Product Profile for Video
Recorders and Set Top Boxes
June 2013
A joint initiative of Australian, State and Territory and New Zealand Governments
© Commonwealth of Australia 2013
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Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
2
Contents
CONTENTS ............................................................................................................................................................... 3
Glossary .......................................................................................................................................................................... 5
INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................................................... 6
Document Scope and Purpose ...................................................................................................................................... 6
Background .................................................................................................................................................................... 6
Product Coverage ........................................................................................................................................................... 6
Where to from here ....................................................................................................................................................... 7
Consultation on this product profile ......................................................................................................................... 7
After consultation on the product profile ................................................................................................................. 7
Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes Product Profile – Key Questions ................................................................... 7
STB AND VR MARKET PROFILE ............................................................................................................................ 9
Australian VR Market Growth ...................................................................................................................................... 9
New Zealand VR Market Growth ................................................................................................................................. 11
STB Market in Australia ............................................................................................................................................... 11
STB Market in New Zealand ....................................................................................................................................... 12
Product Coverage ......................................................................................................................................................... 12
Energy Consumption ................................................................................................................................................... 12
STB AND VR POWER TESTING ............................................................................................................................ 14
Standards available for Video Recorder Power Consumption Testing ..................................................................... 14
Standards available for Set Top Box Testing .............................................................................................................. 15
Power Modes................................................................................................................................................................ 15
Test Process ................................................................................................................................................................. 15
Test Results and Analysis ............................................................................................................................................ 16
Test Results .................................................................................................................................................................. 16
STB AND VR ENERGY USE MODELLING ............................................................................................................ 22
Proposed Energy Use Profile ...................................................................................................................................... 22
Australian Code of Conduct for CSTB ..................................................................................................................... 22
STB measurements compared to existing programmes ........................................................................................ 22
Allowances used for BAU Modelling. ...................................................................................................................... 24
General ......................................................................................................................................................................... 25
BAU for STBs ............................................................................................................................................................... 25
BAU for the Low Growth Scenario ............................................................................................................................. 26
BAU for the Medium Growth Scenario ...................................................................................................................... 28
BAU for the High Growth Scenario ............................................................................................................................ 29
CONCLUSIONS ...................................................................................................................................................... 32
VR Market .................................................................................................................................................................... 32
DTV STB Market .......................................................................................................................................................... 32
IPTV STB Market ......................................................................................................................................................... 32
Power Test Results ...................................................................................................................................................... 32
Proposed model for VR and STB power consumption and adders ........................................................................... 32
APPENDIX A: IEC STB POWER MEASUREMENT METHOD. ............................................................................. 34
PRODUCT PROFILE FOR VIDEO RECORDER AND SET TOP BOXES WWW.ENERGYRATING.GOV.AU ..... 45
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
3
LIST OF TABLES
Table 1: Sales Growth of VRs between 2009 and 2010 (GfK 2009 – 2010)................................................................... 9
Table 2: Assumptions for Low, Medium and High Market projections for VRs. ......................................................... 10
Table 3: Video Recorders and STBs tested. .................................................................................................................... 14
Table 4: VR Power modes ............................................................................................................................................... 15
Table 5: Set Top Box Standby Results ............................................................................................................................ 16
Table 6: Video Recorder Standby Test Results ...............................................................................................................17
Table 7: Set Top Box On(Broadcast) Test results ...................................................................................................................17
Table 8: Video Recorder On(Broadcast) Test Results ........................................................................................................... 18
Table 10 shows the results for the differing recording and playback modes and combinations. ................................ 19
Table 10: On(Play) and On(Record) modes for the VRs that had an optical disk feature and a HDD ................................ 19
Table 11: Measured results for the two STBs tested. ...................................................................................................... 22
Table 12: Base functionality for the Australian Code of Conduct for CSTB and European Union voluntary
agreement ........................................................................................................................................................................ 22
Table 13: Additional function Allowances for the Australian Code of Conduct for CSTB. .......................................... 23
Table 14: Energy Star V4 Base Allowance. ..................................................................................................................... 23
Table 15: Energy Star Additional Functions Allowance. ............................................................................................... 24
Table 16: Allowances for BAU modelling. ...................................................................................................................... 24
Table 17: Energy use CO2 conversion factors for each year. ......................................................................................... 25
Table 18: Cumulative Energy Consumption for STBs to 2020 ..................................................................................... 25
Table 19: Terrestrial DTV STBs: CO2 emissions. .......................................................................................................... 26
Table 20: Energy Use for the Low Growth Scenario...................................................................................................... 26
Table 21: CO2 emissions for a Low Growth Scenario. ................................................................................................... 27
Table 22: Energy Use for the Mid Growth Scenario. ..................................................................................................... 28
Table 23:CO2 emissions for Mid Growth Scenario. ...................................................................................................... 28
Table 24: Energy Use for the High Growth Scenario. ................................................................................................... 30
Table 25: CO2 emissions for a High Growth Scenario. ................................................................................................. 31
Table 26: Summary of Cumulative Savings for VRs to 2020 for the Three Growth Scenarios ................................... 33
Table 27: Operating modes and Functions ....................................................................................................................40
Table 28: Matrix for multi-tuner VRs ............................................................................................................................ 44
LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1: Low Sales Growth Model for the VR market growth from 2009 with forecast from 2011- 2020 ................ 10
Figure 2: Mid Sales Growth Model for the VR market growth from 2009 with forecast from 2011- 2020 ............... 10
Figure 3: Low Sales Growth Model for the VR market growth from 2009 with forecast from 2011- 2020 ................ 11
Figure 4: STB Market decline 2009 to 2010 .................................................................................................................. 12
Figure 5: Typical test set up. ........................................................................................................................................... 16
Figure 6: The spread of On(Broadcast) Power consumption for the categories of VRs. .................................................... 18
Figure 7: Chart of the power use of recording and playback modes for VRs with optical Disk Drives .......................20
Figure 8: On(Record) and On(Play) power consumption verses HDD Capacity .................................................................20
Figure 9: Comparison of power consumption for VRs with only a HDD and those with an Optical Disk Drive. ...... 21
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
4
Glossary
ABS
Australian Bureau of Statistics
APD
Automatic Power Down is a feature that ensures a device is switched to a
standby power mode after a period of no activity from the user or in the case of
audio equipment where there is no longer an audio signal being detected.
AVC
Advanced Video Coding.
BAU
Business as Usual
BD
Blu-Ray Disk
CoC
Code of Conduct
CSTB CoC
Conditional-access Set Top Box Code of Conduct. This is a CoC that the two
major subscription broadcasters, Foxtel and Austar, have entered into in
Australia.
DVD
Digital Versatile Disk
DVR
Digital Video Recorder
FTA
Free to Air
HEP
Home Entertainment Products
HDD
Hard Disk Drive
HDMI
Home Digital Multimedia Interface
IEA
International Energy Agency
IEC
International Electrotechnical Commission
IPTV
Internet Protocol Television
PF
Power Factor
PVR
Personal Video Recorder
STB
Set Top Box
TEC
Typical Energy Consumption (Annualised)
TV
Television
VCR
Video Cassette Recorder
VR
Video Recorder
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
5
Introduction
Document Scope and Purpose
This document presents the product profile for Video Recorders and provides market data, power and energy
consumption data and analysis in order to assess the market size and energy consumption of Video Recorders
(VRs) and Set Top Boxes (STB) sold in Australia and New Zealand.
This profile has three major sections;
1.
2.
3.
STB and VR Market Profile
STB and VR Power Consumption Test Results
STB and VR Energy Consumption Modelling
Background
Since 2001 Australia has been in the process of converting its free-to-air (FTA) television broadcasting from
analogue technology to digital technology. This has seen the replacement of tradition video cassette recorders
(VCR) with digital video recorders (DVRs). These devices are also known as Personal Video Recorders (PVRs) and
simply VRs. VRs, PVRs and DVRs have storage devices in the form of hard disk drives (HDD) and optical disks
(DVD and Blu-Ray). In this report the term VR will be used to describe all types of digital video recorders. New
forms of recorders have emerged that contain combinations of HDDs and Optical disks.
Associated with these devices are STBs used to convert the terrestrial digital broadcasts to signals that can be input
into televisions that may or may not have a digital tuner. The most common interface currently is HDMI.
These digital devices have not only replaced the functionality of VCRs but have also spawned new uses of recording
equipment such as time shifting of programmes and real time review and playback of the programmes being
watched.
VRs in the form of STBs have been in the market for several years but more recently VRs with removable optical
media have also emerged. The removable media is in the form of Blu-Ray (BD) and DVD generally referred to as
optical disks. All types of VRs are showing very strong growth according to GfK retail sales data.
Product Coverage
Simple STBs
Digital STBs first became available in Australia in 2001 to coincide with the launch of digital television. In New
Zealand digital television was launched in 2007. Essentially a digital STB is a device that receives and decodes
digital TV broadcasts and produces analogue or digital signals that can be connected to the input of existing TVs
and other display types. Almost all STBs currently sold are HD and have a HDMI interface as well as some form of
analogue interface.
STBs can have a range of options, from the basic box, which allows the user to watch digital TV channels, to those
that include extra options such as Dolby Digital surround sound.
Complex STBs
So called complex STBs are those that are used in the subscription TV industry and contain conditional access to
ensure that there is no unauthorised use of these STBs. The majority of these types of STBs are already covered
under the Australian CSTB Code of Conduct and are not considered in this report.
Recently a regional broadcaster sponsored programme called VAST1 (Viewer Access Satellite Television) has been
introduced which provides the FTA DTV services via satellite. The regional broadcasters have established RBA
Holdings Pty Ltd to manage the application and authorisation for the service. The service is available to those
1
http://www.digitalready.gov.au/what-is-the-switch/VAST-service.aspx
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
6
viewers who are in black spots for FTA TV reception. These viewers can apply for connection to this service via a
conditional access STB which is activated by RBA Holdings Pty Ltd to allow access. It is estimated that between
250,000- 500,000 units will eventually be deployed Australia wide.
Video Recorders
Video recorders are the group of equipment which receive FTA DTV broadcasts and can record these broadcasts.
Video recorders include Removable Optical Disk recorders (DVD, BD). BD recorders operate in a similar manner
to DVD recorders but have a higher memory capacity allowing them to record high definition programmes which
can be played back on HD TVs.
Solid state recorders have either fixed or removable solid state memory. Although recorders with solid state
removable memory exist, the number of sales for such VRs is limited and GfK data does not distinguish them from
other types of VRs so they are not considered in this report.
Video recording technology is expanding rapidly and has seen the optical disk/HDD become more widely available.
Increasingly, the fixed media recording devices (with HDD) are penetrating the Australian and New Zealand
consumer market. The sale of VRs in Australia are estimated at 300,000 units per annum between 2007 and 2010
(GFK 2009 and GFK 2011) and the population of VRs in Australia is estimated at around 1 Million units in 2010.
Nearly all VRs can receive and decode FTA DTV high definition broadcasts.
Video Cassette Recorders, formally known as VCRs, and are now largely obsolete.
Where to from here
Consultation on this product profile
Readers are asked to comment on a number of aspects in this document, particularly market data and modelling
assumptions, to assist with the formulation of a preferred policy option in future. While we welcome comments on
all aspects of the Product Profile, comments on the Product Profile: Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes –
Key Questions below would be of particular assistance.
Comments and any supporting documents should be emailed to one of the addresses indicated below. The Email
Subject should be titled ‘VIDEO RECORDERS AND SET TOP BOXES PROFILE - Consultation’
The closing date for comments is COB Friday 16 August 2013
Australia
New Zealand
e3.appliance@climatechange.gov.au
regs@eeca.govt.nz
After consultation on the product profile
The evidence in this Product Profile will be reviewed and supplemented in light of any written submissions made
by stakeholders and/or issues raised at stakeholder meetings.
Decisions will then be made on whether to proceed with a proposal for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
(to improve their energy efficiency) and what the preferred options should be.
If the preferred options involve regulation (e.g. MEPS and/or labelling) a RIS will be prepared to analyse the costs,
benefits, and other impacts of the proposal. Consultation will be undertaken with stakeholders prior to any final
decisions being made.
Final decisions on policy will be made by the Select Council on Climate Change in Australia and by the New
Zealand Cabinet.
Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes Product Profile – Key Questions
•
•
Do you agree with the market data presented for Australia and New Zealand? In particular, do you agree
with the estimates of current and projected stock and sales of Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes? Are
there any products that are only sold in New Zealand or Australia?
Do you agree with the breakdown of sales between the various product types? Are there any major trends
that are not specified in the product profile for Australia and New Zealand?
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
7
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Do you agree with the projected trends? Are the average efficiency, size and operating hours accurately
estimated for Australian and New Zealand?
Is there a source of sales weighted average efficiency of devices in Australia or New Zealand that can be
used for further analysis?
What do you think would be the best way for governments to facilitate an increase in the average energy
efficiency of Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes sold?
Do you think that there is a case for MEPS for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes and implementing a
government regulated trans-Tasman MEPS?
Is there a preferred international standard/regulation or protocol that could be used as the basis of a
government regulated MEPS and/or labelling program?
What additional costs do you think this would place on industry compared to the current situation? What
impact do you think it would have on competition and consumer choice?
Are there any other issues that may impact on the potential regulation of Video Recorders and Set Top
Boxes?
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
8
STB and VR Market Profile
Market Profile
STB and VR Market Profile
Sources of Product
The overwhelming majority of STBs and VRs are manufactured outside of Australia and New Zealand. The market
is dominated by companies based in Japan, Korea and China with the manufacture taking place in a diverse range
of countries, mainly throughout Asia.
The major companies supplying STBs in the Australian market are not the established brand names. The major
brand names such as LG, Panasonic, Sony and Samsung decided a number of years ago to cease supplying STBs in
preference to DVD and BD recorders. More recently these products have incorporated HDDs as well as the Optical
Media. VRs that only have a DVD or BD recording feature have not proved popular and have been or are being
phased out of the market.
Brands that supply STBs include TEAC, Palsonic, Humax and Topfield. So called house brands also feature
significantly in this product category. These same companies also feature strongly in the supply of HDD VRs that
do not have optical disk drives.
The major companies supplying VRs with optical disk drives and HDD in the Australian market are the established
brand names such as LG, Panasonic, Sony, TEAC and Samsung.
The structure of the market in Australia is changing in line with international trends and a larger number of
smaller suppliers are increasing market share. There are also an increasing percentage of models in the GfK data
that are not identified and are shown as “Private Label”. These models are sold direct to the retailers and the
brand is not identified for marketing purposes.
Australian VR Market Growth
The forecasts in this product profile are based on a number of assumptions and like all forecasts the end result will
depend on how robust the assumptions are. For this study low, mid and high growth forecasts have been
produced. They have been produced by considering the growth rate that is clear in the GfK data between 2009 and
2010. Another factor is the market saturation point, that is, how many homes are likely to buy a STB or VR. The
last factor in the assumptions is the life of the product itself.
The actual growth of the VR market between 2009 and 2010 is shown in Table 1.
Table 1: Sales Growth of VRs between 2009 and 2010 (GfK 2009 – 2010)
Product Type
Growth
HDD VRs
+29.5%
Optical Disks Plus HDD VRs
+14.4%
Total VR Growth
+19.4%
VRs with HDD have a higher growth rate but VRs with optical disk drives and HDDs still have double digit growth.
This is likely to be because VRs with a DVD or BD as well as a HDD are a newer product and the growth rate has
not peaked yet. It is unlikely that these growth rates would continue in the long term because they will quickly
saturate the market and growth will slow to the level determined by replacement of old units.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
9
Table 2 shows the assumptions that have been made for the modelling.
Table 2: Assumptions for Low, Medium and High Market projections for VRs.
Assumption
Low Model
Mid Model
High Model
Growth
2011-2014 = 15%
2011 = 30%
2015 = 10%
2012 = 25%
2016 – 2020 = 5% falling to 1%
2013 – 2014 = 20%
2015 – 2016 = 15%
2017 -2018 = 10%
2019-2020 = 5%
VRs per House Hold
0.5
0.625
0.8
Usable Life
5 Years
5 Years
5 Years
Stock as at 2009
1M
1M
1M
The growth rate is based on the actual growth between 2009 and 2010 and the level of growth that is likely
between 2010 and 2020 to achieve a saturated market at the levels of VRs per household stated for each model.
The usable life has been based on experience with STBs over the last 10 years. The main failures are in the power
supply and the HDD unit. Some replacement will also occur as consumers seek to update their units to newer
technology such as IPTV and MPEG 4 capable STBs and VRs.
The stock levels are based on GfK data from 2003 – 2010.
Figure 1 shows the market trend for STBs and VRs based on GfK data up to 2010 and provides a forecast to 2020.
Figure 1: Low Sales Growth Model for the VR market growth from 2009 with forecast from 2011- 2020
800
3.5
700
3
600
2.5
500
2
400
1.5
300
1
200
0.5
100
0
2009
Thousands
900
4
Annual Sales
Millions
Cumulative Units
Low Sales Growth Model
4.5
Cumulative
Annual Sales
0
2011
2013
2015
2017
2019
Figure 2: Mid Sales Growth Model for the VR market growth from 2009 with forecast from 2011- 2020
1400
5
1200
1000
4
800
3
600
2
Cumulative
Annual Sales
400
1
200
0
2009
Annual Sales
6
Thousands
Millions
Cumulative Units
Mid Sales Growth Model
0
2011
2013
2015
2017
2019
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
10
Figure 3: High Sales Growth Model for the VR market growth from 2009 with forecast from 2011- 2020
1600
6
1400
1200
5
1000
4
800
3
600
2
cumulative
Annual Sales
400
1
200
0
0
2009
Annual Sales
7
Thousands
Millions
Cumulative Units
High Sales Growth Model
2011
2013
2015
2017
2019
These three scenarios have the market saturating between 4 and 6 Million units most of which will be purchased
post 2012.
New Zealand VR Market Growth
A study of the GfK statistics for New Zealand indicates that the VR market is very embryonic with as much as a
400% growth in VRs with HDD between 2009 and 2012. In such a high growth market it is difficult to forecast
accurately. GfK data to 2008 indicated that video cassette recorders were owned by 60% of households. If the
ultimate take up of VRs is the same then by 2020 it is likely that over 1 Million VRs would be in use in New
Zealand.
STB Market in Australia
The market for STBs fell by 17.8% between 2009 and 2010. The decrease in the market for STBs is probably due to
two reasons. The first is the conversion to digital signal is nearing completion with all analogue signals due to be
turned off by the end of 2013. The Digital Tracker research that is produced by the Digital Switchover Task Force 2
showed that even by 2010 around 85% of households in Australia had converted to digital TV (DTV). This means
that the need for simple set top boxes has been rapidly diminishing. A second factor is the decrease in the relative
price between a simple STB and a VR with an HDD which works as an STB but with the additional recording
capability may have drawn sales away from STBs and toward HDD VRs.
Post 2013 STB sales will fall dramatically as the demand for terrestrial DTV STBs ends. There will be sales
continuing of non-subscription satellite services. These services are predominantly foreign language services from
Asia and the Middle East. Sales would be expected to be much lower than the current level of around 800,000.
It is likely that other forms of STBs will emerge such as IPTV STBs. Sales of this type of STB are hard to estimate
particularly as TVs are now emerging with internet interfaces and can be connected directly to IPTV services. It is
also likely that these types of STBs will have recording capability and would actually be captured as VRs.
Other factors such as the introduction of MPEG 4 and DVB-T2 services may also create new markets for STBs to
enable MPEG 2 and DVB-T TVs to receive these broadcasts. As there are no clear plans to introduce these
broadcasts they are not covered in this report and any forecast would be purely speculation.
2
Part of the Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
11
Figure 4: STB Market decline 2009 to 2010
Millions
Cumulative Units
STB Market
4
3.5
3
2.5
2
Annual Sales
1.5
Cumulative Units
1
0.5
0
2009
2011
2013
2015
2017
2019
This forecast does not include IPTV STBs and shows the market declining to around 100,000 units by 2020. In
terms of cumulative units the stock is peaking between 2011 and 2013 at close to 4 Million units and then begins to
reduce to less than 1 Million in 2020.
STB Market in New Zealand
The STB market in New Zealand is more complicated than in Australia. Digital switchover began in New Zealand
in 2012 and is expected to be completed in late 2013. 89% of households had converted to digital TV in 2012.
New Zealand MEPS for set top boxes was introduced in June 2011 for non-recording, MPEG2 models. Sky TV
dominates the market with over 840,000 subscriptions in 2012, and they signed up to the Voluntary Code for
complex set top boxes in 2011. However competition from free to air television is strong, in 2013, 52% of
households had a Freeview STB, and some Freeview STBs also meet the requirements of the Voluntary Code.
These are promoted on the Freeview website with the „Freeview energy efficient‟ logo. Free to air digital TV
services are provided on both terrestrial and satellite platforms. MPEG4 technology is used for FTA terrestrial
STB‟s. Pay TV models include MPEG4 terrestrial and high definition satellite STB models. Due to New Zealand‟s
geography householders in some regions must have satellite tuners to get TV reception. There were 48,975 digital
satellite STBs sold in 2009 and 39,280 in 2010. Demand seems to be high for video recorders and is likely to
increase.
Product Coverage
The video recorders tested include the following:
•
•
•
•
Simple STBs with USB recording capability
Video Recorders that contain Hard Disk Drives
Video Recorders that contain optical disc recorder (DVD) recorders and Hard Disk Drives
Video Recorders that contain Blue-ray (BD) recorders and Hard Disk Drives.
All video recorders tested were manufactured outside Australia. The market is dominated by companies based in
Japan, Korea and China with the manufacture taking place in a diverse range of countries, mainly throughout Asia.
Energy Consumption
Home electronics are estimated to be responsible for at least 5% of household energy consumption in Australia,
making it larger than the combined energy consumption of clothes washers, dishwashers and dryers (based on EES
2008)3.
The International Energy Agency (IEA)4 estimates that overall, home electronics and ICT products accounted for
15% of global residential energy consumption (700TWh), and that energy use from these devices will increase
3
4
http://www.climatechange.gov.au/what-you-need-to-know/buildings/publications/energy-use.aspx
http://www.iea.org/aboutus/faqs/energyefficiency/
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
12
threefold by 2030, and are likely to comprise the biggest end-use category in many countries before 2020. The
video recorders considered here are a major part of this overall category.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
13
STB and VR Market Profile
Market
Profile and VR Power Testing
STB
Description of Video Recorders Tested
Eleven units were tested of which nine had hard drives and two were STBs with USB recording capability. The
hard disk drive (HDD) capacity varied from 160 GB to 1 TB. This information is summarised in Table 3.
Table 3: Video Recorders and STBs tested.
Model
Make
Type
HDD Capacity
DVD or BD
Number of
Tuners
HDSTB210
Palsonic
STB
USB required
N/A
1
HHR787
Healing
DVR
500GB
N/A
2
SRT5495A
Strong
DVR
500GB
N/A
2
HDR2700T
TEAC
DVR
500GB
N/A
2
DMR-PWT500GL
Panasonic
DVR
320GB
Both
2
HDB849
TEAC
STB
USB required
N/A
1
BD-8900A
Samsung
BD-HDD Combo
1 TB
Both
2
RDR-HDC300
Sony
DVD-HDD Combo
320GB
DVD
1
RH397D
LG
DVD-HDD Combo
160GB
DVD
1
HR698D
LG
BD-HDD Combo
250GB
Both
2
HDR-7500T
HUMAX
DVR
1 TB
N/A
2
A mix of brands was selected to ensure a good selection of well-known and lesser known brands were tested. The
selection included a mix of BD and DVD combination units as they are becoming popular choices of recording
devices. Finally video recorders with only HDD recording were also included as they also represent popular
consumer choices for both recording and displaying DTV broadcasts on an analogue television. All the VRs tested
were capable of decoding high definition (HD) television signals.
Standards available for Video Recorder Power Consumption Testing
The only Australian Standard identified for testing video recorder power consumption was AS/NZS 62087.1:2010.
This standard is based on IEC 62087 Ed 2. The section of AS/NZS 62087 that covers video recorders was found to
be more concerned with VCRs and had not been updated for over 10 years. Therefore the standard was inadequate
to cover the range of measurements that needed to be made with current VRs.
IEC 62087 Ed 3:2011 was studied as it contained an update to the power measurement of STBs that covered STBs
with HDDs which is one of the categories of product covered by this document
This study identified that with little modification all the operating modes of the Video Recorders were covered in
the STB section of IEC 62087 Ed3 with the exception of recording and playing optical disks. Using IEC 62087 Ed3
as the basic measuring standard and adding measurements for the optical disk operation produced an acceptable
test method. Appendix A contains the measuring method used for the testing. The IEC TC 100 committee is
currently revising IEC 62087 to update the video recorder section. The CD draft for this work is currently being
circulated and is strongly based on the STB method of power measurement in IEC 62087 Ed3. For these reasons
the IEC 62087 Ed3 was selected as the test method for STBs and VRs with the proposed Ed 4 requirements for VRs
with removable Optical Media.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
14
Standards available for Set Top Box Testing
IEC 62087 Ed3:2011 was studied for its applicability to measure the power consumption of STBs. Ed3 of this
standard specifically addressed and updated the section on STBs. Other test methods were also considered
including Energy Star, European Voluntary agreement and the Australian CSTB CoC. The Australian CSTB CoC
test method and efficiency levels are also used in New Zealand where it is known as the Voluntary Code for
Complex STBs. The Australian CSTB CoC and Energy Star test methods are very similar to the IEC 62087 Ed3.
Adoption of IEC 62087 Ed3 is currently under discussion for use in the Australian CSTB CoC.
Power Modes
Table 4 shows the power modes for VRs from IEC 62087. To make some of the terminology clearer for the testing
in this report some of the modes have been clarified. This is shown in the third column of Table 4. Most of the
clarification is concerned with examples of VR activity in the respective power modes.
Table 4: VR Power modes
Mode
Video recording equipment
(e.g. VCR)
Comment
Disconnected
The appliance is disconnected from all external power
sources
Off
The appliance is connected to a power source, does not
perform any mechanical function (e.g. playing, recording)
and cannot be switched into any other mode with the
remote control unit, an external or internal signal
Standbypassive
The appliance is connected to a power source, does not
perform any mechanical function (e.g. playing, recording),
does not produce video or audio output signals but can
be switched into another mode with the remote control
unit or an internal signal
This is the most common form of standby for STBs and
VRs. This mode covers VRs that have been programmed
to record a future programme and are waiting for a timer
to signal that the recording is due and turn on the VR to
record.
Standbyactive, low
and can additionally be switched into another mode with
an external signal
This is not a common mode for terrestrial FTA VRs
Standby-active, and is exchanging/ receiving data with/from an external
high
source
This would cover downloading Electronic Programme
Guides.
On(Play)
The appliance is connected to a power source and plays
the disc inside the appliance or a pre-recorded
programme
On(Broadcast)
The appliance is performing the function of providing a
viewer with video and audio from a broadcast.
On(Record)
The appliance is connected to a power source and
records a signal from an external or internal source
This could include copying HDD programmes to a DVD or
BD.
On(Multifunction)
The appliance is performing multiple functions
simultaneously
For example recording one programme at the same time
as playing a previously recorded programme
Test Process
Testing for STBs and VRs was done according to IEC 62087 Ed3:2011 Section 8. This is the latest international
standard for STB testing. For the VRs this included the testing for multiple tuner operation including multiple
recording and playback.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
15
Figure 5: Test set up.
Test Results and Analysis
Test Results
Unless otherwise stated all test results are measured in Watts (W)
Set Top Box (STB) Standby Results
The results of the STB standby power measurements are shown in Table 5.
Table 5: Set Top Box Standby Results
Model
Make
Passive Standby
Standby PF
HDSTB210
Palsonic
0.52
0.3
HDB849
TEAC
0.53
0.22
The results are well within the 1W limit specified in the MEPS for STBs in AS/NZS 62087.2.1.
Video Recorder Standby Test Results
The standby results for video recorders are shown in Table 6.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
16
Table 6: Video Recorder Standby Test Results
Model
Type
Standby
PF
Standby(Recording
Programmed)
PF
HHR787
DVR
0.64
0.17
0.64
0.17
SRT5495A
DVR
0.66
0.22
0.62
0.22
HDR2700T
DVR
0.70
0.17
12.15
0.49
HDR-7500T
DVR
0.83
0.14
0.83
0.14
DMR-PWT500GL
BD-HDD Combo
1.12
0.28
1.13
0.28
BD-8900A
BD-HDD Combo
1.48
0.25
1.49
0.25
RDR-HDC300
DVD-HDD Combo
3.37
0.39
3.35
0.39
RH397D
DVD-HDD Combo
2.78
0.35
2.78
0.35
HR698D
BD-HDD Combo
0.78
0.19
0.78
0.16
These results show that except for the HR698D the VRs with BD or DVD disks performed worse for standby than
the VRs that only had a HDD. The passive standby mode was activated by programming a recording 2 hours into
the future and then turning the VR into standby. As is evident from the results three of the four VRs with only
HDD had an active standby similar to the passive standby whereas the model HDR2700 was considerably higher at
12.15W.
The VRs with optical disks all had similar active standby power consumption as their passive standby
consumption. This would suggest that all VRs except the HDR2700T have a low power wake up processor that
stores the time for the recording and will switch the recorder on at that time to record the programme. As is shown
in the next section the active standby for the HDR2700T is only 0.6W lower than the on mode. This would
indicate that in active standby this VR is only muting audio and blanking video.
On Mode Test Results
Table 7 and Table 8 show the On mode results for the STBs and VRs tested. For this test the On(Broadcast) mode was
used. The output was connected to the display via HDMI cable. The Power Factor (PF) was also shown for
information.
The results show that for On(Broadcast) the STBs were well within the allowable On(Broadcast) for STBs as specified in
AS/NZS 62087.2.1. Both these STBs are High Definition and given the passive standby mode results for them they
would have a base allowance of 15 Watts.
Table 7: Set Top Box On(Broadcast) Test results
Model
On
PF
HDSTB210
5.42
0.50
HDB849
7.30
0.50
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
17
Table 8: Video Recorder On(Broadcast) Test Results
Model
Type
On
PF
HHR787
DVR-HDD Only
11.98
0.54
SRT5495A
DVR-HDD Only
20.30
0.57
HDR2700T
DVR-HDD Only
12.75
0.50
HDR-7500T
DVR-HDD Only
19.81
0.53
DMR-PWT500GL
BD-HDD Combo
20.51
0.56
BD-8900A
BD-HDD Combo
24.80
0.59
RDR-HDC300
DVD-HDD Combo
18.77
0.57
RH397D
DVD-HDD Combo
22.41
0.54
HR698D
BD-HDD Combo
20.08
0.58
Figure 6: The spread of On(Broadcast) Power consumption for the categories of VRs.
Power Range of Models by Type
On Mode Power (W)
30
25
20
Max
15
Min
10
5
0
BD-HDD Combo
DVD-HDD Combo
DVR-HDD Only
Figure 6 shows graphically the spread of power consumption for the three categories of VR. What is clear is the
VRs with optical disks are consuming somewhat more power than VRs that do not have optical disks. It is also
clear that VRs without optical drives have a larger spread of power consumption than VRs with optical drives. The
reason for this is unclear as the optical drives are not being operated in this mode. One explanation for the power
difference between the units could be whether the HDD is spinning regardless of any recording activity. However,
other studies have concluded that the power consumption of a spinning disk drive should be less than 5W. 5
It also seems that DVD combo types consume a little less power than BD combo types.
On(Record) and On(Play) Modes for the VRs that only had a HDD
Table 9 shows the results for the differing recording and playback modes and combinations.
5
ADT APEC study Feb 2011
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
18
Table 9: On(Play) and On(Record) modes for the VRs that only had a HDD.
Model
On Mode (No
Recording or
Playback)
On Record 1
Program
On Record 2
Program
Playback
recording
Playback and
record
Playback and
record 2
Maximum
difference
HHR787
11.98
12.94
13.21
12.52
13.24
13.27
1.29
SRT5495A
20.30
21.44
21.48
21.39
21.52
21.81
1.51
HDR2700T
12.75
12.79
12.93
13.18
13.24
13.27
0.52
HDR-7500T
19.81
20.48
20.68
20.08
20.38
20.57
0.76
The power difference between the On Mode and the other recording and playback modes is between 0.52W and
1.51W. This is significantly lower than what would be expected for the spinning of the HDD so it can be assumed
that the HDDs are spinning whether recording and/or playback is operating.
On(Record) and On(Play) Modes for the VRs that had a HDD and an optical disk
Table 10 shows the results for the differing recording and playback modes and combinations.
Table 10: On(Play) and On(Record) modes for the VRs that had an optical disk feature and a HDD
Model
On Mode
(No
Recording
or
Playback)
DMR-PWT500GL
On Disc
Playing
Disc
Playing
and
Record
Disc Playing
and 2
Recording
On Record
Playback
recording
Playback
and record
Playback
and record
2
20.63
20.82
16.91
20.68
20.82
19.97
25.48
25.596
BD-8900A
26.04
26.11
25.88
26.14
26.22
26.32
27.18
N/A
RDR-HDC300
19.30
N/A
19.15
19.26
N/A
23.43
24.48
N/A
RH397D
23.19
N/A
22.56
23.22
N/A
24.33
24.94
N/A
HR698D
20.27
20.51
20.31
20.60
20.73
23.50
23.61
23.745
Figure 7 shows the comparison of the power use of the VRs that had an optical disk drive. Where a bar is missing
for a particular mode it is because for that VR the mode did not exist. The most common reason for this is where
the number of tuners is limited to one so only one programme can be recorded or viewed at once.
What the chart shows is that for two of the five VRs there is a significant increase in power consumption when the
optical disk is activated. One of these models is a BD (HR698D) and the other is a DVD (RDR-HDC300) so the
increase is not explained by the type of optical drive. Three of the VRs show little difference when the optical drive
is activated. What is also clear is that there is up to about a 7 W difference between the lowest and highest power
consumption (models BD8900A and RDR-HDC300).
One model also shows a significant increase when the optical drive is operating and at least one programme is
being recorded while the other four do not.
These results indicate that there may be power management strategies that could be adopted to produce better
energy performance.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
19
Figure 7: Chart of the power use of recording and playback modes for VRs with optical Disk Drives
Power Consumption of Recording and Playback
Modes for VRs with Optical Disk Drives
30
Power (W)
25
20
On Record 1 Programme
15
On Record 2 Programmes
10
Playback recording
Playback and record
5
Playback and record 2
0
On Disc Playing
Disc Playing and Record
Disc Playing and 2 Recording
VR Model
Comparison of power consumption verses HDD Capacity.
Figure 8 shows the power consumption for On Mode and Record Mode by HDD Capacity.
Figure 8: On(Record) and On(Play) power consumption verses HDD Capacity
Power Consumption (W)
On and Record Power Consumption
vs HDD Capacity
30.00
25.00
20.00
15.00
10.00
5.00
0.00
On Mode
Record Mode
HDD Capacity
The chart does not show any significant trend between the disk size and the associated power consumption. The
highest power consumption is for one of the 1 TB HDDs but the other 1 TB HDD is consuming less power than the
160 GB drive and the lowest power consumption is actually being achieved with a 500GB HDD. The second
highest power consumption is from the 160 GB drive.
This means that it will not be wise to try and separate product into categories based on HDD capacity.
Comparison of power consumption for VRs with and without Optical Disk Drives
Figure 9 shows the power consumption of VRs with and without optical disk drives.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
20
Figure 9: Comparison of power consumption for VRs with only a HDD and those with an Optical Disk
Drive.
Power (W)
Power Consumption of Optical and
Non Optical Models
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
Series1
Model Type
Although the models with an optical disk drive exhibit on average higher power consumption some are actually
below some of the models that do not have an optical disk drive. It may be also hard to categorise VRs on the basis
of whether they have an optical disk drive. An alternative scheme is presented in the conclusions section.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
21
STB and VR Market Profile
Market Profile
STB and VR Energy Use Modelling
Proposed Energy Use Profile
Australian Code of Conduct for CSTB
The Australian Code of Conduct for CSTBs is based on the European Union voluntary code. It contains functional
adders that can form the basis for the allowances applicable to VRs for such features as recording. As will be
discussed below the base allowance needs to be reviewed for terrestrial DTV STBs as does allowances for AVC and
HD but essentially the CSTB CoC can be applied to determine the TEC limits for the range of products from STBs
to VR with and without removable optical media.
STB measurements compared to existing programmes
Testing of two STBs produced the results shown in Table 11.
These results are much lower than the requirements of AS/NZS 62087.2.1 and also much lower than the
requirements of the Australian Code of Conduct for CSTB or the European Union voluntary code.
Table 11: Measured results for the two STBs tested.
Model
Make
Standby (W)
On (W)
Projected TEC
(kWh/Year) with
APD
Projected TEC
(kWh/Year)
without APD
HDSTB210
Palsonic
0.52
5.42
10.25
18.84
HDB849
TEAC
0.53
7.30
13.37
25.04
The projected TEC figures are based on automatic power down (APD) being a MEPS requirement for STBs. This is
becoming a standard requirement in many programmes for HE equipment particularly Europe. The CSTB factors
in a 4.5 hour APD switch off time for STBs with this feature and this is the value that has been factored in for the
projected total energy consumption (TEC) with APD. The figure for TEC without APD is based on the CSTB on
time of 9 hours.
These STBs are high definition (HD) so the measured values factor in HD operation.
Table 12: Base functionality for the Australian Code of Conduct for CSTB and European Union voluntary
agreement
Tier 2.5 Annual (1st Jan 2016)
Energy Allowance
Base Functionality
(kWh/year)
Cable (KWh/year)
50
Satellite (KWh/year)
50
IP (KWh/year)
40
Terrestrial (KWh/year)
45
Thin-Client/Remote
40
Table 12 shows the CSTB base allowance. It is clear from the table that the allowance for a terrestrial is only
slightly lower than the satellite and cable STB allowance. The CSTB has not been reviewed for the terrestrial
operation as the participants in the CSTB are at present all broadcasting on a satellite, or on a limited basis, a cable
platform. Cable and Satellite STBs used by the subscription broadcasters have conditional access which currently
requires an active standby mode to maintain its integrity. Terrestrial broadcasting does not require this so the
standby power is much lower. It appears that the terrestrial allowance has factored in either a much higher
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
22
standby power or a much higher On mode power. It seems evident that the terrestrial allowance needs to be
reviewed to be consistent with the measured results.
Table 13: Additional function Allowances for the Australian Code of Conduct for CSTB.
Additional
Functionalities
Tier 2.5
Additional Tuners
14
Adv. Video Processing
0
DVR
18
Digital Modem
35
Home Network
Interface
18
High Definition
14
Multi-Room
12
kWh/Year
Table 13 shows the CSTB allowances for additional functions. Clearly there is an allowance for HD which would
increase the base allowance by another 14 kWh which from the measurements does not appear necessary. Also the
additional power required for a hard drive is between 3W and 5W6. The current allowance seems to be predicated
on no APD. If APD was a requirement then this allowance would be between 8W and 10W.
Table 14: Energy Star V47 Base Allowance.
Base Functionality
Version 4.0
Allowance
(kWh/year)
Cable
45
Satellite
50
Cable DTA
25
Internet Protocol (IP)
25
Terrestrial
18
Thin-client / Remote
20
Table 14 shows the base allowances for Energy Star. The terrestrial allowance is considerably smaller than the
CSTB and is more consistent with the measurements for the STBs tested in the power testing section of this profile.
Given the terrestrial allowance is applicable from July 2013 and any regulation for Australia would be unlikely to
apply before 2015 there is scope to further reduce the allowance.
6
ADT Testing for APP tear down analysis 2011.
7
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/prod_development/revisions/downloads/settop_boxes/ENERGY_STAR_STB_Final_Version
_4_Specification.pdf
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
23
Table 15: Energy Star Additional Functions Allowance.
Additional Functionality
Version 4.0
Allowance
(kWh/year)
Advanced Video Processing
8
CableCARD
15
Digital Video Recorder (DVR)
36
DOCSIS®
15
High Definition (HD)
16
Home Network Interface
8
Multi-room
30
Multi-stream – Cable/Satellite
8
Multi-stream – Terrestrial/IP
6
Removable Media Player
8
Removable Media Player / Recorder
10
Table 155 shows additional allowances for Energy Star. Again given that the measured results include HD and the
CSTB will not have an allowance for AVC from 2016 it seems that these allowances are much higher than they need
to be.
These results are much lower than the requirements of AS/NZS 62087.2.1 and also much lower than the
requirements of the Australian Code of Conduct for CSTB or the European Union voluntary code.
Allowances used for BAU Modelling.
Table 16 show the allowances used for the BAU Modelling.
Table 16: Allowances for BAU modelling.
Allowance Type
Allowance Level
kWh/Year
Base Allowance
15
Additional Tuners
7
Adv. Video Processing
0
DVR
8
Home Network
Interface
18
High Definition
0
The allowances have been calculated based on the measurements of the two STBs tested and available information
on how much power the features are like to require. They are also predicated on APD being a requirement for any
implemented programme which means that the On mode time per day is restricted to 4.5 Hours if no one is
watching the .STB services.
The additional tuner allowance may actually be considerably smaller or eliminated by the emergence of broadband
tuners that remove the need for additional tuners to tune more than one channel.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
24
An allowance for an optical disk drive has not been provided as it is not clear what this allowance should be. As
can be seen from Part 1 for a number of DVD/BD recorders there was no difference in the power consumption
whether the DVD/BD disk was playing or not. Also it is clear from the Top Runner program in Japan8 that average
BD/DVD disk use is only about one hour per day so the contribution to energy use is actually very small. A
determination on this allowance can be made at a future time.
General
This BAU modelling has used the allowances as explained in the previous section and the market data provided in
Part 2 of this report. The three scenarios from part 2 have been modelled for VRs based on a regulatory framework
from late 2014 which is the earliest practical year any regulation could be developed and implemented.
Table 17 shows the conversion factors to derive the CO2 emissions for each year. These are the same as those used
for the CSTB BAU modelling. As the CSTB CoC is the only other programme in Australia that covers STBs with
recording capability is seems useful to use the same conversion figures.
The TEC for each unit tested has been calculated and then the average for the STBs and VRs has been used to
calculate the energy use for each of the three scenarios. The VRs have not been split into those with and without
optical disk drives because the relative proportion of the population in 2010 for each type cannot be readily
determined. The average of all VRs is a reasonable representation of the overall energy use.
Table 17: Energy use CO2 conversion factors for each year.9
Year
kg/kWh
2009
0.99
2010
0.98
2011
0.96
2012
0.95
2013
0.93
2014
0.92
2015
0.90
2016
0.88
2017
0.86
2018
0.85
2019
0.83
BAU for STBsTable 18 shows the cumulative energy consumption for terrestrial DTV STBs to 2020. As was
discussed in Part 2 of this report the sales of terrestrial DTV STBs will start to decline as the switchover to DTV is
completed. It is possible that depending on the introduction of new technologies such as MPEG 4 and DVB-T2
that new terrestrial STB markets will be established to provide these services to TVs without these features through
interfaces such as HDMI. It is not possible, however, to model the emergence of such STBs as the level of
uncertainty of how and when such services will emerge is at present too high. IPTV STBs are already available but
again at this time it is too uncertain to model this market.
Table 18: Cumulative Energy Consumption for STBs to 2020
Years
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
MEPS (GWh)
79.6
87.6
88.6
89.7
85.8
69.3
53.0
40.0
29.5
21.2
14.4
11.6
BAU (GWh)
79.6
87.6
88.6
89.7
85.8
69.3
55.5
44.4
35.6
28.5
22.9
18.3
Figure 10: Chart for the cumulative BAU vs. Proposed MEPS limits for terrestrial DTV STB Power
Consumption.
8
9
http://www.eceee.org/eceee_events/product_efficiency_08/programme_presentations/Kodaka_TopRunnerProgram.pdf
Sourced from the BAU modelling for the Australian CSTB CoC.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
25
Bau vs Proposed MEPS Limits for terrestrial DTV STB Power
Consumption
100
80
GWattHour
MEPS
60
BAU
40
20
0
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
It is clear that this diminishing market is not contributing to an increased energy use.
Table 19: Terrestrial DTV STBs: CO2 emissions.
Years
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
MEPS CO2 (kt)
79.1
85.9
85.4
85.0
80.0
63.5
47.7
35.3
25.5
18.0
12.0
9.4
BAU CO2 (kt)
79.1
85.9
85.4
85.0
80.0
63.5
50.0
39.2
30.8
24.2
19.0
14.9
Figure 11: Cumulative BAU vs. Proposed MEPS Limits for terrestrial DTV STB CO2 emissions.
X1000 Ton
Bau vs Proposed MEPS Limits for terrestrial DTV STB CO2 Emission
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
MEPS CO2
BAU CO2
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
Although this modelling would suggest that terrestrial DTV STBs are in decline and not contributing significantly
to either energy use or CO2 emissions they do form the basis for the base power consumption for VRs. It is also
likely that as MPEG 4 and DVB-T2 services are introduced that new STBs will emerge to make these services
available on the current generation of TVs that do not have these capabilities.
The IPTV market will also continue to grow. As these markets develop modelling of the markets, the energy use
and the CO2 emissions will become possible.
For these reasons it seems prudent to keep terrestrial DTV STB MEPS limits in the proposed MEPS limits for VRs
so that timely action can be taken to update them when and if it becomes evident that new types of STBs are
emerging and impacting more on energy consumption and CO2 emissions.
BAU for the Low Growth Scenario
Table 20: Energy Use for the Low Growth Scenario.
Year
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
MEPS GWh
106.0
117.9
134.1
155.2
182.0
215.2
224.8
234.6
243.6
251.0
256.3
259.9
BAU GWh
106.0
117.9
134.1
155.2
182.0
215.2
236.4
258.4
278.2
294.7
306.5
314.5
Table 20 shows the energy use for the low growth scenario. For this scenario the energy use increases until the
MEPS become effective in late 2014. After this point the energy use reduces as VRs are replaced with more energy
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
26
efficient units. This decline reduces toward 2020 as the market becomes saturated resulting in sales of new units
being made to only replace existing VRs with similar energy efficiency characteristics. If a second tier of MEPS was
introduced in 2017 then additional savings post 2017 would be expected..
By 2020 the cumulative energy savings would be 54.6 GWh. At 2910 cents/kW this would total around
$63.4 Million.
Figure 12: BAU vs. Proposed MEPS limits for power consumption – Low Growth Model.
Energy Use Low Growth Model
350.0
GWattHour
300.0
250.0
MEPS
200.0
BAU
150.0
100.0
Table 21: CO2 emissions for a Low Growth Scenario.
Year
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
MEPS CO2 kt
105.3
115.5
129.3
147.2
169.6
197.2
202.4
207.1
210.6
212.6
212.5
210.8
BAU CO2 kt
105.3
115.5
129.3
147.2
169.6
197.2
212.9
228.1
240.6
249.6
254.1
255.1
10Australian
Energy Markets Commission AEMC (2011) 2013/2014 Projections
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
27
Figure 13: BAU vs. Proposed MEPS Limits for CO2 emissions – Low Growth Model.
k Ton
BAU vs MEPS CO2 Emissions Low
Growth Model
280.0
260.0
240.0
220.0
200.0
180.0
160.0
140.0
120.0
100.0
MEPS Co2
BAU Co2
Figure 13 shows the
cumulative CO2 savings to 2020. The cumulative savings of co2 for the low growth scenario is 184.4 kTon of CO2.
BAU for the Medium Growth Scenario
Table 22: Energy Use for the Mid Growth Scenario.
Year
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
MEPS GWh
106.0
117.9
137.0
164.9
201.7
249.1
265.1
282.2
298.6
313.9
326.8
337.0
BAU GWh
106.0
117.9
137.0
164.9
201.7
249.1
284.6
322.6
359.0
393.0
421.7
444.4
Table 22: Energy Use for the Mid Growth Scenario. shows the energy use for the low growth scenario. For this
scenario the energy use stabilises after the MEPS becomes effect effective in 2015. This is due to older less efficient
STB being replaced after 2015 and the population of STBs still increasing with greater market penetration. If a
second tier of MEPS was introduced in 2018 then there would be additional savings expected beyond 2018.
By 2020 the cumulative energy savings would be 401.7 GWh. At a minimum project cost of 2911 cents/kWh this
would total around $117 Million.
Figure 14: BAU vs. Proposed MEPS Limits for Power Consumption – Mid Growth Model.
GWattHour
BAU vs MEPS Energy Use Mid Growth
Model
500.0
450.0
400.0
350.0
300.0
250.0
200.0
150.0
100.0
MEPS
BAU
Table 23:CO2 emissions for Mid Growth Scenario.
11
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
28
Year
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
MEPS CO2 kt
105.3
115.5
132.0
156.3
188.0
228.3
238.7
249.1
258.2
265.9
270.9
273.4
BAU CO2 kt
105.3
115.5
132.0
156.3
188.0
228.3
256.3
284.7
310.5
332.9
349.6
360.5
Figure 15: BAU vs. Proposed MEPS Limits for CO2 emissions – Mid Growth Model.
BAU vs MEPS CO2 Emissions Mid
Growth Model
400.0
350.0
kTon
300.0
250.0
MEPS Co2
200.0
BAU Co2
150.0
100.0
Australian Energy Markets Commission AEMC (2011) 2013/2014 projections
Figure 15 shows the cumulative CO2 savings to 2020. The cumulative savings of CO2 for the mid growth scenario
are 338.3 kt of CO2.
BAU for the High Growth ScenarioTable 24 and
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
29
Figure 16 show the energy use for the high growth scenario. For this scenario, for the same reason as for the mid
growth scenario, the energy use stabilises after the MEPS becomes effect effective in 2014. Again, if a second tier
of MEPS was introduced in 2018 then there would be additional savings expected beyond 2018.
Table 24: Energy Use for the High Growth Scenario.
Year
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
MEPS GWh
106.0
117.9
138.4
168.1
207.0
257.0
274.1
291.9
310.7
329.3
347.2
363.1
BAU GWh
106.0
117.9
138.4
168.1
207.0
257.0
295.0
334.5
376.2
417.5
457.4
492.6
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
30
Figure 16: BAU vs. Proposed MEPS Limits for Energy Consumption – High Growth Model.
GWattHour
BAU vs MEPS Energy Use High
Growth Model
550.0
500.0
450.0
400.0
350.0
300.0
250.0
200.0
150.0
100.0
MEPS
BAU
By 2020 the cumulative energy savings would be 457 GWh. At 2912 cents/kWh this would represent a saving of
around 133 Million Dollars.
Table 25: CO2 emissions for a High Growth Scenario.
Year
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
MEPS CO2 kt
105.3
115.5
133.4
159.3
193.0
235.5
246.9
257.7
268.7
278.9
287.9
294.5
BAU CO2 kt
105.3
115.5
133.4
159.3
193.0
235.5
265.7
295.3
325.4
353.6
379.2
399.6
Figure 17: BAU vs. Proposed MEPS Limits for CO2 emissions – High Growth Model.
BAU vs MEPS Co2 Emissions High
Growth Model
450.0
400.0
k Ton
350.0
300.0
250.0
MEPS Co2
200.0
BAU Co2
150.0
100.0
Figure 17 shows the cumulative CO2 savings to 2020. The cumulative savings of co2 for the high growth scenario
are 384 kt of CO2.
12
Australian Energy Markets Commission AEMC (2011) 2013/2014 Projections
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
31
STB and VR Market Profile
Conclusions
Market Profile
VR Market
The VR market is growing significantly and is expected to continue well into the future as consumers see benefit in
the recording features that they offer. High in importance is the ability to time shift programmes so that they can
be viewed at a more suitable time than when they were broadcast. The recorders also offer the ability to series
record so that no episode of a series is missed. This also allows the viewer to watch the series again. VRs with
optical disk also offer the ability to move recordings to DVD or BD disks for archiving. The combination of these
benefits would indicate that the market for VRs is strong and will get stronger.
It is expected that by 2020 the VR market in Australia will be between 800,000 and 1,400,000 units annually and
the stock allowing for replacement will be 4 and 6 Million. The stock as at 2012 is around 2 Million so between 2
and 4 Million units will be added before 2020.
DTV STB Market
In Australia and New Zealand, the demand for STBs has been fundamentally tied to the switchover from analogue
to digital TV. This process is nearing completion and all TVs now sold in Australia and New Zealand have digital
tuners. The market for simple STBs therefore has now begun a sharp decline and will become a market for FTA
satellite services by 2020. By 2020 there will be less than 100,000 units sold annually and the stock will have
declined to around 800,000.
IPTV STB Market
It is difficult to estimate this market as it is very embryonic. It is clear, however, that it is likely to grow quite
significantly. With 8 Million households in Australia even if penetration is at the level of subscription television it
is likely that the market will be at least 3 Million by 2020.
Power Test Results
The following conclusions have been drawn from the discussion of the power testing results;
• STBs can achieve significantly better power consumption than the current MEPS requires.
• It is difficult to categorise VRs based on their functional attributes such as Optical Drives or HDD capacity.
• A VR is basically an STB with additional recording functions so the Australian Conditional Access STB Code of
Conduct can be used as a basis for MEPS.
• Given the better than expected performance of STBs the terrestrial allowance for the Australian Conditional
Access STB Code of Conduct needs to be reviewed.
There is scope for better power management with regard to tuners and HDD operation.
Proposed model for VR and STB power consumption and adders
The basic element of a VR is a tuner and decoder chip set. This is functionally the same as used for an STB. What
distinguishes a VR from an STB is the additional tuners and recording mechanism that allow the recording and/or
playback of multiple programmes. In the case of VRs that have optical drives the distinguishing feature is the
optical drive and the additional components that make that drive functional. Nearly all VRs have at least a HDD.
As will be seen in Part 2 of this profile there is little market evidence of VRs that only contain an optical disk drive.
Rather than trying to categorise VRs by the HDD capacity or the type of recorder in them it is proposed that the
same approach be taken as for the Australian Conditional Access STB Code of Conduct which provides a base level
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
32
for a receiver (STB) and then applies adders to make allowances for the increased functionality for the various
forms of VRs.
It is also recommended that this approach be a TEC approach as in the Australian Conditional Access STB Code of
Conduct.
Given the power consumption measurements for the STBs it is also clear that the base and additional allowances
for free to air terrestrial based VRs in the Australian Conditional Access STB Code of Conduct needs to be
reviewed.
Table 26 shows a summary of the savings for the three growth scenarios. Clearly even for the low growth case
there are significant savings to be made. For the high growth scenario the case for MEPS is even more compelling.
Table 26: Summary of Cumulative Savings for VRs to 2020 for the Three Growth Scenarios
Growth Scenario
Energy Saving
CO2 Saving
Cost saving @ 29c/kWh13
Low
218.6 GWh
184.4 kt
$63.4 M
Mid
401.7 GWh
338.3 kt
$117 M
High
457.1 GWh
384.4 kt
$133.3 M
From the analysis it is clear that the terrestrial base allowance needs to be reviewed both within the Australian
CSTB CoC and more broadly internationally in the EU Voluntary Code.
It is also clear that given the declining market for terrestrial broadcast STBs that there may be little to gain in more
stringent MEPS levels. However, this needs to be considered in the light of new types of STBs emerging such as
IPTV types and STBs that can decode MPEG 4 or receive DVB T2 transmissions which can be used with TVs
without these features to receive these services when they are offered in the future. For this reason there may still
be good reason to include STBs and ensure that any new emerging technology STBs have appropriate MEPS levels.
13
Australian Energy Markets Commission AEMC (2011) 2013/2014 Projections
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
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STB and
VR Market
Profile
Appendix
A: IEC
STB Power Measurement
Market Profile
Method.
INTERNATIONAL ELECTROTECHNICAL COMMISSION
____________
METHODS OF MEASUREMENT FOR THE POWER CONSUMPTION
OF AUDIO, VIDEO AND RELATED EQUIPMENT – PART N, VIDEO RECORDERS
WITH REMOVEABLE MEDIA.
FOREWORD
1) The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) is a worldwide organization for
standardization comprising all national electrotechnical committees (IEC National Committees).
The object of IEC is to promote international co-operation on all questions concerning
standardization in the electrical and electronic fields. To this end and in addition to other
activities, IEC publishes International Standards, Technical Specifications, Technical Reports,
Publicly Available Specifications (PAS) and Guides (hereafter referred to as “IEC
Publication(s)”). Their preparation is entrusted to technical committees; any IEC National
Committee interested in the subject dealt with may participate in this preparatory work.
International, governmental and non-governmental organizations liaising with the IEC also
participate in this preparation. IEC collaborates closely with the International Organization for
Standardization (ISO) in accordance with conditions determined by agreement between the two
organizations.
2) The formal decisions or agreements of IEC on technical matters express, as nearly as possible,
an international consensus of opinion on the relevant subjects since each technical committee
has representation from all interested IEC National Committees.
3) IEC Publications have the form of recommendations for international use and are accepted by
IEC National Committees in that sense. While all reasona ble efforts are made to ensure that the
technical content of IEC Publications is accurate, IEC cannot be held responsible for the way in
which they are used or for any misinterpretation by any end user.
4) In order to promote international uniformity, IEC National Committees undertake to apply IEC
Publications transparently to the maximum extent possible in their national and regional
publications. Any divergence between any IEC Publication and the corresponding national or
regional publication shall be clearly indicated in the latter.
5) IEC provides no marking procedure to indicate its approval and cannot be rendered responsible
for any equipment declared to be in conformity with an IEC Publication.
6) All users should ensure that they have the latest edit ion of this publication.
7) No liability shall attach to IEC or its directors, employees, servants or agents including individual
experts and members of its technical committees and IEC National Committees for any personal
injury, property damage or other damage of any nature whatsoever, whether direct or indirect, or
for costs (including legal fees) and expenses arising out of the publication, use of, or reliance
upon, this IEC Publication or any other IEC Publications.
8) Attention is drawn to the normative references cited in this publication. Use of the referenced
publications is indispensable for the correct application of this publication.
9) Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this IEC Publication may be the
subject of patent rights. IEC shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent
rights.
International Standard IEC 62087 has been prepared by technical area 12: Energy Efficiency for
equipment covered by IEC technical committee 100: Audio, vi deo and multimedia systems and
equipment.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
34
CDV
Report on voting
Full information on the voting for the approval of this standard can be found in the report on voting
indicated in the above table.
This publication has been drafted in accordance with the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2.
The committee has decided that the contents of this publication will remain unchanged until the
14
maintenance result date indicated on the IEC web site under "http://webstore.iec.ch" in the data
related to the specific publication. At this date, the publication will be
•
•
•
•
reconfirmed;
withdrawn;
replaced by a revised edition, or
amended.
A bilingual version of this publication may be issued at a later date.
14
The National Committees are requested to note that for this publication the maintenance result date is 2013.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
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INTRODUCTION
This part of IEC 62087 Ed4 specifies methods of measurement for the power consumption of video
recorders with removable media for consumer use.
nd
The 2 edition added methods for measuring On (average) mode power c onsumption of many
televisions varies depending upon the video signal being displayed. Clause 11 includes three
different video signals: static, dynamic broadcast -content, and Internet-content. For information
about the three video signals and guidance on which signal(s) to use, see Annex C
rd
The 3 edition revises methods for measuring power consumption of Set Top Boxes mainly in the
modes of On mode and Standby-active, high mode. These modes correspond to the active modes
15
which are defined in IEC 62542 Ed1 .
th
The 4 edition has split IEC 62087 into parts.
As each part is published it will supersede the equivalent section in IEC 62087 Ed3:2011
15
IEC 62542 Ed3 is ACDV (Draft approved for Committee Draft) when this CDV is submitted.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
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METHODS OF MEASUREMENT FOR THE POWER CONSUMPTION
OF AUDIO, VIDEO AND RELATED EQUIPMENT – PART N, VIDEO RECORDERS
WITH REMOVEABLE MEDIA.
1. Scope
This International Standard specifies methods of measurement for the power consumption of video
recording equipment with removable media.
Moreover the different modes of operation which are relevant for measuring power consumption are
defined.
The methods of measurement are only applicable for equipment which can be connected to the
mains.
The measuring conditions in this standard represent the normal use of the equipment and may differ
from specific conditions, for exam ple as specified in safety standards.
2. Normative references
The following referenced documents are indispensable for the application of this document. For
dated references, only the edition cited applies. For undated references, the latest edition of the
referenced document (including any amendments) applies.
IEC 60107-1:1997, Methods of measurement on receivers for television broadcast trans missions –
Part 1: General conditions – Measurements at radio and video frequencies
IEC 61938:1996, Audio, video and audio-visual systems – Interconnections and matching values –
Preferred matching values of analogue signals
EN 50049-1, Domestic
Peritelevision Connector
and
Similar
Electronic
Equipment
Interconnection
Requirements:
IEC 62216:2009, Digital terrestrial television receivers for the DVB-T system
3. Terms, definitions and abbreviations
Terms and definitions
For the purposes of this document, the following terms and definitions apply.
3.1.1
additional functions
functions that are not required for the basic oper ation of the device
NOTE TO ENTRY In the case of a television set, examples of additional functions include, but are not limited to, a VCR
unit, a DVD unit, a HDD unit, a FM-radio unit, a memory card-reader unit, or an ambient lighting unit.
3.1.3
conditional access
the encryption, decryption, and authorization techniques employed to protect content from
unauthorized viewing
NOTE TO ENTRY: Point of Deployment (POD) and Downloadable Conditional Access System (DCAS) are examples of this
technology.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
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3.1.4
conditional access module
plug-in module that enables conditional access
3.1.5
data over the cable service interface specification (DOCSIS)
a international suite of standards that define interface requirements for cable modems involved in
high-speed data and video/audio content distribution over cable television systems
3.1.8
multi-room STB
STB that is capable of providing 2 or more independent video and audio streams either direct to
display devices or to thin clients/remote
3.1.9
plug-in module
device that plugs into the television set and provides additional functionality
3.1.10
point of deployment module
conditional access module for digital cable signal reception
3.1.12
set top box (STB)
appliance for the reception of television and related services(eg . radio) from terrestrial, cable,
satellite, or broadband networks which are decoded and delivered to a display and /or recording
device
3.1.13
special functions
functions that are related to, but not required for, the basic operation of the device
NOTE TO ENTRY In the case of a television set, examples of special functions include, but are not limited to, special
sound processing, power saving functions (e.g. automatic brightness control).
3.1.14
television set (TV)
appliance for the display and possible reception of television broadcast and similar services for
terrestrial, cable, satellite and broadband network transmission of analogue and/or digital signals
NOTE
A television set may include additional functions that are not required for its basic operation.
3.1.15
video recording equipment
appliance for the recording and reproduction of video and audio signals on a recording medium, for
example a Video Cassette Recorder (VCR) or a Digital Versatile Disc (DVD) player or recorder
NOTE TO ENTRY
Appliances with only playback function are included as well.
3.1.16
cable STB
STB whose principal function is to receive and decode television signals from a broadband, hybrid
fibre/coaxial, community cable distribution system and deliver them to a display and/or recording
device
3.1.17
terrestrial STB
STB whose principal function is to receive and decode television signals over the air (OTA) and
deliver them to a display and/or recording device
3.1.18
satellite STB
STB whose principal function is to receive and decode television signals from satellites and deliver
them to a display and/or recording device
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
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3.1.19
internet protocol STB
STB whose principal function is to receive and decode television/video signals encapsulated in IP
packets and deliver them to a display and/or recording device
3.1.20
thin-client/remote
STB that is designed to interface between a multi-Room capable STB and a TV (or other output
device) that has no ability to interface with the service provider directly and relies solely on a multi room box STB for content
NOTE TO ENTRY
Client/Remote STB
Any STB that meets the definition of Cable, Satellite, IP or Terrestrial STB is not a Thin -
3.1.21
time shifting:
capability of a device to allow playback type functions with real time broadcast
NOTE: Such functions may include Fast Forward, Review (Rewind), Pause and Slow Motion
3.1.22
buffering:
temporary storage of video and audio streams in some form of memory in order to perform time
shifting functions
Abbreviations
For the purposes of this International Standard, the following abbreviations apply
′
Prime
AC/DC
Alternating Current/Direct Current
BD
Blu-ray Disc™
DVD
Digital Versatile Disc
IP
Internet Protocol
HD
High Definition (720p or better)
HDD
Hard Disk Drive
LNB
Low Noise Block unit
MPEG-2
Moving Picture Experts Group
PS
Power Supply unit
RF
Radio Frequency
rms
Root Mean Square
SD
Standard Definition
STB
Set Top Box
SW
Switch unit
TV
Television set
VCR
Video Cassette Recorder
VR
Video Recorder
16
Blu-ray Disc™ is a trade mark of the Blue-ray Disc Association. This information is given for the convenience of users of this
document and does not constitute and endorsement by IEC of the product named.
16
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
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4. Specification of operating modes and functions
Table 27: Operating modes and Functions
Mode
Video recording equipment
(e.g. VCR)
Disconnected
The appliance is disconnected from all external power sources
Off
The appliance is connected to a power source, does not perform any mechanical function
(e.g. playing, recording) and cannot be switched into any other mode with the remote control
unit, an external or internal signal
Standbypassive
The appliance is connected to a power source, does not perform any mechanical function
(e.g. playing, recording), does not produce video or audio output signals but can be switched
into another mode with the remote control unit or an internal signal
Standbyactive, low
and can additionally be switched into another mode with an external signal
Standbyactive, high
and is exchanging/ receiving data with/from an external source
On (play)
The appliance is connected to a power source and plays the tape or disc inside the
appliance
On (Broadcast)
The appliance is performing the function of providing a viewer with video and audio from a
broadcast.
On (record)
The appliance is connected to a power source and records a signal from an external or
internal source
On (multifunction)
The appliance is performing multiple functions simultaneously
5. Measuring conditions for video recorders.
Input signal
General
In general terms, input signals shall be of the strength and quality for the type of broadcast system
on which the VR is intended to be used. Where a VR supports multiple broadcast systems, it shall
be tested for each broadcast system in which it operates. Each measured result shall be descri bed
in the report. In some circumstances, the dynamic broadcast -content video may be suitable for use
as the video and audio test signal content but will need to be multiplexed and modulated as per
clause 5.1.2 below.
RF Test Signal
For digital terrestrial, satellite and cable VRs, the test signal shall be comprised of a multiplexed
transport stream modulated with parameters that reflect the typical environment in which the VR
with removable media will be used. The video and audio components of the transpor t stream shall
be as described in 5.1.2.1 and 5.1.2.2. For analog terrestrial, satellite and cable VRs, the signal
should be typical of the type of signal the VR is designed to receive.
Video test signal
The VR shall be tested using an appropriate input signal. This signal should be at the highest
resolution that the VR is capable of decoding using the most processing intensive advanced
decoding standard of the intended broadcast system(s) that the VR will be used on. A description of
the signal used for the test shall be included in the test report. This description shall include at a
minimum, resolution, frame rate and bit rate.
If the VR under test is an HD decoder, additional testing may also be conducted with an SD input
signal
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
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Where the VR is operating in a download or recording mode, the input should contain content that
simulates material that would typically be downloaded or recorded.
Where an VR has conditional access system, it should be tested whilst decoding encrypted content .
Where an VR can record other services than the one being watched, the test signal should contain
sufficient services to enable this feature to be tested.
Audio test signal
The audio test signal should have the maximum data rate (bps), maximum number of multiplexed audio
streams, and the maximum number of surround channels (e.g. 5.1, 7.1) of the intended broadcast system.
The audio format used during the power measurement shall be described in the report.
Broadband Input signal
An input that provides the equivalent multiplexed transport as an appropriate internet protocol (IP)
broadband signal shall be applied to the defined Video and Audio Test Signalling (8.2.2.1 and 8.2.2.2)Input
terminals.
Input terminals
Analogue terrestrial input terminal
In the case that the VR is being tested with an analogue terrestrial RF input signal, the signals used
shall conform to IEC 60107-1:1997, 3.3, and shall have the input signal level set at –39 dB(mW)
when terminated with a 75  resistor or at a level to provide a perceptually noise free or error free
picture.
NOTE
–39 dB(mW) corresponds to 70 dB(µV).
Cable television input terminal
In the case that the VR is being tested with a cable television RF input signal, the signals used shall
conform to the cable television specifications for the region, and shall have the input signal level set
at –49 dB(mW) with a termination of 75  resistor or at a level to provide better than the picture
failure point (PF) as defined in IEC62216 for digital signals or a perceptually nois e free picture or
error free for analog signals.
NOTE
–49 dB(mW) corresponds to 60 dB(µV).
Digital terrestrial input terminal
In the case that the VR is being tested with a digital terrestrial RF input signal, the signals used
shall conform to the broadcast specifications for the region, and shall have the input signal level set
at –49 dB(mW) with a termination of 75  resistor or at a level to provide better than the picture
failure point (PF) as defined in IEC62216 or a perceptually noise free picture.
Satellite input terminal
In the case that the television set is being tested with a satellite input, the input signal level shall be
set at –49 dB(mW) with a termination of 75  resistor or at a level to provide provide better than the
picture failure point (PF) as defined in IEC62216 2009 for digital signals or a perceptually noise free
picture or error free for analog signals.
Operating modes
General
VRs are developing in such a way that they can operate in many modes. To retain consistency with
17
other standards , the following modes have been developed.
17
IEC 62542 and IEC 62301 both have classifications of operating modes.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
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On Modes
On (average)
The VR is performing the function of providing, video and audio outputs from a broadcast which
may or may not be buffered to memory for time shifting functions.
On (play)
The VR is performing the function of providing a viewer with video and audio from a prerecorded
source from within the VR or from removable media.
On (record)
The VR is recording a single program and may or may not be providing video and audio outputs of
the program being recorded. Recording is considered a main function of the VR. If the VR is
providing video and audio outputs of a different program or previously recorded program or is
recording more than one program, then it is not in On(Record) mode but On(mu ltifunction) mode.
On (multifunction)
In multifunction mode, the VR is performing two or more actions simultaneously, these functions
may include recording to its memory and providing a viewer with video or audio, or recording to its
memory two or more programs
Standby and Off modes
Standby-active, high
The VR is placed in a mode where it: (1) is not providing audio and video outputs, (2) can be
switched into another mode with the remote control unit, an internal signal, or an external signal (3)
is exchanging/receiving data with/from an ex ternal source.
The data exchanged with an external source may provide information for functions such as:
— Conditional Access Keys Management
— Firmware upgrade
— EPG maintenance
This mode may not be available in all VRs.
Standby-active, low
The VR is placed in a mode where it: (1) is not providing audio and video outputs, (2) can be
switched into another mode with an internal or external signal, and (3) is not exchanging/receiving
data with/from an external source.
This mode may not be available in all VRs.
Standby-passive
The VR is placed in a mode where it: (1) is not providing audio and video outputs, and (2) can only
be switched into another mode with the remote control unit or an internal signal. The VR is
performing no useful function other than monitori ng for a command to switch to another mode. This
command could come from a remote control or an internal signal.
This mode may not be available in all VRs.
Off
The VR is connected to a power source, fulfills no function, and cannot be switched into any other
mode with a remote control, an internal, or an external signal.
This mode may not be available in all VRs.
Auto Power Down Function
An auto power down feature may be implemented on a VR to power down into a Standby mode after
a predetermined time. Such a feature should be referred to as Auto Power Down.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
42
Measurement Procedure
General Measuring conditions
The general measuring conditions including the type of power meters to be used is as per 5.1
except where conditions are otherwise specified in this section.
Stabilization
The measurements shall be performed after the VR has achieved a stable condition with respect to
power consumption. The time used to stabilise the VR shall be recorded in the test report. It would
be expected that the VR will need to be stabilised for between 15 and 30 minutes. A VR is
considered stable when any of the results of the same test repeated are within 2 %.
Environmental conditions
For sub clause 8.6.5 the ambient temperature shall be 23 °C  5 °C.
Set Up
The VR should be set up in a manner to simulate a normal operating environment. In this condition,
the measurement shall be made without optional peripheral devices attached to the device. The
inputs to the VRs may be either live signals or generated test streams that simulate live signals that
the VR is designed to receive and decode.
Where an LNB or antenna amplifier power supply is provided, the measurement should be made
without that device included in the power consumption measurements. Accordingly, the LNB or
antenna amplifier should either be: (1) powered from a source other than the VR, or (2) its power
consumption can be subtracted from the measured power consumption of the unit under test. The
test report shall indicate which method was used for the power measurement.
Power Measurements
General
The VR under test shall be measured in each applicable mode as specified below. In the case of
HD VRs, testing shall be with an HD input. Testing with a SD input signal may also be conducted.
Where the SD test is conducted on a HD VR, the result shall be recorded as P AV_ON_SD .
On (average)
Disable the time shifting function, if possible, and measure the average power consumed for at least
two minute period. Record this as P AV_ON . Record the time used to measure the average power.
On (play)
Start a playback of a previously recorded program on the VR and measure the average power
consumed for at least two minute period. Record this as P PL .
Start a playback of a program on the removable media inserted into the VR and measure the
average power consumed for at least two minute period. Record this as P RPL .
On (record)
Start or schedule a recording. With the VR recording the program, measure the average power
consumed for at least two minute period. Record this as P REC_ON .
Start or schedule a recording. With the VR recording the program to the inserted removable media
measure the average power consumed for at least two minute period. Record this as P REC_RM_ON .
On (multifunction) with a single Tuner
Set the VR to record a program while simultaneously playing back a previously recorded program
and measure the average power consumed for at least two minute period. Record this as P MF_ST .
Time shifting is covered in this measurement as this is the case when the VR is playing back the
same program as it is recording.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
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Note: The mechanism for multifunction with a single tuner is the same as for time shift or recording. For this reason there
is no need to measure time shifting and recording separately See annex D
On (multifunction) with a Multi-Tuner
Table 28shows the matrix that shall be used to characterize a multi -tuner VR.
Table 28: Matrix for multi-tuner VRs
nd
rd
th
Tuner
Viewing
Add 2
tuner
recording
HD or SD
Add 3
tuner
recording
18
HD or SD
Add 4
tuner
recording
4
HD or SD
Add nth
tuner
recording
4
HD or SD
Sequence 1
P MFA_SD_n
SD
P MFA_SD_2
P MFA_SD_3
P MFA_SD_4
P MFA_SD_n
Sequence 2
P MFA_HD_n
HD
P MFA_HD_2
P MFA_HD_3
P MFA_HD_4
P MFA_HD_n
Measure the average power for at least two minute period for each of the modes in the matrix.
For SD VRs, only sequence 1 shall be performed. For HD VRs, both sequence 1 and sequence 2
shall be performed.
Standby Active High
If possible, activate a download mode from the primary service and measure the average power
consumed for at least a two minute period. This measurement may require information from the
manufacturer and/or service provider to ensure the transport stream contains a suitable download
and instructions on how to set the VR to receive the download. Record this value as P SAH .
NOTE: It may not be possible to place the VR into this mode. If this is the case and the value is still required it may have
to be provided by manufacturer’s declaration.
Standby Active Low
To ensure that the VR is in standby active and not performing any downloading or recording
function, the following procedure should be used.
a) Put the VR into its on mode.
b) If the VR is capable of scheduling a recording then schedule a recording 2 or more hours in the future.
c) After five (5) minutes in this mode, press the standby or off button on the remote control.
d) Leave the VR for a minimum of 30 minutes or until housekeeping activities have been completed.
Measure the average power consumed for a 2 minute period. Record this as P SAL . Record the time
taken to switch to Active Standby Low.
Standby Passive
To ensure that the VR is in standby passive, the following procedure should be used.
e) Put the VR into its on mode.
f)
If the VR is capable of scheduling a recording then schedule a recording 2 or more hours in the future.
g) After five (5) minutes in this mode, press the standby or off button on the remote control.
h) Leave the VR for a minimum of 30 minutes or until housekeeping activities have been completed.
Measure the average power consumed for a 2 minute period. Record this as P SP . Record the time
taken to switch to Standby Passive.
NOTE The method for determining standby active low and standby passive are identical as the switching into either one
of these modes is the same. Which mode the VR actually switches to is actually determined by the platform in which the
VR is operating. A terrestrial VR will be more likely to be in a passive mode and a cable or satellite VR will be more likely
to be in a standby active low mode. Both methods are specified here to be consistent with the definitions in table 1.
18
If fitted.
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Off
Turn the VR off using the power switch, if available, and measure the average power consumed for
at least two minute period. Record this as P _OFF .
Auto Power Down
If auto power down has been implemented on a VR, use the following procedure to obtain a test
result for this feature:
a)
If the VR is capable of scheduling a recording, then schedule a recording 6 hours in the future.
b) Connect the VR to either a live stream or a pre-recorded stream and leave the VR until the auto-standby is
initiated.
Measure the average power consumed for at least two minute period. Record this as P APD . Record
the time elapsed before the auto power down was performed.
Standby-passive
Standby-passive
See Clause 4
On (play)
Standby-passive
See Clause 4
On (play)
On
See Clause 4
Standby-active, low
Standby-active, low
See Clause 4
Off
Off
See Clause 4
st
NOTE This sub clause remains from the 1 edition (IEC 62087:2002), see Bibliography) for backward compatibility. For
measuring television set power consumption, On (average) mode, defined in Clause 11, is recommended.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
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Annex A
(informative)
General information on STBs technology and additional aspects of STB
testing.
A.1
General
This annex covers a number of technology and testing issues that may be helpful as additional
information to that which is contained in Section 8.
HDD
Tuner 1
MPEG Decoder
A/V
Output
Tuner n
Ethernet/
Broadband
Interface
CPU
Modem
Flash memory
Figure D.1 – Block diagram of the common functional parts of an STB ′
A.2
Background on STB technology
STB technology was originally introduced to receive subscription based TV services and display the content on
televisions. The original services were analog. However, as digital broadcast technology has been introduced over
the last several years STBs have become a rapidly developing technology for both subscription and free to air
terrestrial, cable and satellite services. Most recently STBs have been developed for IPTV services.
Product Profile for Video Recorders and Set Top Boxes
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The range of types now available vary from simple adaptors for terrestrial free to air services to complex multi
tuner types with recording and time slip functions STBs are now emerging with removable and non-removable
solid state memory.
Due to the rapid rise in STB use, concerns have been raised about the increased energy being consumed by these
devices and action in the form of a number of programs both voluntary and regulatory has been implemented.
In the 3rd Edition of this standard, STB measurement methods were revised in response to both the changed nature
of STBs and the need for internationally accepted methods of measurement to facilitate the development of energy
efficiency programmes associated with STBs. STBs covered by the 3rd Edition include STBs with recording
capability using non removable media such as hard disk drives or solid state memory. It also includes recording
capability on removable solid state memory. DVD recorders and BD (BD) recorders are excluded from the scope.
The measuring method covers both so called simple STBs and also complex STBs. The distinction between these
type of STBs is whether conditional access is deployed in the STB. The power measurement methods in this
standard apply to both types of STBs.
From the perspective of power measurement, Fig D.1 shows the relevant functional contributors to power
consumption for an STB.
A.3
Testing recording and time shift functions.
Figures D.2 and D.3 show data flow for a single tuner time shift function and for multifunction record and
playback.
Demodulator
TV
HDD/Flash
Storage
Figure D.2 – Time shift recording with single tuner′
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Demodulator
TV
HDD/Flash
Storage
HDD/Flash
Storage
Figure D.3 – Single tuner multifunction record and playback′
The diagrams show that essentially it is the same data flow. In the multifunction case, one programme is being
recorded and a second is being played back. These programmes exist on different parts of the recording media.
This is no different than the time shift case. Although it is only one programme, the physical location of the data
being recorded will be different than the data being played back as a time shift. For this reason, this standard only
requires the measurement of the multifunction mode for a single tuner.
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