuit the electrical components inside the MintDrive.
2.3.8
24V control supply
Depending on model, a 24VDC control supply may be required to provide power to the control
electronics when power is removed from the amplifier (see page 2). This is useful for safety where
power needs to be removed from the amplifier stage but the control electronics must be powered to
retain position and I/O information. The 24VDC supply is connected via X1.
Note: A 24VDC supply is always required for the drive enable input on connector X13.
Location Connector X1, single or 2-part connector
Part number MDxxxxxx-xxx3
Input voltage 24V
Input current 1.6A (maximum)
Range 20.4 - 28.8VDC
+24V
GND
Note: Tightening torque for terminal block connections is 4.4~5.3 lbin (0.5~0.6Nm)
16
2.3.9
DC Bus power connections from package size C
Location Connector X1, single or 2-part connector
Part number MD1AxxSx...
MD2AxxSx...
Output voltage 160VDC
To external
320VDC
Range 135-176VDC
drive(s)
306-350VDC
with
Vcc inputs
The MintDrive 10A and 15A variants are available with a DC bus supply output for powering other
drives that do not have their own internal mains power supplies. This power is available on the X1
connector pins Vcc+ and Vcc-.
MintDrive
(MD1AxxSx... )
External drive
External drive
Vcc+
Vcc+
Vcc+
Vcc-
Vcc-
Vcc-
R1
Vcc+
Vcc+
R2
Vcc-
Vcc-
Regeneration
Resistor
Note: It is important to ensure that the total current required by the powering drive, the
external drive(s) and their maximum combined loads does not exceed the current
rating of the powering drive.
Tightening torque for terminal block connections is 4.4~5.3 lbin (0.5~0.6Nm).
The threaded holes in the top and bottom of the enclosure are for cable clamps (provided).
The holes are threaded for M4 bolts no longer than 0.47” (12mm) in length. Longer bolts
may short circuit the electrical components inside the MintDrive.
17
2.3.10 Power supply filters
To comply with EEC directive 89/336/EEC, a mains filter of the appropriate type must be connected.
This will ensure that the unit complies with the CE specifications for which it has been tested. If the
MintDrive has the 24VDC input power supply option then a further filter will be necessary to comply with
CE specifications. Schaffner filters are recommended, with part numbers shown below:
Voltage
230VAC, 1φ
MintDrive current rating 2.5A FN2070-10-06
5A FN2070-6-06
7.5A FN2070-10-06
(Use FN2070-12-06 if 24V
option is fitted)
230VAC, 3φ
115VAC, 1φ
FN9675-3-06
FN2070-10-06
FN2070-12-06
-
10A FN351-36-33
-
15A FN351-50-33
-
24VDC
All models FN9675-3-06
Table 1 - Schaffner filter part numbers
See Appendix D, section D.1.3 for details of filter dimensions and Baldor catalog numbers.
18
2.4
Motor connections
This section provides instructions for connecting the motor.
Location Connector X1, single or 2-part connector
Part number MD1A...
MD2A...
Nominal output voltage 160VDC
320VDC
Range 135-176VDC
306-350VDC
(MintDrive 2.5A / 5A / 7.5A
X1 connector shown)
PE
U
V
W
M
U
V
M
W
M
Motor
Optional
motor circuit
contactors
CAUTION:
Do not connect power to the MintDrive UVW outputs. The MintDrive might be
damaged.
CAUTION:
The motor leads U, V and W must be connected to their corresponding U, V or W
terminal on the motor. Mis-connection will result in uncontrolled motor movement.
All cables must be shielded. The maximum allowable cable length is 82ft (25m).
Note: For CE compliance the MintDrive and motor earth should be connected to the enclosure
backplane. (The enclosure backplane should be connected to the earth at the mains source.
There should be a separate connection from the earth at the mains source to the plant
ground rod).
19
2.4.1
Motor circuit contactors
If required by local codes or for safety reasons, an M-Contactor (motor circuit contactor) may be
installed to provide a physical disconnection of the motor windings from the MintDrive (see page 19).
Opening the M-Contactor ensures that the MintDrive cannot drive the motor, which may be necessary
during equipment maintenance or similar operations.
Under certain circumstances, it may also be necessary to fit a brake to the motor. This is important with
hanging loads where disconnecting the motor windings could result in the load falling. Contact Baldor
for details on appropriate brakes.
CAUTION:
20
If an M-Contactor is installed, the MintDrive must be disabled at least 20ms before
the M-Contactor is opened. If the M-Contactor is opened while the MintDrive is
supplying voltage and current to the motor, the MintDrive may be damaged.
Incorrect installation or failure of the M-Contactor or its wiring may result in
damage to the MintDrive.
2.4.2
Regeneration resistor (Dynamic Brake resistor)
The 2.5A and 5A MintDrives both have internally fitted regeneration resistors*. For 7.5A, 10A and 15A
MintDrives, an external regeneration (Dynamic Brake) resistor must be installed to dissipate excess
power from the internal DC bus during motor deceleration.
WARNING:
A regeneration resistor may generate enough heat to ignite combustible materials.
To avoid fire hazard, keep all combustible materials and flammable vapors away
from the brake resistors.
Location Connector X1, single or 2-part connector
Voltage
MintDrive current rating 230VAC
R1
R2
115VAC
7.5A RG39
RG22
10A RG10
RG4.7
15A RG10
RG4.7
Resistor
power rating
100W
320W
Table 2 - Baldor regeneration resistor catalog numbers
All the regeneration resistors listed in section D.1.4 on page 139 are completely assembled and
enclosed in a IP21/NEMA 1 rated enclosure.
* Additional resistors connected to R1 and R2 will be connected in parallel with the internal resistor.
2.4.2.1
Regeneration resistor mounting
The regeneration resistor should be mounted near the top of an enclosure to maximize heat dissipation.
When the motor regenerates, the yellow DB On LED on the front panel of the MintDrive will illuminate
while the voltage is exceeding the safe limit. See section D.1.4 on page 139.
21
2.5
Feedback connections
Two feedback options are available; a commutating encoder or a resolver, both using connector X2.
Check with the catalog number (see page 2) to ensure you are wiring the correct feedback device.
Resolver based MintDrives provide a simulated encoder output signal available on connector X3 for
master/slave type applications. Encoder based MintDrives duplicate the encoder signals entering X2.
The following points must be observed when wiring the feedback device:
H The feedback device wiring must be separated from power wiring
H Parallel runs of the device wiring must be separated from power cables by at least 3” (76mm)
H Power wires must be crossed at right angles only
H To prevent contact with other conductors or grounds, ungrounded ends of shields must be insulated.
22
2.5.1
Resolver option
The resolver connections are made using the 15-pin D-type female connector X2.
Twisted pair cables must be used for the complementary signal pairs e.g. SIN+ and SIN-.
The overall cable screen/shield must be connected to the metallic shell of the D-type connector.
Location Connector X2, 15-pin D-type female connector
Pin Resolver function
1 SIN+
2 COS+
3 REF+
4~5 (not connected)
6 SIN10
7 COS-
15
5
11
1
8 REF9~10 (not connected)
11 External index
6
12 (not connected)
13 Analog ground
14~15 (not connected)
R2
S2
R1
S4
S3
S1
Baldor
Motor
5
X2
Twisted pairs
+
+
+
+
6
3
4
1
+
+
2
Connector
backshell
1
SIN+
6
SIN-
2
COS+
7
COS-
3
REF+
8
REF- (Common)
13
AGND
Figure 7 - Resolver cable connections
23
2.5.1.1
Resolver cable pin configuration
The table and diagram below show the pin configuration for a typical Baldor Resolver Feedback cable,
part number CBL030SF-ALM.
X2
pin
Motor / cable
pin
Resolver cable wire
color
REF+
3
1
Red
REF-
8
2
Blue
COS+
2
3
Green
COS-
7
4
Yellow
SIN+
1
5
Pink
SIN-
6
6
Grey
Signal name
1
2
9
10
12
11
3
4
8
8
7
6
5
Motor resolver connector
(male)
Pins 7~12 are
not used
7
12
10
11
6
5
2
3
4
Cable connector end view
(female)
Figure 8 - Baldor motor resolver cable pin configuration
24
1
9
2.5.2
Encoder option
The encoder connections are made using the 15-pin D-type female connector X2. This provides the
ABZ channels and Hall signals. Twisted pair cables must be used for the complementary signal pairs
e.g. CHA+ and CHA-. The overall cable screen/shield must be connected to the metallic shell of the
D-type connector.
Location Connector X2, 15-pin D-type female connector
Pin Encoder function
1 CHA+
2 CHB+
3 CHZ+
4 Hall U+
5 Hall U 6 CHA-
10
15
5
7 CHB8 CHZ-
1
11
9 Hall W+
10 Hall V+
6
11 +5V
12 (not connected)
13 DGND
14 Hall W15 Hall VX2
Twisted pairs
Encoder
Hall
Feedback
1
6
2
7
3
8
11
13
CHA+
CHACHB+
CHBCHZ+ (INDEX)
CHZ- (INDEX)
+5V
DGND
4
5
9
14
10
15
12
Hall U+
Hall UHall W+
Hall WHall V+
Hall VNot Used
Connector backshell
Figure 9 - Encoder cable connections
25
2.6
Drive enable
To operate the MintDrive, the drive stage must be active and enabled. This requires an externally
generated 24VDC supply to be connected between pins 1 and 12. This connection can be wired
directly or through an intermediate switch; if a switch is used it should always be used to switch the
signal to pin 1, with the signal to pin 12 being hard-wired.
1
Location Connector X13, pins 1 & 12
Name Drive enable
Input voltage +24VDC (±20%)
Note: The drive enable connection controls the sense of the digital inputs
DIN10 to DIN17 (see pages 35 to 37).
12
Active high: To cause the digital inputs to be active high (active when
a voltage of +24VDC is applied to them) connect +24VDC to pin 1 and
0V to pin 12.
Active low: To cause the digital inputs to be active low (active when
grounded) connect +24VDC to pin12 and 0V to pin 1.
The sense of the digital inputs can also be controlled through the Mint
software, using the keyword INPUTACTIVELEVEL.
For the drive to operate, it must be enabled using the Mint keyword
DRIVEENABLE or RESET.
This completes the basic installation.
You should read the following sections in sequence before
attempting to start the MintDrive.
26
3
3.1
Input / Output
3
Outline
This section describes the various digital and analog input and output capabilities of the MintDrive,
together with descriptions of each of the associated connectors on the front panel.
The following conventions will be used to refer to the inputs and outputs:
I/O . . . . . . . . . . .
DIN . . . . . . . . . .
DOUT . . . . . . . .
AIN . . . . . . . . . .
AOUT . . . . . . . .
3.2
Input / Output
Digital Input
Digital Output
Analog Input
Analog Output
Analog I/O
The MintDrive provides:
H 4 analog inputs, 2 on the block connector X11 and 2 on the 25-pin D-type connector X5
H 4 analog outputs, 2 on the block connector X11 and 2 on the 25-pin D-type connector X5.
None of the analog I/O are optically isolated from internal generated power rails, therefore care must be
taken to avoid earth loops and similar associated problems.
The input buffers do not offer any low pass filtering of the applied voltage. Any system noise presented
at the input will be reflected in the value read on conversion. Therefore, each analog input signal
should be connected to the system using individual screened/shielded cable (a twisted pair cable in the
case of the differential inputs) with an overall shield in order to minimize these effects. The overall cable
shield should then be connected to the chassis at one end. No other connection should be made to the
cable shield. If any inputs are unused, then it is advisable to connect them to the AGND pin. Do not
leave the inputs unconnected (floating).
27
3.2.1
Analog Input, Single Ended - X11
Location Connector X11, pins 1 & 2
1
Name AIN2
2
Mint keyword ADC.2
Description Single ended input.
Range: 0 - ±10VDC.
Resolution: 9-bit with sign.
Input impedance: >4kΩ.
Sampling interval: 5ms.
Note: There is a +15V reference voltage supplied on X11 pin 3 from a 1.96kΩ resistor.
A linear command potentiometer of 5kΩ may be used, with X11 pin 2 connected to the wiper,
and the end terminations connected to pins 1 & 3, as shown below.
X11
GND
5kΩ, 0.25W
potentiometer
or 0-10VDC
Input
Reference
1
2
AIN2 (ADC.2)
3
Figure 10 - AIN2 analog input wiring
28
3.2.2
Analog Input, Differential - X11
Location Connector X11, pins 4 (+) & 5 (-)
Name AIN3
Mint keyword ADC.3
4
Description Differential input.
Common mode voltage range: ±10VDC.
Resolution: auto-selecting as follows:
12-bit with sign (<1V DC input)
9-bit with sign (>1V DC input)
Common mode rejection: 40dB
Input impedance: >5kΩ
Sampling interval: 5ms
Optional 4-20mA current mode (contact Baldor).
5
A typical input circuit is shown below:
X11
+24VDC
1.5kΩ, 0.25W
1kΩ, 0.25W
potentiometer
0V
Input+
Input-
4
AIN3 (ADC.3)
5
Figure 11 - AIN3 analog input
29
3.2.3
Analog Inputs, Differential - X5
Location Connector X5
Pins 8 (+) and 21 (-)
9 (+) and 22 (-)
Name AIN0
AIN1
Mint keyword ADC.0
1
13
ADC.1
Description Two independent differential inputs.
Common mode voltage range: ±10VDC.
Resolution: 12-bit with sign.
Common mode rejection: 40dB
Input impedance: >22kΩ
Sampling interval: 0.5ms - 20ms (depends upon servo
loop frequency).
Accuracy: better than 1%
14
25
Typical use for these may be analog sensor inputs or to provide a low cost joy-stick interface.
The guaranteed DC accuracy of the inputs is 2%. Each input is buffered individually, before being fed
into separate channels of the ADC, a Maxim MAX197. There is some input protection should the input
voltage exceed the maximum rating shown above, although this is for protection against transitional
over-voltage; long term over-voltages will cause permanent damage.
Each analog input signal should be connected to the system using a screened/shielded twisted pair
cable, and the cable shield should be connected to the chassis at one end. Due to the differential
characteristics of these inputs, they can provide better rejection of common mode noise provided
normal good engineering practices are adhered to. No other connection should be made to the cable
shield.
X5
Input +
Input GND
X5
Input +
8
21
20
AIN0 (ADC.0)
Input GND
Figure 12 - AIN0 and AIN1 analog inputs
30
9
22
20
AIN1 (ADC.1)
If an input is unused, then it is advisable to connect it to the AGND pin. Do not leave the input
unconnected (floating).
The analog inputs can be read in Mint using the keywords ADC.0 and ADC.1. Mint will return the value
as a percentage where 0V=0%, -10V= -100% and +10V = 100%.
CAUTION:
The isolation provided on the inputs, outputs, master encoder and CAN is
nominal. The primary function of the isolation is to break earth loops. Both sides
of the isolation boundary must still be kept at SELV potentials with respect to
ground, i.e. the difference in the 0V rail across the isolation boundary must not
exceed 30V.
31
3.2.4
Analog Outputs, Bipolar - X11
Location Connector X11
Pins 6
7
Name AOUT2
Mint keyword AUXDAC.2
6
AOUT3
AUXDAC.3
Description Two independent assignable outputs.
Output range: ±10VDC.
Resolution: 8-bit with sign.
Output current: 1mA maximum.
Update interval: 2ms.
7
Two programmable analog outputs that can be used to provide real time status of various control
conditions. The voltage from the output buffer is supplied through a 50Ω resistor for short circuit
protection.
X11
GND
Output 2
Output 3
1
6
AOUT2 (AUXDAC.2)
7
AOUT3 (AUXDAC.3)
Figure 13 - AOUT2 and AOUT3 analog outputs
CAUTION:
32
Following power-up or a system reset, both outputs will initially be set at
approximately +10V. This condition will remain, for a short period, during the
software initialization process. For this reason, care should be taken if this output
is being used as a drive reference for a speed controller.
3.2.5
Analog Outputs, Bipolar - X5
Location Connector X5
Pins 19
Name AOUT0
Mint keyword AUXDAC.0
7
AOUT1
AUXDAC.1
Description Two independently controlled outputs.
Output range: ±10VDC.
Resolution: 8-bit
Output current: ±4mA maximum
Update interval: immediate, using Mint commands
1
13
14
25
The two analog 8-bit outputs AOUT0 and AOUT1 are not isolated and are primarily intended for system
debugging. Output voltages in the range of ±10V are achievable with a DC accuracy of better than 3%.
They are derived from a high-frequency PWM pulse train from the main processor, which is
subsequently filtered. These signals are buffered by an operational amplifier in the MintDrive and are
capable of sinking or sourcing up to ±4mA. The outputs are protected by fast Schottky diodes against
excessively high transitional voltages of either polarity.
X5
Output 0
Output 1
GND
19
AOUT0 (AUXDAC.0)
7
AOUT1 (AUXDAC.1)
20
Figure 14 - AOUT0 and AOUT1 analog outputs
CAUTION:
Following power-up or a system reset, both outputs will initially be set at
approximately +10V. This condition will remain, for a short period of time during
the software initialization process.
33
3.3
Digital I/O
The MintDrive provides:
H 8 general purpose inputs on block connector X13
H 4 general purpose outputs on block connector X13
H 10 general purpose inputs on 25-pin connector X5
H 5 general purpose outputs on 25-pin connector X5
A digital input can be used to support any of the following typical functions:
H Stop input
H Home input
H Forward limit
H Reverse limit
H Interrupts (controlled from Mint)
H General purpose use
DIN0 and DIN2 are also capable of special alternative functions:
H DIN0 and DIN2 are fitted with Schmitt trigger devices and can be configured using Mint for position
capture of the axis or the master or auxiliary encoder positions. See section 3.3.2.1 on page 38.
The following sections describe the digital I/O in more detail.
34
3.3.1
Digital Inputs - X13
Location Connector X13
1
Pin Name
9
Mint keyword
1 Drive Enable
-
2 DIN10
IN.10
3 DIN11
IN.11
4 DIN12
IN.12
5 DIN13
IN.13
6 DIN14
IN.14
7 DIN15
IN.15
8 DIN16
IN.16
9 DIN17
IN.17
Description Eight general purpose optically isolated AC digital inputs
(DIN10 to DIN17).
One committed drive enable input (Drive Enable).
The digital inputs DIN10 - DIN17 can be read individually using the associated Mint IN keyword (for
example IN.10) and can be configured for any number of user definable functions. These inputs are
sampled every 15.36ms. If a faster response is required, DIN0~DIN9 on connector X5 can be used.
Each of the AC optically isolated digital inputs has one side connected internally via a current limiting
resistor to the signal on pin 12, CREF. The other side appears as a separate pin on connector X13, for
use by the end user.
X13
External +24VDC supply
Active high:
Active low:
A=+24VDC
B=0V
A=0V
B=+24VDC
A
B
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Enable
DIN10 (IN.10)
DIN11 (IN.11)
DIN12 (IN.12)
DIN13 (IN.13)
DIN14 (IN.14)
DIN15 (IN.15)
DIN16 (IN.16)
DIN17 (IN.17)
(not connected)
(not connected)
CREF
Figure 15 - X13 Digital inputs
35
Pin 12 (CREF) controls the sense of all the digital inputs (X13 pins 1 to 9) and should be permanently
wired, dependent on the user requirements, as described below:
Active high: connect +24VDC to pin1 and 0V to pin 12.
The digital inputs will be active when a voltage of +24VDC (±20%) is applied to them and will sink a
maximum of 20mA.
Active low: connect +24VDC to pin12 and 0V to pin 1.
The digital inputs will be active when grounded and will source a maximum of 20mA.
The +24VDC supply mentioned above is from an externally generated 24VDC supply which should
have a current capability of at least 3A to fulfill all the current requirements of the above loads.
The sense of the inputs can also be controlled individually in Mint using the keyword
INPUTACTIVELEVEL. See also section 2.6 on page 26.
3.3.1.1
Thermal switch connection
It is recommended to wire the motor’s thermal switch, via a relay, to an input on connector X13.
Using suitable code, this provides a way for the Mint program to respond to motor overtemperature
conditions. A typical circuit, using DIN11 as the input, is shown below.
X13
Relay
B
A
Motor
thermal switch
connections
+24VDC
0V
External
24VDC
supply
Figure 16 - Motor thermal switch circuit
36
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
DIN10 (IN.10)
DIN11 (IN.11)
DIN12 (IN.12)
DIN13 (IN.13)
DIN14 (IN.14)
DIN15 (IN.15)
DIN16 (IN.16)
DIN17 (IN.17)
12
CREF
3.3.2
Digital Inputs - X5
Location Connector X5
Pin Name
1
13
14
25
Mint keyword
1 DIN0
IN.0
2 DIN2
IN.2
3 DIN4
IN.4
4 DIN6
IN.6
5 DIN8
IN.8
14 DIN1
IN.1
15 DIN3
IN.3
16 DIN5
IN.5
17 DIN7
IN.7
18 DIN9
IN.9
Description Ten general purpose optically isolated AC digital inputs
(DIN0 to DIN9).
The digital inputs DIN0 - DIN9 can be read individually using the associated Mint IN keyword (for
example IN.0) and can be configured for any number of user definable functions. These inputs are
sampled every servo loop (0.5ms to 2ms).
External +24VDC supply
Active high:
A=+24VDC
B=0V
Active low:
A=0V
B=+24VDC
X5
A
B
1
2
3
4
5
6
14
15
16
17
18
DIN0 (IN.0)
DIN2 (IN.2)
DIN4 (IN.4)
DIN6 (IN.6)
DIN8 (IN.8)
COM
DIN1 (IN.1)
DIN3 (IN.3)
DIN5 (IN.5)
DIN7 (IN.7)
DIN9 (IN.9)
Figure 17 - X5 Digital inputs
37
These inputs are isolated and share a single common line (COM). The entire input bank may be
configured for use in PNP mode (sinking current, where current flows in to the inputs) by connecting
COM to the negative rail of the externally generated power source. Alternatively the entire input bank
may be configured for use in NPN mode (current flows out of the inputs) sourcing current by connecting
COM to the positive rail of the externally generated power source.
The use of screened/shielded cable with the screen terminated on the D-shell is highly recommended
and will improve the inputs’ immunity to interference.
COM (pin 6) controls the sense of all the X5 digital inputs and should be permanently wired, dependent
on the user requirements, as described below:
Active high: Connect pin 6 to 0V.
The digital inputs will be active when a voltage of +24VDC (+10VDC to +30VDC) is applied to them and
will sink a maximum of 20mA.
Active low: Connect pin 6 to +24VDC.
The digital inputs will be active when grounded (less than 2VDC) and will source a maximum of 20mA.
(To eliminate any possible errors, designs should ideally provide a “grounded” voltage of less than 1V).
The +24VDC supply mentioned above is from an externally generated 24VDC supply with an adequate
current capability to fulfill all the current requirements of the above loads. The sense of the inputs can
also be controlled individually in Mint using the keyword INPUTACTIVELEVEL.
The inputs are compatible with mechanical switches or open-collector drivers. They are not, however,
compatible with external push-pull drivers unless an external diode is fitted, which effectively converts a
push-pull driver into an open collector driver.
There is a hardware propagation delay of 10µs or less between applying an external voltage and the
switch becoming active (ON). Similarly, there is a delay of 50µs or less for the device to switch OFF
when removing an external voltage.
3.3.2.1
Special functions on inputs DIN0 and DIN2
DIN0 and DIN2 can be configured using the FASTAUXSELECT keyword to perform special functions:
Input Function
DIN0 Configurable as the fast interrupt (FASTIN) hardware position capture input. The
position of the axis is captured in real time and can be read using the Mint keyword
FASTPOS. DIN0 can also be configured to capture the auxiliary encoder input as well
as the axis position input. Fitted with a Schmitt trigger device.
DIN2 Similar to DIN0, but captures the master or auxiliary encoder input which can be
read using the Mint FASTAUXENCODER keyword.
Fitted with a Schmitt Trigger device.
3.3.2.2
Breakout board
Connector X5 can also be connected to an I/O supporting break-out board (giving screw-terminal type
connections and local filtering). The Baldor catalog number for this item is OPT017-501. See page 48.
38
3.3.3
Digital Outputs - X13
Location Connector X13
Pin Name
13
Mint keyword
13 DOUT5-
OUT.5
14 DOUT5+
OUT.5
15 DOUT6-
OUT.6
16 DOUT6+
OUT.6
17 DOUT7-
OUT.7
18 DOUT7+
OUT.7
19 DOUT8-
OUT.8
20 DOUT8+
OUT.8
Description Four general purpose optically isolated digital outputs
(DOUT5 to DOUT8).
20
Each optically isolated output may be configured for either sinking or sourcing current up to a maximum
of 50mA on each output. The maximum saturated voltage across any of these outputs when active is
1.0VDC, so they can be used as TTL compatible outputs. These outputs can have a mixed
configuration, with some sinking current while others source current. However, if the outputs are used
to directly drive a relay, a suitably rated flyback diode must be fitted across the relay coil, observing the
correct polarity. This is to ensure that an output is protected from the back-EMF generated from the coil
when it is de-energized. The outputs are updated every 30.72ms and can be written to directly using
the Mint keyword OUT (for example OUT.5). If a faster response is required, DOUT0~DOUT4 on
connector X5 can be used.
Sink
Relay &
Flyback diode
50mA
maximum
Typical
Source
50mA
maximum
Typical
X13
DOUT+
DOUT-
DOUT+
DOUT-
USR V+
USR GND
USR V+
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
DOUT5DOUT5+
DOUT6DOUT6+
DOUT7DOUT7+
DOUT8DOUT8+
OUT.5
OUT.6
OUT.7
OUT.8
USR GND
Figure 18 - X13 Digital output circuit
39
3.3.4
Digital Outputs - X5
Location Connector X5
Pin Name
1
Mint keyword
10 DOUT4
OUT.4
11 DOUT2
OUT.2
12 DOUT0
OUT.0
23 DOUT3
OUT.3
24 DOUT1
OUT.1
Description Five general purpose optically isolated digital outputs
(DOUT0 to DOUT4).
14
These general purpose optically isolated outputs can only be used to source
current from the USR V+ rail (pin 25). The output current source passes
through the load to USR GND (pin 13). The outputs are updated immediately
and can be written to directly using the Mint keyword OUT (for example OUT.4).
13
25
Note: The outputs have different current ratings!
DOUT0 is a high current output, rated at a maximum continuous current of 1A.
DOUT1~DOUT3 are lower current outputs, rated at a maximum continuous
current of 250mA on each output. There is no minimum current load
requirement for DOUT0~DOUT4.
X5--25
OUT.4
USR V+
D
S
X5--10 (250mA max)
VN330SP
output
driver
Relay coil with
flyback diode
X5--13
USR GND
X5
10
11
12
13
23
24
25
DOUT4 (OUT.4)
DOUT2 (OUT.2)
DOUT0 (OUT.0)
USR GND
DOUT3 (OUT.3)
DOUT1 (OUT.1)
USR V+
Figure 19 - X5 Digital output circuit
These MOSFET type outputs are driven from ST VN330SP devices and have a maximum ON
resistance of 0.4Ω. There are protection features built into each of the outputs. Under voltage sensing
means that when a USR V+ voltage of less than 10V is applied, the output will become inactive.
Thermal protection, for short circuit and over dissipation, also causes the output to become inactive.
If the combined current of all the X5 outputs exceeds 5A, there is the possibility of blowing an internal
SMD fuse, which is not easily replaceable and is non-serviceable. If a hardware fault is suspected on
these outputs, the condition can be checked (by the user’s program) using the Mint keyword
MISCERROR. If the outputs are used to directly drive a relay or an inductive load, a suitably rated flyback
diode must be fitted across the relay coil, observing the correct polarity. This is to ensure that an output
is protected from the back-EMF generated from the coil when it is de-energized.
40
3.4
Other I/O
3.4.1
Simulated encoder output - X3
Location Connector X3
Pin Name
1 CHA+
2 CHB+
3 CHZ+
4 (not connected)
5 DGND
6 CHA9
6
5
7 CHB8 CHZ-
1
9 (not connected)
Description Simulated encoder output on a 9-pin female D-type
connector
This output can be used for master slave situations where the axis movement can be transmitted to
another controller or MintDrive. It is recommended that this output only drives one output circuit load.
Driving multiple loads is not recommended. The encoder outputs are differential and conform to the
RS422 electrical specification. Shielded twisted pair cable is recommended.
If a resolver is fitted to the MintDrive, the output resolution is 1024 ppr (pulses per revolution). This is
equivalent to a 1024 line encoder, giving 4096 quadrature counts per rev. The simulated encoder also
supports an index or marker pulse.
If the MintDrive has the encoder feedback option, X3 duplicates the encoder signals entering X2.
CAUTION:
Using connectors X3 and X6, multiple MintDrives can be ‘daisy-chained‘ together.
However, if another Mint based controller such as a NextMoveBX is to be
connected, a special cable must be built, as shown below:
MintDrive
X3
1
6
3
8
2
7
5
NextMoveBX
encoder input
5
9
2
6
8
3
7
Connector backshell
Figure 20 - MintDrive encoder output to other Mint controller encoder input
41
3.4.2
Master (auxiliary) encoder input - X6
Location Connector X6
Pin Name
1 CHA+
2 CHB+
3 CHZ+
4 (not connected)
5 DGND
9
6 CHA-
5
7 CHB6
8 CHZ-
1
9 +5V
Description Optically isolated encoder input on a 9-pin female
D-type connector
The MintDrive provides an auxiliary (master or handwheel) encoder input which allows following of a
master encoder. An interface for a three channel, incremental encoder (CHA, CHB, CHZ) is provided.
The input receiver circuit allows only encoders with differential line drivers (RS422) to be used.
Single-ended operation is not supported. The interface also provides an isolated 5V supply for the
encoder electronics, capable of driving up to 100mA. These inputs are sampled every 0.5, 1 or 2ms.
CAUTION:
The auxiliary encoder input does not conform to the standard on other Mint based
controllers such as NextMove.
X6
Twisted pairs
1
6
2
7
3
8
9
5
Encoder
Connector backshell
Figure 21 - Differential encoder connections
42
CHA+
CHA-CHB+
CHB-CHZ+
CHZ-+5V
DGND
Connection of shields
to digital ground is optional.
Figure 22 - Auxiliary encoder circuit
43
3.4.3
Serial port - X7
Location Connector X7
Pin RS232 Name
6
9
1
5
RS485 / RS422 name
1 -
RX+ (input)
2 RXD
-
3 TXD
-
4 -
TX+ (output)
5 0V GND
0V GND
6 -
RX- (input)
7 RTS
-
8 CTS
-
9 -
TX- (output)
Description RS232 and RS485 / RS422 connections on a single
9-pin female D-type connector
X7 is a 9-pin male D-type connector, for the single MintDrive serial port.
The four-wire RS485 connections are also available on the this connector. See pages 45 and 46.
This port is configurable as either RS232 or RS485 / RS422 or both. Both X7 options are fully ESD
protected to IEC 1000-4-2 (15kV). Neither is isolated.
44
3.4.4
Using RS232 cable
CAUTION:
The serial connector on the MintDrive (X7) supports two serial channels, one
RS232 and one RS485 / RS422. The serial cable with catalog number
CBL001-501 must NOT be used with the MintDrive as this may result in damage
to the unit. Please use serial cable CBL023-501 or see this section for wiring
details.
The MintDrive has a full-duplex RS232 serial port with the following default configuration:
H 57.6Kbaud
H 1 start bit
H 8 data bits
H 1 stop bit
H No parity
H Hardware handshaking lines (RS232) RTS and CTS must be connected
The MintDrive will transmit a line feed/carriage return (<LF><CR>) combination but only expects a
carriage return (<CR>) from the host terminal. The RS232 connections are brought out onto a 9-pin
male D-type connector (an identical pin configuration as a standard male 9-pin D-type connector, but
RS485 / RS422 signals are also taken to the unused pins). The RS232 port is configured as a DTE
(Data Terminal Equipment) unit so it is possible to operate the MintDrive with any DCE (Data
Communications Equipment) or DTE equipment. Both the output and input circuitry are single ended
and operate between ±12V. The port is capable of operation at up to 57.6Kbaud.
X7
MintDrive
(DCE)
COM
RXD 2
2 RXD
TXD 3
RTS 7
3 TXD
7 RTS
CTS 8
8 CTS
GND 5
5 GND
Connector
backshell
Computer
COM Port
(DTE)
Connector
backshell
Figure 23 - RS232 serial port connections
45
3.4.5
Multidrop using RS485 / RS422 cable
Master
Controller
Twisted pairs
MintDrive X7
TX+
1 RX+
TX-
6 RX-
RX+
4 TX+
RXDGND
9 TX-
TR
5 DGND
GND
MintDrive X7
Terminating resistors TR
each have a typical value of 120Ω
TR 1 RX+
6 RX4 TX+
9 TX5 DGND
GND
Figure 24 - 4-wire RS485 multi-drop connections
ON
The MintDrive at the furthest end of the network from the transmitter should have
its RS485 DIP switch (located on the front panel of the MintDrive) set to the ’On’
position. This will connect a termination resistor, used to match the impedance of
the load to the impedance of the transmission line (cable).
Each TX/RX network requires a termination resistor at the final RX connnection, but intermediate
devices must not be fitted with termination resistors. (An exception to this rule is where repeaters are
being used which may correctly contain termination resistors).
Unmatched impedance causes the transmitted signal to not be fully absorbed by the load. This causes
a portion of the signal to be reflected back into the transmission line (noise). If the Source impedance,
Transmission Line impedance, and Load impedance are all equal, these reflections (noise) are
eliminated. Termination does increase load current and sometimes changes the bias requirements and
increases the complexity of the system.
46
3.4.6
Connecting Baldor HMI Operator Panels
Baldor HMI Operator Panels use a 15-pin male D-type connector (marked PLC PORT), but the
MintDrive connector X7 is a 9-pin D-type connector. If you do not require hardware handshaking then
the following connections should be made:
Baldor HMI
PLC PORT
MintDrive
X7
7 RTS
8 CTS
RXD 2
3 TXD
TXD 3
2 RXD
GND 5
5 GND
1
Figure 25 - Cable wiring if hardware handshaking is not required
If hardware handshaking is required then the following connections should be made:
Baldor HMI
PLC PORT
MintDrive
X7
CTS 11
7 RTS
RTS 10
8 CTS
RXD 2
3 TXD
TXD 3
2 RXD
GND 5
5 GND
1
Figure 26 - Cable wiring if hardware handshaking is required
47
3.4.7
Optional breakout board for connector X5
An optional screw connection fitting is available should you wish to purchase a break-out board. The
break-out board, often referred to as a ’card’, mounts on a 35mm DIN rail. The board has two-part
screw terminals for all of the digital inputs, digital outputs, analog inputs and analog outputs of the
MintDrive’s X5 connector, together with indicator LEDs.
Figure 27 - Optional breakout board
The catalog number for the breakout board is OPT017-501. A 2m (6ft) cable is available with correctly
shielded cables (catalog number CBL022-501).
3.4.8
CAN peripherals
If you wish to make connections to a CAN network see Appendix B, before continuing with section 4.
This completes the input/output wiring.
You should read the following sections in sequence before
attempting to start the MintDrive.
48
4
4.1
Tuning and Configuration
4
Outline
Before powering the MintDrive you will need to connect the PC to the MintDrive using a serial cable and
install the supplied software on the PC. The software provided includes a number of applications and
utilities to allow you to configure, tune and program the MintDrive. If you do not have experience of
software installation or Windows applications you will need to seek further assistance for this stage of
the installation. Please see the hardware section on page 5 to check that you have a suitable PC.
4.1.1
Connecting the MintDrive to the PC
Connect the serial cable between the PC serial port (often labeled as “COM”) to the MintDrive
connector X7 (RS232/RS485).
CAUTION:
4.1.2
The serial connector on the MintDrive (X7) supports two serial channels, one
RS232 and one RS485. The serial cable with catalog number CBL001-501 must
not be used with the MintDrive as this may result in damage to the unit.
Please use serial cable CBL023-501 or see pages 44 and 45.
If this is the first time you are installing a MintDrive then it is strongly
recommended that you use RS232 to get started and use RS485 later.
Installing the software
The CDROM containing the software can be found inside the rear cover of this manual or separately
within the packaging.
1. Insert the CDROM into the drive.
2. After a few seconds the setup wizard should start automatically. If the setup wizard does not appear,
select Run... from the Windows Start menu and type
d:\setup
where d is the drive letter of the CD-ROM device.
Follow the on-screen instructions to install the Mint Configuration Tool and Mint Workbench. The set-up
Wizard will copy the files to appropriate folders on the hard drive. The default directory is C:\Mint v4,
although this can be changed during setup.
49
4.1.3
Starting the MintDrive
If you have followed the instructions in the previous sections, you should now have connected all the
power sources, your choice of I/O peripherals, CAN network connections (if required) and the serial
cable linking the PC with the MintDrive. It is advisable to check all of these connections before
proceeding.
You are now ready to power the MintDrive:
1. Turn on the mains supply.
2. If your MintDrive has an external 24VDC logic supply, turn this on.
The MintDrive’s Ready LED should be orange-green.
Note: If the Ready LED is red after powering the unit, turn off the power immediately.
This indicates that the drive has detected a fault - see section 7.1.3 on page 87.
If this is a severe error condition such as under or over-voltage the unit could be damaged.
Re-check the wiring in accordance with section 2.3 on page 10.
Power the unit again; if the Ready LED is still red then see the troubleshooting guide starting
on page 85.
3. After a couple of seconds the Ready LED should turn green and the Monitor LED should display a minus
sign ( - ). If no LEDs are lit then re-check the power supply connections.
Both CAN LEDs should be green, but if your MintDrive is configured as node 1 and no CANopen devices
are attached, the CAN1 LED will be red.
50
4.2
Mint Configuration Tool Startup Wizard - coarse tuning
Each type of motor and drive combination has a slightly different response. Before the MintDrive can be
used to control the motor accurately, the MintDrive must be “tuned”. This is the process where the
MintDrive powers the motor using a pre-defined set of moves. By monitoring the feedback from the
motor’s resolver or encoder, the MintDrive can make small adjustments to the way it controls the motor.
This information can then be stored in a configuration file, together with other information.
The Mint Configuration Tool (MCT) provides a simple way to tune the MintDrive and create the
configuration file, so this is the first application that should be used.
1. On the Windows Start menu,
select Programs, Mint v4,
Mint Configuration Tool.
The MCT will start and the
Startup Wizard Introduction
window will be shown.
2. Click Next > .
If you wish to enter some details
about the configuration, click in
the appropriate text boxes and
enter the information. You can
leave any or all of the boxes
blank if you wish.
51
3. Click Next > .
MCT will search the serial ports on the PC until the MintDrive
is detected.
If the MintDrive is not found, check the serial connection and
click Rescan.
4. Click Next > .
Check that Axis-0 is highlighted.
Note: If you need to change the configuration, click on the
highlighted line to display the Axis Configuration dialog.
5. Click Next > .
The Wizard Axes Scale Parameters window allows you to setup
a scaling factor for later use when controlling the MintDrive.
Select Counts per revolution in the Scale to box.
This means that references to movement can be expressed in
revolutions, rather than encoder counts.
Note: Mint defines all positional and speed related motion
keywords in terms of encoder quadrature counts (for
servo motors) or steps for stepper motors. The scale
factor allows the system to be scaled to your own units
(called user units) to suit your application.
With a resolver or 1024 line encoder, a scale factor of
4096 gives a user unit of revolutions.
Note: Even though you may have a MintDrive with the resolver
option fitted, the input from the resolver is converted into
simulated encoder counts inside the MintDrive.
52
6. Click Next > .
The Axis Configuration Test Select frame provides two options.
Click PERFORM AXES CONFIGURATION TESTS.
The axis configuration tests allows MCT to tune the MintDrive
for use with the attached motor.
7. Using the drop-down boxes, select the exact motor
type. This information can be found stamped into the
label attached to the motor.
Important Note:
The following axis configuration tests must be
performed
with
the
motor
mechanically
disconnected from other machinery. The tests will
cause movement of the motor, so ensure that it is
safe for the motor to operate.
If it is safe for the motor to rotate, click
Coarse Tune Motor Parameters .
Click OK to confirm that you wish to begin the tests. MCT will begin the motor tests.
8. For the final test, the load should be connected to the motor.
Ensure that it is safe for the motor to operate when connected to the load.
If it is safe for the motor to operate, click OK. MCT will perform the final test.
9. Click Next > to continue with the tuning process.
Note: If an error occurs during any of the tests, an error number will appear on the error button at
the top of the window:
Click the button to see details of the error. When you have fixed the error, click Clear Errors
and then Coarse Tune Motor Parameters to restart the tests.
53
4.3
MCT Startup Wizard - fine-tuning
In the previous section, the motor response was ‘coarse tuned’. The following sections describe how to
fine tune the motor response. If you are familiar with closed loop servo control theory then you may
wish to proceed straight to section 4.3.2. If not, the following section provides an introduction to the
various factors involved, with simple analogies shown with [italics].
4.3.1
An introduction to closed loop control
When a demand is made to move the axis position, the MintDrive control software translates this into
motor currents. An encoder or resolver is used to measure the motor position, and every 1ms* the
MintDrive compares the demanded and measured positions and calculates the demand needed for the
motor to minimize the difference, the following error.
This system of constant measurement and correction is known as closed loop control.
[ For the analogy, imagine you are in your car waiting at an intersection. You are going to go straight on
when the lights change, just like the car standing next to you which is called Demand. You’re not going
to race Demand though - your job as the controller (MintDrive) is to stay exactly level with Demand,
looking out of the window to measure your position ].
The main term that the MintDrive uses to correct the error is called Proportional gain (KPROP).
A very simple proportional controller would simply multiply the amount of error by the Proportional gain
and apply the result to the motor [ the further Demand gets ahead or behind you, the more you press or
release the gas pedal ].
If the Proportional gain is set too high overshoot will occur, resulting in the motor vibrating back and
forth around the desired position before it settles [ you press the gas pedal so hard you go right past
Demand. To try and stay level you ease off the gas, but end up falling behind a little. You keep
repeating this and after a few tries you end up level with Demand, travelling at a steady speed. This is
what you wanted to do but it has taken you a long time ].
If the Proportional gain is increased still further, the system becomes unstable [ you keep pressing and
then letting off the gas pedal so hard you never travel at a steady speed ].
To reduce the onset of instability, a term called Velocity Feedback gain (KVEL) is used. This resists
rapid movement of the motor and allows the Proportional gain to be set higher before vibration starts.
Another term called Derivative gain (KDERIV) can also be used to give a similar effect.
With Proportional gain and Velocity Feedback gain (or Derivative gain) it is possible for a motor to come
to a stop with a small following error [ Demand stopped so you stopped too, but not quite level ].
The MintDrive tries to correct the error, but because the error is so small the amount of torque
demanded might not be enough to overcome friction.
This problem is overcome by using a term called Integral gain (KINT). This sums the error over time,
so that the motor torque is gradually increased until the positional error is reduced to zero [ like a person
gradually pushing harder and harder on your car until they’ve pushed it level with Demand].
However, if there is large load on the motor (it is supporting a heavy suspended weight for example), it
is possible for the output to increase to 100% demand. This effect can be limited using the KINTLIMIT
keyword which limits the effect of KINT to a given percentage of the demand output. Another keyword
called KINTMODE can even turn off integral action when it’s not needed.
The final term to consider is Velocity Feed forward (KVELFF) which can be used to increase the
response and reduce the following error, especially with velocity controlled servos.
54
In summary, the following rules can be used as a guide:
H KPROP: Increasing KPROP will speed up the response and reduce the effect of disturbances and
load variations. The side effect of increasing KPROP is that it also increases the overshoot, and if
set too high it will cause the system to become unstable. The aim is to set the Proportional gain as
high as possible without getting overshoot, instability or hunting on an encoder edge when
stationary (the motor will buzz).
H KVEL: This gain has a damping effect, and can be increased to reduce any overshoot. If KVEL
becomes too large it will amplify any noise on the velocity measurement and introduce oscillations.
H KINT: This gain has a de-stabilizing effect, but a small amount can be used to reduce any steady
state errors. By default, KINTMODE is set so that the KINT term is ignored.
H KINTLIMIT: The integration limit determines the maximum value of the effect of integral action.
This is specified as a percentage of the full scale demand.
H KVELFF: This is a feed forward term and as such has a different effect on the servo system than the
previous gains. KVELFF is outside the closed loop and therefore does not have an effect on
system stability. This gain allows a faster response to demand speed changes with lower following
errors, for example you would increase KVELFF to reduce the following error during the slew
section of a trapezoidal move. The trapezoidal test move can be used to fine-tune this gain.
H KDERIV: This gain has a damping effect. The Derivative action has the same effect as the velocity
feedback if the velocity feedback and feedforward terms are equal, but scaled by a factor of 16.
In systems where precise positioning accuracy is required, it is often necessary to position within one
encoder count. Proportional gain, KPROP, is not normally able to achieve this because a very small
following error will only produce a small demand for the amplifier which may not be enough to overcome
mechanical friction (this is particularly so for current controlled systems). This error can be overcome
by applying some Integral gain.
The Integral gain, KINT, works by accumulating following error over time to produce a demand
sufficient to move the motor into the zero following error position. KINT can therefore also overcome
errors caused by gravitational effects, such as vertically moving linear tables, where with current
controlled drives a non-zero demand output is required to achieve zero following error.
For further details see Appendix A.
* The 1ms sampling interval can be changed using the LOOPTIME keyword.
55
4.3.2
Fine-tuning the speed loop
Before selecting the servo (position) loop gains, the speed loop gains might need to be fine tuned.
Note: MCT will have created starting values for the speed loop gains, so if you are not sure
which values to adjust, you can go straight to section 4.3.3 on page 57.
If you wish to change any of the speed loop gains:
1. Click the Speed Loop Tuning tab
2. The Speed Loop Tuning Parameters frame shows the
values of the terms.
3. MCT will have calculated suitable values during the
coarse tuning tests. However, in some systems you
may achieve better results using the theoretical
value for KIPROP. To do this, click <-Calculate.
The Calculate Current Proportional Gain dialog box
will appear.
Click Use this value to use the theoretical value.
The following information should be considered if you change any of the speed loop parameters.
The value for Current Integral gain (KIINT) is preset to 50Hz. This setting is suitable for almost every
system and should not need be changed.
The value for Speed Proportional gain (KVPROP) is set to a default value of 4. This gain may be
increased or decreased to suit the application. Increasing KVPROP will result in a faster response, but
excessive values will cause overshoot and oscillation.
The value for Speed Integral gain (KVINT) is set to a default value of 1 and should not be adjusted
unless you are an experienced user.
The value for Speed Differential gain (KVDIFF) has no effect on the MintDrive.
56
4.3.3
Fine-tuning the position loop
The following tuning methods involve adjusting the servo loop terms KVELFF, KPROP, KVEL and
KDERIV, which all have a default value of zero.
1. Click the Position Loop Tuning tab
2. The Tuning Parameters frame shows the values of the
terms.
3. The first value to enter is KVELFF. To do
this, click <-Calculate . The Calculate
Velocity Feedforward Gain dialog box
will appear.
Click Use this value to enter the value.
4. In the Shape Parameters frame, ensure the Move
Type box is set to Step.
Click in the Size (uu) box and enter a value of 0.2.
Note: The term “uu” means user units. Previously,
in the Wizard Axes Scale Parameters
window, you setup a scaling factor of 4096 equivalent to 1 count per revolution - so the
the user unit is now revolutions.
If you selected a different scaling factor the
value of 0.2 might not be suitable.
57
5. Click Start Move .
In the dialog box that appears, click GO .
The motor will now attempt to rotate 0.2 revolutions. MCT will upload the recorded (captured) data from
the MintDrive and the Tuning Graph tab will be shown. Below the graph, make sure that only the
Actual Position and Demand Position boxes are checked.
Note:
The graph that you see on your system will not look exactly the same as the graph shown below!
Remember that each motor has a slightly different response.
With only KVELFF defined, you will
get very little response.
The Proportional gain term,
KPROP, should be used to
overcome the large following
error...
Demand position
Measured position
6. Click the Position Loop Tuning tab, click the KPROP box and enter a small starting value, for example 1.
Click Start Move .
In the dialog box that appears, click GO .
Adding the KPROP term has
improved the response, but it is still
quite slow.
Demand position
Measured position
As the value of KPROP increases,
the rise (response) time will
decrease. For example, the plot
opposite shows the effect of setting
KPROP to a value of 3.
58
Demand position
Measured position
If KPROP is increased too far,
overshoot or ringing will occur. The
plot opposite shows the effect of
setting KPROP to a value of 7.
Measured position
This overshoot and/or ringing can
be reduced by introducing a
damping term - either KVEL or
KDERIV...
7. The plot opposite shows how
applying a value of 0.25 to KVEL
(with KPROP set to 4.7), causes a
response with a small overshoot but
which settles quickly.
Demand position
Measured position
Demand position
The ideal response is to have a
sharp (square) response with very
little overshoot and no oscillations.
The Step Response Statistics tab
shows measured values which can
be used as a further guide to tuning.
8. When you have tuned the motor,
click Next > to continue.
4.3.4
Jog test
This tab allows you to perform a jog test on the motor. This will start the motor rotating at a preset speed
until it is stopped by you.
1. Set the demand speed and accelerations by clicking in
the bottom three boxes and typing the required values.
2. Click either Jog -ve or Jog +ve to perform the test.
The Stop button stops the movement.
The top two boxes show real-time information about the
jog move.
When you have completed your tests click Stop, followed
by Disable Drive .
3. Click Next > to continue.
59
4.3.5
Completing the Startup Wizard
The Startup Wizard is now complete. The next step is to continue with the configuration of other
parameters such as inputs and outputs.
If you have not used the MCT before, it is recommended that you continue using the Wizard mode to
guide you through all the stages of configuration. Manual mode is for experienced users only.
1. Click Mint Configuration
Tool in Wizard Mode .
2. Click Next > to continue.
60
4.4
MCT Wizard - hardware configuration
The next part of the Mint Configuration Tool allows you to setup the digital inputs and outputs, perform
further fine-tuning and configure many other parameters. At the bottom of the window, the help bar
shows guidance about the current options.
4.4.1
Digital input configuration
The Digital Input Configuration tab allows you to define how each digital input will be triggered and,
optionally, if it is to be allocated to a special function, for example the Forward Limit.
If you do not wish to configure any inputs at this stage, click Next > and go to section 4.4.2.
In the following example, digital input 1 (IN1) will be allocated to the forward limit input, triggered by a
falling edge.
1. Drag the Falling icon
the IN1 icon .
onto
This will setup IN1 to respond to
a falling edge.
2. Now drag the IN1 icon
onto the FWD Limit icon
.
This will setup IN1 as the
Forward Limit input.
61
3. Continue this process until you
have configured all the required
inputs.
Click Next > to continue.
The Undo Changes button can
be used to reset all the items on
the tab to their original values.
4.4.2
Digital output configuration
The Digital Output Configuration tab allows you to define how each digital output will operate and if it is
to be allocated to the drive enable output. If you do not wish to configure any outputs at this stage, click
Next > and go to section 4.4.3.
1. Drag the appropriate icons to
setup the digital outputs.
If you do not understand an item,
click in its box and read the
information shown in the help
bar at the bottom of the window.
The Undo Changes button can
be used to reset all the items on
the tab to their original values.
When you have finished, click
Next > to continue.
Note: The purpose of the Drive Enable Output is to provide an indication of the MintDrive’s enabled
status. Its use is optional and it does not have to be assigned to an output for the MintDrive
to be operational.
62
4.4.3
Axis0 parameter configuration
The Axis0 Parameter Configuration tab allows you to setup various axis parameters.
If you do not wish to make any changes, click Next > and go to section 4.4.4.
1. Click in the appropriate boxes
and type the required values.
If you do not understand an item,
click in its box and read the
information shown in the help
bar at the bottom of the window.
The Undo Changes button can
be used to reset all the items on
the tab to their original values.
When you have finished, click
Next > to continue.
4.4.4
Axis0 error configuration
The Axis0 Error Configuration tab allows you to setup various axis error parameters.
If you do not wish to make any changes, click Next > and go to section 4.4.5.
1. Click in the appropriate boxes
and type the required values.
If you do not understand an item,
click in its box and read the
information shown in the help
bar at the bottom of the window.
The Undo Changes button can
be used to reset all the items on
the tab to their original values.
When you have finished, click
Next > to continue.
63
4.4.5
Axis0 tuning configuration
The Axis0 Tuning Configuration tab provides a further opportunity to make adjustments to the drive
tuning. The previous values that you set will already be entered in the boxes. If you do not wish to make
any changes, click Next > and go to section 4.4.6.
1. Click in the appropriate boxes
and type the required values.
If you do not understand an item,
click in its box and read the
information shown in the help
bar at the bottom of the window.
The Undo Changes button can
be used to reset all the items on
the tab to their original values.
When you have finished, click
Next > to continue.
4.4.6
Miscellaneous configuration
The Miscellaneous Configuration tab allows you to setup miscellaneous parameters.
If you do not wish to make any changes, click Next > and go to section 4.4.7.
1. Click in the appropriate boxes
and type the required values.
If you do not understand an item,
click in it’s box and read the
information shown in the help
bar at the bottom of the window.
The Undo Changes button can
be used to reset all the items on
the tab to their original values.
When you have finished, click
Next > to continue.
64
4.4.7
Completing the configuration wizard
The configuration must now be saved.
(If you wish to go back and make any further changes, click < Back .
1. Check that the drop down box is showing Mint Configuration
File Format. If it is not, then select this option.
Click Next > to continue.
2. The completed configuration file
will be shown.
If you wish to go back and make
any further changes, click
< Back .
Click Finish to continue.
3. Check that the Launch Mint
Workbench and save the
project and configuration
files option is selected.
Click OK to continue.
65
4. The Save As dialog box will be shown.
The first file to save is the project file.
This file can be loaded into MCT and edited later.
Select a folder and enter a filename for the project file.
Click Save .
5. The second file to save is the configuration file.
This is the file that can be loaded into Mint Workbench
and sent to the MintDrive.
Select a folder and enter a filename for the
configuration file.
Click Save .
A number of things will now happen:
H The configuration file will be saved;
H MCT will be closed;
H Mint WorkBench will be started;
H The configuration file will be automatically loaded into WorkBench.
66
5
5.1
Mint WorkBench
5
Outline
Mint WorkBench is the main application for programming and controlling the MintDrive.
The Terminal window allows you control the MintDrive in real-time, while the Program window allows
you to construct complex programs using the Mintt programming language. The Configuration window
allows you to view and alter the configuration file. For detailed information on Mint programming, see
the Mint v4 Programming Guide.
5.1.1
Completing configuration
To complete the configuration process, the configuration file must be downloaded to the MintDrive.
On the Standard toolbar, click
.
the download button
In the dialog box that appears,
click Yes to confirm download.
button at the top
Click the
of the Configuration Editor
window to close the window.
This completes the configuration and tuning.
The remainder of this section includes some simple motor
movement commands that can be useful for testing.
67
5.2
Using WorkBench
If you have not just completed the Mint Configuration Tool Wizard, you will need to start Mint
WorkBench manually. On the Windows Start menu, select Programs, Mint v4, Mint WorkBench.
5.2.1
Selecting the controller
Before WorkBench can communicate with the MintDrive, it must scan the PC’s serial ports to find where
it is connected. To do this, click Tools on the main menu and choose Select Controller... .
The Select Controller dialog box will appear and WorkBench will scan the serial ports until it finds the
MintDrive. When it has found the MintDrive, click OK .
Note: The MintDrive logic supply must be powered otherwise it will not be found.
If WorkBench was started automatically when you completed the MCT Wizard, you do not
need to do this step.
5.2.2
Menus and buttons
The main Mint WorkBench window contains a menu system and toolbars. Many functions can be
accessed from the menu or by clicking a button - use whichever you prefer. Most buttons include a
’tool-tip’; hold the mouse pointer over the button (don’t click) and its description will appear.
5.2.2.1
Standard toolbar functions
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
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2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
Controller reset (Not available on MintDrive).
Save Displays the save dialog box.
Print Displays the print dialog box.
Cut Cuts the text selected in the editor window and places it on the clipboard.
Copy Copies the text selected in the editor window and places it on the clipboard.
Paste Pastes the text on the clipboard into the editor window at the cursor location.
Undo Reverses the last editing action.
Watch window Turns the watch window on or off.
CAN window Turns the CAN window on or off.
Upload Uploads the current file from the MintDrive to WorkBench.
Download Downloads the current file to the MintDrive from WorkBench.
Run Runs the current configuration and program files in the MintDrive.
Stop Stops the current program running on the MintDrive.
DPR Watchwindow (Not available on MintDrive).
Terminal Displays the Terminal window (CTRL+T has the same effect).
Copy parameters Copies the current drive tuning parameters to the clipboard.
Digital I/O Displays the digital I/O watch window.
Platform information Displays the platform information window.
About Displays WorkBench version number information.
19
5.2.2.2
Motion toolbar functions
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
5.2.2.3
2
4
5
6
7
8
Axis selection (Only Axis0 can be selected)
Jog (reverse) Causes the motor to start a reverse jog motion.
Jog speed Sets the jog speed (in user units per second)
Jog (forward) Causes the motor to start a forward jog motion.
Stop Stops the jog motion.
Enable / Disable Enables (sending a CANCEL command first) or disables the drive.
Clear motion errors If an error occurs, clears the error condition so operation can continue.
Motion error Displays the error code bitmap when a motion error occurs. Click the button to
see a description of the error(s).
Macro toolbar functions
1
1
2
5.2.2.4
3
2
Configure macros Displays the Assign Macros to Function Keys F1..F12 dialog box.
Execute macro Starts the macro assigned to that button.
Status bar
The status bar provides information for the currently selected menu item or the status of WorkBench.
It provides a useful reminder of the meaning of each function. Double click on the center section to
display the Configure this Controller dialog.
5.2.2.5
CAN window
The CAN window shows the current status of the CAN ports. If the MintDrive is not connected to a CAN
network you can turn this window off by choosing View, CAN Window on the main menu or by clicking
the CAN window button on the standard toolbar.
4
1
1
2
3
4
2
3
Events Displays current CAN events
Nodes Displays node information for the CAN network.
Groups Displays grouping information for the CAN network
Viewing Selects the CAN port to be monitored.
69
5.3
Watch window
The Watch window contains four tabs, providing real-time information and allowing tuning of the motor.
If a tab is not visible, click the
buttons at the bottom of the window.
5.3.1
Quick Watch tab
The Quick Watch tab provides real-time information about various
WorkBench and motor parameters. Up to four user selectable parameters
can be monitored at the same time.
To select a parameter to be monitored, click one of the parameter boxes
on the right of the QuickWatch tab.
In the drop down box that appears, click on the item you wish to monitor.
The value will appear in the line just below the drop down box.
Values are sampled, in turn, every 100ms although this can be changed
by clicking the arrows beside the Time Between QuickWatch Samples
(ms) box
The Capture The QuickWatch Channels frame allows the selected
parameters to be captured and shown on a graph. To select the sampling time, click the arrows beside
the Seconds box
, then click the Capture button.
70
5.3.2
Speed Loop tab
The Speed Loop tab provides a further opportunity to tune the motor.
Click in the appropriate boxes and type the required values.
Click Start Move to perform the move.
The motor will now rotate, WorkBench will upload the recorded
(captured) data from the MintDrive and the Capture tab will be
shown.
Note: If an error occurs, the Error: button on the Motion toolbar
will show the error number. Click the button to see details
of the error. Depending on the type of error that occurred,
you might need to click the Clear Motion Errors button
before further moves can be performed.
Speed Step performs a step speed change to the percentage of
maximum motor velocity entered in the Speed (% max motor) box.
Current Proportional Gain (KIPROP)
The gain is set by MCT during the tuning process. If you need to
recalculate this value, use the formula:
KIPROP =
740 × L ×  A∕V 
VAC
where:
L = Line to neutral inductance of the motor in mH.
A/V = Amps / volt scaling of the current feedback.
VAC = Nominal line voltage
Current Integral Gain (KIINT)
This gain is preset to 50Hz and should not need to be adjusted.
Speed Proportional Gain (KVPROP)
This gain will speed up the response and but excessive values will cause overshoot, and possible
instability.
Speed Integral Gain (KVINT)
Increasing the value of KVINT increases the low frequency gain and stiffness of the control, but
excessive values will cause overshoot for transient speed commands and may lead to oscillation.
If KVPROP and KVINT are set too high, an overshoot condition can also occur.
Speed differential gain (KVDIFF)
Theoretically this gain has a damping effect, although it is not implemented in the MintDrive.
For a full description of the tuning parameters, see Appendix A.
71
5.3.3
Position Loop tab
The Position Loop tab provides a further opportunity to tune the motor
and perform test moves. Click in the appropriate boxes and type the
required values. For a full description of the position loop tuning
parameters, see Appendix A.
Click Start Move to perform the move.
The motor will now rotate, WorkBench will upload the recorded
(captured) data from the MintDrive and the Capture tab will be shown.
Note: If an error occurs, the Error: button on the Motion toolbar
will show the error number. Click the button to see details of
the error. Depending on the type of error that occurred, you
might need to click the Clear Motion Errors button before
further moves can be performed.
Depending on the type of move chosen in the MoveType box, different
options will appear below it:
Position Step performs a step position move of the distance entered in
the Step Size (uu) box.
Position Trapezoid performs a trapezoidal move. The total distance of
the move is entered in the Move Distance (uu) box. When the move is
performed the demanded motor speed will increase at the rate entered
in the Acceleration box until the Slew Speed is reached. Towards the
end of the move, the demanded motor speed will decrease at the rate
entered in the Deceleration box.
72
5.3.4
Capture tab
Each time a speed or position test move is performed using WorkBench,
the data from the move is automatically captured and uploaded in to
WorkBench. The Capture tab allows you to select the type of plot produced
from the captured data. Click in the appropriate boxes to select the
required data.
The Plot #1 and Plot #2 frames allow you to select which parameter(s) to
show on the graph and the color of the traces. Plot #2 is only available
after a Position move has been performed.
Normally, the graph will automatically scale itself to show the largest
maximum and minimum captured values for the selected plot types.
However, the Use the same axis as plot #1 check box forces the two
traces to be plotted using the scaling required for plot #1. This allows the
two sets of data to be compared with each other more easily.
The background color of the graph can be changed using the Background
Color drop down box, and the grid can be turned on or off using the Show
Grid check box. The Upload Captured Data From the Controller button
allows you to manually upload the data.
73
5.4
Editor windows
Mint WorkBench has three main editor windows; the Configuration window, the Program window and
the Terminal window.
5.4.1
Configuration window
If the configuration window is not visible,
select Window, Configuration from the main
menu.
The configuration window is used for writing
and editing the configuration file. Any file
downloaded from this window to the MintDrive
will be sent as the configuration file.
To view the current configuration stored in the
MintDrive, click the upload button on the
standard toolbar. After a couple of seconds,
the current configuration file will be displayed.
To download the configuration file to the
MintDrive, click the download button on the
standard toolbar.
In the dialog box that appears, click Yes to confirm download. Saved configuration files can also be
loaded into the configuration window using File, Open, Config... on the main menu.
5.4.2
Program window
If the program window is not visible, select
Window, Program from the main menu.
The program window is used for writing and
editing programs. Any file downloaded from
this window to the MintDrive will be sent as
the program file.
To view the current program stored in the
MintDrive, click the upload button on the
standard toolbar. After a couple of seconds,
the program file will be displayed. If there is no
program in the MintDrive, the window will
remain blank.
To download the program file to the MintDrive,
click the download button on the standard
toolbar.
In the dialog box that appears, click Yes to confirm download. Saved program files can also be loaded
into the program window using File, Open, Program... on the main menu.
74
5.4.3
Terminal window
If the terminal window is not visible, select
Tools, Terminal from the main menu.
(Alternatively, click the Terminal button on the
standard toolbar or press CTRL+T).
The Terminal window can be used for
controlling the MintDrive directly and for
monitoring output messages from programs.
On the PC keyboard, press the Enter key
once to display the C001> or P001> prompt.
Commands typed in the Terminal window will
have immediate effect on the MintDrive,
although the command line will not be
available while a program is running.
5.4.4
Useful commands for testing
The Terminal window can be a useful tool for performing simple tests. Before testing can begin, check
that the enable button
on the motion toolbar is pressed; the MintDrive Monitor LED display should be
showing the symbol.
The following examples can now be typed in the Terminal window:
To start the motor turning slowly, type...
JOG=1
followed by the Enter key.
The motor will begin to rotate at a speed of 1 user unit per second. If you have followed all the previous
examples, this means the motor will rotate at one revolution per second.
To stop the motor turning, type...
STOP
followed by the Enter key.
The motor will stop.
To start the motor turning in reverse, then change direction type...
JOG=-1
followed by the Enter key. Then type:
JOG=1
followed by the Enter key.
The motor will immediately change direction. Type:
STOP
to stop the motor.
75
To turn a distance of 5 turns, type...
MOVER=5
GO
followed by the Enter key. Then type:
followed by the Enter key.
The keyword MOVER means “MOVE Relative”. In this example the motor will turn 5 units. If you have
followed all the previous examples, this means the motor will rotate five revolutions.
To change the speed, type...
SPEED=0.5
followed by the Enter key.
The motor will not turn, but the next time you use a MOVER command, the motor will now turn at half of
one revolution per second. To try it type:
MOVER=2
GO
followed by the Enter key,
followed by the Enter key.
Combining commands on one line...
Commands can be combined on one line by separating them with colons. For example, type:
SPEED=2:MOVER=8:GO
followed by the Enter key.
The motor will immediately turn for 8 revolutions at a speed of 2 revolutions per second.
To learn more about using these commands and how to incorporate them into programs, see the Mint
v4 Programming Guide. Using the Mint programming language, sophisticated programs can be written
that control the motor, set outputs and, most importantly, respond to external inputs.
76
5.4.5
Firmware update
Occasionally there may be updates to Mint to either fix problems or to add new features.
The Mint firmware is stored in Flash memory and can be updated using the RS232 serial port.
The RS485 port cannot be used for firmware update.
CAUTION:
The state of the analog and digital outputs cannot be guaranteed while firmware is
being updated. Please disconnect any equipment which may be damaged.
CAUTION:
It is recommended to remove any AUTO configuration file prior to updating
firmware. Changing the firmware may affect the way your Mint application works.
CAUTION:
Updating firmware may destroy any program(s) held in the battery backed-up
RAM buffers. You should upload these into Mint WorkBench and save them
before updating the firmware.
CAUTION:
Updating firmware will destroy any program(s) held in the Flash memory buffers.
You should upload these into Mint WorkBench and save them before updating the
firmware.
From the Tools menu, select Update Firmware and follow the instructions on screen.
Once the firmware has been updated, both the Configuration and Program flash buffers will need to be
reset. The Mint keyword BUFFERSTORE can be used to switch between battery backed-up RAM and
flash buffers. Typing:
BUFFERSTORE=0
will switch to the battery-backed RAM buffer. Typing:
BUFFERSTORE=1
will switch to the flash buffer.
With the flash buffer selected, type:
CON
to select the configuration buffer (if it is not already selected).
A few report lines will be shown, followed by the C> prompt. Type:
NEW
at the prompt to reset the buffer.
Now type:
PROG
to select the program buffer.
A few report lines will be shown, followed by the P> prompt. Type:
NEW
at the prompt to reset the buffer.
It is recommended to update the keyword tables supported by the controller after updating it with new
firmware. This allows the Mint WorkBench editor to identify keywords recognized by the controller.
To update the keyword tables, select Load Syntax from the Edit menu in Mint WorkBench.
77
78
6
6.1
Specifications
6
Outline
This section provides technical specifications of the MintDrive variants
6.1.1
General specifications
The MintDrive is an integrated motion controller and brushless AC servo drive with internal power
supply.
H Five current output ratings are available: 2.5A, 5A, 7.5A, 10A and 15A
H Four voltage input ratings are available: 115VAC or 230VAC single-phase, with three-phase variants
available on the 10A and 15A units
H An optional internal 24V power supply for control electronics is available
H Resolver or encoder feedback
H 18 optically isolated digital inputs (12-24VDC ±20%), configurable for PNP or NPN operation.
Software configurable for forward limit, reverse limit, stop and home. Two inputs configurable for
high speed position latch (CAPT) on axis position and master encoder position
H 9 optically isolated digital outputs. Four outputs configurable for PNP or NPN operation. One output
rated at 1A, all others at 50mA.
H Four analog input channels:
One single ended input 0-10V, 10-bit resolution
One differential input: ±10V, auto selecting resolution - 12-bit below 1VDC, 10-bit above 1VDC
Two differential inputs: ±10V, 12-bit.
H Four analog output channels:
Two bipolar outputs: ±10V; 8-bit resolution, 1mA output
Two bipolar outputs: ±10V; 8-bit resolution, 4mA output
H Two channel serial interface: RS232 and 4-wire RS485
H Two channel CAN interface: CANopen DS401 master and Baldor CAN protocol
H Seven segment display for diagnostics.
79
6.1.2
Power
Mains and motor output
Unit
Nominal input voltage (Vin=230VAC)
2.5A
5A
VAC
7.5A
220
Maximum input voltage
250
VDC
320
Minimum DC-Bus voltage
306
Maximum DC-Bus voltage
350
Nominal input voltage (Vin=115VAC)
VAC
115
Minimum input voltage
97
Maximum input voltage
125
Nominal DC-Bus voltage
VDC
160
Minimum DC-Bus voltage
135
Maximum DC-Bus voltage
176
Output voltage (line-line)
@VDC-Bus=320V
VRMS
Nominal phase current (±10%)
ARMS
2.5
5.0
7.5
10
15
Peak phase current (±10%)
for 2.4s (+0.5s / -0s)
ARMS
5
10
15
20
30
1.01
2.17
2.99
4.33
6.51
Nominal output power
kVA
Efficiency
Output frequency
Nominal switching frequency
0 ~ 230
%
>95
Hz
0 ~ 500
kHz
8.5
Unit
All models
Optional 24V supply
Input voltage
VRIPPLE = 10%
minimum
maximum
VDC
20
30
Input current
@24VDC
maximum
ARMS
1.6
ARMS
4
Surge current at power on
@24VDC for 100ms
80
15A
230
Minimum input voltage
Nominal DC-Bus voltage
10A
6.1.3
Rectifier and regeneration
Rectifier
Unit
Input voltage (±15%, f=50~60Hz)
DC-Bus voltage (absolute)
All models
Vin=230VAC
Vin=115VAC
Nominal
Minimum
Maximum
VAC
230
190
265
115
90
130
Minimum
Maximum
VDC
270
360
125
175
Regeneration
Unit
Switching threshold
Vin=230VAC
Vin=115VAC
VDC
2.5A*
5A*
7.5A
10A
15A
on:373~383, off:362~372
on:373~383, off:362~372
on:188~195, off:183~188
on:188~195, off:183~188
Nominal power
kW
0.25
1.0
Peak power
kW
2.7
15
ARMS
10
40
Maximum regeneration
switching current
Maximum load inductance
mH
100
*Note: 2.5A model contains an internal 320Ω, 20W resistor
5A model contains an internal 175Ω, 30W resistor.
6.1.4
Resolver feedback
Resolution
set automatically by software
Unit
All models
bits
Velocity <6100RPM: 14 bits
Velocity >6100RPM: 12 bits
Pole pairs
-
1
Resolver winding ratio
-
0.5
MintDrive resolver input accuracy
counts
±2
Typical combined accuracy using
Baldor BSM series resolver motor
counts
±4
81
6.1.5
Encoder feedback
All models
Encoder input
A/B Differential, Z index
Signal frequency (maximum)
1.5MHz (6MHz quadrature)
Hall inputs
6.1.6
Single ended, 5V logic
Control signals
Encoder output (simulated)
Unit
Signal
Encoder resolution
Resolver
Encoder
All models
-
RS422
-
1024ppr, simulated
1024ppr / 2500ppr (actual encoder lines)
(Baldor BSM series motor)
Master (auxiliary) encoder input
Unit
All models
Signal
-
RS422
Operating mode
-
A/B quadrature
Maximum input frequency (quadrature)
Sample time
MHz
8
ms
Selectable: 0.5, 1, 2
Unit
All models
Serial RS232 interface
Signal
Bit rate
Baud
RS232, non-isolated CTS/RTS
9600, 19200, 57600
Serial RS485 interface
Unit
Signal
Bit rate
82
Baud
All models
4-wire RS485, non-isolated
9600
CAN Bus interfaces
Unit
Signal
-
2-wire, isolated
Channels
-
2
Bit rate
Kbit/s
Protocols
6.1.7
All models
-
10, 20, 50, 125, 250, 500, 1000
(800 also available on CAN bus 1 only)
CAN bus 1: CANopen
CAN bus 2: Baldor CAN
Environmental
Unit
Operating temperature range
Minimum
Maximum
Derate
Storage temperature range
All models
°C
°F
+5
+40
2.5% / °C between
40°C and 50°C (max)
+41
+104
2.5% / 1.8°F between
40°C and 50°C (max)
-25 ~ +70
-13 ~ +158
Humidity
%
10~90 non-condensing according to
DIN40 040 / IEC144
Maximum installation altitude
(above m.s.l.)
m
1000
Derate 1.1% / 100m over 1000m
ft
3300
Derate 1.1% / 330ft over 3300ft
Shock
-
10G according to
DIN IEC 68-2-6/29
Vibration
-
1G, 10~150Hz, according to
DIN IEC 68-2-6/29
83
84
7
7.1
Troubleshooting
7
Outline
This section explains common problems that may be encountered and their solutions.
If you want to know the meaning of the LED Monitor display, see section 1.3 on page 3.
7.1.1
Problem diagnosis
If you have followed all the instructions in this manual in sequence, as instructed, you should have few
problems installing the MintDrive.
If you do have a problem, check through the diagnosis sections below. If you cannot solve the problem,
or the problem persists, contact details for Baldor Technical Support are provided at the front of this
manual.
Before contacting Technical Support, please have ready the following information (if available):
H The Serial Number of your MintDrive.
H The Catalog Number indicating the type of MintDrive you have.
H Assuming you have access to the command line, type VER and note down the software version
number and the build number.
H Assuming you have access to the command line, type VIEW HARDWARE and note down the
information given.
H The catalog number of the motor that you are using.
H The version of Mint WorkBench that you are using (click Help, About on the main menu).
H Give a clear description of what you are trying to do, for example trying to establish communications
with the Mint WorkBench, trying to run the Feedback Alignment test under the Drive Setup dialog or
trying to setup Mint gains.
H Give a clear description of the symptoms that you can observe, for example the current state of any
of the status indicators, error messages displayed, the current value of any of the Mint error
keywords AXISERROR, AXISSTATUS, MISCERROR, DRIVEFAULT, ERR and ERL.
H The type of motion generated in the motor shaft.
H Give a list of any parameters that you have setup, for example the motor data you entered/selected
from the ”Drive Setup” dialog, the gain settings generated by MCT during the tuning process and
any gain settings you have entered yourself.
Depending upon the nature of your problem you may be asked for some or all of the above
information.
The term “Power-cycle the MintDrive” is used in the following sections.
This means turn the MintDrive off, wait for it to power down completely, then turn it on again.
85
7.1.2
Communication
Problem
Check
No LEDs are illuminated
(+24VDC models)
Check that the 24VDC power supply is connected on connector X1
and is switched on.
No LEDs are illuminated
(Mains only models)
Check the mains supply is connected and switched on.
Mint WorkBench fails to detect
Mint WorkBench automatically attempts to re-select the last
the MintDrive - it detects another controller to which it was connected. Select Tools, Select
controller
Controller on the main menu. Check that MintDrive has been
selected in the drop-down. If not, select it.
Mint WorkBench fails to detect
Ensure that the MintDrive is powered and the LEDs are illuminated
the MintDrive - it detects
(see section 1.3 on page 3).
“Controller with No Firmware” on
the serial port.
Check that the RS232 cable is connected between the PC serial
port and to connector X7 on the MintDrive.
Check the wiring of the RS232 cable or try an alternate cable.
If available on the PC, try an alternative serial port.
Confirm that a mouse driver or other serial device is not conflicting
with Mint WorkBench.
Cannot communicate with the
MintDrive over the RS232 port
(cannot get P> or C> prompt by
pressing Enter).
Check that Mint WorkBench has detected the MintDrive, indicated
in the status bar at the bottom of the window.
Check that the MintDrive is still powered.
Check that the focus is on the Terminal window of the Mint
WorkBench (click in the Terminal window).
Check that there is not a program already running on the MintDrive
(press CTRL+E to abort the running program).
Check that a program hasn’t disabled the RS232 terminal using
the TERMINAL keyword (pressing CTRL+E will re-enable the
RS232 serial port).
Check that the Monitor LED is illuminated.
Power-cycle the MintDrive.
86
7.1.3
Power up
Problem
Check
No LEDs are illuminated
Check that the 24VDC power supply is connected on connector X1
and is switched on.
Check the mains supply is connected and switched on.
One or more of the Monitor,
Ready or CAN LEDs is not
illuminated
Check power connections. Power-cycle the MintDrive.
The ’Ready’ LED is red.
The drive has detected an error.
Type PRINT DRIVEFAULT in the Terminal window or click the error
button on the motion toolbar to find the error code(s).
See section 7.1.6 on page 91.
A CAN LED is red or flashing
red.
See section 7.1.7 on page 94.
The Ready LED is green and
the Monitor LED indicates ‘L’
The drive has powered-up into ’Local’ mode.
Power-cycle the MintDrive.
If the problem persists contact Baldor Technical Support.
If the problem persists then contact Baldor Technical Support.
The Ready LED is green and
the Monitor LED indicates ‘E’
The MintDrive has detected a motion error.
Type PRINT AXISERROR at the command line or click on the error
button on the motion toolbar to find the error code(s).
Click the Clear Motion Errors button on the motion toolbar.
The message Variables
corrupted. Use RELEASE.
is shown at power-up.
Type RELEASE in the Terminal window to clear variables from the
variable stack.
If the problem persists then this indicates a battery problem.
Trickle charge the MintDrive’s battery by leaving the unit powered
for 24~48 hours.
If the problem still persists contact Baldor Technical Support.
The message Memory
Corruption. Use NEW to
clear buffers. is shown at
power-up.
Type NEW at the Configuration prompt (type CON to display C>).
Type NEW at the Program prompt (type PROG to display P>).
This will clear the corrupted programs from memory.
If the problem persists then this indicates a battery problem.
Trickle charge the MintDrive’s battery by leaving the unit powered
for 24~48 hours.
If the problem still persists contact Baldor Technical Support.
87
Problem
Check
The message Lost User
Data: Defaulting to
Factory settings please wait... is shown at
power-up.
If this message is followed by You must now re-tune your
motor retune the MintDrive by either re-entering the gain settings
set earlier or by following the tuning setup (see section 4.2 on
page 51).
If this message is followed by Failed to automatically
reset Factory settings. power-cycle the MintDrive.
If the same message re-appears or the Ready LED stays red,
contact Baldor Technical Support. Otherwise, retune the MintDrive
by either re-entering the gain settings set earlier or by following the
tuning setup (see section 4.2 on page 51).
If this message is followed by Factory settings have been
reset, but failed to clear error flag. Try
clearing the error manually using CANCEL. type
CANCEL. and power-cycle the MintDrive. If the same message
re-appears or the Ready LED stays red, contact Baldor Technical
Support. Otherwise, retune the MintDrive by either re-entering the
gain settings set earlier or by following the tuning setup
(see section 4.2 on page 51).
The message
Initialization Error is
shown at power-up.
Contact Baldor Technical Support.
The message Fatal
Initialization Error is
shown at power-up.
Contact Baldor Technical Support.
The message Processor
Reset Code = xx is shown at
power-up.
If new firmware has just been downloaded this message may be
ignored.
If the MintDrive has been power-cycled, power-cycle the MintDrive
again. If the problem persists contact Baldor Technical Support.
If the firmware just reset without the unit being power-cycled,
contact Baldor Technical Support.
88
7.1.4
Tuning
The following problems could occur when the software is performing automatic tuning tests.
If the Ready LED is red during any of the tests see section 7.1.6 on page 91.
Check that the software can communicate with the MintDrive by typing PRINT DRIVEFAULT in the
Terminal window. If no error is reported then communication can be achieved.
Problem
Check
Current Loop compensation test
fails.
If the MintDrive has the internal 24VDC supply, check that the
mains is powered and connected.
Check that the motor UVW cable is connected. Check that the
feedback cable is connected. Repeat the test.
Power-cycle the unit and repeat the test.
Click the Calculate button and use this value or enter the Current
proportional gain manually and proceed to the feedback alignment
test.
Feedback alignment test fails
If the MintDrive has the internal 24VDC supply, check that the
mains is powered and connected.
Check that the motor UVW cable is connected. Check that the
feedback cable is connected. Repeat the test.
Power-cycle the unit and repeat the test.
Check the motor data settings (number of poles, resolver speeds
etc.) have been entered correctly.
Check the wiring of the feedback cable.
Check that the resolver cable is physically separated from power
cables. If the resolver cable has to cross power cables, check that
they cross at an angle of 90 degrees.
Enter the default angle of 23 degrees (for a 8-pole motor) or 46
degrees for a 4-pole motor.
Speed Controller Calculations
test fails
If the MintDrive has the internal 24VDC supply, check that the
mains is powered and connected.
Check that the motor UVW cable is connected. Check that the
feedback cable is connected.
89
7.1.5
Mint gains
Problem
Check
Cannot enable the MintDrive
because AXISERROR has bit
13 set
Check the drive enable input on connector X13-1 and X13-12 is
connected and that the input is enabled.
When the MintDrive is enabled
the motor is unstable
If a “Lost User Data” error (DRIVEFAULT = 21) has occurred
recently you must retune the current loop.
Check that you have configured the MintDrive, for example:
CONFIG = _cfSERVO
or
CONFIG = _cfCURRENT_AMPLIFIER
Check that the current loop has been tuned.
Check that the current loop was tuned with the correct motor data.
If, after removing Mint gains, the motor is still unstable try reducing
the Speed Proportional gain and Speed Integral gain.
90
I get a Following Error
(AXISERROR bit 5 is set) and
the drive disables when tuning
the Mint gains
Set FOLERRORMODE to zero to ignore the following error while
tuning the Mint gains.
I get a Software limit error
(AXISERROR bits 3 or 4 set)
and the drive disables when
tuning the Mint gains
Set SOFTLIMITMODE to zero to ignore the software limit error while
tuning the Mint gains.
I get a Hardware limit error
(AXISERROR bits 1 or 2 set)
and the drive disables when
tuning the Mint gains
Set LIMITMODE to zero to ignore the hardware limit errors while
tuning the Mint gains. Alternatively, disable the hardware limit
inputs.
7.1.6
Ready LED is red
If the Ready LED is illuminated red and the Monitor LED shows
PRINT DRIVEFAULT.
, at the command line type
This will return one of the codes listed below. Alternatively, click on the error button on the motion
toolbar, which will also display the drive fault.
If the code is not listed below please contact Baldor Technical Support.
Code
Problem
Check
3
Power Base ID fault
The MintDrive does not recognize the power base ID.
Type CANCEL. If the fault does not clear, power-cycle the MintDrive.
If the fault persists type VIEW HARDWARE, make a note of the
‘Power Base ID’ number and contact Baldor Technical Support.
4
Insufficient Bus Volts
at start-up
DC Bus Low detected at power-up
Check the mains supply, re-instate and type CANCEL.
6
Current Sense fault
Defective phase current sensor or open circuit detected between
control board and current sensor.
Contact Baldor Technical Support.
7
Power Base fault
Desaturation of power device occurred or the bus current threshold
was exceeded.
If this occurs when enabling the drive, disconnect the motor cable
and power-cycle the unit. If this cures the fault check the motor
cable wiring for low impedance shorts.
If this occurs during high acceleration and deceleration, reduce the
Mint ACCEL and DECEL parameters and the Current Proportional
gain and Speed Proportional gain.
9
Resolver fault /
Encoder Loss
Resolver/Encoder feedback problem is indicated
Check the wiring of the encoder / resolver cable at both ends.
If using an encoder, check that +5VDC is being supplied to the
encoder and that 3.5VDC is being returned on each of the encoder
channels.
10
Logic supply fault
Logic power supply not working properly or supply has dropped
below the minimum input voltage (24VDC models only).
Check that 24VDC is being supplied to the MintDrive.
Replace power supply.
If the problem persists, contact Baldor Technical Support.
91
Code
Problem
Check
12
Over voltage fault
Bus over voltage condition occurred.
If this occurs during high deceleration, a regeneration resistor
might need to be installed. If a regeneration resistor is already
installed check the wiring and if it has an adequate rating.
Alternatively, try decreasing the Mint DECEL parameter.
Check that the correct AC voltage is being supplied for the power
rating of your MintDrive.
Check for power input line disturbances (mains spikes) and fit a
mains filter.
Measure the actual input voltage being supplied to the MintDrive
and check that it is within the specification.
If the problem persists, contact Baldor Technical Support.
15
Under voltage fault
DC Bus Voltage has fallen below minimum threshold.
If this occurs during acceleration then the load may be too great for
the acceleration selected. Try reducing the value of the Mint ACCEL
parameter.
Check that the correct AC voltage is being supplied for the power
rating of your MintDrive.
If the fault occurs immediately after power-up, remove the
regeneration resistor (if connected) and try again.
Check for power input line disturbances (sags caused by start-up
of other equipment).
Measure the actual input voltage being supplied to the MintDrive
and check that it is within the specification
If the problem persists, contact Baldor Technical Support.
16
Overload
The current rating of the drive has been exceeded.
Check the motor and feedback wiring.
If this occurs·during high acceleration rates, decrease the Mint
ACCEL parameter and/or reduce the motor load.
Check the motor and load for excessive friction or improper
operation such as a broken gear in a gearbox.
92
Code
Problem
Check
17
Over speed fault
Motor RPM exceeded 110% of programmed MAX Motor speed.
Type PRINT MAXMOTORSPEED. If the value returned exceeds
the maximum mechanical speed of the motor specified in the
catalog, type MAXMOTORSPEED = xxxx where xxxx is the
maximum speed listed in the catalog, in RPM.
You should retune the motor after changing this parameter.
Check the Mint demanded velocity by using either the QuickWatch
tab or Capture tab and compare with the MAXMOTORSPEED
parameter. If the Mint demanded velocity is greater than the
maximum speed of the motor, modify your Mint program to
generate a slower demand velocity.
19
Control temp fault
Temperature of drive heatsink exceeded safe level.
Check correct operation of fans (if fitted) and ensure that they are
clear of dirt.
Check the ambient temperature around the drive.
Ensure that the unit is adequately ventilated.
If the problem persists add additional cooling.
21
Lost User Data
Battery backed RAM parameters have been lost or corrupted.
If the fault did not clear automatically after power-up, enter the
“Drive Setup” dialog and retune the MintDrive by following the
tuning setup (see section 4.2 on page 51).
22
Microprocessor
reset
Turn off the power supply and wait for the residual Bus voltage to
reach 0VDC before turning on.
Power-cycle the MintDrive. Check power-supply
26
New Base Id fault
Control board was changed since last operation.
Power-cycle the MintDrive.
31
Feedback module
fault
Indicates a problem with the feedback device.
If the problem persists after you have power-cycled the MintDrive
and you are using an encoder, rotate the motor shaft and
power-cycle the MintDrive again
32
Serial watchdog fault Inter-processor communication problem.
Abort any program that may be running by pressing CTRL+E.
Type CANCEL. If the fault re-appears, power-cycle the MintDrive.
93
7.1.7
CAN
Use this section to troubleshoot any problems encountered when connecting to CAN. Full details of
setting up CAN devices can be found in Appendix B.
For information about CAN error messages reported through Mint, see the Mint v4 Programming Guide.
Problem
Check
The CAN1 LED is
illuminated red
The CAN1 bus is off.
Check that there is a 24VDC supply to the CAN network.
Check that all nodes are running at the same baud rate.
Check the CAN cable.
Check for sources of errors on the bus.
Type CANBUSRESET to reset the bus.
The CAN1 LED is flashing
red
The CAN bus is passive. This means that the bus is operational but
errors are occurring.
Check that all nodes are running at the same baud rate.
Check that each node has been assigned a unique NodeID.
Check that the network has been terminated at each end. If the
MintDrive is at the end of the network, check that the CAN1 switch on
the front panel is in the ON position.
Check the CAN cable.
Check for sources of errors on the bus.
Type CANBUSRESET to reset the bus.
The CAN2 LED is
illuminated red.
The CAN2 bus is off.
Check that there is a 24VDC supply to the CAN network.
Check that all nodes are running at the same baud rate.
Check the CAN cable.
Check for sources of errors on the bus.
Type CANBUSRESET to reset the bus.
94
Problem
Check
The CAN2 LED is flashing
red.
The CAN bus is passive. This means that the bus is operational but
errors are occurring.
Check that all nodes are running at the same baud rate.
Check that each node has been assigned a unique NodeID.
Check that the network has been terminated at each end. If the
MintDrive is at the end of the network, check that the CAN2 switch on
the front panel is in the ON position.
Check that the jumpers on each CAN peripheral are in the correct
position. JP1 and JP2 should be set for bus 2 (see page 120).
Check the CAN cable.
Check for sources of errors on the bus.
Type CANBUSRESET to reset the bus.
95
96
A
A.1
Tuning
A
Introduction
Within the MintDrive control software, instantaneous axis position demands produced by the MintDrive
software must be translated into motor currents. This is achieved by closed loop control of the motor.
The motor is controlled to minimize the error between the demanded and measured positions (often
known as the following error). An incremental encoder or a resolver is used to measure the motor
position. Every 1ms* the MintDrive compares demanded and measured positions and calculates the
correct demand for the motor. The corrective signal is calculated by a PIDVF (Proportional, Integral,
Derivative and Velocity Feed Forward) algorithm.
On the following page, Figure A.1 shows the MintDrive’s positional, speed and current control loops.
These are internal MintDrive control loops which can be tuned using the following keywords:
Purpose
Name
Abbreviation / keyword
Position Control
Proportional gain
KPROP
Integral gain
KINT
Velocity Feedback
KVEL
Velocity Feedfoward
KVELFF
Derivative gain
KDERIV
Acceleration Feedforward
KACCEL
Proportional gain
KVPROP
Integral gain
KVINT
Proportional gain
KIPROP
Integral gain
KIINT
Velocity Control
Current Control
* The 1ms sampling interval can be changed using the LOOPTIME keyword.
97
98
Figure A.1 MintDrive Closed Loop System
16 Sample
Filter
Motor
Speed
Filter
A.1.1
Closed loop control
It is possible that control could be achieved by applying a signal proportional to the position error alone,
but this is a rather simplistic approach. If it is imagined that there is a small error between demanded
and actual position, a proportional controller will simply multiply the error by a constant (the Proportional
gain) and apply the resultant to the motor. If the gain is too high this may cause overshoot, which will
result in the motor vibrating back and forth around the desired position. As the gain is increased, the
MintDrive will present more resistance to positional error, but oscillations will increase in magnitude until
the system becomes unstable. To reduce the onset of instability a damping term is incorporated in the
servo loop algorithm, called velocity feedback gain. Velocity feedback acts to resist rapid movement of
the motor and hence allows the Proportional gain to be set higher before vibration occurs.
Alternatively, derivative gain (the derivative of the error) can be used for damping.
With Proportional gain and velocity feedback (or derivative action) it is possible for a motor at rest at a
set point to exhibit a small positional error (called following error). The MintDrive multiplies the error by
the proportional term to produce an applied corrective torque (in current control), but for very small
errors the torque may not be large enough to overcome static friction. This error can be overcome by
incorporating an integral term in the loop calculations. Integral action involves summing the error over
time, so that motor torque is gradually increased until the positional error falls to zero. The speed at
which integral action works is controlled by the integral gain. Integral action is useful to eliminate steady
state positional errors, but will result in reduced dynamic response for the system. For this reason, a
software selectable option KINTMODE is provided so that the user can select that the integrator is
switched off during periods of constant velocity. With integral gain, it is possible for the output to wind up
to 100% demand. This effect can be limited using the KINTLIMIT keyword which limits the effect of the
integral gain at a defined percentage of the demand output.
The final term in the control loop is velocity feed forward. This is useful for increasing the response and
reducing the following error, especially with velocity controlled servos.
In summary, the following rules can be used as a guide:
H KPROP: Increasing KPROP will speed up the response and reduce the effect of disturbances and
load variations. The side effect of increasing KPROP is that it also increases the overshoot, and if
set too high it will cause the system to become unstable. The aim is to set the Proportional gain as
high as possible without getting overshoot, instability or ’hunting’ on an encoder edge when
stationary (the motor will buzz).
H KVEL: This gain has a damping effect, and can be increased to reduce any overshoot. If KVEL
becomes too large it will amplify any noise on the velocity measurement and introduce oscillations.
H KINT: This gain has a de-stabilizing effect, but a small amount can be used to reduce any steady
state errors. (By default, KINTMODE is set to ignore the KINT term).
H KINTLIMIT: The integration limit determines the maximum value of the effect of integral action.
This is specified as a percentage of the full scale demand.
H KVELFF: This is a feed forward term and as such has a different effect on the servo system than the
previous gains. KVELFF is outside the closed loop and therefore does not have an effect on
system stability. This gain allows a faster response to demand speed changes with lower following
errors, for example you would increase KVELFF to reduce the following error during the slew
section of a trapezoidal move. The trapezoidal test move can be used to fine-tune this gain.
H KDERIV: This gain has a damping effect. The Derivative action has the same effect as the velocity
feedback if the velocity feedback and feedforward terms are equal, but scaled by a factor of 16.
H KACCEL: This term is designed to reduce velocity overshoots on high acceleration moves. Due to
the quantization of the positional data and the speed of the servo loop, for the acceleration feed
forward term to affect the servo loop the acceleration of the axis must exceed 1,000,000 encoder
counts per second.
99
In systems where precise positioning accuracy is required, it is often necessary to position within one
encoder count. The Proportional gain is not normally able to achieve this because a very small
following error will only produce a small demand for the amplifier which may not be enough to overcome
mechanical friction (this is particularly so for current controlled systems). This error can be overcome
by applying some integral gain. The integral gain, KINT, works by accumulating following error over time
to produce a demand/command sufficient to move the motor into the zero following error position. KINT
can therefore also overcome errors caused by gravitational effects, such as vertically moving linear
tables, where with current controlled drives a non-zero demand output is required to achieve zero
following error.
A.1.2
Position loop
The position loop uses a Proportional, Integral, Derivative, Velocity Feedback, Velocity Feed-forward
and Acceleration Feed-forward (PIDVFA) algorithm. Every servo tick, the measured position and
velocity are sampled. The profiler generates a new demand position, speed and acceleration according
to the move type requested and the specified parameters (e.g. the acceleration and deceleration rates).
Both the demanded and measured values are fed into the PIDVFA algorithm, which generates an input
term (demand signal) to either the Speed loop or Current loop (depending upon the configuration).
The PIDVFA algorithm is as follows:
Command = KP.e + KD.
where:
KP
KD
KV
KF
KI
KA
e
τ
v
V
A
(∆e)
− KV v + KF V + KI.Σe + KA.A
16
16
(∆τ)
 
 
Proportional position loop gain
Derivative position loop gain
Velocity feedback gain
Velocity feed forward gain
Integral gain
Acceleration feed forward gain
Following error (quad counts)
Servo update period (sample time)
Actual axis velocity (quad counts/sample time)
Demand axis velocity (quad counts/sample time)
Demand axis acceleration (quad counts/sample time2)
Tuning the position loop involves selecting values for some or all of the terms KP, KD, KI, KV, KF and
KA to provide the best performance for a particular motor/encoder combination and load inertia. In view
of the diversity of applications, these values all default to zero.
100
A.1.3
Speed loop
The speed loop uses a Proportional and Integral (PI) algorithm. The PI algorithm is as follows:
Command = KVP.e + KVI.Σe
where:
KVP
KVI
e
A.1.4
Proportional speed loop gain
Integral gain
Speed error
Current loop
The current loop uses a Proportional and Integral (PI) algorithm. The PI algorithm is as follows:
Command = KIP.e + KII.Σe
where:
KIP
KII
e
A.1.5
Proportional current loop gain
Integral gain
Current error
MintDrive operational modes
The MintDrive can be configured to operate in 3 different modes:
H as a servo drive, where speed and position loops are active and the motion profiler produces a
speed demand (CONFIG=1);
H as a velocity servo drive, similar to the servo drive configuration above (CONFIG=1) but only the
Velocity Feedforward term KVELFF is used in the position loop;
H as a torque servo drive, where the speed loop is bypassed and the motion profiler produces a
current demand (CONFIG=6).
These modes are selected using the Mint keyword CONFIG. The default is the servo drive mode,
CONFIG=1 .
The loops are sampled at different rates:
H Current loop: 12.012kHz
H Speed loop:
8kHz
H Position loop: 1kHz (optionally configurable as 500Hz and 2kHz).
101
A.1.6
Tuning the position loop for a velocity servo drive
The MintDrive can be tuned as a velocity servo drive, passing the profiled demand components through
the speed and current loops only. To do this the MintDrive keyword CONFIG should be set to 1 by
typing:
CONFIG=1
The gain term KVELFF should be set to the value derived from the following equation:
KVELFF = (32767 / (((MaxMotorSpeed / 60) / Servo Frequency) x (4 x MotorEncoderLines))) / 16
where:
Servo Frequency
MotorEncoderLines
MaxMotorSpeed
A.1.7
is the reciprocal of the time period set using the Mint keyword LOOPTIME;
is 1024 for a resolver motor;
is found from the motor specifications.
Tuning the position loop for a servo drive
The MintDrive can be tuned as a servo drive, passing the profiled demand components through the
position, speed and current loops. To do this the MintDrive keyword CONFIG should be set to 1 by
typing:
CONFIG=1
There are two types of move that can be used to help tune the position loop; step and trapezoid.
A step move performs an instantaneous position demand change. This is useful for tuning the motor to
overcome following error and decrease response time.
The trapezoid move type performs a trapezoidal move based on a given acceleration, slew speed and
deceleration profile. This is equivalent to a positional move generated by using the keywords MOVEA or
MOVER.
A.1.7.1 Position Loop gain terms
The output from the position loop is effectively a speed command. This command is a 16-bit signed
value scaled such that 32767 represents the maximum motor speed.
Before starting, it may be necessary to increase the Following Error Fatal limit, the threshold at which
the drive will trip with a Following Error. The default value is 1000 counts which may not be sufficient
whilst initially tuning the motor.
KVELFF - Velocity Feedforward gain
This is applied to the demand speed. The profiler will generate a demand speed based upon the
current move. This term should be used to scale that demand speed to the equivalent speed command
for the speed loop - this is related to the specified maximum speed of the motor and of the position
(servo) loop frequency:
The gain term KVELFF should be set to the value derived from the following equation:
KVELFF = (32767 / (((MaxMotorSpeed / 60) / Servo Frequency) x (4 x MotorEncoderLines))) / 16
102
where:
Servo Frequency
MotorEncoderLines
MaxMotorSpeed
is the reciprocal of the time period set using the Mint keyword LOOPTIME;
is 1024 for a resolver motor;
is found from the motor specifications.
Click on the Position Loop tab and enter the calculated value for KVELFF.
KPROP - Proportional gain
This is applied to the Following Error. This should be used to overcome any lag in the system response
and to remove any final following error. Increasing this gain will improve the response of the system and
reduce following error. The side effect of increasing this gain is that it also increases overshoot, and if
set too high will cause the system to become unstable.
The speed increase (per servo loop) resulting from the term KPROP can be calculated from;
Speed increase = KPROP x FOLERROR / KVELFF
where:
FOLERROR
is the following error expressed in counts
As an example, for a following error of 100 counts with KPROP = 2, the commanded speed would be
increased by 46.72 counts/tick, for a resolver motor with MaxMotorSpeed = 7000 RPM.
Click on the Position Loop tab and enter 1 as an initial value for KPROP.
KVEL - Velocity Feedback gain
This is applied to the Measured Speed. This term has a damping affect and can be used to reduce any
overshoot. If the gain gets too large it will amplify any noise on the velocity measurement and introduce
oscillations. Click on the Position Loop tab and enter 0 as an initial value for KVEL.
KINT - Integral gain
The integral term KINT can be used to overcome steady-state errors. Only small values should be
used otherwise the term will have a de-stabilizing affect. By default the integral term is turned off, but it
can be turned using the Mint keyword KINTMODE. Two modes are supported, one in which the integral
will be applied throughout a move ( KINTMODE=1 ), and another which will only apply it through constant
speed ( KINTMODE=2 ). KINT can also be affected by defining the integration limit using the Mint
keyword KINTLIMIT. In Mint WorkBench, type:
KINTMODE=2
in the Terminal window.
Click on the Position Loop tab and enter 0 as an initial value for KINT and 20 as an initial value for
KINTLIMIT. (If you are using the Mint Configuration Tool, enter 0 in the KINT box).
KDERIV - Derivative gain
This is applied to the change in Following Error. This term will speed up the response to the initial
change in demand and reduce overshoot. This can be used to control any overshoot given using
KPROP on a step response. Click on the Position Loop tab and enter 0 as an initial value for KDERIV.
KACCEL - Acceleration Feedforward gain
This is applied to the demand acceleration. This term has the affect of reducing following error during
high acceleration and deceleration phases of a move. This term can only be set in Mint WorkBench in
the Terminal window.
103
A.1.7.2 Position Loop Tuning using a step move
In the Move Type box select Position Step and select a reasonably small step change. For example
start with a position step change equivalent to 100 counts. Remember that the value entered here is in
”user units” and will therefore be scaled by the scale factor you entered earlier.
With only KVELFF set, you will get very little response. Since the step move demands an instantaneous
change in demand position, the demand speed will only last for one servo tick. The speed loop alone
will not be sufficient to achieve the position step change. The Proportional gain term KPROP should be
used to overcome the following error. Start with a small for of KPROP, for example 1
This will start to achieve the demanded position. As the value of KPROP increases, so will the rise
(response) time. As KPROP is increased further, eventually either an overshoot or ringing will occur.
Both these factors can be reduced by introducing a value for the damping terms KVEL and KDERIV.
The Step Response Statistics tab can be used to analyze the response to the step move:
A.1.7.3 Position Loop Tuning using a trapezoidal move type
Select the ‘Move Type’ as Position Trapezoid and select a move profile (acceleration, deceleration and
slew speed) to reflect the typical move your application will use. Remember that the values entered
here are in “user units” and will therefore be scaled by the scale factor you entered earlier.
With only KVELFF set there will be a resultant Following Error at the end of the move. Start increasing
the value of KPROP and repeat the move. Increasing the value of KPROP should allow the following
error through the slew period and at the end of the move to be almost eliminated.
During the acceleration and deceleration phases, the following error will be greater. This following error
will increase in relation to any increase in the acceleration or deceleration rates.
The KACCEL term can be applied to reduce the following error during the acceleration and deceleration
rates. This term can only be set in Mint WorkBench in the Terminal window.
104
A.1.8
Tuning the position loop for a torque servo drive
The MintDrive can be tuned as a torque servo drive, passing the profiled demand components through
the position and current loops only. To do this the MintDrive keyword CONFIG should be set to 6 by
typing:
CONFIG=6
You should have already tuned the current loop and speed loop, but in this mode of operation the
speed loop gains are disregarded. The value of KPROP should be set to a small value when operating
the controller as a torque servo drive - a starting value of 0.5 is suggested.
Increase KVEL until the motor shaft becomes stiff to turn. Use WorkBench to perform test moves and
monitor results. If KVEL is increased too much, instability will occur.
Typically, KVELFF is found to be close to KVEL when operating the controller as a torque servo drive,
so set KVELFF to the same value as KVEL.
Values for the terms KINT, KDERIV and KACCEL can be found by applying the principles for tuning the
motor as servo drive. See section A.1.7 on page 102.
A.1.9
Saving tuning information
The speed loop and current loop gains are stored in the controller’s battery backed memory, but the
position loop gains are not. It is recommended that all of these parameter settings are placed in your
application’s Configuration file so that the MintDrive can be re-configured after each power-cycle or if it
is replaced.
105
106
B
B.1
CAN
B
Outline
This section provides an introduction to the CAN (Controller Area Network) peripherals and how these
are configured to operate with the MintDrive.
B.1.1
MintDrive capabilities
The MintDrive can communicate with I/O expansion modules or other Mint v4 controllers via CAN,
and is compatible with DS-301, version 4 (Application Layer and Communication Profile) and
mandatory sections of DS-401, version 2 (Device Profile for Generic I/O modules). Some parts of
DS-403, version 1 (Device Profile for Human Machine Interfaces) are also supported. When connecting
third party devices please contact Baldor if you are unsure about compatibility.
CAN offers serial communications over a two wire twisted pair cable up to a maximum of 1640ft (500m)
in length, and offers very high communication reliability in an industrial environment; the probability of
an undetected error is 4.7x10-11. The default transmission rate is 125Kbaud although higher rates up to
1000Kbaud can be selected.
CAN is optimized for the transmission of small data packets and therefore offers fast update of I/O
devices (peripheral devices) connected to the bus. Several CAN peripheral devices may be attached to
the same controller via the CAN link using the CAL protocol. Up to 63 mixed type CAN peripherals may
be connected to the MintDrive CAN network, with the limitation that only 4 enabled keypads are allowed
at one time.
On the MintDrive, connection to the CAN networks are made using a 9-pin male D-type connector for
CAN bus channel 1 (CANopen) and a shielded RJ45 type connector for CAN bus channel 2 (Baldor
CAN). Both CAN channels are isolated. When MintDrive is at the end of a CAN network, the terminator
for that channel must be activated. The terminators are activated by setting the DIP switch on the front
panel to ON. Each CAN channel has its own DIP switch and terminator.
A very low error rate over CAN can only be achieved with a suitable wiring scheme, so the following
points should be observed:
H CAN must be connected via twisted pair cabling to reduce RF emissions and provide immunity to
conducted interference. The connection arrangement is normally a simple multi-point drop. The
CAN cables should have a characteristic impedance of 120Ω and a delay of 5ns/m. Other
characteristics depend upon the length of the cabling:
Cable length
Maximum bit rate
Resistance
Conductor area
0ft ~ 131ft (0m ~ 40m)
1000Kbaud
<70mΩ/m
0.25-0.34mm2
131ft ~ 984ft (40m ~ 300m)
500Kbaud
<60mΩ/m
0.34-0.60mm2
984ft ~ 1968ft (300m ~ 600m)
100Kbaud
<40mΩ/m
0.50-0.60mm2
1968ft ~ 3280ft (600m ~ 1000m)
50Kbaud
<26mΩ/m
0.75-0.80mm2
107
H Terminators must only be fitted at both ends of the network, not at intermediate nodes.
H The 0V rails of all of the nodes on the network must be tied together through the CAN cabling.
This ensures that the CAN signal levels transmitted by MintDrive or CAN peripheral devices are
within the common mode range of the receiver circuitry of other nodes on the network.
MintDrive supports the full range of Baldor CAN peripherals - InputNode 8, OutputNode 8, RelayNode
8, ioNode 24/24 and KeypadNode.
108
B.2
CAN 1 (CANopen)
This section provides an introduction to CANopen. peripherals and how they are configured to operate
with the MintDrive.
B.2.1
CAN 1 (CANopen) - X9
Location Connector X9
Pin Name
1
1
6
9
5
-
Description
Not connected
2 CAN1-
CAN channel 1 negative
3 CAN1 0V
Ground/earth reference for CAN signals
4
Not connected
-
5 Shield
Cable shield
6
Not connected
-
7 CAN1+
CAN channel 1 positive
8
Not connected
-
9 CAN1 V+
CAN remote node power V+ (12-24V)
Description CANopen interface using a 9-pin female D-type connector
with CiA standard DS102 pin configuration
CAN1 is opto-isolated and is intended for use as the machine-wide fieldbus using the open protocol
CANopen. Practical operation of this CAN channel is limited to 500Kbaud owing to the propagation
delay of the opto-isolators.
Correct operation of CAN1 can only be achieved with screened/shielded twisted pair cabling.
CAN1+ and CAN1- must form a twisted pair with the shield connected to the connector backshell.
CAN1 must be terminated by a 120Ω resistor connected between CAN1+ and CAN1- at both ends of
the network and nowhere else.
If the MintDrive is at the end of the network then ensure that the CAN1 DIP switch (located on the front
panel) is in the ON position, which will connect an internal terminating resistor. A convenient way of
wiring a chain of devices is by using a T-connector.
Note: The CAN1 port must be powered with a DC voltage in the range 12-24V.
Baldor HMI
Operator Panel
2
7
Twisted pair
TR
+24VDC IN
0V
CAN1
MintDrive A
CAN1
MintDrive B
End node
2
7
2
7
2
7
9
3
9
3
Twisted pairs
TR
9
3
Figure 28 - Typical MintDrive CAN1 network connections
109
B.2.2
What is CANopen?
CANopen is a networking system based on the serial bus CAN. It uses the international CAN standard,
ISO 11898 as the basis for communication. The MintDrive implements the CANopen Communication
Profile (CiA DS-301) in Mint v4, which supports both direct access to device parameters and time critical
process data communication. The MintDrive also supports a number of third-party I/O devices and HMI
(Human Machine Interface) operator panels. Each type of device has been assigned a unique node
type number that is used to identify it on the network.
Node Type
0 _ntNONE
Not present
1 _ntANALOG_IN
Analog Input module (third-party)
2 _ntANALOG_OUT
Analog Output module (third-party)
4 _ntDIGITAL_IN
Digital Input module (third-party)
8 _ntDIGITAL_OUT
Digital Output module (third-party)
B ap va
Bitma
alue
Type Mint Constant
21 _ntNEXTMOVE_BX
Controller (Baldor)
22 _ntNEXTMOVE_PCI
Controller (Baldor)
30 _ntSERVONODE51
Controller (Baldor)
32 _ntMINTDRIVE
Controller (Baldor)
41 _ntOPERATOR_PANEL
HMI operator panel (Baldor)
A third-party CANopen I/O node may have a combination of analog and digital I/O modules. The node
type for such a node is a bitmap of the type of modules present, resulting in a node type between 1 and
15. The Baldor controller nodes are connected together over CAN to form a peer-to-peer network. Lines
of communication between these nodes exist in the form of singlecast and broadcast messages via the
comms array. The I/O nodes and HMI operator panels are connected via CAN and are then assigned to
a single Baldor controller node that then has full control over the node’s data (I/O). Due to memory
limitations there is a limit to the number of nodes that can be present on the CAN 1 Bus:
H A maximum of 63 Baldor controller nodes can be on the bus at the same time.
H A maximum of 20 CANopen I/O nodes with full digital and analog I/O functionality can be on the bus
at the same time.
If the I/O nodes have a reduced function set then a greater number of nodes may be supported.
If support for a greater number of nodes is required on the CAN 1 Bus, please contact Baldor Technical
Support for more information.
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B.2.3
Configuring nodes
A node must be assigned a unique node number. On Baldor controllers, the node number and CAN
baud rate can be set using the NODE and CANBAUD Mint keywords. For example the following
commands change the controller’s node number to 12 and the baud rate to 500Kbaud:
NODE = 12
CANBAUD.1 = 500
Note: Note that third-party I/O nodes will have a specific method for setting their node number and
CAN baud rate. Please refer to the manufacturer’s instructions.
The MintDrive stores its node number and CAN baud rate in non-volatile memory so that each time it is
powered, the basic CAN configuration is automatically setup.
B.2.4
Network manager - node 1
On the CAN1 network there must be a device with node number 1. This node is called the network
manager node because it performs supervisory tasks that ensure the network operates correctly.
These include:
H NMT Master tasks - This includes initialization of NMT slaves that are to be added to the bus during
a node scan, supervision of node status via nodeguarding and supervision of the bus status.
H SDO Manager - Setting up and maintaining a list of all connections that are active between nodes
(comms array links and groups).
H Configuration Manager - Upload/download of configuration data to/from a node on the network
during a node scan.
If node number 1 is being used to manage a network with a large number of nodes, it is advisable that it
is not used to control motion on its local axis/axes. The node should act simply as a gateway from the
host computer to the networked controllers, maintaining all network connections and reporting all
node/bus events.
B.2.5
Scanning nodes
The first step in creating a CANopen network is to find and identify the nodes that exist on the CAN bus.
This is achieved by using the NODESCAN command on the network manager node.
The controller can find all nodes that exist on the bus by passing zero as the node parameter:
NODESCAN.1.0
where 1 is the CAN bus,
or the user can request the network manager to scan for individual nodes by passing the node number
as the node parameter:
NODESCAN.1.2
The VIEW NODELIVE command can be used on the network manager to get a summary of the nodes
that have been detected by the scan.
111
Alternatively, the NODELIVE and NODETYPE keywords can be used within a Mint program to return the
same information. The following commands will get information about node 2:
? NODELIVE.1.2
? NODETYPE.1.2
When a node has been successfully scanned it can be removed from the bus by setting the node type
for that node to zero. For example, the following command will remove node 2 from CAN bus 1:
NODETYPE.1.2 = 0
B.2.6
Connecting to nodes
Device parameters and data are stored in a reserved area of memory called the Object Dictionary.
Once a node has been scanned by the network manager, the next step is to make a connection to that
node to allow data from the node’s Object Dictionary to be accessed. This also puts the node into the
operational state.
However, there are differences when making connections to Baldor controller nodes or third-party I/O
nodes. By default, when the network manager successfully detects that a Baldor controller node has
become live (has been successfully scanned), it will automatically establish a connection to the
controller by performing the command:
CONNECT.1.n = 1
where n is the node number.
This allows the network manager node to automatically access the comms array of live controller nodes
over CAN. If the user wants a controller node n to access the comms array of the network manager
node, a connection must be manually made in the reverse direction, on the network manager node:
C001>CONNECT.n.1 = 1
For third-party I/O nodes an automatic connection is not made so the commands have to be manually
issued, for example:
C001>CONNECT.1.n = 1
Until this connection has been made, a controller node will not be able to access an I/O node using Mint
keywords, meaning you will not be able to read inputs and set outputs. Making the connection puts the
I/O node into its operational state. Once the I/O node has been connected to a Baldor controller node it
will not be possible to connect it to another node at the same time.
The VIEW CONNECT command can be used on the network manager to get a summary of the
connections that have been made, or information on any other controller node to find what connections
it has. The network manager can also break a connection to a node so that access to the remote data
from the node’s Object Dictionary is removed. For example, the following command will remove the
connection between node 2 and the network manager node:
CONNECT.2.1 = 0
Connection information can also be viewed in the CAN window in Mint WorkBench.
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B.2.7
Monitoring CAN events
When a node’s status changes (live or dead for example), it will generate a CAN message to inform the
network manager of the change. The network manager will then generate a Mint event. The type of
events that are supported on the CAN bus 1 are listed below:
Event Number
Mint Constant
0
_cetNONE
1
_cetBUS_OPERATIONAL
2
_cetBUS_PASSIVE
3
_cetBUS_OFF
4
_cetRECEIVE_OVERRUN
5
_cetDIED
6
_cetLIVE
7
Reserved
8
Reserved
9
Reserved
10
Reserved
11
_cetEMERGENCY
12
_cetUNIOP_COMMS_UPDATE
13
_cetTRANSMIT_OVERRUN
These events are buffered until they are read using the CANEVENT keyword. When one or more events
are held in the buffer the Mint CAN event handler (subroutine) for bus 1 will be called (#CAN1) if it exists.
The CANEVENT and CANEVENTINFO keywords should be used in this subroutine to determine which
event has occurred and its associated information.
#CAN1
? ”CAN bus 1 : Event ”,CANEVENT.1,
? ” occurred with info ”,CANEVENTINFO.1,”.”
RETURN
Alternatively, the VIEW CANEVENT command can be used at the Mint command line to continuously
monitor the CAN bus for events:
C001>VIEW CANEVENT.1
The act of reading CANEVENT and CANEVENTINFO will remove the event from the buffer, so the next
time the subroutine is called the following event will be read.
CAN events can also be monitored using the CAN window in Mint WorkBench.
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B.2.8
Controller nodes
Each controller node on the network contains its own comms array, which provides a convenient
method of transferring data between controller nodes on the bus. The meaning of the data, which is
passed between the controllers is determined by the application (Mint) program.
For further details on the comms array please refer to the Mint v4 Programming Guide.
B.2.8.1 Singlecast communication
The advantage of the comms array when accessed over the CAN network is that a link can be
established so that a controller can read from and write to another controller’s comms array. After the
link has been established using the network manager, the two nodes can communicate without further
intervention from the network manager.
For example, the following command would need to be issued on the network manager to create a link
so that node 7 could read from and write to the comms array on node 23:
CONNECT.7.23 = 1
The CONNECTSTATUS keyword can be used on the slave node to check that its link to node 23 is valid
before it is used:
PAUSE CONNECTSTATUS.23=1
For node 7 to access its own comms array (index 5 for example) the following commands can be used:
COMMS(5) = 6
v = COMMS(5)
to write a value
to read a value.
To access the comms array (index 5) on the remote controller node (node 23), via the CAN bus, the
following commands can be used:
COMMS(23,5) = 6
v = COMMS(23,5)
to write a value
to read a value.
B.2.8.2 Broadcast communication
The second method of accessing the comms arrays over CAN allows a group master node to write to a
comms array location of a group of nodes. Each group must have a master node and any node may be
in any number of groups. Grouping is set up using the GROUPMASTER keyword, for example:
GROUPMASTER.3 = 15
would set node 15 to be the group master of group 3.
To allow a node to receive a group write broadcast the GROUP keyword is used on the network
manager. The following commands would allow nodes 2 and 23 to receive the group write broadcasts
for group 3:
GROUP.3.2 = 1
GROUP.3.23 = 1
The group master node can check if it has been made the group master by using the
GROUPMASTERSTATUS keyword. This command will return 1 when the node on which it is issued has
been made the group master, for example:
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PAUSE GROUPMASTERSTATUS.3
On the group master node (node 15 for example), the GROUPCOMMS command is used to access the
comms array of all nodes in that group. The following command would write the value 4 to location 30
of all the nodes that are in group 3:
GROUPCOMMS(3,30) = 4
The VIEW GROUP instruction can be used on the network manager to get a summary of the groups that
have been set up, or on a slave node to see the groups in which it is a member/master.
B.2.8.3 Comms array subroutines
The #COMMS subroutine allows a program to be interrupted when its comms array has been updated by
a comms array write from another node, over CAN. For example, if a node defines its local comms
array element 5 as a target position, the following subroutine triggers a move each time this element is
updated by a remote node:
#COMMS5
MOVEA.1 = COMMS(5)
GO.1
RETURN
The #COMMS subroutine will also be triggered if the local comms array element is updated over RS232
or DPR (Dual Port RAM), if these interfaces exist on the controller. The comms locations COMMS(1) to
COMMS(5) are mapped to subroutines #COMMS1 to #COMMS5.
B.2.9
I/O nodes
A variety of third-party I/O nodes are available that include devices with fixed configuration (a fixed
number of analog outputs) and devices that are flexible in their configuration (have a number of different
types of I/O modules connected via a bus coupler). Provided the node conforms to the CANopen
Device Profile for Generic I/O Modules (DS-401), it should be fully compatible with the Baldor range of
controllers. The following sections describe the Mint keywords that can be used to read and write data
to these devices.
B.2.9.1 Digital I/O access
Digital inputs and outputs have two possible states; ON and OFF. Mint allows for two methods of
reading from and writing to digital I/O on a CANopen node.
The first method uses the REMOTEIN and REMOTEOUT keywords and accesses all of the inputs/outputs.
The value that is read from or written to the node is simply a bitmap of the inputs/outputs and can be
written in any of the base formats supported in Mint (binary, decimal or hexadecimal).
For example:
? REMOTEIN.1.2
will read the state of all of the inputs on node 2.
The command:
? REMOTEOUT.1.2
will read the state of all of the outputs on node 2.
115
Similarly:
REMOTEOUT.1.2 = 255
will set the state of all of the outputs on node 2 to 255 decimal.
The second method uses the REMOTEINX and REMOTEOUTX keywords and accesses individual inputs
or outputs. Each input/output can either be ON (1), or OFF (0).
For example:
? REMOTEINX.1.2.0
will read the state of input 0 on node 2.
The command:
? REMOTEOUTX.1.2.0
will read the state of output 0 on node 2.
Similarly,
REMOTEOUTX.1.2.0 = 1
will set the state of output 0 on node 2 to ON (‘1’).
B.2.9.2 Analog I/O Access
Analog inputs and outputs can have any value between 0 and 100. This value will represent a voltage
equal to the specified percentage of the full-scale voltage; please see the manufacturer’s instructions.
For example:
? REMOTEADC.1.2.0
will read the value of analog input channel 0, on node 2.
The command:
? REMOTEDAC.1.2.3
will read the value of analog output channel 3, on node 2.
Similarly,
REMOTEDAC.1.2.3 = 100
will set the value of analog output channel 3, on node 2, to 100.
B.2.9.3 Extra Analog I/O Functionality
Mint provides some extra functionality with analog input nodes. The value of an analog input will often
change constantly. This can cause a lot of CAN ‘traffic’ to be generated if the node is event driven
because the node will generate a CAN message every time the input changes. The REMOTEMODE
keyword is provided in Mint to allow the user to set the analog node to either Event (0) or Cyclic (1)
mode. Setting it to Cyclic mode will force the node into generating CAN messages on a cyclic basis, in
synchronization with a SYNC message that is generated by the network manager. This will help reduce
CAN traffic and also allow the user to predict the level of activity on the CAN bus more easily.
The following example will set the analog input channels of node 2 to Cyclic mode:
REMOTEMODE.1.2 = 1
Running in Event mode will cause a CAN message to be generated every time the input changes.
116
The Mint keyword REMOTEADCDELTA can also be used to reduce the amount of CAN traffic.
This keyword allows the user to specify an amount by which an analog input must change (delta) before
a CAN message is generated. The value used will depend on the type of node; please refer to the
manufacturer’s instructions. This function can be used if the node has been set to ’Event’ mode using
the REMOTEMODE keyword.
The following example code will set the delta interrupt for analog input 3 on node 2, to 100:
REMOTEADCDELTA.1.2.3 = 100
B.2.10 HMI Operator Panels
Baldor produce a range of HMI (Human Machine Interface) operator panel nodes which, when fitted
with an optional CANopen driver card, can be fully exercised by a Baldor controller node over
CANopen. The software in the CANopen driver uses a communication protocol based on the CANopen
device profile for Human Machine Interfaces (DS-403). The types of HMI available range from a simple
low cost device with a 4x20 character display and 10 keys, to a powerful touchscreen device with a
16x40 character VGA graphical display.
All of the HMI operator panels use the same CANopen interface for communications which is very
similar to the singlecast communication described for Baldor controllers. Communication between a
Baldor controller and a HMI operator panel is achieved via the comms array in the HMI. This comms
array consists of the following:
H 254 x 32-bit integer variables
H 254 x IEEE floating point variables.
Using the HMI Operator Panel design software used to create the character/graphical layout for the HMI
display, these two groups of variables appear as two separate databases (INT32_DB and FLOAT_DB
respectively), using an index between 0h and FEh to access the individual variables. When accessing
these variables from a Baldor controller they appear as contiguous elements of the device’s comms
array.
Data format
HMI database variable
HMI variable index
Baldor comms index
32-bit integer
INT32_DB
1 ~ FEh
1 ~ 254
IEEE floating point
FLOAT_DB
1 ~ FEh
255 ~ 508
For example, if the HMI panel were to be configured as CANopen node 30, the COMMS keyword could
be used to access the HMI data as shown:
COMMS(30,1) = 100
COMMS(30,255) = 10.23
? COMMS(30,1)
? COMMS(30,255)
will set the 32 bit integer variable at index 1 to 100
will set the float variable at index 255 to 10.23
will read the 32 bit integer variable at index 1
will read the float variable at index 255.
Note: It is useful to note that even though the comms array is being used to access data on the
HMI, the data is only stored on the HMI itself and is completely unrelated to the data stored in
the comms array on the Baldor controller.
117
In addition to being able to set data on the HMI from a Baldor controller, the HMI panel can set its own
data, the nature of which is determined when the user designs their own HMI project using the HMI
Operator Panel design software.
The HMI communicates its own changes to the MintDrive using CAN event 12
(_setUNIOP_COMMS_UPDATE). This event will initiate the Mint CAN event handler (subroutine)
#CAN1, and the associated CAN event information read using CANEVENTINFO will inform the user
which HMI comms location has changed. The COMMS keyword can then be used to read the new data if
required. Alternatively, the MintDrive can poll the comms data stored in the HMI to determine if it has
changed. The HMI allows the data to be stored in its databases in the following formats:
INT32_DB
Bit 1 bit
Byte 8 bits / 1 byte
Word 2 bytes
Word Inv. 2 bytes
Double Word 4 bytes
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FLOAT_DB
Float 4 bytes - IEEE format
Float Inv. 4 bytes - IEEE format
B.3
CAN 2 (Baldor CAN)
B.3.1
CAN 2 (Baldor CAN) - X8
Location Connector X8
Pin Name
1
8
Description
1
-
Not connected
2
-
Not connected
3
-
Not connected
4 CAN2 0V
Ground/earth reference for CAN signal
5 CAN2 V+
CAN remote node power V+ (12-24V)
6
Not connected
-
7 CAN2+
CAN channel 2 positive
8 CAN2-
CAN channel 2 negative
Description Baldor proprietary CAN interface using a RJ45 connector.
CAN2 is opto-isolated and is intended for use with Baldor’s ioNode family of CAN peripherals. Practical
operation of this CAN channel is limited to 500Kbaud owing to the propagation delay of the
opto-isolators.
Correct operation of CAN2 can only be achieved with screened/shielded, twisted pair cabling.
CAN2+ and CAN2- must form a twisted pair with the shield connected to the connector backshell.
CAN2 must be terminated with a 120Ω resistor connected between CAN2+ and CAN2- at both ends of
the network and nowhere else.
If the MintDrive is at the end of the network then ensure that the CAN2 DIP switch (located on the front
panel), is in the ‘ON’ position, which will connect an internal terminating resistor.
The CAN2 port must be powered with a DC voltage in the range 12-24V. This can be achieved by
powering an ioNode family device. Note that on the ioNode jumpers JP1 and JP2 must be in the CAN
Bus 2 position as this selects pins 7 & 8 for CAN traffic.
119
B.3.2
Preparing the MintDrive
Termination resistors must be fitted at each end of the network to reduce signal reflection.
The MintDrive is fitted with a termination resistor for this purpose.
On the front panel of your MintDrive the termination resistor should be selected by setting the CAN2
DIP into the ON position.
B.3.4
JP4
JP3
JP5
Configuration
Jumpers JP4 and JP5 should not be fitted at this stage.
1
CAN Terminator
Also, when connecting a CAN peripheral to a MintDrive controller, the
peripheral’s CAN Bus channel 2 must be selected by fitting jumpers JP1
and JP2 to position 2.
2
}
If the CAN peripheral is at the end of the CAN network, the termination
resistor can be selected by fitting a jumper to JP3.
JP1
Termination resistors must be fitted at the ends of the network to reduce
signal reflection.
The CAN peripheral is fitted with a termination resistor for this purpose.
JP2
Preparing the CAN peripheral
CAN Bus
Channel
B.3.3
Connecting the PC, MintDrive and CAN peripheral
Connect the CAN peripheral to the MintDrive using a suitable CAN cable.
Connect the CAN peripheral to a 24VDC supply.
If it is not already connected, connect the MintDrive to the PC using a suitable RS232 cable.
Power up the PC and the MintDrive.
Start Mint WorkBench and open the Terminal window (CTRL+T).
Press the Enter key to display the C> prompt. If the prompt does not appear, press CTRL+E. This will
end any program that might be running on the MintDrive.
120
B.3.5
Node IDs
Each CAN peripheral must be given a unique “node ID” within the network.
The node ID, which is just a number, is used to ensure that a node only responds to messages
intended for it. The node ID does not have to reflect the order in which the nodes are physically
connected in the network.
CAN peripherals have a default node ID as shown in the table below, but they can be assigned any
node ID between 1 and 63. This can be done in Mint WorkBench using a method called static
configuration and is essential if two peripherals of the same type are installed.
Type
Mint Constant
Default
Node ID
Default
Baud rate
Not present
0
_ntNONE
-
125
8 digital input node
1
_ntINPUT_NODE_8
1
125
8 digital output node
2
_ntOUTPUT_NODE_8
7
125
8 relay output node
3
_ntRELAY_NODE_8
7
125
Reserved
4~7
-
-
-
ioNode 24/24
8
_ntIONODE24_24
8
125
KeypadNode
9
_ntKEYPAD
14
125
REMOTESETUP
Mint will respond with the current details of the node, followed by a
prompt for the new node ID number. For example, if the CAN peripheral
is an InputNode 8, you will see a message similar to:
JP4
JP3
JP5
Configuration
In the Terminal window, type:
1
CAN Terminator
The LED on the CAN peripheral should be red.
2
CAN Bus
Channel
In addition to jumpers JP1, JP2 and JP3, jumpers JP4 and JP5 must
be fitted for configuration.
JP1
To perform static configuration of a CAN peripheral, it is essential that
no other nodes are connected to the CAN network. Only the MintDrive
and the peripheral to be configured should be connected.
JP2
Static configuration
}
B.3.6
Node type
Node Type = inputnode8
Current Node Number = 5
Serial Number = 00000000148420
Firmware Version = 1.00.b4
New Node Number ?
121
Type a number between 1 and 63, followed by the Enter key. This will tell the node its new node
number. Remember to choose a number that no other node will be using.
A prompt for the CAN Baud rate will be shown.
New CAN Baud ?
Type a valid Baud rate (in Kbaud), for example 125.
Note: The CAN baud rate is the rate at which data is transferred over the network.
The controller and CAN peripherals use a default CAN transmission rate of 125Kbaud.
Although it is possible to alter this it should not be necessary so enter a value of 125.
When the node has been configured successfully WorkBench will display the message:
Remote Node is set.
Power down the CAN peripheral.
Remove jumpers JP4 and JP5.
B.3.7
Adding the node to the network
Now that the peripheral has been given its unique node ID, it can be added to the network.
For example, assuming a RelayNode 8 has been statically configured to node number 7 type:
NODETYPE.7 = _ntRELAY_NODE_8
This tells Mint that node number 7 is a RelayNode8 peripheral.
The term _ntRELAY_NODE_8 is called a Mint constant.
Alternatively, you could have typed the line:
NODETYPE.7 = 3
This is because in addition to the Mint constant, the RelayNode 8 also has a type number of 3.
The table in section B.3.5 on page 121 shows the Mint constants and type numbers for various
peripherals.
The LED on the RelayNode8 will start to flash green, approximately once every half second. Each flash
indicates that the RelayNode8 is participating in CAN activity.
Note: Each time a CAN Peripheral is added, a node live event occurs.
122
B.3.8
Monitoring CAN Bus communications
CAN Bus communications can be monitored in real-time using Mint WorkBench. To monitor CAN Bus
communications, type:
VIEW CANEVENT
All events and errors on the CAN Bus will be reported. To stop monitoring CAN events, press CTRL+E.
To confirm that the MintDrive is able to communicate with RelayNode8, you can test to see if the node
is “live”. Press CTRL+E to stop CAN Bus monitoring, then type:
? NODELIVE.7
The ? means “print on the screen”. Mint will return the value 1 (true) confirming the node with ID 7 is
live. If a 0 (false) is returned it means the node is not live and there is a problem with communication.
To list all the present nodes together with their type and if they are live, type:
VIEW NODELIVE
Live on Node 7 will have been abbreviated to L and the outputs are now free to be controlled.
B.3.9
Controlling the CAN peripheral
To test the peripheral, you may wish to try the following commands. For example, if you have connected
a RelayNode 8, try the following test. Type:
REMOTEOUTX.7.3 = 1
This will set node 7, output 3 to 1 (on or true).
B.3.10 Normal operation
When involved in CAN communication the status LEDs on the CAN peripherals flash green.
The MintDrive operates a node guarding procedure in which all nodes are regularly sent a CAN
message. This action is shown on the CAN peripheral by the green LED flashing approximately once
every half second.
123
B.3.11 KeypadNode
The KeypadNode provides a general purpose interface suitable for standalone machines of all types. It
is a cost effective solution for simple functions such as replacing thumb wheel switches and providing
simple diagnostics. It can also be used as a fully interactive programming panel for machine control.
Features include:
H High speed CAN bus connection
H 20 character by 4 line LCD display
H 27 keys, numeric keypad, function keys
and XYZ control keys
H Software controlled piezoelectric buzzer
Up to 4 active keypads can be used with
MintDrive at any one time.
When connecting a KeypadNode to the CAN2
bus, the node must be added to the network
as usual using the REMOTESETUP and
NODETYPE keyword (see sections B.3.6 on
page 121 and B.3.7 on page 122).
However, because MintDrive allows up to 4 KeypadNodes to be connected to the bus, the
KEYPADNODE keyword must also be used to inform Mint of the terminal channel to be used.
The terminal channel for a KeypadNode is assigned using the Mint constant _tmLCD1, _tmLCD2,
_tmLCD3 or _tmLCD4.
For example, assuming the KeypadNode is configured as node 14 (the default value) type the following
commands to add the node to the network on channel _tmLCD1 :
BUS=2
NODETYPE.14 = _ntKEYPAD
PAUSE NODELIVE.14
KEYPADNODE._tmLCD1 = 14
where:
BUS=2
NODETYPE.14 = _ntKEYPAD
PAUSE NODELIVE.14
KEYPADNODE._tmLCD1 = 14
sets the default CAN Bus for following commands to CAN Bus 2.
assigns node 14 to a Keypad peripheral.
waits for the node to become live.
assigns keypad terminal channel 1 to the node.
The PAUSE NODELIVE command is required to force a wait until the node is live before the
KEYPADNODE keyword is executed. Without this command an error will occur because there is a small
delay before the node becomes live. It should now be possible to communicate with the device.
The VIEW keyword can be used to check that the KeypadNode has been connected and is recognized.
Type:
VIEW NODELIVE
The KeypadNode should be displayed next to its node number. An L indicates that the node is live, a D
indicates dead.
124
The TERMINAL keyword should now be used to turn on the appropriate terminal devices.
For example, type:
TERMINAL = _tmLCD1 OR _tmRS232
PRINT ”Hello”
The keyword TERMINAL is used to set the terminal input/output channels for the MintDrive.
By default the MintDrive is assigned to communicate with only the RS232, RS485 and CAN1 channels,
so it must be set to communicate with a KeypadNode.
Hello will appear on the RS232 port and the LCD display of KeypadNode.
Any key presses from the KeypadNode or the PC keyboard (on the RS232 port) will now be displayed
on the PC screen and the KeypadNode.
The group of four code lines on page 124 can be added to the configuration file or a program.
Now the KeypadNode has been configured onto the bus, other Mint terminal keywords such as
PRINT#, INKEY, LOCATE and CLS can be used. See the CAN Peripherals Installation Manual and the
Mint Programming Guide for more details about the KeypadNode and its associated keywords.
B.3.12 ioNode 24/24
ioNode 24/24 supports 24 input channels and 24 output channels.
Inputs are opto-isolated and are organized into three banks of eight, each bank having its own common
connection. Outputs are opto-isolated and are organized into three banks of eight. This makes ioNode
24/24 electrically equivalent to 3 InputNode8 plus 3 OutputNode8. The pin numbering of connectors
and the functions of the jumpers and CAN LEDs have been made as similar as possible in all products.
For full details see the CAN Peripherals Guide.
The node can be configured using the methods described in the previous sections, using a NODETYPE
of _ntIONODE24_24.
Figure B.1 ioNode 24/24
125
B.3.13 Example CAN network
To show the steps required in putting a CAN network together, a multi node network is described below.
The network will include:
H 1 MintDrive controller
MintDrive
Serial cable
32NO
1
H 2 InputNode 8 nodes
H 2 OutputNode 8 nodes
H 1 RelayNode 8 node
H 1 ioNode 24/24 node
CAN2 Bus
H 1 KeypadNode node
The nodes are daisy-chained
together with the MintDrive
and KeypadNode node at the
ends of the network. The
controller is housed a short
distance from the machine,
with the CAN peripherals
distributed
around
the
machine near to their
respective actuators and
sensors. Each node is
supplied with 24VDC from a
bus supplying the machine.
The CAN Baud rate will be
the default 125 Kbaud.
InputNode
#1
InputNode
#2
OutputNode
#3
OutputNode
#4
ioNode 24/24
#6
Host computer
RelayNode
#5
KeypadNode
#7
For the following steps, you might wish to refer to section B.3.6 on page 121:
H Statically configure the two InputNode 8 nodes with Node IDs 1 and 2.
H Statically configure the two OutputNode 8 nodes with Node IDs 3 and 4.
H Statically configure the RelayNode 8 node with Node ID 5.
H Statically configure the ioNode 24/24 node with Node ID 6.
H Statically configure the KeypadNode node with Node ID 7.
H Terminate the network. On the MintDrive, the terminator should be selected by setting the CAN2 DIP
switch into the ON position. On the KeypadNode, the terminator should be selected by fitting jumper
JP3. The remaining nodes should have their terminators disconnected by removing jumper JP3.
H Power up the system.
H Once Mint is running, scan the network for nodes by typing:
NODESCAN.0
H Now type:
VIEW NODELIVE.2
to display all the active nodes on the CAN2 network.
126
B.3.14 Mint CAN related keywords
The following Mint keywords are used for communicating with CAN. Full details of the use and syntax
of Mint commands can be found in the Mint Programming Guide.
Keyword
Abbreviation
Keyword
Abbreviation
CANBAUD
CB
REMOTEDEBOUNCE
RD
CANBUSRESET
CBR
REMOTEESTOP
RES
CANEVENT
CV
REMOTEIN
RI
CANEVENTINFO
CVI
REMOTEINPUTACTIVELEVEL
RIA
CLS
CLS
REMOTEINX
RIX
INKEY
IK
REMOTEOUT
RO
KEYPADNODE
KN
REMOTEOUTPUTACTIVELEVEL
ROA
LINE
LINE
REMOTEOUTPUTERROR
ROE
LOCATE
LOCATE
REMOTEOUTX
ROX
NODELIVE
NL
REMOTERESET
RR
NODETYPE
NT
REMOTESETUP
RMS
PRINT
?
REMOTESTATUS
RS
READKEY
RK
TERMINAL
TM
B.3.14.1 Using abbreviations
Abbreviations can make text entry at the Terminal window much faster.
For example, the baud rate of the CAN2 bus can be set/read using the keyword CANBAUD (or CB).
To print (on screen) the current baud rate you could type:
PRINT CANBAUD.2
You could also type:
?CB.2
which would have exactly the same effect.
Note: If the BUS keyword has been used to set the default CAN Bus to 2, there is no need to type
the .2 extension. The baud rate is stored on the MintDrive and will be recalled each time the
unit is powered up.
127
128
C
C.1
CE Guidelines
C
Outline
This section provides general information regarding
recommended methods of installation for CE compliance.
It is not intended as an exhaustive guide to good practice
and wiring techniques. It is assumed that the installer of
the MintDrive is sufficiently qualified to perform the task,
and is aware of local regulations and requirements.
Baldor products which meet the EMC directive requirements
are indicated with a “CE” mark. A duly signed CE declaration
of conformity is available from Baldor.
C.1.1
Declaration of Conformity
Baldor indicates that the products are only components
and not ready for immediate or instant use within the
meaning of “Safety law of appliance”, “EMC Law” or
“Machine directive”.The final mode of operation is defined
only after installation into the user’s equipment. It is the
responsibility of the user to verify compliance. The product
conforms with the following standards:
DIN VDE 0160 / 05.88:
Electronic equipment for use in electrical power
installations
DIN VDE 0100:
Erection of power installations with nominal voltages
up to 1000V
DIN IEC 326 Teil 1 / 10.90:
Design and use of printed boards
DIN VDE 0110Teil 1-2 / 01.89,
DIN VDE 0110Teil 20 / 08.90:
Dimensioning of clearance and creepage distances
EN 60529 / 10.91
Degrees of protection provided by enclosures
129
C.1.2
EMC Conformity and CE marking
The information contained herein is for your guidance only and does not guarantee that the installation
will meet the requirements of the council directive 89/336/EEC.
The purpose of the EEC directives is to state a minimum technical requirement common to all the
member states within the European Union. In turn, these minimum technical requirements are intended
to enhance the levels of safety both directly and indirectly.
Council directive 89/336/EEC relating to Electro Magnetic Compliance (EMC) indicates that it is the
responsibility of the system integrator to ensure that the entire system complies with all relative
directives at the time of installing into service.
Motors and controls are used as components of a system, per the EMC directive. Hence all
components, installation of the components, interconnection between components, and shielding and
grounding of the system as a whole determines EMC compliance.
The CE mark does not inform the purchaser which directive the product complies with. It rests upon the
manufacturer or his authorized representative to ensure the item in question complies fully with all the
relative directives in force at the time of installing into service, in the same way as the system integrator
previously mentioned. Remember, it is the instructions of installation and use, coupled with the product,
that comply with the directive.
C.1.3
Use of CE compliant components
The following points should be considered:
H Using CE approved components will not guarantee a CE compliant system!
H The components used in the drive, installation methods used, materials selected for interconnection
of components are important.
H The installation methods, interconnection materials, shielding, filtering and grounding of the system
as a whole will determine CE compliance.
H The responsibility of CE mark compliance rests entirely with the party who offers the end system for
sale (such as an OEM or system integrator).
C.1.4
EMC wiring technique
Cabinet
Using a typical electroplated zinc coated enclosure, connected to ground, means that all parts mounted
on the back plane are connected to ground and all shield (screen) connections can be connected to
ground. Within the cabinet there should be a spatial separation between power wiring (motor and AC
power cables) and control wiring.
Screen connections
All connections between components must use shielded cables. The cable shields must be connected
to the enclosure. Use conductive clamps to ensure good ground connection. With this technique, a
good ground shield can be achieved.
130
EMC filters
The EMI or mains filter should be mounted next to the power supply. For the connection to and from
the mains filter screened cables should be used. The cable screens should be connected to screen
clamps on both sides. An exception to this is the analog command signal.
Grounding (Earth)
For safety reasons (VDE0160), all Baldor components must be connected to ground with a separate
wire. Ground connections must be made from the central ground to the regen resistor enclosure and
from the central ground to the Shared Power Supply.
C.1.5
EMC installation suggestions
To ensure electromagnetic compatibility (EMC), the following installation points should be considered to
help reduce interference:
H Grounding of all system elements to a central ground point
H Shielding of all cables and signal wires
H Filtering of power lines.
A proper enclosure should have the following characteristics:
H All metal conducting parts of the enclosure must be electrically connected to the back plane.
These connections should be made with a grounding strap from each element to a central
grounding point.*
H Keep the power wiring (motor and power cable) and control wiring separated. If these wires must
cross, be sure they cross at 90 degrees to minimize noise due to induction.
H The shield connections of the signal and power cables should be connected to the screen rails or
clamps. The screen rails or clamps should be conductive clamps fastened to the cabinet.**
H The cable to the regeneration resistor must be shielded. The shield must be connected to ground at
both ends.
H The location of the AC mains filter has to be situated close to the drive so the AC power wires are as
short as possible.
H Wires inside the enclosure should be placed as close as possible to conducting metal, cabinet walls
and plates. It is advised to terminate unused wires to chassis ground.*
H To reduce ground current, use the largest suitable wire available for ground connections.
*
Grounding in general describes all metal parts which can be connected to a protective conductor,
e.g. housing of cabinet, motor housing, etc. to a central ground point. This central ground point is
then connected to the main plant (or building) ground.
** Or run as twisted pair at minimum.
131
C.1.6
Wiring of shielded (screened) cables
Conductive
Clamp
Remove the outer insulation
to expose the overall screen.
MintDrive
Cable
Twisted pairs
Conductive Clamp - Must contact bare cable shield
and be secured to metal backplane.
Figure C.2 Grounding cable screens
MintDrive
X2
Resolver Connector
Housing
Cable
Twisted pairs
1
6
2
7
3
8
13
Connector backshell
Connector backshell
Figure C.3 Resolver cable grounding
132
MintDrive
X6
Handwheel / Encoder
Housing
Cable
Twisted pairs
1
6
2
7
3
8
5
Connection of shields to analog ground is optional.
Connector backshell
Connector backshell
Figure C.4 Handwheel (Encoder) cable grounding
MintDrive
X2
Encoder Connector
Housing
Cable
Twisted pairs
1
6
2
7
3
8
11
13
Connector backshell
Connection of shields to digital ground is optional.
Connector backshell
Figure C.5 Encoder signal cable grounding
133
134
D
D.1
Accessories and options
D
Outline
This section describes common accessories and options that you may need to use with your MintDrive.
D.1.1
Cables
Shielded (screened) cables provide EMI / RFI shielding and are required for compliance with CE
regulations. All connectors and other components used must be compatible with this shielded cable.
Cable
rated current
Cable assembly
description
B ld catalog
Baldor
t l
number
b
Power Cable Assembly
Threaded connector
(Standard Metric Style)
CBL015SP-FHM
CBL030SP-FHM
CBL046SP-FHM
CBL061SP-FHM
CBL076SP-FHM
CBL091SP-FHM
CBL106SP-FHM
CBL122SP-FHM
CBL152SP-FHM
CBL229SP-FHM
CBL305SP-FHM
CBL030SP-FHQ
CBL061SP-FHQ
CBL076SP-FHQ
CBL091SP-FHQ
CBL106SP-FHQ
CBL152SP-FHQ
CBL030SP-FHCE
CBL061SP-FHCE
CBL091SP-FHCE
CBL152SP-FHCE
CBL030SP-F
CBL046SP-F
CBL061SP-F
CBL076SP-F
CBL091SP-F
CBL152SP-F
CBL030SP-E
CBL046SP-E
CBL061SP-E
CBL091SP-E
CBL152SP-E
Power Cable Assembly
Quick Connect Style
20 Amps
Power Cable Assembly
CE Style Threaded
Connector
Power Cable
No Connectors
30 Amps
Power Cable
No Connectors
Length
ft
m
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
50
75
100
10
20
25
30
35
50
10
20
30
50
10
15
20
25
30
50
10
15
20
30
50
1.5
3.0
4.6
6.1
7.6
9.1
10.6
12.2
15.2
22.9
30.5
3.0
6.1
7.6
9.1
10.6
15.2
3.0
6.1
9.1
15.2
3.0
4.6
6.1
7.6
9.1
15.2
3.0
4.6
6.1
9.1
15.2
135
D.1.2
Resolver feedback cable
The following table lists the part numbers of resolver feedback cables for use with the MintDrive.
Motor type
Cable assembly
description
Resolver Feedback
Cable Assembly
Threaded connector
(Standard Metric Style)
BSM 50/63/80/90/100
Resolver Feedback
Cable Assembly
Quick Connect Style
Resolver Feedback
Cable Assembly CE
Style Threaded
Connector
Resolver Feedback
Cable No Connector
BSM 50/63/80/90/100
136
Baldor catalog
number
CBL015SF-ALM
CBL030SF-ALM
CBL046SF-ALM
CBL061SF-ALM
CBL076SF-ALM
CBL091SF-ALM
CBL106SF-ALM
CBL122SF-ALM
CBL152SF-ALM
CBL229SF-ALM
CBL305SF-ALM
CBL379SF-ALM
CBL030SF-ALQ
CBL061SF-ALQ
CBL076SF-ALQ
CBL091SF-ALQ
CBL106SF-ALQ
CBL152SF-ALQ
CBL030SF-ALCE
CBL061SF-ALCE
CBL091SF-ALCE
CBL152SF-ALCE
CBL030SF-A
CBL046SF-A
CBL061SF-A
CBL091SF-A
CBL122SF-A
CBL152SF-A
CBL213SF-A
CBL244SF-A
CBL305SF-A
CBL457SF-A
Length
ft
m
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
50
75
100
125
10
20
25
30
35
50
10
20
30
50
10
15
20
30
40
50
70
80
100
150
1.5
3.0
4.6
6.1
7.6
9.1
10.6
12.2
15.2
22.9
30.5
37.9
3.0
6.1
7.6
9.1
10.6
15.2
3.0
6.1
9.1
15.2
3.0
4.6
6.1
9.1
12.2
15.2
21.3
24.4
30.5
45.7
D.1.3
EMC mains filters
AC filters remove high frequency noise from the mains supply, protecting the MintDrive. These filters
also prevent high frequency signals from being transmitted back onto the power lines and help meet CE
requirements. To select the correct filter, see section 2.3.10.
D.1.3.1 Catalog numbers
Schaffner
filter type
Rated volts
FN 2070-6-06
FN 2070-10-06
FN 2070-12-06
FN 351-36-33
FN 351-50-33
250
250
250
440
440
Rated
amps
@ 40°C
6
10
12
36
50
Leakage
current (mA)
Weight
lbs (kg)
Baldor catalog
number
0.4
0.4
0.4
28.0
29.6
0.99 (0.45)
1.61 (0.73)
1.61 (0.73)
6.61 (3.0)
6.83 (3.1)
ASR30545
FN2070-10-06
ASR30548
ASR24670
ASR24671
D.1.3.2 Filter dimensions - FN351-36-33 and FN351-50-33
4.53 (115)
F = Depth
G
G
C
D
E
H
M6
B
A
Dimension
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
Dimensions inches (mm)
9.84 (250)
7.87 (200)
5.9 (150)
4.72 (120)
5.35 (136)
2.55 (65)
0.78 (20)
0.83 (21)
137
D.1.3.3 Filter dimensions - types FN2070-6-06, FN2070-10-06, FN2070-12-06
L
C
H
D
E
A
G
F
K
J
B
Dimension
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
J
K
L
138
Dimensions inches (mm)
FN2070-6-06
FN2070-10-06
FN2070-12-06
4.47 (113.5)
6.14 (156)
2.26 (57.5)
1.83 (46.6)
3.70 (94)
5.14 (130.5)
4.06 (103)
5.63 (143)
0.98 (25)
0.49 (12.4)
1.28 (32.4)
0.17 (4.4)
0.21 (5.3)
0.24 (6)
0.61 (15.5)
D.1.4
Regeneration resistors
Some drives are shipped with an internal regeneration resistor (see page 2). If an internal resistor is not
present, a regeneration resistor should be installed to dissipate energy during braking if a fault “1”
(over-voltage) occurs.
MintDrive
current rating
Package size
2.5A
5A
7.5A
10A
15A
A
B
B
C
C
Baldor catalog number
115VAC drives
230VAC drives
Baldor
Baldor
Power rating
Power rating
catalog
catalog
(W)
(W)
number
number
RG27
44
RG56
44
RG27
44
RG56
44
RG22
100
RG39
100
RG4.7
320
RG10
320
RG4.7
320
RG10
320
1.7 (45)
3.9
(100)
3.54
(90)
L
L= 4.3 (123) for 44 watts
13.2 (337) for 320/640 watt
M4
2.6 (65)
Dimensions: inches (mm)
139
D.1.5
Breakout board - X5
An optional screw connection fitting is available should you wish to purchase a break-out board. The
break-out board, often referred to as a ’card’, mounts on a 35mm DIN rail. The board has two-part
screw terminals for all of the digital inputs, digital outputs, analog inputs and analog outputs of the
MintDrive’s X5 connector, together with indicator LEDs.
Figure D.1 MintDrive X5 breakout board
140
Baldor UK Ltd
Mint Motion Centre
6 Bristol Distribution Park
Hawkley Drive, Bristol
BS32 0BF, UK
UK
TEL: +44 1454 850000
FAX: +44 1454 850001
US
TEL: +1 501 646--4711
FAX: +1 501 648--5792
MX
TEL: +52 47 61 2030
FAX: +52 47 61 2010
CH
TEL: +41 52 647 4700
FAX: +41 52 659 2394
D
TEL: +49 89 90 50 80
FAX: +49 89 90 50 8491
F
TEL: +33 145 10 7902
FAX: +33 145 09 0864
I
TEL: +39 11 562 4440
FAX: +39 11 562 5660
AU
TEL: +61 29674 5455
FAX: +61 29674 2495
CC
TEL: +65 744 2572
FAX: +65 747 1708
MN1274 06/2001
Printed in UK
 Baldor UK Ltd