- Dynamic Controls

R-series
DR50 and DR90
Scooter Controllers
Installation Manual
GBK52040 Issue 9, June 2016
About this Manual
This manual can help you understand and install the Dynamic Controls (DYNAMIC) R-SERIES scooter
controller. It describes the general principles, but it gives no guidelines for specific applications. If there
is a specific requirement for your application, please contact Dynamic Controls or one of the sales and
service agents to assist you.
This manual must be read together with all other relevant scooter component manuals.
In this manual, a few symbols will help you identify the purpose of the paragraph that follows:
Notes & Precautions:
Notes provide supporting information in order to install, configure, and use the
product. Not following the instructions given in notes or precautions can lead
to equipment failure.
Warnings:
Warnings provide important information that must be followed in order to
install, configure, and use the product safely and efficiently. Not following the
instructions given in a warning can potentially lead to equipment failure,
damage to surrounding property, injury or death.
The term ‘programming’ used in this manual refers to adjusting parameters and configuring options to
suit an application. ‘Programming’ does not change or alter any software within the controller and is
performed using a controlled programming tool available only to authorised personnel.
The product is not user serviceable. Specialised tools are necessary for the repair of any component.
Do not install, maintain or operate this equipment without reading, understanding and following this
manual – including the Safety and Misuse Warnings – otherwise injury or damage may result. This
manual contains integration, set-up, operating environment, test and maintenance information
needed in order to ensure reliable and safe use of the product.
Due to continuous product improvement, DYNAMIC reserves the right to update this manual.
This manual supersedes all previous issues, which must no longer be used.
DYNAMIC reserves the right to change the product without notification.
Any attempt to gain access to or in any way abuse the electronic components and associated
assemblies that make up the scooter system renders the manufacturer’s warranty void and the
manufacturer free from liability.
DYNAMIC, the DYNAMIC logo, the Rhino logo and the R-series logo are trademarks of Dynamic Controls. All
other brand and product names, fonts, and company names and logos are trademarks or registered
trademarks of their respective companies.
DYNAMIC owns and will retain all trademark rights and DYNAMIC or its licensors own and will retain all
copyright, trade secret and other proprietary rights, in and to the documentation.
All materials contained within this manual, in hardcopy or electronic format, are protected by
copyright laws and other intellectual property laws.
© Copyright 2016 Dynamic Controls. All rights reserved.
About this Manual
Contents
1
Introduction to the R-series ............................................ 7
2
Specifications .................................................................. 8
2.1
2.2
3
Electrical Specifications ........................................................................ 8
Physical Specification ........................................................................... 9
Installation and Testing ................................................. 10
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
Mounting ............................................................................................... 10
Connections and Wiring ..................................................................... 11
3.2.1 Typical R-series Wiring Installation .......................................... 11
3.2.2 General Wiring Recommendations ....................................... 12
3.2.3 Battery Connections ................................................................ 13
Motor Connections ............................................................................. 14
3.3.1 Motor Protection ....................................................................... 14
3.3.2 Motor Testing ............................................................................. 15
Park Brake Connections ..................................................................... 16
3.4.1 Park Brake Testing ..................................................................... 17
Battery Charging and Programming Connections ........................ 18
3.5.1 Battery charger connections ................................................. 18
3.5.2 Programmer Connections....................................................... 20
Tiller Connector .................................................................................... 21
Throttle Configuration ......................................................................... 23
3.7.1 EN12184 and ISO7176 requirements ...................................... 23
3.7.2 Single throttle wiper .................................................................. 24
3.7.2.1
Additional hardware to comply with ISO7176-14 .................... 24
3.7.3 Neutral Detect .......................................................................... 25
3.7.3.1
Installation of a Neutral Detect switch ....................................... 26
3.7.4 Two throttle wipers - mirrored ................................................. 27
3.7.5 Throttle Calibration ................................................................... 29
3.7.6 Speed Limit Pot Connections ................................................. 30
3.7.6.1
3.7.6.2
3.8
In series with the throttle wiper .................................................... 30
In parallel with the throttle ............................................................ 31
3.7.7 Alternative Speed Reduction Options .................................. 32
3.7.8 Tiller Battery Supply ................................................................... 33
3.7.9 Key Switch Input ....................................................................... 34
3.7.10 Status Indicator Output ........................................................... 34
3.7.11 Beeper Output .......................................................................... 35
3.7.12 Battery Gauge Output ............................................................ 35
3.7.13 Brake and Reversing Lights ..................................................... 36
Multi-function Pins ................................................................................ 37
3.8.1 Multi-function Inputs ................................................................. 37
3.8.1.1
3.8.1.2
3.8.1.3
3.8.1.4
Active States ................................................................................... 39
Slows to ............................................................................................. 40
Latches ............................................................................................. 40
Flashes .............................................................................................. 40
Chapter 1: Introduction to the R-series
3.9
4
3.8.2 Multi-function Outputs ............................................................. 41
Testing .................................................................................................... 42
Programming the R-series ............................................ 43
4.1
The Hand Held Programmer (HHP) ................................................... 44
4.1.1 Programming menu ................................................................. 45
4.1.1.1
4.1.1.2
4.1.1.3
4.2
4.3
4.4
Profile 1/2 ......................................................................................... 45
Non-profiled .................................................................................... 46
Throttle calibration ......................................................................... 47
4.1.2 Diagnostics menu ..................................................................... 49
4.1.3 Technician menu ...................................................................... 50
Dynamic Wizard ................................................................................... 51
4.2.1 Software revisions ..................................................................... 51
Parameter List ....................................................................................... 52
Parameter Descriptions ...................................................................... 56
4.4.1 User Personalisation .................................................................. 56
4.4.1.1
4.4.1.2
4.4.1.3
4.4.1.4
4.4.1.5
4.4.1.6
4.4.1.7
4.4.1.8
4.4.1.9
4.4.1.10
4.4.1.11
4.4.1.12
Sleep Timer ....................................................................................... 56
Wakeup Style .................................................................................. 56
Swap Throttle Direction ................................................................. 57
Enable Beeper ................................................................................ 57
Flash Code Beeper ........................................................................ 57
Sleep Beeper ................................................................................... 57
Reverse Beeper ............................................................................... 58
Motion Beeper ................................................................................ 58
Beeper Timing ................................................................................. 58
Deep Discharge Beeper ............................................................... 59
Sleep on Fault or Inhibit ................................................................. 59
Power Off after Sleep .................................................................... 59
4.4.2 Throttle Configuration .............................................................. 60
4.4.2.1
4.4.2.2
4.4.2.3
4.4.2.4
4.4.2.5
4.4.2.6
4.4.2.7
4.4.2.8
4.4.2.9
4.4.2.10
4.4.2.11
4.4.2.12
4.4.2.13
Throttle Type .................................................................................... 60
Throttle Input.................................................................................... 60
Throttle Neutral Offset .................................................................... 61
Throttle Full Scale Deflection ........................................................ 61
Throttle Response ........................................................................... 62
Throttle Dead-band ....................................................................... 62
Throttle Testing ................................................................................ 63
Maximum Throttle Voltage ........................................................... 63
Throttle OONAPU Testing............................................................... 64
Throttle Fault Non Latching .......................................................... 64
Speed Limit Pot ............................................................................... 65
Slam Brake ....................................................................................... 66
Broken Wiper Wire Detection. ...................................................... 67
4.4.3 Drive Performance ................................................................... 67
4.4.3.1
4.4.3.2
4.4.3.3
4.4.3.4
4.4.3.5
4.4.3.6
4.4.3.7
4.4.3.8
4.4.3.9
4.4.3.10
4.4.3.11
Maximum Forward Speed ............................................................ 67
Forward Acceleration ................................................................... 67
Forward Deceleration ................................................................... 69
Maximum Reverse Speed ............................................................. 70
Reverse Acceleration .................................................................... 70
Reverse Deceleration .................................................................... 71
Lowest Forward Speed .................................................................. 72
Lowest Reverse Speed .................................................................. 72
Soft Start Period .............................................................................. 73
Soft Finish .......................................................................................... 73
Emergency Deceleration ............................................................. 74
Chapter 1: Introduction to the R-series
4.4.3.12
4.4.3.13
4.4.3.14
4.4.3.15
Slam Braking .................................................................................... 74
Push Speed ...................................................................................... 75
Roll-away Speed ............................................................................ 75
Speed Reduction Wiper (SRW) parameters .............................. 76
4.4.4 OEM Drive Limits ........................................................................ 77
4.4.4.1
4.4.4.2
4.4.4.3
4.4.4.4
4.4.4.5
4.4.4.6
Maximum Forward Speed Limit ................................................... 77
Maximum Reverse Speed Limit .................................................... 77
Lowest Forward Speed Limit......................................................... 77
Lowest Reverse Speed Limit ......................................................... 77
Acceleration Limit .......................................................................... 77
Deceleration Limit .......................................................................... 77
4.4.5 Motor Management ................................................................ 78
4.4.5.1
4.4.5.2
4.4.5.3
4.4.5.4
4.4.5.5
4.4.5.6
4.4.5.7
4.4.5.8
4.4.5.9
4.4.5.10
4.4.5.11
4.4.5.12
4.4.5.13
4.4.5.14
Motor Protection ............................................................................ 78
Motor Protection Parameters (Rev. C,D and E) ....................... 78
Motor Protection Parameters (Rev. A and B) ........................... 79
Motor Reverse ................................................................................. 79
Load Compensation ..................................................................... 80
Maximum Load Compensation .................................................. 81
Load Compensation Damping ................................................... 82
Remembered Load Compensation ........................................... 82
Current Limit .................................................................................... 83
Boost Current / Boost Time............................................................ 83
Stall Timeout..................................................................................... 84
Motor Testing ................................................................................... 85
Maximum Motor Voltage ............................................................. 85
Dead-time Adjust ........................................................................... 85
4.4.6 Park brake Management........................................................ 87
4.4.6.1
4.4.6.2
4.4.6.3
Park brake Testing .......................................................................... 87
Park brake Neutral Delay .............................................................. 87
Park Brake Release Delay ............................................................. 88
4.4.7 Battery Management .............................................................. 88
4.4.7.1
4.4.7.2
4.4.7.3
4.4.7.4
4.4.7.5
4.4.7.6
4.4.7.7
Overvoltage Rollback ................................................................... 88
Undervoltage Rollback ................................................................. 88
Battery Gauge Minimum/Maximum ........................................... 90
Battery Gauge Warning ................................................................ 90
Battery Cut-Off Voltage ................................................................ 90
Battery Gauge Dead-band ......................................................... 91
Battery Gauge Sensitivity .............................................................. 91
4.4.8 System Options ......................................................................... 92
4.4.8.1
Service Scheduler ........................................................................... 92
4.4.9 Multi-function Inputs Configuration ....................................... 93
4.4.9.1
4.4.9.2
Pin [X] Function ............................................................................... 93
Active States ................................................................................... 96
4.4.10 Multi-function Outputs Configuration.................................... 97
4.4.10.1
4.4.10.2
4.4.10.3
4.4.10.4
5
Flash Code Type ............................................................................. 97
Pin 3/11 Function ............................................................................ 98
Pin 10 Function ................................................................................ 99
Key Switch Status LED .................................................................... 99
Diagnostics .................................................................. 100
5.1
5.2
Introduction ........................................................................................ 100
Flash Code Display ............................................................................ 100
5.2.1 Scooter Flash Codes .............................................................. 101
5.2.2 SHARK Flash Codes................................................................. 102
Chapter 1: Introduction to the R-series
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
6
5.2.3 Type 3 Flash Codes................................................................. 103
5.2.4 Type 4 Flash Codes................................................................. 103
Diagnostics Tools ................................................................................ 104
HHP Fault Codes with Sub Codes ................................................... 105
Advanced Diagnostics Logs ............................................................ 107
Service Scheduler .............................................................................. 108
Appendices ................................................................. 109
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7
6.8
6.9
Neutral Detect Active States ........................................................... 109
Parts List ............................................................................................... 110
Intended Use and Regulatory Statement...................................... 111
Service life ........................................................................................... 111
Maintenance ..................................................................................... 112
Warranty.............................................................................................. 112
Safety and Misuse Warnings ............................................................ 113
Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) ........................................... 115
Environmental statement ................................................................. 116
Chapter 1: Introduction to the R-series
1 Introduction to the R-series
The R-series family of scooter controllers provides a reliable, refined, cost-effective control
solution for most mobility scooters and includes:
DR50-A01
DR50-B01
DR90-A01
-
R-series 50 A Controller
R-series 50 A Controller compatible with separate metal top cover
R-series 90 A Controller
DR50
DR90

50 and 90 A models provide the power you want when you need it

Programmable acceleration curves, zero rollback on slopes, improved motor matching
algorithms ensuring improved curb-climbing and hill-starting capabilities

Speed reduction wiper (SRW) technology provides seamless speed reduction in curves for
extra stability.

Intelligent motor and battery management providing automatic power flow optimisation,
auto battery configuration, 5V and 12V battery capacity outputs and in-depth battery
logging and analysis tools.

Drop-in replacement with industry standard connections and mounting, support for a
range of battery types, multifunction pins and flexible drive inhibits

Advanced diagnostics and servicing tools, including event and drive time logging, and
programmable servicing scheduler.

2 drive profiles, brake and reverse lights, reversing beeper and electronic park brake
release.

A separately available metal top cover for the DR50-B01 and DR90-A01 variants provides
maximum protection against water splashes and overheating.

Throttle Dual Decode provides extra safety in case of a throttle failure, and allows OEMs
to comply with the requirements of ISO7176-14: 2008.

Deep Discharge Beeper provides an audible alarm for when the battery is drained below
the battery’s cut-off level to comply with the requirements of ISO7176-14: 2008.

RSeries controllers comply with global standards, and are intended for use with Class B
scooters, as defined in EN12184:2014 E.
Note:
Unless otherwise specified, all references in this manual apply to all variants of
the R-series controller.
Chapter 1: Introduction to the R-series
7
2 Specifications
2.1 Electrical Specifications
Parameter
Description
Compatible Battery
Supply
24V supply, 2 x 12V in series, circuit breaker protected.
For the DR50, recommended minimum capacity 15 Ah.
For the DR90, recommended minimum capacity 20 Ah.
Compatible Motor
24V DC permanent magnet type, typically rated 100-300 watts.
Min
Nominal
Max
Units
Operating Voltage ( Vbatt )
18
24
32
V
Reverse Supply Voltage
-32
Quiescent Current (idle)
Charging Current
V
0.3
mA
8
A (RMS)
Throttle Resistance (Pin 2 to Pin 8)
4
5
6
kΩ
Speed Limit Pot – Pin 9 (linear)
90
100
110
kΩ
Speed Reduction Wiper – Pin 4 (log)
9
10
11
kΩ
Current Rating – DR50

Continuous (@ 20°C ambient)
14
A

Peak (<60 seconds @ 20°C initial)
40
A

Boost Current
10
A

Boosted Current
50
A

Boost Time
0
8
s
Current Rating – DR90

Continuous (@ 20°C ambient)
20
A

Peak (<60 seconds @ 20°C initial)
70
A

Boost Current
20
A

Boosted Current
90
A

Boost Time
0
8
s
Park Brake Output

Voltage

Current
24
1.25
V
A
Chapter 2: Specifications
8
2.2 Physical Specification
Parameter
Material
Die cast Aluminium base with Plastic Cover
- Aluminium Base
Aluminium alloy ADC12
- Plastic Cover
Kingfa JH960 6300 - UL94 V-0 rating
Protection Rating
Electronics rated to IPx5
Shipping Weight
260 grams
Min
Operating Temperature Range
Storage Temperature Range
Operating Humidity Range
-25
-13
-40
-40
0
Nominal
Max
Units
50
122
65
150
90
°C
°F
°C
°F
%RH
For mounting hole dimensions, refer to Section 3.1
Chapter 2: Specifications
9
3 Installation and Testing
3.1 Mounting
R-series Mounting Configuration










The position and orientation should give maximum mechanical protection to the
controller.
Mount out of the path of water splashes from wheels or cowling and protect the
connector panel from direct splashing.
The controller can be mounted horizontally or vertically, if vertically position the
connectors on the bottom.
As drain holes are incorporated within the connector panel, mounting on an inclined
plane with the connectors at the bottom would facilitate drainage.
The controller must be mounted so that water will drain away from the controller.
Failure to adhere to the mounting conditions specified may lead to water ingress,
which could result in system malfunctions and long-term damage to the unit.
For peak performance, locate the controller so that air can flow over and around the
case, particularly if mounting in the tiller.
If the controller is mounted in a tray or cavity, ensure that there are adequate
drainage holes to prevent the accumulation of liquids around the controller.
A position close to the batteries and motor is recommended to reduce the length of
high-current wires.
Use both screw positions to attach the controller. Socket cap screws are
recommended. Select a screw length that protrudes between 4 and 6mm through
the case. Do not over tighten the mounting screws.
Regardless of mounting orientation, protect scooter wiring, connectors and
components (including those of the tiller head) from the risk of damage, water
splashes and/or water ingress, and route the cabling so that water will not run
down into the connector system. The use of cable boots is highly
recommended.
Do not mount the R-series in a position where the user can come into contact
with the unit. The case temperature can exceed 41°C.
If the controller is mounted in a tray, ensure that there are adequate drainage
holes in the tray to prevent the accumulation of liquids around the controller.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
10
3.2 Connections and Wiring
3.2.1 Typical R-series Wiring Installation
Note:
To meet the requirements of relevant standards, a status indicator must be fitted to
the scooter.
Warning:
It is the responsibility of the installer to make sure that the finished wiring package
is safe and fit for purpose.
Before making any connections to the controller, disable the scooter by one of
the following means to prevent accidental movement.
 Place the battery circuit breaker in the open position.
 Disconnect the motor or batteries and/or elevate the drive wheels.
To meet ISO requirements, the Battery and Motor connectors must be fixed in such
a way they cannot be swapped or transposed. Alternatively, these may be
protected by a cover that cannot be removed without the use of tools.
Incorrect battery connection may lead to immediate controller damage and risk
of fire. (This can occur, for example, if a battery lead is connected to a motor
terminal.)
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
11
3.2.2 General Wiring Recommendations
To maximise performance, minimise EMC emissions, maximise EMC and ESD immunity, and to
keep the cabling of the scooter safe and tidy, please observe the following guidelines.

Keep all cables as short as possible.

Avoid wire loops, especially loops of single wires instead of wire pairs.
Try to run wires in pairs or bunches. Bind wires together and fix them to the chassis.

Do not route the cables (including the motor cable) near the motor case, where possible.

Do not leave electrical connections unnecessarily exposed. Insulate exposed
connections (for example with sleeving) to reduce the risk of short circuits, exposure to
water and connection stress.

Make sure that all vehicle sub-frames, particularly the transaxle, controller case and tiller
head assemblies, are electrically connected.

Make sure that the controller and speed setting potentiometers are electrically
connected to the vehicle frame.

Do not use the vehicle frame as the earth return. Any electrical low-resistance connection
to the frame is a safety risk and is not allowed by international safety standards.

To minimise electromagnetic emissions by the motor brushes, it may be necessary to fit
capacitors between the brush holders and the motor case. Make sure that the leads are
kept as short as possible. A suitable capacitor is 4n7, 2kV Ceramic.

For best electrical performance, the wire size must be as large as possible.
Recommended minimum wire sizes are shown in the wiring sections.

For low-current signals, do not use wire sizes smaller than 0.5 mm2/AWG20, because
smaller wires are physically not strong enough for this application.

The type of cable used must be appropriate for the mechanical and environmental
abuse it is likely to encounter.

Do not use damaged or abused cables. A damaged cable can potentially produce
localised heat, sparks or arcing and as such it can cause a fire.

Protect all cables against possible contact with flammable material.

Where possible, the installation must prevent and/or discourage the user to access any
cable.
Warning:
1. Route the cables and fasten all scooter components in a position so that the
cables, the connectors and the connector sockets of the R-series do not allow
water entry or suffer from physical strain, abuse or damage, such as cutting or
crushing. Take particular care on scooters with movable structures such as seat
raise. Make sure that the cables do not extend from the scooter so that they
cannot be caught or damaged by external objects.
2. Disconnect all the cables of the scooter at the powered end whenever units
are replaced or moved.
3. The user maintenance schedule and the service instructions of the scooter
must include the appropriate inspection and maintenance requirements for
the connectors and the cables.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
12
3.2.3 Battery Connections
Battery Connections
Pin
Function
Minimum Wire Gauge
(see notes below)
+
Battery Positive
R50 : 2.5mm² | 13 AWG
-
Battery Negative
R90 : 4.0mm² | 11 AWG
Mating Connector
Industry standard ¼” (6.35mm) Quick Connect (“QC”) female
receptacles, available from many manufacturers. Use only high
quality parts from a reputable manufacturer.
The wire gauge recommendations above are the MINIMUM gauge and are generally
suitable for runs up to 800 mm. Longer runs will require heavier wire – typically an extra 1.0
mm2 for each additional 400 mm run length. The heavier the wire, the better driving
performance will be. These notes are in addition to the General Wiring Recommendations as
described in Section 3.2.2.
Note:
The final connection to the Battery Positive (+) terminal should not be made until the
scooter is completely wired and ready for testing as described in the Testing section.
The R-series has been designed to perform optimally with multiple battery types (see
below). By default Lead-Acid and Gel Cell 24 V deep cycle batteries rated between
20 - 120 Ah are to be used.
To comply with ISO requirements, a red wire for the Battery Positive must be used.
This must be the only use of a red wire in the controller installation.
Warning:
A thermal circuit breaker or fuse must be installed between the battery supply and
the controller, to protect both the batteries and the system wiring. This shall be
mounted as close as possible to the batteries. The thermal circuit breaker should
have a trip rating no higher than the current limit of the controller. Check thoroughly
to ensure that it provides the necessary degree of motor protection.
Model
Fuse or circuit breaker rating.
R50
30 – 40 A
R90
40 – 50 A
If the two batteries are permanently wired
together (for example in a single battery
box), the best position for the circuit breaker is
between the two batteries. If the batteries
are separated (individual battery boxes),
each battery requires a circuit breaker. A
slow-acting, thermal type circuit breaker is
suggested.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
13
3.3 Motor Connections
Motor Connections
Pin
Function
Minimum Wire Gauge
(see notes below)
+
Motor Positive
R50 : 2.5mm² | 13 AWG
-
Motor Negative
R90 : 4.0mm² | 11 AWG
Mating Connector Part Numbers
Industry standard ¼” (6.35mm) Quick Connect (QC) female
receptacles, available from many manufacturers. Use only high
quality parts from a reputable manufacturer.
The wire gauge recommendations above are the MINIMUM gauge and are generally
suitable for runs up to 400 mm. Longer runs will require heavier wire – typically an extra 1.0
mm2 for each additional 200 mm run length. The heavier the wire, the better the driving
performance will be. In particular the length and gauge of wire affects the wire resistance
and hence the optimum Load Compensation setting.
Make sure that the Load Compensation parameter (4.4.5.5) is tuned to match the scooter
wiring for best driving performance.
These notes are in addition to the General Wiring Recommendations as described in Section
3.2.2.
The motor polarity can be swapped with the Motor Reverse parameter (4.4.5.4).
Warning:
To meet ISO7176-14 requirements, do not use a red-coloured cable for the motor
wiring. If a red-coloured cable is used, then the installer should consider sliding a
different coloured sleeve (such as heat-shrink tubing) over the cable before fitting
the Quick Connect receptacle. This will prevent confusion with the battery wiring.
3.3.1 Motor Protection
To prevent the motor from overheating the motor protection function can reduce the
performance of the scooter when the motor consumes too much power for a prolonged
period.
Enable motor protection with the Motor Protection parameter (4.4.5.1).
Note:
Enabling Motor Protection is only useful if its parameters are adapted to
match the fitted motor. See the motor specifications given by the motor
manufacturer for the correct values.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
14
3.3.2 Motor Testing
The R-series has 4 different modes for testing the motor circuitry: All, Open, Short and None.
These are configured in the Wizard with the Motor Testing parameter (4.4.5.12)
Warning:
It is highly recommended that motor testing is not turned off.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
15
3.4 Park Brake Connections
Park Brake Connections
Pin
Function
Wire Gauge
1
Park Brake Positive
R50 : 0.5mm² (20 AWG)
2
Park Brake Negative
R90 : 0.5mm² (20 AWG)
Mating Connector Part Numbers
Dynamic
Part #
Part Description
Supplier Part #
GCN0884
Molex ‘Mini-Fit Jr’ 2-socket
housing
39-01-3028
GCN0771
Molex ‘Mini-Fit Jr’
Receptacles 18-24 AWG
39-00-0039
The R-series supports a 24V park brake that is connected to the park brake connector.
A manual park brake release lever can be fitted so the scooter can be pushed when the
controller is turned off. To meet ISO requirements, if a manual park brake release lever is
fitted, a micro switch should be connected in such a way that it inhibits driving when the
park brake is released.
For example, wire a micro switch to any multi-function input that is configured to inhibit
driving and mechanically couple this switch to the park brake release lever.
Figure 1 – Recommended Park Brake Wiring
using a mechanical release lever
Figure 2 – Alternative Park Brake Wiring using
a mechanical release lever
Alternatively, a normally closed micro-switch can be placed in series with the park brake. This
will cause a Flash Code 5 to be displayed and the scooter will be unable to drive. To clear
the fault, engage the park brake and turn the power off and then on again.
If the park brake is released when the scooter is off, the R-series reduces the speed of the
scooter* if the speed of the scooter is higher than the value that is set with the Roll-away
Speed parameter (4.4.3.14). This is to make sure that the scooter is limited to a safe speed on
a slope while the park brakes are released.
*If no batteries are connected, the speed of the scooter will be limited to a crawl because
the R-series needs the generated motor voltage to stay on.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
16
The park brake may also be released electrically
by activating a switch in the tiller.
Park brake release functionality is available on
any of the Multi-function Inputs (3.8.1). Set the
corresponding Pin [X] Function parameter
(4.4.9.1) to 'Release Brake'.
The switch can be configured to be active in
any of six states. Refer to Section 3.8.1.1 for
further details about Active States.
Figure 3 - Electronic Park Brake release wiring
If the park brake is released electrically, the R-series limits the speed of the scooter to the
value that is set with the Push Speed parameter (4.4.3.13). This is to make sure that the
scooter is limited to a safe speed on a slope while the park brakes are electrically released.
Warnings:
To meet ISO requirements, the scooter must not be able to drive when the park brake
is released.
The scooter must not be driven with the park brake release operated.
Do not operate the park brake release while on a slope.
3.4.1 Park Brake Testing
The R-series has 3 different modes for testing the park brake circuitry. These are selected with
the Park brake Testing parameter (4.4.6.1).
None
-
disables all open-circuit park brake testing.
Pre-Drive
-
continuously tests that the park brake is present while not driving.
Driving
-
continuously tests the park brake is present including periodic tests while
driving. This test may result in some audible noise during driving.
Regardless of the option selected, the R-series checks the park brake for short circuit faults
immediately before and periodically during driving.
Warning:
Do not turn off Park Brake Testing unless there are no park brakes installed.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
17
3.5 Battery Charging and Programming Connections
Charger/Programmer Connections
Pin
Function
Wire Gauge
1
Battery Negative
1.0mm² (18 – 16 AWG)
2
Battery Positive
1.0mm² (18 – 16 AWG)
3
[no connection]
4
Multi-function
Input/Program
0.5mm² (20 – 18 AWG)
Mating Connector Part Numbers
Dynamic
Part #
Part Description
Supplier Part #
GCN0886
Molex ‘Mini-Fit Jr’ 4-socket
housing
39-01-3048
GCN0085
Molex ‘Mini-Fit Jr’ Receptacles
18 -16 AWG (0.8 – 1.3 mm²
wire)
39-00-0078
GCN0771
Molex ‘Mini-Fit Jr’ Receptacles
24 -18 AWG (0.2 – 0.8 mm²
wire)
39-00-0039
3.5.1 Battery charger connections
There are two options for connecting a battery charger, either on-board (OBC) or off-board.
For schematics, see the next page. If an on-board charger is installed, it is recommended to
plug it directly into the Charge/Program connector. For either charging solution, a battery
charger with a maximum rating of 8A RMS should be used. A suitable fuse must be installed in
the Battery Positive wire to protect the scooter wiring.
For off-board chargers, an XLR-type socket can be connected either through the
Charge/Program connector or through the tiller by using the Battery + and Battery connections on the tiller connector.
Warning:
To prevent driving while charging, an appropriate inhibit pin (in either the
Charge/Program or Tiller connector) must be connected so that a connection
between Battery Negative (B -) and Inhibit is made when charging. For off-board
chargers, this connection must be made as soon as the charger is connected to the
scooter, independent of the charging state.
Warning:
The battery charger socket is to be used exclusively for the intended purpose.
Warranty will be voided if any unauthorized device is connected to this port.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
18
Warning:
To protect the scooter wiring from over currents while charging, battery chargers
must have the ability to reduce their current output when electrically shorted.
Charger inhibit functionality is available on pin 14 and pin 4 (P/I) of the Multi-function Inputs
(3.8.1). Set the corresponding Pin [X] Function parameter (4.4.9.1) to 'Charger Inhibit' and set
its Active state to 'Low'.
Alternatively, any of the Multi-function Input pins that support the Slow function may be used.
In this case, set Slows to to 0 and set Latches to 'Yes'.
If Latches is set to 'Yes', a power cycle is required to be able to drive again.
If Latches is set to 'No', removing the battery charger will allow driving immediately.
Figure 4 – Example of On-board charger
wiring (shown using
Charger/Programmer connector)
Figure 5 – Example of Charger Socket wiring for
an Off-board charger (shown using the tiller
connector)
Note:
The inhibit pin is a Multi-function input and can be used for an alternative
function if a charger is not plugged into this pin.
Warning:
1)
A suitable fuse must be installed in the Battery Positive wire to protect the
scooter wiring. Fuse to be connected as close as practical to the controller
connector, to minimise the length of unprotected wiring.
2)
The Battery Positive (B+) wires (pin 2 of the 4-pin connector, and pin 7 of the
14-way connector) should be coloured ‘red’ to conform to ISO7176-14.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
19
3.5.2 Programmer Connections
Pin 14 of the Tiller Connector and pin 4 of the charging/programming connector can both
be used for programming the R-Series. Charging and programming cannot occur using the
same inhibit pin at the same time.
The R-series programming adapter will plug directly into an off-board charger socket or into
the 4-pin Molex Mini-Fit Junior connector with the use of the AMP programming adapter. If an
on-board charger is installed, it will be necessary to disconnect it prior to programming
through this connector.
The R-series can be programmed with two different programming tools:
 The DX-HHP hand held programmer (see 4.1)
 The PC-based Wizard programmer (see 4.2)
DR-PRGLM02 Connector Adaptor
Programming socket
XLR Charger socket
Charger/Programmer socket
Adaptors needed
DWIZ-ADAPT
DWIZ-ADAPT + DR-PRGLM02
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
20
3.6 Tiller Connector
The tiller connector provides all the connections necessary to power and control all the
functions contained in the tiller head. This connector also supports the new Multi-function pins
that can be configured for alternative functionality depending on application requirements.
Where the multi-function pins are listed below the bold text indicates the recommended
default functions.
Tiller Connections
Pin
Function
Wire Gauge
1
Throttle Wiper / 1st Dual Decode
2
Throttle Positive
3
Multi-function Output (Beeper)
4
Multi-function Input (Profile 2)
5
Key Switch
6
Multi-function Input (Slow)
7
Battery Positive
8
Throttle Negative
9
Speed Limit Pot / 2nd Dual Decode
10
Multi-function Output (Status Low)
11
Multi-function Output (none)
12
Multi-function Input (Reverse Drive)
13
Battery Negative
1.0mm²
(18 – 16
AWG)
14
Multi-function Input (Charger Inhibit)
0.5mm²
(20 – 18
AWG)
0.5mm²
(20 – 18
AWG)
1.0mm²
(18 – 16
AWG)
0.5mm²
(20 – 18
AWG)
Mating Connector Part Numbers
Dynamic
Part #
Part Description
Supplier Part
#
GCN0887
Molex ‘Mini-Fit Jr’ 14-socket housing
39-01-2145
GCN0085
Molex ‘Mini-Fit Jr’ Receptacles
18-16 AWG (0.8 – 1.3 mm² wire)
39-00-0078
GCN0771
Molex ‘Mini-Fit Jr’ Receptacles
24-18 AWG (0.2 – 0.8mm² wire)
39-00-0039
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
21
Warning:
If a fuse greater than 5A is used to protect the battery wiring for either the 4 pin or 14
pin connectors then the battery wiring should be the maximum size allowed by the
receptacles of 1.3mm2 (16 AWG). This will permit the receptacle to carry its full
current.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
22
3.7 Throttle Configuration
Select the correct throttle type with the Throttle Type parameter (4.4.2.1):
Throttle Type
Description
Wig-Wag
Neutral
Forward
Reverse
To swap the forward and reverse directions, (for left-handed use),
set the Swap Throttle Direction parameter (4.4.1.3) to 'Yes'.
Uni-polar
Neutral
Forward*
Forward*
The scooter moves in the same direction for both sides of the throttle.
Single-ended
Neutral
Forward*
Neutral is not halfway but at the start of the pot.
The full speed position in a single direction is at the end of the pot.
*The direction is dependent on the position of a Forward/Reverse switch. Connect this switch
to one of the Multi-function Inputs (3.8.1), and set the corresponding Pin [X] Function
parameter (see 4.4.9) to 'Reverse Drive'.
To have more throttle control at low speeds, increase the Throttle Response parameter
(4.4.2.5).
3.7.1 EN12184 and ISO7176 requirements
The R-series offers OEMs a number of options for complying with international safety
standards with respect to the integrity of the scooter's throttle signal.
When single fault conditions occur on a scooter, the standards require appropriate means
should be adopted to eliminate or reduce, as far as possible, consequent risks.
For the throttle signal, this means an error due to an open-circuit, short-circuit or leakage
current does not result in a hazardous situation. Specifically, if it is reasonably foreseeable
that a short circuit, open circuit or leakage current could occur between conductors that
carry analogue speed or direction signals, reference voltages, supply voltages, or actuator
commands, then the identified possibilities must be tested and comply with the requirements.
The R-series now supports 3 throttle configurations:

Single throttle wiper  3.7.2.
This option is compatible with previous R-series products. However, if the installation
foreseeably allows a leakage current between either a 24V supply or reference line and
the speed potentiometer wiper line, the system will fail the ISO7176 leakage current
requirement.
Furthermore, if a speed limit potentiometer is placed in the speed potentiometer wiper
line and the installation foreseeably allows a leakage current between any other tiller
connection and the speed potentiometer wiper, the system may fail the ISO7176 leakage
current requirement.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
23
Note:
Leakage currents could arise from rain water ingress, splashes of water off the
road surface and condensation from humid situations.

Single throttle wiper with separate Neutral Detect switch input  3.7.3.
This option allows compliance for any foreseeable leakage current. The Neutral Detect
switch indicates whether or not the throttle is in the physical neutral position. If the throttle
signal does not match the Neutral Detect signal, the controller generates a fault and
does not drive. The controller will also stop if this happens while driving.

A throttle with 2 linear wiper signals that are each other's opposite  3.7.4
This option also allows compliance for any foreseeable leakage current. If the sum of both
signals is not constant, the controller generates a fault and does not drive. The controller
will also stop if this happens while driving.
3.7.2 Single throttle wiper
Connect the throttle potentiometer ends to T+ (Throttle Positive, pin 2) and T- (Throttle
Negative, pin 8). Connect the throttle wiper to TW (Throttle Wiper, pin 1).
5V
T+
TW
5 kΩ
0V
T-
To use this option, set the Throttle Input parameter (4.4.2.2) to 'Single'.
Warning:
If the throttle potentiometer is powered externally (not by T+ and T-), take
extreme care to avoid ground shift. The R-series can interpret a ground shift
voltage as a drive signal and the scooter might start driving. If the throttle must
be powered externally, either use additional hardware as described below or
use the Neutral Detect feature (see 3.7.3) to detect a ground shift and prevent
a potential runaway.
3.7.2.1
Additional hardware to comply with ISO7176-14
To make a single throttle wiper configuration compliant with the new standard, extra
hardware is required. The extra hardware must check if the throttle signal is valid.
One way to achieve this is to use a Neutral Detect (ND) switch that indicates if the throttle is
in the physical neutral position.
B+
T+ (Pin 2)
5 kΩ
Throttle
Throttle Wiper
TW (Pin 1)
AdditionalChapter 3: Installation
Hardware
Neutral Detect
T- (Pin 8)
and Testing
24
Normally, the hardware transfers the Throttle Wiper voltage to the TW output directly.
However, if the ND switch indicates "Neutral", but the wiper signal is not at the neutral value,
the hardware must set the TW output to a "fault" value (higher than Maximum Throttle
Voltage or lower than Minimum Throttle Voltage, see 4.4.2.8). A "fault" value causes the
controller to generate a fault and prevent driving. This makes sure that the scooter will never
drive if the throttle wiring is faulty. See also Throttle Testing (4.4.2.7).
The Dual Decode variants of the R-series offer a Neutral Detect input, to which a Neutral
Detect switch can be connected directly without the use of additional hardware.
See the next section for details.
3.7.3 Neutral Detect
The Neutral Detect function can be used in addition to a classic single wiper throttle to
check whether or not the throttle is in the physical neutral position. If the throttle signal does
not match the Neutral Detect signal, the controller generates a fault and does not drive.
This makes sure that the scooter will never drive if the throttle wiring is faulty.
T+ (Pin 2)
5 kΩ
Throttle
Throttle Wiper
TW (Pin 1)
ND (Pin X)
Neutral Detect
Switch
B+/- *
T- (Pin 8)
To use this option, set the Throttle Input parameter (4.4.2.2) to 'Single' and select the correct
throttle type with the Throttle Type parameter (4.4.2.1). Connect the Neutral Detect switch to
one of the Multi-function Inputs (3.8.1), and set the corresponding Pin [X] Function parameter
(0) to 'Neutral Detect'.
*The Neutral Detect switch can be connected to B+ or B-, dependent on which option is
selected in the Active field of the Pin [X] Function parameter. For more information, see
Active States (4.4.9.2) and Neutral Detect Active States (6.1).
This option can be used with a speed limit pot in series as well as with a speed limit pot in
parallel. See Speed Limit Pot Connections (3.7.6) for details.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
25
Note:
The Neutral Detect function assumes that the throttle is in Neutral when the
Neutral Detect input is in its active state.
For optimal mechanical accuracy, the neutral window of the Neutral Detect
switch (the range of physical throttle deflection at which the switch indicates
'Neutral') should be as narrow as possible.
Make sure that the Throttle Dead-band parameter (4.4.2.6) is set larger than
the mechanical neutral window of the Neutral Detect switch, otherwise
throttle faults will occur.
If the throttle potentiometer is powered externally (not by T+ and T-),
take care to avoid ground shift. Ground shift will result in a throttle fault.
Make sure that any mechanical design has the same lifespan as the throttle
potentiometer.
3.7.3.1
Installation of a Neutral Detect switch
To detect the physical neutral position of the throttle potentiometer, many options are
possible. Two options are shown here.
Disk with microswitch
Mount a disk to the potentiometer shaft. The disk must have a notch, in which the roller of a
microswitch will fall when the throttle is in the neutral position. Fasten the disk in the correct
neutral position with a screw.
Disk
Micro
Switch
Notch
Pot
Shaft
Screw
Make sure that the notch is not too deep and that is does not have sharp edges, otherwise
the user may have difficulty to move the throttle out of the neutral position and the disk may
slide out of position during use.
To maximise accuracy, increase the diameter of the disk.
Wear and tear will decrease accuracy. Make sure that the mechanical design conforms to
the required lifespan of the throttle potentiometer.
Disk with optical switch
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
26
Many other options are possible, for example a disk with a slit that allows the light of a slotted
optical switch to pass through in the neutral position.
Disk
Slit
Optical
Switch
Pot
Shaft
Screw
Turn 90˚
and slide
over disk
This option provides the advantage that there are no mechanical forces on the disk.
The 'feel' of the throttle to the user is the same, and the chance that the disk will slide out of
position during use is decreased. Also, the optical switch will probably last longer than the
roller of a microswitch.
To maximise accuracy, decrease the width of the slit.
3.7.4 Two throttle wipers - mirrored
The R-series supports the use of a 2x 10 kΩ dual gang throttle with 2 linear wiper signals that
are each other's opposite. The throttle can either be a short travel or long travel variant.
Normal range of travel
T+ (Pin 2)
1
2
0
10 kΩ
10 kΩ
3
0
1
0
3
0
2
0
Standard
TW (Pin 1)
Mirrored
SLP (Pin 9)
Short Travel
Neutral
Long Travel
T- (Pin 8)
SRW (Pin 4)
Long Travel
Mirror
10 kΩ log
speed limit
pot
B-
Short Travel
Mirror
Maximum over-travel
To use this option, set the Throttle Input parameter (4.4.2.2) to 'Dual' and select the correct
throttle type with the Throttle Type parameter (4.4.2.1).
For a speed limit pot in series with the throttle wiper signals, insert a dual-gang speed limit pot
in series, and connect both pots to the 2 throttle wiper signals.
For a speed limit pot in parallel with the throttle, it is not possible to use the dedicated Speed
Limit Pot input (pin 9), because it is already used for the 2nd wiper input. To implement a
variable speed reduction control, connect the wiper to pin 4 instead of pin 9, and set Pin 4
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
27
Function (4.4.9.1) to 'SRW'. See Alternative Speed Reduction Options (3.7.7) for more details.
Note:
If the throttle potentiometer is powered externally (not by T+ and T-),
take care to avoid ground shift. Ground shift will result in a throttle fault.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
28
3.7.5 Throttle Calibration
For correct throttle operation, the electrical range of the throttle must be calibrated by
correctly setting Swap Throttle Direction (4.4.1.3), Throttle Neutral Offset (4.4.2.3), Minimum
Throttle Voltage & Maximum Throttle Voltage (4.4.2.8), Throttle Dead-band (4.4.2.6) and
Throttle Full Scale Deflection (4.4.2.4).
The HHP hand held programmer can calibrate the throttle automatically. It is recommended
to use the automatic process, especially for the Dual Decode circuits.
See Throttle calibration (4.1.1.3) in the programming section for details.
Note:
To calibrate the throttle with the Wizard PC-based programmer,
use the HHP emulator mode:
Tools -> Plug-ins -> HHP Emulation
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
29
3.7.6 Speed Limit Pot Connections
A speed limit pot may be connected either in series with the throttle wiper, or in parallel by
using the dedicated input Pin 9 (Speed Limit Pot wiper), Pin 2 (Throttle Positive) and Pin 8
(Throttle Negative).
3.7.6.1
In series with the throttle wiper
Warning:
If a series speed limit pot is used, the system will be unlikely to satisfy all of the
requirements of ISO7176-14: “Controller command signal processing failure”.
If wiring in series, use a 25kΩ potentiometer and set
Speed Limit Pot (4.4.2.11) to 'No', because the
dedicated speed pot input (pin 9) is not used.
To increase the chance of detecting short-circuit
faults in the throttle wiring, use an ISO test resistor
between the throttle wiper and the speed pot. The
ISO Test resistor must be placed as close to the speed
pot as possible, preferably directly soldered with as
short a lead as possible and mechanically protected.
Speed Pot in Series
T+ (Pin 2)
25 kΩ
TW
(Pin 1)
5 kΩ
Throttle
Speed
Limit Pot
T- (Pin 8)
Speed Pot in Series with ISO Resistor
T+ (Pin 2)
As an alternative to wiring a single ISO Test Resistor in
the Throttle Wiper, two ISO Test Resistors may be
added to the Throttle Positive and Throttle Negative
terminal of the throttle potentiometer. This will,
unfortunately, increase the susceptibility of the
throttle circuit to leakage. The 2 ISO resistors must be
placed as close to the throttle pot as possible,
preferably directly soldered with as short a lead as
possible and mechanically protected.
25 kΩ
TW
(Pin 1)
Speed
Limit Pot
4k7 - 10kΩ
ISO Test
Resistor
5 kΩ
Throttle
T- (Pin 8)
Speed Pot in Series with 2 ISO Resistors
330 Ω
T+ (Pin 2)
ISO Test
Resistor
TW (Pin 1)
T- (Pin 8)
Speed
Limit Pot
5 kΩ
Throttle
330 Ω
ISO Test
Resistor
Note:
If ISO test resistors are used then it may be necessary to adjust:
1)
the Throttle Calibration settings (3.7.5)
2)
the Throttle Configuration parameters (4.4.2).
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
30
3.7.6.2
In parallel with the throttle
For a speed pot in parallel, use a 100kΩ
potentiometer and set Speed Limit Pot to 'Yes'.
If the Speed Limit Pot is at its minimum position, the
speed of the scooter at full throttle deflection is set by
Lowest Forward Speed (4.4.3.7) and Lowest Reverse
Speed (4.4.3.8).
Dual Decode variants already use pin 9 for the
second throttle wiper connection. To use a separate
Speed Limit Pot in parallel to the throttle with these
variants, use a 10k log potentiometer. Connect it
between pin 4 and B-, and set Pin 4 Function (4.4.9.1)
to 'SRW'. If the Speed Limit Pot is at its minimum
position, the speed of the scooter at full throttle
deflection is set by the Speed Reduction Wiper (SRW)
parameters (4.4.3.15).
Speed Pot in Parallel (Pin 9)
T+ (Pin 2)
TW
5 kΩ
Throttle
(Pin 1)
SLP
(Pin 9)
100 kΩ
Speed
Limit Pot
T- (Pin 8)
Speed Pot in Parallel (Pin 4)
T+ (Pin 2)
TW
(Pin 1)
T- (Pin 8)
SRW (Pin 4)
5 kΩ
10k log
Throttle
Speed
Limit Pot
B- (Pin 13)
To avoid a throttle dead band when the speed is
reduced, use the 'Speed Scale' parameters and
leave the 'Speed Limit' parameters at 100%.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
31
3.7.7 Alternative Speed Reduction Options
In addition to the throttle and speed limit pot, the R-series has other speed reduction options
to allow for further flexibility in the way speed reduction is applied. For specific details about
each of these options, please refer to the programming section:
Option
Description
Profile 2
When this function is active, the drive performance and
characteristics as defined in Profile 2 will be used. The primary
use of this function is to set a Reduce Speed mode.
Available on Tiller Connector Pins 4, 6, 12, and 14 and
Charger/Programmer Connector Pin 4.
Speed Reduction Wiper
(SRW)
If Pin 4 Function (4.4.9.1) is set to 'SRW', it
provides a variable speed reduction
dependent on the position of an external
potentiometer. This function is based on
the resistance between pin 4 and B- :
decreasing the resistance will decrease
the speed of the scooter. Decreasing
resistance to zero will slow down the
scooter to a speed set by the Speed
Reduction Wiper (SRW) parameters (4.4.3.15).
Proportional speed reduction
As a conventional User Control potentiometer, the SRW
supports the use of a 10k logarithmic pot wired as a variable
resistor between Pin 4 and B– of the tiller. To avoid a throttle
dead band when the speed is reduced, use the 'SRW Speed
Scale' parameters and leave the 'SRW Speed Limit' parameters
at 100%.
Turning speed reduction
Alternatively, this function can be used as an anti-tip feature to
stop the scooter tipping while turning at a high speed, the
speed being reduced dependent on how far the tiller is turned.
In order for this function to work, mechanically connect the
wiper of the external pot to the steering mechanism during
installation. If the steering mechanism is in the centre position
(driving straight) the wiper should also be in the centre position,
providing maximum resistance. When the mechanism is turned
the wiper will move off-centre, which decreases the resistance
between pin 4 and B-, slowing down the scooter.
To avoid that the scooter slows down during a turn when it is
already driving at low speed, use the 'SRW Speed Limit'
parameters. Leave the 'SRW Speed Scale' parameters at 100%.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
32
Slow
Slows the scooter to a set speed limit (a percentage of the
maximum speed). Has no effect on scooter acceleration or
deceleration.
Available on Tiller Connector Pins 4, 6, 12, and 14 and
Charger/Programmer Connector Pin 4.
Slow/Stop
This function has three states: Inactive, Slow and Stop.
When Slow is active, the scooter will
slow to a programmed speed limit (a
percentage of the maximum speed).
Has no effect on scooter acceleration
or deceleration.
When Stop is active, the scooter will
stop at the programmed Emergency
Deceleration rate.
Available on Tiller Connector Pins 4, 6,
12, and 14 and Charger/Programmer
Connector Pin 4.
B+ (if Active High)
B- (if Active Low)
3.7.8 Tiller Battery Supply
Pin 7 provides the Battery Positive (B+) supply to the tiller, while Pin 13 provides the Battery
Negative (B-) return. These pins have current ratings of 9A and can be used for wiring an XLR
socket for an off board battery charger. An external fuse should be installed into the Battery
Positive circuit. Refer to Section 3.5.1 for further details about battery charging.
The B+ and B- supplies must not be connected either directly or through switches to the same
input connector.
Warnings:
A suitable fuse (8A or smaller) must be installed in the Battery Positive wire to
protect the scooter wiring. Fuse to be connected as close as practical to the
controller connector, to minimise the length of unprotected wiring.
In connecting switches between an input pin and either Battery Positive or
Battery Negative, the installer must ensure that there is no possibility of the
switch(es) connecting Battery Positive to Battery Negative.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
33
3.7.9 Key Switch Input
Pin 5 of the analogue connector provides the key-switch power circuit. A high quality key
switch (>50,000 operations) should be used. A status LED (up to 10mA) may be wired in line
with this output as an alternative to using one of the Status output pins.
Key Switch
Key Switch with one
in-line Status LED
Key Switch
Key Switch
(Pin 5)
(Pin 5)
One 10mA
Status LED
If there is no status LED wired in series with the key switch, set Key Switch Status LED (4.4.10.4)
to 'No' to decrease the current drain by 10 mA when the R-series is turned on.
3.7.10 Status Indicator Output
Pins 3, 10, and 11 on the tiller connector can be configured as dedicated status outputs. Pin
10 also has the ability to be active either high or low.
Pin 10 is rated for 50mA sink and 10mA source, whereas Pins 3 and 11 are capable of an
output up to 500mA. Select a resistor to limit LED current.
Pin 10 Status Output Options
Status High
Status
(Pin 10)
10mA
Status
LED
Status Low
50mA
Status
LED
or
10mA at 12V
50mA at 24V
Pin 3 and 11 Status Output Options
Status
Status
LED
or
500mA at 24V
The status indicator can be configured to display 4 different types of diagnostics
flash code plus battery deep discharge warning.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
34
3.7.11 Beeper Output
Pins 3 and 11 on the tiller connector can be configured as a beeper output. They are both
capable of an output up to 500mA.
Beeper
Beeper
(Pin 3 or 11)
The following beeper functions can be enabled or disabled; beeping when
entering sleep mode, beeping the fault codes, beeping when driving in reverse plus
battery deep discharge warning.
3.7.12 Battery Gauge Output
The R-series has incorporated a battery capacity algorithm and can output this to either a 5V
or 12V voltmeter battery gauge display (shown left). Alternatively, a digital LED display is
supported by using the ”LED Battery Gauge” wiring shown on the right. The algorithm used is
the same as the Dynamic Shark powerchair controller and has built-in filters to adjust for
voltage dips under load and floating voltages after periods of idling.
This function is available on Pin 10 of the Tiller Connector and is rated for 10mA source.
Voltmeter Battery Gauge
LED Battery Gauge
For a 5V Voltmeter Battery Gauge, set Pin 10 Function (4.4.10.3) to '5V Gauge'.
For a 12V Voltmeter Battery Gauge, set Pin 10 Function to '12V Gauge'.
For a LED Battery Gauge, set Pin 10 Function to 'Other'.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
35
3.7.13 Brake and Reversing Lights
Pin 3 and Pin 11 on the tiller connector can be configured as either a brake light or reversing
light. Either light output may be connected to an LED array (500mA) or relay-driven
incandescent or halogen bulb.
If an LED array is used, it must be a 24V array and have its own internal current limiting system.
An LED array will also need to incorporate reverse polarity protection such as a series diode.
Note: An LED array may exhibit a faint glow if not engaged. If this glow is objectionable, wire
a 22kΩ resistor across the LED array terminals.
The brake light will operate whenever the controller decelerates. The reversing light will
operate whenever the controller is driving in reverse.
LED Lighting Output
Incandescent or Halogen bulb output
24V Relay (<100mA)
Light Output
(Pin 3 or 11)
24V Relay with fly-back and
series diode (<500mA)
Diode
24V relay
500mA LED
light array
Light Output
(Pin 3 or 11)
24V relay
Diode
Pins 3 and 11 can be set to one of Beeper, Brake Light, Reversing Light or Status.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
36
3.8 Multi-function Pins
The Multi-function Pins maximise flexibility in both scooter design and installation. Allowing the
ability to be configured as one of multiple functions, scooter variations typically implemented
through wiring changes can now be implemented through programming.
The R-series offers both Multi-function Input and Output pins.
3.8.1 Multi-function Inputs
The Multi-function Inputs are available on pins 4, 6, 12 and 14 of the Tiller Connector and on pin
4 (Programming/Inhibit (P/I)) of the programming connector. These inputs are activated by
external circuits. Each input pin can be set to operate a specific function (see table below).
Most functions are fully configurable as to the circuit state in which they are active (or
operating), as well as the ability to become latched (where the controller must be turned off
and then on again to cancel the function). In addition, the speed to which a Slow input
decelerates is fully customisable.
The table below shows the supported functionality for each input pin. The specific
functionality of each input will be explained in a further section.
Pin 4
Pin 6
Pin 12
Pin 14
Pin P/I
Reverse Drive
●
●
●
●
●
Release Brake
●
●
●
●
●
Charger Inhibit
-
-
-
●
●
Profile 2
●
●
●
●
●
Slow
●
●
●
●
●
Slow/Stop
●
●
●
●
●
Slow/Stop Fwd
●
●
●
●
●
Slow/Stop Rev
●
●
●
●
●
SRW
●
-
-
-
-
Neutral Detect
●
●
●
●
●
For an extensive description of each function, see Multi-function Inputs Configuration (4.4.9).
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
37
Multi-function Inputs Configuration
Figure 6 - Multi-function Input Pins
The configurable options for each input pin are:
Active
– this defines the circuit state at which the function operates
Slows to
– if a Slow function is active, this is the speed the scooter will be limited to
Latches
– this defines whether the function is latching. If a function is latched, the active
condition will have to be removed and the controller turned off and then on
again before the function will be turned off. The Latches parameter applies only
to the functions that inhibit driving: Charger Inhibit and Stop.
Flashes
– during Drive Inhibit (when a Stop condition or a Charger Inhibit condition
occurs) a flash code will be displayed.
Due to the nature of the different functions, some functions do not support the complete
range of configuration. See the table below for further details.
Active
Slows to
Latches
Flashes
SRW
-
-
-
-
Profile 2
●
-
-
-
Charger Inhibit
●
-
●
●
Slow
●
●
●
● (0% only)
Reverse Drive
●
-
-
-
Release Brake
●
-
-
-
Slow/Stop Fwd
●
●
●
●
Slow/Stop Rev
●
●
●
●
Slow/Stop
●
●
●
●
Neutral Detect
●
-
-
-
Note:
The three Slow/Stop functions only support Active "High" and "Low".
All other settings disable the input (the input will never become active).
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
38
3.8.1.1
Active States
If a pin is in its active state, the corresponding function will be executed.
The input pins can be set to the following active states:
Low
-
Input is active when pulled down, inactive when open or pulled up
High
-
Input is active when pulled up, inactive when open or pulled down
Open
-
Input is active when open, inactive when pulled up or pulled down
Low or High
-
Input is active when pulled down or pulled up, inactive when open
Low or Open
-
Input is active when pulled down or open, inactive when pulled up
High or Open
-
Input is active when pulled up or open, inactive when pulled down
To pull up an input, connect it to B+. To pull down an input, connect it to B-.
If a multi-function input switch is connected to Pin 5 (Key Switch), put a diode in series for
increased reliability. If multiple switches are connected to Pin 5 (Key Switch) it is not
necessary to add a diode for each of them. One diode for all multi-function input switches
combined is enough.
Insert the diode as close to the switches as possible.
Pin 5 (Key Switch)
Multi
Function
Diode
Inputs
Put a diode in series if switches are connected to Pin 5 (Key Switch)
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
39
3.8.1.2
Slows to
The Slows to parameter sets the speed to which the controller slows down when a Slow
function is active.
If set to 0%, the controller will decelerate at the programmed Emergency Deceleration rate
and apply the park brake.
If set to 100%, the Slow function will have no effect.
Any values between 0% and 100% will cause the controller to decelerate using the
programmed forward or reverse deceleration rate.
3.8.1.3
Latches
The Latches parameter sets whether the function will become latched once active. If a
function is latched, the active condition will have to be removed and the controller turned
off and then on again before the function will be turned off. The Latches parameter applies
only to the functions that inhibit driving: Charger Inhibit and Stop.
Note:
If 'Latches' is selected, please select 'Flashes' as well to indicate to the user
why the scooter will not drive.
3.8.1.4
Flashes
The Flashes parameter sets whether during a Drive Inhibit condition (when a Stop function is
active or a Charger Inhibit condition occurs) a flash code will be displayed. The flash code
that is displayed depends on the setting of the Flash Code Type parameter. See also
section 5.2: Flash Code Display.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
40
3.8.2 Multi-function Outputs
The Multi-function Outputs will output signals dependent on the condition of the controller or
batteries. As with the Multi-function Inputs, the Multi-function Output pins have been
designed to offer maximum flexibility in the implementation of the scooter feature set and
are programmable using the Wizard.
With the exception of the status output on Pin 10, these functions are not configurable as to
their active state or have the ability to be latched. The specific functionality of each output
will be explained in a further section.
The table below shows the supported functionality for each input pin.
Pin 3
Pin 10
Pin 11
Beeper
●
●
Brake Light
●
●
Power Status
●
●
Reversing Light
●
●
Status
●
●
Status High
●
Status Low
●
5V Battery Gauge
●
12V Battery Gauge
●
Other (multi-LED battery gauge display)
●
For more information, see Multi-function Outputs Configuration (4.4.10).
Figure 7 - Multi-function Output Pins
If deep-discharge-warning (beep on low battery) is enabled, all pins configured for 'Beeper',
'Status ', or 'Status High/Low' will issue this warning. This warning takes priority over all other
signalling. The warning consists of 2 short flashes and 2 short beeps every 1.8s.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
41
3.9 Testing
To ensure that each scooter meets a minimum level of safety, the following procedure should
be undertaken. This procedure should be carried out in a spacious environment and with
due regard to any possible unexpected scooter movement in the event of faulty installation.
1.
Raise the wheels off the ground using blocks under the scooter frame so that the
wheels can turn freely.
2.
Recheck all wiring, paying particular attention to polarities of batteries, motor and
park brake. Most importantly, ensure that the motor and battery cables are on their
own terminals and have not been interchanged.
3.
Make the final connection to the Battery Positive (+) terminal, open the key switch
and close the circuit breakers.
4.
Turn the key-switch to turn the R-series on. Ensure it turns on correctly.
5.
Turn the key-switch again to turn the R-series off. Ensure it turns off correctly. Turn the
key-switch again to turn the R-series back on.
6.
Ensure all installed hardware is functioning correctly by activating appropriate
buttons/switches etc.
7.
Move the throttle slightly out of neutral and listen for the “click” as the park brakes
disengage.
8.
Move the throttle backwards and forwards and ensure that the wheels respond
smoothly and in the correct direction.
9.
Release the throttle to neutral and listen for the click of the park brakes re-engaging.
10.
Turn off the R-series and remove the blocks from under the scooter.
11.
Turn the R-series back on and turn the speed dial (if installed) to the lowest speed
setting.
12.
Sit in the scooter and drive forward and reverse slowly, checking for precise and
smooth control.
13.
Repeat at higher speeds.
14.
Drive the scooter on a 1:6 ramp and check for normal power, smoothness and
parking.
15.
Test all other hardware fitted.
16.
Repeat testing until the scooter performs as expected.
Chapter 3: Installation and Testing
42
4 Programming the R-series
Warning:
Performance adjustments must only be made by healthcare professionals, or
by persons who completely understand the adjustment process and the
capabilities of the operator.
Wrong settings, or programming in a location that is not safe, can cause injury
to the operator or bystanders, or damage to the vehicle or surrounding
property.
After you have configured the vehicle, check to make sure that the vehicle
performs to the specifications entered in the programming procedure. If the
vehicle does not perform to specifications, reprogram it. Repeat this
procedure until the vehicle performs to specifications. If the wanted
operation cannot be reached, contact your service agent.
Ensure that the deceleration parameters are always higher than the
acceleration parameters for a safe response.
It is responsibility of the health care professional to make sure that the user is
capable of both cognitively understanding and physically operating the
programmed features and functions.
With inappropriate programming settings, certain features and options may
not be accessible or perform as expected.
The R-series is programmed during manufacture with default settings.
Modify these settings with a programmer to suit a specific scooter model or end user.
The R-series can be programmed with two different programming tools:
 The DX-HHP hand held programmer (see 4.1)
 The PC-based Wizard programmer (see 4.2)
Two different programming sockets can be used to program the R-series:
 The standard 3-pin XLR-type Battery Charger socket (if available on the scooter)
 The Charger/Programmer socket on the R-series itself.
DR-PRGLM02 Connector Adaptor
Programming socket
XLR Charger socket
Charger/Programmer socket
Adaptors needed
DWIZ-ADAPT
DWIZ-ADAPT + DR-PRGLM02
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
43
4.1 The Hand Held Programmer (HHP)
The DX-HHP Hand Held Programmer (HHP) is a programming tool that
gives access to drive parameters (such as speed and acceleration) and
throttle calibration. A technician mode additionally gives access to
system settings such as load compensation, and can read extensive
system diagnostics such as motor voltage.
Note:
The Wizard PC-based programmer has an HHP emulator mode:
Tools -> Plug-ins -> HHP Emulation
Warning:
The DX-HHP is for use only by powerchair manufacturers and their authorised
dealers. It is not for use by the powerchair user. Dealers may only program
parameters as instructed by the powerchair manufacturer.
The DX-HHP Manual should be read and understood before attempting to
use the HHP.

Turn on the scooter before you connect the programmer to the R-series.

All changes are saved immediately, it is not necessary to disconnect the HHP or to cycle
the power to save changes. For this reason it is not possible to cancel a change, other
than to set the parameters back to their original settings manually.
Programmer Main Menu Screen
Dynamic 2GS VX.XX
System OK
Controller Software Version
Faults are shown here
Press DIAG for details
PR OG D I AG T EC H
Programming Diagnostics
Menu
Menu
Technician
Menu
The following sections describe the menus of the HHP and give a parameter listing if
applicable.

Programming menu, 4.1.1

Diagnostics menu, 4.1.2

Technician menu, 4.1.3
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
44
4.1.1 Programming menu
The programming menu gives access to



The speed and acceleration settings of Drive Profile 1 and Drive Profile 2
Other (non-profiled) settings such as left or right handed throttle, sleep timer, beeper
settings and the service scheduler
Throttle calibration
Main Menu
Programming Menu
Dynamic 2GS VX.XX
System OK
PR OG D I AG T EC H
Go to the
Programming Menu
4.1.1.1
View/Edit
Profile 1
EXIT NEXT
Main
Menu
EDIT
Next Option (Prof 2,
Non-prof, Calibrate)
Choose this
Option
Profile 1/2
The R-series has 2 Drive Profiles that are typically used for


Drive Profile 1 - Normal Drive
Drive Profile 2 - A 'Slow Speed' mode for indoor use, that the user can select with a 'Slow' switch
Normally Drive Profile 1 is always selected. Drive Profile 2 is only used when
Pin [X] Function (4.4.9.1) is set to 'Profile 2' and the associated input pin is activated.
Profile Menu
Programming Menu
View/Edit
Profile 1
EXIT NEXT
EDIT
Profile 1
Max Forward Speed
100%
EXIT NEXT DOWN UP
Back to
Next
Main Next Option (Prof 2, Choose this
Option
Prog Menu Parameter
Menu Non-prof, Calibrate)
Adjust this
Parameter
1. In the Main Menu screen, press PROG to enter the Programming Menu.
2. To select Drive Profile 1, press EDIT. To select Drive Profile 2, press NEXT and then press EDIT.
3. Press NEXT until the desired parameter is shown.
4. Press UP or DOWN to adjust the parameter to the desired value. Please note that each
change is effective immediately, there is no option to cancel a change. To undo a
change, manually set the parameter back to its original setting with UP or DOWN.
5. Press EXIT twice to return to the Main Menu.
For each drive profile, the following parameters can be adjusted:
Parameter
Maximum Forward Speed
Forward Acceleration
Forward Deceleration
Maximum Reverse Speed
Reverse Acceleration
Reverse Deceleration
Lowest Forward Speed
Lowest Reverse Speed
Section
4.4.3.1
4.4.3.2
4.4.3.3
4.4.3.4
4.4.3.5
4.4.3.6
4.4.3.7
4.4.3.8
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
45
4.1.1.2
Non-profiled
The parameters that are not in the Drive Profiles can be adjusted in the Non-Profiled menu.
Programming Menu
View/Edit
Non-Profiled
EXIT NEXT
EDIT
Non-Profiled Menu
Non-Profiled
Sleep Timer
15 min
EXIT NEXT DOWN UP
Next Option
Choose this
Back to
Next
Main
Option
Prog Menu Parameter
Menu (Calibrate, Prof 1/2)
Adjust this
Parameter
1. In the Main Menu screen, press PROG to enter the Programming Menu.
2. To select Non-Profiled, press NEXT twice and then press EDIT.
3. Press NEXT until the desired parameter is shown.
4. Press UP or DOWN to adjust the parameter to the desired value. Please note that each
change is effective immediately, there is no option to cancel a change. To undo a
change, manually set the parameter back to its original setting with UP or DOWN.
5. Press EXIT twice to return to the Main Menu.
In the Non-Profiled Menu, the following parameters can be adjusted:
Parameter
Sleep Timer
Enable Beeper
Swap Throttle Direction
Battery Capacity (before V2 software)
BatGauge Sensitivity (after V2 software)
Service Scheduler (Service Period)
Beep on Fault (Flash Code Beeper)
Beep on Sleep (Sleep Beeper)
Reversing Beeper
Motion Beeper
Section
4.4.1.1
4.4.1.4
4.4.1.3
4.4.7.7
4.4.8.1
4.4.1.5
4.4.1.6
4.4.1.8
4.4.1.8
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
46
4.1.1.3
Throttle calibration
The throttle calibration automatically detects and sets the correct values for the Swap
Throttle Direction (4.4.1.3), Throttle Neutral Offset (4.4.2.3), Minimum Throttle Voltage and
Maximum Throttle Voltage (4.4.2.8) parameters.
Notes:
1. The HHP can only calibrate the throttle if there are no faults active,
including throttle faults and OONAPU faults that are caused by a faulty
calibration.
To calibrate a throttle when a throttle fault is active, set Throttle Testing
4.4.2.7 to 'No' with the Wizard, calibrate the unit, and then set Throttle
Testing to 'Yes' again. For OONAPU faults, set Throttle OONAPU Testing
4.4.2.9 to 'None' during calibration, and return it to its original setting
afterwards.
2. The throttle calibration does not set the Throttle Dead-band (4.4.2.6) and
Throttle Full Scale Deflection (4.4.2.4) parameters. These parameters must
still be set manually.
3. If a Speed Limiting Potentiometer (SLP) has been fitted, then the SLP must
be set for full-speed when performing throttle calibration. Throttle
calibration may fail if the SLP is set to a lower speed.
Programming Menu
Calibration Menu
Calibration Menu
Throttle Calibration
Calibrate Now?
Throttle Calibration
Deflect Forward
Throttle Calibration
Return to Neutral
EXIT NEXT
EXIT
EXIT
Main
Menu
YES
Calibrate
Next Option
(Prof 1/2, Non-Profiled)
Back to Programming Menu
Programming Menu
1. In the Main Menu screen, press PROG to enter the Programming Menu.
2. To select Throttle Calibration, press NEXT three times and then press YES.
3. Wait until 'Deflect Forward' is shown on the HHP.
4. Deflect the throttle FULLY forward. This procedure measures the end position of the
throttle, so it is important that you deflect the throttle as far as it can go mechanically.
5. Keep the throttle deflected forward until 'Return to Neutral' is shown on the HHP.
Notes:
If the 'Return to Neutral' screen does not appear, the calibration procedure
was started while a fault was active. Press EXIT to cancel the calibration
procedure, eliminate the fault and start the calibration procedure again.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
47
6. Release the throttle to its neutral position.
Calibration Menu
Calibration Menu
Calibration Menu
Throttle Calibration
Deflect Reverse
Throttle Calibration
Return to Neutral
Throttle Calibration
Successful
EXIT
EXIT
EXIT NEXT
Programming Menu
Programming Menu
Main Menu
Programming Menu
7. Wait until 'Deflect Reverse' is shown on the HHP.
8. Deflect the throttle FULLY reverse.
9. Keep the throttle deflected reverse until ‘Return to Neutral' is shown on the HHP.
10. Release the throttle to its neutral position.
11. If the throttle calibration is complete, the HHP will show 'Successful'.
12. Press EXIT to go to the Main Menu, or press NEXT to go to the Programming Menu.
Failed calibration
If the controller cannot measure the throttle correctly, or when there is no expected throttle
activity for 20 seconds during any of the calibration screens, the HHP will show 'Failed'.
Calibration Menu
Throttle Calibration
Failed
EXIT NEXT
Main
Menu
RETRY
Calibrate again
Next Option
(Prof 1/2, Non-Profiled)
If this happens, press RETRY to repeat the calibration from the start, and go back to step 4.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
48
4.1.2 Diagnostics menu
If a fault exists, the HHP can show extended diagnostics information.
Diagnostics Menu
** D I AG N O ST I C S **
System Faults
No Faults
EXIT NEXT
Main
Menu
Next Option (Fault log,
Usage, Identification)
Fault Log
** D I AG N O ST I C S **
Fault Log
0900/0504/0504/0504
EXIT NEXT
MORE
Main
Menu
Next
Option
See more
stored faults
1. In the Main Menu screen, press DIAG to enter the Diagnostics Menu.
2. If a fault exists, the System Faults screen gives a description of the current fault.
3. Press NEXT for the fault log. The fault log shows the last 4 faults that have occurred.
The faults are shown in 4-digit numbers. See HHP Fault Codes with Sub Codes (5.4) for
more information. Press ‘MORE’ to see earlier faults; up to 16 faults can be displayed.
4. Press NEXT to access the usage counters. Press MORE to see the counters one by one.
Usage Counter
Description
Time on (h)*
The total time that the unit has been powered
up
Power-ups*
The total number of successful power-ups
Drive Time (h)*
The total time during which the throttle has been
deflected
Drive Count*
The total number of times that the throttle has
been deflected and retuned to neutral
5. Press NEXT to see the unit identification. Press MORE to see the parameters one by one:
Model, ESN and Software version.
Identification
Description
Model
The model number of the unit (DR50-AD01 etc.)
ESN
The serial number of the unit
Version
The software version number of the unit
6. Press EXIT to return to the Main Menu.
*The HHP reads the currently active value of these parameters. A diagnostics report made
with the Wizard shows the values that have been stored the last time that the unit was turned
off. For this reason, the usage counters shown in the Wizard are usually slightly lower than the
values shown in the HHP.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
49
4.1.3 Technician menu
Some parameters are protected; they can only be accessed in Technician Mode.
To enter technician mode on the HHP:
1. Turn the R-series ON
2. Connect the HHP to the R-series
3. Press TECH
Dynamic 2GS VX.XX
System OK
PR OG D I AG T EC H
5. Press OK
** T EC H N I C I AN **
Enter Passnumber
000
D1 D2
D3 OK
4. Enter the technician password
** T EC H N I C I AN **
Enter Passnumber
000
D1 D2
D3 OK
6. You are now in Technician mode.
** T EC H N I C I AN **
Load Compensation
100 mOhm
EXIT NEXT DOWN UP
In the Technician Menu, the following parameters can be adjusted:
Parameter
Section
Load Compensation
4.4.5.5
Soft Start Period
4.4.3.9
Soft Finish
4.4.3.10
Also, the following parameters can be read real-time:
Parameter
Typical
Battery Voltage
23 - 28 V
Motor Voltage
0 - Battery Voltage
Motor Current
0 - unit rating
Controller Temperature
10 - 80 degrees
Throttle Voltage
0-5V
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
50
4.2 Dynamic Wizard
The PC-based Dynamic Wizard provides access to the all parameters that are allowed to be
edited or seen based on the dongle level. In addition, the Wizard can also generate
comprehensive diagnostics reports. For more information, see the Wizard user manual.
4.2.1 Software revisions
Some parameters are only available to specific software revisions.
A list of software revisions and which controller they refer to is given below.
Software Revision
Rev A
Rev B
Rev C
Rev D
Rev E
Software version*
Lower than 0.53
0.53 - 1.04
1.04 - 1.14
1.15 - 2.0
2.0 and higher
*You can check the software version of your controller with


the main screen of the HHP (see 4.1).
the Wizard: Tools  Change Module Version.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
51
4.3 Parameter List
Key:


Par C,D
Editable at this level (* = HHP Technician Mode)
Viewable at this level
Parameter only available in controllers with software Rev. C or D.
Parameter
Possible Values Default
User Personalisation (4.4.1)
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv
Sleep Timer
0 - 50 min
15 min
Wakeup Style
Key + Throttle
Key Only
Key + Throttle
Swap Throttle Direction
No / Yes
No




Enable Beeper
No / Yes
Yes




Flash Code Beeper
No / Yes
Yes




Sleep Beeper
No / Yes
Yes




Reverse Beeper A,B,C
No / Yes
Yes




Motion Beeper D,E
None
Reverse
Forward/Reverse
Reverse




Beeper On Time D,E
100 – 1500 ms
300 ms



Beeper Off Time D,E
0 – 1500 ms
700 ms



Deep Discharge Beeper E
No / Yes
Yes



Sleep on Fault or Inhibit
No / Yes
No



No / Yes
No



Power Off after Sleep
E
E
Throttle Type
Throttle Input E
Throttle Configuration (4.4.2)
Wig-wag
Single-ended
Wig-wag
Uni-polar
Single
Single
Dual**











Throttle Neutral Offset
-0.63 - +0.62 V
0V



Throttle Full Scale Deflection
20 - 100 %
85 %



Throttle Response
0 - 100 %
80 %



Throttle Dead-band
0 - 100 %
15 %



Throttle Testing
No / Yes
Yes


Maximum Throttle Voltage
0-5V
4.86 V


Minimum Throttle Voltage
0-5V
0.16 V


Throttle OONAPU Testing
None
Non-Latching
Latching
Non-Latching


B,C,D,E
No / Yes
No


Speed Limit Pot
No / Yes
Yes


Slam Brake Enable B,C,D,E
No / Yes
No
Slam Brake Threshold E
0 - 100 %
0%


Broken Wiper Wire Test
No / Yes
No


Throttle Fault Non Latching



Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
52
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
HHP
Broken Wiper Wire Accuracy
0-15
0

Lite
Std
Adv





































Drive Performance (4.4.3)
Maximum Forward Speed
Forward Acceleration
Forward Deceleration
Maximum Reverse Speed
Reverse Acceleration
Reverse Deceleration
Lowest Forward Speed
Lowest Reverse Speed
Soft Start Period
Soft Finish
Emergency Deceleration
Slam Braking
Push Speed
Roll-away Speed
SRW Forward Speed Limit
SRW Forward Speed Scale
SRW Reverse Speed Limit
SRW Reverse Speed Scale
20 - 100 %
60 %
0 - 100 %
40 %
0 - 100 %
60 %
20 - 100 %
40 %
0 - 100 %
25 %
0 - 100 %
40 %
0 - 100 %
20 %
0 - 60 %
10 %
0 - 2550 ms
1000 ms
0 - 100 %
40 %
0 - 100 %
80 %
0 - 100 %
100 %
15 - 100 %
40 %
30 - 100 %
40 %
0 - 100 %
50 %
0 - 100 %
50 %
0 - 100 %
50 %
0 - 100 %
50 %
OEM Drive Limits (4.4.4)
Maximum Forward Speed Limit
0 - 100 %
100 %
Maximum Reverse Speed Limit
0 - 100 %
100 %
Lowest Forward Speed Limit
0 - 100 %
0%
Lowest Reverse Speed Limit
0 - 100 %
0%
Acceleration Limit
0 - 100 %
100 %
Deceleration Limit
0 - 100 %
100 %
Motor Management (4.4.5)
Motor Protection
No / Yes
No
12 A (DR50)
Motor Continuous Current
0 - 255 A
15 A (DR90)
Motor Heating Time C,D,E
0 - 255 s
20 s
C,D,E
Motor Cooling Time
0 - 1020 s
32 s
A,B
Motor Case Time
0 - 87 min
20 min
Motor Brush Time A,B
0 - 326 s
20 s
A,B
Motor Brush/Case Ratio
0 - 100 %
30 %
Motor Reverse
No / Yes
No
Load Compensation
0 - 1020 mΩ
100 mΩ
Maximum Load Compensation
0 - 1020 mΩ
1000 mΩ
Load Compensation Damping
0 – 60%
50%
Remembered Load
Compensation
Current Limit
Boost Current
Boost Time
Stall Timeout
0 – 60%
0 - 40 A (DR50)
0 - 70 A (DR90)
0 - 10 A (DR50)
0 - 20 A (DR90)
0 - 51 s
0 - 51 s








*
*















*










40 A
4s
25 s


50%
8A















Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
53
Parameter
Motor Testing
Maximum Motor Voltage
Deadtime Adjust
Possible Values Default
None
Open
Short
Short
All
2 – 40.2 V
28.8 V
0-4
0
Park brake Management (4.4.6)
Park brake Testing
None
Pre-drive
Driving
Pre-drive
Park brake Neutral Delay
0 - 25500 ms
2000 ms
Park Brake Release Delay
Overvoltage Warning
Overvoltage Rollback
Undervoltage Rollback Start
Undervoltage Rollback End
Battery Gauge Minimum
Battery Gauge Maximum
Battery Gauge High Warning
Battery Gauge Low Warning
Battery Gauge Dead-band
Battery Gauge Sensitivity
Battery Cut-Off Voltage E
0 - 25500 ms
0 ms
Battery Management (4.4.7)
24 – 34.2V
30.2V
30.2 – 34.8V
34.2V
18 - 32.2 V
21 V
17 - 21 V
18 V
16 - 24 V
22 V
19 - 27 V
24.4 V
24 - 32 V
29 V
18 - 26 V
23.4 V
0-6V
3.5 V
0 - 170
40
16 - 24 V
19.1 V
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv








































System Options (4.4.8)
Service Scheduler
Service Period
Pin 4 Function
Pin 6 Function
Pin 12 Function
Pin 14 Function
Prog/Inh Pin Function
No / Yes
Yes
0 - 5100 h
5000 h
Multi-function Inputs Configuration (4.4.9)
None
Reverse Drive
Release Brake
Charger Inhibit
Profile2
Slow
Slow/Stop
Slow/Stop FWD
Slow/Stop REV
SRW
Neutral Detect**
None

**Dual Decode variants only (see chapter 1)
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
54
Multi-function Outputs Configuration (4.4.10)
Scooter
Shark
Flash Code Type
Scooter
Type 3
Type 4
None
Pin 3 Function
Beeper
Brake Light
Reverse Light
Beeper
Status
Pin 11 Function
Status
Power Status
None
Status High
Status Low
Pin 10 Function
None
5V Gauge
12V Gauge
Other
Key Switch Status LED
No / Yes
Yes









Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
55
4.4 Parameter Descriptions
Warning:

The default settings in this section must be used as a guideline only. Their
values may deviate from the default values as shown by the Wizard.

It is the responsibility of the powerchair manufacturer to make sure that the
program is safe and suitable for a particular scooter configuration.

It is the responsibility of the dealer or therapist to check and make sure that
the settings of a scooter for a particular user are safe and appropriate for
that user.
4.4.1 User Personalisation
4.4.1.1
Sleep Timer
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
HHP
Sleep Timer
0 - 50 min
15 min

Lite
Std
Adv

The R-series automatically "goes to sleep" if the throttle has been in the Neutral position for
Sleep Timer minutes. When the R-series sleeps, it is partially turned off to reduce energy
consumption and to make sure that the scooter does not move when the user accidentally
moves the throttle. In Sleep Mode, the scooter does not respond to commands.
To wake up the R-series, take the action that is selected with Wakeup Style.
If Wakeup Style is set to 'Key + Throttle', the Status Light gives a short flash every 5 seconds
during sleep mode.
To disable Sleep Mode, set Sleep Timer to zero.
4.4.1.2
Wakeup Style
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Wakeup Style
Key + Throttle
Key Only
Key + Throttle
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv

Defines how the controller will wake up from sleep.
Key Only
-
Key + Throttle -
Only the key switch wakes up the controller (by turning the key off and then
on again).
The key switch as well as any throttle movement wakes up the controller.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
56
4.4.1.3
Swap Throttle Direction
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Swap Throttle Direction
No / Yes
No
HHP

Lite
Std
Adv



This parameter is only used when Throttle Type (4.4.2.1) is set to 'Wig-wag'.
For single-ended throttles, use a Forward/Reverse switch instead (see 4.4.9.1).
Yes - The polarity of the throttle is reversed. Moving the throttle in the direction that
normally causes forward movement now results in reverse movement while the
reverse buzzer beeps. Typically used for left-handed operation.
No
- The polarity of the throttle is normal. Typically used for right-handed operation.
Notes:
The Motor Reverse parameter (4.4.5.4) also reverses the direction of the scooter,
but it does not swap the behaviour of the reversing buzzer or the speed limit
parameters. If Motor Reverse is set to 'Yes', the reversing buzzer will beep when
the scooter moves forward, and the forward speed will be limited by the
Maximum Reverse Speed parameter. For this reason, do not use Motor Reverse
for left-handed operation. Use Swap Throttle Direction instead.
4.4.1.4
4.4.1.5
Enable Beeper
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Enable Beeper
No / Yes
Yes
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv




Yes
-
The beeper will beep according to the settings of Flash Code Beeper, Sleep Beeper,
Motion Beeper and Deep Discharge Beeper.
No
-
All beeper functions are disabled.
Flash Code Beeper
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Flash Code Beeper
No / Yes
Yes
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv




This parameter is only used when Enable Beeper has the value 'Yes'.
4.4.1.6
Yes
-
If a flash code is shown on the Status LED, the buzzer beeps the same number of
beeps as the flash code number.
No
-
The buzzer does not beep during a fault.
Sleep Beeper
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Sleep Beeper
No / Yes
Yes
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv




This parameter is only used when Enable Beeper has the value 'Yes'.
Yes
-
When the controller goes to sleep, the buzzer beeps for one second.
No
-
When the controller goes to sleep, the buzzer does not beep.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
57
4.4.1.7
Reverse Beeper
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Reverse Beeper
No / Yes
Yes
HHP

Lite
Std
Adv



This parameter is only used when Enable Beeper has the value 'Yes'.
Yes
-
The scooter beeps only when it is moving in the reverse direction
No
-
The scooter does not beep when it is moving
If Motion Beeper has the value 'Forward/Reverse' or 'Yes' (HHP), the value of Reverse Beeper
is ignored and the scooter will beep when it is moving in any direction, including reverse.
4.4.1.8
Motion Beeper
Parameter
Possible Values
Motion Beeper
None
Reverse
Forward/Reverse
Yes (HHP)
No (HHP)
Default
Reverse
No (HHP)
HHP




Lite


Std


Adv


This parameter is only used when Enable Beeper has the value 'Yes'.
None / No (HHP)
-
The scooter does not beep when it is moving
Reverse
-
The scooter beeps only when it is moving in the reverse direction
Forward/Reverse Yes (HHP)
Beeper Timing
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Beeper On Time
100 – 1500 ms
Beeper Off Time
0 – 1500 ms
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv
300 ms



700 ms



These parameters are only used when Enable Beeper has the value 'Yes'.
Beeper On Time and Beeper Off Time together set the beeper interval time. During Beeper
On Time the beeper emits a sound. During Beeper Off Time the beeper is silent.
Sound
4.4.1.9
The scooter beeps when it is moving in any direction
Beeper On
Time
Beeper Off Time
Time
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
58
4.4.1.10 Deep Discharge Beeper
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Deep Discharge Beeper
No / Yes
Yes
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv



Lite
Std
Adv



This parameter is only used when Enable Beeper has the value 'Yes'.
Enables beeping if the battery is drained below the cut-off level that is set by
Battery Cut-Off Voltage (4.4.7.5).
Note:
This parameter needs to be set to comply with the ISO7176-14 ‘overdischarge protection’ requirement.
4.4.1.11 Sleep on Fault or Inhibit
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Sleep on Fault or Inhibit
No / Yes
No
HHP
Enables going to sleep if a fault or inhibit condition is active. If set to no, the unit will not go to
sleep, but will signal the fault indefinitely.
Note:
If the value of Sleep Timer is zero, the value of Sleep on Fault or Inhibit
is ignored.
During a throttle fault or OONAPU fault the controller will never go to sleep,
even if this parameter is set to 'Yes'.
4.4.1.12 Power Off after Sleep
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Power Off after Sleep
No / Yes
No
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv



Enables powering the unit off automatically after sleeping for approximately 6 hours to save
battery power.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
59
4.4.2 Throttle Configuration
4.4.2.1
Throttle Type
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Throttle Type
Wig-wag
Single-ended
Uni-polar
Wig-wag
Wig-Wag
-
HHP
Lite

Std


Adv

The throttle controls speed and direction, no Forward/Reverse switch is
required. The neutral position is halfway the pot.
If the throttle is moved out of the centre position in one direction, the
scooter drives forward. If the throttle is moved out of the centre in the
opposite direction, the scooter drives in reverse. The standard direction of
the scooter can be swapped with Swap Throttle Direction (4.4.1.3).
Single-Ended -
The throttle controls speed only. The neutral position is at the start of the
pot. The direction of the scooter is selected with a Forward/Reverse switch.
Uni-polar
The throttle controls speed only. The neutral position is halfway the pot. If
the throttle is moved out of the centre position in either direction, the
scooter starts to drive in the direction that has been selected with the
Forward/Reverse switch. This allows left-handed and right-handed
operation of the same wigwag without reprogramming the scooter.
-
If a Forward/Reverse switch is needed, connect it to one of the Multi-function Inputs (3.8.1),
and set the corresponding Pin [X] Function parameter (see 4.4.9) to 'Reverse Drive'.
For schematics, see Throttle Configuration (3.7).
4.4.2.2
Throttle Input
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Throttle Input
Single
Dual
Single
HHP

Lite
Std
Adv


Single
-
Use for a standard throttle with a single wiper.
The only valid choice for all controllers except the dual decode variants.
Dual
-
Use for a throttle with 2 linear wiper signals that are each other's opposite.
In the extreme positions, one wiper is set to the minimum value and the
other wiper is set to the maximum value. In the halfway position, both
wipers have the same value. The R-series checks both signals for
consistency: the sum of both signals must be a constant value, equal to the
maximum value. If the sum of the signals is more than 10% lower or higher
than the expected maximum value, the scooter stops and a throttle fault is
shown on the Status light.
Only valid on Dual Decode variants. Not valid on all other controllers.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
60
4.4.2.3
Throttle Neutral Offset
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Throttle Neutral Offset
-0.63 - +0.62 V
0V
HHP
Lite

Std
Adv


Set this to account for any slight mechanical offset between the throttle neutral position and
the centre position of the throttle wiper. The offset is an absolute voltage above or below
neutral.
Use the HHP to calibrate the unit instead of setting a value manually, see Throttle calibration
(4.1.1.3) for details.
0V
Reverse
speed limit
demand
Forward
speed limit
demand
5V
2.5V
Neutral
offset
Default
neutral
Scaled to
Scaled to
100%
100%
The default neutral value is dependent on the value of the Throttle Type parameter (4.4.2.1):


4.4.2.4
Wig-Wag and Uni-polar both have the default neutral value at 2.5 V.
Single-ended has its default neutral value at 0 V + Minimum Throttle Voltage(4.4.2.8).
In this case all negative values of Throttle Neutral Offset are ignored and all positive values
are multiplied by 2, which means that a Wizard setting of 0.5V will produce an actual
neutral offset of 1.0V.
Throttle Full Scale Deflection
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Throttle Full Scale Deflection
20 - 100 %
85 %
HHP
Lite

Std
Adv


Set the percentage of total throttle movement that will result in full speed.
The scale of this parameter ranges between Throttle Neutral Offset (0%) and Maximum
Throttle Voltage/ Minimum Throttle Voltage (100%).
For example, if a mechanical stop restricts the throttle from moving more than 60% of its full
electrical travel, set this parameter to 50% to make sure that the scooter can still reach
maximum speed.
Min
Voltage
Neutral
Offset
Mechanical
stopper
Mechanical Max
stopper Voltage
0V
5V
2.5V
Full Scale
Deflection
set to 50%
Full Scale
Deflection
set to 50%
0 0 - 100%
Throttle- range
1
0
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
%
61
4.4.2.5
Throttle Response
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Throttle Response
0 - 100 %
80 %
HHP

Lite
Std
Adv



Defines the scooter response to movement of the throttle.
0%
-
The response to the throttle is linear. If the throttle is held halfway, the scooter will
drive at half its programmed speed.
100%
-
The response to the throttle is curved. If the throttle is held halfway, the scooter will
drive at around 25% of its programmed speed. This gives the user finer control at
low speed. The curve does not change the maximum speed, so the scooter will still
drive at full maximum speed when the throttle is fully deflected.
Speed
100%
0%
100%
50%
Movement
4.4.2.6
100%
Throttle Dead-band
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Throttle Dead-band
0 - 100 %
15 %
HHP

Lite

Std

Adv

Also commonly referred to as 'Neutral Window', Throttle Dead-band sets how far the throttle
must be moved out of neutral before the controller will begin to drive. The percentage range
is dependent on the value of the Throttle Type parameter (4.4.2.1).
The speed demand from the
throttle remains at zero while
the throttle deflection from
neutral is less than half of the
programmed Throttle Deadband. As the throttle is
deflected beyond this point
and up to the programmed
Dead-band, the throttle
demand increases smoothly
from zero so that there is no
abrupt change in demand as
the throttle moves out of
neutral. For a throttle
deflection greater than the
programmed Dead-band the
speed demand is
proportional to the throttle
deflection.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
62
4.4.2.7
Throttle Testing
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Throttle Testing
No / Yes
Yes
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv


Yes
-
The R-series tests if the voltage at the throttle wiper has a value that is between
Minimum Throttle Voltage and Maximum Throttle Voltage. This is especially useful
when ISO resistors are used to detect faults in the throttle wiring. If the voltage falls
more than 10% outside the limits, a throttle fault is generated, the scooter will not
drive and a 'Throttle Fault' flash code is shown on the Status light. For the correct
flash code, see the description of the Flash Code Type parameter (4.4.10.1).
No
-
The R-series does not generate throttle faults. This setting is not recommended
because faults in the throttle wiring may not be detected. Use for throttle calibration
and throttle testing only.
For schematics and the use of ISO resistors, see Throttle Configuration (3.7).
Maximum Throttle Voltage
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Maximum Throttle Voltage
0-5V
4.86 V

Minimum Throttle Voltage
0-5V
0.16 V

HHP
Lite
Std
Adv




Maximum Throttle Voltage sets the maximum expected throttle voltage. Set this parameter to
the voltage that is present at the R-series throttle wiper input (pin 1 of the tiller head connector)
when the wiper of the throttle is moved fully to the Throttle Positive position (pin 2).
Minimum Throttle Voltage sets the minimum expected throttle voltage. Set this parameter to
the voltage that is present at the R-series throttle wiper input when the wiper of the throttle is
moved fully to the Throttle Negative position (pin 2).
The Minimum and maximum throttle voltage parameters determine the operation of the
Throttle Full Scale Deflection (4.4.2.4) and Throttle Dead-band (4.4.2.6) parameters. See the
description of those parameters for details.
If Throttle Testing is set to 'Yes', and the voltage at the throttle wiper input is more than 10%
higher than Maximum Throttle Voltage or 10% lower than Minimum Throttle Voltage, the
controller generates a throttle fault to indicate that an error may have occurred with the
throttle or its wiring.
Parameter
FSD Fwd:
DB Fwd:
FSD Rev:
DB Rev:
Throttle
4.4.2.8
Min Th.
Voltage
FSD
(0.5V) (80%)
Fault
Full
Speed
0 V 0.5 V
Throttle
Range REV
0.8 V
DB
NO
(25%) (-0.5V)
Zero
Speed
1.7 V
Max Th.
FSD
Voltage
(80%) (4.5V)
DB
(25%)
Zero
Speed
2.0 V
2 + (4.5 - 2) x 80% = 4.0V
2 + (4.0 - 2) x 25% = 2.5V
2 - (2 - 0.5) x 80% = 0.8V
2 - (2 - 0.8) x 25% = 1.7V
2.5 V
Throttle
Range FWD
Full
Speed
4.0 V
Fault
4.5 V
5V
Wig-wag setup with Neutral Offset = -0.5 V, Dead-band = 25% and Full Scale Deflection = 80%
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
63
4.4.2.9
Throttle OONAPU Testing
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Throttle OONAPU Testing
None
Non-Latching
Latching
Non-Latching
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv


An Out Of Neutral At Power Up (OONAPU) fault occurs if the throttle is not in the neutral
position when the scooter is switched on. This makes sure that the scooter does not suddenly
start to drive.
If an OONAPU fault exists, the Status LED shows a flash code* and the scooter does not drive.
Return the throttle to the neutral position. The fault goes away and the scooter drives normally.
Latching
-
If the throttle is not returned to the neutral position within 5 seconds, the
OONAPU fault becomes a latching fault. To clear the fault, switch the
scooter off and then on again.
Non-Latching -
The OONAPU fault never becomes a latching fault. To clear the fault, simply
return the throttle to the neutral position. Use this setting for users who have
difficulty to return the throttle to the neutral position within 5 seconds.
None
An OONAPU fault will never occur.
Do not use except for testing purposes or throttle calibration.
-
*The flash code that is shown depends on the Flash Code Type parameter (4.4.10.1).
Note:
If an OONAPU fault does not go away after the scooter has been turned off
and on, the throttle may be faulty or incorrectly calibrated. See section 3.7.5 for
more information.
Warning:
If Throttle OONAPU Testing is set to 'None', the scooter is unsafe for normal
operation. The scooter can start to drive unexpectedly if it is turned on while
the throttle is stuck in a deflected position.
4.4.2.10 Throttle Fault Non Latching
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Throttle Fault Non Latching
No/Yes
No
HHP
Lite

Std
Adv

Set to ‘Yes’ for non-latching throttle faults, set to ‘No’ for latching throttle faults.
Warning:
Only set this parameter to 'Yes' for testing purposes. If throttle faults are
non-latching, the scooter immediately starts to drive at the speed that the
throttle is held at when a throttle fault disappears. This can easily happen with a
throttle that is not calibrated correctly.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
64
4.4.2.11 Speed Limit Pot
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Speed Limit Pot
No / Yes
Yes
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv


Yes
-
The dedicated Speed Limit Pot input (pin 9) is used to limit the speed of the scooter.
Use this setting with a 100 kΩ speed pot that is connected IN PARALLEL with the
throttle, between 'Throttle Positive' (pin 2) and 'Throttle Negative' (pin 8), and that
has its wiper connected to pin 9 (speed limit pot input).
No
-
The Speed Limit Pot input (pin 9) is ignored.
Use this setting with a 25 kΩ speed pot that is connected IN SERIES with the throttle,
and that is connected to pin 1 (throttle wiper input).
For schematics and the use of ISO resistors, see Speed Limit Pot Connections (3.7.6).
Note:
If Speed Limit Pot is set to 'Yes' when no speed pot is connected to pin 9 (when
the speed pot is wired in series with the throttle instead of in parallel), the R-series
will read pin 9 as if the speed pot is at its lowest setting, and will always limit the
speed of the scooter to the lowest forward and reverse speeds.
If the voltage at pin 9 is the same as Throttle Positive (T+), the maximum speed of the scooter
at 100% throttle deflection is not limited and is as set by the Maximum Forward Speed
(4.4.3.1) and Maximum Reverse Speed (4.4.3.4) parameters.
If the voltage at pin 9 is the same as Throttle Negative (T-), the maximum speed of the
scooter at 100% throttle deflection is scaled down to Lowest Forward Speed (4.4.3.7) and
Lowest Reverse Speed (4.4.3.8).
Speed @
100% Throttle
Maximum FWD Speed
Maximum REV Speed
Lowest FWD Speed
Lowest REV Speed
T-
T+
Voltage (pin 9)
The throttle output is scaled down, not limited, so the throttle does not have a dead band
when the speed pot is at a low setting.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
65
4.4.2.12 Slam Brake
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv
Slam Brake Enable
No / Yes
No

Slam Brake Threshold
0 - 100 %
0%

Slam Brake Enable turns on slam braking in the forward and reverse direction*.
Slam Braking is applied when the throttle is significantly moved in the opposite direction to
the direction that the scooter is currently moving in (the minimum amount of throttle
movement in the opposite direction is set with Slam Brake Threshold)
During a slam brake, the scooter decelerates with the rate that is set with the Slam Braking
parameter (4.4.3.12). Be careful when enabling slam braking because this setting may not be
suitable for all scooter types.
Note:
*With R-series controllers before software version 1.26 (DR50-A01 before s/n
B09175730, DR50-B01 before s/n A09150168 and DR90-A01 before s/n B09201834)
it is not possible to turn off slam braking in the forward direction. For these units
Slam Brake Enable only applies to the reverse direction, the forward direction is
always enabled. Slam Brake Enable was previously called Slam Brake Reverse.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
66
4.4.2.13 Broken Wiper Wire Detection.
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv
Broken Wiper Wire Test
No / Yes
No

Broken Wiper Wire Accuracy
0 - 15
0

Broken Wiper Wire Test turns on broken wiper wire testing for wig-wag type throttles.
Broken Wiper Wire Accuracy is used to decrease the likelihood of false faults in a noisy
environment. Higher values make testing less sensitive to noise, but increases the response
time. Every increase by 1 extends detection time by 20ms.
If the wiper wire breaks during driving, the controller will interpret that as a neutral signal and
will slow the scooter to a stop using normal deceleration.
Once the scooter has stopped, the controller will test for a broken wiper wire, if enabled
using parameter Broken Wiper Wire Test. The controller will signal a broken wiper wire to the
user with a flash code.
Turning this feature off does not impact safety, because the scooter will be stopped and will
not drive any more if the wiper wire is broken. Its function is to make the user aware that
there is a problem with the throttle.
4.4.3 Drive Performance
The R-series has 2 Drive Profiles that are typically used for
 Drive Profile 1 - Normal Drive
 Drive Profile 2 - A 'Slow Speed' mode for indoor use that the user can select with a 'Slow' switch.
The indoor profile can limit the speed as well as the acceleration.
Normally Drive Profile 1 is always selected. Drive Profile 2 is only used when
Pin [X] Function (4.4.9.1) is set to 'Profile 2' and the associated input pin is activated.
4.4.3.1
Maximum Forward Speed
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Maximum Forward Speed
20 - 100 %
60 %
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv




Sets the maximum speed in the forward direction when the highest speed has been selected
with the speed limit pot (see 3.7.6) and the throttle is fully deflected forward. Dealers can
adjust this parameter to the preference of an individual user or to the terrain that a specific
scooter will be used in.
Note:
This parameter cannot be set higher than the value of the Maximum Forward
Speed Limit parameter (4.4.4.1) that has been set by the scooter manufacturer.
4.4.3.2
Forward Acceleration
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Forward Acceleration
0 - 100 %
40 %
HHP
Lite
Std



Adv

Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
67
Sets how quickly the forward speed increases after the throttle has been deflected forward.
0%
100 % -
From standstill, the scooter reaches full forward speed in 10 s
From standstill, the scooter reaches full forward speed in 0.4 s
  
Lo
gic
Co
nn
ect
or
performance
(A
TIME
Low acceleration values give a softer
and a less sensitive throttle response. High
acceleration values give a more aggressive performance and a fast throttle response.
A
A
Note:
A
This parameter cannotAbe set higher than the value of the Acceleration Limit
A has been set by the scooter manufacturer.
parameter (4.4.4.5) that
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
Too high
Good
Too low
A
 Too sensitive  Smooth
 Unresponsive
A
 Dependent
on user
 Jerky
 Long delays
A environment
SPEED
and
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
A
A
A
A
68
4.4.3.3
Forward Deceleration
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Forward Deceleration
0 - 100 %
60 %
HHP
Lite
Std



Adv

Sets how quickly the scooter slows down after the throttle has been released to neutral.
0%
100 % -
From full forward speed, the scooter stops in 10 s
From full forward speed, the scooter stops in 0.4 s
SPEED
 
Too high
 Rough
 The user can
fall out of the
scooter

Good
Smooth
 Dependent on user
and environment
Too low
 Unresponsive
 Braking distance
too long
Low deceleration values produce a gentle stop, but increase the braking distance. High
deceleration values produce a more aggressive stop, but can be uncomfortable. Adjust this
parameter to the preference of the user.
Note:
This parameter cannot be set higher than the value of the Deceleration Limit
parameter (4.4.4.6) that has been set by the scooter manufacturer.
Warning:
Setting Forward Deceleration too low or too high can result in a scooter that is
unsafe. Test thoroughly after programming to make sure that the scooter
complies with local regulatory requirements for maximum allowable braking
distance.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
69
4.4.3.4
Maximum Reverse Speed
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Maximum Reverse Speed
20 - 100 %
40 %
HHP
Lite
Std



Adv

Sets the maximum speed in the reverse direction when the highest speed has been selected
with the speed limit pot (see 3.7.6) and the throttle is fully deflected reverse. Dealers can
adjust this parameter to the preference of an individual user or to the terrain that a specific
scooter will be used in.
Note:
This parameter cannot be set higher than the value of the Maximum Reverse
Speed Limit parameter (4.4.4.2) that has been set by the scooter
manufacturer.
4.4.3.5
Reverse Acceleration
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Reverse Acceleration
0 - 100 %
25 %
HHP
Lite
Std



Adv

Sets how quickly the reverse speed increases after the throttle has been deflected reverse.
0%
100 % -
From standstill, the scooter reaches full reverse speed in 10 s
From standstill, the scooter reaches full reverse speed in 0.4 s
Low acceleration values give a softer performance and a less sensitive throttle response. High
acceleration values give a more aggressive performance and a fast throttle response.
Note:
This parameter cannot be set higher than the value of the Acceleration Limit
parameter (4.4.4.5) that has been set by the scooter manufacturer.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
70
4.4.3.6
Reverse Deceleration
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Reverse Deceleration
0 - 100 %
40 %
HHP
Lite
Std



Adv

Sets how quickly the scooter slows down after the throttle has been released to neutral while
driving reverse.
0%
100 % -
From full reverse speed, the scooter stops in 10 s
From full reverse speed, the scooter stops in 0.4 s
Low deceleration values produce a gentle stop, but increase the braking distance. High
deceleration values produce a more aggressive stop, but can be uncomfortable. Adjust this
parameter to the preference of the user.
Note:
This parameter cannot be set higher than the value of the Deceleration Limit
parameter (4.4.4.6) that has been set by the scooter manufacturer.
Warning:
Setting Reverse Deceleration too low or too high can result in a scooter that is
unsafe. Test thoroughly after programming to make sure that the scooter
complies with local regulatory requirements for maximum allowable braking
distance.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
71
4.4.3.7
Lowest Forward Speed
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Lowest Forward Speed
0 - 100 %
20 %
HHP
Lite
Std



Adv

This parameter is only used when Speed Limit Pot (4.4.2.11) is set to 'Yes'.
Lowest Forward Speed sets the maximum speed in the forward direction when the lowest
speed has been selected with the speed limit pot (see 3.7.6) and the throttle is fully deflected
forward. Dealers can adjust this parameter to the preference of an individual user or to the
terrain that a specific scooter will be used in.
Note:
This parameter is used with a speed limit pot that is connected IN PARALLEL
with the throttle, between 'Throttle Positive' (pin 2) and 'Throttle Negative' (pin
8), and that has its wiper connected to pin 9 (speed limit pot input). If the
scooter has a speed limit pot that is connected IN SERIES with the throttle
wiper, Lowest Forward Speed is not used and Speed Limit Pot must be set to
'No'.
This parameter cannot be set lower than the value of the Lowest Forward
Speed Limit parameter (4.4.4.3) that has been set by the scooter
manufacturer.
4.4.3.8
Lowest Reverse Speed
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Lowest Reverse Speed
0 - 60 %
10 %
HHP
Lite
Std



Adv

This parameter is only used when Speed Limit Pot (4.4.2.11) is set to 'Yes'.
Sets the maximum speed in the reverse direction when the lowest speed has been selected
with the speed limit pot (see 3.7.6) and the throttle is fully deflected reverse. Dealers can
adjust this parameter to the preference of an individual user or to the terrain that a specific
scooter will be used in.
Note:
This parameter cannot be set lower than the value of the Lowest Reverse
Speed Limit parameter (4.4.4.4) that has been set by the scooter
manufacturer.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
72
4.4.3.9
Soft Start Period
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Soft Start Period
0 - 2550 ms
1000 ms
HHP
Lite
Std

*
Adv

When the scooter starts to drive from a standstill, the soft start function temporary reduces
the acceleration rate during the time that is set with Soft Start Period. This makes the
acceleration smoother, especially with high acceleration rates or high load compensation
settings.
Higher values give a softer start, while lower values give a more direct and harsh start.
To disable soft start completely, set Soft Start Period to zero.
Speed
Soft-Start Period
Time
4.4.3.10 Soft Finish
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Soft Finish
0 - 100 %
40 %
HHP
Lite
*
Std

Adv

When the scooter almost reaches its desired speed during acceleration or deceleration, the
acceleration/deceleration rate is slowly decreased to zero. This prevents a sudden change in
acceleration once the desired speed is reached.
Use the Soft Finish parameter to adjust the point where the soft transition starts.
0 %:
Direct and harsh transition (no soft finish at all)
100 %: Very smooth transition
For most applications, the default value of 40 % works fine.
Soft Finish
100 %
Speed
Time
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
73
4.4.3.11 Emergency Deceleration
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Emergency Deceleration
0 - 100 %
80 %
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv

Emergency Deceleration sets how quickly the scooter comes to a halt when



a Stop input is active
a fault that requires an emergency stop occurs
the key switch is removed while driving
If the normal deceleration rate is higher than Emergency Deceleration, the normal
deceleration value is used.
Emergency deceleration rate is only used when travelling forward. When travelling reverse,
normal deceleration is used. This is to avoid tipping backwards when backing on a slope.
Warning:
If this parameter is set too high, the user can fall out of the scooter during an
emergency stop.
4.4.3.12 Slam Braking
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Slam Braking
0 - 100 %
100 %
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv

Slam Braking sets how quickly the scooter comes to a halt when the throttle is moved
significantly in the opposite direction to the direction that the scooter is currently moving in.
If the normal deceleration rate is higher than Slam Braking, the normal deceleration value is
used.
Warning:
If this parameter is set too high, the user can fall out of the scooter during a
slam braking operation.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
74
4.4.3.13 Push Speed
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Push Speed
15 - 100 %
40 %
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv

This feature will stop the scooter from rolling away on a slope when the controller is on and
the park brakes have been released electrically (this would normally be the case if the
scooter is being pushed).
If the scooter is being pushed (by an external force) at a higher speed than Push Speed, the
controller will limit the speed to Push Speed.
Note:
To release the park brakes electrically, set one of the multi-function input pin
parameters (see 4.4.9) to 'Release Brake'.
4.4.3.14 Roll-away Speed
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Roll-away Speed
30 - 100 %
40 %
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv

This feature will stop the scooter from rolling away on a slope when the controller is off and
the park brakes have been released manually.
If the scooter moves at a higher speed than Roll-away Speed, the controller will turn on by
itself and reduce the speed of the scooter to a safe level.
Warning:
If this parameter is set too high, especially with heavier scooters, there is a risk
of injury, through collision or crushing, when the scooter rolls down a slope.
Note:
If the batteries are not connected, the controller uses the power that is
generated by the motors during a rollaway to power itself on. In this case the
controller will also limit the speed to a safe level.
Warnings:
1)
After the scooter has stopped successfully, apply the park brake before
turning on the scooter. During the 2-second boot process the scooter is
not controlled. In these 2 seconds, the scooter will start to roll again before
it will come to an abrupt halt when the R-series has completed the boot
process.
2)
If the batteries are not connected and the scooter is rolling away at some
speed, the anti-rollaway feature may cause sudden braking so that it can
reduce the speed of the scooter quickly; this may be upsetting and / or
dangerous for the occupant.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
75
4.4.3.15 Speed Reduction Wiper (SRW) parameters
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv
SRW Forward Speed Limit
0 - 100 %
50 %


SRW Reverse Speed Limit
0 - 100 %
50 %


SRW Forward Speed Scale
0 - 100 %
50 %


SRW Reverse Speed Scale
0 - 100 %
50 %


These parameters are only used when Pin 4 Function (0) is set to 'SRW'
If Pin 4 Function is set to 'SRW', the R-series reduces the speed proportionally to the resistance
between pin 4 of the tiller head connector and battery negative (B-). If the resistance is 10kΩ
or more, the speed is not reduced. If the resistance is zero, the speed is reduced to the value
of any of the four SRW Speed parameters.
For more information on Speed Reduction Wiper connections, see section 3.7.7.
Max Speed
100%
SRW Speed parameter @ 50 %
5
10
Resistance (kΩ)
The speed can be reduced in 2 different ways:
Limit
-
Scale -
Limits the speed of the scooter itself. This means that the throttle can still ask for
100% speed, but when the scooter reaches the SRW Speed Limit value, the actual
speed will not increase any further. This creates a dead band in throttle operation.
However, below the speed limit the behaviour of the throttle does not change.
Scales the throttle output. This means that if SRW Speed Scale is set to 50%, the
throttle will only ask for 50% speed at full deflection. This does not create a throttle
dead band. However, it changes the behaviour of the throttle over the full range
of deflection.
SRW Speed Limit
SRW Speed Scale
100%
Speed @ 0 kΩ
Limit 80 %
Limit 50 %
50%
Throttle
100%
Scale 80 %
Speed @ 0 kΩ
100%
Scale 50 %
50%
Throttle
100%
All 4 parameters reduce the speed simultaneously and independently of each other. If any of
the parameters is set to 100%, it disables the reduction effect of that specific parameter.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
76
4.4.4 OEM Drive Limits
The OEM Drive Limits allow the OEM to set the maximum value that dealers can set several
drive performance parameters to. This allows OEMs to limit certain parameters for specific
scooter models. Dealers will not be able to set the value of these parameters higher or lower
than the limits given below.
4.4.4.1
Maximum Forward Speed Limit
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Maximum Forward Speed Limit
0 - 100 %
100 %
HHP
Lite

Std


Adv

Sets the maximum value that can be set by a dealer for the Maximum Forward Speed
parameter (4.4.3.1). Set to 100 % for no effect.
4.4.4.2
Maximum Reverse Speed Limit
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Maximum Reverse Speed Limit
0 - 100 %
100 %
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv


Sets the maximum value that can be set by a dealer for the Maximum Reverse Speed
parameter (4.4.3.4). Set to 100 % for no effect.
4.4.4.3
Lowest Forward Speed Limit
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Lowest Forward Speed Limit
0 - 10 %
0%
HHP
Lite

Std
Adv


Sets the minimum value that can be set by a dealer for the Lowest Forward Speed parameter
(4.4.3.7). Set to 0 % for no effect.
4.4.4.4
Lowest Reverse Speed Limit
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Lowest Reverse Speed Limit
0 - 100 %
0%
HHP
Lite
Std

Adv

Sets the minimum value that can be set by a dealer for the Lowest Reverse Speed parameter
(4.4.3.8). Set to 0 % for no effect.
4.4.4.5
Acceleration Limit
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Acceleration Limit
0 - 100 %
100 %
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv


Sets the maximum value that can be set by a dealer for the Forward Acceleration (4.4.3.2)
and Reverse Acceleration (4.4.3.5) parameters. Set to 100 for no effect.
4.4.4.6
Deceleration Limit
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Deceleration Limit
0 - 100 %
100 %
HHP
Lite

Std
Adv


Sets the maximum value that can be set by a dealer for the Forward Deceleration (4.4.3.3)
and Reverse Deceleration (4.4.3.6) parameters. Set to 100 for no effect.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
77
4.4.5 Motor Management
4.4.5.1
Motor Protection
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Motor Protection
No / Yes
No
HHP
Lite
Std


Adv

Motor Protection is a function that calculates the approximate temperature of the motor by
measuring the motor current over time. If the calculated motor temperature becomes too
high, the current output of the R-series is reduced to protect the motor from burning out.
In R-series software revision C, a new algorithm was introduced that is easier to set up than the old
algorithm. The new algorithm uses different parameters with a different name. The parameters of
the two versions are described in two different sections on this and the following page.
Note:
This function assists in motor protection. However, it cannot completely prevent
the motor from burning out. The motor may last longer, but specific conditions
can still burn out a motor, even with Motor Protection activated.
The motor protection function operates in parallel with other current control
functions and so the actual current limit will be determined by whichever
process requests the lowest operating current.
4.4.5.2
Motor Protection Parameters (Rev. C,D and E)
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv
Motor Continuous Current
0 - 255 A
12 A (DR50)
15 A (DR90)

Motor Heating Time
0 - 255 s
20 s

Motor Cooling Time
0 - 1020 s
32 s

These parameters are only used if Motor Protection is set to 'Yes'.
Adapt these parameters to match the motor that is fitted on the scooter. See the motor
specifications given by the motor manufacturer for the correct values.
Motor Continuous Current is the current at which the motor can run continuously without
becoming too hot.
Motor Heating Time is the time that the motor can run at the programmed Current Limit
(4.4.5.9) before it becomes too hot. If the motor current has been close to Current Limit for
Motor Heating Time seconds, the current is limited to Motor Continuous Current so the motor
can cool down.
Before the current can reach the Current Limit value again, the motor current must stay
below the value of Motor Continuous Current for Motor Cooling Time seconds.
Note:
The time before the motor protection current limit is activated depends on
the actual motor current. Motor Heating Time is the time that the motor can
take the full Current Limit current before it becomes too hot. If the actual
motor current is above Motor Continuous Current but much lower than
Current Limit, the time before the motor protection limit is activated is longer.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
78
4.4.5.3
Motor Protection Parameters (Rev. A and B)
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv
Motor Continuous Current
0 - 255 A
12 A (DR50)
15 A (DR90)

Motor Case Time
0 - 87 min
20 min

Motor Brush Time
0 - 326 s
20 s

Motor Brush/Case Ratio
0 - 100 %
30 %

These parameters are only used if Motor Protection is set to 'Yes'.
Adapt these parameters to match the motor that is fitted on the scooter. See the motor
specifications given by the motor manufacturer for the correct values.
Motor Continuous Current is the current at which the motor can run continuously without
becoming too hot.
Motor Brush Time / Motor Case Time. The algorithm estimates the temperature of both the
motor brush assembly and the motor case. A heating term and a cooling term are
calculated for the motor brush assembly. This calculation updates at intervals proportional to
Motor Brush Time. A heating term and a cooling term are also calculated for the motor case.
This calculation updates more slowly, at intervals proportional to Motor Case Time.
Motor Brush/Case Ratio specifies what fraction the motor case temperature rises compared
to the brush temperature. This Ratio term will be used to multiply the case heating term, and
the complement of the Ratio will be used to multiply the case cooling term. Thus a Ratio of
66% will cause the estimated case temperature to stabilise at two-thirds of the estimated
brush temperature, while a Ratio of 25% will cause the estimated case temperature to
stabilise at 1/4 of the estimated brush temperature. The Ratio term will also be used to scale
the brush cooling term, but the actual multiplier will be (1/(1-Ratio)). Therefore the higher the
Ratio value, the smaller the difference between brush and case temperatures for a given
amount of brush cooling.
4.4.5.4
Motor Reverse
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Motor Reverse
No / Yes
No
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv


Yes - The polarity of the motor pins on the R-series is reversed and the motor turns in the
opposite direction.
No
- The polarity of the motor pins is as described in section 3.3.
Note:
Do not use Motor Reverse to setup the scooter for left-handed use, set the
Swap Throttle Direction parameter (see 4.4.1.3) to 'Yes' instead. Motor Reverse
only swaps the motor polarity, not other forward/reverse features such as the
Forward/Reverse speed setting and the reversing beeper. Using Motor Reverse
to setup the scooter for left-handed use will result in the reversing beeper
beeping while the scooter drives slowly forward.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
79
4.4.5.5
Load Compensation
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Load Compensation
0 - 1020 mΩ
100 mΩ
HHP
*
Lite
Std
Adv


Load Compensation automatically compensates for changes in motor speed when the
scooter drives over loads such as sidewalks, curbs or slopes.
Note:
The Load Compensation parameter affects the performance of all other speed
and acceleration parameters, and it is important to set Load Compensation
correctly before you program these parameters. If the Load Compensation
parameter is changed after the scooter has been set up, the complete
speed/acceleration programming and testing procedure must be repeated.
Set Load Compensation to the resistance of the motor that is installed on the scooter.
Motor
Resistance
Too low
Correct
Too high
Scooter
behaviour
 Drives like it is
going through
thick mud
 Slows down when
it goes up a
sidewalk edge or
up a ramp
 Slows down with
heavier users
 Rolls back
significantly after
stopping on a
slope
 Drives smoothly
 Keeps the speed
reasonably
constant. Only
slightly slows down
on a slope
 Does not roll back
after stopping on a
slope
 Drives very rough
 Hard to control,
vibrates or surges
 May creep forward
after stopping on a
slope
 Motor becomes
hotter than normal
very easily,
decreased motor
life
If the scooter gives poor performance on carpet or at low speeds, the most probable cause
is a Load Compensation value that is set too low.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
80
Determining the correct motor resistance by looking at the scooter behaviour
Tools needed
1. A scooter with an R-series controller fitted
2. A Hand Held Programmer (HHP) or
a laptop with the Wizard Programmer
3. A slope that you can drive up to
1
2
3
Procedure


Set Load Compensation to 20.
Drive the scooter onto a slope and increase the Load Compensation value until the
scooter does not roll back after it has stopped on the slope.
To test if Load Compensation has the correct value, perform a series of scooter tests (drive on
a slope, up a sidewalk edge, and over thick carpet) and check if the scooter behaviour is
similar to the correct behaviour described above.
Performance
Optimum Load Compensation.
Scooter responsive AND smooth
Nervous
Unresponsive
Aim for this point: 20 % back
from the top of the hill
Uncontrollable
Load Compensation
Notes:
1. This test procedure causes the motor to become hot. For this reason, the
resulting value for Load Compensation is too high. Reduce Load Compensation
by 20% to make sure that the scooter is still comfortable to drive when the motor
is cold.
2. A new motor usually has a higher motor resistance than a motor that has been
used for some time, because the motor brushes that are inside the motor do not
make optimal contact until they are "worn in". If possible, perform this procedure
when the motor has been used for several hours.
4.4.5.6
Maximum Load Compensation
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Maximum Load Compensation
0 - 1020 mΩ
1000 mΩ
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv

This parameter sets the maximum value that the Load Compensation parameter can be set to.
This value must be set by the OEM to match the motors of the powerchair.
Maximum Load Compensation prevents the dealer from setting Load Compensation to a
value that is too high, which can be dangerous.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
81
4.4.5.7
Load Compensation Damping
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Load
Compensation
Damping
0 - 60%
50%
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv

Load Compensation Damping is used to dampen the effects of the load compensation to
avoid bucking and instability at high Load Compensation settings. Bucking is characterised
as a rocking or lurching motion when coming to a halt or jerky and unsteady acceleration
when starting from a stop (usually occurring under low throttle application).
The recommended value for this parameter is between 25 – 50%. It’s important to avoid
higher values of Load Compensation Damping as this can lead to the load compensation
continuing to be applied when the motor current has fallen, causing problems such as the
scooter continuing to surge forward after, for example, climbing an obstacle.
The Load Compensation Damping parameter interacts with the following parameters:



Remembered Load Compensation
Load Compensation
Park Brake Neutral Delay
When setting these parameters, follow the method below:
1. Adjust the Load Compensation parameter first to give correct driving performance.
2. Adjust Load Compensation Damping to minimise bucking, while keeping the system
responsive.
3. Adjust the Park Brake Neutral Delay parameter to provide acceptable rollback on
slopes and prevent jerking – higher values decrease jerking but give more rollback
and vice versa.
4. Adjust the Remembered Load Compensation to give acceptable starting
performance when the park brakes are released, both when driving on the flat and
on slopes. (Note: this parameter has no effect if the scooter stops and restarts driving
quickly such that the park brakes are never applied.)
4.4.5.8
Remembered Load Compensation
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Remembered
Load
Compensation
0 - 60%
50%
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv

The controller records the amount of motor current that is required to hold the scooter
stationary just before the park brakes are applied. When the scooter starts off again, this
recorded value is used to calculate the starting load compensation value to reduce the
amount that the scooter rolls back. The Remembered Load Compensation parameter adjusts
the amount of this starting load compensation.
The Remembered Load Compensation parameter interacts with the following parameters:



Load Compensation Damping
Load Compensation
Park Brake Neutral Delay
When setting these parameters, follow the method below:
1. Adjust the Load Compensation parameter first to give correct driving performance.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
82
2. Adjust Load Compensation Damping to minimise bucking, while keeping the system
responsive.
3. Adjust the Park Brake Neutral Delay parameter to provide acceptable rollback on
slopes and prevent jerking - higher values decrease jerking but give more rollback
and vice versa.
4. Adjust the Remembered Load Compensation to give acceptable starting
performance when the park brakes are released, both when driving on the flat and
on slopes. (Note: this parameter has no effect if the scooter stops and restarts driving
quickly such that the park brakes are never applied.)
4.4.5.9
Current Limit
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Current Limit
0 - 40 A (DR50)
0 - 70 A (DR90)
40 A
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv


Current Limit sets the maximum output current in Ampere that the R-series will deliver to a
motor. A low value can affect the performance of the scooter, for example when the
scooter tries to climb up a curb.
The maximum useable setting depends on the current rating for the controller type, for
example 40A for the DR50. Higher settings have no effect on the controller.
Warning:
Do not set this parameter too high for the type of motor used.
Notes:
The time that the R-series will deliver the maximum sustained current to the
motors is limited by the Stall Timeout parameter (4.4.5.11).
To protect the electronics of the R-series, the maximum current will be
reduced further if the controller becomes too hot.
4.4.5.10 Boost Current / Boost Time
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
HHP
Boost Current
0 - 10 A (DR50)
0 - 20 A (DR90)
8A

Boost Time
0 - 51 s
4s

Lite

Std
Adv




The R-series can deliver an additional current of Boost Current Ampere for Boost Time
seconds, to overcome transient loads such as starting on a hill, overcoming castor lock,
climbing obstacles, etc.
If the Boost Time is reached, the current is limited to Current Limit.
Before the current can reach the Boost Current value again, the motor current must stay
below the value of Current Limit for at least twice as long as that it has been above Current
Limit.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
83
4.4.5.11 Stall Timeout
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Stall Timeout
0 - 51 s
25 s
HHP
Lite
Std


Adv

If the throttle is deflected but the scooter cannot drive because



It is on a slope that is too steep,
It tries to climb up a curb that is too high, or
It is trapped,
the maximum current (as set by the Current Limit parameter) will flow through the motor
continuously, because the motor is still trying to drive. This situation is called motor stalling.
Motor stalling can cause motor damage when the motor becomes too hot. To prevent
motor damage, the R-series disables drive after Stall Timeout seconds of maximum
continuous current.
If a stall timeout has occurred, the scooter will perform an emergency stop and the Status
LED shows Flash Code 4 (see section 5.2 for flash code descriptions). The scooter does not
drive. To reset the fault, turn the scooter off and turn it back on again.
Notes:
Some safety standards specify a particular stall timeout. See the regulations of
the country in which the scooter is to be used to determine what the correct
Stall Timeout value is.
If Stall Timeout is set to zero, the R-series will deliver as much power as it can, for
as long as it can, while still protecting itself. This is not recommended because it
can be against local regulations and can cause motor damage.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
84
4.4.5.12 Motor Testing
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Motor Testing
None
Open
Short
All
Short
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv

Before and during driving, the motors are tested to make sure that they are OK.
This parameter controls the tests that are done before driving.
All
-
Test the motor for both open and short circuits.
Always use this setting unless one of the conditions below applies.
Open -
Test the motor for open circuits.
Use this setting if low-impedance motors are being detected as a short circuit.
Short
Test the motor for short circuits.
Use this setting if the open circuit test is noisy, or if the system wiring is not compatible.
-
None -
Disable all motor testing.
Warning:
For safety reasons, do not set this parameter to 'None' unless for testing in a
controlled environment.
Only set this parameter to 'Open' or 'Short' if the motors used are failing the test
and they have been fully tested to make sure that they are healthy.
4.4.5.13 Maximum Motor Voltage
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Maximum Motor Voltage
2 – 40.2 V
28.8 V
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv

Maximum Motor Voltage sets the maximum voltage that the R-series will apply to the
motor.
Note:
If local regulations require that the scooter speed is limited to a specific value,
use this parameter to set a speed limit for a particular scooter type (for specific
motors and a specific wheel diameter).
If the momentary battery voltage is less than the programmed Maximum Motor Voltage
value (for example when the battery is almost empty), then the battery voltage itself is the
maximum applied voltage at 100 % speed demand.
The actual voltage output from the R-series may at times be up to 10 V higher than this
setting due to Load Compensation (4.4.5.5).
4.4.5.14 Dead-time Adjust
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Deadtime Adjust
0-4
0
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv

Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
85
The Dead-time Adjust value affects the way the H-Bridge is controlled. When the controller is
calibrated during manufacture, the dead-time of the H-Bridge FETs is set to its most efficient
value. On some scooters this can lead to slightly elevated EMC emission levels.
If the Dead-time Adjust value is set to zero, then the controller uses the factory calibration
value.
If the Dead-time Adjust value is incremented beyond zero, then the H-bridge will be driven in
a slightly less efficient way, resulting in a minor loss of performance (power delivered to the
motor) with a maximum loss of around 1%.
Most scooters will show a slight drop in EMC emission levels if the Dead-Time Adjust value is
incremented. Set this parameter as low as possible.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
86
4.4.6 Park brake Management
4.4.6.1
Park brake Testing
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Park brake Testing
None
Pre-drive
Driving
Pre-drive
Driving
-
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv

The R-series checks the park brake for open-circuit faults before and during
driving.
Pre-drive -
The R-series checks the park brake for open circuit faults before driving, but not
during driving. Use this option when the open circuit test during driving is very
noisy and/or incorrect faults are generated.
None
The R-series never checks the park brake for open circuit faults.
This option allows the R-series to be used without an electric park brake.
-
Regardless of the option selected, the R-series checks the park brake for short circuit faults
immediately before and periodically during driving.
Warning:
For safety reasons, do not use 'None' if the scooter has an electric park brake.
Park brake Neutral Delay
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Park brake Neutral Delay
0 - 25500 ms
2000 ms
HHP
Lite
Std

Adv

The Park brake Neutral Delay parameter sets the delay between zero speed demand (after
the scooter has decelerated and stopped) and the moment that the park brakes are
engaged.
speed
4.4.6.2
Park brake
neutral delay
t
Throttle returned to neutral
De-energise
park brake
The correct value of this parameter is dependent on the mechanics of the park brake that is
used on the scooter. The delay must be longer for fast acting park brakes.
If the value of Park brake Delay is set too high, there may be too much rollback when
stopping on a slope. If the value is set too low, the scooter may stop too abruptly.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
87
4.4.6.3
Park Brake Release Delay
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Park Brake Release Delay
0 - 25500 ms
0 ms
When the scooter is stopped, and the
throttle is deflected, the park brake is
released immediately but the scooter will
not start driving until the Park Brake Release
Delay has expired. This is useful for park
brakes that have a slow mechanical
release.
speed
The Park Brake Release Delay is the interval
between when the park brake is released
and when the scooter starts driving.
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv


Park brake
release delay
t
Throttle deflected &
Park brake energised
Set the Park Brake Release Delay to suit the mechanical release speed of the park brake: set
the value high for slow releases, and low or zero for fast releases.
Warning:
If the Park Brake Release Delay value is set too high the scooter may begin
rolling before the motors start driving.
4.4.7 Battery Management
4.4.7.1
Overvoltage Rollback
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv
Overvoltage Warning
24 - 30.2V
30.2V

Overvoltage Rollback
30.2 – 34.8V
34.2V

Set Overvoltage Warning to the voltage at which the controller will begin slowing the scooter
to protect the batteries from an over-voltage condition.
Set Overvoltage Rollback to the voltage at which the controller will stop driving the scooter
to protect the batteries from an over-voltage condition.
4.4.7.2
Undervoltage Rollback
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv
Undervoltage Rollback Start
18 - 32.2 V
21 V

Undervoltage Rollback End
17 - 21 V
18 V

If the battery Voltage falls below Undervoltage Rollback Start, the R-series reduces the
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
88
maximum throttle input value, so the user cannot ask for full speed anymore. This



protects the battery
gives the scooter a longer range before the battery is completely empty
gives the user a physical warning that the battery is almost empty before the battery is
damaged.
Maximum Throttle
The scooter will drive slower but should still be able to climb small obstacles such as curbs. If
the battery voltage falls below Undervoltage Rollback End, the scooter stops driving because
the throttle is reduced to zero.
Battery
Almost
Empty
Battery
Empty
UVR End
UVR Start
V
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
89
4.4.7.3
4.4.7.4
4.4.7.5
Battery Gauge Minimum/Maximum
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv
Battery Gauge Minimum
16 - 24 V
22 V

Battery Gauge Maximum
19 - 27 V
24.4 V

Battery Gauge Minimum
-
sets the voltage at which the Battery gauge indicates
an empty battery.
Battery Gauge Maximum
-
sets the voltage at which the Battery gauge indicates
a full battery.
Battery Gauge Warning
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Battery Gauge High Warning
24 - 32 V
Battery Gauge Low Warning
18 - 26 V
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv
29 V


23.4 V


Battery Gauge High Warning
-
sets the voltage at which a high-voltage condition is
indicated.
Battery Gauge Low Warning
-
sets the voltage at which a low-voltage condition is
indicated.
Battery Cut-Off Voltage
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Battery Cut-Off Voltage
16 - 24 V
19.1 V
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv



This parameter is only used when Deep Discharge Beeper (4.4.1.10) has the value 'Yes'.
The Battery Cut-Off Voltage specifies the voltage at which the battery is empty and battery
damage will occur if the battery is discharged any further. If the battery voltage falls below
this value, the R-series gives the user an audible warning.
Contact your battery supplier for the cut-off level of your batteries. Typically, the cut-off level
for lead-acid batteries is 21V.
Note:
An audible deep discharge warning is required to comply with ISO7176-14.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
90
4.4.7.6
Battery Gauge Dead-band
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Battery Gauge Dead-band
0-6V
3.5 V
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv

Prevents the battery gauge from increasing when the battery voltage recovers after driving.
If the scooter is driving, the battery voltage will be lower than when the scooter stands still.
However, the actual charge of the battery does not increase during standstill, even though
the voltage has increased. This can cause the battery gauge to increase as well, showing a
charge that is too high during standstill.
Battery Gauge Dead-band makes sure that the battery gauge only shows a higher charge
when the battery is actually being charged. Any increase in battery voltage that is lower
than the value of Battery Gauge Dead-band is ignored.
4.4.7.7
Battery Gauge Sensitivity
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Battery Gauge Sensitivity
Battery Capacity (HHP - A,B,C)
0 - 170
40
HHP
Lite
Std

Adv

Adjusts the speed with which the battery gauge reacts to voltage fluctuations of the battery.
Batteries with a higher capacity take more time to discharge. For this reason, the battery
gauge should react slower with high-capacity batteries to ignore fast voltage fluctuations
that happen when the scooter encounters temporary loads such as a ramp.
If the battery voltage is less than the battery gauge currently indicates, the battery gauge
decreases by 5% after Battery Gauge Sensitivity x 1.5 seconds. The 100% range of the battery
gauge falls between Battery Gauge Minimum and Battery Gauge Maximum.
For better battery gauge accuracy, increase the value of Battery Gauge Sensitivity with highcapacity batteries and decrease the value with low-capacity batteries.
In older versions of the R-series, this parameter was called Battery Capacity by the HHP.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
91
4.4.8 System Options
4.4.8.1
Service Scheduler
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Service Scheduler
No / Yes
Yes
Service Period
0 - 5100 h
5000 h
HHP

Lite
Std
Adv






The Service Scheduler is a preventative maintenance feature that allows the OEM to set up
scheduled servicing plans for their scooter customers.
To enable the Service Scheduler function, set Service Scheduler to 'Yes'.
Service Period sets the drive time between service schedules. When this number of hours has
been exceeded, the status indicator will flash slowly 3 times every time the scooter is turned
on or wakes up from sleep, to indicate that a service is due. This is repeated every 15 minutes.
To clear the service indication, either set the value of Service Period to zero, or erase the
controller history with the Wizard:
Tools -> Erase Controller History.
Note:
Erasing the controller history erases the fault log as well.
Consequently, erasing the controller history to erase the fault log will reset the
service scheduler as well.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
92
4.4.9 Multi-function Inputs Configuration
4.4.9.1
Pin [X] Function
Parameter
Possible Values
Pin 4 Function
None
Reverse Drive
Release Brake
Charger Inhibit
Profile2
Slow
Slow/Stop
Slow/Stop FWD
Slow/Stop REV
SRW
Neutral Detect**
Pin 6 Function
Pin 12 Function
Pin 14 Function
Prog/Inh Pin Function
Default
None
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv















The Program/Inhibit (P/I) pin (pin 4) of the charger connector and pins 4, 6, 12 and 14 of the
tiller head connector can be configured as input pins.
Connect external switches or potentiometers to the input pins to activate one of the
following functions:
None
-
No function, normal drive in all states.
Reverse Drive
-
When this function is active, it swaps the throttle direction.
This function can be used for a 'Reverse' switch when Throttle Type
(4.4.2.1) is set to 'Single-ended' or 'Uni-polar'.
If this function is activated while driving, the scooter will immediately
decelerate to zero at the normal rate and then accelerate in the
opposite direction.
If multiple pins are programmed to perform Reverse Drive, they work in
parallel: reverse drive applies as long as any combination of one or
more pins is activated.
Release Brake
-
When this function is active, the Park brake is released electrically, so that it
is possible to push the scooter. It is not possible to drive the scooter while the
park brake is released.
To prevent a rollaway situation while the park brake is released,
the scooter will stop if the speed during pushing is higher than the value of
the Push Speed parameter (4.4.3.13).
If the switch is active at power-up or is activated while driving, a park brake
fault flash code will show on the Status light, but the scooter will still drive
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
93
normally. In this case, the Release Brake function will be disabled and the
state of the associated input pin ignored until the power is cycled.
Warning:
The Release Brake function will not release the park brake while the scooter is
inhibited from driving due to charger inhibit, a stop function or during
programming with the Wizard.
Charger Inhibit -
Stops the scooter at the programmed Emergency Deceleration and
inhibits drive. If Latches is set to 'Yes', the scooter must be turned off and on
before it is possible to drive again. If Flashes* is set to 'Yes', the Status Light
will show a "Drive Inhibit" flash code while the drive inhibit is active. See
section 5.2 for more information on flash codes.
Note: to make the charger inhibit pin compatible with the industry
standard where the inhibit signal must be connected to B- to activate
inhibit, set Active to 'Low'.
Profile 2
-
When this function is active, the scooter switches to Profile 2 (see 4.4.3). A
typical application for Profile 2 is a user-selectable 'slow speed' mode that
can be used indoors, while Profile 1 is selected for outdoor use. Apart from
only a limited speed, the indoor profile can have its acceleration and
deceleration set lower as well.
Slow
-
Limits the maximum speed of the scooter to the value that is set with
Slows To. Has no effect on scooter acceleration or deceleration.
Slows To is a percentage of Maximum Forward Speed (4.4.3.1) or
Maximum Reverse Speed (4.4.3.4). For example, if Maximum Forward
Speed is set to 80% and Slows To is set to 50%, the resulting maximum
speed will be the value of Slows To i.e. 50%.
If Slows To is set to 0%, the function behaves the same as the 'Stop' state
of the Slow/Stop function (including latching and flashing), which is
described below. If Slows To is set higher than 0%, The Slow function does
not latch or flash.
Slow/Stop
-
This function has three states:
 Normal drive (pin not connected).
 Slow (2.2 kΩ connected to B+ if Active High or B- if Active Low).
Operates the same as the Slow function.
 Stop (pin connected to B+ if Active High or B- if Active Low).
Stops the scooter at the programmed Emergency Deceleration and
inhibits drive. If Latches is set to 'Yes', the scooter must be turned off and
on before it is possible to drive again. If Flashes* is set to 'Yes', the Status
Light will show a "Drive Inhibit" flash code while the drive inhibit is active.
See section 5.2 for more information on flash codes.
Only valid Active settings are 'High' and 'Low', all other settings disable
the input (the input will never become active).
Slow/Stop FWD -
The same as Slow/Stop, but only applies to the forward direction, reverse
drive is not affected. If Latches is set to 'No' and forward Stop has been
activated and released, forward drive will still not be possible until the
scooter has stopped and the throttle has been returned to neutral .
Flash codes are not used during this function (Flashes* is ignored).
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
94
Slow/Stop REV
-
The same as Slow/Stop, but only applies to the reverse direction, forward
drive is not affected. If Latches is set to 'No' and reverse Stop has been
activated and released, reverse drive will still not be possible until the
scooter has stopped and the throttle has been returned to neutral .
Flash codes are not used during this function (Flashes* is ignored).
SRW
-
The Speed Reduction Wiper function provides an analogue input that
can be used for a user-operated speed limit pot, or an anti-tip feature
that automatically limits the speed of the scooter while turning. For more
information, see the description of the Speed Reduction Wiper (SRW)
parameters (4.4.3.15).
Neutral Detect** -
To prevent a runaway caused by a faulty electrical throttle circuit,
this function compares the throttle signal with the signal from a 'neutral'
switch. The 'neutral' switch must be mechanically connected to the
throttle so that it activates when the throttle is in the true neutral position. If
the throttle now gives an out-of-neutral output signal when the 'neutral'
switch is still active, the R-series does not drive and the Status light shows a
"Throttle Fault" flash code (FC 7). The scooter must be turned off and on to
clear the fault.
For this function to work correctly, the 'neutral window' of the throttle (as
set with the Throttle Dead-band parameter, see 4.4.2.6) must be larger
than the active range of the 'neutral' switch.
Only valid Active settings are 'High', 'Low' and 'Open', all other settings will
result in throttle faults. See also Neutral Detect Active States (6.1).
* The Flashes setting is available in controller software Rev. D and higher.
** The Neutral Detect setting can only be used with Dual Decode variants (see chapter 1).
Note:
If 'Latches' is selected, please select 'Flashes' as well to indicate to the user
why the scooter will not drive.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
95
4.4.9.2
Active States
The input pins can be set to the following active states:
Low
-
Input is active when pulled down, inactive when open or pulled up
High
-
Input is active when pulled up, inactive when open or pulled down
Open
-
Input is active when open, inactive when pulled up or pulled down
Low or High
-
Input is inactive when open, active when pulled up or pulled down
Low or Open
-
Input is inactive when pulled up, active when open or pulled down
High or Open
-
Input is inactive when pulled down, active when open or pulled up
To pull up an input, connect it to B+. To pull down an input, connect it to B-.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
96
4.4.10 Multi-function Outputs Configuration
4.4.10.1 Flash Code Type
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Flash Code Type
Scooter
Shark
Type 3
Type 4
Scooter
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv


To make the most of your existing industry knowledge of products, the R-series has the ability
to display a variety of different flash code types.
#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Scooter
Meaning
Battery Low
Low Battery Fault
High Battery Fault
Stall Time-out / Controller too hot
Park brake Fault
Drive Inhibit
Speed Pot / Throttle Fault
Motor Voltage Fault
Other / Internal
Type 3
Meaning
Battery Low
Bad Motor Connection
Motor Short Circuit
Stall Time-out / Controller too hot
- (unused)
Drive Inhibit
Speed Pot / Throttle Fault
Controller Fault
Park brake Fault
High Battery Voltage
#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
#
1-1
1-2
1-3
1-4
1-5
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
Shark
Meaning
Stop function / Charger Inhibit
Battery Fault
Motor Fault
Stall Time-out / Controller too hot
Park brake Fault
- (unused)
Speed Pot / Throttle Fault
System / Internal Fault
Type 4
Meaning
Thermal Cut-back / Stall
Throttle Trip
Speed Limit Pot Fault
Under Voltage Fault
Over Voltage Fault
Main Contacter Driver Off Fault
- (Unused)
Main Contacter Fault
Main Contacter Driver On Fault
Dr. inhibit / OONAPU / Proc or Wiring
Brake On Fault
Precharge Fault
Brake Off Fault
High Pedal Disable Fault
Current Sense Fault
Motor Voltage Fault
EEPROM Fault
Power Section Fault
See Section 5.2 for a full description of the flash codes.
The Wizard Diagnostics Report lists the currently selected Flash Code type.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
97
4.4.10.2 Pin 3/11 Function
Parameter
Possible Values
Pin 3 Function
Pin 11 Function
None
Brake Light
Reverse Light
Beeper
Status
Power Status
Default
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv
Beeper


Status


These parameters set the function of Pin 3 and pin 11 on the tiller connector.
Pin 3 and pin 11 are both capable to sink 500 mA. To use the outputs, connect a 24V beeper,
lamp, or Status LED (with resistor) between B+ and pin 3 or pin 11.
None
-
The output is not used.
Brake Light
-
The output pin drives a 24V Brake Light. The brake light is on when the
scooter decelerates in either the forward or reverse direction. Connect the
light between B+ and the pin that has 'Brake Light' selected.
Reverse Light -
The output pin drives a 24V Reverse Light. Connect the light between B+
and the pin that has 'Reverse Light' selected.
Beeper
-
The output pin drives a 24V beeper. Connect the beeper between B+ and
the pin that has 'Beeper' selected. To activate any beeper sounds,
set Enable Beeper (4.4.1.4) to 'Yes'. Other beeper options can be selected
with Flash Code Beeper (4.4.1.5), Sleep Beeper (4.4.1.6), Motion Beeper
(4.4.1.8), Deep Discharge Beeper (4.4.1.10) and Beeper Timing (4.4.1.9).
Status
-
The output pin drives a Status light.
The Status light is on when the power is on.
When a fault condition exists, the Status light shows the related flash code.
Power Status
-
The output pin drives a Power-on light.
The Power-on light is on when the power is on.
The Power-on light does not show flash codes, it remains on continuously.
If an output is set to 'Brake Light', 'Reverse Light', 'Status' or 'Power Status', the light to use can
be a 24V LED array (max. 500mA) or a relay-driven incandescent or halogen bulb.
If a relay is used, a fly-back diode and a series diode must be installed. If an LED array is used,
it must have its own internal current limiting system. An LED array must also have reverse
polarity protection such as a series diode. An LED array may show a faint glow if the output is
not active. If this is the case, resistors mounted in parallel to the LED array may reduce the
glow.
For more information and schematics, see Status Indicator Output (section 3.7.10),
Beeper Output (section 3.7.11) and Brake and Reversing Lights (section 3.7.13).
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
98
4.4.10.3 Pin 10 Function
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Pin 10 Function
None
Status High
Status Low
5V Gauge
12V Gauge
Other
None
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv


Sets the function of Pin 10 on the tiller connector.
Pin 10 is capable to sink 50 mA at 24V and to source 10 mA at 12V.
None
-
The output is not used.
Status High
-
The output pin drives a 12 V Status LED (10 mA max).
The Status LED is on when the power is on.
When a fault condition exists, the Status LED shows the related flash code.
Connect the LED between pin 10 and B-. Install a resistor that limits the
current to 10 mA at 12 V. See also Status Indicator Output (section 3.7.10).
Status Low
-
The output pin drives a 24 V Status LED or lamp (50 mA max).
The Status LED is on when the power is on.
When a fault condition exists, the Status LED shows the related flash code.
Connect the LED between B+ and pin 10. Install a resistor that limits the
current to 50 mA at 24 V. See also Status Indicator Output (section 3.7.10).
5V Gauge
-
The pin will show the state of the battery on an analogue 5V voltmeter
battery gauge. Connect the battery gauge between pin 10 and B-.
See also Battery Gauge Output (section 3.7.12).
12V Gauge
-
The pin will show the state of the battery on an analogue 12V voltmeter
battery gauge. Connect the battery gauge between pin 10 and B-.
See also Battery Gauge Output (section 3.7.12).
Other
-
Drives a digital multi-LED battery gauge display.
Connect the LED battery gauge between B+ and B-. Connect pin 10 to the
"Data In" input of the LED battery gauge.
If a Battery Charger inhibit is activated, the gauge shows a charging
sequence. If a flash code condition exists, the flash code number is
indicated by the number of flashes (same as for a single status indicator),
regardless of the number of bars lit. The number of bars lit continues to
indicate the battery gauge level during flash code indication.
4.4.10.4 Key Switch Status LED
Parameter
Possible Values
Default
Key Switch Status LED
No / Yes
Yes
HHP
Lite
Std
Adv

To reduce current drain, set this parameter to 'No' if a status LED is not wired in series with the
key switch.
Chapter 4: Programming the R-series
99
5 Diagnostics
Note:
The R-series is not user serviceable. Specialised tools are necessary for the
repair of any R-series component.
5.1 Introduction
An abnormal condition may be indicated by a flash code on the Status output. A Flash Code
is a sequence of flashes, separated by a pause, followed by a repetition of the sequence.
Additionally, Flash Codes may be sounded by connecting a beeper to a suitably
programmed output and setting the Flash Code Beeper parameter (4.4.1.5) to 'Yes'.
Depending on the condition, the scooter may or may not allow driving. In some cases driving
may be allowed but in a reduced speed (‘limp’) mode.
5.2 Flash Code Display
To make the most of your existing industry knowledge of products, the R-series has the ability
to display a variety of different flash code types. These may be one of Scooter, Shark, Type 3,
or Type 4. The Diagnostics Report lists the Flash Code type that the controller is currently set to
display. See the following sections for each set of flash code details.
Note:
In addition to the Flash Codes detailed next, a special low battery warning can be
enabled by setting parameter Deep Discharge Beeper to Yes. This warning is a
requirement of various safety standards. The scooter will output a visible and audible
low battery warning if the battery voltage drops below its cut-off voltage. The
warning will be two short flashes, and will take priority over all other flash codes in the
system.
Chapter 5: Diagnostics
100
5.2.1 Scooter Flash Codes
Flash
Description
Meaning
1
Battery Low
The batteries are running low.

2
Low Battery Fault
The batteries have run out of charge.


3
High Battery Fault
Current Limit Time-out or
Controller too hot

Park Brake Fault

Drive Inhibit

Speed Pot Fault
Motor Voltage Fault
Other error
Check the throttle and speed pot and
associated connections and wiring.
The motor or its associated wiring is faulty.

9
Release the Stop condition (seat raised etc.)
Disconnect the Battery Charger
Ensure the throttle is in neutral when turning the
controller on.
The Throttle may require re-calibration.
The throttle, speed limit pot, SRW or their
associated wiring may be faulty.

8
Check the park brake and associated
connections and wiring.
Ensure any associated switches are in their
correct positions.
Either a Stop function is active or a Charger Inhibit
or OONAPU condition has occurred.



7
The scooter may have stalled. Turn the
controller off, leave for a few minutes and turn
back on again.
The motor may be faulty. Check the motor and
associated connections and wiring.
Either a park brake release switch is active or the
park brake is faulty.

6
If travelling down a slope, reduce your speed to
minimise the amount of regenerative charging.
The motor has been exceeding its maximum
current rating for too long.

5
Recharge the batteries.
Check the battery and associated connections
and wiring.
Battery voltage is too high. This may occur if
overcharged &/or travelling down a long slope.

4
Recharge the batteries.
Check the motor and associated connections
and wiring.
The controller may have an internal fault.

Check all connections & wiring.
Chapter 5: Diagnostics
101
5.2.2 SHARK Flash Codes
Flash
1
Description
Meaning
User Fault / Drive Inhibit
Either a Stop function is active or a Charger Inhibit
condition has occurred.


Release the Stop condition (seat raised etc.)
Disconnect the Battery Charger
• Turn the controller off and then on again.
2
Battery Fault
Battery voltage is either too low or too high.



3
Motor Fault
The motor has been exceeding its maximum
current rating for too long, or may be faulty.


4
Current Limit Time-out or
Controller too hot

Park Brake Fault

unused
7
Throttle Fault


System Fault
Check the park brake and associated
connections and wiring.
Ensure any associated switches are in their
correct positions.
The Throttle is out of neutral when turning the
controller on. The throttle or speed limit pot, or their
associated wiring may be faulty.

8
The scooter may have stalled. Turn the
controller off, leave for a few minutes and turn
back on again.
The motor may be faulty. Check the motor and
associated connections and wiring.
Either a park brake release switch is active or the
park brake is faulty.

6
Turn the controller off, leave for a few minutes
and turn back on again.
Check the motor and associated connections
and wiring.
The motor has been exceeding its maximum
current rating for too long.

5
If you have been driving normally the batteries
may be depleted. Recharge the batteries.
If you are travelling down a slope, the batteries
may be overcharged. Reduce your speed to
minimise the amount of regenerative charging
Check the battery and associated connections
and wiring.
Ensure the throttle is in neutral when turning the
controller on.
The Throttle may require re-calibration.
Check the throttle and speed pot and
associated connections and wiring.
The controller may have an internal fault.

Check all connections & wiring.
Chapter 5: Diagnostics
102
5.2.3 Type 3 Flash Codes
Flash
Description
1
Low Battery
2
Bad Motor Connection
3
Motor Short Circuit
4
Current Limit Time-out /
Controller too hot
5
unused
6
Drive Inhibit
7
Throttle Fault
8
Controller Fault
9
Park Brake Fault
10
High Battery Voltage
5.2.4 Type 4 Flash Codes
A Type-4 flash code involves the use of twin-flashes to identify the type of fault.
Flash
Description
1-1
Thermal Cut-back / Stall
1-2
Throttle Trip
1-3
Speed Limit Pot Fault
1-4
Under Voltage Fault
1-5
Over Voltage Fault
2-1
Main Contacter Driver Off Fault
2-2
Unused
2-3
Main Contacter Fault
2-4
Main Contacter Driver On Fault
3-1
Drive inhibit / OONAPU /
Proc or Wiring Fault
3-2
Brake On Fault
3-3
Precharge Fault
3-4
Brake Off Fault
3-5
High Pedal Disable Fault
4-1
Current Sense Fault
4-2
Motor Voltage Fault
4-3
EEPROM Fault
4-4
Power Section Fault
Chapter 5: Diagnostics
103
5.3 Diagnostics Tools
While the R-series may indicate the abnormal condition, a hand held programmer or the PCbased Wizard 5 will provide more detailed information on the fault.
Hand Held Programmer
Plugging a hand held programmer into the R-series when an abnormal condition exists will
cause the fault to be displayed on the screen. A short text will be displayed which indicates
the condition. A latching fault will be logged in the fault log as a 4-digit code. The first two
digits provide the flash code number; the second two digits provide more specific diagnostics
information that is suitable for repair technicians. See section 4.1.2 for details.
While there are alternative flash code sequences that may be flashed on the status LED, the
hand held programmer will only display the appropriate Scooter Flash Code information. For
instance if the Shark Flash Codes are used, the Status LED will display an 8-Flash code for an
internal error. When the hand held programmer is plugged in, it will display a flash code 9 on
the screen.
DYNAMIC Wizard
Wizard is the preferred diagnostics tool in the workshop environment, providing a full fault
history (last 16) and verbal descriptions of each flash and associated servicing code.
If after analysing the data, the condition cannot be diagnosed, it is possible to print or save a
Status Report for further analysis or distribution through fax or email to a service centre.
Fault log
The R-series contains a fault log that stores the last occurred faults in sequence. The fault log
can be accessed with the HHP and with the Wizard (by making a diagnostics report).
It is possible to clear the fault log with the Wizard:
Tools -> Erase Controller History.
Note:
Erasing the controller history will reset the Service Scheduler (5.6) as well.
Chapter 5: Diagnostics
104
5.4 HHP Fault Codes with Sub Codes
Code
01
Fault source
User
Sub
code
01
Meaning
Out Of Neutral At Power Up (OONAPU) testing going on

02
A warning is being displayed on the Battery Gauge
03
Chair needs to be serviced

02
Battery
00
00

Park brake
00
Check if the cables of the park brake are loose or damaged
Park brake not connected, short circuit or broken

04
Check for damaged cables
Motor brushes may be too stiff, bouncing against the case
o Replace motor brushes or motor
PB energised or Drive-time test failed

01
Possible motor short circuit
o check the motor cables for damage
o Motor brushes may be too stiff and bouncing
Otherwise internal controller fault, contact Dynamic
Intermittent short circuit


04
Check if the motor has been connected correctly
Check the motor cables for damage
Motor voltage is not what it should be during drive

07
Check if the motor has been connected correctly
Check the motor cables for damage
Motor terminal connected to battery positive (+)


04
Check if the motor cables are loose
Motor brushes may be worn
o Turn wheels to reconnect
o Replace motor brushes or motor
Motor terminal connected to battery negative (-)


03
Check the motor cables for damage
Motor brushes may be too stiff, bouncing against the case
o Replace motor brushes or motor
Open circuit


02
Batteries may be overcharged: if driving downhill, slow down
Short circuit


01
Batteries may be overcharged: if driving downhill, slow down
Voltage too high – emergency stop occurred

Motor
Contact your service agent
Voltage too high

01
03
Release the throttle and wait for the test to be finished
Check if the cables of the park brake are loose or damaged
Park brake short circuit or broken

Check the park brake cables for damage
Chapter 5: Diagnostics
105
Code
05
Fault source
Throttle
Sub
code
00
Meaning
Throttle wiper (pin 1 on Tiller Connector) voltage out of spec



01
Check the throttle cables for damage
Recalibrate throttle
Replace the throttle pot
Throttle Positive (pin 2 on Tiller Connector) or
Throttle Negative (pin 8 on Tiller Connector) out of spec


02
Speed pot fault, treating speed pot as set to minimum


03
I/O
01
Rollaway
02
Finish the calibration instructions
Battery gauge fault, battery gauge deactivated

07
Recalibrate throttle
Check the throttle cables for damage
Replace the throttle pot
Throttle calibration in progress

06
Release the throttle and try again
Calibration fault



06
Check SRW cable for damage
Replace SRW
Out Of Neutral At Power Up (OONAPU)

05
Check speed pot cable for damage
Replace speed pot
Speed Reduction Wiper (SRW) fault, treating as set to minimum


04
Check the throttle cables for damage
Replace the throttle pot
Check if the battery gauge cables are damaged or loose
The scooter moved too fast when the park brakes were
released

Turn the scooter off and back on again
08
Internal fault
All
Contact Dynamic
09
Thermal
fault
04
Thermal fault
 Case or FET or motor temperature too high
 Stall time-out exceeded
09
Internal fault
Other
Contact Dynamic
Chapter 5: Diagnostics
106
5.5 Advanced Diagnostics Logs
In addition to the standard diagnostics reports, additional diagnostic information is available
from the controller using the Wizard or HHP. This additional information is extremely useful for
identifying the root cause of any faults, and allows for a faster, more efficient service process.
It will also allow for feedback to be given to the user if their use of the scooter is causing any
issues.
There are two sources of the advanced diagnostics logs; the Usage Counters provide
detailed information on the use of the scooter; the Run-time Readings provide real-time
analysis of the system in operation.
Usage Counters (available in both Wizard and HHP)
Counter
Description
Powered Up Time
The total amount of time (hours) the controller has been turned
on.
Powered Up Count
The number of times the controller has been turned on.
Drive Time
The total amount of time (hours) the controller has been driving
(park brakes disengaged).
Drive Count
The number of times the controller has been driving (number of
times the park brakes have disengaged).
Run-time Readings (available in HHP – Technician mode only)
Reading
Description
Battery (V)
The voltage of the batteries.
Motor (V)
The voltage being applied to the motor.
Motor (A)
The current being applied to the motor.
Temperature (C)
The internal temperature of the controller.
Throttle (V)
The voltage of the throttle.
Chapter 5: Diagnostics
107
5.6 Service Scheduler
The Service Scheduler is a preventative maintenance feature that allows the OEM to set up
scheduled servicing plans for their scooter customers.
If enabled, a Service Period can be programmed into the controller. Once the Drive Time
exceeds this value, the status LED will flash slowly 3 times every time the scooter is turned on or
wakes up from sleep, to indicate the service is due.
To enable the Service Scheduler function, set Service Scheduler (4.4.8.1) to 'Yes' and set
Service Period to the desired number of drive time hours before a service is due.
To clear the service indication, either set the value of Service Period to zero, or erase the
controller history with the Wizard:
Tools -> Erase Controller History.
Note:
Erasing the controller history erases the fault log as well.
Consequently, erasing the controller history to erase the fault log will reset the
service scheduler as well.
Chapter 5: Diagnostics
108
6 Appendices
6.1 Neutral Detect Active States
The following options are available to setup a Neutral Detect circuit.
Active Switch in Switch
Neutral Driving Short
State Neutral connected
circuit in
to
Neutral
Low
Closed
B- (Pin 13) no
no
no
Fault
Fault Fault
High
Closed
Open Open
B+ (Pin 7)
no
Fault
no
Fault
no
Fault
B- (Pin 13)
or
B+ (Pin 7)
no
Fault
no
Fault
FC7
Short circuit Open
while driving wire in
neutral
no Driving,
FC7
FC7
Open wire
while driving
Cannot start
driving with
an open wire,
but a wire
break during
driving is not
detected*
no Driving,
FC7
Cannot start
FC7
driving with
an open wire,
but a wire
break during
driving is not
detected*
Cannot start no Fault FC7
driving with a
short circuit,
but a short
circuit during
driving is not
detected*
*As soon as the throttle is returned to neutral, the wire fault will result in FC7 and Drive Inhibit.
Chapter 6: Appendices
109
6.2 Parts List
Dynamic R-Series Installation Manuals
Part Description
Dynamic R-series Installation Manual
DCL Part #
GBK52040
Qty/Unit
1
Dynamic R-Series Connectors
Part Description
R50 Connector Set
DCL Part #
DR-CONSETA
Qty/Unit
1
Dynamic R-Series Programming Accessories
Part Description
DCL Part #
Qty/Unit
Dynamic Wizard Programming Adapter
DWIZ-ADAPT
1
DR PROGRAMMER ADAPTOR LOOM 0.2m
DR-PRGLM02
1
Wizard Kit – Programming Kit Contains
software, cables and adapter (no dongle)
DWIZ-KIT*
1
Wizard – Software Only (CD)
DWIZ-SW
1
DWD-OEM-U
DWD-EDL-U
DWD-DLR-U
DWD-FAC-U
1
1
1
1
DX-HHP
1
Wizard Dongles – USB port
OEM/Advanced version
Enhanced dealer/Standard version
Dealer/Lite version
Factory version
DX Hand Held Programmer
(includes DWIZ-ADAPT and DR-PRGLM02)
*Note: The DWIZ-KIT does NOT include DR-PRGLM02 but it does include DWIZ-ADAPT.
Chapter 6: Appendices
110
6.3 Intended Use and Regulatory Statement
Intended Use
The R-Series scooter controller is intended to provide speed control for small or medium sized
scooters that utilise a single 24V DC brushed motor and integrated park brake. The controller
will respond to user input demand via an analogue input in terms of direction (forward and
reverse) and speed.
The scooter manufacturers are provided with all the integration, set-up, operating
environment, test and maintenance information needed in order to ensure reliable and safe
use of the controller.
Device Classification
Europe
The R-Series Controller is a component of a Class I medical device as detailed in the
Council Directive 93/42/EEC concerning Medical Devices.
USA
The R-Series Controller is a component of a Class II medical device (Motorised Scooter)
as detailed in 21 CFR § 890.3800.
A wheelchair component is classified under 21 CFR 890.3920 as Product Code KNN,
Class 1, 510(k) exempt.
Compliance and Conformance with Standards
In accordance with the device classification, the R-Series scooter controller is designed to
enable the scooter manufacturer to comply with the relevant requirements of the European
Medical Device Directive 93/42/EEC as amended and 21 CFR § 820.30.
The R-Series scooter controller has been designed such that the combination of the scooter
and controller, along with accessories as applicable, complies with the Essential
Requirements of the MDD by adopting relevant clauses of harmonised standards EN12184
and EN12182 and the FDA Consensus standard ANSI/RESNA WC-2 for performance.
However, final compliance of the complete scooter system with international and national
standards is the responsibility of the scooter manufacturer or installer.
Programming Adapter
The programming adapter is intended to allow the R-Series scooter controllers the ability to
communicate with the Wizard and the DX Hand Held Programmer. The adapter is not
intended to alter the controller in any way, but simply passes information to and from the
controller. The information passed may alter the controller performance.
The intended power source is a 24V battery supply from the controller. The intended
environment is indoors, or outdoors in dry conditions.
6.4 Service life
If the product has been installed, used and maintained as recommended, all instructions
contained in this manual have been properly followed, and the unit has not been abused,
the expected service life period (i.e. serviceable life expectancy) of the product is five (5)
years. After this period, DYNAMIC CONTROLS recommends the product be replaced for safety
reasons. DYNAMIC CONTROLS accepts no responsibility or liability for product failure if the
product is retained in use beyond the stated service life period.
Chapter 6: Appendices
111
6.5 Maintenance
The following instructions must be passed on to the operator before use of the product.

Keep all DYNAMIC CONTROLS products free of dust, dirt and liquids. To clean the product,
use a cloth dampened with warm soapy water. Do not use chemicals, solvents or
abrasive cleaners, as this may damage the product.

Monthly check all vehicle components for loose, damaged or corroded components,
such as connectors, terminals, or cables. Restrain all cables to protect them from
damage. Replace damaged components.

Once every 6 months, test all switchable functions on the DYNAMIC CONTROLS electronics
system to ensure they function correctly.

There are no user-serviceable parts in any DYNAMIC CONTROLS electronic product. Do not
attempt to open any case or undertake any repairs, else warranty will be voided and the
safety of the system may be compromised.

Where any doubt exists, consult your nearest service centre or agent.
Warning:
It is the responsibility of the end user to maintain the product in a state of good
repair at all times. If any component is damaged in any way, or if internal
damage may have occurred (for example by being dropped), have it
checked by qualified personnel before operating.
6.6 Warranty
All equipment supplied by DYNAMIC CONTROLS is warranted by the company to be free
from faulty workmanship or materials. If any defect is found within the warranty period, the
company will repair, or at its discretion replace, the equipment without charge for materials
or labour.
This warranty is subject to the provisions that the equipment:




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has been correctly installed
has been thoroughly checked upon completion of installation, and all
programmable options correctly adjusted for safe operation prior to use
has been used solely in accordance with this manual and all other manuals of the
DYNAMIC CONTROLS products that are used on the mobility vehicle
has been properly connected to a suitable power supply in accordance with this
manual
has not been subjected to misuse or accident, or been modified or repaired by any
unauthorised personnel
has not been connected to third party devices without the specific approval of
DYNAMIC CONTROLS
has been used solely for the driving of electrically powered mobility vehicles in
accordance with the intended use and the recommendations of the vehicle
manufacturer
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6.7 Safety and Misuse Warnings
Warnings to be included in the User Manual
The following warnings are applicable to the end user as well as the installer of the product,
and must be passed on to the end user before use.
1. Do not install, maintain, or operate this equipment before you have read and understood
all the instructions and all the manuals for this product and all the other products that you
use or install together with this product. Follow the instructions of the manuals. If you do
not follow all instructions, injury or damage can be the result.
2. Do not try to open or disassemble any case - there are no user-serviceable parts inside.
3. The operator has the responsibility to keep the vehicle in a good safe operating
condition. To protect all the components (for example the cables) from damage, the
operator must fasten them in optimum positions.
4. If operators of the vehicle are left with limited or no mobility for any reason (for example,
because the vehicle loses electric power or breaks down), it is important that they can
still call for assistance from wherever they may be.
5. Make sure that the product does not become colder or hotter than the minimum and
maximum temperatures specified in this manual.
6. Do not touch the connector pins. If you touch the pins, they can become dirty or they
can be damaged by electrostatic discharge.
7. During normal operation the controller may become hot. Before handling the controller
check its temperature is not too excessive to handle safely.
8. Most electronic equipment is influenced by Radio Frequency Interference (RFI). Be
careful when portable communications equipment is used in the area around such
equipment. DYNAMIC CONTROLS has made every effort to make sure that RFI does not
change the behaviour of the controller, but very strong signals can still cause a problem.
The vehicle manufacturer has the responsibility to make sure that the vehicle is tested
according to local EMC regulations.
9. Immediately turn the controller off and consult your service agent if the vehicle
o is damaged
o does not behave the same every time
o does not respond normally, the way you expect it to
o becomes hotter than normal
o smokes
o arcs
o does not change its speed when you adjust the speed reduction pot or the speed
reduction switch (if one is available on your vehicle)
o shows a fault on its fault indicator and the controller does not perform normally.
10. Turn the controller off
o when you do not use it
o before you get in or get out of the vehicle
o before you answer or make a call from a mobile phone or a portable communications
device near the vehicle
o if your vehicle drives by itself or against your will. When you turn the controller off the
vehicle will halt.
11. In the case of an emergency while the vehicle is driving, press the On/Off button or turn
the key switch to perform an emergency stop and turn the controller off.
12. If the controller indicates that the battery is low, recharge the battery as soon as possible.
The life of the battery decreases faster if the battery has a low charge; the longer a
battery remains at a low charge, the shorter its life will be. Do not drive the vehicle if the
battery is almost empty, this may cause the vehicle to drive slower or stop. If the battery
becomes completely empty, the vehicle may stop suddenly.
13. Make sure that the battery charger that is used with the vehicle has a drive inhibit
function that is correctly connected for use with the controller. If you are not sure, ask
your dealer or vehicle manufacturer.
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14. Operation of a vehicle on steep slopes can be dangerous. Before you drive up or down
a slope, make sure that the slope does not exceed the capability of the vehicle.
15. Do not use the park brake release on a slope.
16. Go downhill slowly. When the vehicle drives downhill, the motors act as a dynamo and
generate energy. The controller sends the generated energy from the motor to the
battery. This charges the battery. However, if the battery is fully charged, it cannot
accept the generated energy anymore. When this happens, there is a risk of damage to
the battery or an explosion. To prevent this risk, the controller forces the vehicle to slow
down until the battery can accept more energy. After this, it allows the vehicle to speed
up again. The result of this will be sudden speed changes of the vehicle. To prevent these
speed changes with fully charged batteries, turn on the lights (if fitted) and decrease the
speed of the vehicle when going downhill.
17. The controller can cause the vehicle to come to a sudden stop. If this can be dangerous
to the operator, the installer must install a seat belt, and the operator must wear this seat
belt.
18. Performance adjustments must only be made by healthcare professionals, or by persons
who completely understand the programming parameters, the adjustment process, the
configuration of the vehicle, and the capabilities of the driver. Wrong settings can make
the vehicle uncontrollable or unstable. An uncontrollable or unstable vehicle can cause
an unsafe situation such as a crash, with the risk of serious injury to the driver or
bystanders, or damage to the vehicle or surrounding property.
19. Performance adjustments must only be made indoors, or outdoors in dry conditions.
Service and Configuration Warnings
The following warnings are applicable to the installation technician and the dealer or the
therapist who supplies the vehicle to the end user.
20. It is the responsibility of the installer to make sure that accessories that are connected to
the wires of the vehicle do not interfere with the operation of the controller.
21. Do not use the vehicle frame as the earth return. Any electrical low-resistance
connection to the frame is a safety risk and is not allowed by international safety
standards.
22. It is the responsibility of the installer to specify a battery charger that is suitably adapted
to handle the charging voltage drop created by the combined resistance of the
controller, cabling and connectors used in a particular vehicle configuration.
23. If the vehicle loses electric power, it is important that an attendant is able to move the
vehicle easily.
24. After you have completed the installation, check it thoroughly. Correctly adjust all
programmable options before the vehicle is used.
25. After you have configured the vehicle, test the vehicle to make sure that the vehicle
performs to the specifications entered in the programming procedure. Check that the
vehicle drives safely and that the performance of the vehicle is appropriate to the
capabilities and needs of the user. If the vehicle does not perform as intended,
reprogram the vehicle and test again. Repeat this procedure until the vehicle performs
as intended. If the intended performance and/or operation cannot be reached, contact
your service agent.
26. After maintenance or service of the vehicle, check the functional operation of all
components that are externally connected to the controller, such as
o lights
o external switches
o actuators
o DCI/ACI/OBC resistor switch circuits (including programmed slowdown behaviour)
27. The dealer, therapist or other agent who supplies the vehicle to the end user has the
responsibility to make sure that the vehicle is correctly configured for the needs and
ability of that user.
28. For each individual user, the vehicle set up and configuration should take into
consideration his or her
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o technical knowledge, experience and education, and
o medical and physical condition, including the level of disability and capability (where
applicable).
29. It is the responsibility of the OEM and installer to make sure that the maximum driving
speed of the vehicle is limited as appropriate when the vehicle is in a mechanically
unstable position, for example when the seat is raised.
30. The display (if present) must be visible to the user in all seating positions.
31. It may be possible to set up the vehicle seating in such a way that users cannot operate
the controls in every position. For example, if the seat is tilted backward, it may not be
possible for some users to reach the controls. Make sure that the user has alternative
means of operating the seating until the seat is back in a seating position that is suitable
for the use of the standard controls.
32. It is the responsibility of the therapist/ installer to minimise any risk of use error, including
those arising from ergonomic features and/or the environment in which the device is
intended to be used.
33. Prior to handing over the vehicle, make sure that users are fully able to operate the
product by giving them appropriate training on functionality and safety features, and
having them test-drive the vehicle in a safe area in the presence of their agent.
6.8 Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC)
DYNAMIC CONTROLS Electronic controllers and accessories have been tested on typical
vehicles to confirm compliance with the following appropriate EMC standards:
USA:
ANSI/RESNA WC-2: 2009 Sec 21
Europe:
EN12184: 2014, ISO7176 - 21: 2009
National and international directives require confirmation of compliance on particular
vehicles. Since EMC is dependent on a particular installation, each variation must be tested.
Minimising emissions
To minimise emissions and to maximise the immunity to radiated fields and ESD, follow the
General Wiring Recommendations in section 3.2.2 of this manual.
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6.9 Environmental statement
This product has been supplied from an environmentally aware
manufacturer.
Please be environmentally responsible and recycle this product at
the end of its life through your local recycling facility.
This product may contain substances that could be harmful to the
environment if disposed of into a landfill.
Do not dispose of this product in fire.
See also: http://www.dynamiccontrols.com/designers-and-manufacturers/compliance
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