Guest room service and control system

US 20040059815A1
(19) United States
(12) Patent Application Publication (10) Pub. N0.2 US 2004/0059815 A1
Buckingham et al.
(54)
(43) Pub. Date:
GUEST ROOM SERVICE AND CONTROL
SYSTEM
(52)
(76) Inventors: Duane W. Buckingham, Old Lyme, CT
(US); Michael Franklin, Old Lyme, CT
US. Cl. .......................................... .. 709/224; 709/226
(57)
(US); Philipp A- ROOSli, MOllIlIaiIl
Lakes, NJ (Us); Tulsa A- Scott, Mystic,
Mar. 25, 2004
ABSTRACT
A guest room service and control system for a building
including a plurality of guest rooms, the guest room service
CT (Us)
and control system comprising: a local area netWork; a
Correspondence Address:
plurality of guest room netWorks operably coupled to the
local area netWork, each guest room netWork of the plurality
CANTOR COLBURN: LLP
55 GRIFFIN ROAD SOUTH
BLOOMFIELD, CT 06002
of guest room netWorks is associated With a guest room in
the building, each guest room netWork includes: a room hub
operably coupled to the local area netWork, a guest room
(21)
Appl' NO‘:
10/470,111
control device operably coupled to the room hub, the guest
room control device is a centralized electronic locking
(22)
PCT Flled'
Jan‘ 24’ 2002
tem component, a direct digital control system component,
(86)
(30)
PCT NO"
PCT/US02/02264
Foreign Application Priority Data
_
_
system component, a guest room energy management sys
_
a minibar monitoring device, or a combination comprising at
least one of the foregoing guest room contol devices. A guest
room service device is also operably coupled to the room
hub, the guest room service device is a computer, a voice
Jan. 24 2001
(US) ......................................... .. 60263940
Over Internet Protocol Ph0n¢> an Internet Protocol “dim a
Sep. 21’ 2001 (US) ......................................... .. 60323872
’
Publication Classi?cation
television Signal Convene/B or a Combination Comprising at
least one of the foregoing guest room service devices. Data
betWeen the local area netWork and the room hub is com
municated in packets con?gured according to a ?rst com
munications protocol
(51)
Int. Cl.7 ................................................. .. G06F 15/173
50
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US 2004/0059815 A1
GUEST ROOM SERVICE AND CONTROL SYSTEM
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED
APPLICATIONS
ture, determine and annunciate Whether the room is occu
pied or unoccupied, determine and annunciate Whether the
room’s mini-bar has been accessed, sound ?re and emer
gency alarms, turn lights on or off, permit or deny access to
the room, open and close drapes, turn audio-visual equip
[0001] This application claims the bene?t of US. Provi
sional Application Serial No. 60/263,940, ?led Jan. 24,
2001, and to US. Provisional Application Serial No. 60/323,
872, ?led on Sep. 21, 2001, both of Which are incorporated
by reference herein in their entirety.
ment on or off, and perform other functions related to
controlling equipment or annunciating status in rooms. The
central control computer located in each room can be tied to
a single master central control computer. The central com
puter from each room provides data to the master central
control computer from Which such data is disseminated to
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
[0002]
Energy conservation is a proven means to reduce
the operating costs of hotels. But many lodging facility
operators shun attempts at saving energy in the guest-rooms,
as they are concerned about the negative impact such
measures may have on guest perception and comfort.
[0003] A modern guestroom uses approximately 25 Kilo
Watt-hours (KWHr) of electricity each day. Based on a cost
estimate of $0.07 per KWHr, this amounts to about $1.75 per
day per room. This ?gure assumes the folloWing appliances
are used in a typical room: Heating/Ventilation/Air-Condi
tioning (HVAC), Lamps (portable), Lights (?xed), Televi
sion, Radio, and Minibar. A mini-bar is a convenient store of
goods Within each room, usually Within a refrigerator, that
can be accessed by the guest at his or her discretion.
[0004] With the exception of the minibar, the appliances
are manually controlled, and their daily hours of use can be
reduced using an energy management system (EMS). In the
case of the HVAC system, a Well-designed EMS can reduce
not only the number of hours the system is used each day,
but can also reduce the average poWer required. The EMS
can set back the HVAC temperature Whenever a room is not
rented and, When rented, Whenever a guest is not in the
room. The EMS Will turn off lamps and lights When the guest
or housekeeping leaves the room. The EMS can turn off the
television When the room is not rented, and it can open or
close the drapes to control heat exchange With the outside.
[0005] In modern lodging facilities, the EMS is part of a
larger guest room control system, Which also includes direct
digital control (DDC) of the HVAC system, guestroom
controls and a central electronic lock system (CELS). The
guestroom controls alloW a guest to remotely control the
display and control terminals at housekeeping, front desk,
security, engineering or any number of other locations in
order to provide hotel personnel With access to the data and
With the ability to remotely control various room functions
or settings from such terminals.
[0007]
In one such guest room control system, a telephone
console ?tted With a touch screen acts as the control com
puter for the room. It obtains room temperature information
from internal sensors, target temperature information from
the guest through the touch screen, and room status infor
mation (rented/vacant) from the master central control com
puter via a tWisted pair of loW voltage Wires connecting all
of the rooms through a netWork structure. The control
computer then decides if the various appliances in the room
should be adjusted and controls the appliances by providing
control signals to the appliances accordingly.
[0008] Such guest room control systems Work Well to
provide conveniences to the guest. For example, a guest can
control many functions in the guest room through a bedside
telephone console. Such guest room control systems also
provide convenience to housekeeping staff. For example, a
housekeeper Would simply refer to the screen on the master
central control computer to determine if the guest room Was
occupied or if the minibar needs re-stocking. Moreover,
guest room control systems Work Well to conserve energy in
a guest room. HoWever, modern guest room control systems
have limitations as Well. Applications that depend on a faster
and unconditional link to the master central control com
puter, such as digital video, cannot be implemented under
this architecture. To overcome this limitation, additional
data lines are required-to be installed. HoWever, the instal
lation of additional data lines in an existing hotel is expen
sive and increases the maintenance required for the hotel.
lamps, lights, drapes, television, and other appliances from
a single control station. The CELS connects guestroom
doorlocks to a central computer in the hotel for logging
keycard access operations and for enabling and canceling
access cards.
[0006] Guest room control systems are typically com
prised of a control computer or device for each room. The
control computer receives data from various sensors
throughout the room and, in response to the feedback
provided by the sensors, operates a number of remote room
control devices. Such remote sensors include, for example,
motion sensors, temperature sensors, smoke detectors, and
door and other closure sWitches. Such remote room control
devices include, for example thermostats and associated
BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
[0009]
The above described draWbacks and de?ciencies
are overcome or alleviated by a guest room service and
control system for a building including a plurality of guest
rooms, the guest room service and control system compris
ing: a local area netWork; a plurality of guest room netWorks
operably coupled to the local area netWork, each guest room
netWork of the plurality of guest room netWorks is associ
ated With a guest room in the building, each guest room
netWork includes: a room hub operably coupled to the local
area netWork, a guest room control device operably coupled
to the room hub, the guest room control device is a central
iZed electronic locking system component, a guest room
relays for heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC)
equipment, electronic locks, lighting control sWitches and
relays, and motors and sWitches for opening and closing
energy management system component, a direct digital
control system component, a minibar monitoring device, or
drapes. The central control computer uses the data and
room control devices. A guest room service device is also
control devices to, for example, adjust the room’s tempera
operably coupled to the room hub, the guest room service
a combination comprising at least one of the foregoing guest
Mar. 25, 2004
US 2004/0059815 A1
device is a computer, a voice over Internet Protocol phone,
an Internet Protocol radio, a television signal converter, or a
agement Protocol SNMP packets, Address Resolution
Protocol (ARP) packets, Dynamic Host Con?guration Pro
combination comprising at least one of the foregoing guest
tocol (DHCP), or the like, are passed through room hub 16
room service devices. Data betWeen the local area netWork
to the various guest room service devices 18. The various
guest room service devices 18 may include: high-speed
Internet access for a guest laptop 20; a Voice Over Internet
and the room hub is communicated in packets con?gured
according to a ?rst communications protocol.
Protocol (VoIP) phone 22 that provides the guest With phone
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
[0010] Referring to the exemplary draWings Wherein like
elements are numbered alike in the several Figures:
[0011] FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of a centraliZed
guest room control system;
[0012]
FIG. 2 is a block diagram depicting an external
service (e.g., a VoIP phone commercially available from
Nortel); an Internet Protocol (IP) radio 23 that provides the
guest With music service (e.g., a Moving Pictures Expert
Group (MPEG) 1 audio layer 3 (MP3) capable radio); and a
signal converter (set-top) box 24 that provides the guest With
digital video-on-demand (VoD) for vieWing on television 26
(e.g., model DSN-300 commercially available from Dae
vieW of a smart router;
Woo). Information to guest room service devices 18 can be
transmitted Within room 12 using data transmission media
[0013] FIG. 3 is a block diagram depicting an internal
vieW of the smart router of FIG. 2;
cables, or can be transmitted via a radio or infrared signal.
[0014] FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram depicting the inter
face of application programs and portions of operating
systems in the smart router of FIG. 2; and
[0015]
FIG. 5 is a netWork address translation table.
such as tWisted-pair Wire, coaxial cables, or ?ber optic
[0020]
Room hub 16 also coordinates communications to
and from a room gateWay 28. Room gateWay 28 translates
the data received from room hub 16, Which is formatted in
packets, into a secondary protocol that may be readable by
room control devices 30 in room 12. Room gateWay 28 also
translates the data received from room control devices 30
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE
INVENTION
into a protocol (e.g., TCP/IP or UDP/IP) that can be trans
mitted via room hub 16. The secondary protocol is deter
[0016] FIG. 1 depicts a centraliZed guest room control
system or netWork 10 by Which building-level services such
as, but not limited to, digital video-on-demand, central
electronic lock control, energy management, room control,
used. For example, the secondary protocol may include the
mined based on the types of room control devices 30 that are
and Internet access services are provided to one or more
guest rooms 12 throughout one or more hotels 14 over the
same netWork 10. While the embodiment described herein is
directed to one or more hotels 14, it Will be recogniZed that
the system 10 has application in a Wide range of buildings
including, but not limited to, universities, health care, multi
dWelling units (MDUs), of?ce, resort, and residential.
[0017]
Guest room control system 10 is distributed across
three general areas: one or more guest rooms 12, hotel 14
including the one or more guest rooms 12, and a location
external to the hotel 14. It Will be appreciated that the guest
room control system 10 can be distributed across any
number of rooms 12 in the hotel 14 and any number of
buildings or hotels 14 as shoWn in FIG. 1.
[0018] Within each room 12, a room hub 16 coordinates
communications to and from various service devices 18
Within the guestroom 12. Room hub 16 is a common point
of connection for the various devices 18 Within guest room
12. Room hub may be a passive hub, such that When a packet
arrives at one port in room hub 16, it is copied to the other
ports so that all devices in the guest room can see all packets.
An example of a passive hub is the commercially available
Netgear® model DS104 4-port Dual Speed (10/100) Hub.
Alternatively, room hub 16 maybe a sWitching hub that reads
the destination address of each packet and then forWards the
packet to the correct port. Room hub 16 may also include an
intelligent hub that enables an administrator to monitor the
traf?c passing through the hub 16 and to con?gure each port
in the hub 16.
[0019] Within netWork 10, User Datagram Protocol/Inter
net Protocol (UDP/IP) packets, Transport Control Protocol/
Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) packets, Simple NetWork Man
IRS infrared protocol as described in US. Pat. No. 5,128,
792, Which is protocol may include Inncom International’s
CINET protocol, Which is commercially available in Inncom
International’s Central Interface NetWorks. Other secondary
protocols may include the ModBus protocol, the Bluetooth
protocol, or the like.
[0021] The room control devices 30 serviced by room
gateWay 28 may include one or more of: an Energy Man
agement System (EMS) device 32, a minibar monitoring
device 34, a direct digital control (DDC) system device 35,
and a central electronic lock system (CELS) device 36.
Energy Management System (EMS) device 32 is a compo
nent in a system that digitally controls a heating, ventilation,
and/or air conditioning system associated With the room 12
and Which may include a digitally controlled thermostat.
One example of an EMS is the e4TM Energy Management
System commercially available from Inncom International,
Inc. of Niantic, Conn. Minibar monitoring device 34, is a
device that indicates When the minibar in room 12 has been
accessed and may indicate Which consumable items have
been removed. One example of a minibar monitoring device
34 is a minibar door sWitch such as a model S441 door
sWitch commercially available from Inncom International,
Inc; another example is a minibar With built in monitoring
capabilities commercially available from Bartech Systems
Corporation of Millersville, Md. Direct digital control
(DDC) system device 35 is a component in a system that
alloWs a guest to remotely control lamps and lights, WindoW
draperies, television, or other appliances. DDC device 35
may include, for example: a model L207 lamp control
module commercially available from Inncom International,
Inc; a motoriZed WindoW drapery system such as those
commercially available from the Makita, BTX, or Silent
Gliss companies; an infrared television remote control; and
a model P463 Do Not Disturb/Make Up Room plate com
mercially available from Inncom International, Inc. Acentral
Mar. 25, 2004
US 2004/0059815 A1
electronic lock system (CELS) device 36 is a component
in-a system for locking and unlocking an access door to
[0027] Outside hotel 14, all hotel data, including the
hotel’s in-house Internet homepage, are stored and main
room 12. CELS device 36 may include, for example, a
tained on a remote server 84. Remote server 84 is connected
model K294 Infrared Transciever, Which is commercially
available from Inncom International, Inc., and infrared
capable guest room door locks commercially available from
to the Internet 80, and a connection betWeen the remote
server 84 and router 66 in hotel 14 is maintained via a Virtual
Private NetWork (VPN) Tunnel 86. All Internet traffic com
such companies as TimeLoX, Sargent, Safelok; VingCard.
ing from router 66 or modem 82 in hotel 14 is automatically
[0022]
Inside hotel 14, guest room control system 10 is
divided by a smart router 50 into tWo sub-networks: a
primary netWork 52 and a secondary netWork 54. Secondary
directed to remote server 84 through Virtual Private Net
Work (VPN) 86. A CIS 88 is located outside hotel 14 and
communicates With primary system 52 via VPN 86 and
netWork 54 includes a local area netWork (LAN) 55 employ
router 66. By placing CIS 88 at a remote site, CIS 88 can
ing the Ethernet protocol for transferring data encapsulated
store, process, and recall control signals for legacy guest
in packets. LAN 55 includes a main sWitch 56 that ?lters and
room control systems in any number of hotels 14. The
remote CIS 88 can replace or supplement server 68 in hotel
14.
forWards packets betWeen one or more ?oor sWitches 58.
Floor sWitches 58 ?lter and forWard packets betWeen one or
more room hubs 16 on a ?oor of hotel 14.
[0023] Secondary netWork 54 includes a commercially
available property management system (PMS) server 74
[0028]
Because all Internet traf?c to and from hotel 14
traverses VPN 86 to remote server 84, remote server 84 can
connected serially or via the Ethernet to smart router 50.
act as a portal for internet traf?c to and from guest laptop 20.
For each guest laptop 20, remote server 84 provides access
PMS server 74 may include, for eXample, the Micros®
Fidelio OPERA PMS, Which is commercially available from
Micros Systems, Inc. of Columbia, Md. PMS server 74
stores, processes, and recalls room usage information (i.e.,
stored in remote server 84 (e.g., the hotel’s homepage, local
information, and advertiser pages) free of charge. As a
result, the remote server 84 offers possibilities for selling
to certain Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) pages
Whether the room is rented or vacant) and room billing
advertising, demographic data, and other services, Which
information for lodging fees, Internet access, video-on
can be displayed on the HTML pages available to the guest.
demand, mini-bar usage and other services. PMS server 74
transmits room status information to and accepts billing
information from smart router 50.
In addition, once the guest has agreed to a high-speed
Internet access charge (unless the property offers Internet
[0024] Secondary netWork 54 also includes a Web broWser
station 60, Which is a personal computer connected to a port
of main sWitch 56. Web broWser station 60 alloWs hotel
20 to have unrestricted access to the Internet 80 via VPN 86
and remote server 84. Remote server 84 achieves this
personnel to access hotel information. The station 60 uses a
broWser to provide indication on rented status, room occu
pancy, minibar service, do-not-disturb (DND) and make-up
room (MUR) requests, diagnostics and other data. Engineer
access free of charge), remote server 84 alloWs guest laptop
Internet portal function in conjunction With smart router 50.
Smart router 50 monitors the secondary netWork 54 for
guests’ laptops 20, assigns a local IP address to those laptops
20, and dynamically adapts to the netWork and mail settings
of those laptops 20. This feature alloWs guests to access
ing or management personnel Will be able to see information
guest room control system 10 Without having to recon?gure
on energy management performance, diagnostic alerts and
other useful items. Acentral interface server (CIS) 70 is also
provided, Which stores, processes, and recalls guestroom
their laptops 20. Remote server 84 ?lters traf?c to and from
control signals to augment on-site capability. One eXample
of a CIS 70 is Inncom International’s commercially avail
able CIS-S 22058 Central Interface Server.
[0025] Primary netWork 52 includes a LAN 63 employing
the Ethernet protocol for transferring data encapsulated in
packets. LAN 63 includes one or more information servers
64 and a router 66. Information servers 64 store, process,
and retrieve data typically used in the operation of a modern
hotel system. Information servers 64 include a digital video
server 68, Which stores, processes, and recalls digital video
programming for vieWing on television 26. While digital
video server 68 is shoWn, it Will be recogniZed that primary
the local IP addresses, and passes only those TCP/IP packets
addressed to, or sent from, the IP address of those guests that
have agreed to the access charge, or have been given access
free of charge.
[0029] Filtering of the TCP/IP packets may also be accom
plished by assigning an available bandWidth to each laptop
20, Where higher priority packets (e.g., packets sent from a
guest that has paid a fee for premium access) are given
greater bandWidth, and loWer priority packets (e.g., free
services) are given less bandWidth. This bandWidth can be
based on, for eXample, Quality of Service (QoS) attributes
indicated in the headers of packets provided to, or sent from,
each laptop 20. For packets sent from each laptop 20, smart
router 20 may revieW the QoS attributes of the packets and
netWork 52 may include other information servers as Well.
give priority to those packets having a higher priority QoS.
[0026] Router 66 connects primary netWork 52 With the
Internet 80. Router 66 receives TCP/IP packets from the
Conversely, smart router 20 may revieW the QoS attributes
of the packets sent from each laptop 20 and drop or queue
Internet 80 and uses packet headers and a forWarding table
stored Within router 66 to direct the packets to smart router
50 or digital video server 68. Router 66 also provides
sent to each laptop 20, remote server 84 may revieW the QoS
?reWall and security services for the primary and secondary
netWorks 52, 54. In addition to router 66, a modem 82
connects primary netWork 52 With the Internet 80 via smart
router 50, and smart router 50 provides a ?reWall and
security services for the primary and secondary netWorks 52,
54.
(delay) those packets With a loWer priority QoS. For packets
attributes of the packets and give priority to those packets
having a higher priority QoS. Conversely, remote server 84
may revieW the QoS attributes of the packets sent from each
laptop 20 and drop or queue (delay) those packets With a
loWer priority QoS. Using both the smart router 20 and
remote server 84 to ?lter packets reduces traf?c in VPN
Tunnel 86.
Mar. 25, 2004
US 2004/0059815 A1
[0030] Smart router 50 periodically connects through
in DRAM 170 are one or more room process database
modem 82 and VPN 86 to the remote server 84. Through
these connections, smart router 50 off-loads collected hotel
and guest information to the remote server 84. This infor
mation can be monitored using a broWser station 90 con
nected With the remote server 84. In addition, remote server
images 180, a hotel process database image 182, and a
netWork address translation (NAT) table 184, as Will be
described in further detail hereinafter.
84 provides this information back to the hotel 14, via router
66 and VPN 86, Where the information can be vieWed
through broWser station 60. In this manner, a single user can
vieW the status of any number of hotels 14 or hotel rooms 12
[0035] Microprocessors 156 and 168 operate indepen
dently of each other and share information via an interface
device 186. Processors 156, 168 and interface device 186 are
commercially available from Net Silicon, Inc. of Waltham,
74 or to the appropriate ?oor, room, and appliance. In this
Mass. Microprocessor 156 is connected to serial ports 102
and 104 and to Ethernet port 110. Microprocessor 168 is
connected to serial ports 106 and 108 and to Ethernet port
112. In general, microprocessors 156 and 168 eXecute appli
cations 164 and 178, Which instruct microprocessors 156
and 168 to perform various steps necessary to off-load data
stored in queue 166 to remote server 84 (FIG. 1) and to route
and to track all data transferred betWeen devices 18 and 30
manner, a single user can alter the state of the PMS or any
appliance in any room from a remote location.
70 and/or CIS 88, and digital video server 68.
from a single location (e.g., broWser station 60 or broWser
station 90).
[0031] Remote server 84 also connects With smart router
50 to upload data from remote server 84 to smart router 50.
Smart router 50 Will then direct the data to the PMS server
in guest rooms 12 and PMS server 74, remote server 84, CIS
ing an external vieW of smart router 50 is shoWn. Smart
router 50 is housed in a rack mountable chassis 100 that
[0036] FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram depicting the inter
face of smart application programs 164 and 178 and portions
of operating systems 162 and 176 in primary and secondary
includes four serial ports 102, 104, 106, and 108 and tWo
netWork processing systems 152 and 154, respectively.
Ethernet ports 110 and 112. The smart router 50 includes
Operating systems 162 and 176 each include a stack of
protocol layers, With each layer representing a process or
group of processes that perform related communications
[0032]
Referring noW to FIG. 2, a block diagram depict
light emitting diodes (LEDs) to indicate the folloWing:
poWer-on (LED 114), tra?ic on primary Ethernet port 110
(LED 116), traffic on secondary Ethernet port 112 (LED
118), traffic on RS-232 port of serial ports 102, 104, 106, and
108 (LEDs 120), and tra?ic on RS-485 port of serial ports
102, 104, 106, and 108 (LEDs 122). The smart router 50 also
includes a push button 124 for instant connection to remote
server 84 (FIG. 1). Push button 124 alloWs a service
technician to off-load data instantly to the remote server 84
during tests and debugging phases, Without having to Wait
for the neXt scheduled data off-load.
[0033] Ethernet port 110 is connected to LAN 63 of
primary netWork 52, and Ethernet port 112 is connected to
LAN 55 of secondary netWork 54. Serial port 104 is con
nected to modem 82, and serial port 108 is connected to
PMS 74. Serial ports 102 and 106 alloW smart router 50 to
act as a replacement to a netWork bridge, such as the B271
riser bridge commercially available from Inncom Interna
tional, Inc., in a legacy guest room control system 126.
[0034]
Referring to FIG. 3, a block diagram depicting an
internal vieW of smart router DC is shoWn. Smart router 50
includes tWo processing systems 152 and 154. Processing
system 152 processes data received from and provided to
primary netWork 52, and processing system 154 processes
data received from and provided to secondary netWork 54.
Primary netWork processing system 152 includes a micro
processor 156, dynamic random access memory (DRAM)
158, and ?ash memory 160 interconnected by a bus 161.
Stored in ?ash memory 160 and accessed by microprocessor
156 via DRAM 158 and bus 161 is an operating system
program 162 and a primary side smart application program
164. Stored in DRAM 158 is a ?rst-in ?rst-out queue 166 of
data for off-loading to remote server 84, as Will be described
in further detail hereinafter. Secondary netWork processing
system 154 includes a microprocessor 168, DRAM 170, and
?ash memory 172 interconnected by a bus 174. Stored in
?ash memory 172 and accessed by microprocessor 168 via
DRAM 170 and bus 174 is an operating system program 176
and a secondary side smart application program 178. Stored
tasks according to a communications protocol. In one
embodiment of primary netWork processing system 152, the
stack of layers 200, 202, 204, and 206 is knoWn as the
Transport Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
stack. Processes in each layer 200, 202, 204, and 206 can
call on, or be called by processes in adjacent layers 200, 202,
204 or 206, or by application 164. Layer 200 is the sockets
layer; layer 202 is the TCP layer; layer 204 is the IP layer;
and layer 206 is the netWork layer. NetWork layer 206
includes a process or group of processes 208 that perform
communications tasks according to the Ethernet protocol for
communication With LAN 63. NetWork layer 206 also
includes a process or group of processes 210 that perform
communications tasks according to the Point-to-Point Pro
tocol (PPP) for communication With modem 82. The func
tions of the processes in the various layers 200, 202, 204,
and 206 of the TCP/IP stack are Well knoWn in the art.
Operating system 162 also includes various device drivers
and a netWork layer process 208 for handling netWork layer
protocols (e.g., the CINET protocol used in Inncom Inter
national Inc. commercially available guest room control
systems) used in legacy guest room control system 126.
[0037] Application 164 includes processes to perform
various functions. These processes include: a dial-up sched
uler process 211, a data compression and elimination pro
cess 212, a ?oW management process 214, a security process
216, a program upload process 218, a tra?ic separation
process 220, and a modem driver process 222. Dial-up
scheduler process 211 periodically initiates a connection
betWeen the smart router 50 and the remote server 84. Dial
up scheduler process 211 activates modem driver process
222, Which dials a local Internet service provider (not
shoWn). Dial up scheduler process 211 then initiates a data
off-load through a ?le transfer protocol (FTP) link toWards
the remote server 84.
[0038] Data compression and elimination process 212
compresses data prior to placing the data in queue 166 to
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US 2004/0059815 A1
increase the amount of data that can be buffered in DRAM
158 and to reduce the chances of data congestion and
bottleneck. Security process 216 provides a basic level of
encryption on the data packets that leave the smart router 50
to ensure that the data is secure from inside or outside
intrusion. Program upload process 218 alloWs application
164 in the primary netWork processing system 152 to be
replaced on the ?y by doWnloading neW code into the ?ash
memory 160.
[0039]
Traf?c separation process 220 identi?es the data
destined for the room devices 18 or 30, room gateWay 28,
PMS 74, Internet 80, etc. by monitoring data provided by a
set of socket servers in sockets layer 200, as Will be
described in further detail hereinafter. After the data has
been identi?ed, the traf?c separation process 220 directs the
data to its appropriate destination. FloW management pro
cess 214 ensures that the traffic is directed in an ef?cient and
ing changes to application 164 or 178 stored in ?ash memory
160 or 172, and a Simple NetWork Management Protocol
(SNMP) agent 242 for use in remotely setting Ethernet
sWitches 56 and 58 in LAN 55.
[0043] In an embodiment of secondary netWork system
154, a stack of layers 250, 252, 254, and 256 is knoWn as the
User Datagram Protocol/Internet Protocol (UDP/IP) stack.
Processes in each layer 250, 252, 254, and 256 can call on,
or be called by processes 250, 252, 254, or 256 in adjacent
layers or by application 178. Layer 250 is the sockets layer;
layer 252 is the UDP layer; layer 254 is the IP layer; and
layer 256 is the netWork layer. NetWork layer 256 includes
a process or group of processes 258 that perform commu
nications tasks according to the Ethernet protocol for com
munication With LAN 55. NetWork layer 256 also includes
a process or group of processes 260 that perform commu
organiZed fashion by delaying the transmission of certain
nications tasks according to the Point-to-Point Protocol
(PPP) for communication With PMS server 74. The func
data While expediting transmission of other data based on
tions of the processes in the various layers 250, 252, 254,
such factors as data criticality and eXpected delays.
[0040] Sockets layer 200 includes a plurality of socket
servers. Each socket server in sockets layer 200 is assigned
to establish an assigned port for data from the TCP layer of
the TCP/IP stack and to handle data sent to that port. In
addition, each socket server provides a basic security fea
ture. The folloWing TCP/IP sockets servers are found in
sockets layer 200: socket server 224 for PMS 74, socket
server 226 for an INNCOM or third-party peak-demand
monitoring system (not shoWn), socket server 228 for
remote server 84, socket server 230 for ISP gateway (e.g.,
remote server 84), socket server 232 for other third-party
servers (not shoWn), socket server 234 for CIS 70 or 88,
socket server 236 for con?guration, and a socket server 238
for netWork address table (NAT) 184 management. Socket
server 224 for PMS 74 ensures connectivity to PMS 74.
PMS 74 uses the link established by socket server 224 to
send room status information (e.g., occupied/vacant) to
smart router 50.
[0041]
Socket server 226 for an INNCOM or third party
peak-demand monitoring system ensures connectivity to
EMS 32. EMS 32 uses the link established by socket server
226 to send information such as outside temperature, humid
ity, etc. to the smart router 50. Socket server 228 for remote
server 84 ensures connectivity to the remote server 84. The
smart router 50 uses the link established by socket server
228 to off-load data from queue 166 to the remote server 84.
The socket server 230 for ISP gateWay ensures connectivity
to the ISP gateWay server, Which is the remote server 84 in
the present embodiment. The socket server 232 for other
third-party servers ensures connectivity to any other servers.
The socket server 234 for CIS 70 ensures connectivity to
CIS 70. Smart router 50 uses the link established by socket
server 234 to transfer any legacy data (e.g., a CINET frame)
received by the smart router 50 to the CIS 70. Correspond
ingly, room gateWay 28 requests from the CIS 70 are routed
toWards the devices 30 serviced by room gateWay 28, and
device 30 responses are routed to the CIS 70. The socket
server 236 for con?guration is opened to set or change
various data in ?ash memory 160 or 172 of smart router 50.
The socket server 238 for NAT 184 management alloWs
remote access to NAT 184.
[0042]
In addition to TCP/IP socket servers 224-238,
sockets layer 200 includes an FTP server 240 for doWnload
and 256 of the UDP/IP stack are Well knoWn in the art.
Operating system 176 also includes various device drivers
and a netWork layer process 262 for handling netWork layer
protocols (e.g., the CINET protocol used in Inncom Inter
national Inc. commercially available guest room control
systems) used in legacy guest room control system 126.
[0044] Application 178 in the secondary netWork system
includes processes 264-288 to perform various functions.
Process 264 is a laptop traf?c management process, Which
alloWs microprocessor 168 to manage any traffic from guest
laptop 20. Process 266 is a legacy data management process,
Which alloWs microprocessor 168 to manage all of the
legacy data (e.g., CINET frames) received on the secondary
Ethernet port 112 (i.e., via LAN 55). Process 268 is a NAT
management process, Which alloWs microprocessor 168 to
read and Write from NAT 184. Process 270 routes traf?c to
and from the various room devices 18 and 30. Process 272
is a database image creation process that updates the room
process image 180 every time the smart router 50 receives
information from the room devices 18 and 30. Process 274
collects information from the PMS 74 and the room devices
18 and 30 about the status of the rooms (e.g., rented or
vacant). AUDP exchange process 276 receives UDP packets
from the room gateWay 28, decodes the packets and routes
the packets to the primary netWork processing system 152.
Process 280 acts as a Simple NetWork Management Protocol
(SNMP) agent for remote setup and maintenance of sWitches
56 and 58. Processes 282 and 284 alloW for automatic
con?guration of guest laptop 20, Where process 282 pro
vides Dynamic Host Con?guration Protocol DHCP) binding
of dynamically con?gured laptops 20, and process 284
provides address spoo?ng of statically con?gured laptops
20. In the former case, microprocessor 168 Will act as the
DHCP server, and mapped IP addresses Will be provided by
the ISP gateWay (e.g., remote server 84). Process 286
provides information on the various devices 18 and 30
connected to the secondary netWork 54, such as device type,
connection status, and quality of connection. Process 288
provides a histogram of traffic in the secondary netWork 54.
[0045]
As can be seen in FIG. 4, data communication
betWeen LAN 63 or modem 82 and LAN 55 or PMS 74 is
accomplished at the application levels of primary and sec
ondary netWork processing systems 152 and 154. That is,
data communication betWeen LAN 63 or modem 82 and
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US 2004/0059815 A1
LAN -55 or PMS 74 is handled by applications 164 and 178.
[0049]
As can also be seen in FIG. 4, data communication betWeen
message in response to some event Within room 12. An event
portions of legacy guest room control system 126 is accom
plished betWeen netWork layers processes 209 and 262. In
message may include the opening of a door to minibar 34 or
Devices 30 may be con?gured to provide an event
other Words, smart router 50 acts as a netWork layer bridges
operation of door lock 36 by someone in guest room 12, for
example. Upon receiving such an event message, room
betWeen portions of legacy guest room control system 126.
gateWay 28 encapsulates the event message into one or more
[0046] With reference to FIGS. 1 through 4, the func
the device 30. Room gateWay 28 sends the frames to smart
router 50, Which uses the addressing information to deter
mine the origin and appropriate response to the event
message.
tionality of guest room control system 10 and smart router
50 can noW be described. Communication betWeen smart
router 50 and devices 30 via room gateWay 28 is performed
using a series of query and reply frames (packets) using
frames. Each frame includes addressing information from
UDP as the link protocol. Each frame includes a frame
[0050]
header containing addressing information for a speci?c
chroniZe data stored in smart router 50 and room gateWay
room gateWay 28 and a speci?c device 30, a frame sequence
number, a control ?ag that can disable a reply to the frame,
and a ?eld that de?nes the type of the frame (e.g., query by
smart router 50, query by room gateWay 28, response by
smart router 50, or response by room gateWay 28).
[0047]
Smart router 50 can off-load data to a device 30 via
room gateWay 28 by using a series of query frames With their
control ?ags set to disable any reply. For example, When a
guest checks in to hotel 14, a desk clerk enters guest
information into a terminal (not shoWn) connected to PMS
server 74. The guest information is stored as a record in the
PMS server 74, and the PMS server 74 provides the data to
smart router 50 via serial port 108. Room status process 274
receives the data via sockets layer 250, stores the data in
non-volatile memory, and initiates the transfer of room
status data to EMS 32 by calling traf?c separation process
270. Traffic separation process 270 establishes a link With
room gateWay 28 over LAN 55 and sends frames containing
the room status information to the room gateWay 28 via
The query and reply frames are also used to syn
28. SynchroniZation is performed periodically, as initiated
by the room status process 274 in smart router 50. Room
status process 274 initiates a query containing a number of
attributes (parameters) that impact on the operation of guest
room 12. These parameters are retrieved from the room
process image 180 for the particular room 12 and from the
hotel process image 182 for the hotel 18. The parameters
include, for example: rented status of the room, outside
temperature, Water-temperature in the HVAC supply piping,
system-Wide energy demand situation, ?re condition (i.e., if
a ?re alarm has been activated), central HVAC settings, and
date and time. Data in the query fragments are translated by
room gateWay 28 and provided to devices 30, Which use the
data to con?gure room control settings. In response to these
query frames, devices 30 provide data to room gateWay 28,
Which, in turn, provides one or more reply frames to smart
router 50. The reply frames contain a number of attributes
that indicate status information from the guest room 12.
These parameters include, for example: occupancy status
(i.e., if the room is unoccupied or occupied by the guest or
LAN 55. Room gateWay 28 strips the header from the frame
and determines the destination of the device 30. Room
gateWay 28 then converts the data from the packet into a
by staff), do not disturb (if indicated by the guest), make up
room (if indicated by the guest), butler request (if indicated
protocol understood by EMS 32 (e.g., Inncom Internation
by the guest), balcony door open/closed, entry door open/
al’s IRS protocol as described in US. Pat. No. 5,128,792).
EMS 32 accepts the data and acts according to pre-pro
closed, room temperature, target temperature, air condition
grammed, rented-status logic. For example, EMS 32 may
speed, heat valve percentage open, cooling valve percentage
open, and electric heater relays activated. Upon receiving
sWitch the room heating or air conditioning system from an
energy savings mode to a guest comfort mode. Room status
process 274 periodically resends room status data to EMS
32. Upon the guest’s check out, the process is repeated With
PMS providing the guest information to the smart router 50,
ing mode (e.g., off, fan only, auto), air conditioning fan
the response frames, room status process 274 updates the
room process image 180 for the room 12.
[0051] Hotel process image 182 is updated by input from
and room status process 274 providing the room status data
PMS server 74. Hotel process image 182 includes hotel
to EMS 32. EMS 32 accepts the data and acts according to
Wide information such as outside temperature, Water tem
its pre-programmed, vacant-status logic. For example, EMS
32 may sWitch the heating or air condition system from the
guest comfort mode to an energy savings mode.
[0048]
perature in the HVAC supply piping, system-Wide energy
demand situation, ?re condition (i.e., if a ?re alarm has been
activated), and central HVAC settings. In addition, the
information in hotel process image 182 can be changed
Where smart router 50 requires a reply from device
remotely from remote server 84 via VPN 86 router 66 and
30, smart router 50 can query a device 30 via room gateWay
LAN 63. Remote changing of hotel-Wide information, in
conjunction With the synchroniZation process described
28 using one or more frames having their control ?ags set to
enable a response. Upon receiving these frames, room
gateWay 28 Will strip the header from the frame and send the
data to the appropriate device 30. Room gateWay 28 saves
the frame sequence number in anticipation of the response.
Upon response from the device 30, room gateWay 28 encap
sulates the response data Within a frame and includes the
frame sequence number in the appropriate ?eld. Upon
receiving the frame, smart router 50 identi?es the response
using the frame sequence number and processes the
response data from the frame.
above, alloWs an operator at Web broWser station 90 attached
to remote server 84 to alter the con?guration of devices 30
in one or more hotels 14. This feature is particularly impor
tant for a remote server 84 that services a number of hotels
14. In this case, remote server 84, by changing the system
Wide energy demand situation setting, can change the poWer
consumption in hundreds or thousands of rooms 12 simul
taneously. In effect, remote server 84 aggregates these rooms
12 into a single poWer consumer. As a single poWer con
sumer, the operator of remote server 84 can negotiate With
Mar. 25, 2004
US 2004/0059815 A1
electric utility companies for better power rates in exchange
for promising to loWer poWer consumption during peak
demand times.
[0052] Data from hotel process image 182 and one or
more room process images 182 are periodically provided by
remote server 84 periodically access NAT table 184 using
NAT management process 268 in smart router 50 to ensure
that their copy of NAT table 184 is up to date. Information
servers 64 and remote server 84 can then use the data NAT
table 184 to address data to any individual device 18 or 30
microprocessor 168 in secondary netWork processing sys
in room 12.
tem 154 to microprocessor 156 in primary netWork process
ing system 152. This data is then stored in FIFO queue 166.
[0057] Centralized guest room control system 10 provides
high speed Internet access, sophisticated energy manage
If the smart router is constantly connected to remote server
ment, direct digital control, digital video-on-demand, mini
84 through LAN 63, router 66 and VPN 86, the data is sent
bar reporting, Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) phones,
immediately to remote server 84. If the connection is of the
dial-up type, smart router 50 periodically establishes a
connection With remote server 84 via modem 82 and VPN
86. This data can be vieWed through Web broWser station 90.
[0053]
In addition to receiving off-loaded data from smart
router 50, remote server 84 is able to provide data to any
individual device 18 or 30 in room 12. To accomplish data
transfer to devices 18 or 30, remote server 84, smart router
50 and other information servers 64 are provided With a
netWork address translation (NAT) table 184 such as that
shoWn in FIG. 5.
[0054]
Referring to FIG. 5, NAT table 184 is a miX of
static (persistent) data and dynamically acquired data. In
NAT table 184, “Room Address” is the logical room number,
Which is used as the real address for applications. “Wiring
Address” indicates the port number of the ?oor sWitch (hub)
58 to Which the room hub 16 attached. “Suite ID” indicates
a grouping of room hubs 16 for servicing a guest suite.
“CINET Address” indicates an address for a legacy guest
room control system. “MAC Address” indicates a medium
access control address assigned to a speci?c device 18 or
room gateWay 28 in room 12. “IP Address” indicates an
Internet protocol address for a device 18 or room gateWay 28
(or an application in device 18). “Device Type/Status”
identi?es the device 18 or room gateWay 28 and indicates
Whether the device 18 or room gateWay 28 is present on the
netWork. “IPAddress ToWards ISP GateWay” indicates an IP
address for use by a guest laptop 20 (FIG. 1) for Internet
access. The IP address in this ?eld is generated by the ISP
gateWay (e.g., remote server 84 of FIG. 1) Where process
282 (FIG. 4) provides Dynamic Host Con?guration Proto
col (DHCP) binding for a dynamically con?gured laptop 20
(FIG. 1).
[0055] Referring to FIGS. 1 through 5, When hotel 14 is
being Wired, the installer creates a list of room 12 addresses
and the respective Wiring address information for the room
12. This information is fed into NAT table 184 through either
a tool (e.g., an identi?cation frame injected into room
gateWay 28 at the time of the installation) or through
entering the data manually into the smart router 50. Prefer
ably, data can be entered into NAT table 184 though an
information server 64 and then eXported to smart router 50
via LAN 63.
[0056] The smart router 50 complements NAT table 184
With dynamic data. The SNMP agent process 280 in smart
router 50 queries room hubs 16 With SNMP messages. The
room hubs 16 respond With the MAC and IP addresses of
devices 18 and room gateWays 28 that are connected to their
respective ports. The SNMP agent process 280 frequently
polls the found devices 18 and room gateWays 28 to monitor
their presence—deriving from it a present/lost status, Which
is input into NAT table 184. Information servers 64 and
central electronic lock control, and a myriad of other ser
vices to the hotel and resort oWner. Centralized guest room
control system 10 provides these services to each room
through a single Wire, rather than the large number of Wires
previously associated With guest room control systems.
Accordingly, centraliZed guest room control system 10
reduces installation and maintenance costs from those pre
viously attainable using guest room services of the prior art.
In addition, guest room control system 10 supports appli
cations that depend on faster, unconditional links, such as
digital video or a centraliZed locking system.
[0058]
CentraliZed guest room system 10 alloWs a single
user at a remote server to control any number of hotels or
guest rooms. Because the smart router, sWitches, and hubs
are fully controllable from a remote location, centraliZed
guest room control system 10 alloWs for remote diagnostics,
restarts, and softWare doWnloads. Moreover, centraliZed
guest room control system 10 alloWs any number of rooms
to be aggregated into a single poWer consumer. As a single
poWer consumer, the operator of centraliZed guest room
system 10 can negotiate With electric utility companies for
better poWer rates in exchange for promising to loWer poWer
consumption during peak demand times.
[0059] While the invention has been described With ref
erence to a preferred embodiment, it Will be understood by
those skilled in the art that various changes may be made and
equivalents may be substituted for elements thereof Without
departing from the scope of the invention. In addition, many
modi?cations may be made to adapt a particular situation or
material to the teachings of the invention Without departing
from the essential scope thereof. Therefore, it is intended
that the invention not be limited to the particular embodi
ment disclosed as the best mode contemplated for carrying
out this invention, but that the invention Will include all
embodiments falling Within the scope of the appended
claims.
What is claimed is:
1. A guest room service and control system for a building
including a plurality of guest rooms, the guest room service
and control system comprising:
a local area netWork;
a plurality of guest room netWorks operably coupled to
said local area netWork, each guest room netWork of
said plurality of guest room netWorks is associated With
a guest room in the building, said each guest room
netWork includes:
a room hub operably coupled to said local area net
Work,
a guest room control device operably coupled to said
room hub, said guest room control device is a
Mar. 25, 2004
US 2004/0059815 A1
centralized electronic locking system component, a
guest room energy management system component,
10. The guest room service and control system of claim 8,
Wherein said primary netWork is operably coupled to a
a direct digital control system component, a minibar
monitoring device, or a combination comprising at
least one of the foregoing guest room control
remote server by a virtual private netWork, said remote
server is located eXternal to the building.
11. The guest room service and control system of claim
10, Wherein said remote server is operably coupled to a
devices;
a guest room service device operably coupled to said
room hub, said guest room service device is a
computer, a voice over Internet Protocol phone, an
Internet Protocol radio, a television signal converter,
or a combination comprising at least one of the
foregoing guest room service devices; and
Wherein data betWeen said local area netWork and said
room hub is communicated in packets con?gured
according to a ?rst communications protocol.
2. The guest room service and control system of claim 1
Wherein said local area netWork and said room hub are
coupled by a single medium, said single medium is a tWisted
Wire pair, a coaxial cable, a ?ber optic cable, a radio signal,
or an infrared signal.
3. The guest room service and control system of claim 1
Wherein said room hub is an intelligent hub.
4. The guest room service and control system of claim 1
Wherein said room hub is a sWitching hub.
5. The guest room service and control system of claim 1,
Wherein said each guest room netWork further includes:
a room gateWay operably coupled betWeen said room hub
and said guest room control device; and
plurality of primary netWorks.
12. The guest room service and control system of claim
11, Wherein each primary netWork in said plurality of
primary netWorks provides room data to said remote server,
said room data is a rented status, a do not disturb status, a
make up room status, a door open/closed status, a room
temperature, a target temperature, an air conditioning mode,
an air conditioning fan speed, a heat valve percentage open,
a cooling valve percentage open, an electric heater relay
status, or a combination comprising at least one of the
foregoing room data.
13. The guest room service and control system of claim 5,
Wherein said ?rst communications protocol is selected from
a group including TCP/IP and UDP/IP.
14. The guest room service and control system of claim 8,
further including:
an information server operably coupled to said primary
netWork, said information server is selected from a
group including a digital video server and a central
interface server.
15. The guest room service and control system of claim 8,
further including:
Wherein data betWeen said room gateWay and said guest
a property management system server operably coupled to
said smart router, said property management system
room control device is communicated according to a
server stores room usage information and room billing
second communications protocol.
6. The guest room service and control system of claim 5
information for each guest room in said plurality of
guest rooms.
Wherein data betWeen said room hub and said guest room
16. The guest room service and control system of claim
service device is communicated in packets con?gured
according to said ?rst communications protocol.
10, Wherein said remote server stores information accessible
by a personal computer operably coupled to one or more of
7. The guest room service and control system of claim 5,
said plurality of guest room netWorks, said data including
Wherein said local area netWork includes:
a ?oor sWitch operably coupled-to said room hub in each
of said plurality of guest room netWorks said ?oor
sWitch directs said packets con?gured according to said
?rst communications protocol among said plurality of
guest room netWorks;
a main sWitch operably coupled to said ?oor sWitch, said
main sWitch directs said packets con?gured according
to said ?rst communications protocol to said ?oor
sWitch.
8. The guest room service and control system of claim 6,
Wherein said local area netWork is operably coupled to a
smart router, said smart router is operably coupled to a
primary netWork.
9. The guest room service and control system of claim 8
Wherein said smart router includes:
a ?rst processor operably coupled to said primary net
Work;
a second processor operably coupled to said local area
netWork; and
Wherein said ?rst and second processors are con?gured to
provide data communications betWeen said primary
netWork and said local area netWork.
advertising data.
17. The guest room service and control system of claim
10, Wherein said remote server ?lters data communicated
betWeen a personal computer operably coupled one or more
of said plurality of guest rooms and said internet.
18. The guest room service and control system of claim
10, Wherein said smart router stores data transmitted from
said guest room service device and periodically of?oads said
data collected from said guest room service device to said
remote server.
19. The guest room service and control system of claim
18, further including a Web broWser station operably
coupled to said remote server for displaying said data
collected from said guest room service device.
20. The guest room service and control system of claim 5
Wherein data betWeen said room hub and said room gateWay
is encapsulated in a frame, said frame having a frame header
including an address of said guest room control device.
21. The guest room service and control system of claim 20
Wherein said frame header further includes a frame sequence
number and a control ?ag.
22. The guest room service and control system of claim 8,
Wherein said smart router includes a memory device, said
memory device is con?gured to store building-Wide data,
said building-Wide data is an ambient temperature eXternal
to the building, a Water temperature in HVAC piping, a
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US 2004/0059815 A1
system Wide energy demand situation, a ?re situation, a
central HVAC setting, or a combination comprising at least
one of the foregoing building-Wide data.
23. The guest room service and control system of claim 8,
Wherein said smart router includes a memory device, said
memory device is con?gured to store room data for each
room in said plurality of rooms, said room data is a rented
status, a do not disturb status, a make up room status, a door
open/closed status, a room temperature, a target tempera
ture, an air conditioning mode, an air conditioning fan speed,
a heat valve percentage open, a cooling valve percentage
open, an electric heater relay status, or a combination
comprising at least one of the foregoing room data.
24. The guest room service and control system of claim 8,
Wherein said smart router includes a memory device, said
memory device is con?gured to store a netWork address
translation table, said netWork address translation table
indicates a location of said guest room control device.
25. The guest room service and control system of claim 6,
Wherein said smart router includes a memory device, said
memory device is con?gured to store a netWork address
a ?rst energy management system component in said ?rst
guest room, said ?rst smart router provides said data
indicating said energy demand situation to said ?rst
energy management system component in said ?rst
guest room;
a second smart router in operable communication With
said remote server, said second smart router is con?g
ured to receive said data indicating an energy demand
situation from said remote server;
a second energy management system component in said
second guest room, said second smart router provides
said data indicating said energy demand situation to
said second energy management system component in
said second guest room.
28. The guest room service and control system of claim
27, further comprising:
a ?rst memory device, said ?rst memory device is con
?gured to store room data provided by said ?rst energy
management system component;
translation table, said netWork address translation table
a second memory device, said second memory device is
indicates a location of said guest room service device and IP
and MAC addresses corresponding to said guest room
con?gured to store room data provided by said second
service device.
26. The guest room service and control system of claim
Wherein said room data is a rented status, a do not disturb
status, a make up room status, a door open/closed
status, a room temperature, a target temperature, an air
25, Wherein said IP address is provided by said remote
server.
27. A guest room service and control system for a ?rst
building including a ?rst guest room and a second building
including a second guest room, said guest room control
system comprising:
a remote server;
a ?rst smart router in operable communication With said
remote server, said ?rst smart router is con?gured to
receive data indicating an energy demand situation
from said remote server;
energy management system component; and
conditioning mode, an air conditioning fan speed, a
heat valve percentage open, a cooling valve percentage
open, an electric heater relay status, or a combination
comprising at least one of the foregoing room data, and
said ?rst and second smart routers are con?gured to
provide said data to said remote server.
29. The guest room service and control system of claim
28, Wherein said room data in said ?rst and second memory
devices is accessible by said remote server.
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