Porter Cable Power Tools Instruction Manual

f) Keep cutting tools sharp and clean. Properly maintained cutting tools with sharp cutting
edges are less likely to bind and are easier to control.
g) Use the power tool, accessories and tool bits, etc. in accordance with these
instructions, taking into account the working conditions and the work to be
performed. Use of the power tool for operations different from those intended could result
in a hazardous situation.
5) SERVICE
a) Have your power tool serviced by a qualified repair person using only identical
replacement parts. This will ensure that the safety of the power tool is maintained.
690 SERIES 1-3/4 PEAK
HP ROUTERS
ADDITIONAL SPECIFIC SAFETY RULES
690LR
691
693LRPK
9690LR
The following are PORTER-CABLE trademarks for one or more power tools and accessories: a gray and black color
scheme; a “four point star” design; and three contrasting/outlined longitudinal stripes.
• Hold power tool by insulated gripping surfaces because the cutter may contact its
own cord. Cutting a “live” wire may make exposed metal parts of the tool “live” and shock the
operator.
• Use clamps or another practical way to secure and support the workpiece to a stable
platform. Holding the work by your hand or against the body leaves it unstable and may lead
to loss of control.
• Metal cutting with router: If using router for metal cutting, clean out tool often. Metal
dust and chips often accumulate on interior surfaces and could create a risk of serious injury,
electrical shock or death.
• Never run the motor unit when it is not inserted in one of the router bases. The motor
is not designed to be handheld.
• Keep handles dry, clean and free from oil and grease. This will enable better control of the
tool.
• Maintain a firm grip with both hands on the tool to resist starting torque. Maintain a firm
grip on the tool at all times while operating.
• Keep hands away from cutting area above and below the base. Never reach under the
workpiece for any reason. Keep the router base firmly in contact with the workpiece when
cutting.
• Never touch the bit immediately after use. It may be extremely hot.
• Be sure that the motor has stopped completely before you lay the router down. If the
bit is still spinning when the tool is laid down, it could cause injury or damage.
• Be sure that the router bit is clear of the workpiece before starting the motor. If the bit
is in contact with the workpiece when the motor starts, it could make the router jump, causing
damage or injury.
• Always follow the bit manufacturer’s speed recommendations as some bit designs
require specific speeds for safety or performance. If you are unsure of the proper speed
or are experiencing any type of problem, contact the bit manufacturer.
• Do not use router bits with a diameter in excess of 2-1/8" (29 mm) in this tool.
• Do not hand-hold the router in an upside-down or horizontal position. The motor can
separate from the base if not properly attached according to the instructions.
• Before starting the motor, check to see that the cord will not snag or impede the routing operation.
• Keep cutting pressure constant. Do not overload motor.
• Provide clearance under workpiece for bit when through-cutting.
• Tighten collet nut securely to prevent the bit from slipping.
• Never tighten collet nut without a bit.
• Always make sure the work surface is free from nails and other foreign objects. Cutting
into a nail can cause the bit and the tool to jump.
• Always keep chip shield (if included) clean and in place.
• Air vents often cover moving parts and should be avoided. Loose clothes, jewelry or long
hair can be caught in moving parts.
• An extension cord must have adequate wire size (AWG or American Wire Gauge) for
safety. The smaller the gauge number of the wire, the greater the capacity of the cable, that is
16 gauge has more capacity than 18 gauge. An undersized cord will cause a drop in line voltage
resulting in loss of power and overheating. When using more than one extension to make up
the total length, be sure each individual extension contains at least the minimum wire size. The
following table shows the correct size to use depending on cord length and nameplate ampere
rating. If in doubt, use the next heavier gauge. The smaller the gauge number, the heavier the
cord.
Minimum Gauge for Cord Sets
Volts
Total Length of Cord in Feet (meters)
120V
25 (7.6)
50 (15.2)
100 (30.5) 150 (45.7)
240V
50 (15.2)
100 (30.5) 200 (61.0) 300 (91.4)
DEFINITIONS - SAFETY GUIDELINES
Ampere Rating
indicates an imminently hazardous situation which, if not
avoided, will result in death or serious injury.
indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided,
could result in death or serious injury.
indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided,
may result in minor or moderate injury.
NOTICE
used without the safety alert symbol indicates potentially
hazardous situation which, if not avoided, may result in property damage.
To reduce the risk of injury, read the instruction manual.
GENERAL POWER TOOL SAFETY WARNINGS
Read all safety warnings and all instructions Failure to follow
the warnings and instructions may result in electric shock, fire and/or
serious injury.
SAVE ALL WARNINGS AND INSTRUCTIONS
FOR FUTURE REFERENCE
The term “power tool” in the warnings refers to your mains-operated (corded) power tool or
battery-operated (cordless) power tool.
1) WORK AREA SAFETY
a) Keep work area clean and well lit. Cluttered or dark areas invite accidents.
b) Do not operate power tools in explosive atmospheres, such as in the presence of
flammable liquids, gases or dust. Power tools create sparks which may ignite the dust or
fumes.
c) Keep children and bystanders away while operating a power tool. Distractions can
cause you to lose control.
2) ELECTRICAL SAFETY
a) Power tool plugs must match the outlet. Never modify the plug in any way. Do not
use any adapter plugs with earthed (grounded) power tools. Unmodified plugs and
matching outlets will reduce risk of electric shock.
b) Avoid body contact with earthed or grounded surfaces such as pipes, radiators,
ranges and refrigerators. There is an increased risk of electric shock if your body is earthed
or grounded.
c) Do not expose power tools to rain or wet conditions. Water entering a power tool will
increase the risk of electric shock.
d) Do not abuse the cord. Never use the cord for carrying, pulling or unplugging the
power tool. Keep cord away from heat, oil, sharp edges or moving parts. Damaged
or entangled cords increase the risk of electric shock.
e) When operating a power tool outdoors, use an extension cord suitable for outdoor
use. Use of a cord suitable for outdoor use reduces the risk of electric shock.
f) If operating a power tool in a damp location is unavoidable, use a ground fault
circuit interrupter (GFCI) protected supply. Use of a GFCI reduces the risk of electric
shock.
3) PERSONAL SAFETY
a) Stay alert, watch what you are doing and use common sense when operating a
power tool. Do not use a power tool while you are tired or under the influence of
drugs, alcohol or medication. A moment of inattention while operating power tools may
result in serious personal injury.
b) Use personal protective equipment. Always wear eye protection. Protective equipment
such as dust mask, non-skid safety shoes, hard hat, or hearing protection used for
appropriate conditions will reduce personal injuries.
c) Prevent unintentional starting. Ensure the switch is in the off position before
connecting to power source and/or battery pack, picking up or carrying the tool.
Carrying power tools with your finger on the switch or energizing power tools that have the
switch on invites accidents.
d) Remove any adjusting key or wrench before turning the power tool on. A wrench or
a key left attached to a rotating part of the power tool may result in personal injury.
e) Do not overreach. Keep proper footing and balance at all times. This enables better
control of the power tool in unexpected situations.
f) Dress properly. Do not wear loose clothing or jewelry. Keep your hair, clothing and
gloves away from moving parts. Loose clothes, jewelry or long hair can be caught in
moving parts.
g) If devices are provided for the connection of dust extraction and collection facilities,
ensure these are connected and properly used. Use of dust collection can reduce dustrelated hazards.
4) POWER TOOL USE AND CARE
a) Do not force the power tool. Use the correct power tool for your application. The
correct power tool will do the job better and safer at the rate for which it was designed.
b) Do not use the power tool if the switch does not turn it on and off. Any power tool
that cannot be controlled with the switch is dangerous and must be repaired.
c) Disconnect the plug from the power source and/or the battery pack from the power
tool before making any adjustments, changing accessories, or storing power tools.
Such preventive safety measures reduce the risk of starting the power tool accidentally.
d) Store idle power tools out of the reach of children and do not allow persons
unfamiliar with the power tool or these instructions to operate the power tool. Power
tools are dangerous in the hands of untrained users.
e) Maintain power tools. Check for misalignment or binding of moving parts, breakage
of parts and any other condition that may affect the power tool’s operation. If
damaged, have the power tool repaired before use. Many accidents are caused by
poorly maintained power tools.
More
Than
0
6
10
12
Not More
Than
6
10
12
16
AWG
18
18
16
14
16
16
16
12
16
14
14
12
14
12
Not Recommended
ALWAYS use safety glasses. Everyday eyeglasses are NOT safety glasses. Also use
face or dust mask if cutting operation is dusty. ALWAYS WEAR CERTIFIED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:
• ANSI Z87.1 eye protection (CAN/CSA Z94.3),
• ANSI S12.6 (S3.19) hearing protection,
• NIOSH/OSHA/MSHA respiratory protection.
Some dust created by power sanding, sawing, grinding, drilling, and other
construction activities contains chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer, birth
defects or other reproductive harm. Some examples of these chemicals are:
• lead from lead-based paints,
• crystalline silica from bricks and cement and other masonry products, and
• arsenic and chromium from chemically-treated lumber.
Your risk from these exposures varies, depending on how often you do this type of work. To reduce
your exposure to these chemicals: work in a well ventilated area, and work with approved safety
equipment, such as those dust masks that are specially designed to filter out microscopic particles.
• Avoid prolonged contact with dust from power sanding, sawing, grinding, drilling, and
other construction activities. Wear protective clothing and wash exposed areas with
soap and water. Allowing dust to get into your mouth, eyes, or lay on the skin may promote
absorption of harmful chemicals.
Use of this tool can generate and/or disperse dust, which may cause serious and
permanent respiratory or other injury. Always use NIOSH/OSHA approved respiratory protection
appropriate for the dust exposure. Direct particles away from face and body.
Always wear proper personal hearing protection that conforms to ANSI S12.6
(S3.19) during use. Under some conditions and duration of use, noise from this product may
contribute to hearing loss.
• The label on your tool may include the following symbols. The symbols and their definitions are
as follows
V .....................volts
A.........................amperes
Hz...................hertz
W .......................watts
or AC ............alternating current
min .................minutes
or DC.....direct current
or AC/DC .....alternating or direct current
no .......................no load speed
...................Class I Construction
.......................(grounded)
n .........................rated speed
...................Class II Construction
.......................earthing terminal
........................safety alert symbol
(double insulated)
…/min ............per minute
BPM ...................beats per minute
IPM.................impacts per minute
RPM ...................revolutions per minute
SPM ...............strokes per minute
sfpm...................surface feet per minute
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS
MOTOR
Be sure your power supply agrees with the nameplate marking. Voltage decrease of more than
10% will cause loss of power and overheating. PORTER-CABLE tools are factory tested; if this tool
does not operate, check power supply.
COMPONENTS (Fig. 1–19)
Never modify the power tool or any part of it. Damage or personal injury could result.
A. Motor clamp (1001 base)
U. Depth indicator knob (6931 base)
B. Motor lower pins
V. Depth rod (6931 base)
C. Adjustment ring
W. Three turret stops (6931 base)
D. Index line
X. Fixed turret stops (6931 base)
E. Base
Y. Short turret stops (6931 base)
F. Motor Unit
Z. Locking lever (6931 base)
G. Mounting screws
AA. Lower limiting nut (6931 base)
H. Subbase
BB. Upper limiting nut (6931 base)
I.
Collet nut
CC. Retaining screw (6931 base)
J. Motor clamp (6931 base)
DD. Adjustment screw (6931 base)
K. Motor clamp screw (6931 base)
EE. Clamp screw (6911, 1001 bases)
L. Lock washer and flat washer (6931 base) FF. Motor Switch
M. Motor clamp nut (6931 base)
GG. Knob handles (6911 base)
N. Locking plate (6931 base)
HH. Outlet handle (6911 base)
O. Pins (6931 base)
II. Power cord (6911 base)
P. Slots (6931 base)
JJ. Lock button (6911 base)
Q. Wrench
KK. Trigger switch (6911 base)
R. Depth rod locking knob (6931 base)
LL. Zero line (6911 base)
S. Turret stop (6931 base)
MM. "D" Handle Grip
T. Depth indicator (6931 base)
INTENDED USE
This heavy-duty router is designed for professional routing applications.
DO NOT use under wet conditions or in presence of flammable liquids or gases.
This is a professional power tool. DO NOT let children come into contact with the tool. Supervision
is required when inexperienced operators use this tool.
G
F
D
C
H
B
E
A
GG
I
GG
A
A
FIG. 1
FIG. 2
FIG. 3
FIG. 4
K
FIG. 7
O
L
N
Q
P
M
FIG. 5
FIG. 6
J
FIG. 8
T
W
Z
U
R
V
Y
S
FIG. 9
FIG. 10
FIG. 11
X
FIG. 11A
B
DD
BB
CC
EE
AA
FIG. 12
FIG. 13
FIG. 14
II
FF
FIG. 15
D
F
C
LL
II
HH
KK
JJ
MM
JJ
FF
MM
EE
GG
GG
KK
FIG. 16
E
OPERATION
To reduce the risk of injury, turn unit off and disconnect it from power source
before installing and removing accessories, before adjusting or when making repairs. An
accidental start-up can cause injury.
Do not use router bits with a diameter in excess of 2-1/8" (29 mm) in this tool.
GRIPPING LOCATIONS (FIG. 3, 16, 18)
1001 BASE and 6931 PLUNGE BASE: Grip both knob handles (GG) while operating.
6911 "D" Handle Base: Grip "D" Handle (MM) and knob handle (GG) while operating.
The "D" Handle router base has two positions for the knob to accommodate right or left hand use.
INSTALLING THE BIT (1001 BASE)
Projectile hazard. Only use bits with shanks that match the installed collet.
Smaller shank bits will not be secure and could become loose during operation.
This tool is provided with two collets that accept a 1/4" (6.35 mm) or 1/2" (13 mm) shank bit.
1. To remove the motor unit from the base unit:
(a) Open the clamp (A) Fig. 1.
(b) While holding the base, turn the power unit COUNTER-CLOCKWISE until the lower pin
(B) in the motor housing is disengaged from groove in base.
(c) Lift the power unit free from the base unit.
2. Clean and insert the shank of the bit into the collet until the shank bottoms, then back it out
approximately 1/16" (1.6 mm).
3. Lay the power unit on its side on a bench with the collet pointing AWAY from you.
4. Place one wrench on the flats of the chuck with the opposite end of the wrench resting on the
bench to your left (Fig. 2).
5. Place the other wrench on the collet and tighten counter-clockwise. Tighten the collet nut
securely to prevent the bit from slipping.
6. To remove the bit, reverse the procedure.
Never tighten the collet without first installing a router bit in it. Tightening an empty
collet, even by hand, can damage the collet.
INSTALLING THE MOTOR (1001 BASE)
1. Open the clamp (A) Fig. 1 and set the power unit in the base unit.
2. Align the lower pin (B) Fig. 1 of the power unit with the groove in the base.
3. Rotate the power unit clockwise into the base until the upper guide pins are set in the groove of
the base.
4. Close the clamp.
ADJUSTING THE DEPTH OF CUT (1001 BASE)
1. Open the clamp (A) Fig. 3.
2. Hold the base (E) and turn the power unit (F) Fig. 3 counter-clockwise until the tip of the bit is
above the bottom of the base.
3. Set the tool on a flat surface.
4. Turn the power unit (F) Fig. 3 clockwise until the bit touches the work.
5. Close the clamp (A) Fig. 3.
6. Rotate the depth adjusting ring (C) Fig. 3 until the zero-line is opposite the index line (D) on the
housing.
7. Open the clamp (A) Fig. 3.
8. Tip the router so that the bit is clear of the work surface. Turn the power unit (F) Fig. 3 clockwise
until the index line (D) on the motor housing reaches the desired depth indicated on the ring.
9. Close the clamp (A) Fig. 3.
NOTE: Setting the index line to 1/4" on the ring means the cutting edge of the bit is exposed 1/4"
(6.4 mm) below the base.
ADJUSTING THE SUBBASE ALIGNMENT (ALL ROUTERS)
Applications using a template guide require the bit to be centered in the guide. This, in turn, requires
the center hole in the subbase to be in line with the collet of the motor unit. Your model has an
adjustable subbase that has been aligned at the factory. The fixed-base router comes with the
large hole.
FIG. 17
FIG. 18
1.
2.
Loosen the subbase mounting screws (G) Fig. 4 just enough to allow the subbase (H) to move.
Open the clamp (A) Fig. 4 (or screw (EE) Fig. 17) and adjust the power unit so that the collet
nut (I) Fig. 4 engages the center hole in the subbase (H). Allow the subbase to center itself on
the collet nut. Close the clamp or tighten the clamp screw firmly.
3. Tighten the subbase mounting screws (G) Fig. 4 securely.
INSTALLING THE MOTOR (6931 PLUNGE BASE)
1. Support the motor clamp (J) Fig. 5 and loosen the motor clamp screw (K) Fig. 5 approximately
1/2" (13 mm) with the hex wrench (supplied).
2. Insert the motor unit into the base with the switch positioned at the front of the left handle.
Align the four pins (O) Fig. 7 (two of which are shown) in the motor case with the slots (P) Fig. 7
in the base.
3. Seat the motor in the base and tighten the motor clamp screw.
REMOVING THE MOTOR (6931 PLUNGE BASE)
1. Remove the clamp screw (K) Fig. 5, flat washer, lock washer (L), and clamp-locking nut (M)
Fig. 6.
2. Insert the hex wrench (Q) Fig. 8 to contact the locking plate (N) Fig. 6. Tap lightly to release
and remove the locking plate.
3. Slide the motor out of the base.
4. Reattach the clamp screw, lock washer, flat washer, locking plate and clamp locking nut to the
base and tighten lightly.
ADJUSTING THE DEPTH OF CUT (6931 PLUNGE BASE)
1. Loosen the depth rod locking knob (R) Fig. 9, and the depth indicator knob (U), allowing the
depth rod (V) to contact one of the turret stops (S). Normally the deepest desired cut is set
with the depth rod resting on the shortest turret stop (Y) Fig. 10. The other two fixed stops (X)
Fig. 10 provide reduced cutting depths of 1/4" (6.4 mm) and 1/2" (13 mm) respectively. You
can adjust the three stops (W) Fig. 10 to any desired height. You can utilize any combination
of fixed and/or adjustable stops to achieve the desired depths required for a particular job.
Do not change the turret stop while the router is running. This will place your hands
too near the cutter head.
2. Release the plunge mechanism by pulling the locking lever (Z) Fig. 11A to the left. Lower the
plunge mechanism until the router bit touches the work surface. Release the lever and push it
to the right to lock the mechanism in this position.
3. Tighten the depth-rod locking knob.
4. Position the depth indicator (T) Fig. 9 at the "0" position and tighten the knob.
5. Loosen depth-rod locking knob (R) Fig 9. Raise the indicator until it aligns with the graduation
representing the desired depth of plunge. (The example in Fig. 9 shows setting for 1" plunge.)
6. Turn the lower travel-limiting nut (AA) Fig. 12 until it is approximately 1/4" (6.4 mm) above the
top of the the plunge housing. While holding the lower nut, turn the upper nut (BB) until it
"jams" against the lower nut (AA) Fig. 12.
Jam the travel-limiting nuts together to prevent movement (caused by vibration) which
could prevent full bit retraction.
Set the travel limiting nuts so that bit can be retracted into the base of the router, clear
of the workpiece.
DO NOT attempt to increase the plunge travel by readjusting the stop nut. Increasing
the travel beyond 2-1/2" (63.5 mm) can cause the mechanism to jam. NEVER remove the stop nut.
Motor can disengage resulting in loss of control.
ADJUSTING THE PLUNGE LOCKING LEVER (6931 PLUNGE BASE)
You can adjust the plunge-locking mechanism to reposition the lever (in the locked position), or to
compensate for wear.
1. While holding the lever in the upright position, remove the retaining screw (CC) Fig. 13.
Continue to hold the lever through the remaining steps.
2. Use an 1/8" hex wrench (not furnished) to turn the adjustment screw (DD) Fig. 14 counterclockwise approximately 1/2 turn.
3. Move the lever to the desired locked position and tighten the adjustment screw.
4. Remove the hex wrench and replace the retaining screw.
INSTALLING THE MOTOR (6911 "D" HANDLE BASE)
1. Loosen the clamp screw (EE) Fig. 15 to set the power unit in the base unit.
2. Insert the motor unit into the base aligning the lower pin (B) with the groove in the base.
3. Rotate the motor unit into the base clockwise until the motor switch (FF) Fig. 16 is directly
above the knob handle (GG).
4. Connect the motor unit cord to the outlet in handle (HH) Fig. 16.
5. Continue rotating the motor unit into the base until upper guide pins set rigidly into base.
6. Tighten the clamp screw firmly.
ADJUSTING THE DEPTH OF CUT (6911 BASE)
1. Loosen the clamp screw (EE) Fig. 17.
2. Hold the base (E) and turn the motor unit (F) Fig. 17 counter-clockwise until the tip of the bit
is above the bottom of the base.
3. Set the router on a flat surface.
4. Turn the motor unit (F) Fig. 17 clockwise until bit touches the wood surface.
5. Tighten the clamp screw (EE) Fig. 17.
6. Rotate the depth adjusting ring (C) Fig. 17 until the zero-line (LL) is opposite the index line (D)
on the housing.
7. Loosen the clamp screw (EE) Fig. 17.
8. Tip the router so that the bit is clear of the wood surface. Turn the motor unit (F) Fig. 17
clockwise until the index line (D) on the motor housing reaches the desired depth indicated on
the ring.
9. Tighten the clamp screw (EE) Fig. 17 firmly.
NOTE: Setting the index line to 1/4" on the ring means the cutting edge of the bit is exposed 1/4"
(6.4 mm) below the base.
CONNECTING TO POWER SOURCE
Before connecting motor unit power cord to power source or "D" handle (if applicable),
ensure the toggle switch and the "D" handle trigger switch are in the OFF position. An accidental
start-up can cause injury.
STARTING AND STOPPING THE MOTOR
Before starting the tool, clear the work area of all foreign objects. Check to see that
the cord will not snag or impede the routing operation. Also keep firm grip on tool to resist starting
torque.
To avoid personal injury and/or damage to finished work, always allow the power unit
to come to a COMPLETE STOP before putting the tool down.
To start the tool, move the rocker switch (FF) Fig. 18 to the "ON" or "I" position. To stop the tool,
move the rocker switch to the "OFF" or "O" position.
STARTING AND STOPPING THE MOTOR - “D” HANDLE
Check to see that the motor unit power cord (II) Fig. 16 is plugged into the handle, and that the
switch (FF) on the motor is set to the “ON” position. The starting and stopping of the motor is then
controlled by pressing and releasing the trigger switch (KK) Fig. 16 in the handle of the base.
To allow the tool to run without continually pressing the trigger, press the trigger (KK) into the handle
and engage the switch locking button (JJ) on the side of the handle. While holding the button in,
slowly release the trigger. To stop the tool, squeeze the trigger into the handle and release.
USING THE TOOL
Do not operate tools rated “AC only” on a DC supply. Loss of speed control may
result, causing tool damage and possible hazard to the operator.
If the speed control ceases to operate, or is intermittent, stop using the tool
immediately. Take it to a PORTER-CABLE factory or authorized service facility for repair.
Avoid “Climb-Cutting” (cutting in direction opposite that shown in Fig. 11). “ClimbCutting” increases the chance for loss of control resulting in possible injury. When “Climb-Cutting”
is required (backing around a corner), exercise extreme caution to maintain control of router. Make
smaller cuts and remove minimal material with each pass.
DIRECTION OF FEED (FIG. 11)
The direction of feed is very important when routing and can make the difference between a
successful job and a ruined project. Figure 11 shows the proper direction of feed for some typical
cuts. A general rule to follow is to move the router in a counterclockwise direction on an outside cut
and a clockwise direction on an inside cut.
Shape the outside edge of a piece of stock by following these steps:
1. Shape the end grain, left to right
2. Shape the straight grain side moving left to right
3. Cut the other end grain side
4. Finish the remaining straight grain edge
6931 PLUNGE BASE
Turn the router on before plunging the cutter head into the workpiece.
MAINTENANCE
To reduce the risk of injury, turn unit off and disconnect it from power source
before installing and removing accessories, before adjusting or when making repairs. An
accidental start-up can cause injury.
CLEANING
Blow dirt and dust out of all air vents with clean, dry air at least once a week. To minimize the risk of eye injury, always wear ANSI Z87.1 approved eye protection when performing this.
Never use solvents or other harsh chemicals for cleaning the non-metallic parts of the
tool. These chemicals may weaken the plastic materials used in these parts. Use a cloth dampened
only with water and mild soap. Never let any liquid get inside the tool; never immerse any part of
the tool into a liquid.
NOTE FOR 6391 PLUNGE BASE ONLY: Use only a DRY cloth to wipe the plunge rods. These
rods require no lubrication. Lubricants attract dust, reducing the performance of your tool.
FAILURE TO START
Should your tool fail to start, check to make sure the prongs on the cord plug are making good
contact in the outlet. Also, check for blown fuses or open circuit breakers in the line.
LUBRICATION
This tool has been lubricated with a sufficient amount of high grade lubricant for the life of the unit
under normal operating conditions. No further lubrication is necessary.
BRUSH INSPECTION (IF APPLICABLE)
For your continued safety and electrical protection, brush inspection and replacement on this tool
should ONLY be performed by a PORTER-CABLE FACTORY SERVICE CENTER OR PORTERCABLE AUTHORIZED WARRANTY SERVICE CENTER.
At approximately 100 hours of use, take or send your tool to your nearest PORTER-CABLE Factory
Service center or PORTER-CABLE Authorized Warranty Service Center to be thoroughly cleaned
and inspected. Have worn parts replaced and lubricated with fresh lubricant. Have new brushes
installed, and test the tool for performance.
Any loss of power before the above maintenance check may indicate the need for immediate
servicing of your tool. DO NOT CONTINUE TO OPERATE TOOL UNDER THIS CONDITION. If
proper operating voltage is present, return your tool to the service station for immediate service.
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