Tekelec Signaling Systems

— PRELIMINARY —
Tekelec
Signaling Systems
Systems Overview
909-1021 Revision D
May 2005
— PRELIMINARY —
Copyright© 2005 Tekelec.
All Rights Reserved
Printed in U.S.A.
Notice
Information in this documentation is subject to change without notice. Unauthorized use or
copying of this documentation can result in civil or criminal penalties.
No part of this documentation may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means,
electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording, for any purpose without the
express written permission of an authorized representative of Tekelec.
Other product names used herein are for identification purposes only, and may be trademarks of
their respective companies.
Trademarks
The Tekelec logo, EAGLE, G-Flex, G-Port, IP7, and IP7 Secure Gateway are registered trademarks
of Tekelec, Inc.
ASi, EAGLE 5, GenuOne, IP7 Front End, SXi, TekServer, TekWare, and VXi are trademarks of
Tekelec, Inc.
All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
Patents
This product is covered by one or more of the following U.S. and foreign patents:
U.S. Patent Numbers:
6,327,350 6,662,017 6,456,845 6,647,113 5,953,404 6,606379 6,167,129 6,324,183 6,639,981
5,008,929
Ordering Information
Additional copies of this document can be ordered from Tekelec Network Systems Division,
5200 Paramount Parkway, Morrisville, North Carolina, 27560.
Table of Contents
Chapter 1. Introduction
Purpose .................................................................................................................... 1-1
Tekelec Signaling Systems .................................................................................... 1-2
Conceptual Network Overview .................................................................... 1-2
Eagle .................................................................................................................. 1-4
IP7 Secure Gateway ........................................................................................ 1-4
LNP ................................................................................................................... 1-4
Sentinel ............................................................................................................. 1-5
Supplemental Processing Systems ................................................................ 1-6
Chapter 2. SS7 Networks
Introduction ............................................................................................................ 2-1
Common Channel Signaling Networks ............................................................. 2-1
SS7 Link and Message Types ............................................................................... 2-2
Role of SSPs, STPs and SCPs in SS7 Networks .................................................. 2-3
Service Switching Points (SSPs) .................................................................... 2-3
Signaling Transfer Points (STPS) .................................................................. 2-3
Service Control Points (SCPs) ........................................................................ 2-6
STP System Link Administration ........................................................................ 2-6
Chapter 3. EAGLE 5 SAS/IP7 Secure Gateway
System Architecture
Introduction ............................................................................................................ 3-1
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems ............................................................. 3-2
Administration Subsystem ............................................................................ 3-4
Communication Subsystem ........................................................................... 3-5
Application Subsystem ................................................................................... 3-7
Timing Systems Eagle/IP7 SG .................................................................... 3-12
Basic EAGLE 5 SAS Theory of Operation ................................................. 3-14
SEAS Subsystem (Optional) ........................................................................ 3-15
Embedded Operations Applications Processor (EOAP) ........................ 3-18
IP7 Secure Gateway ...................................................................................... 3-19
Chapter 4. LNP
Introduction to LNP .............................................................................................. 4-1
Query Methods for Wireless and Wireline Networks ............................... 4-2
— PRELIMINARY —
Local Service Management System (LSMS) ................................................ 4-4
EAGLE LNP Functional Capabilities .................................................................. 4-4
LNP Query Service (LNPQS) ......................................................................... 4-4
Automatic Call Gapping (ACG) .................................................................... 4-5
LNP Message Relay (LNPMR) Function ..................................................... 4-5
EAGLE LNP Database ..........................................................................................4-6
SCCP Subsystem Management ............................................................................ 4-6
Messages for Local EAGLE LNP Subsystems .............................................4-6
Database Audit ................................................................................................ 4-7
LNP Maintenance ............................................................................................ 4-7
Reporting Functions ........................................................................................ 4-7
Measurement and Billing Functions ............................................................. 4-8
LNP Hardware ....................................................................................................... 4-9
LSMS ................................................................................................................ 4-9
LSMS Hardware Configuration .................................................................. 4-10
Chapter 5. Sentinel
Sentinel .................................................................................................................... 5-1
Sentinel Frames Overview .................................................................................... 5-4
Site Collector Frames ...................................................................................... 5-4
Flight Recorders ............................................................................................... 5-4
Extended Services Platform (ESP) ................................................................ 5-5
Sentinel Server Frames ................................................................................... 5-5
Integrated Sentinel ..........................................................................................5-6
Probed Sentinel ................................................................................................ 5-9
Chapter 6. MPS
Introduction ............................................................................................................6-1
MPS System Hardware ......................................................................................... 6-2
MPS on Tekelec 1000 ............................................................................................. 6-2
Layered Design ................................................................................................ 6-3
MPS Platform Software Configuration ........................................................ 6-5
Serial Communication .................................................................................... 6-6
Remote Access ................................................................................................. 6-6
Diagnostics, Monitoring, and Alarming ..................................................... 6-7
MPS System Network Configuration ........................................................... 6-7
MPS on Netra Platform ......................................................................................... 6-9
MPS on Netra System Features ................................................................... 6-10
ii
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
— PRELIMINARY —
Chapter 7. Tekelec 1000 Applications Server (APS)
Introduction ............................................................................................................ 7-1
Tekelec 1000 Hardware Features ......................................................................... 7-1
Hardware Components .................................................................................. 7-2
Interfaces .......................................................................................................... 7-3
Electrical Features ........................................................................................... 7-3
Mechanical Design .......................................................................................... 7-3
Alarm and Status Indicators .......................................................................... 7-6
Installation and Replacement .............................................................................. 7-6
Diagnostics .............................................................................................................. 7-7
Reliability, Interoperability, and Scalability ...................................................... 7-7
Reliability ......................................................................................................... 7-7
Interoperability ................................................................................................ 7-7
Scalability ......................................................................................................... 7-8
Chapter 8. EOAP
Overview ................................................................................................................. 8-2
Hardware ................................................................................................................ 8-4
Shelf ................................................................................................................... 8-4
Components ..................................................................................................... 8-5
Asynchronous Maintenance Modem (Optional) ........................................ 8-6
Terminal ........................................................................................................... 8-7
Interfaces ................................................................................................................ 8-7
EOAP-to-Eagle STP ......................................................................................... 8-8
EOAP-to-SEAS ............................................................................................... 8-10
Administration ..................................................................................................... 8-12
IP7 Secure Gateway Provisioning .............................................................. 8-12
EOAP Retransmission Delay ....................................................................... 8-13
Maintenance ......................................................................................................... 8-13
Hardware ....................................................................................................... 8-13
Software .......................................................................................................... 8-14
Upgrade Considerations ..................................................................................... 8-14
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
iii
— PRELIMINARY —
List of Figures
Figure 1-1. Network Functions of
Tekelec Signaling Systems ................................................................ 1-3
Figure 2-2. SS7 Common Channel Signaling Networks .................... 2-2
Figure 3-1. EAGLE 5 SAS System Functional Diagram .................... 3-2
Figure 3-2. Eagle/IP7 SG Subsystems .................................................. 3-3
Figure 3-3. Maintenance and Administration Subsystem ................. 3-5
Figure 3-4. Example EAGLE 5 SAS message flow ............................ 3-15
Figure 3-5. SEAS Subsystem ................................................................. 3-17
Figure 3-6. GR-376 EOAP in an Eagle System ................................... 3-19
Figure 3-7. IP7 Secure Gateway Network (STP Connectivity
via MTP-over-IP) .............................................................................. 3-21
Figure 3-8. IP7 Secure Gateway Network (SCP Connectivity
via TCAP-over-IP) ............................................................................ 3-22
Figure 3-9. IP7 Secure Gateway Network (SEP connectivity via ISUP,
Q.BICC, and TUP-over-IP) .............................................................. 3-23
Figure 4-1. LNP Hardware Overview .................................................. 4-9
Figure 4-2. Overview of LSMS Hardware Components ................. 4-11
Figure 5-1. NOC in a Combined Probe-based and probe-less
Configuration ...................................................................................... 5-2
Figure 5-2. Sentinel Components .......................................................... 5-3
Figure 5-3. Integrated Sentinel Block Diagram ................................... 5-7
Figure 5-4. probed Sentinel .................................................................. 5-10
Figure 6-1. MPS on Tekelec 1000/EAGLE Overview ......................... 6-3
Figure 6-1. Layered Design for MPS and Applications ...................... 6-4
Figure 6-2. MPS Hardware Configuration in Frame .......................... 6-5
Figure 6-2. Rear View of Tekelec 1000 .................................................. 6-5
Figure 6-3. MPS Serial Port Connections .............................................. 6-6
Figure 6-4. MPS on Tekelec 1000 Network Connections ................... 6-8
Figure 6-5. MPS NTP Configuration ..................................................... 6-9
Figure 6-3. MPS on Netra Hardware Overview ................................ 6-10
Figure 7-1. Tekelec 1000 in Tekelec Heavy-Duty Frame .................... 7-2
Figure 7-2. Rear I/O Panel ...................................................................... 7-5
Figure 7-3. Tekelec 1000 Status Indicators ........................................... 7-6
iv
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
— PRELIMINARY —
Figure 8-1. EOAP Communication ....................................................... 8-3
Figure 8-2. EOAP Shelf ........................................................................... 8-4
Figure 8-3. Operating Context of EOAP ............................................... 8-8
Figure 8-4. EOAP-to-IP7 Secure Gateway Interface ........................... 8-9
Figure 8-5. EAGLE-to-SEAS Interface ................................................ 8-11
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
v
— PRELIMINARY —
List of Tables
Table 3-1. Example SS7 Routing Key Table ........................................................... 3-34
Table 4-2. Enterprise 450 Server Features .............................................................. 4-22
Table 5-3. ESP Frame Components Releases 8.0 and 8.1 ..................................... 5-17
Table 5-4. ESP Frame Components Release 9.0 ..................................................... 5-18
Table 5-5. ESP Server 1A Release 9.0 ...................................................................... 5-19
Table 5-6. ESP Servers 1B through 1Q Release 9.0 ................................................ 5-19
Table 5-7. ESP Frame Components Release 10.0 ................................................... 5-20
Table 5-8. Site Collector Frame Components ........................................................ 5-34
Table 5-9. Sentinel Site Collector Server A ............................................................. 5-35
Table 5-10. Sentinel Site Collector Servers B and C .............................................. 5-35
Table 5-11. EMS Frame Components ...................................................................... 5-38
Table 5-12. MPS Server Specifications ...................................................................... 6-8
Table 7-1. Basic Interfaces ........................................................................................... 7-4
Table 7-2. Optional Interfaces .................................................................................... 7-5
Table 7-3. TekServer Chassis Dimensions ............................................................. 7-13
Table 8-13. Status LEDs of the EOAP System ......................................................... 8-5
Table 8-14. EOAP Port Labels and Functions .......................................................... 8-7
Table 8-15. SCSI Addresses ...................................................................................... 8-10
Table 8-16. EOAP Applications ............................................................................... 8-11
Table 8-17. RFC1006 TCP Protocol Stack ............................................................... 8-20
Table 8-18. Performance Impacts of New EOAP Hardware ............................... 8-22
i
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
1
Introduction
Purpose ................................................................................................ 1–1
Tekelec Signaling Systems ................................................................ 1–2
Eagle .............................................................................................. 1–4
IP7 Secure Gateway..................................................................... 1–4
LNP................................................................................................ 1–4
Sentinel.......................................................................................... 1–5
Supplemental Processing Systems ............................................ 1–6
Manual Organization and Conventions ......................................... 1–7
Acronyms ............................................................................................ 1–8
Purpose
The purpose of this Systems Overview Manual is to provide customers and
system planners with a basic understanding of Tekelec Signaling systems and
how those systems work together in a network. This manual also provides a
high-level overview of each system and its subsystems. This manual does not
describe how to install or replace hardware.
For installation information, refer to the Installation Manual included in your
current documentation suite. For replacement procedures of existing
hardware components, refer to the Maintenance Manual included in your
current documentation suite.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
1-1
Tekelec Signaling Systems
Tekelec Signaling Systems
Tekelec uses different systems to support its processor and feature
applications. This manual describes the following Tekelec systems:
•
EAGLE 5 Signaling Application System (SAS) Signal Transfer Point (STP)
and IP7 Secure Gateway (SG)
•
Local Number Portability and LSMS
•
Sentinel
•
Supplemental Processing Systems
–
Multi-purpose Server (MPS)
–
Tekelec 1000 Applications Server (APS)
–
Embedded Operations Support System Applications Processor
(EOAP)
Conceptual Network Overview
Figure 1-1 on page 1-3 outlines three scenarios that show how Tekelec
Signaling products might work in a network.
1-2
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Tekelec Signaling Systems
Figure 1-1.
Network Functions of
Tekelec Signaling Systems
Probed Sentinel
Some of the ways the EAGLE 5 SAS interacts with other Tekelec systems is
illustrated in the following scenario descriptions:
1. A call is placed by a customer in North America who has just changed
phone companies, but has retained the same phone number. SS7 data
associated with the customer contained in the call is received by the
EAGLE 5 SAS. The EAGLE 5 SAS needs Number Portability
Administration Center (NPAC) data associated with the customer to
transmit the call data properly. NPAC data gets to the EAGLE 5 SAS from
Tekelec’s Local Service Management System (LSMS) that has stored the
NPAC data on a local database. The LSMS uses the Tekelec 1000-based
MPS hosting ELAP software to pass the data to the EAGLE 5 SAS. This
data transfer enables the customer to be associated with a specific phone
number even though the customer has changed providers.
2. The EAGLE 5 SAS receives SS7 information in a phone call. Integrated
Sentinel ESP servers monitor the SS7 links in the EAGLE 5 SAS directly
(without the use of probes). Sentinel Transport Cards (STCs) in the
EAGLE 5 SAS pass SS7 messaging data to the ESP. This data is processed
by the ESP and sent to the Sentinel Server. The Sentinel Server further
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
1-3
Tekelec Signaling Systems
processes the information and can then provide a wide array of data
including billing infomation and fraud detection.
3. A non-EAGLE 5 SAS STP receives SS7 information in a phone call.
Sentinel Site Collectors use external probes to connect to and monitor the
SS7 links in the STP. This information including the call data record is
passed to the base Sentinel Server for processing and reporting.
The following sections provide brief descriptions of the Tekelec Signaling
systems used in these scenarios.
Eagle
Eagle is a large-capacity, multi-functional, fully scalable Signaling Transfer
Point (STP). High capacity and scalability allow the Eagle to grow from a
single-shelf, 80-link STP to a multi-frame, 1500-link STP.
EAGLE 5 SAS-based Products are NEBS-compliant (GR-63-CORE, Network
Equipment-Building Systems). EAGLE 5 SAS -based products are configured
in standard equipment frames to provide services to SS7 telephony networks.
Because of the distributed processor design, Eagle does not have a separate
central processing unit to bottleneck traffic throughput. Application and
interface cards are designed to provide plug and play type functionality that
facilitates future growth. Eagle application and interface cards generally do
not have specific shelf or frame limitations, allowing you to fully customize
and define how your STP is configured. Eagle also supports a variety of
interface cards to support connectivity to a wide range of network elements.
Eagle provides connectivity interfaces for IP, ATM, DS0A, V.35, OCU, T1, and
E1 protocols.
IP7 Secure Gateway
The IP7 Secure Gateway product is a subsystem of the EAGLE 5 SAS and
provides connectivity between SS7 and IP networks, enabling messages to
pass between the SS7 network domain and the IP network domain. It receives
and sends switched circuit network (SCN) native signaling at the edge of the
IP network. The signaling gateway function may relay, translate, or terminate
SS7 signaling in an SS7-Internet gateway. The signaling gateway function may
also be co-resident with the media gateway function to process SCN signaling
associated with line or trunk terminations controlled by the media gateway.
LNP
Local Number Portability (LNP) allows a subscriber to change location,
service provider, or service while keeping the same directory number. LNP
ensures that subscribers receive the same freedom of choice for local service as
1-4
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Tekelec Signaling Systems
they do with long-distance service providers. The EAGLE 5 SAS with Local
Number Portability (LNP) solution provides fully scalable transaction rates
from 1,700 to 40,000 TPS.
Tekelec simplifies number portability by integrating advanced database
management and signaling functions directly into its EAGLE 5 SAS platform.
Using a memory-based approach, LNP functions are combined with EAGLE 5
SAS capabilities in a single network node.
Tekelec’s LNP solution includes the Local Service Management System
(LSMS). LSMS provides the interface between the number portability
administration center (NPAC) service management system and the EAGLE 5
SAS’s element management system (EMS). It maintains and distributes LNP
data to the service provider’s LNP databases. The LSMS is equipped with a
graphical user interface to administer subscription, service provider, and
network data.
Sentinel
The Sentinel product line provides the capability to monitor SS7 links.
Sentinel is a network monitoring and diagnostic system that gives service
providers visibility of and access to their SS7 networks. Sentinel includes the
following components:
•
•
Fault-management:
–
Problem re-creation
–
Problem analysis
–
Proactive surveillance
–
Problem resolution
Business applications:
–
Loop detection
–
Mass call detection
–
Fraud detection
–
Billing verification
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
1-5
Tekelec Signaling Systems
Supplemental Processing Systems
Multi-Purpose Server
The Multi-Purpose Server (MPS) hosts the EAGLE 5 SAS LNP Application
Processor (ELAP) or EAGLE 5 SAS STP Provisioning Application Processor
(EPAP) applications such as G-Flex and G-Port. When used to host ELAP or
EPAP applications, the MPS provides an interface between the customer
provisioning network and the Eagle DSM cards. As the customer’s data is
updated, the MPS stores the data and updates the DSM cards. An MPS is
usually co-located with an Eagle, but can be installed remotely.
Beginning in release 30.1, MPS systems running EPAP 4.0 are hosted on the
Tekelec 1000 Services Platform. Existing MPS systems running on SUN
servers will continue to be supported. Customers wanting to upgrade to the
functionality of MPS/EPAP 4.0 are required to install the Tekelec 1000
hardware.
Tekelec 1000 Applications Server (APS)
Tekelec 1000 provides a fully integrated application-hosting environment
directly on top of the EAGLE 5 SAS platform. The Tekelec 1000 is a
general-purpose application engine (AE) that offers high transaction rates
with low latency. It supports a variety of application solutions for the wireless
and wireline telecommunications infrastructure to provide the building
blocks for next-generation signaling systems. The Tekelec 1000 supports a full
suite of applications known as TekWare. The Tekelec 1000 is scalable and
packaged in a compact-size, stand-alone enclosure.
EOAP
The Embedded Operations Support System Application Processor (EOAP)
provides the Eagle STP system with a generic platform to develop and run
OAP software for feature-specific interfaces to the Eagle STP. These interfaces,
for example, include the optional Signaling and Engineering Administration
System (SEAS) and the optional Local Service Management System (LSMS).
EOAP applications reside on redundant hardware processor modules in a
chassis mounted in a Tekelec Operations Application Frame (OAF). Other
applications such as the GR-376 can also be configured on an EOAP chassis.
The OAP application residing on the EOAP replaces the older OAP.
1-6
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Tekelec Signaling Systems
Manual Organization and Conventions
This Systems Overview Manual is organized into the following chapters:
•
Chapter 1, "Introduction"—contains general information about manual
organization, the scope of this manual, its targeted audience, brief
explanations of the various systems, typical content of a Documentation
Suite delivered with each system, how to handle hardware repairs and
returns, and how to get technical assistance.
•
Chapter 2, "SS7 Networks"—provides an overview of common channel
signaling networks, the role of STPs in those networks, the connectivity of
STPs with other network elements, and the administration of STPs within
a signaling network.
•
Chapter 3, "EAGLE 5 SAS/IP7 Secure Gateway System Architecture"
—describes the components of the EAGLE 5 SAS/IP7 Secure Gateway
system, and provides a high-level theory of its operation.
•
Chapter 4, "LNP" —describes the EAGLE Local Number Portability (LNP)
system, including the Local Service Management System (LSMS). It also
provides a high-level theory of operation designed to assist maintenance
personnel in troubleshooting the EAGLE 5 SAS LNP system.
•
Chapter 5, "Sentinel" —describes both the integrated and probed Sentinel
network monitoring and diagnostic systems.
•
Chapter 6, "MPS" — describes the MPS hardware platform, MPS hardware
components, and MPS disks and file systems.
•
Chapter 7, "Tekelec 1000 Applications Server (APS)" — describes the Tekelec
1000 hardware platform.
•
Chapter 8, "EOAP" — describes the Embedded Operations Support System
Application Processor (EOAP) and the software for feature-specific
interfaces to the Eagle STP.
The Systems Overview Manual uses the following conventions:
•
Components used only in a specific system are clearly labeled, for
example, (EAGLE 5 SAS only) or (IP7 SG only).
•
Components that are specific to a release are labeled with the system and
release number; for example, (IP7 SG 4.0 or later) or (EAGLE 27.2 or
earlier).
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
1-7
Tekelec Signaling Systems
Acronyms
A ..........................................Ampere
ACL.....................................Application processor Code Loader
ACM ...................................Applications Communications Module
AIN .....................................Advanced Intelligent Networks. Set of standards
for advanced intelligent services
AINF ...................................Application Interface Applique
ANSI ...................................American National Standards Institute.
AP........................................Application Processor
APD ....................................Application Processor DCM bootstrap code
API ......................................Application Interface
AS........................................Application server
ASM ....................................Application Services Module
ATM ....................................Asynchronous Transfer Mode
BHCA .................................Busy Hour Call Attempts
BITS.....................................Building Integrated Timing System
BM.......................................Buss Master (Cognitronics)
BOM....................................Bill Of Materials
BP ........................................Boot Prom
BPDCM ..............................Boot Prom DCM
Bps.......................................Bit per second
CAP.....................................Communication & Application Processor
CAR ....................................Corrective Action Report
CCS7 ...................................Common Channel Signaling System #7
CE CISPR A .......................Compliance European, Comite Internationale
Special des Perturbations Radioelectrique
(European Compliance, International Special
Committee on Radio Interference, Class A)
CDR ....................................Call Detail Record
CDU ....................................CAP Downloadable Utility
CLEI ....................................Common Language Equipment Identifier
CF ........................................Control Frame
CLLI ....................................Common Language Location Identifier
CNAM ................................Calling Name Delivery Service
1-8
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Tekelec Signaling Systems
COTS .................................. Commercial Off-the-Shelf
CP ....................................... Communications Processor
CSR ..................................... Customer Service Request
D1G .................................... Database Communication 1 Gigabyte Expansion
Memory Module
DCM................................... Database Communications Module
DMS.................................... Disk Management Service
DRAM................................ Dynamic Random Access Memory
DS0 ..................................... Digital Signal Level-0 (64 Kbits/sec)
DS1 ..................................... Digital Signal Level-1 (1.544Mbits/sec)
DSM.................................... Database Services Module
E1 ........................................ European Digital Signal Level-1 (2.048 Mbits/sec).
EBI ...................................... Extended Bus Interface
EDCM ................................ Enhanced Database Communications Module
EF........................................ Extension Frame
EILA ................................... Enhanced Integrated LIM Applique
EMM................................... Extended Memory Management
EMP.................................... EAGLE Monitor Protocol
EOAM ................................ Enhanced OAM GPL
EOAP ................................. Embedded Operation Support System Applications
Processor
ESD..................................... Electro-Static Discharge
ESP...................................... Extended Services Platform
FAP ..................................... Fuse and Alarm Panel
FR........................................ Flight Recorder
FTP...................................... File Transfer Protocol
FTRA .................................. FTP-based Table Retrieve Application
GB ....................................... GigaByte
GLS ..................................... Generic Loader Services
GPL..................................... Generic Program Load
GPLM................................. GPL Management
GPSM-II ............................. General Purpose Service Module
GTT..................................... Global Title Translation
GWS ................................... GTT Gateway Screening
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
1-9
Tekelec Signaling Systems
HCAP .................................High-Speed Communications & Applications
Processor
HCAP-T..............................Improved HCAP card
HDLC .................................High-Level Data Link Control
HIPR ...................................High-speed IMT Router
HMUX ................................High-speed Multiplexer
IAD......................................Integrated Access Device
ICM .....................................IMT configuration manager task
ILA ......................................Integrated LIM-AINF module
ILDR....................................IMT loader task
IMT .....................................Inter-processor Message Transport
IMTC...................................IMT Control task
IP .........................................Internet Protocol
IP7 ........................................Tekelec’s Internet Protocol to SS7 Interface
IPD ......................................IMT Processor DCM operational code
IPMX...................................IMT Power and Multiplexer card
ISDN ...................................Integrated Services Digital Network.
IS-NR ..................................In Service – Normal
ISR .......................................Interrupt Service Routine
ITU ...................................... International Telecommunications Union
IWF .....................................Inter-Working Function
KHz.....................................Kilohertz (1000 Hertz)
LAN ....................................Local Area Network.
LFS ......................................Link Fault Sectionalization
LIM .....................................Link Interface Module
LNP.....................................Local Number Portability
LIM-AINF ..........................A LIM with a software-selectable interface
LOM....................................Lights out Management
LSMS...................................Local Service Management System
M256 ...................................256 Megabyte Memory Expansion Card
MAS ....................................Maintenance and Administration Subsystem
MASP..................................Maintenance and Administration Subsystem
Processor
MBUS..................................Maintenance Bus
1-10
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Tekelec Signaling Systems
MCAP ................................ Maintenance Communications & Applications
Processor
MDAL ................................ Maintenance, Disk, and Alarm card
MG...................................... Media Gateway
MGB ................................... Master Ground Bar
MGC................................... Media Gateway Controller
MGCP ................................ Media Gateway Controller Protocol
MIB ..................................... Maintenance Information Base utility
MIM.................................... Multi-Channel Interface Module
MPL.................................... Multi-Port LIM
MPS .................................... Multi-Purpose Server
MSU.................................... (SS7) Message signaling Unit
MS....................................... Media Server
MTOS ................................. Multi-Tasking Operating System, Industrial
Programming Inc.
NEBS .................................. Network Equipment Building System
NOC ................................... Network Operations Center
NS ....................................... Network Server
NSD .................................... Tekelec’s Network Systems Division
OAM .................................. Operations, Administration, & Maintenance
OA&M ............................... Operations, Administration, & Maintenance
OAP.................................... Operations System Support/Applications Processor
OAPF.................................. Operations System Support/Applications Processor
Frame
OCU ................................... Office Channel Unit
OEM ................................... Original Equipment Manufacturer
OOS-MT-DSBLD .............. Out of Service –Maintenance Disabled
PMTC ................................. Peripheral Maintenance task
PSTN .................................. Public Switched Telephone Network
RAID .................................. Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks
RAM ................................... Random Access Memory
RMA ................................... Return Material Authorization
SAI/P ................................. Serial Asynchronous Interface PCI Adapter
SCP ..................................... Service Control Point (SS7 Network)
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
1-11
Tekelec Signaling Systems
SCCP...................................Signal Connection Control Part
SCM ....................................System Configuration Manager
SCN.....................................Switched Circuit Network
SCSI.....................................Small Computer Systems Interface
SEAC...................................Signaling Engineering and Administration Center
SEAS ...................................Signaling Engineering and Administration System
SG ........................................Secure Gateway
SIP .......................................Session Initiation Protocol
SS7.......................................Signaling System Seven
SSP ......................................Service Switching Point (SS7 Network)
STC......................................Sentinel Transport Card
STP ......................................Signal Transfer Point (SS7 Network)
STPLAN .............................Signaling Transfer Point Local Area Network
T1.........................................The North American telecommunications standard
defining a circuit that multiplexes and switches 24
channels and operates at speeds of 1.544 Mbps
TCU.....................................Table Creation Utility
TCP .....................................Transport Control Protocol
TCP/IP ...............................Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol
TDM....................................Terminal Disk Module
TEKCC................................Tekelec Composite Clock
TEKOS ................................Tekelec Operating System
TMOAP ..............................Texas Micro processor chassis hosting the OAP
application
TOS486 ...............................Tekos Operating System for the 486
TOS4M................................Tekos Operating System for the 486 implemented
via MTOS
TSC......................................Time Slot Counter
TSM.....................................Translation Services Module
UAM ...................................Unsolicited Alarm Output
UD1G..................................Updated Database Communication 1 Gigabyte
Expansion Memory Module
UIM.....................................Unsolicited Information Messages
V.35......................................ITU Interface Recommendation, V.35
VPN ....................................Virtual Private Network
1-12
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Tekelec Signaling Systems
WAN .................................. Wide Area Network
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
1-13
Tekelec Signaling Systems
1-14
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
2
SS7 Networks
Contents ......................................................................................................... Page
Introduction.......................................................................................................2-1
Common Channel Signaling Networks ........................................................2-1
SS7 Link and Message Types ..........................................................................2-2
Role of SSPs, STPs and SCPs in SS7 Networks.............................................2-3
STP System Link Administration...................................................................2-6
Introduction
This chapter provides an overview of common channel signaling networks, the
role of STPs in those networks, the connectivity of STPs with other network
elements, and the administration of STPs within a signaling network.
Common Channel Signaling Networks
Signaling System No. 7 (SS7) is a signaling protocol that has become a worldwide
standard for modern telecommunications networks. The U.S. implementation is
based on the International Telecommunications Union-Telecommunications
Section (ITU-TS) and TIX I Committee of the Exchange Carriers Standards
Association (ECSA). SS7 is a layered protocol following the OSI reference model.
It offers all of the same call setup advantages as CCS6, but also enables network
elements to share more than just basic call-control information through the many
services provided by the SS7's Integrated Services Digital Network-User Part
(ISUP), and the Transaction Capabilities Application Part (TCAP).
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
2-1
SS7 Link and Message Types
The functions of the TCAP and ISUP layers correspond to the Application
Layer of the OSI reference model, and allow for new services such as
User-to-User signaling, Closed-User Group, Calling Line Identification,
various options on Call Forwarding and the rendering of services based on a
centralized database (e.g., 800 and 900 service). All of these services may be
offered between any two network subscribers, not just to subscribers served
by the same telephone switch.
SS7 Link and Message Types
An SS7 Network consists of a flat non-hierarchical configuration enabling
peer-to-peer communication. Figure 2-2 depicts the makeup and connectivity
of SS7 common channel signaling networks currently installed and in use.
Figure 2-2.
SS7 Common Channel Signaling Networks
Signalling Network Elements
[ Signalling Points (SP)]
SSP- Service Switch Point
STP- Signaling Transfer Point
SCP-Service Control Point
STP
C
D
Another Carrier’s CCS7 Network
(e.g., IEC, International, etc.)
STP
SSP
STP
SSP
A
SCP
STP
B
C
C
STP
STP
A
SSP
SSP
SCP
E
SSP
F
SSP
STP
STP
B
STP
“Another”
CCS7
Network
STP
Signaling Link Types
A = “Access” Links
B= ”Bridge” Links
C= ”Cross” Links
D= ”Distant” (Inter-Network) Links
E= ”Extended” Access Links
F= “Associated, “FX” (Inter-SSP) Links
2-2
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Role of SSPs, STPs and SCPs in SS7 Networks
Figure 2-2 shows the three principal network elements of SS7 common
channel signaling networks, interconnected by the six standard types of
signaling links currently in use. Signaling links are data transmission links
that ordinarily operate on digital carrier facilities at 56,000 bits per second in
North America, and at 64,000 bits per second in most other regions of the
world. High Speed Links (HSLs) at 1.54 M bps are beginning to be used in
North America.
Signaling links between any two signaling network elements are deployed in
groups called “link sets,” dimensioned to carry the estimated signaling traffic
between two STPs. Because STPs like the EAGLE 5 SAS are deployed in pairs,
as shown in Figure 2-2, an alternate route always exists between any two
STPs.
One combination of the link sets interconnecting an SSP or SCP with both
members of the STP pair is called a “Combined link set.” 'The traffic carried
between any two signaling network elements is load-shared across links in a
link set, rotating through all links available according to the rules of the SS7
protocol.
Traffic destined for any network element via the STP pair is further
load-shared over the combined link set, unless restricted by network
management rules also established by the SS7 protocol.
Role of SSPs, STPs and SCPs in SS7 Networks
Service Switching Points (SSPs)
In conventional telephone networks, Service Switching Points (SSPs) are
usually telephone central offices, also known as “End-Offices,” or “Access
Tandems.” In the cellular mobile or “wireless” communications environment,
an SSP is frequently located at the Mobile Switching Center (MSC). In either
case, the SSPs perform circuit switching functions, and are capable of using
the SS7 protocol to signal other SSPs for call setup, or to query the centralized
databases that are stored in Service Control Points (SCPs).
Signaling Transfer Points (STPS)
STPs like the EAGLE 5 SAS are ultra-reliable, high speed packet switches at
the heart of SS7 networks, which terminate all link types except “F” links. For
reliability reasons, they are nearly always deployed in mated pairs.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
2-3
Role of SSPs, STPs and SCPs in SS7 Networks
The primary functions of STPs are to provide access to SS7 networks and
routing of signaling messages. The SS7 protocol itself defines destination
routing for both circuit related signaling (inter-SSP) and non-circuit related
data base inquiries (to SCPS). Many STPs contain additional routing
information concerning the exact location of specific databases stored at
different Service Control Points (SCP), so that a SSP can request information
without knowing in which specific SCP it is stored.
STPs operate using the message transfer and signaling connection control
parts (MTP and SCCP) of the SS7 protocol. The MTP provides basic message
handling and network management procedures, and the SCCP adds the
capability to transmit database queries and other non-circuit related signaling
messages across the network. SCCP also provides a non-SS7 specific
addressing interface (Global Title), as explained below.
In SS7 networks, STPs perform the following three basic functions:
•
Message routing - by using the originating and destination point codes
(OPC & DPC) contained in the MTP's “routing label,” in a “datagram”
environment (i.e. where a separate route may be chosen for each message
packet). Routing tables, which are structured to allow message transport
between any given pair of SSPs over different routes, are stored and
maintained within STPS. The STP's signaling Network Management
functions control message routing during periods of link congestion or
failure.
•
Specialized routing (Global Title Translation) - by using the SCCP to
translate addresses (Global Titles) from signaling messages that do not
contain explicit information allowing the MTP to route the message. For
example, an STP translates a dialed “1+800” number to an SCP's DPC for
MTP routing, and gives a subsystem number (SSN) for delivery to the
“800” database application at the SCP. In case of congestion or failures, the
STP's SCCP management takes responsibility for rerouting signaling
traffic, based on information received via the MTP concerning the point
code's routing status, and SSNs allowed or prohibited.
•
Carrier signaling access (Gateway Screening) - by using the MTP and
SCCP to allow or deny access to the “Home” SS7 network for transport of
signaling messages from another network.
To establish and maintain trunk connections between two SSPs, and to notify
both when the connection is to be released, a pre-defined sequence of SS7
messages is exchanged between the two SSPs. Except where “F-links” have
been installed between the concerned SSPs, these messages are routed to one
of a pair of STPs in the local (“Home”) SS7 network over an “A- link,” or to
one of a pair of STPs in another SS7 network over an “E-fink.” The STP
function is illustrated by the following two cases:
•
2-4
For an ordinary customer-dialed call to a 7- or 10-digit domestic station
address (I±NPA+NXX+XXXX), the STP, after consulting its routing tables,
will route its received SS7 messages towards the designated SSP over the
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Role of SSPs, STPs and SCPs in SS7 Networks
•
appropriate A, B or D-link. (Note: A message will be rerouted via a C-link
only in cases of where use of the other B or D link sets are restricted or
unavailable.)
For calls to be given special billing or routing treatment, as indicated by
other dialled prefix digits (e.g., I+NOO+..., IOXX +..., 0+..., etc.), an
intermediate step requires the STP to retrieve routing information from a
non-resident routing table or database. This retrieval process ordinarily
involves translation of the signaling address and a completely separate
message transaction with a SCP.
As shown in Figure 2-2, STPs are the hub of the signaling network
infrastructure. A less efficient, and more expensive, signaling network might
have each SSP connected to every other SSP via a (“F”-type) signaling link.
This approach would be much more costly than the hubbed network shown
in Figure 2-2, due to the total number of links that would be required. For
example, a fully-connected, ten node network would require 45 “F-links,” or
90 “F-links” if each link was redundant. The alternative hubbed network
approach for ten SSPs utilizing STPs (deployed in pairs for increased
availability) requires only 20 links, one link to each member of the STP pair.
One conspicuous drawback to the totally centralized signaling network as
currently implemented is that it decreases the availability of the network. In
the past, instances of this shortcoming have caused some carriers to lose
whole networks. The optimal network implementation is somewhere between
the fully connected and totally hubbed implementations. In an environment
of relatively inexpensive high capacity, fiber-optic transmission systems, a
fully connected network of smaller, more cost effective STPs can provide
desired network diversity and diffusion.
Diversity is increasing the sectionalization of the network with the
implementation of STPs in “communities of interest” or areas smaller than
currently provisioned (i.e., large urban LATAs, statewide or multi-state
regions). The savings from deploying this approach are two-fold: increased
network availability (guaranteeing uninterrupted revenue streams), and
reduction in the number of back-hauled “Inter-LATA,” or inter-regional links
to the larger, centralized STP. Increasing diversity positions multiple STPs
within a network, as designated by the first three digits of the Point Code, and
thus reduces the number of subscribers affected by a possible STP outage.
“Diffusion” increases the connectivity of the SSPs via E-links to STPs in
adjacent networks. Diffusion may also increase the number of D-links
between different STPs which were not previously connected due to a
hierarchical network implementation. Perfusion of signaling connectivity in
this manner decentralizes the role of signaling in network implementations,
and decreases its impact on network availability.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
2-5
STP System Link Administration
Service Control Points (SCPs)
Service Control Points (SCPs) are network intelligence centers where
databases of call processing information is stored. The primary function of
SCPs is to respond to queries from other SCPs, by retrieving the requested
information from the appropriate database within the SCP node, and sending
it back to the originator of the request.
SCPs currently serve as centralized databases to translate logical numbers
(e.g., 1+N00 numbers) into network physical addresses, or to verify credit card
data and status. Future plans call for expanding the SCPs' centralized resource
responsibilities to include greater interaction in call processing. This
expansion of responsibilities will be attained through newly defined “call
models” implemented in SSPs that may invoke assistance from SCPs more
than once for the same call.
The information managed by an SCP can be modified or updated without
affecting any other node in the SS7 network. This ease of data administration
is a major appeal of SS7 implementation. The first applications of SCPS for
1+800 calls and Credit Card verifications could also have been implemented
by storing the respective databases at each network switching node. This
approach was rejected, however, due to the unmanageable task of
administering multiple decentralized databases.
To appreciate the expediency and economy of centralized databases, consider
adding a new service to a 100 node network by updating 100 databases. The
ease of administration and greater control of new service offerings are obvious
when one compares the two alternatives.
STP System Link Administration
After a STP is installed, system administration consists primarily of the
following:
2-6
•
Addition of signaling link hardware and software
•
Creation and maintenance of data tables for links, link sets, and Routes
•
Addition of hardware and software required for Global Title Translation
•
Creation and maintenance of Global Title Translation tables
•
Addition of hardware and software for Gateway Screening
•
Creation and maintenance of Gateway Screening tables
•
Updating software
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
STP System Link Administration
When required, hardware must always be installed at the affected STP site.
However, there are three methods that can be employed to load software and
administer data tables:
1. Local administration via user interface(s) and portable storage media
(disks/tapes)
2. Remote administration via modem using vendor-proprietary methods
and commands to load and update data
3. Centralized, remote administration via modem or dedicated digital data
link, using industry or network operator's standard operations support
system (e.g., SCCS, SEAS, etc.).
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
2-7
STP System Link Administration
2-8
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
3
EAGLE 5 SAS/IP7 Secure Gateway
System Architecture
Contents.......................................................................................... Page
Introduction ...................................................................................... 3-1
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems ....................................... 3-2
Administration Subsystem....................................................... 3-4
Communication Subsystem ..................................................... 3-5
Application Subsystem............................................................. 3-7
Timing Systems Eagle/IP7 SG............................................... 3-12
EAGLE Basic EAGLE 5 SAS Theory of Operation ............. 3-14
SEAS Subsystem (Optional)................................................... 3-15
Embedded Operations Applications Processor (EOAP) .. 3-18
IP7 Secure Gateway................................................................. 3-19
Introduction
This chapter introduces the components of the EAGLE 5 SAS/IP7 Secure
Gateway system, and provides a high-level theory of its operation. For
detailed descriptions of the EAGLE 5 SAS hardware, refer to the Installation
Manual.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
3-1
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
Eagle and IP7 SG systems are mounted in the same types of frames and are
configured similarly. In the Hardware Manual specific component requirements
or configurations for each system are explained in detail. Figure 3-1, on
page 3-2 provides a high-level overview of the EAGLE 5 SAS subsystems and
functions. These functions are described in the following sections of this
chapter.
NOTE: In some cases in this manual EAGLE 5 SAS hardware card
names are based upon the name of the software that is loaded on the
card rather than the card type printed on the card label. Before servicing
or configuring any EAGLE 5 SAS cards, be sure to physically inspect the
card and read the card label to determine the card type.
EAGLE 5 SAS System Functional Diagram
Figure 3-1.
LSMS
CUSTOMER
PROVISIONING
SYSTEM
S
Remote
Customer’s
WAN
Maintenance and
Administration
Subsystem
**EPAP and ELAP applications are
mutually exclusive on a node basis
Shared Administration SCSI Bus
Alarm
Displays
EAGLE PROVISIONING
APPLICATION PROCESSOR
(EPAP)**
MDAL
including
2 GB
EXTERNAL
CLOCK
M
P
S
M
P
S
M
P
S
M
P
S
A
B
A
B
Removable Disk
Local Bus
GPSM-II
TDM
18 GB
Disk
TDM
18 GB
Disk
MASP-B
MASP-A
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
TCP/IP
Interface
10/100 BaseT
IP connection
for telnet
and FTRA
STC
TCP/IP
Interface
Memory/
Interface
DSM
DSM
I
I
I
Communication Subsystem
HMUX
I M T Busses
IPSM
I
I
I
MCPM
TCP/IP
Interface
I
I I
I
MIM
MPL
DCM
I
BaseT
10/100
Memory/
Interface
*TSMsn ot typically deployed on
same node with DSMs for SCCP
TSM
EAGLE LNP APPLICATION
PROCESSOR (ELAP)**
GATEWAY SCREENING
LOADING SERVICES
Memory
GPSM-II
BaseT
10/100
AUXILIARY MEMORY
SUBSYSTEM (SCCP)*
Local Bus
Customer’s
WAN
1-8 channels
E1 or T1
ANSI DS0
56 Kbps
10/100 BaseT
10/100 BaseT
8 channels per card
IP connection to ESP IP connection for can be daisy chained to
(Integrated Sentinel) measurements
support all channels
8 ANSI DS0
56 Kbps LINKS
I
TCP/IP
Interface
10/100 BaseT
IP LINK
I I
LIM or
LIM-E1
DS0, V. 35,
DSCS or E1
SS7 or X.25 LINKS
Memory
TSM
I
I
I
I
I
LIMATM
I
I
E1ATM
2.048Mbps
1.544Mbps
ITU ATM
ANSI AT M HIGH SPEED LINK
HIGH SPEED LINK
Application Subsystem
3-2
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
The EAGLE 5 SAS consists of the following subsystems:
•
Maintenance and Administration Subsystem (MAS)
•
Communication Subsystem
•
Application Subsystem
In addition, Eagle and IP7 SG systems have a clock derived from the Building
Integrated Timing System (BITS). This connects to the 64KHz composite BITS
signal and distributes clock signals to the rest of the cards in the systems. See
“Timing Systems Eagle/IP7 SG” on page 3-12 for information about
High-Speed Master Timing and Time Slot Counter (TSC) Synchronization
features.
Figure 3-2.
Eagle/IP7 SG Subsystems
Maintenance
and Administration
Subsystem
General Purpose Service Module (GPSM-II)
Terminal Disk Module (TDM)
Maintenance Disk and Alarm Card (MDAL)
Communication Subsystem
Microprocessor Message Transport (IMT)
Small Computer System Interface (SCSI)
High-Speed Multiplexor (HMUX)
Optional Sentinel
Transport Cards
(STC)
or
Maintenance
Polling
and Collection
Modules (MCPM)
Application
Service
Module (ASM)
Translation
Service
Module (TSM)
Link Interface
Module (LIM)
Database
Communications
Module (DCM)
Database Service
Module (DSM)
Application
Communication
Module (ACM)
Application Subsystem
subsystem
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
3-3
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
Administration Subsystem
The Maintenance and Administration Subsystem (MAS) provides services to
other subsystems, and consists of the following:
•
The General Purpose Service Module (GPSM-II)
•
Terminal Disk Module (TDM)
•
Maintenance Disk and Alarm (MDAL)
MASP
The Maintenance and Administration Subsystem Processor (MASP) function
is a logical pairing of the GPSM-II card and the TDM card. The GPSM-II card
is connected to the TDM card by means of an Extended Bus Interface (EBI)
local bus.
The MDAL card contains the removable cartridge drive and alarm logic.
There is only one MDAL card in the Maintenance and Administration
Subsystem (MAS) and it is shared between the two MASPs.
The GPSM-II and TDM card combination performs the following functions:
•
Maintenance communication—Maintenance functions poll each
application card and receives trouble reports. These are reported to the
alarm function in the MASP to generate alarms, or to the event messaging
function for output to the printer.
•
Measurements—Collection and reporting of system performance data.
•
Peripheral services—Provides access to all peripherals attached to the
system, terminals, disks, alarms, clocks, and others.
•
Alarm processing—Provides audible and visual alarms.
•
System disks—Provides for storage of application or system software.
Software is downloaded to application cards from the MASP. The software
provides the interface function depending on application requirements. The
type of software the application processor receives depends on the function of
the application board which is determined by provisioning the board.
Eagle System architecture provides Inter-processor Message Transport (IMT)
connectivity directly to the maintenance and administration subsystem
through the GPSM-II card. This allows the MASP to provide maintenance and
administrative communication services to application cards.
Figure 3-3, “Maintenance and Administration Subsystem,” on page 3-5 shows
relationships between different components of the maintenance and
administration subsystem.
3-4
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
Figure 3-3.
Maintenance and Administration Subsystem
Terminal #1
Terminal #16
MASP-B
MASP-A
EBI
Local Bus
GPSM-II
TDM
Fixed
Disk
MDAL
Alarm Card
Removable
Disk
EBI
Local Bus
TDM
Fixed
Disk
GPSM-II
Shared Administration SCSI BUS
Interprocessor Message Transport
(HMUX or HIPR card)
mtcsub
Communication Subsystem
The communication subsystem consists of two separate sets of buses:
•
Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) buses
•
Inter-processor Message Transport (IMT) buses
Small Computer System Interface Buses
There are two independent Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) buses,
one to the fixed disks on TDM cards and the other to the shared
administration SCSI bus that runs on the backplane between TDMs and the
MDAL card. Each SCSI bus has a block of memory that allows transfers from
memory to occur without delaying the application processor.
Inter-processor Message Transport
The Inter-processor Message Transport (IMT) bus is the main
communications artery for all subsystems in the system. This high-speed
communications system is composed of two counter-rotating serial buses. The
IMT bus uses load sharing, so messages from the various subsystems are
divided evenly across both buses. If one bus should fail, the other
immediately assumes control of all messages.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
3-5
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
With EAGLE release 28.0 and later and Integrated Sentinel release 8.0 and
later the IMT buses can function as an private LAN assigning internal IP
address to LIM cards. By addressing cards on an internal LAN the
EAGLE/Sentinel Integration feature allows monitoring of SS7 links without
external connections. SS7 link information from the EagleLIM cards is
collected by Sentinel Transport Cards (STC) and transferred to Expanded
Service Platform (ESP) subassemblies. After processing in the ESP, the link
information is forwarded to a Sentinel server.
The High-Speed IMT Packet Router
Beginning with EAGLE release 33.0, the High-Speed IMT Packet Router
(HIPR) Module (P/N 870-2574-01) provides increased IMT bus bandwidth
and individual high-speed card/server links. The HIPR enhances the IMT bus
by introducing switched 125 Mbps interfaces to each slot within a shelf. HIPR
acts as a gateway between the intra-shelf IMT BUS, running at 125 Mbps, and
the inter-shelf ring operating at 1.0625 Gbps.
Traffic between cards on the same shelf will be switched directly to the
destination slot and is not transmitted to any other cards in the shelf. Traffic
between shelves is not required to pass onto an intra-shelf IMT channel.
Two HIPR modules are required in shelves equipped with high-performance
LIMs, such as the High-Capacity MIM, and for interfacing to Tekelec 1000
Application Server through IMT Bridge and IMT PCI modules. HIPR requires
all other shelves be equipped with either all HMUX cards or all HIPR cards
(shelves cannot contain a mix of HMUX and HIPR).
The HIPR programmable logic is upgradeable and reprogrammable via the
IMT inter-shelf interface. Updated images can be downloaded from the OAM
to the HIPR and stored in FLASH memory on the HIPR.
With the improved bandwidth from the switched architecture, the HIPR card
enables customers to use other higher performance cards from Tekelec such as
the High Capacity MIM.
Beginning with EAGLE STP Software Release 30.0 all IPMX cards must be
replaced by either High-Speed Multiplexer (HMUX) cards (P/N 870-1965-01)
or High Speed IMT Router (HIPR) cards (P/N 870-2574-0). Beginning with
EAGLE STP software release 33.0, IPMX cards must be replaced by either
HMUX cards or High-Speed IMT Router Cards (P/N 870-2574-01). A mixture
of HMUX and HIPR cards within one IMT ring is possible, provided HIPR
is installed on both IMT A and IMT B on a given shelf. HMUX and HIPR
3-6
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
cards are installed at the factory or by Tekelec Technical Support and are
not installed by customers.
High-Speed Multiplexer
High-Speed Multiplexer (HMUX) cards support requirements for up to 1500
links, allowing communication on IMT buses between cards, shelves and
frames. HMUX cards interface to 16 serial links, creating a ring from a series
of point to point links. Each HMUX card provides a bypass multiplexer to
maintain the ring's integrity as cards are removed and inserted into an
operational shelf. HMUX cards are installed at the factory or by Tekelec
Technical Support and are not installed by customers.
Application Subsystem
The application subsystem consists of application cards. Application cards are
capable of communicating with other cards through the redundant IMT
buses. A Communications Processor (CP) on each application board provides
control of communications from the cards to the IMT buses.
Software is downloaded to application cards on initial power-up from the
Maintenance and Administration Subsystem Processors (MASP). Once Eagle
and IP7 SG systems are loaded, software is downloaded to cards by the
Generic Loader Services (GLS) and Operation Administration and
Maintenance (OAM).
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
3-7
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
EAGLE 5 SAS Application Subsystem Modules
An Application Processor (AP) receives the software load on the application
card. The type of software the AP receives depends on the function of the
application board which is determined by the provisioning of the board. This
combination of software and hardware card is known as a “module”. The
following are the application modules in the EAGLE 5 SAS:
•
Link Interface Module (LIM)
•
ACM - Application Communication Module
•
TDM - Terminal Disk Module
•
IPSM - IP Services Module
•
DCM - Database Communication Module
•
STC - Sentinel Transport Card
•
DSM - Database Services Module
•
GPSM-II - General Purpose Service Module
•
MCPM - Measurements Collection and Polling Module
•
ASM - Application Service Module
•
TSM - Translation Service Module
•
HCMIM - High-capacity MIM
Link Interface Module
The link Interface Module (LIM) provides the interface between the
application subsystem and external services. Each LIM provides one or two
SS7 links (depending on configuration), one X.25 link, or IP links. This
assembly provides level one and some level two functions on SS7 signaling
links.
The types of interfaces presently available through a LIM are:
3-8
•
DS0A at 56 kbps
•
OCU at 56 kbps
•
V.35 at 56 kbps and 64 kbps for SS7
•
T1-ATM at 1.544 Mbps
•
E1-ATM at 2.048 Mbps
•
E1 at 2.048 Mbps
•
T1 at 1.544 Mbps
•
TCP/IP at 10/100 MHz
•
SCTP/IP at 10/100 MHz
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
Application Communication Module
The Application Communication Module (ACM) is an application card
equipped with a main assembly and an Ethernet applique. It is used by the
Signaling Transfer Point Local Area Network (SLAN) feature to access a
remote host through an Ethernet LAN using TCP/IP.
The SLAN feature requires the gateway screening feature also be activated to
control which messages are copied and sent to the remote host.
IP Services Module
The IP Services Module (IPSM) supports the optional IP User Interface feature
introduced in EAGLE Release 29.0. This feature enhances the MAS features by
providing a higher-speed Ethernet connection for EAGLE commands and
responses. Up to three IPSMs can be deployed in a single EAGLE node. Each
IPSM card supports up to eight simultaneous users over a 10/100BaseT
Ethernet connection. The IPSM also provides IP connection for telnet and the
FTRA application. Support for the Secure Shell (SSH) protocol was added to
the IP User Interface in EAGLE Release 30.2 for added security. SSH clients
and SFTP servers deployed by customers must be OpenSSH Version 2
Compatible.
The IPSM also supports the FTP Retrieve and Replace Feature. FTP-based
Table Retrieve Application (FTRA) software package provides additional
capability to the user for table data retrieval. The FTRA software maintenance
and administration software is compatible with both Unix and Windows
platforms supplied by the customer.
Database Communications Module
The Database Communications Module (DCM) provides STP Local Area
Network (STPLAN) function, and 10/100Base-T ethernet links to EAGLE STP
and IP7 SG systems.
General Purpose Service Module (GPSM-II)
The General Purpose Service Module (GPSM-II) is part of the Maintenance
and Administration subsystem and supports the large system feature (up to
1500 links) in the Eagle. GPSM-II cards also support the Time Slot Counter
(TSC) Synchronization and Integrated Sentinel Monitoring features.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
3-9
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
Measurements Collection and Polling Module (MCPM)
The Measurements Collection and Polling Module (MCPM) is a EDSM-2G
card loaded with the MCPM software. The MCPM provides comma delimited
core STP measurement data to a remote server for processing. The MCPM
card’s ethernet ports can transfer measurements information directly to a FTP
server.
Sentinel Transport Card (STC)
The Sentinel Transport card (STC) sends link monitoring data from the
EAGLE 5 SAS to the Sentinel system. The STC functions as an IP router
between the IMT bus internal to the EAGLE and the ethernet networks used
to communicate with the Sentinel ESP servers.
Database Service Module (Eagle)
The Database Service Module (DSM) provides large capacity SCCP/database
functionality used to support LNP, G-Port, G-Flex, and other functions. The
DSM requires two slots for mounting and must be assigned to an odd
numbered slot.
Application Service Module (Obsolete as of EAGLE 31.6)
The Application Service Module (ASM) provides an additional 16 MBytes of
available memory for application processing. The ASM consists of a main
assembly and a memory applique. The memory is used to store translation
tables and screening data for applications such as Signaling Connection
Control Part (SCCP), which is part of Global Title Translation (GTT), and
Generic Load Services (GLS) which is part of Gateway Screening.
Generic Load Service (GLS) and Signaling Connection Control Part (SCCP) in
systems without Local Number Portability (LNP), are provided by ASMs.
Beginning with EAGLE release 31.6, the ASM card will no longer be
supported. The SCCP and GLS applications previously residing on the ASM
card will be supported by the TSM card.
Translation Services Module
The Translation Services Module (TSM) performs global title translation
functions required for Local Number Portability (LNP). For the Eagle system
to perform LNP functions, all Signaling Connection Control Part (SCCP)
Application Service Modules (ASMs) in the system must be replaced with
TSMs or DSMs.
3-10
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
High-Capacity Multichannel Interface Module
The High-Capacity Multichannel Interface Module is a dual slot card
providing eight trunk terminations processing signaling links of configurable
channelized E1 or T1 connectivity. The eight E1/T1 ports reside on backplane
connectors A and B.
Total system signaling link capacity depends on other cards within the system
and must not exceed the provisioning limit of the EAGLE system. Since the
HCMIM has the capacity to process a full T1 or E1 on a single card, daisy
chaining or channel card operation is not needed. Interoperation with LIM-E1
or E1/T1 MIMs operating in channel mode is not supported
Generic Program Loads
Application software is downloaded to individual application cards by means
of Generic Program Loads (GPLs). A GPL is a specific instance of an
application for a specific piece of hardware. Hardware is defined to Eagle and
IP7 SG systems by means of a series of administration commands. Software is
then loaded from the fixed disk over the IMT bus directly to the cards. The
type of the GPL loaded depends on the card and card function that is chosen.
The following are examples of GPLs:
•
SCCP —Signaling Connection Control Part. This software allows the
Translation Service Module (TSM/DSM) to be used as a memory board
for Global Title Translation (GTT). Inbound SCCP messages from Link
Interface Modules (LIMs) are sent to the TSM/DSM assigned to the LIM
by system software. SCCP software on the TSM/DSM performs the
translation, and sends messages through the IMT back to the appropriate
LIM, which routes messages to the destination. The SCCP application can
run on TSM and DSM cards.
•
SLAN—Signaling Transfer Point Local Area Network. This software
allows the system to support a TCP/IP interface to any external host with
ACMs and DCMs.
•
SS7—This software provides access to remote SS7 network elements.
•
GX25—This software allows the system to send and receive traffic to and
from an X.25 network, and convert the packet to an Signaling System #7
Message Signaling Unit (SS7 MSU).
•
GLS—Gateway Loading Service (GLS) software controls download of
Gateway Screening (GWS) data to Link Interface Modules (LIMs) and
TSM when necessary. This ensures a fast download of gateway screening
data when a card re-initializes.
Gateway screening data is downloaded when a card is re-initialized, when
Gateway screening is changed by database administration, or when there
is manual intervention with commands being entered at a terminal.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
3-11
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
•
EROUTE—Ethernet Routing transfers link information messaging from
the Eagle LIM cards to the Integrated Sentinel using TCP/IP and EAGLE
Monitor Protocol (EMP). Implemented in Sentinel Transport Cards (STC).
•
EOAM—Enhanced Operation Administration and Maintenance GPL for
GPSM-II cards.
•
IPLIM—The application software used by the DCM card for IP
point-to-point connectivity for ANSI point codes.
•
IPLIMI—The application software used by the DCM card for IP
point-to-point connectivity for ITU point codes.
•
SS7IPGW—The application software used by the DCM card for IP
point-to-multipoint capability within an ANSI network.
•
IPGWI—This application is used by the DCM card for IP
point-to-multipoint connectivity for ITU point codes. The system allows a
maximum of 64 cards to be assigned the ipgwi application.
Timing Systems Eagle/IP7 SG
Eagle and IP7 SG systems use synchronized timing systems to provide
accurate reference standards to all cards on the IMT buses.
System Clock
Eagle and IP7 SG systems connect to the 64KHz composite Building
Integrated Time System (BITS) clocks through two DB-15 style connectors on
the backplane of the control shelf. The two clocks are labeled primary and
secondary and are sent to both MASPs. Each MASP selects between two BITS
clock signals to provide a system clock to the rest of the Eagle and IP7 SG
systems. The system clock is used by Link Interface Modules (LIMs) for X.25
and Signaling System #7 (SS7) Digital Service level-0 Applique (DS0A)
signaling links, with each LIM selecting either clock A or clock B for its own
use.
Eagle and IP7 SG systems also distribute system clocks to all frames. All
shelves, both extension shelves and control shelves, provide “clock in” and
“clock out” connections. Clock cables from the control shelf connect to the
“clock in” connector on the top shelf of each frame. From the “clock out”
connector on the top shelf of each frame, the clock signals are connected to the
“clock in” connector of the middle shelf of the frame and from that shelf to the
bottom shelf.
3-12
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
The EAGLE 5 SAS Primary and Secondary system clock inputs are internally
distributed by the TDM through the EAGLE as clocks A and B. The DB-15
connectors and the appropriate cables can accept up to three distinct types of
clock signals:
•
RS-422 High- Speed Master Timing clock running at 2.048Mhz or
1.544Mhz
•
Clock reference signals in T1 or E1 formats
•
64KHz composite clock
NOTE: Note: EAGLE systems equipped with TDM card 870-0774-15 or
later and EAGLE software Release 31.6 or later can accommodate E1 and
T1 formatted clock reference signals in addition to RS-422 signals.
Holdover Clock
An optional holdover clock can maintain clock synchronization for Eagle and
IP7 SG system DS0A links during brief interruptions of the Building
Integrated Timing System (BITS) clock signals. In accordance with Telcordia
Technologies GR-1244-CORE, BITS clock outages of up to 15 seconds can be
tolerated.
BITS Clock Routing
BITS clock signals A and B are routed through the holdover clock and then to
the system, allowing the holdover clock to continue Stratum 3 clock signals to
the Eagle and IP7 SG systems.
High-Speed Master Timing
The Eagle can be configured with high-speed master timing capabilities.
High-speed master timing allows synchronization of LIM cards at E1 or T1
rates.
High-Speed clock input is required to support an EAGLE node serving as the
Timing Master in a network. High-Speed clocks are not necessary if EAGLE
high-speed signaling links (either channelized E1/T1, or ATM formatted E1
or T1) operate in “line” mode, meaning that each individual link derives
timing from its incoming signal. Both High-speed Master Timing inputs and
Composite Clock signals can be simultaneously accommodated by the
EAGLE Control Shelf using the appropriate Tekelec cables.
For more information about installing or upgrading to high-speed timing see
the section on Master Timing in the “NSD Installation Manual”.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
3-13
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
Time Slot Counter Synchronization
Time Slot Counter Synchronization (TSC) Synchronization, an option for
Eagle systems in release 28.0 and later, allows all cards in the system that
contain a Time Slot Counter (TSC) to synchronize with one another. The
ability to have synchronized timing between cards is used in applications
such as system wide message time stamping.
Basic EAGLE 5 SAS Theory of Operation
The EAGLE 5 SAS implements SS7 MTP function, level 2 and level 3, through
software contained entirely within the LIMs. (No separate central processing
unit exists within the EAGLE 5 SAS.) All message processing logic, including
the links, link sets, and routes associated with each origination point
code/destination point code in the signaling network are included within the
MTP routing feature module. The STP offers full point code routing. (For
rapid recovery from processor faults, copies of this software are also stored on
the hard disk.) The LIMs can handle a 100% traffic load on each link,
assuming a small MSU size.
The following illustrates incoming messages that are routed through an
EAGLE 5 SAS. If gateway screening is activated, the messages are screened
before they are examined for further processing. The message discrimination
function determines whether the message can be routed based solely on the
MTP routing label. If so, the outgoing link is identified with its equipment
address (LIM), and the message is transferred through an IMT bus to that LIM
for transmission to the designated destination point code (DPC).
If the discrimination function determines that a global title translation (GTT)
is required, the message is sent, through the message distribution function, to
SCCP routing that routes the message.
After the message arrives at the designated module, the destination point
code (DPC) and subsystem number for this message are determined by global
title translation, and the message is transferred through an IMT bus to the
appropriate LIM for transmission to the designated DPC. See Figure 3-4.
3-14
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
Figure 3-4.
Example EAGLE 5 SAS message flow
TSM
SCCP SUBSYSTEM
Global Title
Translation
SCCP Routing Control
(SCRC)
SCCP MGMT
MTP
Routing
IMT BUS
LIM
MTP
Routing
Distribution
Tx Control
Discrimination
Rx Control
LIM
MTP
Routing
Distribution
Tx Control
Discrimination
Rx Control
SEAS Subsystem (Optional)
The SEAS subsystem allows the EAGLE 5 SAS to connect to the Signaling
Engineering and Administration System (SEAS). The Signaling Engineering
and Administration System (SEAS) is an interface defined by Bellcore and
used by the Regional Bell Operating Companies (RBOCs), as well as other
Bellcore Client Companies (BCCs), to remotely administer and monitor the
signaling points in their network from a central location.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
3-15
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
SEAS provides a single, reliable, machine-to-machine interface by which
commands are entered from a Signaling Engineering and Administration
Center (SEAC) or a Signaling Network Control Center (SNCC) to various
signaling points, such as STPs. These signaling points then provide command
responses to the SEAC. The signaling points also provide automatic alarm
and measurement data to the SEAC. Specifically, SEAS is used for the
following functions.
•
Memory Administration (Recent Change and Verification)
•
Network Maintenance
•
Network Data Collection (Measurements)
•
Network Traffic Management Surveillance
•
SEAS Application Control
•
Supplier Specific Functions
The SEAS interface has the following capabilities:
•
Flow through messages - This allows any EAGLE 5 SAS command to be
entered into the system from a SEAS console.
•
Recent change and verify (immediate activation only) for following data
entities:
-
MTP (routes, route sets, signaling links, linksets, point codes, and so
forth)
-
GTT (global title translations, subsystems, and mated applications)
-
GWS (all gateway screening tables)
•
Data collection (autonomous and on-demand) for existing measurement
data
•
On-occurrence output capability for existing reports
•
Supports one active X.25 signaling link and one backup X.25 signaling
link. Each X.25 signaling link supports a maximum of 10 PVCs at a data
rate of 9.6 kbps on a per link basis.
The SEAC uses X.25 links to transmit data to and receive data from the
signaling points it is monitoring. Terminal inputs to the EAGLE 5 SAS use
asynchronous RS-232 ports. An operations system support applications
processor (OAP) is used to allow the EAGLE 5 SAS to communicate with the
SEAC.
3-16
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
The OAP is an adjunct processor that interfaces to a X.25 link and converts the
data stream to an asynchronous serial format. All conversion from SEAS to
EAGLE 5 SAS command sets takes place on the EAGLE 5 SAS. Two terminal
disk module (TDM) ports (RS-232) running at 19,200 bps connect the OAP to
the EAGLE 5 SAS. Two X.25 links connect the OAP to the SEAC. The OAP is
mounted in a frame similar in design to the other frames used in the EAGLE 5
SAS, and is labeled as OAPF. See Figure 3-5.
SEAS Subsystem
Figure 3-5.
OAPF
fuse and alarm panel
SEAC
X.25 network
-48VDC power
*
X.25
modems
OAP reset
*
OAP
asynch
communications
asynch
modem
*
EAGLE 5 SAS
control shelf
serial port
serial port
serial port
maintenance
center
VT 520 terminal
* Two links are provided in a single OAP system.
When two OAPs are installed in a system, each OAP
has a single link.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
3-17
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
Embedded Operations Applications Processor (EOAP)
The Embedded Operation Support System Applications Processor (EOAP) is
hosted in an assembly mounted in a dedicated EOAP Frame (OAPF). The
EOAP and GR-376 applications run on the EOAP host assembly. More than
one EOAP host shelf can be mounted in each OAPF. Each EOAP host shelf
contains cards provisioned to support one or two EOAP systems. The EOAP
application translates and converts higher layer protocols into asynchronous
serial communications. The EOAP provides translation and async/X.25
conversion as part of the optional Signaling and Engineering Administration
System (SEAS) interface for the Eagle system. An EOAP host shelf
communicates with the Eagle system control shelf through two serial interface
ports. The EOAP host replaces the older TMOAP assembly which is obsolete
in the field but still supported by Tekelec. For more information see Chapter 8,
"EOAP".
GR-376 EOAP
The GR-376 application runs on the EOAP host processor assembly mounted
in a dedicated OAP Frame (OAPF). Two GR-376 EOAPs can be mounted in
each OAPF. The GR-376 EOAP application communicates with the Eagle
system through an Ethernet port (see Figure 3-6). The GR-376 EOAP hardware
changes required to accommodate the GR-376 EOAP features include the
addition of a second Ethernet port to the processor card, and use of 256MByte
of memory instead of 64MByte. A Tekelec-designed drive bay provides
connections and housing for a 3 1/2-inch Small Computer System Interface
(SCSI) hard drive card and a 5 1/4-inch CD-ROM drive card.
3-18
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
GR-376 EOAP in an Eagle System
Figure 3-6.
Shelf
GR-376
100 Base T
DCM Enet
DCM Enet
Serial port
Asynch
GR-376
100 Base T
Asynch
VT 520 terminal
gr376 blk dia
To LAN
To LAN
IP7 Secure Gateway
The IP7 Secure Gateway subsystem of the EAGLE 5 SAS provides
connectivity between SS7 and IP networks, enabling messages to pass
between the SS7 network domain and the IP network domain, as follows:
•
When the IP7 Secure Gateway receives an SS7 formatted message over an
SS7 link, it dynamically converts this message into TCP/IP format and
routes the re-formatted message over an associated IP link to a destination
residing within an IP network.
The IP7 Secure Gateway uses sockets to access the IP domain. Sockets
identify TCP/IP sessions.
•
Conversely, when the IP7 Secure Gateway receives a TCP/IP formatted
message over an IP link, it dynamically converts this message into SS7
format and routes the re-formatted message over an associated SS7 link to
a destination residing within the SS7 signaling network.
Address resolution is not performed in the IP to SS7 direction. It is the
responsibility of the sending application to insert a point code into the
SCCP Called and Calling Address message fields. The IP7 Secure
Gateway uses the address fields to build the MTP routing label, to include
the MTP3 portion, and route the message to the SS7 network.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
3-19
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
IP7 Secure Gateway Hardware, Applications, and Functions
The IP7 Secure Gateway functions are provided by applications that run on IP
cards. IP cards can be either a Database Communications Module (DCM) or
an Enhanced-Performance Database Communications Module (EDCM). IP
cards provide interfaces between the IMT bus and two 10/100 Base-Tx IEEE
802.3/Ethernet interfaces. The IP cards, similar to any other Link Interface
Module (LIM) on the IP7 Secure Gateway, use the Interprocessor Message
Transport (IMT) bus to communicate with the other cards in the system. The
primary job of an IP card is to send and receive SS7 data on a network (in this
case, an IP network), and to route that data to other cards in the system as
appropriate.
The IP card can run any of the following applications:
•
iplim or iplimi - Both applications support STP connectivity via
MTP-over-IP functionality point-to-point connectivity (for more
information, see “Connecting STPs Over the IP Network” on page 3-21).
For these applications, the other end of the point-to-point connection is
always another IP card running the iplim or iplimi application. This
type of connection is essentially the same as that of a traditional SS7
point-to-point link, except that the traditional MTP2 and 56Kb/s
technology is replaced by TCP/IP and Ethernet technology.
The iplim application supports point-to-point connectivity for ANSI
networks. The iplimi application supports point-to-point connectivity for
ITU networks. With the optional ANSI/ITU MTP Gateway feature and
proper configuration, the system could convert between any of the ANSI,
ITU-N, and ITU-I networks, switch traffic between these networks, and
perform network management for each of these networks.
The IP7 Secure Gateway can support up to 41 100 cards with iplim and
iplimi applications.
•
ss7ipgw and ipgwi - These applications support the following types of
point-to-multipoint connectivity for networks:
–
SCP connectivity via SCCP/TCAP-over-IP functionality (for more
information, see “Connecting to SCPs with SCCP/TCAP Messages
Sent Over the IP Network” on page 3-22)
–
SEP connectivity via ISUP, Q.BICC, and TUP-over-IP functionality (for
more information, see “Connecting SEPs Using ISUP, Q.BICC, and
TUP Messages Over the IP Network” on page 3-22)
–
SCP/SEP connectivity via non-ISUP, non-SCCP, non-Q.BICC, and
non-TUP-over-IP functionality.
The ss7ipgw application supports point-to-multipoint connectivity for
ANSI networks. The ipgwi application supports point-to-multipoint
connectivity for ITU networks.
3-20
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
In addition to running an iplim, iplimi, ss7ipgw, or ipgwi application,
each IP card supports the following functions:
•
A Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) agent.
•
Message Transfer Part (MTP) status. This function is available only on IP
cards that support the ss7ipgw or ipgwi application. For more
information, see “Support for MTP Status Functions” on page 3-23.
Connecting STPs Over the IP Network
This functionality allows the use of an IP network in place of point-to-point
SS7 links to carry SS7 MSUs. Figure 3-7 shows a diagram of this type of
IP7 Secure Gateway network. For example, the C links between the mated
pair of STP or B/D Quad links between STPs can be replaced by an IP
network. The IP7 Secure Gateways are deployed on both ends of the link
(point-to-point connection). The IP7 Secure Gateway converts the SS7 MSUs
to IP packets on one end of the link, and IP packets to SS7 MSUs on the other
end of the link.
Figure 3-7.
IP7 Secure Gateway Network (STP Connectivity
via MTP-over-IP)
Gateway
C Links
Gateway
B/D Links
SS7
Network
B/DLinks
C Links
IP Network
C Links
C Links
B/D Links
Gateway
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
B/D Links
Gateway
3-21
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
Connecting to SCPs with SCCP/TCAP Messages Sent Over the IP Network
This functionality allows SS7 nodes to exchange SCCP/TCAP queries and
responses with an SCP residing on an IP network. Figure 3-8 shows a diagram
of this type of IP7 Secure Gateway network.
Figure 3-8.
IP7 Secure Gateway Network (SCP Connectivity
via TCAP-over-IP)
Gateway
SCP
IP-SCP
SS7
Network
IP Network
Gateway
IP-SCP
The IP7 Secure Gateway node manages the virtual point codes and subsystem
numbers for the IP-SCP. From the SS7 network perspective, the TCAP queries
are routed using these virtual point codes/SSNs. The IP7 Secure Gateway
node maps the virtual point code/SSN to one or more TCP sessions
(point-to-multipoint connection), converts the SS7 MSUs to TCP/IP packets
by embedding the SCCP/TCAP data inside TCP/IP packets, and routes them
over an IP network. The IP7 Secure Gateway also manages application
subsystem status from an IP network's perspective and an SS7 network's
perspective.
Connecting SEPs Using ISUP, Q.BICC, and TUP Messages Over the IP
Network
This point-to-multipoint functionality allows SS7 nodes to exchange ISUP,
Q.BICC, and TUP protocol messages with one or more signaling end points
(class 4 switches, class 5 switches, VoIP gateways, Media Gateway
Controllers, or Remote Access Servers) residing on an IP network. Figure 3-9
shows an example of this type of IP7 Secure Gateway network.
3-22
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
Figure 3-9.
IP7 Secure Gateway Network (SEP connectivity via ISUP,
Q.BICC, and TUP-over-IP)
Gateway
SS7
Network
MGC1
MG1
MGC2
MG2
IP Network
Gateway
MG3
The IP7 Secure Gateway node maps the originating point code, destination
point code, and circuit identification code to a TCP/IP address and port. The
SEP is provided the originating and destination point codes in the MTP level 3
routing label as part of the passed protocol.
Understanding Routing for ss7ipgw and ipgwi Applications
The ss7ipgw and ipgwi applications can use a single point code, called a
virtual point code. This code is assigned to a set of TCP/IP devices that it
connects to. The IP7 Secure Gateway distinguishes between the devices
within the set by using application routing keys and application IP
connections.
Application routing associates SS7 routes with IP connections. SS7 routes
define a filter based on SS7 message data. Application IP connections define
the connection between the IP local host/local port and IP remote
host/remote port. If the routing keys filter matches the IP connection, the SS7
message is sent to the associated application IP connection.
Routing keys can be fully or partially specified, or specified by default.
Support for MTP Status Functions
This feature, available only on IP cards that support the ss7ipgw and ipgwi
applications, allows the Message Transfer Part (MTP) status of point codes in
the SS7 networks to be made available to IP-connected media gateway
controllers (MGCs) and IP-SCPs. This feature is similar to the MTP3 network
management procedures used in an SS7 network.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
3-23
Eagle and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
This feature enables an IP device to:
3-24
•
Divert traffic from an SG that is not able to access a point code that the
mated SG can access
•
Audit point code status
•
Build up routing tables before sending traffic
•
Be warned about network congestion
•
Abate congestion
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
4
LNP
Contents ................................................................................... Page
Introduction to LNP .................................................................. 4-1
EAGLE LNP Functional Capabilities ..................................... 4-4
EAGLE LNP Functional Capabilities ..................................... 4-4
LNP Hardware........................................................................... 4-9
Introduction to LNP
This chapter describes the EAGLE Local Number Portability (LNP) system,
including the Local Service Management System (LSMS). It also provides a
high-level theory of operation designed to assist maintenance personnel in
troubleshooting the EAGLE LNP system. For detailed descriptions of EAGLE
LNP hardware, refer to the Installation Manual.
LNP is a public switched telephone network capability that allows a user
served by one switch (donor switch) to move their service to a different switch
(recipient switch) while retaining their public directory number. Any user can
call the ported subscriber using the unchanged directory number. The switch
which recognizes that the call may be to a ported number (initiating switch)
will route the call to the new recipient switch instead of old donor switch
using a new Location Routing Number (LRN) instead of the dialed directory
number (DN). The initiating switch may be the switch where the call
originated (originating switch), an intermediate switch, or a terminating
switch.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
4-1
Introduction to LNP
The LNP network capabilities described above are traditional STP (Signal
Transfer Point) functions (for example, enhanced LNP Global Title Translation
[GTT] routing services). However, there are certain application level functions
which are traditional SCP functions (LRN query/Response), but are
implemented as an extension to the EAGLE. This requires the EAGLE to
emulate some of the service control point (SCP) behavior at Signaling
Connection Control Point (SCCP) and Transaction Capabilities Application
Part (TCAP) levels. The enhanced GTT functions consist of ported NPA-NXX
detection and the message relay function.
Query Methods for Wireless and Wireline Networks
Tekelec’s LNP solution provides two query methods to address the needs of
wireline and wireless providers. For wireline, ANSI-41, and PCS-1900
networks, triggers in the originating exchange launch an LNP query to the
EAGLE with LNP to determine whether the dialed number (DN) has been
ported. The EAGLE queries its database and, if the number has been ported,
returns the location routing number (LRN) to the originating exchange so the
call can be routed. If the number has not been ported, a response indicating a
non-ported number is returned.
The second query method is a triggerless solution, which delivers cost savings
on switch upgrades and extends the mobile switching center’s (MSC’s) life.
For triggerless queries, the LNP-equipped EAGLE receives the initial address
message (IAM) with the dialed number from the MSC. It queries its LNP
database to locate the LRN and determine whether the number has been
ported. If the number has not been ported, the IAM is switched through to the
tandem indicating a non-ported number has been detected. If the number has
been ported, the triggerless-equipped EAGLE modifies the IAM to include the
LRN. The converted IAM is then passed directly to the tandem.
4-2
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Introduction to LNP
EAGLE LNP features include:
• less than 75 mean millisecond processing delay (last bit in to first bit
out)
• simplified data management and more efficient data storage
• supports up to 96 million ported numbers with five service (CNAM,
LIDB, CLASS, ISVM, SMS)
• scalable solution (1,700 to 40,000 TPS)
• LRN query and message relay translation combined directly on the
platform
• existing EAGLE platform users add LNP functionality with a simple
hardware and software upgrade
• based on T1S1.6 Number Portability and Telcordia’s GR-2936- CORE
LNP Capability specifications
• supports AIN, IN, ANSI-41 and PCS 1900 query formats
• T1 high-speed and IP link capability
• supports triggerless LNP solution for wireless applications
• supports advanced global title translation (GTT) functions (including
LNP message relay):
• 10 digit intermediate and final GTT
• 10 digit GTT for CLASS/LIDB/ISVM/CNAM/SMS
•
6 digit default GTT for non-ported DN in a ported NPA-NXX
• eliminates SCCP looping and circular routing
• provides subsystem management of remote applications
• supports routing of non-final GTT messages to an A-link
• performs GTT for LNP queries and LNP query processing on the same
node
• supports coexisting databases for non-LNP GTT, LNP GTT, and LRN
• supports number pooling / efficient data representation
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
4-3
EAGLE LNP Functional Capabilities
Local Service Management System (LSMS)
Tekelec’s LNP solution includes the LSMS, which provides the interface
between the number portability administration center (NPAC) service
management system and the EAGLE’s element management system (EMS). It
maintains and distributes LNP data to the service provider’s LNP databases.
The LSMS is equipped with a graphical user interface to administer
subscription, service provider, and network data.
LSMS features include:
• eight industry standard Q.3 NPAC interfaces
• supports administration of override data internal to the service
provider’s network
• supports up to eight EAGLE pairs
• ability to partition databases according to area of portability service
(AOPS), eliminating the need for database replication on all nodes
•
data auditing and reconciliation between EAGLE and the LSMS
• connection management for communications links, including
automatic error detection and failure recovery
• enhanced security, including key management and firewall
Tekelec’s LSMS operates on a SUN server system in an active and hot-standby
configuration for high availability. Each Tekelec LSMS is configured with dual
processors for fail-over conditions and shares a disk array capable of storing
96 million LNP data entries.
Normal updates are sent from the LSMS to the active EAGLE LNP
Application Processor (ELAP) at a rate of 25 TNs per second over a connection
that uses the proprietary High Speed Operations Protocol (HSOP) over
TCP/IP protocol. The ELAP forwards the messages to all the DSMs using a IP
multicast protocol (for more information, refer to the ELAP Administration
Manual). No user action is required at the network element.
EAGLE LNP Functional Capabilities
LNP Query Service (LNPQS)
All LNP query messages for call connection to ported DNs received by the
EAGLE are processed by the LNPQS task. LNPQS task receives queries from
the subsystem management task.
LNPQS task is divided into the following sub-tasks:
• Query verification
All Queries are verified to conform to the encoding rules. If a query
4-4
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
EAGLE LNP Functional Capabilities
does not conform to encoding standards, it is considered an invalid
query and is either discarded or a TCAP error response is generated.
• Query decoding
This is where the DN is decoded from query. This decoded dialed
number (DN) is used to search for the provisioned LRN.
• Response generation
Here a response message encoded with a DN or/and LRN is sent back
to the generator of the query.
Automatic Call Gapping (ACG)
Automatic Call Gapping (ACG) procedures are used for overload control.
ACG controls the rate at which location routing number (LRN) queries for a
specified telephone number or a portion of a telephone number are received
by the EAGLE LNP when predefined thresholds are reached. When
conditions warrant, the LNP application will send ACGs as part of the AIN or
IN LRN query response to throttle queries from the SSPs.
LNP Message Relay (LNPMR) Function
The LNPMR function performs enhanced GTT routing to support vertical
services associated with portable numbers. This function performs 10-digit
LNP GTT maintaining backward compatibility with existing non-LNP
Operations Support Systems (OSSs). Currently, OSSs (and some switches) use
6-digit GTT for certain services. To minimize the impact of LNP on these
systems, the EAGLE has to extract 10-digits from the TCAP portion of the
message and use that as a Global Title Address (GTA). LNPMR is required to
have a DN in the SCCP portion of the message.
Message Relay (MR) is an enhancement to existing GTT functions. Message
relay involves the following main functions:
• Extraction of 10 digit dialed number from the TCAP portion of the
message: If the MSU contains a 6-digit Called Party Address, MR will
get the 10-digit dialed number from the TCAP portion of the MSU.
• Increased number of translations: For each 10 digit dialed number, up
to 6 translations are possible. The number of dialed numbers that can be
entered depends on the hardware.
• Replacement of GTA: MR provides the option of replacing the GTA in
the Called Party Address with the LRN associated with the ported
dialed number.
Message relay is performed in three stages:
1. The message arrives at the EAGLE LNP route-on-gt. The EAGLE performs
6-digit (NPA-NXX) translation. The result of this translation indicates if
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
4-5
EAGLE LNP Database
message relay is required. If it is required, the result of this translation also
gives the default data that may be used in stage 3.
2. If stage 1 indicates message relay is required, the EAGLE LNP then
performs 10-digit message relay. If the 10 digit number is found, the
translation data for the 10 digit number is used to route the message.
3. If the 10 digits are not found, the dialed number is not ported, and the
default data from stage 1 is used to route the message.
EAGLE LNP Database
The database is partitioned between the EAGLE LNP and the EAGLE to
eliminate the possibility of an LNP subsystem failure causing an EAGLE
failure. The database provides fast real-time database access times (LNP 6
digit default GTT data, 10 digit ported GTT data, and LRN data all accessed
within approximately 20ms). The EAGLE LNP database has the capability to
increase the amount of database records in an incremental fashion without
losing real-time performance. The EAGLE LNP database has the capability to
provide different administrable views of database records (NPAC, LSMS,
SEAS, EAGLE views), and also provides global database change capabilities
(such as NPA-SPLITS, LRN Final GTT changes).
SCCP Subsystem Management
Messages for Local EAGLE LNP Subsystems
Messages for the local EAGLE LNP subsystem arrive rt-on-ssn or rt-on-gt. If
they arrive rt-on-ssn, they contain an EAGLE true point code in the destination
point code (DPC) field of the message, and an EAGLE LNP Subsystem
number in the Called Party Subsystem field of the message. The EAGLE LNP
processes the message if it has the EAGLE capability point code for the DPC,
but will not be able to divert the message in the event of subsystem failure.
If messages arrive rt-on-gt, they contain a translation type and GTA that
translates to the EAGLE True Point Code and the EAGLE LNP Subsystem.
These messages also contain one of the EAGLE capability point codes in the
DPC field. The EAGLE LNP processes the message if it has the EAGLE true
point code for the DPC, but it will not be able to divert the message in the
event of subsystem failure.
4-6
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
SCCP Subsystem Management
Database Audit
The EAGLE LNP audit is responsible for the following:
• Ensuring the contents of the current or backup LNP databases do not
become altered by unapproved or unexpected mechanisms such as
software bugs, COPY-TBL, etc.
• Ensuring the contents of the current LNP database are mirrored exactly
on all cards which are maintaining a copy.
The ELAP to DSM interface is over TCP/IP Multicast to allow for rapid
loading of the DSM cards. Auditing and reconciling LNP data is automatic
and does not require any user intervention.
The ELAP downloads LNP data to the each DSM card with a checksum. After
receiving the LNP data, the DSM recomputes the checksum and if the 2
checksums do not match, the DSM automatically requests a new update from
the MPS.
The DSM(s) can continue to receive updates from the MPS when a particular
DSM card needs to be reloaded. DSM(s) can also retain their RAM-based data
as long as power is not removed from the card (warm restart). DSM(s) can
reload LNP data rapidly in the event of the DSM loses power (cold restart).
The LNP database audit executes once every 24 hours. If a complete audit of
the LNP database requires less than 24 hours (i.e. because the LNP database is
not fully populated), then another audit cycle will not start until 24 hours
have elapsed since the previous audit cycle started.
LNP Maintenance
The EAGLE LNP requires a DSM card for GPL and data loading. In addition,
the SCCP GPL’s application data loader will register all tables for loading,
independent of the LNP feature provisioning and motherboard /
daughterboard hardware configuration.
As a result, load requests are always identical. During loading, multiple SCCP
load requests are combined into a single download, reducing the overall
download time. The SCCP card will store or discard LNP table data based on
whether it has LNP capable hardware or not.
Reporting Functions
The EAGLE LNP solution provides users on-demand status of the LNP
subsystem. The EAGLE displays a detailed status of LNP information for the
LNP system as a whole or for a given DSM. The system wide detailed report
includes information for each of the GTT, LNP message relay (LNPMR), LNP
query service (LNPQS), Wireless (IS-41) LNP query service (WNPQS), PCS
1900 LNP query service (PLNPQS) and automatic call gapping (ACG)
functions.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
4-7
SCCP Subsystem Management
The EAGLE also provides a set of measurements related to LNP query and
message relay traffic. These measurements include queries for ported
numbers per LRN, queries for non-ported numbers per NPA-NXX, and
ported and non-ported message relay GTTs received for CLASS, LIDB,
CNAM, ISVM and WSMSC. These measurements are available hourly and
daily. Daily measurements are maintained for one week.
Measurement and Billing Functions
Measurement data is provded by the Measurement Collection and Polling
Module (MCPM). This dedicated processor platform consists of multiple
MCPM (EDSM-2G) cards in a primary/secondary configuration, in which a
single primary MCPM performs all collection and reporting functions. The
secondary MCPM cards serves as backup for the primary MCPM.
The primary MCPM monitors the status of all secondary MCPM cards. If the
primary MCPM fails before or during collection, the secondary MCPM card
assumes the primary role, and begins/continues collection. Legacy
GR310/778 measurements are still supported.
The Measurements Platform collects and stores the collected data in MCPM
RAM. Following collection, comma delimited scheduled reports are
automatically generated and transferred to the customer’s FTP server via the
FTP interface.
The reports are always transferred to the configured Primary FTP Server or, if
the Primary server is down, to the configured Secondary FTP Server. The
filename of the report contains the CLLI name of the EAGLE to easily identify
the source of the data. Measurement collection periods of 15 minute, 30
minute, hourly, and daily are provided.
On-demand report requests are also generated and transferred to the
customer’s FTP server, or output to the terminal. A command to enable the
user to transfer missed scheduled reports is also available. Its purpose is to
enable the customer to recover any scheduled reports within the last 24 hours
that may not have transferred to the FTP Server. If these measurements are
used for the billing function, aggregation, formatting and other billing
functions must be performed on an external device.
4-8
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
LNP Hardware
LNP Hardware
Figure 4-1 provides an overview of the hardware components needed to
support LNP. ELAP servers transmit data from the EAGLE to LSMS servers.
ELAP Servers use Tekelec’s Multi-purpose Server (MPS) platform. For
information on MPS, see Chapter 6, "MPS".
Figure 4-1.
LNP Hardware Overview
LSMS
The Local Service Management System (LSMS) provides an interface between
the Number Portability Administration Center (NPAC) Service Management
System (SMS) and the service provider’s Element Management System (EMS).
The LSMS maintains a service provider’s LNP data.
The LSMS is composed of hardware and software components that interact to
create a secure and reliable LNP system. This section gives an overview of the
LSMS hardware and describes the LSMS hardware components.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
4-9
LNP Hardware
Standard and Optional Hardware Components
This section lists the standard and optional hardware components for the
LSMS Release 6.1 Enterprise 450 platform.
Standard Hardware Components
• Two Sun Enterprise 450 servers
• Two Sun StorEdge D1000 Disk Systems
• Twelve external hard disks (six per storage array)
• Two internal hard disks
• One Fast Ethernet switch
• Two HP SureStore Optical 5200ex (MO) disk drives
• Two 3Com U.S. Robotics 56K modems
• Two expansion cabinets (with power sequencers) housing the servers,
disk systems, switch, optical disk drives, and modems
• One Sun Ultra 5 with 17” monitor, keyboard, and mouse
• Two Sun DDS-3 Autoloader tape drives
Optional Hardware Components
• 96 Million Numbers Option
–
Two external hard drives (one per storage array) as hot-spare disks.
–
Four external hard drives (two per storage array) as mirrored shared
storage.
LSMS Hardware Configuration
The physical layout of the Tekelec LSMS hardware platform server
components is shown in Figure 4-2 on page 2-11.
4-10
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
LNP Hardware
Figure 4-2.
Overview of LSMS Hardware Components
Switch
Storage
A
Cabinet A
front
Cabinet B
front
Administration
Console
Storage
B
DDS-3
autoloader
Monitor
Modem
MO drive
System unit
lsms components front
Server A
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Power sequencer
Server B
4-11
LNP Hardware
4-12
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
5
Sentinel
Sentinel .............................................................................................. 5-1
Integrated Sentinel .................................................................... 5-6
Probed Sentinel .......................................................................... 5-9
Site Collector Frames ................................................................ 5-4
Flight Recorders......................................................................... 5-4
Extended Services Platform (ESP)........................................... 5-5
Sentinel Server Frames ............................................................. 5-5
Sentinel
Sentinel™ is a complete network monitoring and diagnostic system that gives
service providers total visibility of and access to their Signaling System 7 (SS7)
and Internet protocol (IP) networks.This section describes Sentinel hardware
products from Sentinel Release 8.1 and later. Sentinel products use some
commercial off-the-shelf components and Tekelec proprietary products
configured in heavy-duty frames.
Some of the hardware server components are based upon the Tekelec 1000
Applications Server (Tekelec 1000 APS) introduced with Sentinel Release 11.x.
For information on Sentinel components that are based on the Tekelec 1000
platform, including assembly drawings, interconnect diagrams, and
installation instructions, see the Tekelec 1000 Applications Server Hardware
Manual.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
5-1
Sentinel
A Sentinel system is comprised of two major system components: distributed
site collectors located at remote sites and centralized servers located at the
Network Operations Center (NOC). Site collectors are for remote
deployments within a carrier's switching offices. For a probe-based
configuration, one or more Probe and server systems are deployed at remote
sites as site collectors. For the probe-less (Integrated) configuration, EAGLE
STP and the ESP servers are the site collectors. Typically, Sentinel includes a
Base System Server, Alarm Server and optional Traffic Database Server as
well as one or more Data Gateway Servers in the NOC. User workstations are
typically located either in the NOC or in a Technical Assistance Center (TAC).
The Site Collectors are connected to the NOC via the customer WAN.
The Sentinel system can simultaneously support both probe-based and
probe-less configurations. In a combined probe-based and probe-less
configuration, the same NOC can be used to simultaneously monitor MSU
data sent by an EAGLE STP or via the probes as shown in the Figure 5-1 on
page 5-2.
Figure 5-1. NOC in a Combined Probe-based and probe-less Configuration
REMOTE SITE COLLECTORS
Probe
LAN
SS7 links
NETWORK
(NOC) CENTRAL COLLECTORS
Base
System
Server
Server
ESP
Servers
Alarm
Server
WAN
EAGLE
LAN
L
I
M
IMT
SS7 links
S
T
C
ESP
Server
Data
Gateway
Server
Traffic
Database
Server
Figure 5-2 on page 5-3 shows the major components of a Sentinel system.
5-2
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Sentinel
Figure 5-2. Sentinel Components
Sentinel Server Frame
Customer
Site Collector Frame
WAN
Ethernet Switch
Console Server
Ethernet Switch
Flight Recorder A
Server
(Optional) Server 4
Server
(Optional) Server 3
Flight Recorder B
Flight Recorder C
SS7 Links
i 2000 C
Optional
Server
i 2000 B
Optional
Server 2
i 2000 A
Server
Server 1
Supported Sentinel Server Types:
Required Servers
Base Sentinel Server
(BSS)
Sentinel Alarm Management System Server (SAMS)
Optional Servers
Traffic Database Server
Data Gateway Server
(TDS)
(DGS)
Integrated Solution 500 Links
ESP Frame
EAGLE STP
ESP Frame
CF00
SS7 Links
010203040506070809 11 12131415161718
)
)
Control
Shelf
010203040506070810 11 12131415161718
010203040506070809 11 12131415161718
Extension
To STC
Cards in
STP
Shelf
010203040506070810 11 12131415161718
010203040506070809 11 12131415161718
Extension
Ethernet
Switches
Shelf
010203040506070810 11 12131415161718
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
)
Ethernet
Switches
)
Routers
Routers
1A
1B
1A
1B
1C
1D
1E
1F
1G
1H
1I
1J
1K
1C
1D
1E
1F
1G
1H
1I
1J
1K
1L
1M
1L
1M
1N
1O
1P
1Q
1N
1O
1P
1Q
5-3
Sentinel Frames Overview
Sentinel Frames Overview
Both the integrated and probed Sentinel products use some commercial
off-the-shelf components and Tekelec proprietary products configured in
heavy-duty frames. Sentinel frames typically are configured with dual breaker
panels and are cabled with redundant power busses for reliability. Sentinel
products support application specific services that monitor SS7 network links.
Sentinel systems are mounted in standard seven-foot high, 23-inch wide
frames. For information on unpacking and installation of Sentinel frames see
the Installation Manual included in this documentation set. Sentinel systems
use the following Frames:
•
Site Collector
•
Flight Recorder
•
Extended Services Platform
•
Sentinel Server
Site Collector Frames
All Sentinel site collectors consist of the following three basic functional
components:
•
Data Acquisition - External probe-based connections to SS7 links using
monitoring shelves (probed solution) or internal connections to the Eagle
(integrated solution).
•
LAN Transport - Connects all components of a Sentinel site collector,
routers, ethernet switches, hubs, and servers.
•
Processing and Storage - Site collector servers process monitored SS7 link
information and call detail record (CDR) data, storing data and
forwarding to Base Sentinel Servers.
Flight Recorders
The Tekelec’s Flight Recorder (FR) is responsible for maintaining a history
buffer of MSUs that can be forwarded to the Base Sentinel Server for historical
call trace. It prepares MSUs and forwards them to the Data Gateway Server
for use in various data collection applications. It is a multiprocessor-based
probe used to monitor TALI links carrying SS7 traffic. The flight recorder
transmits MSUs to the Base Sentinel Server for real-time link monitoring, PA,
and call trace.
An FR connects to a Tekelec i2000 shelf to provide processing and storage for a
probed Sentinel solution. Flight Recorders are not used in the Integrated
Sentinel. The FR functions are similar to the Integrated Sentinel Extended
Services Platform (ESP) server described in the following section.
5-4
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Sentinel Frames Overview
Extended Services Platform (ESP)
The ESP is also a Sentinel site collector server that can work in conjunction
with the EAGLE. ESPs are responsible for receiving MSUs directly from an
EAGLE STP. The ESP prepares MSUs for transmission to the Base Sentinel
Server for protocol analysis, link monitoring, and call trace functions. ESPs are
also responsible for maintaining traffic statistics and forwarding those
statistics to the traffic subsystem on the Base Sentinel Server.
Sentinel Server Frames
Both the integrated and probed Sentinel systems use Sentinel Server frames
for processing of message link information. The Sentinel server frames
described in this manual operate in conjunction with Sentinel site collector
systems. Sentinel Server Frames are generic server frames, located at a central
location, for example a Network Operations Center (NOC), and have servers
configured to operate as the following Sentinel server types for specific
system functions.
•
Base Sentinel Server (BSS)
Responsible for administrative provisioning of all other network elements
within the Sentinel system; responsible for running the links monitoring,
call trace, and protocol analysis applications.
•
Data Gateway Server (DGS)
Responsible for receiving message signal units (MSUs) from ESPs and
flight recorders; for creating Call Detail Records (CDRs), Transaction
Detail Records (TDRs), and Usage Measurment Data Feeds from the
MSUs; for running the optional loop detection and mass call detection
applications; and for delivering data feeds to back-office applications
running on application servers.
•
Sentinel Alarm Management Server (SAMS)
Provides an extensive alarms management package to collect system-wide
Sentinel alarms information and make it available to alarms C\clients. It
includesa topology application as well as an alarm browser.
•
Traffic Database Server (TDS)
Provides user the option to use any SQL (Structured Query
Language)-based interface (Oracle Forms, Crystal Reports, etc.) to access
the traffic pegs stored in a database and generate customized reports.
The following sections describe how these frames work together with the
EAGLE in a network.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
5-5
Sentinel Frames Overview
Integrated Sentinel
The Integrated Sentinel product includes network surveillance capabilities
and fault-management functions. Integrated Sentinel features a call detail
record (CDR) generation system that uses raw network traffic on the links to
generate CDR data for use in various business intelligence applications.
The Integrated Sentinel monitors EAGLE STP links internally to eliminate
hardware connections such as cabling, bridge amplifiers, and patch panels.
The Integrated Sentinel can receive all acknowledged message signal units
(MSU) as well as other important information from the Eagle. The Eagle
monitors SS7 links at the LIM, and connects to ESP LAN interfaces using the
dual-port Sentinel Transport Card (STC). The STC card acts as a router to
route TCP/IP traffic from Eagle ports to ESP servers.
In Integrated Sentinel, site collector processing and storage tasks are hosted
on ESP servers, providing all of the relevant site collector functions for data
processing and storage of collected SS7 data. Integrated Sentinel ESP servers
are connected to an associated Eagle using redundant LAN interfaces. The
internal local area network (LAN) traffic is isolated to keep monitored data
separate from the customer’s wide area network (WAN).
Figure 5-3 shows a block diagram of a SS7 monitoring network incorporating
the Integrated Sentinel.
5-6
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Sentinel Frames Overview
Figure 5-3.
Integrated Sentinel Block Diagram
TA C
i3000 shelves
i2000 shelves
Base
Sentinel
Server
(BSS)
Data
Gatewa y
Serve r
(DGS)
Sentinel
Alarm s
Management
Server
(SAMS)
Traffic
Database
Server
(TDS)
other ESP's
Customer Ethernet WAN
Customer Terminal
MRV Console
Server
Telco Line
EAGLE
STP
GPSM-II
Yellow
Network
LAN Switch
STC
MPL
SS7 Links
STC
Blue
Network
LAN Switch
IMT Bu s
LIM
LIM
ESP
ESP
ESP
ESP
ESP
STC
Sentinel ESP
Subsystem
First Frame
STC
Yellow Network Links
Blue Network Links
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
5-7
Sentinel Frames Overview
Integrated Sentinel with Eagle
To implement the Integrated Sentinel solution on with the EAGLE STP, the
following hardware and software is required:
•
Installation of HMUX or HIPR cards in all shelves
•
Activation of HMUX Group Ticket Voucher (TVG)
•
Upgrade to Sentinel release 8.1 and EAGLE Release 28.2 or later
•
GPSM-II cards in OAM slots (1113 and 1115) of the control shelf
•
Installation of two TDM boards (P/N 870-0774-10 and later)
•
Installation of Sentinel Transport Cards (STC) in the EAGLE STP
•
Activation of the Time Slot Counter (TSC) Synchronization feature
•
Activation of the Integrated Sentinel feature
•
Activation of the MSU copy feature
Sentinel Transport Cards
The STC functions as an IP router between the IMT bus internal to the EAGLE
and the ethernet networks used to communicate with the ESP servers.
Time-Slot Counter Synchronization
Time Slot Counter (TSC) Synchronization is an option for the EAGLE that will
allow all cards in the system that contain a Time Slot Counter to synchronize
with one another. The ability to have synchronized timing between cards is
used in applications such as system wide message time stamping.
Integrated Sentinel ESP
The Extended Services Platform (ESP) is the Integrated Sentinel software
bundle and the required software platform that provides the interface from
the EAGLE STP to the Integrated Sentinel monitoring system. All ESP servers
located at one EAGLE location are an ESP subsystem.Each ESP server is
considered a separate processing element with respect to communications to
the downstream Sentinel servers and therefore needs its own IP address. As
shown in Figure 5-3 on page 5-7, a single demarcation point is provided for
the Customer's network at the ESP frame's ethernet switch.
The Integrated Sentinel ESP subsystem interfaces to the monitored links in the
EAGLE through ethernet connections to the Sentinel Transport Cards (STC)
located in the EAGLE frame. In the Eagle the information being copied from
LIM cards and sent to the ESP subassembly is transported by TCP/IP using a
custom proprietary protocol called EAGLE Monitor Protocol (EMP).
5-8
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Sentinel Frames Overview
Probed Sentinel
The Probed Sentinel product provides external monitoring of SS7 links
without direct connection to an EAGLE. In the probed Sentinel, SS7 traffic is
processed by a series of processes collectively referred to as a Sentinel Site
Collector. A Sentinel Site Collector System consists of user workstations, the
Eagle Shelves, Signaling Transfer Points (STPs) or other SS7 Network
Equipment and a Site Collector Frame. Figure 5-4 shows the components of
the probed Sentinel.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
5-9
Sentinel Frames Overview
Figure 5-4.
probed Sentinel
Base Sentinel Server (BSS)
Sentinel Probe
(non-integrated)
Site Collector Frame
i2000
Sentinel Server Frame
Customer
WAN
Hub
Switch
Console Server
Flight Recorders
3 servers
model 120
Server model 20
Data Gateway Server
(Optional)
P/N 870-2656-01
Server 4
Server model 20
Traffic Database Server
(Optional)
P/N 870-2656-01
Server 3
i 2000
Server model 20
Sentinel Alarm
P/N 870-2656-01
Server 2
i 2000
Server model 20
Base Sentinel
P/N 870-2656-01
Server 1
i 2000
3 Bridge Amps
P/N 977-2019-01
8’cable max.
Other connection
Customer
WAN
Any
SS7 Network
Element:
SCP
SSP
STP
MSC-wireless
VLR -wireless
HLR-wireless
i3000
Internet Protocol (IP)
High Speed Links
LAN
Switch
IP
Network
SCP
SS7 Network
Low Speed Links
02_sen_probe_dia
Site Collector is a collective term for either ESPs or Flight Recorders (FR) that
collect MSUs and forward them on to the Sentinel Server system for
processing. FRs are connected to mated i2000 shelves in the Sentinel Site
Collector Frame. Sentinel i2000 shelves are connected by probes to the SS7
links that are monitored.
5-10
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Sentinel Frames Overview
The Flight Recorder (FR) refers to a subsystem composed of hardware and
software components that comprise the platform for a particular Sentinel site
collector. The FR platform functions very similar to the ESP platform used in
the integrated solution for a Sentinel site.
NOTE: A Sentinel Site Collector Frame can be ordered without i2000
shelves to inter-connect with existing Sentinel systems.
Probed Sentinel Server Frame
The Sentinel Server Frame is configured with one to four Sun Netra servers to
support Data Gateway servers (DGS), Traffic Database servers (TDS), Sentinel
Alarm Management System (SAMS) servers or Base Sentinel servers (BSS).
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
5-11
Sentinel Frames Overview
5-12
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
6
MPS
Introduction ......................................................................................... 6-1
MPS System Hardware ...................................................................... 6-2
MPS on Tekelec 1000........................................................................... 6-2
MPS on Netra Platform ...................................................................... 6-9
Introduction
Tekelec’s Multi-purpose Server (MPS) is a hardware and software platform
that can be configured as an EAGLE Local Number Portability (LNP)
Application Processor (ELAP) or EAGLE Provisioning Application Processor
(EPAP) server.
The MPS provides an interface between the customer provisioning network
and the Eagle DSM cards. As the customer’s data is updated, the MPS stores
the data and updates the DSM cards. An MPS is usually co-located with an
Eagle. If you need to install an MPS at a distance from the EAGLE, contact
“Tekelec Technical Services” for assistance.
Currently, the MPS supports the following features:
•
MPS running the EAGLE Provisioning Application Processor (EPAP)
software supports the GSM Flexible Numbering (G-Flex), GSM Mobile
Number Portability (G-Port), and INAP-based Number Portability (INP)
features.
These features allow a subscriber to change location, service provider, or
service while keeping the same directory number and ensures that
subscribers receive the same freedom of choice for local service as they do
with long-distance service providers.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
6-1
MPS System Hardware
•
MPS running the EAGLE LNP Application Processor (ELAP) software
supports the LNP 96 Million Numbers Feature.
The Local Number Portability (LNP) 96 Million Numbers feature increases
the number of provisionable telephone numbers (TNs) from 18 million to
48 million. The LNP 96 Million Numbers feature also relocates the LNP
database from the OAM (Operation Administration and Maintenance) to
the MPS.
The MPS is composed of hardware and software components that interact
to create a secure and reliable system. This chapter includes an overview
of the MPS hardware platform and a description of MPS hardware
components.
MPS System Hardware
The MPS is based on Tekelec’s Tekelec 1000. Earlier deployments of MPS are
based on Netra servers.
Tekelec 1000-based MPS is required for the LNP application EPAP 4.0. Tekelec
1000-based MPS configuration are comprised of:
•
2 breaker panels
•
4 hubs
•
2 Tekelec 1000 processing systems.
The Netra-based MPS is comprised of:
• 2 breaker panels
• 4 hubs
• 2 Sun Microsystems Netra t 1400 processing systems.
MPS on Tekelec 1000
MPS on Tekelec 1000 supports the EAGLE Provisioning Application
Processor (EPAP) The EPAP application includes the INP, G-Flex, and
G-Port® features. In addition to the software application, additional
third-party software might be required to support the software application.
Figure 6-1 on page 6-3 shows an overview of how the MPS on Tekelec 1000 is
used with the EAGLE system.
This section provides an overview of the hardware and platform software that
comprises the MPS on Tekelec 1000. For information about the EPAP
application and how it interacts with the EAGLE, refer to the EPAP
Administration Manual.
6-2
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
MPS on Tekelec 1000
MPS on Tekelec 1000/EAGLE Overview
Figure 6-1.
Customer End
Office Equipment
Customer
Provisioning
Application
Customer
Provisioning
Stations
EPAP GUI
Terminal
Customer
Network
(Private network recommended)
MPS System 2
(Mate Servers A and B)
MPS System 1
(Mate Servers A and B)
EPAP A
PDBA
EPAP A
PDBA
EPAP B
RTDB
RTDB
PDB
MPS B
MPS A
EPAP B
RTDB
PDB
RTDB
MPS B
MPS A
Main
DSM
Network
Main
DSM
Network
Backup
DSM
Network
Backup
DSM
Network
DSM
DSM
DSM
DSM
DSM
DSM
RTDB
RTDB
RTDB
RTDB
RTDB
RTDB
Eagle Platform
Eagle Platform
eagle epap
Layered Design
MPS Release 4.0 is based on the Tekelec 1000 and uses a layered design with
defined interfaces to enable application and platform changes to be made
independently. This design provides an environment in which changes made
to platform components need not cause changes in application.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
6-3
MPS on Tekelec 1000
Figure 6-1 on page 6-4 shows the layered design of the MPS and the
application it supports.
Figure 6-1. Layered Design for MPS and Applications
MPS System Hardware Configuration
Application Software
MPS Platform Software
Complete MPS 4.0
Platform
TekServer Hardware
Each MPS system requires the hardware shown in Table 6-1.
Table 6-1. Tekelec 1000 Main Unit
Qty
Hardware Item
2
Tekelec 1000 main unit; each unit has the following
cards added during manufacturing:
• Three dual-port gigabit Ethernet Peripheral
Component Interconnect (PCI) cards
• One Quad-Port serial PCI card
Each Tekelec 1000 main unit has 2 gigabytes of
Random Access Memory (RAM) installed and
available.
4
Ethernet hubs:
• Two for main DSM network
• Two for backup DSM network
2
Breaker panels
1
Power distribution panel (also called terminal
block or terminal strip)
2
PCI modem card located in MPS servers A and B
Figure 6-2 on page 6-5 shows the MPS hardware configuration in a frame and
a magnified view of the Tekelec 1000 main unit.
6-4
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
MPS on Tekelec 1000
MPS Hardware Configuration in Frame
Figure 6-2.
MPS Frame
Breaker Panels
Hubs
Power Distribution Panel
tekserver frame front
Figure 6-2. Rear View of Tekelec 1000
-48 VDC Input A
-48 VDC Input B
Logic
Ground
Cable
Management
Arm Screw Holes Chassis
PCI 8
Ground
PCI 1
Two USB
Ports
RJ45 B
RJ45 A
System Timing
Clock Inputs
Mouse
Keyboard
RS-232
Serial
VGA
For more detailed information about the main unit, refer to the Tekelec 1000
Applications Server Hardware Manual.
MPS Platform Software Configuration
MPS Release 4.0 platform software is packaged and distributed as a Tekelec
Platform Distribution (TPD).
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
6-5
MPS on Tekelec 1000
The MPS platform uses an optimized kernel which supports:
•
UNIX domain sockets
•
TCP/IP version 4
•
Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE)
•
Universal Serial Bus (USB) version 1.1
•
Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) for dial-in access
•
10/100BASE-T and 1000BASE-T Ethernet cards
Serial Communication
The MPS on Tekelec 1000 provides the serial communication interfaces shown
in Figure 6-3 on page 6-6:
Figure 6-3. MPS Serial Port Connections
Power Monitoring
ttyS9 Quad
Serial
ttyS7
ttyS8
ttyS6
ttyS9
ttyS6
MPS A
TekServer
Mainboard
ttyS0
serial
port
ttyS7
Quad
ttyS8 Serial
ttyS0
Modem
Eagle STP
TekServer
Mainboard
MPS B
Local
Provisioning
Terminal
Remote Access
The MPS on Tekelec 1000 system provides the following remote access
features.
6-6
•
Five Ethernet interfaces are provided; each interface can support
10 megabits per second (Mbps), 100 Mbps, or 1 gigabit per second (Gbps).
•
A web server provides hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP) access over
both Ethernet and PPP.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
MPS on Tekelec 1000
•
The MPS does not support incoming connections that use services such as
rlogin, rsh, rexec, ftp, and telnet. Any incoming connections using
these services are dropped. Instead, the MPS supports secure protocols
that provide similar features.
•
A dial-in modem, installed in PCI slot 7 on MPS B, provides access for
both Microsoft® Windows® and Linux® clients using the Point to Point
Protocol (PPP). The modem is for use only by Tekelec Technical Services.
Diagnostics, Monitoring, and Alarming
The MPS on Tekelec 1000 provides the following diagnostic, monitoring, and
alarming functions:
•
Network diagnostic tools
•
Monitoring of the following items:
— Power
— Fans
— Hard drives for free capacity and faults
— Logical integrity of meta-devices and filesystems
— IP network’s core components
— Whether core processes that should be running are running
— Virtual Memory (VM) subsystem
— Temperature
•
Alarms, in the form of Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) or messages, to
report problems found by monitoring
MPS System Network Configuration
The following sections describe the MPS system network configuration.
Network Interfaces
Each MPS server has three added dual-port gigabit Ethernet PCI cards to
support network interfaces. The MPS software configures the Ethernet
interfaces and modifies files to make the network interfaces available to the
EPAP application.
Figure 6-4 shows the network connections for an MPS system.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
6-7
MPS on Tekelec 1000
Figure 6-4. MPS on Tekelec 1000 Network Connections
Customer
Network
Provisioning Network and
Optional Backup Provisioning Network
DSM
DSM
Network Hubs
Dual
Gigabit
Ethernet
cards
TekServer
chassis
Sync Network
DSM
Network Hubs
DSM
Dual
Gigabit
Ethernet
cards
TekServer
chassis
MPS System
Network Time Protocol (Core)
Network Time Protocol (NTP) is an Internet protocol used to synchronize
clocks of computers to Universal Time Coordinated (UTC) as a time reference.
NTP reads a clock provided by a timeserver and transmits the reading to one
or more clients; each client adjusts its clock as required. If left unchecked, the
system time of a Tekelec 1000 will drift out of synchronization with other
equipment that it communicates with.
All Tekelec 1000 servers can optionally be configured to communicate with
customer-defined NTP timeservers. Tekelec 1000 servers at a given site will
also be configured to communicate with each other, so they will stay
synchronized even if contact to other NTP servers within the customer
network is lost.
•
of text inset file.
•
6-8
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
MPS on Netra Platform
Figure 6-5. MPS NTP Configuration
NTP Server 1
NTP Server 2
MPS
A
Legend:
Client
Client
Peer
MPS
B
NTP Server 3
MPS
A
MPS
B
Server
Server
Peer
For information about defining an external NTP time server, refer to the EPAP
Administration Manual.
MPS on Netra Platform
The following section provides overview information and describes the parts
of the Netra-based MPS.
The MPS Server is a one- to four-processor device that uses the family of
UltraSPARC™ II processors. Housed within a rack-mounting enclosure, the
MPS Server provides the following:
•
High performance processors
•
Extensive I/O expansion and a wide range of options
•
Modular internal design
•
High performance disk, system, memory, and I/O subsystems
•
High performance peripheral component interconnect (PCI) I/O
•
Redundant hot swap power supply units
•
Alarm function for remote management
•
Powered by –48V DC supplies
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
6-9
MPS on Netra Platform
The following sections provide a brief description of the MPS Server I/O
devices and a detailed overview of the system features.
Figure 6-3.
MPS on Netra Hardware Overview
Breaker Panel 1 (BP-1)
Breaker Panel 2 (BP-2)
Breaker Panel Drip Tray
Terminal Strips (4x)
on a Mounting Bracket
Hub 1
Hub 2
Hub 3
Hub 4
MPS Server A
8-Port Connector Box
MPS Server B
8-Port Connector Box
Mounting Bracket
General Purpose Frame
MPS on Netra System Features
System components are housed in a rack-mounting enclosure. The
motherboard contains the CPU module(s), memory, system control
application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), and I/O ASICs.
The system has these additional features:
6-10
•
Rack mounting enclosure with n+1 redundant, hot-swap –48VDC power
supplies
•
UltraSPARC Port Architecture (UPA) coherent memory interconnect
•
Use of Dual Inline Memory Module (DIMMs), with an interleaved
memory system. Populating with two pairs of identical capacity DIMMs
enables the memory controller to interleave and overlap, providing
optimal system performance. There are a total of 16 DIMM slots supplying
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
MPS on Netra Platform
a minimum of 256 MB (4 x 64 MB) and a maximum of 4 GB (16 x 256 KB)
of memory.
•
40 Mbps Fast-20 (UltraSCSI) disk subsystem supporting up to four 18 GB
disk drives
•
Two RS232/423 DB-25 serial ports (asynchronous protocols)
•
Parallel port
•
External Fast-20 (UltraSCSI) 68-pin port
•
Two SCSI removable media drives (CD-ROM or DVD-ROM, and Tape
Drive)
•
Alarm card
The alarm card has a non-volatile buffer to record recent events, monitors
internal hardware devices, and controls the front panel alarm, fault, and
system LEDs.
•
Quad FastEthernet Network Interface Card
•
Serial Asynchronous Interface/PCI adapter (SunSAI/P card with 8-Port
Connector Box) on Server B only
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
6-11
MPS on Netra Platform
6-12
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
7
Tekelec 1000 Applications Server (APS)
Introduction ......................................................................................... 7-1
Tekelec 1000 Hardware Features....................................................... 7-1
Hardware Components ............................................................... 7-2
Interfaces........................................................................................ 7-3
Electrical Features......................................................................... 7-3
Mechanical Design ....................................................................... 7-3
Alarm and Status Indicators ....................................................... 7-6
Introduction
The Tekelec 1000 Applications Server (APS) provides a fully integrated
application-hosting environment directly on top of the EAGLE platform. The
Tekelec 1000 is a general-purpose application engine (AE) that offers high
transaction rates with low latency. It supports a variety of application
solutions for the wireless and wireline telecommunications infrastructure to
provide the building blocks for next-generation signaling systems. The
Tekelec 1000 software is comprised of a POSIX compliant, Open System
Environment.The Tekelec 1000 supports a full suite of applications known as
TekWare. Also, the Tekelec 1000 is used to host the MPS, and Sentinel ESPs
and Traffic Database Servers.
Tekelec 1000 Hardware Features
The TekServer Services Platform is a scalable computing platform constructed
with state-of-the-art components packaged in a compact-size, stand-alone
enclosure. The TekServer chassis utilizes dual processors, and has eight PCI
slots, four internally mounted media devices, and expandable memory.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
7-1
Tekelec 1000 Hardware Features
NOTE: Tekelec 1000 servers are normally configured in an (n+1)
configuration to achieve 99.999% availability. Some applications may not
require the redundant configuration.
Figure 7-1 on page 7-2 shows a Tekelec 1000 configured in a Tekelec
heavy-duty frame.
NOTE: The Tekelec 1000 shown in Figure 7-1 on page 7-2 is at the top
of the frame; this is the typical position when the Tekelec 1000 is part of
a new installation at the customer location. The Tekelec 1000 can also be
located at other positions in the frame.
Figure 7-1. Tekelec 1000 in Tekelec Heavy-Duty Frame
Breaker Panels
Tekelec 1000
Hardware Components
The TekServer platform offers the following standard hardware components:
7-2
•
Intel® E7501 chipset
•
Dual Intel Pentium® 4 Xeon™ processors
•
Redundant BIOS architecture
•
266-MHz DDR RAM, registered, with ECC and ChipkillTM support
•
533 megahertz (MHz) processor bus speed
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Tekelec 1000 Hardware Features
•
Light Emitting Diode (LED) diagnostic display
•
Battery-backed real-time clock
•
Hardware monitors that read and report:
— Supply, battery, and core voltages
— Fan speed inputs
— Ambient and processor temperatures
•
E1/T1 composite clock signals
•
Four devices for storage media (for example, fixed media disk drives and
CD-RW/DVD ROMs) for internally supporting persistent storage
In addition, the TekServer platform has a variety of internal and external
interfaces, as described in “Interfaces” on page 7-3.
Interfaces
The TekServer platform includes interfaces for accommodating expansion,
control and configuration, network connectivity, and peripheral support. See
the Tekelec 1000 Applications Server Hardware Manual for details.
Electrical Features
The TekServer platform offers the following standard electrical features:
•
Operates from -48 VDC +/- 5% power input according to Network
Equipment Building System (NEBS) requirements in accordance with
typical telecommunications applications
•
Includes short-circuit protections and safety precautions in accordance
with common standards
Mechanical Design
The TekServer mechanical design meets all applicable NEBS requirements
and is designed to protect all of the active components. The design has
efficient component cooling using low-impedance air paths, and its compact
size allows multiple units to be configured in a frame with zero top and
bottom clearance when stacked.
The TekServer hardware has been designed for easy maintenance. The
following components are field-replaceable units (FRUs):
•
Fans
•
Fan filters
•
Disk drives (located on the removable lid)
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
7-3
Tekelec 1000 Hardware Features
•
Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) cards
•
Complete Tekelec 1000 Chassis
The fans, filters, and disk drives have lower mean time between failures
(MTBF) and can be easily replaced, so they have been grouped together. The
disk drives are located in the removable lid (for more information, see
“Component Access Front Lid” on page 7-4). The PCI cards are located at the
rear of the Tekelec 1000 chassis and plug into the main board.
All other components, which are less likely to fail and are more difficult to
replace, are located in the TekServer main unit. If one of the components in
the main unit fails, you can remove the disks (preserving your data which is
stored on the disk drives in the lid), replace the entire main unit, and then
install the disk drives in the replacement chassis.
Use the procedures in the Tekelec 1000 Applications Server Hardware Manual
when removing or replacing FRUs. Always perform a soft shutdown of the
Tekelec 1000 chassis before switching OFF both circuit breakers supplying
redundant power. For more information about troubleshooting systems and
performing soft shutdowns see the appropriate maintenance manual for your
application.
Component Access Front Lid
The TekServer platform has a hinged lid at the front that is locked in place by
captive screws during normal operation. This lid allows access to the fan
trays, BIOS select switch, reset button, and two USB ports that are located
under the lid. The front lid also has the following features:
•
Light emitting diode (LED) alarm indicators, mounted to the front surface
of the lid.
•
Space for routing and strain relief of cables to the media device, LED's,
and fan trays.
•
Constant torque hinges, which are a safety feature to protect the attached
components from shock by preventing sudden closure of the lid.
•
The following devices, mounted to the bottom side:
— Two 3.5 disk drives (HDD) mounted separately. Each HDD is mounted
to a bracket. This assembly is then mounted to the front lid.
— Two slimline drives (for removable media devices) and drive adapter
board, mounted together with a dual CD-RW/DVD ROM bracket.
These assemblies are then mounted to the front lid.
Rear I/O Panel
The rear input/output (I/O) panel is perforated to facilitate airflow and forms
the back wall of the TekServer enclosure. It has openings for:
•
7-4
Eight peripheral component interface (PCI) cards' I/O panels
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Tekelec 1000 Hardware Features
•
The I/O connectors on the rear edge of the main board (mouse, keyboard,
VGA, serial port, E1 or T1 clock inputs, and two USB ports)
•
The power board I/O (logic ground connection)
Power entry is at the rear of the TekServer platform. There are two right angle
power connectors (A and B feeds) on the power board that are accessible
through the rear I/O panel. The power input connectors are keyed and have
positive locking features.
Logic ground is carried on a 15-position, right-angle connector on the power
board. The connector is bulkhead-mounted to the rear I/O panel. There are
also two frame ground connector studs on the rear I/O panel. See Figure 7-2
on page 7-5 for a detailed view of the rear I/O panel.
NOTE:
clarity.
The rear I/O panel is shown without the perforated air panel for
Figure 7-2. Rear I/O Panel
TekServer Main Board
-48 VDC Input A
-48 VDC Input B
Logic
Ground
Cable
Management
Arm Screw Holes Chassis
PCI 8
Ground
PCI 1
Two USB
Ports
RJ45 B
RJ45 A
System Timing
Clock Inputs
Mouse
Keyboard
RS-232
Serial
VGA
The main board has eight PCI card slots. PCI cards are plugged directly into the
main board, and the PCI cards bulkhead panels are fixed to the Rear I/O Panel
with screws. Slots one through six support full length (12.283 inch) PCI cards,
slots seven and eight support cards 6.875 inches long, or less.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
7-5
Installation and Replacement
Alarm and Status Indicators
The Tekelec 1000 platform provides the following alarm and status indicators:
•
Critical, Major, and Minor visual alarm indicators located on the front
panel of the TekServer platform.
•
Status indicators provide additional information regarding the
operational condition of the TekServer platform, including status of the
major subsystems: processors, volatile memory, non-volatile memory
(disk drives, etc.), and interfaces. Front panel light-emitting diode (LED)
indicators for primary and secondary power inputs are provided.
Figure 7-3. Tekelec 1000 Status Indicators
Status Indicators
Power Indicators
For more information about the diagnostics that manage these alarm and
status indicators, see the Tekelec 1000 Applications Server Hardware Manual.
Installation and Replacement
The Tekelec 1000 chassis is field installable in a Tekelec Heavy Duty Frame.
The slides are constructed such that the telescoping portion can be installed in
the frame and the inner slide rail can be attached to the TekServer chassis. The
TekServer chassis can then be loaded into the frame without having to
support it while installing hardware.
The TekServer chassis is also field replaceable. TekServer replacement,
including disconnecting cables, mounting a replacement system (of identical
configuration), and reconnecting cables requires no more than 30 minutes. See
the Tekelec 1000 Applications Server Hardware Manual for installation and
replacement procedures.
7-6
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Diagnostics
Diagnostics
All components that comprise the TekServer platform are designed for
testability to ensure that operational status can be accurately determined and
that appropriate levels of fault detection and isolation are possible with a
minimum of effort.
The following levels of diagnostics are provided:
1. Power-On Self Test (POST) diagnostics run once at start-up to determine
whether all required devices are installed and functional. POST can also be
run by Tekelec Technical Services to verify that the TekServer platform is
operational.
2. Online diagnostics actively monitor the health of a running TekServer
platform. When online diagnostics encounter a problem, an alarm is
raised and front panel light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are illuminated to
indicate a problem. Online diagnostics can be run while maintaining
in-service operation of node. Individual links undergoing tests will be
out-of-service.
3. Offline diagnostics can be used by Tekelec Technical Services to detect
system hardware problems that POST cannot detect. Offline diagnostics
can also provide load simulation and stress testing
Diagnostics enable troubleshooting of installed systems by verifying:
•
Operational capability of Field Replaceable Units (FRU).
•
Operational status of peripheral system components (such as cables and
connectors) through automated testing initiated by FRU components.
Examples are loop-back and Bit Error Rate Test (BERT) tests.
Reliability, Interoperability, and Scalability
Reliability
The primary market for the TekServer platform is traditional
telecommunications signaling environments requiring robust performance
and 99.999% availability. The TekServer platform is designed to maximize
reliability and include redundancy of critical systems (such as the primary
power modules and fans) that may detract from reliability expectations
Interoperability
The TekServer platform interoperates with a variety of IP enabled and SS7
compliant devices in accordance with the standard interfaces and protocols
supported.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
7-7
Reliability, Interoperability, and Scalability
Scalability
The TekServer platform is scalable to provide for price/performance ratios
best suited to specific customer applications. Tekelec provides scalability
through insertion and/or depopulation of the following components.
•
Processors -Two
•
RAM - Scalable from 2Gbytes to 16Gbytes in 2Gbyte increments.
•
Ethernet components
•
Expansion cards
•
Bay-mounted devices
Additional E1/T1 interfaces can be configured.
7-8
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
8
EOAP
Overview .............................................................................................. 8-2
Hardware ............................................................................................. 8-4
Shelf ................................................................................................8-4
Components ..................................................................................8-5
Components ..................................................................................8-5
Asynchronous Maintenance Modem (Optional) .....................8-6
Asynchronous Maintenance Modem (Optional) .....................8-6
Terminal .........................................................................................8-7
Interfaces .............................................................................................. 8-7
EOAP-to-Eagle STP ......................................................................8-8
EOAP-to-SEAS ............................................................................8-10
Administration .................................................................................. 8-12
IP7 Secure Gateway Provisioning ............................................8-12
EOAP Retransmission Delay........................................................... 8-13
EOAP Retransmission Delay ....................................................8-13
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
8-1
Overview
Maintenance .......................................................................................8-13
Hardware .................................................................................... 8-13
Software....................................................................................... 8-14
Upgrade Considerations...................................................................8-14
Overview
The Embedded Operations Support System Application Processor (EOAP) is
a general purpose interface module that provides the Eagle STP system with a
generic platform to develop and run software for feature-specific interfaces to
the Eagle STP. These interfaces, for example, include the optional Signaling
and Engineering Administration System (SEAS).
The EOAP translates and converts higher layer protocols into asynchronous
serial communication. It communicates with the Eagle STP system through a
serial interface port. For the SEAS interface, the EOAP provides translation
and asynchronous-to-X.25 communication conversion. For the LSMS
interface, the EOAP processes input from the LSMS.
Each EOAP reports to the Eagle STP its general status as well as the status of
its User Application Layer (UAL), X.25 links, PVCs on those links, and Q.3
associations. The Eagle STP can then report the status of the EOAP and its
components to the user through the Eagle STP's HMI.
You can configure most aspects of the EOAP through the Eagle STP terminal.
For upgrade, debug, and maintenance functions, use a VT-520 terminal
directly connected to the EOAP.
The EOAP is a modular unit with field-replaceable components. For upgrade
purposes, the EOAP can replace an existing Texas Micro OAP.
The EOAP shelf is designed for a split system consisting of an EOAP-A and an
EOAP-B. Each EOAP system in the dual configuration consists of a processor
card, a serial interface card, a power supply card, a removable hard drive, and
a removable CD-ROM drive.
8-2
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Overview
EOAP Communication
Figure 8-1.
Signaling and Engineering Administration System (SEAS)
SEAS
SEAC
System
(Customer Site)
Synch
X.25
modem
EOAP
Host-A
Asynch
communications
Asynch
Asynch
modem
Serial port
Asynch
X.25
modem
Serial port
Serial port
Synch
EOAP
Host-B
Asynch
Asynch
modem
Asynch
communications
Asynch
Maintenance
center
VT 520 terminal
Ethernet
interface
Server
Disk array
Disk array
Processor
LSMS
eoapblk
NPAC
(Remote Location)
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
8-3
Hardware
Hardware
Shelf
The EOAP shelf is designed for a split system consisting of an EOAP-A and an
EOAP-B. Each EOAP in the dual configuration consists of the following
components:
•
Air management card (P/N 870-1524-01)
•
CD-ROM drive card (P/N 870-1515-03)
•
Hard drive card (P/N 870-1514-03)
•
Power supply card (P/N 870-1521-01)
•
Processor card (P/N 870-1523-01)
•
Serial card (P/N 870-1522-01)
Figure 8-2 illustrates the layout of the system.
The center section of the dual EOAP system (both EOAP-A and EOAP-B)
contains four individual drive bays. The top two drive bays are hard wired to
EOAP-A and the bottom two drive bays are hard wired to EOAP-B. The top
drive bay for each EOAP is occupied by the hard drive for that unit. The hard
drive must be a SCSI II device, set to SCSI ID#0, with a minimum capacity of
9 GB.The factory pre-loaded hard drive is a field replaceable unit. If the hard
drive card is replaced, the platform followed by all site-specific information
must be reloaded on the EOAP.
EOAP Shelf
Figure 8-2.
GR-376 EOAP A
EOAP-A
hard drive and CD-ROM
GR-376 EOAP B
EOAP-B
EOAP-A
Processor Card
8
8
Ethernet Port
Serial card
Air Management Cards
Powersupply Card
V
1 2 3
4 5 6 7
8
1
2
3 4 5
6 7 8
EOAP-B
hard drive and CD-ROM
8-4
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Hardware
Components
Processor Card
The processor card occupies slots 1 and 2 of the EOAP. This card is a 300 MHz
or faster CompactPCI card with 64 MB on-board RAM (expandable to 1 GB).
The processor card is the main computational component of the EOAP
system. On the front of the card are system status LEDs (see Table 8-1) and an
Ethernet port. The card also provides abort and reset capabilities through both
manual and software intervention.
Table 8-1. Status LEDs of the EOAP System
Value
Meaning
0
Normal Operation
1
Halted
The processor card is a field-replaceable unit. It provides two serial ports,
which are accessible through the EOAP backplane, for connecting to a VT-520
terminal and an asynchronous maintenance modem. An RJ-45 Ethernet port
on the front of the card provides negotiated 10/100BaseT network access for
Local Number Portability (LNP) support using the LSMS.
The card provides the following usable front panel fixtures: abort and reset
switches, a rotary mode switch, microphone and headphone jacks, a SCSI
connector, and a keyboard connector.
Serial port A is used for direct console connection (vt100, PC, etc.) and port B
is used for the maintenance modem connection (when required).
The processor card provides one 10/100 Mbits/s Ethernet port. It is routed to
the front panel where it can be accessed via a TPE-RJ45 interface. The
processor card incorporates an auto-negotiate feature to auto-detect
10Mbits/s or 100 Mbits/s. The bit rate auto-configures itself during operation.
Serial Card
The serial card occupies slot 3 of the EOAP. This card is a CompactPCI with
four serial ports accessible from the EOAP backplane. These ports support full
RS-232C capabilities in both synchronous and asynchronous modes. The first
two ports are used for EOAP-to-Eagle STP connections. The other two ports
are used for connecting the EOAP with SEAS. The serial card is a
field-replaceable unit.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
8-5
Hardware
Power Supply Card
The power supply card occupies slots 7 and 8 of the EOAP. This card is a
48V input CompactPCI card. When powered by 48V central office power, the
card provides +5, +12 and -12V outputs used by various components of the
EOAP system. Two LEDs are located on the front of the card. The green LED
indicates that the input voltage falls within the allowable range of 48 to 72
VDC, 12A max. The red LED indicates than an internal fault has occurred.
These faults include over-voltage, input DC fail warning, loss of output
power, and temperature exceeding set limits. The power supply card is a
field-replaceable unit. Each EOAP I/O backplane contains a single input
power connector.
Hard Drive Card
The center section of the dual EOAP system (both EOAP-A and EOAP-B)
contains four individual drive bays. The top two drive bays are hard wired to
EOAP-A and the bottom two drive bays are hard wired to EOAP-B. The top
drive bay for each EOAP is occupied by the hard drive for that unit. The hard
drive must be a SCSI II device, set to SCSI ID#0, with a minimum capacity of 9
GB. The factory pre-loaded hard drive is a field-replaceable unit. If the hard
drive card is replaced, the platform followed by all site-specific information
must be reloaded on the EOAP from the IP7 Secure Gateway.
CD-ROM Drive Card
The center section of the dual EOAP system (both EOAP-A and EOAP-B)
contains four individual drive bays. The top two drive bays are hard wired to
EOAP-A and the bottom two drive bays are hard wired to EOAP-B. The
bottom drive bay for each EOAP is occupied by the CD-ROM drive card for
that unit. The CD-ROM drive card must be a Solaris-compatible SCSI device
and is currently configured as a 32X CD-ROM drive. The CD-ROM drive card
is a field-replaceable unit.
Asynchronous Maintenance Modem (Optional)
CAUTION: The EOAP’s open system architecture allows access to the
operating system. Any undocumented changes to the files may cause
the system to become corrupted and unusable. Making any
undocumented changes on the EOAP, including changes to the
hardware, operating system and/or the components found therein will
void the warranty.
WARNING: EOAP hardware components, including disk drives, may
be removed and (re)inserted with the power on, but they are NOT HOT
SWAPPABLE at the operating system level.
Before any hardware component is removed from the EOAP, the
operating system MUST BE HALTED. To halt the system, log in as
8-6
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Interfaces
root, then at the command line, type: /usr/sbin/init 0. When
the ok prompt appears, it is safe to remove the component.
After a component is (re)inserted, the system must be reset for Solaris to
successfully detect the component. To reset the system, at the ok prompt
type: reset-all. The system should boot up. If the system returns to
the ok prompt after the reset-all command has executed, type:
setenv auto-boot? true. Then type: reset-all.
WARNING: If the system still does not boot, as a LAST RESORT,
perform a hardware reset by using a paperclip to press the ABORT and
then RESET buttons on the faceplate, or by removing and reinserting
the cPCI power supply from slot 7. Performing a hardware reset runs a
HIGH RISK of corrupting the operating system to the point of
rendering it unusable. If this occurs, the operating system and system
software must be reloaded. A hardware reset also runs the RISK of
causing the hard drive to fail. If this occurs, the hard drive must be
replaced.
Although not provided with the EOAP, you can connect a Hayes-compatible
modem to the EOAP to provide connectivity for remote monitoring and
maintenance. This allows access to the EOAP as required by Tekelec Technical
Services. If used, the modem is connected to the EOAP through the processor
card’s second serial port. The modem must be configured for 9600 bps, 7 bits,
Even parity, and 1 stop bit (7-E-1).
Terminal
The user console for the EOAP is a Digital Equipment Corporation VT-520
terminal. The VT-520 is connected to the EOAP through an RS232C terminal
cable attached to the first serial connector of the processor card through the
EOAP backplane. The terminal allows monitoring and direct interfacing
capabilities to the EOAP. To ensure that the terminal and EOAP interact
correctly, the terminal must be setup for vt100 emulation.
Interfaces
The EOAP is a general purpose interface module that provides the Eagle STP
system with a generic platform to develop and run software for
feature-specific interfaces to the Eagle STP. These interfaces include the
optional Signaling and Engineering Administration System (SEAS) and the
optional Local Service Management System (LSMS). Figure 8-3 shows the
EOAP’s operation context.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
8-7
Interfaces
Figure 8-3.
Operating Context of EOAP
EAGLE
Modem
Hard drive
SCSI2
RS232C
Serial Connection
Removable
Media drive
SCSI2
RS232C
Terminal
EOAP
X.25
Connection
SEAC
EOAP-to-Eagle STP
Function
Each EOAP reports to the Eagle STP its general status as well as the status of
its User Application Layer (UAL), X.25 links, PVCs on those links, and Q.3
associations. The Eagle STP can then report the status of the EOAP and its
components to the user through the Eagle STP's HMI.
8-8
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Interfaces
You can configure most aspects of the EOAP through the Eagle STP terminal.
For upgrade, debug, and maintenance functions, use a VT-520 terminal
directly connected to the EOAP.
The Eagle STP cannot perform a reset of the EOAP with the init-oap
command from the Eagle STP terminal as it does with the OAP.
Interface
This section details the overall connections and setup required for the EOAP
to Eagle STP interface. This includes the physical connection and a brief look
at the messaging that occurs between the two.
EOAP-to-IP7 Secure Gateway Interface
Figure 8-4.
EAGLE
Alarm
Serial Connection
EOAP
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Serial Connection
EOAP
8-9
Interfaces
Physical Connection
The EOAP is connected to the Eagle STP through the EOAP backplane using
one of the two serial ports assigned to the processor card (only one port is
used in a dual EOAP configuration). On the Eagle STP backplane, the cables
are connected to any two of the MMI ports (MMI 0-MMI 15). By convention, if
there are two EOAPs connected to the IP7 Secure Gateway (dual
configuration), EOAP-A is connected to the lower numbered MMI port and
EOAP-B is connected to the higher numbered MMI port. Regardless of their
configuration, at any given moment, the EOAP connected to the lowest port is
reported as OAP A by the Eagle STP. Any Eagle STP port connected to an
EOAP must be configured as type "OAP" from the Eagle STP terminal.
Testing the Connection
Once the EOAP has been connected to any external device, it must be tested to
ensure the connection was made correctly and is working as designed. For the
EOAP-to-Eagle STP connection, this involves testing the ability for the EOAP
to send maintenance information to the Eagle STP and have that information
reported, verifying that the EOAP can communicate with the EOAP
backplane serial ports, and test the ability of the IP7 Secure Gateway to
perform a restart of the EOAP from the Eagle STP terminal.
EOAP-to-SEAS
Function
The EOAP provides connectivity between the Signaling Engineering and
Administration Center (SEAC) and the Eagle STP by implementing the UAL
and X.25 layers of the SEAS protocol.
Each EOAP is configured according to customer specifications.
Configurations for the EOAP support for SEAS include X.25 and UAL
parameters.
This section details the overall connections and setup required for the EOAP
to SEAS interface. This includes the physical connection and a brief look at the
messaging that occurs between the two. It will also include a list of the
components (hardware and software) necessary for its implementation, which
will also include the EOAP-to-IP7 Secure Gateway connections.
8-10
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Interfaces
Figure 8-5.
EAGLE-to-SEAS Interface
EOAP
X.25 Connection
SEAS
Physical Connection
The EOAP is connected to the SEAS through the serial card. Port 3A/B and
port 4A/B are reserved for SEAS communication. From these port(s), an
RS232C cable is connected to a 9600 bps synchronous modem or other
equivalent device necessary to connect to the SEAS system. If the
configuration is for a single EOAP, the connection is made from both ports to
two separate modems or other equivalent devices (X.25 connection). If the
configuration is for a dual EOAP configuration, only one of the two serial
ports is used per EOAP.
Messaging
Communication between the EOAP and the SEAS involves three message
types:
•
SEAS commands
•
STP responses
•
STP autonomous messages
These messages may involve one-way or two way communication between
the SEAS and the EOAP. The actual messages are from the SEAC to the Eagle
STP, however, the EOAP receives and transmits these messages between the
two in a format that each can understand.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
8-11
Administration
SEAS Commands
SEAS commands are messages originating from the SEAC that request the
Eagle STP to perform a specific action. A response to this messages is returned
by the Eagle STP within a required amount of time. These commands may
specify when the command is to take place: either immediately upon receipt,
upon receipt of a subsequent SEAS order-activation command, or
automatically at a specified date and time. The default activation time for a
SEAS command is immediately unless otherwise specified. At this time, the
EOAP does not support time-delayed commands.
STP Responses
STP responses are messages sent from the Eagle STP to the SEAC in response
to a SEAS command. The three basic types of STP responses are: completion
responses, acceptance acknowledgments without completion, and exception
responses.
STP Autonomous Messages
STP autonomous messages are messages sent from the Eagle STP
automatically to the SEAC. These messages contain either scheduled
measurement reports or on-occurrence event reports. Although these
messages are logged by the SEAC, no acknowledgment is sent back to the
Eagle STP confirming receipt.
Administration
The IP7 Secure Gateway administration supports the EOAP by providing the
means to provision the EOAP at the IP7 Secure Gateway
IP7 Secure Gateway Provisioning
Administration provides support for the EOAP as follows:
•
chg-oap-config command
This command allows the configuration of the host name, IP address,
netmasks, SEAC CLLI. X.25 mode and packet size, and EOAP
configuration.
•
act-oap-config command
This command allows the update of the EOAP configuration.
•
rtrv-oap-config command
This command displays the IP address, netmasks, default router, SEAC
CLLI. X.25 configuration, and X.25 packet size and DTE/DCE.
8-12
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Maintenance
EOAP Retransmission Delay
Performance of this feature is affected by the requirement that the EOAP
buffer an IP7 Secure Gateway message before transmission. It is a SEAS
requirement that the STP knows the total length of a message before
transmission of the message to SEAS. The IP7 Secure Gateway currently is not
aware of message length before transmission. This requires the EOAP to
buffer the entire message before it retransmits the message to the SEAS.
The Eagle STP/EOAP interface baud rate is 19200. The X.25 EOAP SEAS
interface baud rate is 9600. To transfer a 12,000-character report
(approximately 150 lines) from the Eagle STP to the EOAP, for example, takes
approximately 5 seconds. The EOAP must buffer all 12,000 characters before
retransmission. The EOAP would require another 10 seconds to retransmit the
message. Total transmission time is 15 seconds.
The SEAS computers do not receive any response from the Eagle STP until
EOAP retransmission begins. In the example above, SEAS does not receive
any response for 5 seconds. This response delay increases for longer reports,
assuming that SEAS will not time-out during the delay.
Maintenance
Hardware
Hardware maintenance for the EOAP consists of the replacement of any
defective EOAP field-replaceable component. These components are the
processor card, the the serial card, the power supply card, the hard drive card,
and the CD-ROM drive card.
You must halt the Solaris operating system and remove power from the
chassis before executing any hardware replacement procedures. You may
have to power down one or both sides depending on what is replaced.
CAUTION: The EOAP’s open system architecture allows access to the
operating system. Any undocumented changes to the files may cause
the system to become corrupted and unusable. Making any
undocumented changes on the EOAP, including changes to the
hardware, operating system and/or the components found therein will
void the warranty.
If the hard drive is replaced, all site-specific information must be reloaded on
the EOAP from the IP7 Secure Gateway. If other hardware items are replaced,
no software changes will be required as long as they are replaced with
identical items.
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
8-13
Upgrade Considerations
Software
Software maintenance is not required. The IP7 Secure Gateway performs all
required configuration. Should a failure occur that cannot be corrected
through the IP7 Secure Gateway, Tekelec Technical Services has the ability to
access the EOAP through a modem or a direct terminal connection. If the
operating system has been corrupted beyond the ability for Technical Services
to perform a recovery, the hard drive will be replaced in the field.
Although the capability does exist for an on-site full re-install of all software
packages found on the EOAP, this maintenance must only be performed
under close supervision of Tekelec Customer Services.
CAUTION: The EOAP’s open system architecture allows access to the
operating system. Any undocumented changes to the files may cause
the system to become corrupted and unusable. Making any
undocumented changes on the EOAP, including changes to the
hardware, operating system and/or the components found therein will
void the warranty.
Alarm Interface
The EOAP provides a programmable seven-segment display on the front
panel of the processor card. Additionally, the power supply card provides
“Input OK” and Fault LEDs.
Upgrade Considerations
A detailed procedure for configuring the Eagle STP when upgrading from
OAPs to EOAPs is described in the Eagle STP Installation Manual. The entire
upgrade is performed either by a terminal connected directly to the EOAP or
by an external connection through a modem.
8-14
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
Index
48 Million Numbers feature
see LNP 48 MIllion Numbers feature
A
administration
EOAP 8-12
alarm card, MPS Server
description 6-11
Application Communication Module 3-9
Application Service Module 3-10
Application Subsystem 3-7
Applications 3-20
Automatic Call Gapping 4-5
B
Billing Functions 4-8
EOAP 1-6
administration 8-12
EPAP
support of GSM features 6-1
equipment, MPS hardware 6-2
expansion cabinets 4-10
F
Fast Ethernet switch 4-10
features
G-Flex 6-1
G-Port 6-1
GSM 6-1
INP 6-1
LNP 48 MIllion Numbers 6-2
MPS system additional 6-10
MPS system supported 6-1
FTP Retrieve and Replace Feature 3-9
FTRA 3-9
C
card
MPS Server alarm 6-11
Communication Subsystem 3-5
components, MPS
list of hardware 6-2
specifications 6-10
D
Database Audit 4-7
Database Communications Module 3-9
Database Service Module (Eagle STP) 3-10
disk systems 4-10
E
Eagle LNP Functional Capabilities 4-4
Eagle STP 1-4
Eagle STP and IP7 Secure Gateway Systems
3-2
ELAP
supports LNP 48 Million Numbers
feature 6-2
Embedded Operations Applications
Processor 3-18
Enterprise 450
servers 4-10
909-1021 Revision D, May 2005
G
G-Flex feature
G-Port feature
GR-376 EOAP
GSM features
6-1
6-1
3-18
6-1
H
hardware
platform 4-10
hardware, MPS
list of equipment 6-2
hardware, MPS system configuration 6-4
High Speed Operations Protocol 4-4
High-Capacity Multichannel Interface
Module 3-11
High-Speed IMT Packet Router 3-6
High-Speed Master Timing 3-13
High-Speed Multiplexer 3-7
HIPR 3-6
HSOP 4-4
I
INP feature 6-1
Integrated Sentinel 5-6
Integrated Sentinel (ESP Frame Side) 5-8
Index--1
Inter-processor Message Transport 3-5
IP7 Secure Gateway 1-4
ipgwi 3-20
iplim 3-20
iplimi 3-20
list of hardware components 6-2
supported features 6-1
MPS/EPAP 4.0 1-6
Multi-Platform Server (MPS) Systems 6-1
Multi-Purpose Server 1-6
L
N
layered design 6-3
LEDs
MPS Server 6-11
Link Interface Module 3-8
LNP
measurements 4-8
LNP 48 Million Numbers feature 6-2
LNP Database 4-6
LNP Maintenance 4-7
LNP Query Service (LNPQS) 4-4
LSMS
hardware platform 4-10
network
configuration 6-7
interfaces 6-7
network time protocol
in TekServer platforms 6-8
NTP
in TekServer platforms 6-8
M
Maintenance and Administration Subsystem
3-4
MASP 3-4
Message Relay (MR) Function 4-5
MO drive 4-10
modems 4-10
MPS
overview
layered design 6-3
system hardware configuration 6-4
system software configuration 6-5
MPS hardware
list of equipment 6-2
MPS on Netra 6-9
MPS on TekServer 6-2
MPS Server
see also MPS system
alarm card
description 6-11
component specifications 6-10
LEDs 6-11
overview 6-9
MPS system
see also MPS Server
additional features 6-10
component specifications 6-10
Index-2
O
optical disk drives 4-10
Overview of LSMS Hardware Components
4-11
P
platform 4-10
power sequencers 4-10
R
remote access 6-6
Reporting Functions 4-7
S
SCCP Subsystem Management 4-6
Scope and Audience 1-1
Sentinel Frames 5-4
Sentinel Server Frames 5-5
Sentinel Transport Cards 5-8
serial communication 6-6
server 4-10
Server, MPS
see MPS Server
Site Collector Frames 5-4
Small Computer System Interface Buses 3-5
software, MPS system configuration 6-5
specifications
MPS Server component 6-10
ss7ipgw 3-20
909-1021 Revision B, July 2004
Sun StorEdge
D1000 Disk Systems 4-10
Sun Ultra
Enterprise 450 servers 4-10
Sun Ultra 5
standard hardware component 4-10
System Clock 3-12
T
T-1000 5-1
Tekelec 1000 1-6
Tekelec 1000 Applications Server 1-6, 5-1
Tekelec Signalling Products Systems 1-2
TekServer 1-6
Theory of Operation 3-14
Time Slot Counter Synchronization 3-14
Timing Systems Eagle STP/IP7 SG 3-12
Translation Services Module 3-10
909-1021 Revision B, July 2004
Index-3
Index-4
909-1021 Revision B, July 2004
— DRAFT —
IntroductionEAGLE STP/LNP Overview1-1
Common Channel signaling NetworksEAGLE STP/LNP Overview1-1
SS7 Link and Message TypesEAGLE STP/LNP Overview1-3
Role of SSPs, STPs and SCPs in SS7 NetworksEAGLE STP/LNP Overview1-7
STP System Link AdministrationEAGLE STP/LNP Overview1-11
IntroductionEAGLE STP/LNP Overview2-1
EAGLE SubsystemsEAGLE STP/LNP Overview2-1
Theory of OperationEAGLE STP/LNP Overview2-15
IntroductionEAGLE STP/LNP Overview3-2
EAGLE LNP SubsystemsEAGLE STP/LNP Overview3-2
EAGLE LNP Functional CapabilitiesEAGLE STP/LNP Overview3-8
OverviewEAGLE STP/LNP Overview4-2
HardwareEAGLE STP/LNP Overview4-4
SoftwareEAGLE STP/LNP Overview4-10
InterfacesEAGLE STP/LNP Overview4-13
AdministrationEAGLE STP/LNP Overview4-20
PerformanceEAGLE STP/LNP Overview4-21
MaintenanceEAGLE STP/LNP Overview4-22
Upgrade ConsiderationsEAGLE STP/LNP Overview4-23
Download PDF