Spectralink 84 Series Wireless Telephones Deployment Guide

Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephone
Deployment Guide
Spectralink Software Version 4.3.x/4.4.x/4.6.x
1725-86724-000 Rev: H
September 2013
Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones Deployment Guide
Copyright Notice
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Do not remove (or allow any third party to remove) any product identification, copyright or other notices.
Notice
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The drawings and specifications contained herein are the property of Spectralink and shall be neither
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Contact Information
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800-775-5330
Denmark Location
+45 7560 2850
Spectralink Corporation
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Boulder, CO 80301
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info@spectralink.com
infodk@spectralink.com
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Contents
Introduction ...................................................................... 8
Where is the Software? .................................................................................................... 8
Recommended Software Tools ........................................................................................ 9
XML editor ....................................................................................................................... 9
FTP Server ...................................................................................................................... 9
Release Notes ................................................................................................................. 9
Product Support ............................................................................................................... 9
Spectralink References ...................................................................................................10
Specific Documents ........................................................................................................11
Conventions Used in This Guide ....................................................................................12
Icons ..............................................................................................................................12
Typography ....................................................................................................................13
Part I: Getting Started ...................................... 15
Chapter 1: Quick Start with SLIC ........................................... 16
Chapter 2: Handset Usage Scenarios ..................................... 17
The Three Scenarios........................................................................................................17
Flat Deployment .............................................................................................................18
Group Deployment .........................................................................................................18
User Profiles Deployment ...............................................................................................19
Listing Handsets/Users to be Deployed .........................................................................20
Sample File for Listing Users and Parameters ..............................................................22
Chapter 3: Infrastructure ..................................................... 23
Network Components ......................................................................................................23
Recommended Reading ..................................................................................................23
Quality of Service.............................................................................................................24
WLAN Security .................................................................................................................24
Security Methods............................................................................................................24
System Diagram ...............................................................................................................26
System Requirements .....................................................................................................27
System Components .......................................................................................................27
Spectralink 84-Series handsets. .....................................................................................27
Servers ...........................................................................................................................28
Access points .................................................................................................................30
Ethernet switch ...............................................................................................................30
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Chapter 4: Understanding Wireless Telephony Provisioning ........ 31
What is Provisioning? .....................................................................................................31
The Provisioning Process ...............................................................................................32
Managing Configuration Files .........................................................................................33
Viewing the .cfg File Templates ......................................................................................33
Where are the Templates? .............................................................................................34
Configuration Folder Contents ........................................................................................34
Viewing and Editing .cfg Files.........................................................................................35
Creating New .cfg Files ...................................................................................................37
Types of .cfg Files............................................................................................................38
Top Level .cfg Files ........................................................................................................38
General-to-Specific Criteria ............................................................................................40
Flat Deployment ...............................................................................................................41
Group_Deployment..........................................................................................................44
User_Profiles_Deployment .............................................................................................46
Features Deployment ......................................................................................................48
Part II: Configuration ....................................... 49
Chapter 5: Determining What Parameters You Will Need to
Configure ........................................................................ 50
Using the Template Spreadsheet....................................................................................50
Wireless Settings .............................................................................................................51
System and Telephony Settings .....................................................................................52
Per-Phone (User) Settings...............................................................................................53
Feature(s) and Group(s) Settings ...................................................................................54
Chapter 6: Telephony Server Variations .................................. 55
Lync Telephony Server ...................................................................................................55
Microsoft® Lync® compatibility ........................................................................................55
Lync Interoperability Overview........................................................................................57
OpenSIP Telephony Server .............................................................................................57
Chapter 7: Configuring Central Provisioning Server .cfg files ....... 58
Finalize your Deployment Scenario Structure ...............................................................58
Organize the Files ............................................................................................................58
Configure site.cfg ............................................................................................................59
System Parameters ........................................................................................................60
Telephony Parameters ...................................................................................................62
Feature Parameters .......................................................................................................64
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User Profiles ...................................................................................................................69
Configure the Per-phone .cfg File...................................................................................70
Filenames for per-phone or per-user .cfg files ................................................................70
Per-Phone .cfg Files .......................................................................................................71
Per-User .cfg Files ..........................................................................................................73
Configure the <MACaddress>.cfg file ............................................................................76
Deploying Features..........................................................................................................78
Barcode ..........................................................................................................................78
Corporate Directory ........................................................................................................78
OAI .................................................................................................................................79
Personal Alarms .............................................................................................................79
Push-to-talk (PTT) ..........................................................................................................80
RTLS ..............................................................................................................................82
Save the Central Provisioning Server .cfg Files ............................................................83
Chapter 8: Configuring Wireless Parameters (without SLIC) ........ 84
Prepare to Configure the Wireless Settings...................................................................85
The USB_Setup folder .....................................................................................................85
Configure wireless.cfg ....................................................................................................86
WriteDeviceConfig..........................................................................................................87
PhoneAdminPassword ...................................................................................................87
Provisioning Server ........................................................................................................88
WirelessSettings.............................................................................................................89
Wi-Fi Radio Settings .......................................................................................................90
Wi-Fi Security .................................................................................................................94
DHCP .............................................................................................................................99
DNS ...............................................................................................................................99
SNTP .............................................................................................................................99
Save the USB_Setup files..............................................................................................102
Part III: Deployment ....................................... 103
Chapter 9: Set up the Central Provisioning Server ................... 104
Central Provisioning Server Requirements .................................................................104
Set up Directories ..........................................................................................................105
File Permissions ...........................................................................................................105
Downloading Spectralink 84-Series Software Files to the Central Provisioning Server
........................................................................................................................................106
View the 84-Series Software Files ................................................................................107
Copy your custom .cfg files to the appropriate folders ..................................................107
Ensure the Provisioning Server is available on the LAN ............................................108
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Chapter 10: Wireless Deployment ....................................... 109
Identify a Suitable Initial Provisioning Computer ........................................................109
Enable the Handset’s Network Capabilities ..................................................................110
Download the Wireless Configuration to the Handsets ..............................................110
Optimization Pointers for Quantity Deployment ..........................................................113
Which Phone Goes to Which User? .............................................................................113
Storing Wireless Configuration Files ...........................................................................113
Chapter 11: Testing the Handsets ....................................... 115
Wireless LAN Association.............................................................................................115
Test Configured Features..............................................................................................115
Chapter 12: Deploying Additional Phones or Features.............. 116
Adding New Phones ......................................................................................................116
Configuration ................................................................................................................116
Deployment ..................................................................................................................116
Test ..............................................................................................................................116
Decommissioning for RMA ...........................................................................................117
Receiving Phones from RMA ........................................................................................117
Changing Phone Configuration ....................................................................................117
Adding New or Advanced Features ..............................................................................117
Part IV: Troubleshooting ................................. 118
Chapter 13: Basic Troubleshooting ..................................... 119
Config Files ....................................................................................................................119
Provisioning Methods and Override Files ....................................................................119
Clearing overrides on a single phone ...........................................................................120
Software Version ...........................................................................................................120
Wireless Connection .....................................................................................................120
Connection to SIP Server and Calling .........................................................................121
Display ............................................................................................................................122
Upgrading.......................................................................................................................122
Setting Up Syslog .........................................................................................................122
User Accessible Network Diagnostics ........................................................................123
Parameter values ...........................................................................................................123
Chapter 14: Wi-Fi Diagnostics ............................................ 124
Screen 1 (Packet Count) ................................................................................................125
Screen 2 (General Information) .....................................................................................125
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Screen 3 (AP List) ..........................................................................................................126
Mnemonic Reason Codes ...........................................................................................126
Screen 4 (Association Count/Failure) ...........................................................................127
Screen 5 (Security) ........................................................................................................128
Screen 6 (Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) Information) .............................128
Chapter 15: Run Site Survey ............................................. 129
Update Interval ...............................................................................................................131
Chapter 16: Access Point Issues ........................................ 133
In Range/Out-of-Range ..................................................................................................133
Capacity..........................................................................................................................133
Transmission Obstructions .........................................................................................133
Part V: Appendices ........................................ 134
Appendix A: Setting up an FTP Server ................................. 135
Appendix B: Upgrading Spectralink 84-Series Software ............ 137
Upgrading Your Phones ...............................................................................................137
Appendix C: Using the Web Configuration Utility ................... 140
Configuration Using the Web Configuration Utility ...................................................140
Exporting Configuration Files......................................................................................143
Appendix D: Software Copyrights and Open Source Information 145
Software Copyright ........................................................................................................145
OFFER for Source for GPL and LGPL Software ..........................................................145
Contact Information for Requesting Source Code.........................................................146
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Introduction
This guide introduces the requirements of wireless telephony provisioning and how these
requirements are implemented for the Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones. The intention
of this document is to help you set up your system so that you establish the necessary building
blocks for efficient administration and easy expansion.
You may be familiar with several deployment methods or ready to learn. However, Spectralink
recommends the methods described in this guide as the most flexible and manageable. Once
you learn how to work with the configuration requirements recommended here, you will be able
to use other provisioning and deployment methods with more understanding.
Although it assumes a fairly high level of familiarity with your existing system, this guide will walk
you through each step that specifically pertains to wireless telephone configuration, the
parameters required by the 84-Series handsets and major features that are commonly
deployed.
This guide assumes you are familiar with:
•
Computer networking and driver administration for your operating system
•
An XML editor
•
Wireless client administration
•
WLAN infrastructure parameters and equipment
•
Your phone system and how to add SIP telephones extensions to it
Admin Tip: If you are currently using Polycom UC desk phones
This guide does not provide information about how to deploy Spectralink 84-Series
handsets into a system currently using Polycom UC software. Refer to the
Interoperability Guide: Spectralink 84-Series Coexistence with Polycom Desksets and
contact your Polycom representative if you are currently using Polycom wired
phones.
Where is the Software?
You will need to download the software from the Spectralink website. When you unzip the file,
you will find folders for the configuration file templates and other files that are referenced in this
document to help you deploy the handsets. Get the software at http://support.spectralink.com.
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Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones Deployment Guide
Recommended Software Tools
XML editor
In order to view, edit and create the configuration files, you will need to use an XML editor.
Some we have used are listed below. See Managing Configuration Files for more information.
The XML editor used in the screen shots in this document is a free editor provided by Microsoft,
XML Notepad
XML Notepad can be downloaded from this site:
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=7973
Notepad++ with the XML Plugin is a text editor that uses colors to emphasize the XML structure.
Notepad++ is free and available at this site:
http://notepad-plus-plus.org/
XML Marker is a free text editor which may prove useful for file viewing.
XML Marker is available at:
http://symbolclick.com/
FTP Server
Although you can use other protocols (TFTP, HTTP, HTTPS), we recommend the use of FTP as
the file transfer protocol required by the system. Accordingly this document will direct you to set
up the provisioning server and the wireless configuration station as FTP servers. See Appendix
A: Setting up an FTP Server for exact information about how to set up an FTP server.
Settings: Using other file transfer protocols
For directions on setting up a different file transfer protocol (TFTP, HTTP, or HTTPS),
please contact your Spectralink support representative.
Release Notes
Every software release is accompanied by release notes that provide the new and changed
features and resolved issues in the latest version of the software. Please review these for the
most current information about your software.
Product Support
Spectralink wants you to have a successful installation. If you have questions please contact the
Customer Support Hotline at 1-800-775-5330.
The hotline is open Monday through Friday, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mountain time.
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For Technical Support: mailto:technicalsupport@spectralink.com
For Knowledge Base: http://support.spectralink.com
For Return Material Authorization: mailto:nalarma@spectralink.com
Spectralink References
All Spectralink documents are available at http://support.spectralink.com.
To go to a specific product page:
Select the Product Category and Product Type from the dropdown lists and then select the
product from the next page. All resources for that particular product are displayed by default
under the All tab. Documents, downloads and other resources are sorted by the date they were
created so the most recently created resource is at the top of the list. You can further sort the
list by the tabs across the top of the list to find exactly what you are looking for. Click the title to
open the link.
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Specific Documents
This document does not presume to cover the complete range of deployment requirements for
Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Handsets.
For quick setups and easy deployments, please see the Spectralink Installation and
Configuration Tool Administration Guide.
Please refer to the Deploying Enterprise-Grade Wi-Fi Telephony white paper for security,
coverage, capacity and QoS considerations necessary for ensuring excellent voice quality within
enterprise Wi-Fi networks.
For more detailed information on wireless LAN layout, network infrastructure, QoS, security and
subnets, please see the Best Practices Guide to Network Design Considerations for Spectralink
Wireless Telephones. This document identifies issues and solutions based on Spectralink’s
extensive experience in enterprise-class Wi-Fi telephony. It provides recommendations for
ensuring that a network environment is adequately optimized for use with Spectralink Wireless
Telephones.
This document has a brief discussion about wireless security. For more information and for
assistance in determining which security method to use, see Understanding Wireless Security
on Your Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones.
The comprehensive Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephone Administration Guide covers all
configuration parameters for the 84-Series Wireless Telephones.
For implementation of barcode application see the Quick Barcode Connector document. The
Spectralink 84-Series User Guide also contains information about deploying the barcode
feature.
The Spectralink 84-Series User Guide offers comprehensive instructions on using each of the
features deployed on the handsets.
Technical Bulletins detail workarounds to existing issues and provides expanded descriptions
and examples. These are available under the Technical Bulletins tab on the 84-Series handset
page.
Release Notes describe the new and changed features, and resolved issues in the latest
version of the software. Find them under the Downloads tab.
The Web Developer’s Guide is your guide for the development of applications that run on the
Browser on the Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Handsets. Contact your service consultant for
more information.
AP Configuration Guides show you how to correctly configure access points and WLAN
controllers (if applicable) and identify the optimal settings that support Spectralink 84-Series
handsets. The guides can be found at the View Certified page.
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Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones Deployment Guide
Conventions Used in This Guide
Icons
Icons indicate extra information about nearby text.
Warning
The Warning icon highlights an action you must perform (or avoid) to avoid exposing
yourself or others to hazardous conditions.
Caution
The Caution icon highlights information you need to know to avoid a hazard that
could potentially impact device performance, application functionality, successful
feature configuration and/or affect phone or network performance.
Note
The Note icon highlights information of interest or important information that will help
you be successful in accomplishing a procedure or understanding a concept.
Tip
The Tip icon highlights information that may be valuable or helpful for users to know,
such as special techniques, shortcut methods, or information that will make user
tasks easier to perform.
Web
The Web Info icon highlights supplementary information available online such as
documents or downloads on support.spectralink.com or other locations.
Timesaver
A time-saving tip is typically used to mention or highlight a faster or alternative
method for users who may already be familiar with the operation or method being
discussed.
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Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones Deployment Guide
Admin Tip
This tip advises the administrator of a smarter, more productive or alternative method
of performing an administrator-level task or procedure.
Power User
A Power User Tip is typically reserved for information directed specifically at highlevel users who are familiar with the information or procedure being discussed and
are looking for better or more efficient ways of performing the task. For example, this
might highlight customization of a feature for a specific purpose.
Troubleshooting
This element can be used in any type of document and is typically used to highlight
information to help you solve a relevant problem you may encounter, or to point to
other relevant troubleshooting reference information.
Settings
The Settings icon highlights information to help you zero in on settings you need to
choose for a specific behavior, to enable a specific feature, or access customization
options.
Typography
A few typographic conventions, listed next, are used in this guide to distinguish types of in-text
information.
Convention
Description
Bold
Highlights interface items such as menus, soft keys, file names, and
directories. Also used to represent menu selections and text entry to the
phone.
Italics
Used to emphasize text, to show example values or inputs, and to show
titles of reference documents available from the Spectralink Support Web
site and other reference sites.
Underlined blue
Used for URL links to external Web pages or documents. If you click on
text in this style, you will be linked to an external document or Web page.
Bright orange text
Used for cross references to other sections within this document. If you
click on text in this style, you will be taken to another part of this
document.
Fixed-width-font
Used for code fragments and parameter names.
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Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones Deployment Guide
This guide also uses a few writing conventions to distinguish conditional information.
Convention
Description
<MACaddress>
Indicates that you must enter information specific to your installation,
phone, or network. For example, when you see <MACaddress>, enter
your phone’s 12-digit MAC address. If you see <installed-directory>, enter
the path to your installation directory.
>
Indicates that you need to select an item from a menu. For example,
Settings > Basic indicates that you need to select Basic from the
Settings menu.
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Part I: Getting Started
Part I: Getting Started covers basic information you will need to understand the hardware and
software components that comprise a wireless SIP implementation. This Part introduces you to
SIP and managing the .cfg files that the 84-Series handset requires.
•
Handset usage scenarios
Three common deployment scenarios are introduced. Each of these requires a different
deployment approach and information.
•
Infrastructure requirements
Covers network components, QoS issues, WLAN security and system requirements.
•
Understanding Wireless Telephone Provisioning
Provides an overview of phone provisioning and how the different scenarios are
deployed.
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Chapter 1: Quick Start with SLIC
Use the Spectralink Installation and Configuration (SLIC) tool for a simple and speedy two-step
setup process. Detailed information about this tool is provided in the Spectralink Installation and
Configuration Tool Administration Guide available online. You can procure the tool from your
service representative. Details on wireless configuration parameters are available in Chapter 8,
section: Configure wireless.cfg.
1
Connect the Spectralink Installation and Configuration (SLIC) Tool to a PC and start the
browser to open the Wireless Wizard and configure wireless settings. Then use SLIC to
load the settings onto the handset. The handset will associate with the wireless LAN.
2
Download firmware software from the Spectralink support site. Load this software onto
the provisioning server. Configure SIP and feature settings by using the SLIC Feature
Wizard or you can custom configure your files. Once these files are loaded into the
provisioning server, the handset picks them up over-the-air.
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Chapter 2: Handset Usage Scenarios
How you provision and deploy your Spectralink 84-Series handsets depends on the usage
scenario you will employ. Key factors in determining which scenario applies to your installation
depend on three mutually exclusive usage criteria.
Read through this document to get an idea of what a basic deployment looks like and then
develop your own configuration tree that incorporates all the features you intend to deploy in
your facility.
The Three Scenarios
The three scenarios outlined below cover any type of installation of any size. We recommend
using one of these scenarios for simplicity of configuration, ease of maintenance and
consistency of installations. This increases the efficiency of support across your entire user
base and improves service to the wireless telephone user.
Determine which scenario applies to your installation then use that strategy to deploy the
telephones.
Tip: Combining scenarios
Technically, these three usage criteria are not mutually exclusive but programming
and maintenance are challenging if they are combined. Due to serious management
and deployment issues, we consider these mutually exclusive for the purposes of this
document. If you wish to combine these criteria, contact your service representative
for installation assistance from a Deployment Specialist.
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Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones Deployment Guide
Flat Deployment
In the simplest deployment, all phones use virtually the same features, like ordinary office desk
phones. This scenario is common in smaller or more homogenous facilities where handsets are
assigned by extension and there is little variation in the features assigned to different users.
Group Deployment
Some facilities require different features for different users. Push-to-talk channels, for example,
are frequently assigned in groups. For example, in a hardware store different channels may be
assigned to customer service, plumbing and hardware but supervisors must monitor all
channels. In another example, a hospital setting may require different PTT channels for
maternity and ICU nurses while facilities staff could be assigned completely separate channels
and all supervisors monitor all channels.
The simplest way to configure groups and make them easily maintainable is to set up specific
group files and assign them to individual users as shown in the following diagram. This is a
more involved deployment but yields benefits in ease of maintenance of complex installations.
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Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones Deployment Guide
Power Tip: More on configuring Groups
Groups can be deployed under the Flat Deployment and User Profiles scenarios by
including group parameters in individual user files. This is a workable alternative in a
limited setting where simplicity of deployment is the primary consideration and future
maintenance would not be a burden. Contact Customer Support and request a
Deployment Specialist for help on setting up group parameters in per-user files.
User Profiles Deployment
User profiles are important when you want to separate phone assignment from the phone
hardware. With User Profiles, any user can pick up any phone and log into it and the phone will
have that user’s personal settings. This type of deployment is frequently used in shift situations
where convenience and accountability are important.
Although the structure is similar to the Flat Deployment scenario, they are conceptually quite
different as user information such as call logs and contacts is stored on the server, not in the
individual handset’s memory. User Profiles give you a high degree of deployment flexibility since
you can have more extensions and users than you have phones.
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Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones Deployment Guide
Listing Handsets/Users to be Deployed
Determine what handset models you will be deploying and who will be using them. We
recommend that you use a spreadsheet to track the handsets and users. The list you make will
vary depending on your scenario. You can use the configuration spreadsheet as a starting point.
It is on the 84-Series webpage under the Download tab.
For Flat and Group Deployments, phones are linked to extensions. You will need to assign each
phone to an extension by its MACaddress. The MACaddress is a unique identifier found on the
label inside the battery compartment of each handset that follows the convention
00.90.7A.xx.yy.xx. The last three sets of numbers and letters are unique for each phone. Ensure
that there is a column for the MACaddress on the list you create.
Label example:
Power Tip: Assigning phones to users
When you get your shipment of phones, unpack them and assign them to a user or
extension by MACaddress by entering each phone’s MACaddress next to an
extension on your list. This way you will establish the correspondence between the
extension and the phone from the start. Using the data on the list you create from the
start will help to avoid confusion later when you start configuring the parameters.
•
In a Flat deployment installation, the phones are assigned to specific extensions. List all
the phones you intend to deploy with a column reserved for the MACaddress---
•
If you are configuring Groups the phones are assigned to specific extensions. List all the
phones you intend to deploy with a column reserved for the MACaddress. Identify what
Groups you will deploy and add a column for the Group Name. Use the Group tab in the
sample spreadsheet to help you identify the parameters you need to define for each
group.
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Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones Deployment Guide
•
If you use User Profiles, you need to list all the users. You may separately list all the
phones but users and phones are not tethered to one another and only the Users list
matters when determining features and extensions.
Admin Tip: OCS or Lync configuration
If you are deploying Instant Messaging or other features which use OCS or Lync®,
you will need to add a second row for each user to enter the parameters required by
these applications.
The affected parameter names are included in this table for future reference. They are defined
later in this document.
Setting column
What it is
Affects:
MACaddress
or
Phone's MACaddress (find it on the label in the
battery compartment format 00.90.7A.xx.xx.xx.
File name of <MACaddress>ext.cfg file
UserProfile
User Profile ID that will be used for the user profile
configuration file name. For identification and
maintenance purposes, this is usually the person’s
name.
File name for
<UserProfile>.cfg file
Name of user
When using the MACaddress to assign phones, you
need a concordance with a user name in order to
facilitate file maintenance.
Info only
Type
Telephony, OCS or Lync (represents server type
line appearance will register against.)
Info only
Address
Call server IP Address or Fully Qualified Domain
Name
[reg.x.server.x.address]
Port
SIP Call server port number (Default is 5060 if not
specified)
[reg.x.server.x.port]
Extension
SIP device extension ***
If your SIP domain is programmed on the call server
for the handsets you must include the domain with
the Extension***
(do not include @sipdomain for AudioCodes) ie.
extension@sipdomain
[reg.x.address]
UserID
SIP Extension user ID
[reg.x.auth.userId]
Password
SIP extension authentication password (Required
for digest authentication) (Leave blank for
AudioCodes)
[reg.x.auth.password]
Display Name
SIP Extension Caller-ID display information
[reg.x.displayName]
Line Label
SIP Extension label that appears on the handset
display
[reg.x.label]
Profile Pwd
User Profiles default password
[prov.login.localPassword]
VM Pilot
For Nortel and Avaya Call Servers you may want to
[msg.mwi.x.callBack]
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Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones Deployment Guide
Setting column
What it is
Affects:
Number
provide the VM pilot number
Subscribe To
MWI
Some Call Servers require an extension to
subscribe to get MWI (Avaya, for example). Enter
the phone extension here if this is required.
[msg.mwi.x.subscribe]
QBC Target
If using phone in single end-point mode, this is the
PC host name or static IP address the phone will
connect to
[qbc.connect.ipAddresshostname]
OAI Virtual MAC
If using User Profiles, the Virtual MAC to use as the
OAI UserID
An OAI Virtual MAC address is an 8 bit number
unique for each phone. It often includes a base
number then an offset equal to the extension. As
example the number 12345678 is a unique number
for one phone. The next phone could use
12345679. Another strategy for extension beginning
at 4100 is for OAI Virtual MAC assigned as
12344100, then 12344102, then 12344102, etc.
[oai.userId]
Group
parameters
If deploying Groups, you will need to establish
which Group uses which parameter. Read through
this document for more information about Group
settings.
Push-to-talk channels,
applications, and barcode
settings are typical Group
parameters.
Sample File for Listing Users and Parameters
Refer to the spreadsheet UsersList.xlsx in the zip with the template configuration files for
organizing the handset assignments and parameter requirements. You will use this information
when you provision the configuration files. If you have purchased installation, the installer will
use this file to create the configuration files for your system
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Chapter 3: Infrastructure
Provisioning a wireless handset is somewhat more complex than plugging a phone cable into a
wall jack and getting a dial tone. You will need to establish a wireless infrastructure specifically
designed for voice communications that takes into consideration the unique quality of service
requirements of voice transmissions. Then you will need to consider the issue of communication
security and decide which method is appropriate for your facility.
Network Components
Delivering enterprise-grade VoWLAN (Voice over Wireless Local Area Network) means that
wireless networks must be designed to provide the highest audio quality throughout the facility.
Voice has different attributes and performance requirements than wireless data applications
making VoIP WLAN pre-deployment planning necessary.
A Wi-Fi handset requires a continuous, reliable connection as the user moves throughout the
coverage area of the facility. In addition, voice applications have a low tolerance for network
errors, packet retries and packet delays. Whereas data applications are able to accept frequent
packet delays and retransmissions, wireless voice quality will deteriorate with just a few hundred
milliseconds of delay or a very small percentage of lost packets. Additionally, data applications
are typically bursty in terms of bandwidth utilization; whereas voice conversations use a
consistent and a relatively small amount of network bandwidth throughout the length of a
conversation.
This chapter covers the basic elements in a relatively simple system. Recommendations for
your specific requirements are part of the service Spectralink includes with the installation of
Spectralink wireless telephones. The following information will give you an overview of what
each component does and how it is used by the wireless telephones.
Recommended Reading
Please familiarize yourself with documents that contain additional information about security
methods and issues, including using Virtual LANs, MAC filtering and authentication, firewalls
and traffic filtering.
All Spectralink documents are available at http://support.spectralink.com.
Best Practices for Deploying Spectralink 84-Series Handsets White Paper
For additional information about making security decisions, read Understanding Wireless
Security on Your Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Phones
For full information about deploying the bar code feature of the Spectralink 8450/8452/8453,
read Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephone Barcode Administration Guide
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Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones Deployment Guide
Quality of Service
The Spectralink 84-Series handset uses Wi-Fi Multimedia (WMM), WMM Power Save and
WMM Admission Control mechanisms to deliver enterprise-grade Quality of Service (QoS). The
use of WMM and WMM Power Save are required. You can disable WMM Admission Control in
the access points if needed. However the use of all three WMM specifications is highly
recommended by Spectralink and is the default operating mode of the handset.
Refer to Best Practices Guide to Network Design Considerations for Spectralink Wireless
Telephones.
AP Configuration Guides show you how to correctly configure access points and WLAN
controllers (if applicable) and identify the optimal settings that support Spectralink 84-Series
handsets. The guides can be found at the View Certified page.
WLAN Security
Wireless technology does not provide any physical barrier from malicious attackers since radio
waves penetrate walls and can be monitored and accessed beyond the wall even from outside
the facility. The extent of security measures used is typically proportional to the value of the
information accessible on the network. The security risk for VoWLAN is not limited to the typical
wired telephony concerns of eavesdropping on telephone calls or making unauthorized toll calls,
but is equivalent to the security risk of the data network that connects to the APs. Several
different security options are supported on Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones.
Determining the proper level of security should be based on identified risks, corporate policy
and an understanding of the pros and cons of the available security methods.
Security Methods
The security methods available for Spectralink Wireless Telephones are industry standard
implementations used in typical Enterprise VoIP installations. The scope of this document does
not include a complete analysis of security methods. Refer to Best Practices for Wireless
Security for detailed information.
Wireless
Security
Method
Security in
Enterprise
Environments
Audio
Ease of Configuration and Other General Information
WEP
Poor
Excellent
Easy to administer, little processing overhead, adequate
security for many home Wi-Fi networks. Easily
compromised with hacking tools readily available on the
internet. Every phone can decrypt every other phone’s
data. Still in use on some older enterprise networks.
WPA-PSK
Acceptable
Excellent to
Good
Acceptable security for many small business Wi-Fi
networks. Each phone negotiates a key (see TKIP
below) with the AP so phones can’t decrypt each other’s
data, although a sophisticated hacking device that knows
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Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones Deployment Guide
Wireless
Security
Method
Security in
Enterprise
Environments
Audio
Ease of Configuration and Other General Information
the PSK can decode anyone’s traffic. The problem can
be minimized with periodic rotation of long, hard-to-hack
passwords.
WPA2PSK
Acceptable to
Good
Excellent to
Good
Good security for most small business Wi-Fi networks.
Similar to WPA with the addition of AES/CCMP, one of
the most secure encryption algorithms available. The
PSK limitation is still an issue, however.
WPA21
Enterprise
Excellent
Excellent to
Poor
Excellent security for enterprise Wi-Fi network. PSK is
replaced by some form of EAP and a RADIUS server,
and each phone is configured with its own username and
password, making the conversation between phone and
AP completely private. The processing requirements of a
RADIUS server, however, can compromise handoffs, so
a fast-roaming technique such as OKC or CCKM must be
employed.
1
WPA2-Enterprise variables:
84-Series handsets use either of two authentication types: EAP-FAST or PEAPv0 with MSCHAPv2.
EAP-FAST is used by products of Cisco, its creator, and by a growing number of other WLAN vendors.
It uses a PAC file, which is similar to a certificate. PEAPv0 with MSCHAPv2 is the most common form of
PEAP, which uses a certificate to authenticate the server.
84-Series handsets use either of two fast-handoff techniques as they roam among APs: CCKM or OKC.
CCKM is used exclusively by Cisco APs. OKC is used by most non-Cisco APs.
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Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones Deployment Guide
System Diagram
The following diagram shows the Spectralink components residing on a typical network with
APs and wireless LAN Ethernet Switch.
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Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones Deployment Guide
Tip: Are multiple servers necessary?
Sometimes a single piece of hardware may provide multiple services, for example
some AP controllers can also provide radius services. Consult your service provider
for more information about how to tailor your system configuration for your
requirements.
System Requirements
A typical installation requires the following components:
•
Access Points (APs) and Controller
•
Ethernet Switch
•
Call Server (SIP server)
•
Provisioning Server
•
Simple Network Time Protocol Server
•
Authentication (RADIUS) Server
•
DHCP Server
Optional components:
•
OCS or Lync Server
•
Exchange Server
•
LDAP Server
•
Application Server
System Components
Spectralink 84-Series handsets.
Available in several models, the 84-Series handsets provide essential communication resources
for facility wide implementation. Each model has a unique hardware ID that is printed on the
label.
Handset hardware ID numbers
Model Name
Hardware ID
SL8440
SL8450
SL8452
3111-36150-001
3111-36152-001
3111-36154-001
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Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones Deployment Guide
Model Name
Hardware ID
SL8441
SL8453
3111-67360-001
3111-67361-001
8440
The basic model that includes basic and advanced wireless telephone features.
8441
An accelerometer has been added to the 8440 that enables it to utilize the Personal Alarm
feature.
8450
The features of the 8440 model plus barcode scanning for 1D scanning for use with or without
the Quick Barcode Connector application.
8452
The features of the 8440 model plus barcode scanning for both 1D and 2D scanning for use
with or without the Quick Barcode Connector application.
8453
An accelerometer has been added to the 8454 that enables it to utilize the Personal Alarm
feature.
Servers
Provisioning Server
A provisioning server is required to distribute firmware and configuration files to the handsets
after they connect to the WLAN and network. The Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones
support FTP, TFTP, HTTP, HTTPS (for security) and FTPS provisioning servers for provisioning
the phones. FTP is the default protocol and this document explains how to use the FTP option.
The provisioning server may be on a different subnet than the APs and/or handsets.
Time Server
Simple Network Time Protocol Server or SNTP server. When WPA2 Enterprise security is used,
the handset will confirm the PEAP certificate has a valid date and time with the NTP Server on
the network, if one is available. If an NTP Server is not available, the certificate will be assumed
valid and operate accordingly, without the date and time check.
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RADIUS Server
A RADIUS authentication server must be used to provide username/password-based
authentication using RSA certificates for PEAPv0/MSCHAPv2 or PAC files for EAP-FAST.
The following authentication servers have been validated for use with Spectralink 84-Series
handsets:
•
Juniper Networks Steel-belted Radius Enterprise Edition (formerly Funk), v6.1
•
Microsoft® Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server 2003, Windows 2008 NPS
•
Cisco Secure Access Control Server (ACS), v5.2, 4.1
•
FreeRADIUS v2.1.10, 2.0.1 and 1.1.7
Other RADIUS servers may work properly with Spectralink handsets, but have not been tested.
Inquiries on untested servers will receive limited, “Best Effort”, support.
DHCP Server
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is a standardized protocol that enables clients to
be dynamically assigned with various configuration parameters, such as an IP address, subnet
mask, default gateway, and other critical network configuration information. DHCP servers
centrally manage such configuration data, and are configured by network administrators with
settings that are appropriate for a given network environment. The handset will use the DHCP
options shown in the following table if DHCP use is enabled. The DHCP setting will usually take
precedence if it is set and if it is available but can be overridden by certain parameters.
Option
SIP Parameter
Meaning
1
NA
Subnet mask
3
NA
Default gateway
6
DNSSRVR
DNS server
7
LOGSRVR
Syslog server logging
15
DOMAIN
Domain name
42
SNTPSRVR
NTP Server
43
sec.TLS.customCaCert.x
Auto discovery of the root CA
certificate. If this setting is
unavailable, set the parameter per
this guide.
66
TFTPSRVR
TFTP server
Consult with your service provider if you choose to use static configuration.
SIP Call Server
The call server provides SIP telephony support.
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Access points
Enterprise-grade Wi-Fi access points provide the connection between the wired LAN and the
wireless LAN. VIEW Certified APs must be positioned in all areas where Spectralink handsets
will be used to ensure seamless radio coverage. The number, type and placement of access
points will affect the coverage area and capacity of the wireless system. Careful planning of the
WLAN is necessary to ensure excellent voice quality. An’ optimized for voice’ WLAN will yield
great benefits to the wireless telephone user community.
APs must be properly configured to support the corresponding QoS and security methods
selected for the 84-Series handset.
Ethernet switch
One or more Ethernet switches interconnect multiple network devices. Enterprise Ethernet
switches provide the highest performance networks, which can handle combined voice and data
traffic, and are required when using the Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones.
Ensure the WLAN and network infrastructure provides connectivity from the wireless telephone
to all its required network resources (SIP Server, etc.) once the 84-Series handset connects to
the network and obtains an IP address.
Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones cannot roam with uninterrupted service between
subnets unless specific LAN components are present. Certain AP/Ethernet switch combinations
establish a Layer-3 tunnel across subnets that enable the handsets to roam. Without this
capability, any call in progress will be dropped when the user moves out of range and the
handset must be power cycled in order to resume functionality in the new subnet area. Consult
your AP vendor document for more information about Layer 3 tunneling.
If you do not have Layer 3 capability, ensure that the SSID your phones associate with uses the
same subnet on all APs for proper operation.. The handset can change subnets if DHCP is
enabled and the handset is powered off then back on when within range of APs on the new
subnet. Note that the wireless telephones cannot “roam” across subnets, since they cannot
change IP addresses while operational.
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Chapter 4: Understanding Wireless
Telephony Provisioning
The Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephone is a Wi-Fi device that provides users with a
wireless extension to the SIP call server. By seamlessly integrating into a SIP environment,
wireless telephone users are provided with high-quality mobile voice communications
throughout the workplace, giving users the freedom to roam throughout the workplace while
providing all the features and functionality of a wired SIP desk phone.
Three provisioning methods exist; the central provisioning server, the Spectralink Installation &
Configuration Tool (SLIC), and the local phone user interface. Only the central provisioning
server method can provision all settings. The SLIC tool provides wizards that help you configure
the parameters that allow the handset to associate with the wireless network and configure the
most frequently-used SIP configuration options. The local phone interface does not offer every
setting and is tedious to administer when deploying any number of phones. This document
explains how to use a central provisioning server to configure and deploy the Spectralink
84-Series handsets. Find out more about the SLIC tool in Chapter 1: Quick Start with SLIC and
from the Spectralink Installation and Configuration Tool Administration Guide.
What is Provisioning?
Instead of painstakingly going through the menus on each phone to set required parameters,
parameters are programmed on a central provisioning server and delivered over the air to all
Spectralink 84-Series handsets in the system.
The provisioning concept is essentially very simple: programmable parameters configure
hardware settings and implement features. The parameters are enabled or disabled and given a
value or values as applicable. These parameters are contained in configuration files or .cfg files
that are configured by the system administrator and reside on a provisioning server. There can
be only a few or many .cfg files for each 84-Series handset, as determined by the system
administrator.
The strength of the Spectralink provisioning mechanism and also its challenge is that the
system administrator has the flexibility to manipulate a large number of parameters to
implement the unique requirements of any given installation. A beginner can find that building
configuration files and setting up a provisioning system is a daunting task, especially in a robust
implementation with 3,000 parameters that offer every possible communication system feature.
Therefore this document suggests certain guidelines that, if followed, will give even an
inexperienced administrator a successful implementation. This document does not presume to
cover every possible feature or every setting in any given feature. It covers the most commonly
used features. Once those features are configured and working, the remaining features and
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settings can be addressed with increased confidence by the telephony administrator by referring
to more advanced references. The configuration process outlined in this document provides a
basic structure upon which more complex features may be provisioned and deployed.
The Provisioning Process
Usually a laptop or other easily-accessible PC is used to configure all the .cfg files. It also
functions as the initial provisioning server to download the wireless files to the phones using a
microB USB cable. Files destined for the central provisioning server are also configured on the
laptop and then transferred to the central provisioning server either over the network or by a
jump drive or other method.
Deployment itself is a two-part process: First the wireless file is downloaded into each handset
through MicroB USB cable and then the handset is able to access the configuration files on
central provisioning server.
The provisioning process as described in this document goes through this recommended
sequence:
1
Configuration of the parameters for the central provisioning server according to the
deployment scenario selected.
2
Setting up the central provisioning server:
3
a
The central provisioning server uses a file transfer protocol such as FTP and it must
be set up for this.
b
The central provisioning server must have a specific file structure to store and
manage the files that it delivers to and receives from the wireless telephones. This
structure must be established.
Loading the files onto the central provisioning server.
Ensure that the files are on the central provisioning server before powering up the
phones. This is so that once they connect to the central provisioning server through the
wireless and wired LAN, they can retrieve the files they need and are immediately
operational.
4
Configuration of the wireless parameters.
5
Setting up the initial provisioning server as an FTP server.
6
Downloading the wireless files onto the phones.
The wireless configuration files need to be loaded into the phone before it can access
the wireless LAN and request the rest of the configuration files from the central
provisioning server. Until its initial configuration is loaded (using a MicroB USB cable)
the 84-Series handset will not connect to the WLAN or network.
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After the file transfer is complete between the initial provisioning computer and the
84-Series handset, the USB cable can be disconnected and the next phone can get
started. Meanwhile, the handsets that have been loaded are busy associating with the
wireless LAN, finding the central provisioning server and obtaining the rest of the
configuration files. Once it has all these files, it is fully provisioned and may be tested
and deployed anywhere in the facility.
7
Testing and correcting.
Always deploy a few phones first to make sure that all the configuration parameters were
done correctly and they operate as desired.
8
Full deployment.
Once the few test phones work as desired, download the wireless files to the rest of the
phones per step 6.
Settings: Sequence variations
This document covers the configuration of the central provisioning server files first.
You could just as easily configure the wireless files first. In some situations, it is
desirable to deploy test phones wirelessly first to verify those settings before setting
up the central provisioning server. If you have any questions, please contact a
Deployment Specialist to direct you through this process.
Managing Configuration Files
Although configuration (.cfg) files can be set up in many different ways, for ease of explanation
and uniformity of implementation, we recommend using specific names in a specific structure. If
you purchased onsite installation support, similar files are already installed in your system. If
you are going to deploy the handsets yourself, follow the instructions in this Guide to build your
own configuration structure.
Before the handset is configured, it is a blank slate. It does not know who or what it is or what it
is supposed to do. Its identity is its MACaddress, a network machine number assigned to it at
the factory which is printed on its label. The .cfg files will provide it with the parameters it needs
to associate with the wireless LAN using an IP address, link a name and/or extension to the IP
address, and provide many telephony parameters so that it functions correctly in your facility.
Viewing the .cfg File Templates
As you move through the configuration process, you will be opening and configuring parameters
in several different .cfg files. The template files form building blocks for further customization.
Once you become familiar with the process and organization, you can use them to devise the
structure that suits your deployment.
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Where are the Templates?
You will find 84-Series configuration templates that match the recommendations in this Guide
bundled with the handset software. Download the software zip to any convenient location for
now. Extract the files. The templates are located in the Config folder. The other files in the
software zip are explained in Downloading Spectralink 84-Series Software Files to the Central
Provisioning Server.
Config folders on the Web
From time to time a revised Config folder may become available in the Downloads
area on the website.
Configuration Folder Contents
Once extracted, the folders and files in the Config.zip are a complete set of all the parameters
available to you. They are arranged in a structure so that you can easily identify the files you will
need.
Each of these folders and files is explained in Part II Configuration.
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Features folder
barcode.cfg
directory.cfg
oai.cfg
PersAlarms.cfg
ptt.cfg
RTLS.cfg
Scenarios folder
Flat_Deployment folder
000000000000.cfg
site.cfg
MACaddress-ext.cfg
Group_Deployment folder
MACaddress.cfg
site.cfg
group.cfg
identity.cfg
User_Profiles_Deployment folder
000000000000.cfg
site.cfg
login.cfg
Troubleshooting folder
logging.cfg
everything.cfg
USB_Setup folder
000000000000.cfg
wireless.cfg
000000000000-directory~.xml
What is the schema file?
The schema file is named handsetConfig.xsd and it contains all parameters and their valid
values and is used in verifying the correctness of .cfg files, the parameter values, and in
troubleshooting. It is located in the root area of the provisioning server to ensure it is readily
available when needed.
Viewing and Editing .cfg Files
In order to view, edit and create the configuration files, you will need to use an XML editor.
Many XML editors are available. Here are a few to consider.
The XML editor used in the screen shots in this document is a free editor provided by Microsoft,
XML Notepad. The value of this program is its tree view GUI which provides an easy way to
create, edit and view XML files. It also verifies the XML structure of files created by a text editor
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and provides errors if the structure is incorrect. The downside is that it can corrupt the lengthy
security certificates used by our phones and the GUI may not be that easy to work with. It may
also remove hierarchical structures of XML files created in a text editor if it is used to edit the
file, leaving the text file more difficult to view.
XML Notepad can be downloaded from this site:
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=7973
If you are using security certificates, we recommend that you use a text editor such as
Notepad++. Notepad++ is a text editor that uses colors to emphasize the XML structure. The
XML Plugin must be downloaded and installed so that it works correctly. This editor has been
found to maintain the integrity of the security code which may become corrupted with other XML
editors. However, you need to be conversant with XML code to use this editor as it has no GUI.
Notepad++ is free and available at this site:
http://notepad-plus-plus.org/.
XML Marker by Symbol Click is a free text editor which may prove useful for file viewing. It
shows both the text view and the GUI tree view. Edits are done in the text view so you need to
be conversant with XML code to use this editor successfully. It may have field limitations which
makes it unworkable for editing if you use lengthy certificates.
XML Marker is available at:
http://symbolclick.com/.
Foxe is an editor from First Object that shows the tree view and text view and allows you to
make edits in either. It apparently does not have the field limitations of XML Notepad so you
could use it if you have lengthy certificates.
Foxe is free and available at:
http://www.firstobject.com/dn_editor.htm
Tip: How to view and edit files when you use security certificates
If you use a text editor to edit the .cfg files, check them for errors in an XML editor
such as XML Notepad. However, if you use XML Notepad to change the file, you will
destroy the hierarchy and when you open it in the text editor the attributes of a tag will
be in one long line instead of neatly separated.
Therefore we recommend that you use the text editor for editing and the XML editor
for viewing and checking. If you are not using security certificates, you can use XML
Notepad or one of the other GUI editors for both viewing and editing.
Please download and install an XML editor so you can follow along with the rest of this
document
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Example .cfg file
The above example shows a portion of the barcode.cfg file, a feature template that contains the
barcode parameters. You can see the screen has two parts, the “tree” view is on the left and
text and values are on the right. The first few rows contain necessary XML stuff that you can
safely ignore. The comments in green provide important information about the file and how to
use it.
The folder and parameter structure start below the initial comments. The folder names are
somewhat explanatory about the type of parameter they contain. The parameters use a nested
structure to organize and differentiate them. In this example, all barcode parameters start with
“barcode.” and then have descriptive text to explain the parameter. The values are set on the
right side. In many cases, default values are shown. Any value shown on the right can be
overwritten.
Sometimes comments are interspersed with parameters. Comment text is positioned before the
related parameters. Read them for critical information about the parameters to follow.
Different XML editors use different editing tools. For the most part, you can drag-and-drop, copy
and paste, open and save in the usual way but you may need to practice with the xml tools you
select.
Creating New .cfg Files
Unless you are an expert with XML, you will find it easiest to create new .cfg files by opening an
existing file and saving it as a new name. The templates are designed to make this easy so that
usually only a few values need to be changed to customize the file. Some filenames must be
very specific and you will find precise naming instructions in the configuration sections in Part II.
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When you need to refine the .cfg files to suit your own requirements, parameters can be copied
from sample files provided with the downloaded code and pasted into the files you have
developed for this initial deployment. Or you may decide to establish your own feature structure
by locating the parameters you wish to modify in one of the sample files, editing the contents
accordingly and saving it with a file name that conforms to your file structure strategy.
Power Tip: Automating the configuration process
Deployment Specialists use a custom batch process to automatically generate the
per-phone files.
Types of .cfg Files
Configuration files are basically differentiated by the number of phones that use the parameters
set in the file.
Top Level .cfg Files
When the phone locates the central provisioning server, it first looks for a file with its
MACaddress as the filename, such as 00907A0CD967.cfg. If it does not find this file, it will look
for the master configuration file, 000000000000.cfg.
Either one of these two top level files will direct the phone to:
•
The phone’s software which is usually loaded into the root directory of the central
provisioning server.
•
Configuration files that contain the parameters it needs.
•
Directory information that tells the phone where to upload and find information on the
central provisioning server.
The two top level files serve identical purposes but which one is utilized depends on which
scenario you select. The value of the MACaddress file is that it is unique for each phone and is
necessary when you need to direct specific phones to specific files such as recommended for
groups and is therefore used in Group Deployment. The master configuration file is used for the
Flat and User Profile Deployments.
The only parameters you might need to change in either one of these files are the
APP_FILE_PATH, CONFIG _FILES and the DIRECTORIES if you choose to configure them.
APP_FILE_PATH
The APP_FILE_PATH directs the handset to its application file. The default value for the lync
software is lync.ld. The default value for the standard software is sip.ld.
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How the Handset Finds the Software
When a phone running 4.3.0/4.4.x or later software boots, it will automatically look for the
slink84xx.sip.ld or slink84xx.lync.ld. This is a hardcoded filename that is not dependent on the
APP_FILE_PATH parameter in the 000000000000.cfg or [MACaddress].cfg files.
However, if the APP_FILE_PATH parameter is deleted, then the phone does not look for any
files and uses whatever software is already on the phone. This is pre 4.3.x behavior.
If the phone cannot find the slink84xx.sip.ld or slink84xx.lync.ld file it will look for a filename
using the same algorithm as pre 4.3.x software. For example, an 8440 phone will look for a file
named 3111-36150-001 pre-pended to the value of APP_FILE_PATH. If that file can’t be found,
then it looks for APP_FILE_PATH as a standalone file.
Example 000000000000.cfg file for FLAT Deployment
CONFIG_FILES
The CONFIG_FILES parameter lists the configuration files that the phone needs to find for its
operational parameters. In the Flat Deployment screen example, a variable
[PHONE_MAC_ADDRESS] in the filename directs the phone to its per-phone .cfg file. For Flat
Deployment when you create the individual per-phone files, they must be named with the
phone’s MACaddress plus a –ext, such as 00.90.7A.0C.D9.67-ext.cfg.
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Notice the site.cfg file in the CONFIG_FILE list. The site.cfg file is present in all deployment
scenarios. It holds system and telephony parameters that are common to all phones.
The config files used by the different scenarios are covered in more detail later in this chapter.
The order that the .cfg files are listed determines the order in which the phone will obtain its
parameters. The first time the phone gets a parameter is the value it will use. If the same
parameter occurs in a later file, it will be ignored. In our example, you can see that the perphone file is first in the sequence of .cfg files which means that the parameters set in this file will
take precedence. We recommend deleting duplicate parameters to avoid conflicts and
confusion.
DIRECTORIES
The top level file can contain directory information that tells the phone where to store and find
certain information such as logs and overrides. Without setting up these separate directories,
the phone will put all the information into the root folder on the central provisioning server,
making it very large and very difficult for an administrator to find data. We recommend that you
set up these file paths here and set up a corresponding file structure on the central provisioning
server as explained at the end of this chapter.
The template provides a directory parameter but does not have any values set. Here is an
example of named directories:
•
LOG_FILE_DIRECTORY
•
OVERRIDES_DIRECTORY
•
Contacts are stored by MACaddress in this directory as a
backup so that they can be reloaded when the phone reboots.
•
CALL_LISTS_DIRECTORY Call lists are stored by phone or by User Profile.
•
USER_PROFILES_DIRECTORY . The individual User Profile login.cfg files are stored here.
This is the directory where the phone will write its log files.
Parameters set in the .cfg files can be overridden when
changed in the Web Configuration Utility or in the phone menus using its keypad. This
directory stores these overrides by MACaddress so that they are available when the
phone restarts.
CONTACTS_DIRECTORY
General-to-Specific Criteria
Aside from the top level .cfg files, other criteria establish additional types of .cfg files. The
template .cfg files are arranged according to how many phones are affected by the parameters
in the file:
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•
General settings: system wide settings are set in the site.cfg file,
•
A few phones; features can be deployed that apply only to certain groups,
•
A specific phone (or user); extension information is set in a per-phone file.
Admin Tip: Lync Telephony Server Variation
The .cfg files provided by the software include a per-phone file for each scenario. If
you are using a Lync telephony server, you may not need to configure these files
because the Lync server already knows about them. See the chapter on telephony
server variations for more information if you are using a Lync telephony server.
Flat Deployment
In a Flat Deployment, each phone is deployed to a specific extension and all phones have
similar parameters. In this deployment, phones are typically linked to extensions which are then
assigned to users. You will need to create one .cfg file for each extension/user, unless you are
using a Lync telephony server. See Chapter 5: Telephony Server Variations.
In our example, these three files are provisioned:
•
000000000000.cfg
•
Site.cfg
•
<MACaddress>-ext.cfg (one file for each extension/handset)
000000000000.cfg
When provisioning a flat deployment, you will use the default master template file
(000000000000.cfg) to direct the handsets to other cfg files it will need.
In the Flat Deployment scenario, you only need two files, the per-phone file and site.cfg
which holds all the system and feature parameters you will deploy.
We recommend that you specify directories.
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In this scenario a variable is used—[PHONE_MAC_ADDRESS]—to direct the handset to its
own phone-specific MACaddress .cfg file.
Admin Tip: Naming the phone-specific configuration file
The [PHONE_MAC_ADDRESS]-ext.cfg file uses a variable to point to the
MACaddress files you create for each phone/extension. The ‘-ext” part of the
filename used in this document is not necessary or could be replaced by some other
identifier. The important thing is that whatever identifier you use here is also used on
each of the MACaddress files you create for each phone.
Do not use the following file names as your per-phone file name:
<MACaddress>-phone.cfg,
<MACaddress>-Web.cfg,
<MACaddress>-app.log,
<MACaddress>-boot.log, or
<MACaddress>-license.cfg.
These file names are used by the phone itself to store user preferences (overrides)
and logging information.
Site.cfg
The site.cfg template contains most common parameters including network and telephony
information that pertains to all of the handsets, such as SIP servers, dial plan, etc.
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MACaddress-ext.cfg
You must create a specific <MACaddress>-ext.cfg file for each phone/extension you deploy.
The User spreadsheet you completed that lists each extension/user and the MACaddress of
the phone assigned to that extension will help you create these files.
These files must be named with the identical structure as the variable used by the phone to
find it. Therefore when the variable [PHONE_MAC_ADDRESS]-ext.cfg is used, the phonespecific files must be named <MACaddress>-ext.cfg.
You will use the MACaddress-ext.cfg template to create the files for each extension/user. It
contains the most common parameters, including network and telephony information, that
pertain to all of the handsets, such as SIP servers, dial plan, etc.
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Group_Deployment
Group deployment is more complex than Flat deployment but far easier to manage if you needto
differentiate users into groups. In this deployment, you will need to create a <MACaddress>.cfg
file for each phone. During deployment, the phone looks for this file and uses it for direction to
other .cfg files. Having individual MACaddress files as the first step (instead of using the generic
000000000000.cfg file) allows you to direct the handset to a specific Group.cfg file and then to
its individually named identity-specific file. These files can be named with the extension number
such as 3033.cfg or with the identity of the user such as JohnDoe.cfg or Clerk01.cfg. Note that
you do not have to assign every user to a Group. You can have a generic user type that does
not belong to any Group and these users will use the site-wide parameters in the site.cfg file. In
our example, these templates are used:
•
MACaddress.cfg
•
site.cfg
•
group.cfg
•
identity.cfg
MACaddress.cfg
When using Groups, you need to create a <MACaddress>.cfg file for each phone. During
deployment, the phone looks for this file and uses it for direction to other .cfg files that have
been configured to be used by this specific handset. In our example these are Site.cfg,
GroupABC.cfg and <identity>.cfg.
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Example screen for MACaddress.cfg, the top level .cfg file for Group Deployment
In the example screen the CONFIG_FILES use descriptive filenames for the per-phone .cfg file
and the group.cfg files.
Site.cfg
The template that contains most common parameters including network and telephony
information that pertains to all of the handsets, such as SIP servers, dial plan, etc.
Group.cfg
When using Groups, you will need to create a Group.cfg file for each group you deploy.
Replace “Group” with the name of the Group. Such names usually reflect the group’s function
such as ICUnurse.cfg or HardwareDept.cfg. See the sample spreadsheet for an example of
what type of parameters are typically deployed for Groups.
identity.cfg
You will need to create a specific <identity>.cfg file for each handset you deploy to a specific
extension. Typically this file is named for the extension assigned to the user, such as
3033.cfg.
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User_Profiles_Deployment
In a User Profiles deployment, the master configuration file 000000000000.cfg is only used to
point to the site.cfg file which contains the requirement for the user to log on in order to access
the phone’s features. Since User Profiles are not linked to individual handsets, the phone
specific file is not referenced in the master configuration file. This deployment is also known as
“basket of phones” where any phone can be selected out of a supply and used by anyone who
has log on credentials. You need to create a file for each User Profile. The name of the file is
the user’s login name and the password is stored in the <login>.cfg file.
Because phones are not linked to extensions, User Profile information is stored on the central
provisioning server instead of in the handset’s memory. Server files are discussed in Chapter 7.
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000000000000.cfg
When deploying User Profiles, you will use the default master template file
(000000000000.cfg) which directs the handsets to the site.cfg file. The login.cfg file is not
referenced.
site.cfg
The template that contains most common parameters including network and telephony
information that pertains to all of the handsets, such as SIP servers, dial plan, etc.
This file also contains the log on requirements for User Profiles.
login.cfg
If you are using User Profiles, you will need to create a separate .cfg file for each user that
provides login information and preferences specific to that user. These files are often named
psmith.cfg (for pauline smith) or 1100.cfg (for extension 1100). User Profiles allow you to
create many more separate .cfg files for individuals or extensions than you have physical
phones to deploy.
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Features Deployment
Features files can be used as a resource to drag-and-drop parameters into other files or they
may be used as feature deployment files by directing the handset to them in the
000000000000.cfg file or MACaddress.cfg file.
The Features folder contains cfg files that act as repositories for the parameters of that feature:
•
Push-to-talk (ptt.cfg)
•
Barcode symbologies and administration including QBC (barcode.cfg)
•
Ekahau location services (RTLS.cfg)
•
Custom applications (oai.cfg)
•
Corporate directory (directory.cfg)
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Part II: Configuration
Part II: Configuration covers the essential information you need to know in order to set the
parameters in the handsets so that they work in your facility.
•
Listing what parameters need to be set.
In coordination with the spreadsheet you have already started, this Chapter 4 goes into
detail about what parameters are requested by each file. It explains the templates and
their use and the settings that are required by the different scenarios.
•
Telephony server variations covers the difference you will encounter if you set up a Lync
telephony server vs a non-Lync server.
Variations between servers are also covered in the various Interop Guides that are
published on the website. However, there are significant variations between Lync and
the other servers and these are covered in Chapter 5.
•
Configuring the files.
Chapter 6 covers the actual configuration of the files for the central provisioning server.
•
Configuring wireless parameters.
Wireless parameters are configured separately for the central provisioning server files
because they have to be downloaded onto the phones with a USB cable.
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Chapter 5: Determining What Parameters
You Will Need to Configure
Before jumping into configuring the files, take a moment to ensure that you know the values for
all the parameters you will need to set.
Using the Template Spreadsheet
The provided UsersList.xlsx spreadsheet is divided into wireless, system, group and user
settings by tabs. Use it as a starting point and customize it according to your requirements. You
may need to add parameters or delete ones you will not use. If you are using Groups, customize
the Group tab and add additional Group tabs if you have more than one. If you keep these
parameters separate, your .cfg file provisioning will be that much smoother.
Refer to the scenarios to determine which .cfg files you will need to configure.
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Wireless Settings
Wireless parameters are located in the wireless.cfg template. They include:
The phones’ administrative password
Provisioning server information
•
Server type (FTP,TFTP, HTTP, HTTPS)
•
Server name or IP
•
User name
•
Password
Radio settings
•
SSID
•
Domain (Country)
•
2.4GHz or 5GHz or both
•
If 5GHz, which bands?
•
Transmit power settings
Security parameters for one of these types:
•
None
•
WEP
•
WPA-PSK
•
WPA2-PSK
•
WPA2-Ent
QoS (consult your AP documentation)
•
AC mandatory
DHCP enable?
DNS server information
•
Hostname
•
Domain
•
IP address
•
Alternate IP address
SNTP
•
Server name
•
GMT offset
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System and Telephony Settings
System parameters are located in the site.cfg template. Each deployment scenario has a
slightly different version. Use the template for your scenario to avoid confusion.
Logging
•
File size
•
Frequency of uploads
Dial plan
•
Many parameters are possible, we have provided two of the most common.
Syslog server name
Lync Server base profile
or
openSIP Server
•
SIP Server address & port
•
Dial plan
•
Call Forwarding
•
Do Not Disturb
•
Voicemail parameters
•
For User Profiles
•
Login requirement
Features (commonly-deployed Global feature settings)
•
App URLs
•
Emergency Dial
•
Exchange Calendar (IP address)
•
Instant Messaging parameters
•
OAI
•
QBC
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Per-Phone (User) Settings
Per –phone parameters are located in the per-phone file which is different for each scenario.
Use the template for your scenario to avoid confusion. The parameters for each scenario are
identical except a User Profiles section and a Lync section are added if you are deploying User
Profiles.
Calls per line key
openSIP Telephony line registrations
For User Profiles
•
Password
•
Note that user profiles .cfg file includes some Lync telephony parameters that are in the
site.cfg files for the two other scenarios.
Admin Tip: Exception for the Lync telephony server
If you are deploying a Lync telephony server, you may not need to configure perphone .cfg files. If you are deploying User Profiles, you will need a per-user file to
validate the profile login password.
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Feature(s) and Group(s) Settings
The Features folder contains a file for each feature listed here. If a feature applies only to a
Group, the parameters can be moved to a Group .cfg file. Parameters can be moved to the
site.cfg file if a feature applies to the entire deployment. Alternatively, if a feature applies to the
entire deployment, a feature .cfg files can be used individually as part of the string in the top
level .cfg file.
Applications
•
URL
•
Label (name)
Barcode and QBC (refer to Barcode Admin Guide)
QBC
Corporate directory
•
address
•
User ID (if required)
•
Password (if User ID is required)
OAI
•
Gateway IP address
Personal Alarms
•
Motion Alarms
•
Duress Button
•
Suspend Timeout
•
Location Services
•
Set Silent Profile Ring
•
API detail
PTT or Emergency Dial
•
Emergency Dial description and number
•
Default channel
•
Priority channel
•
Emergency channel
•
Available channels
•
Subscribed channels
•
Allow transmit channels
•
Channel labels
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Chapter 6: Telephony Server Variations
For our purposes, telephony servers fall into two categories: Lync and non-Lync. The Lync
telephony server manages a number of telephony parameters that therefore do not have to be
set in the .cfg files.
The site.cfg files have two telephony sections---one for Lync and one for openSIP. You must
delete the one you will not use to avoid configuration conflicts.
Lync Telephony Server
For full information about Lync interoperability, see Interoperability Guide Spectralink 84-Series
Wireless Telephones and Microsoft Lync Server 2010 or Interoperability Guide Spectralink
84-Series Wireless Telephones and Microsoft Lync Server 2013.
Microsoft® Lync® compatibility
Spectralink software is available in two variants – Lync and non-Lync (or open SIP). Starting
with Spectralink software 4.3/4.4, even numbered releases support both Lync and open SIP and
odd numbered releases support open SIP only.
“Non-Lync” versions of the 8440/41/52/53 do not support any Lync capability. A Lync-enabled
handset supports Lync telephony, IM, calendaring, and Exchange. A handset without Lync
support does not support any Lync functionality including IM, calendaring, and exchange.
Handsets cannot be upgraded from non-Lync to Lync-enabled in the field. If customers are
unsure if Lync capability will ever be needed, we recommend the purchase of Lync-enabled
handsets.
Handsets purchased without Lync capability will not run Lync software releases, e.g. 4.6.x.
Handsets with Lync compatibility will run Lync and non-Lync software releases.
Manufacturing date
Support Lync?
Prior to June 2013
Yes
June 2013 and later
2 handset variations:
Lync-enabled: supports Lync
non-Lync: does not support Lync
Tip
All 84-Series handsets manufactured before June 2013 support Lync.
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All handsets have product ID’s that identify them as Lync or non-Lync compatible.
84-Series Product IDs with Microsoft Lync Support
Model
Lync SKUs
8440:
2200-37149-001, 2200-37150-001
2200-37174-101, 2200-37175-101
8441:
2200-37290-001, 2200-37290-101
8450:
2200-37152-001, 2200-37153-001
2200-37176-101, 2200-37177-101
8452:
2200-37172-001, 2200-37173-001
2200-37198-101, 2200-37199-101
8453:
2200-37294-001, 2200-37294-101
84-Series Product IDs without Microsoft Lync Support
Model
Open SIP SKUs
8440:
2200-37147-001, 2200-37148-001
2200-37165-101, 2200-37164-101
8441:
2200-37288-001, 2200-37288-101
8450:
All 8450 models support Lync.
8452:
2200-37163-001, 2200-37162-001
2200-37161-101, 2200-37160-101
8453:
2200-37292-001, 2200-37292-101
Label example
Label example
Admin Tip
Handsets manufactured prior to June 2013 are not differentiated on the label in the
battery compartment as to Lync or non-Lync. All handsets manufactured before June
2013 are Lync compatible. For handsets built during or after June 2013, check the
label text. The product ID and the “with Lync” or “without Lync” text on the label will
confirm whether or not the handset is Lync-enabled.
The two code variants are additionally differentiated as Lync or non-Lync by their filenames
when the zip file is extracted:
Lync compatible:
sl84xx.lync.ld
Non-Lync
sl84xx.sip.ld
You can download either code stream from the website but the Lync code is compatible only as
detailed above.
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Lync Interoperability Overview
The Lync telephony server handles many parameters in the background through a Base Profile.
The phones require an initial sign-in procedure using network credentials once it is deployed.
After the user has signed in for the first time, the phone will not require it again unless the user
logs out.
The Lync server already knows about the phone, therefore per-phone files are not needed for
Flat Deployment or Group Deployment.
User Profile Deployment is a special case. A per-user file is needed---the login.cfg file--because the password the user gives must be validated. Due to certain conflicts between the
Lync sign in process and the login process required by User Profiles, the Base Profile cannot be
used. Instead we have to spell out Lync parameters. Some Lync parameters are located in the
site.cfg file as they need to be activated before the user logs on and others are located in the
login.cfg file as they need to be activated after the user logs on. If you use a Lync telephony
server, delete the openSIP folder in both the site.cfg file and the login.cfg file.
Caution: Using a Lync Telephony Server with User Profiles
You must set up a default user when using User Profiles in a Lync telephony server
environment in order to make emergency calls without logging in. Contact a
Deployment Specialist for help in setting up default user parameters.
Be sure to use the templates for the scenario you are going to deploy as they contain the exact
parameters you will need.
OpenSIP Telephony Server
The Spectralink 84-Series handsets have been tested with several SIP servers. Special
interoperability guides have been produced and are available on the Spectralink website. See
the References section at the front of this document for directions to these documents.
The openSIP telephony parameters are located in the site.cfg file and are as you would expect.
They cover things like dial plan, voicemail and instant messaging. Warning: Do not confuse
using Lync for IM with using a Lync telephony server.
Consult a Deployment Specialist if you need help setting up your system.
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Chapter 7: Configuring Central
Provisioning Server .cfg files
This chapter is used to configure files that reside on the central provisioning server.
Finalize your Deployment Scenario Structure
Draw a diagram of your deployment structure to determine if additional design considerations
need to be explored before provisioning.
Before you start to configure the files, be sure you know:
•
Which deployment scenario you will use,
•
What .cfg files you need to configure,
•
What parameters you need to set,
•
What filenames will be used and
•
Which .cfg files go with which phones if you are using separate features configuration
files or deploying Groups.
Organize the Files
You will be working on a computer, such as a PC laptop, that is convenient and accessible to
the network. Create a suitable file structure so that each of the files you create can be easily
retrieved when you need to move them to a different location.
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Configure site.cfg
All three scenarios reference the site.cfg file, which is positioned as the last file in the
CONFIG_FILE list. Positioning it is a neat way to ensure that any per-user or group file
parameters have precedence. The site.cfg file contains a wide range of telephony and system
configuration parameters. We will step through these just as we did with the wireless
parameters.
The file is separated into four areas:
•
System Parameters: Network parameters that all phones use.
•
Telephony Parameters: Parameters that are dependent on the call server.
•
Feature Parameters: Some commonly-deployed features are included.
•
User Profile (this folder is only in the site.cfg file found in the User Profile Deployment
folder): Requires a login in order to use the phone.
site.cfg template
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System Parameters
Log and syslog parameters are in the System folder.
When you will see a separate .set parameter
Only the device.x parameter uses the mechanism that requires a set=1 parameter to
confirm the parameter value. The device.x parameter is disabled by set=0. You will
not see the .set parameter used with any other type of parameter.
Log
Unless otherwise specified, all values are recommended settings and do not need to be
changed.
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
log.render.file.upload.period
positive integer
172800
Time in seconds between log file uploads to the provisioning server.
Note: The log file will not be uploaded if no new events have been logged since the last upload.
log.render.file.size
positive integer, 1 to 180
32
Maximum size of flash memory for logs in Kbytes. When this size is about to be exceeded, the phone
will upload all logs that have not yet been uploaded, and erase half of the logs on the phone. The
administrator may use Web browser to read all logs on the phone.
log.render.file.upload.append.sizeLimit
positive integer
512
Maximum log file size that can be stored on provisioning server in Kbytes.
log.render.level
0 to 6
4
Specifies the lowest class of event that will be rendered to the log files. This is the output filter from the
internal memory-based log system.
The log.render.level maps to syslog severity as follows:
0 -> SeverityDebug (7)
1 -> SeverityDebug (7)
2 -> SeverityInformational (6)
3 -> SeverityInformational (6)
4 -> SeverityError (3)
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Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
5 -> SeverityCritical (2)
6 -> SeverityEmergency (0) For more information, refer to the next section on Syslog.
log.render.stdout
0 or 1
0
Set to 1. Spectralink recommends that you do not change this value. Note that on Spectralink
handsets, the default value is 0.
Syslog
Spectralink recommends that you provision a syslog server so that the wireless telephony events can be monitored.
The syslog server name can be an IP address or fqdn (fully qualified domain name).
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
device.syslog.serverName
dotted-decimal IP address OR
domain name string
mysyslogserver.domain.com
The syslog server IP address or domain name string.
device.syslog.renderLevel
0 to 6
3
Specify the logging level that will display in the syslog. Note that when you choose a log
level, you are including all events of an equal or greater severity level and excluding
events of a lower severity level. The logging level you choose determines the lowest
severity of events that will be logged.
0 or 1: SeverityDebug(7). 2 or 3: SeverityInformational(6). 4: SeverityError(3). 5: SeverityCritical(2). 6:
SeverityEmergency(0).
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Telephony Parameters
Telephony parameters are subdivided into Lync and open SIP. In order to prevent phone
confusion, delete the openSIP folder if you are using a Lync telephony server or delete the
Lync folder if you are not using a Lync server.
Caution: Deleting unused parameters
You MUST delete either the Lync or openSIP folder. Keeping both these folders in
your file could cause the phone to malfunction.
Lync
Starting with UCS 4.1.0, the "base profile" feature allows you to set up Lync telephony by setting
a base profile rather than by setting each telephony parameter to a Lync-compatible value. User
Profiles Deployment cannot use the base profile and the site.cfg file for User Profiles has other
Lync parameters. Do not change them unless instructed by a Deployment Specialist.
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
Device.baseProfile
Lync
Null
If using Lync, set the value to Lync.
User Profiles
The Lync Telephony parameters in the User Profiles site.cfg file should not be changed. They have
been preset for proper Lync operation.
Open SIP
openSIP servers are basically all those that are not Lync.
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SIP Server
The SIP server is the server that accepts and manages the registrations for the phones.
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
voIpProt.server.x.address
dotted-decimal IP
address or hostname
Null
The IP address or host name and port of a SIP server that accepts registrations.
Multiple servers can be listed starting with x=1 to 4 for fault tolerance.
voIpProt.server.x.port
0, 1 to 65535
0
The port value entered here must match the port used in the SIP server to accept connection requests.
The template value is 5060. The Nortel CS1K SIP server uses 5070.
voIpProt.SIP.enable
0 or 1
1
A flag to determine if the SIP protocol is used for call routing, dial plan, DTMF, and URL dialing.
If set to 1, the SIP protocol is used.
Dialplan
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
dialplan.removeEndOfDial
0 or 1
1
If set to 1, strip trailing # digit from digits sent out.
dialplan.digitmap
string compatible with the
digit map feature of MGCP
described in 2.1.5 of RFC
3435
[2-9]11|0T|
+011xxx.T|
0[2-9]xxxxxxxxx|
+1[2-9]xxxxxxxx|
[2-9]xxxxxxxxx|
[2-9]xxxT
The digit map used for the dial plan. The string is limited to 2560 bytes and 100 segments; a comma is
also allowed; a comma will turn dial tone back on;’+’ is allowed as a valid digit; extension letter ‘R’ is
used as defined above. This parameter enables the phone to automatically initiate calls to numbers that
match a digit map pattern.
Typically the value x.T as given in the template is all that is needed.
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DND_CallForwarding
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
voIpProt.SIP.serverFeatureControl.cf
0 or 1
0
If set to 1, server-based call forwarding is enabled. The call server has control of call forwarding.
If set to 0, server-based call forwarding is not enabled. This is the old behavior.
voIpProt.SIP.serverFeatureControl.dnd
0 or 1
0
If set to 1, server-based DND is enabled. The call server has control of DND.
If set to 0, server-based DND is not enabled. This is the old behavior.
Voicemail
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
up.oneTouchVoiceMail
0 or 1
0
If set to 1, the voicemail summary display is bypassed and voicemail is dialed directly (if configured).
up.mwiVisible
0 or 1
0
If set is 0, the incoming MWI notifications for lines where the MWI callback mode is disabled
(msg.mwi.x.callBackMode is set to 0) are ignored, and do not appear in the message retrieval menus.
If set to 1, the MWI for lines whose MWI is disabled will display, even though MWI notifications have
been received for those lines.
msg.mwi.x.callBackMode
contact, registration, disabled
registration
The message retrieval mode and notification for registration x.
contact – a call is placed to the contact specified by msg.mwi.x.callback.
registration – the registration places a call to itself (the phone calls itself).
disabled – message retrieval and message notification are disabled.
msg.mwi.x.callBack
ASCII encoded string
containing digits (the user
part of a SIP URL) or a string
that constitutes a valid SIP
URL (6416 or
6416@spectralink.com)
Null
The contact to call when retrieving messages for this registration if msg.mwi.x.callBackMode is set to
contact
Feature Parameters
Some commonly used features are included in the site.cfg file. Features that are used by all
phones can be included in this file.
The features that do not have separate .cfg files are explained below.
•
Applications
•
Exchange calendar
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•
Instant Messaging (IM)
Please see the section “Deploying Features” for an explanation of the other features’
parameters.
Features that are not covered in a separate .cfg file
Applications
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
apps.x.label
The descriptive text that displays in the
Applications menu
2
apps.x.url
The URL of an application
String
null
The label and URL of up to 12 applications (for x = 1 to 12).
Exchange Calendar
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
feature.exchangeCalendar.enabled
0 or 1
0
If 0, the calendaring feature is disabled. If 1, the feature is enabled.
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Parameter
exchange.server.url
Permitted Values
Default
String
Null
0 or 1
1
The Microsoft Exchange server address.
exchange.meeting.reminderEnabled
If 0, meeting reminders are disabled. If 1, they are enabled.
IM (Instant Messaging)
In our IM example, reg2 becomes the IM line. Lync2010 is deployed. For User Profiles
Deployment, the reg.2 parameters are located in the login.cfg file.
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
feature.messaging.enabled
0 or 1
0
If 0, the instant messaging feature is disabled. If 1, the feature is enabled.
feature.presence.enabled
0 or 1
0
If 0, the presence feature — including buddy managements and user status — is disabled. If 1, the
presence feature is enabled with the buddy and status options.
reg.x.telephony
0 or 1
1
If 0, telephony calls are not enabled on this registration (use this value if the registration is used with
Microsoft Office Communications Server 2007 R2 or Microsoft Lync 2010/2013. If 1, telephony calls are
enabled on this registration.
reg.x.auth.useLoginCredentials
0 or 1
0
If 0, login credentials are not used for authentication to the server on registration x. If 1, login credentials
are used for authentication to the server. Note: This must be set to 1 for instant messaging on the
Spectralink handsets.
reg.x.server.y.address
dotted-decimal IP
address or hostname
Null
The IP address or host name of a SIP server that accepts registrations. If not Null, all of the parameters
in this table will override the parameters specified in voIpProt.server.*. Notes: If this parameter is set,
it will take precedence even if the DHCP server is available. If this registration is used for Microsoft
Office Communications Server 2007 R2 on Spectralink handsets, this parameter must be in the form
OCShostname.OSCdomain_name.
reg.2.server.1.address. the address to use to contact and register with the Lync server for IM and
Presence.
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Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
reg.x.server.y.port
0, 1 to 65535
Null
The port of the sip server that specifies registrations. If 0, the port used depends on
reg.x.server.y.transport.
reg.x.server.y.register
0 or 1
1
If the outbound proxy can route calls without the phone being registered to it, set this value to 0..
reg.x.server.y.specialInterop
standard, ocs2007r2,
lcs2005,
lync2010,lync2013
standard
Specify if this registration should support Microsoft Office Communications Server 2007 R2 (ocs2007r2),
Microsoft Live Communications Server 2005 (lcs2005), Microsoft Lync 2010 (lync2010) or Microsoft
Lync 2013 (lync2013). Note: To use instant messaging on Spectralink handsets, set this parameter to
ocs2007r2.
reg.x.server.y.transport
DNSnaptr,
TCPpreferred,
UDPOnly, TLS,
TCPOnly
DNSnaptr
The transport method the phone uses to communicate with the SIP server.
Null or DNSnaptr – if reg.x.server.y.address is a hostname and reg.x.server.y.port is 0 or
Null, do NAPTR then SRV look-ups to try to discover the transport, ports and servers, as per RFC 3263.
If reg.x.server.y.address is an IP address, or a port is given, then UDP is used.
TCPpreferred – TCP is the preferred transport; UDP is used if TCP fails.
UDPOnly – only UDP will be used.
TLS – if TLS fails, transport fails. Leave port field empty (will default to 5061) or set to 5061.
TCPOnly – only TCP will be used.
roaming_buddies.reg
1 to 34
Null
The index of the registration which has roaming buddies support enabled. If Null, the roaming buddies
feature is disabled. Note: This parameter must be set if the call server is Microsoft Live Communications
Server 2005, Microsoft Office Communications Server 2007 R2, or Microsoft Lync.
sec.TLS.customCaCert.x
String
Null
The custom certificate for TLS Application Profile x (x= 1 to 6). This parameter is not in the template but
may need to be added. It is not required if you use DHCP option 43 to tell the phone where to get its
certificate automatically but if that is not available , then add the certificate using this parameter.
sec.TLS.profileSelection.SIP
a TLS profile
PlatformProfile1
The TLS platform profile or TLS application profile to use for SIP operations. Permitted values are:
•
PlatformProfile1
•
PlatformProfile2
•
ApplicationProfile1
•
ApplicationProfile2
•
ApplicationProfile3
•
ApplicationProfile4
•
ApplicationProfile5
•
ApplicationProfile6
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Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
voIpProt.SIP.mtls.enable
0 or 1
1
If 0, TLS with mutual authentication is disabled. If 1, TLS with mutual authentication is enabled. Used in
conjunction with Microsoft Lync 2010/2013.
voIpProt.SIP.IM.autoAnswerDelay
0 to 40, seconds
10
The time interval from receipt of the instant message invitation to automatically accepting the invitation.
If users have a PC that is logged to their IM account, should thePC auto-answer incoming IMs if no
action is taken on the phone?
Yes: voIpProt.SIP.IM.autoAnswerDelay=”30”
No: voIpProt.SIP.IM.autoAnswerDelay=”10”
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User Profiles
When deploying User Profiles, you must specify that a login is required in order to use the
phone.
The phone uses the profile.login.enabled=”1” parameter to present a login prompt. In our
template, login in enabled and required, other users besides the default user can log in, users
remain logged in when the handset reboots, if prov.login.persistent="1" is set. The user must log
out as the user is never automatically logged out.
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
prov.login.enabled
0 or 1
0
If 0, the user profile feature is disabled. If 1, the user profile feature is enabled.
prov.login.required
0 or 1
0
If 1, a user must log in when the login feature is enabled. If 0, the user does not have to log in.
prov.login.defaultOnly
0 or 1
0
If 1, the default user is the only user who can log in. If 0, other users can log in.
prov.login.persistent
0 or 1
0
If 0, users are logged out if the handset reboots. If 1, users remain logged in when the phone reboots.
prov.login.automaticLogout
0 to 46000
0
The time (in minutes) before a non-default user is automatically logged out of the handset. If 0, the user
is not automatically logged out.
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Configure the Per-phone .cfg File
All three scenarios use nearly identical per-phone files. They all contain the line registrations
that the phone will need to, well, to be telephones.
Both the Flat and Group Deployment scenarios have per phone files that are linked directly to
the phones’ MACaddress. In these two scenarios, phones are assigned to an extension and
usually deployed to a single user. The files are differentiated by their filenames.
The per-user template provided for each scenario only contains those parameters that are
required by that single phone or user. Feature settings or system settings are not in the perphone .cfg file. They could be, but maintenance issues get very complicated when system
settings that belong in site.cfg are dispersed through the other .cfg files.
Admin Tip: Lync Telephony Server Variation
The .cfg files provided by the software include a per-phone file for each scenario. If
you are using a Lync telephony server, you may not need to configure these files in a
Flat or Group Deployment because the Lync server already knows about the phones
and their registrations. You will need a per-user file when deploying User Profiles as
the password must be validated at login.
See Chapter 5 for more information if you are using a Lync telephony server.
Filenames for per-phone or per-user .cfg files
Each scenario has a specific naming protocol for the per-phone or per-user .cfg files that it uses.
Flat Deployment
In the Flat Deployment scenario the per-phone .cfg filename you see in the top level .cfg file is
[PHONE_MAC_ADDRESS]-ext.cfg. Here a variable is being used to direct the phone to its perphone .cfg file. When you create the individual per-phone files, they must be named with the
phone’s MACaddress plus this suffix -ext, such as 00907A0CD967-ext.cfg.
Admin Tip: Naming the phone-specific configuration file
The [PHONE_MAC_ADDRESS]-ext.cfg file uses a variable plus an extension
identifier to point to the MACaddress files you create for each phone/extension. The ‘ext” part of the filename used in this document could be replaced by some other
identifier. The important thing is that whatever identifier you use here is also used on
each of the MACaddress files you create for each phone.
Do not use the following file names as your per-phone file name: <MACaddress>-
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phone.cfg, <MACaddress>-Web.cfg, <MACaddress>-app.log, <MACaddress>boot.log, or <MACaddress>-license.cfg. These file names are used by the phone
itself to store user preferences (overrides) and logging information.
Group Deployment
In the Group Deployment scenario the per-phone .cfg filename you see in the top level .cfg file
is identity.cfg. Because the MACaddress is already identified by using a top level .cfg file with
the phone’s MAC address, you can use any filename as an identifier for the per-phone file.
Usually per-phone filenames are named for the extension, such as 3303.cfg or the user, such
as jdoe.cfg. You will reference this .cfg file in the top level MACaddress.cfg file you will create
for each phone in the next section.
User Profiles Deployment
When User Profiles are deployed, phones are not assigned to users or extensions by
MACaddress. Any phone can be used by any user who has login credentials. The filename of
the per-phone .cfg file must be its login name. The password is included in the parameters for
validation. Example: Mary Smith has a login name of msmith and therefore her per-phone .cfg
file must be names msmith.cfg. Her password is benji and benji must be entered for the
password value in her msmith.cfg file.
Per-Phone .cfg Files
Flat and Group Deployment scenarios use identical per-phone files. The files must be named
according to the convention described previously but otherwise, the same template design is
used. If you are using a Lync telephony server, these per-phone files may not be needed. See
Chapter 5: Telephony Server Variations.
User Profiles Deployment requires a per-user file no matter what type of server you are using.
The per-user file validates the login password and contains essential parameters if you are
using a Lync telephony server.
Flat Deployment and Group Deployment
Select the per-phone template according to your deployment scenario. For Flat Deployment, the
per-phone file is called MACaddress-ext.cfg. For Group Deployment, the file is called
identity.cfg. Use the template file to build each per-phone.cfg file you need to create. If you have
completed a spreadsheet that lists all the users, you will have a handy reference for the
extension and the MACaddress of each phone.
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Per-phone .cfg file template
A typical per-phone file will simply use an extension number for these parameters:
reg.1.address="8451" reg.1.auth.password="8451" reg.1.auth.userId="8451"
reg.1.displayName="8451" reg.1.label="8451" . These parameters will provide unique
information to connect this phone to the SIP server.
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
call.callsPerLineKey
1-4, 1-8, 1-24
4, 8, 24
Set the maximum number of concurrent calls per line key. This parameter applies to all registered lines.
Note that this parameter may be overridden by the per-registration parameter of
reg.x.callsPerLineKey.
reg.x.address
string address
Null
The user part (for example, 1002) or the user and the host part (for example, 1002@Spectralink.com) of
the registration SIP URI or the H.323 ID/extension.
reg.x.auth.password
string
Null
The password to be used for SIP server extension for this registration. If the password is non-Null, it will
override the password entered into the Authentication submenu on the Settings menu of the phone.
reg.x.auth.userId
string
Null
User ID to be used for SIP server extension for this registration. If the User ID is non-Null, it will override
the user parameter entered into the Authentication submenu on the Settings menu of the phone.
reg.x.label
UTF-8 encoded string
Null
The text label that displays next to the line key for registration x. If Null, the user part of reg.x.address
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Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
UTF-8 encoded string
Null
is used.
reg.x.displayName
The display name used in SIP signaling and/or the H.323 alias used as the default caller ID.
Per-User .cfg Files
In User Profiles Deployment, phones are not deployed per-phone; they are deployed per-user
so that you can have many more users than you have phones.
User Profiles Deployment
The per-user file is called login.cfg in the template. You will notice that this file has two different
line registration folders---one for Lync and one for openSIP---similar to the site.cfg file. Like you
did in the site.cfg file, delete the one that you will not be using.
The login.cfg file is named for the user’s login name. After the user enters the name on the
phone, the password must be entered. The login.cfg file needs to validate the password and
therefore the login password parameter is contained in this file.
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Per-user login.cfg file for User Profiles Deployment
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
prov.login.localPassword
String
123
The password used to validate the user login. It is stored either as plain text or encrypted (an SHA1
hash).
Lync Line Registration
The Lync line registration information should not be changed. It has been preset for proper Lync
operation. It must remain in the login.cfg file, even though it is common to all users, so that it only takes
effect after the user has logged into their profile.
OpenSIP Telephony Registration
The openSIP registration is the same as used for Flat and Group Deployments except for IM
parameters. See Flat/Group per-phone parameters.
For IM, the line registrations are in the login.cfg file instead of in the site.cfg file. See the IM section in
the site.cfg configuration section for parameter names and values.
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Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
OAI
oai.userId
String of eight hexadecimal
characters
Null
The lower four bytes of the six-byte OAI handset identifier in the OAI gateway. If OAI is provisioned in
the site.cfg file, you can use this parameter to provide a user ID to the OAI gateway.
If the value is null or invalid, the handset identifies itself to the OAI gateway using the MAC address of
the handset; otherwise, the upper two bytes are zero and the lower four bytes are as specified.
Example: "fffff315" 8 bit virtual hexadecimal address to identify each handset when User Profiles are
used. This example shows base ‘fffff” prepended with extension 315. Each handset shall have its own
virtual ID.
If the oai.userId is not used, then the 84-Series handset MACaddress is used to register the handset
with the OAI. The oai.userID is used with UserProfiles but is not needed for the standard profile.
Caution: Using a Lync Telephony Server with User Profiles
You must set up a default user when using User Profiles in a Lync telephony server
environment in order to make emergency calls without logging in. Contact a
Deployment Specialist for help in setting up default user parameters.
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Configure the <MACaddress>.cfg file
In Group Deployment, you will need to create a top level .cfg file for each phone. This top level
file will reference the per-phone file you created in the previous section and the feature.cfg and
Group.cfg files you create.
Refer to the spreadsheet you customized. It should list the extension/person, the MACaddress
of the phone assigned to that extension and the name of the group(s) you assigned to that
extension/person.
1
Open the MACaddress.cfg template in the Group_Deployment folder.
The MACaddress.cfg template
2
Edit the software path as needed.
3
Replace the CONFIG_FILES values with the filenames you create:
Template value
Type of .cfg file
Example name
insert-identity-here.cfg
per-phone file
3303.cfg
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Template value
Type of .cfg file
Example name
GroupA.cfg
Custom group file
ICUnurse.cfg
GroupB.cfg
Custom group file
MaternityNurse.cfg
site.cfg
System parameters
site.cfg
4
Enter values for the DIRECTORIES (You will set up these directories in the central
provisioning server).
5
Save as the MACaddress of the phone assigned to the identity you have entered in
CONFIG_FILE list. E.g. 00907A0CD967.cfg.
6
Repeat for all phones.
You will have as many unique MACaddress.cfg files as you have phones to deploy.
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Deploying Features
Some commonly-used features are included in the site.cfg file. The templates include .cfg files
for several features that may not be as familiar or may be only partially deployed. These .cfg
files can be uses as a resource to add features and parameters to existing site.cfg or group.cfg
files. In some cases, you may want to deploy a feature by including its .cfg file in the
CONFIG_FILE list of the top level .cfg file. Be aware of duplicate parameters and ensure that
you do not set conflicting parameters that will cause confusion later.
Templates are provided for these features:
•
Barcode
•
Directory
•
OAI
•
Personal Alarms
•
PTT
•
RTLS
Barcode
The barcode.cfg file includes settings for QBC which is also in the site.cfg file. You can deploy
barcodes with just that much but if you need to tweak those settings or use additional
symbologies, refer to the Barcode Administration Guide for detailed information and a list of all
barcode parameters.
Corporate Directory
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Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
feature.corporateDirectory.enabled
0 or 1
0
If 0, the corporate directory feature is disabled. If 1, the feature is enabled.
dir.corp.address
dotted-decimal IP address or hostname
or FQDN
Null
The IP address or hostname of the LDAP server interface to the corporate directory. For example,
host.domain.com.
dir.corp.password
UTF-8 encoded string
Null
The password used to authenticate to the LDAP server.
dir.corp.user
UTF-8 encoded string
Null
The user name used to authenticate to the LDAP server.
OAI
Parameter
Permitted values
Default
oai.gateway.address
IP address
Null
The address of the OAI server.
Personal Alarms
Spectralink 8441 and 8453 handsets offer personal monitoring and duress call functionality,
including “man down” alarms, “running” alarms and duress calls to an emergency number.
Duress call alarms can also be deployed within the functionality of the 8440 and 8452 models.
See the Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephone Administrative Guide for detailed information
about this feature.
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Push-to-talk (PTT)
PTT and Emergency Dial parameters are both included in the ptt.cfg file as they both use the
large Talk button on the left side of the handset.
Parameters from this file can be moved to the site.cfg and/or a group file.
Emergency Dial
Emergency Dial is also located in the site.cfg file. They are mutually exclusive features. If you
enable Emergency Dial in the site.cfg file, PTT cannot be deployed. If both are enabled,
Emergency Dial will take precedence and PTT will not work. Emergency Dial is disabled by
default.
Emergency dial is enabled by mapping the PTT key on the left side of the phone to a speed dial
function instead.
Parameter
Permitted values
Default
Key.20.function.prim
SpeedDial
Null
Maps speed dial key 20 to the PTT button if set.
Ptt.pttMode.enable
0 or 1
Null
If Emergency Dial is enabled, disable PTT by setting this value to 0.
ptt.emergencyDial.description
Null
Enter a label description which will appear on the display when the number is called.
ptt.emergencyDial.number
Null
Enter the number to be dialed.
PTT
Push-to-talk channels are frequently deployed in groups so that only certain people receive and
send transmissions on specific channels.
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Channels 1-25 are listed for each of the four folders. For each of these four types of settings,
the channels are listed and you can set the value according to your deployment requirements.
•
Available = the channel will appear on the phone and can be subscribed to.
•
Subscribed = the channel is active and incoming transmissions will be heard.
•
Allow Transmit = the user may transmit on the channel.
•
Label = the name of the channel that will appear on the handset’s screen during
transmissions.
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
ptt.pttMode.enable
0 or 1
0
If 0, push-to-talk is disabled. If 1, push-to-talk is enabled.
ptt.address
multicast IP address
224.0.1.116
The multicast IP address to send page audio to and receive page audio from. Use default.
ptt.compatibilityMode
0 or 1
1
If 0, the PTT protocol behavior is not compatible with Spectralink handset models 8020/8030 or older. If
1, all PTT protocol behavior is compatible with the older Spectralink handsets, even if some
configuration parameters are incompatible. For example, if this parameter is enabled and ptt.codec is
set to G.722, the G.726QI codec will be used for outgoing PTT audio to maintain compatibility.
ptt.defaultChannel
1 to 25
1
The PTT channel used to transmit an outgoing page if the user does not explicitly specify a channel.
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Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
ptt.payloadSize
10 to 80
20
The audio payload size in milliseconds. Use default.
ptt.priorityChannel
1 to 25
24
1 to 25
25
0 or 1
1
0 or 1
1
string
ch1: All, ch24: Priority,
ch25: Emergency, others:
Null
The channel assigned for priority pages.
ptt.emergencyChannel
The channel assigned for emergency pages.
ptt.channel.x.available
Make the channel available to the user
ptt.channel.x.allowTransmit
Allow outgoing broadcasts on the
channel
ptt.channel.x.label
The label to identify the channel
ptt.channel.x.subscribed
Subscribe the phone to the channel
0 or 1
ch1, 24, 25: 1, others: 0
A push-to-talk channel x, where x= 1 to 25. The label is the name used to identify the channel during
broadcasts.
If available is disabled (0), the user cannot access the channel or subscribe and the other channel
parameters will be ignored. If enabled, the user can access the channel and choose to subscribe.
If allowTransmit is disabled (0), the user cannot sent PTT broadcasts on the channel. If enabled, the
user may choose to send PTT broadcasts on the channel..
If subscribed is disabled, the phone will not be subscribed to the channel. If enabled, the phone will
subscribe to the channel.
RTLS
This parameter configures the use of the Ekahau Location System for the Spectralink handsets.
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Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
Wi-Fi.rtls.ekahau.address
IP-address
169.254.10.10
0 or 1
0
The IP address of the Ekahau Positioning Engine.
Wi-Fi.rtls.ekahau.enable
If 0, the Ekahua Real-Time Location System (RTLS) is disabled. If 1, the Ekahua RTLS is enabled.
Wi-Fi.rtls.ekahau.port
0 to 65535
8552
0 to 2
0
The port number of the Ekahau Positioning Engine.
Wi-Fi.rtls.ekahau.txInterval
The maximum time between transmit intervals. If set to 0, the transmit interval is 1-minute. If set to 1, the
transmit interval is 5-minutes. If set to 2, the transmit interval is 10-minutes.
Save the Central Provisioning Server .cfg Files
Save the files you have created in a separate folder in a convenient location. Later you will copy
these to the central provisioning server.
Ensure that the .cfg files have the correct extension. Some XML editors append “.xml” to a
filename when the file is saved. For example site.cfg.xml. Rename any files and delete the .xml
extension so that they only show the .cfg extension.
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Chapter 8: Configuring Wireless
Parameters (without SLIC)
Admin Tip: Using SLIC
The Spectralink Installation and Configuration (SLIC) tool is the preferred and
recommended method for configuring wireless parameters. See Chapter 1: Quick
Start with SLIC for additional information.
For those using SLIC, this chapter provides detailed information about wireless
configuration parameters.
Wireless parameters are configured on an initial provisioning computer by filling in the values in
the wireless.cfg file using an XML editor, then loading the file into each phone over a USB
MicroB. These parameters enable the phone to associate with the wireless LAN and find the
central provisioning server and other components. Once the central provisioning server is
accessed, the handset gets the rest of the files and parameters it needs from it.
This chapter explains how to configure the wireless parameters. The deployment chapter
explains how to load them into the handset.
Load the file into each handset
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the handset associates with the wireless LAN
and accesses the provisioning server
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Prepare to Configure the Wireless Settings
Wireless settings are listed in Chapter 4. Review the list and ensure you have the necessary
information before you start.
You can use the same computer to provision the wireless settings that you used to configure the
central provisioning server .cfg files in Chapter 5. Just be sure to keep the wireless settings in a
separate folder.
The USB_Setup folder
Two files are in the USB_Setup folder. You only need to configure the wireless.cfg file.
•
000000000000.cfg
•
wireless.cfg
The 0000000000.cfg file directs the handset to the wireless.cfg file to obtain the parameters it
needs. The 000000000000.cfg template is already set up for this and needs no changes. Save
this file to a convenient location. Do not change the filename.
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Configure wireless.cfg
The wireless.cfg file contains the parameters (settings, provisioning server IP and protocol, set
the Regulatory Domain for the local country, turn on the proper 802.11a/b/g radio and enable
channels, etc.) that the phone requires in order to associate with the wireless LAN.
Wireless.cfg, top view
When you will see a separate .set parameter
Only the device.x parameter uses the mechanism that requires a set=1 parameter to
confirm the parameter value. The device.x parameter is disabled by set=0. You will
not see the .set parameter used with any other type of parameter. The device.x
parameters are those which are loaded during the initial provisioning process with the
USB cable. Examples are: device.set="1", device.dhcp.enabled.set="1",
device.dhcp.enabled="1", etc.
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WriteDeviceConfig
Write device configuration allows the wireless parameters to be written to the phone and then
disables the USB connection to prevent future conflicts once the phone is connected to the
central provisioning server. Do not change the template values.
set device.set to 1 to write the new config for each device.xxx parameter being set, also set
device.xxx.set="1" after it
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
device.set
0 or 1
0
If set to 1, use the device.xxx fields that have device.xxx.set=1. Use the 1 value for initial
provisioning.
device.usbnet.enabled
0 or 1
0
If 0, USBNet is disabled. If 1, USBNet is enabled. USBNet must be disabled here.
PhoneAdminPassword
The Admin Password is the password that is required to access the Advanced settings in the
phones’ Settings menu. This password protects the phones from being inadvertently disabled
due to inexpert changes to its administrative settings. For efficient administration, this password
should be the same for all phones and is therefore in this file.
The phones’ admin password is configured here so it is not visible in the site.cfg file. The default
value is 456. This is the password that a user must enter to access the Advanced Settings on
the Settings menu on the phone.
Enter a value and change set to 1.
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Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
device.auth.localAdminPassword
string (32 character
max)
456
The phone’s local administrative password. The minimum length is defined by sec.pwd.length.admin. If
not defined, the default length is 1.
Enter the default password or change it as desired in the device.auth.localAdminPassword parameter
and change the set parameter to 1.
Special characters
Number of presses
Key
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
!
|
‘
^
\
@
:
1
*
.
*
-
&
%
+
;
(
0
/
,
_
$
~
=
?
0
#
#
>
<
{
}
[
]
“
9
)
`
Special characters in passwords
Some passwords may contain special characters that the phone cannot produce. The
special characters listed above are the only ones available in the phone. If your
password contains other special characters, you will need to change it to include only
those available in the phone.
Provisioning Server
Set the parameters for the central provisioning server requirements.
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Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
device.dhcp.bootSrvUseOpt
Default, Custom, Static,
CustomAndDefault
Null
Default The phone will look for option number 66 (string type) in the response received from the DHCP
server. The DHCP server should send address information in option 66 that matches one of the formats
described for device.prov.serverName.
Custom The phone will look for the option number specified by device.dhcp.bootSrvOpt, and the type
specified by device.dhcp.bootSrvOptType in the response received from the DHCP server.
Static The phone will use the boot server configured through the provisioning server device.prov.*
parameters.
Custom and Default The phone will use the custom option first or use Option 66 if the custom option is
not present.
device.dhcp.bootSrvOpt
Null, 128 to 254
160
When the boot server is set to Custom or Custom+Option66, specify the numeric DHCP option that the
phone will look for.
device.prov.serverType
FTP, TFTP, HTTP, HTTPS,
FTPS
Null
The protocol the phone uses to connect to the provisioning server. Note: Active FTP is not supported for
BootROM version 3.0 or later. Note: Only implicit FTPS is supported.
device.prov.serverName
dotted-decimal IP
address, domain name
string, or URL
Null
The IP address, domain name, or URL of the provisioning server, followed by an optional directory and
optional configuration filename. This parameter is used if DHCP is disabled (device.dhcp.enabled is 0),
if the DHCP server does not send a boot server option, or if the boot server option is static
(device.dhcp.bootSrvUseOpt is static).
Note: If you modify this parameter, the phone will re-provision. The phone may also reboot if the
configuration on the provisioning server has changed.
device.prov.user
string
Null
The user name required for the phone to log in to the provisioning server (if required).
Note: If you modify this parameter, the phone will re-provision. The phone may also reboot if the
configuration on the provisioning server has changed.
device.prov.password
string
Null
The password for the phone to log in to the provisioning server. Note that a password may not be
required.
Note: If you modify this parameter, the phone will re-provision. The phone may also reboot if the
configuration on the provisioning server has changed.
WirelessSettings
Wireless settings include those parameters that are necessary for establishing a wireless
connection between the phones and access points. You will need to be familiar with your
access points and their settings in order to set many of these parameters correctly.
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SSID
You will need to enable Wi-Fi and set the value of the SSID in your system.
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
device.Wi-Fi.enabled
0 or 1
1
If 0, the wireless interface is disabled. If 1, the wireless interface is enabled.
device.Wi-Fi.ssid
1
String
Null
0 or 1
1
The Service Set Identifier (SSID) of the wireless network.
device.Wi-Fi.dot11n.enabled
If 0, 802.11n support is disabled. If 1, 802.11n support is enabled.
Wi-Fi Radio Settings
Some of these setting will be familiar from setting up other wireless devices and some pertain
only to telephony radio usage. The frequencies that are permitted to wireless telephony devices
are strictly regulated by country or domain and each country establishes its own set of rules.
If you are deploying 802.11n, set device.wifi.dot11n.enabled to 1. More information about
802.11n can be found in the Spectralink white paper Deploying Enterprise-Grade Wi-Fi
Telephony. See the references section in the front of this document for more information.
Determine which domain you are in and the radio settings you will need by referring to the
pertinent tables.
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Regulatory Domain
Set your regulatory domain by country.
Domain
Country
1
United States
Canada
2
Europe (ETSI)
New Zealand
10
Australia
Caution: North America regulatory domain warning
If you are in North America, only regulatory domain 1 is permitted. If any other
domain is set, the error message ‘Invalid Regulatory Domain’ appears once the
handset is restarted and the handset will not associate with an AP. If this should
occur, check the label on the handset for the FCC certificate to verify that the handset
is for North America only, change the regulatory domain to 1 and update the
handset’s configuration.
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
device.Wi-Fi.radio.regulatoryDomain
1, 2, or 10
Null
The regulatory domain. The supported values are 1 (North America), 2 (Europe and 10 (Australia). The
domain must be set in order for the phones to associate with the wireless LAN.
Note: Country code vs. Domain name
In former releases of the software, the domain name was referred to as the country
code and the parameter was device.Wi-Fi.radio.countryCode.
Radio Frequency Settings
The Band/Frequency (2.4 GHz or 5 GHz) parameters can be configured for the desired 802.11
band on your WLAN network. If both bands are configured as active, the handsets’ band
roaming capabilities will choose the best signal available from both the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz
options. To disable the band roaming mechanism, configure only the band that the Spectralink
84-Series handsets are to use (either 2.4 GHz or 5 GHz, not both).
You will need to set sub-bands for the 5 GHz frequency and transmit power for both
frequencies.
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Subbands for the 5GHz Band
Regulatory authorities throughout the world subdivide the 5 GHz band into multiple sub-bands
according to the channel assignments in the country of use. After you select the regulatory
domain for your country, choose the channels used in your facility. Enable only the same bands
and sub-bands as are configured on your wireless infrastructure, otherwise the handsets will
waste time looking for a signal on the unused sub-bands and roaming performance will be
impaired.
Warning Do not enable all sub-bands
Do not enable all bands and sub bands in the WLAN or the phone. This will cause the
phone to have a very long channel scanning cycle which causes poor roaming and
poor audio. See Best Practices for Deploying Spectralink 84-Series Handsets White
Paper. The link is in the Recommended Reading section.
Caution: Sub-bands
The Spectralink 84-Series handset menus will display all four 5GHz sub-bands but only
those with channels shown in the following tables are available in your domain.
Sub-bands that are not available are marked in the tables as not applicable. If a band
is not available and you select it anyway and that is the only selected sub-band, the
handset will not be able to associate with an AP and the error message ‘Invalid
Regulatory Domain Setting’ displays on the handset. If this message displays, check
that the correct regulatory domain is selected, and then compare the sub-bands that
are enabled with the table for that regulatory domain shown next. Enable only those
sub-bands that are permitted for your regulatory domain and available in the WLAN.
The following tables identify which channels are available in your domain.
For Regulatory Domain 1:
Sub-band of 5 GHz
Band
Channel
DFS (Yes/No)
1
36, 40, 44, 48
No
2
52, 56, 60, 64
Yes
3
100, 104, 108, 112, 116,
120, 124, 128, 132, 136,
140
Yes
4
149, 153, 157, 161, 165
No
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For Regulatory Domain 2:
Sub-band of 5 GHz
Band
Channel
DFS (Yes/No)
1
36, 40, 44, 48
No
2
52, 56, 60, 64
Yes
3
100, 104, 108, 112, 116,
120, 124, 128, 132, 136,
140
Yes
4
Not applicable
Not applicable
For Regulatory Domain 10:
Sub-band of 5 GHz
Band
Channel
DFS (Yes/No)
1
36, 40, 44, 48
No
2
52, 56, 60, 64
Yes
3
100, 104, 108, 112, 116,
132, 136,
140
Yes
4
Not applicable
Not applicable
Transmit Power
For 2.4 GHz and each sub-band of 5 GHz, you will need to set the maximum transmit power
level the handset will use. If the APs use transmit power control, the handset listens to TPC
elements in the beacons or probe response frames and will reduce or increase its power to match
what the AP advertises but never exceeds the power setting set here.
P1..P6 limits the TX power to the existing definition of P1..P6
•
When TPC is enabled, it may further reduce the phone's transmit power from the power
specified in the menu, but will never exceed it.
•
if you set Tx for a sub-band that can't go that high, the phone will display a regulatory
domain error
P7 is the highest power possible for that sub-band
•
When TPC is enabled, it may further reduce the phone's transmit power
•
P7 is also called "Auto" in various menus
•
P7/Auto is the default setting
If no maximum is set, the handset uses the Auto/P7 settings for each channel activated.
The maximum power used by the handsets to transmit in supported 5 GHz sub-bands are
defined as follows.
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Maximum Power of 5 GHz
Band
Definition
P1
1mW RMS power 0dBm (6mW peak OFDM)
P2
5 mW RMS power 7dBm (32mW peak OFDM)
P3
10 mW RMS power 10dBm (63mW peak OFDM)
P4
16 mW RMS power 12dBm (100mW peak OFDM)
P5
25 mW RMS power 14dBm (158mW peak OFDM) (default)
P6
40 mW RMS power 16dBm (250mW peak OFDM) (default)
Auto/P7
MAX (maximum allowable power for that channel and data
rate)
The maximum power used by that the handsets to transmit in supported 2.4 GHz bands are
defined as follows.
Maximum Power of 2.4 GHz
Band
Definition
P1
1mW RMS power 0dBm (6mW peak OFDM, 1.8mW peak CCK)
P2
5 mW RMS power 7dBm (32mW peak OFDM, 9mW peak CCK)
P3
10 mW RMS power 10dBm (63mW peak OFDM, 18mW peak
CCK)
P4
16 mW RMS power 12dBm (100mW peak OFDM, 28mW peak
CCK)
P5
25 mW RMS power 14dBm (158mW peak OFDM, 45mW peak
CCK) (default)
P6
40 mW RMS power 16dBm (250mW peak OFDM, 71mW peak
CCK)
Auto/P7
MAX (maximum allowable power for that channel and data rate)
Wi-Fi Security
The topic of Wi-Fi security is thoroughly discussed in the Spectralink white paper Understanding
Wireless Security on Your Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones. See the references
section in the front of this document for more information.
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Caution: Delete unused security folders
You may only deploy one security method or no security method. To prevent
configuration conflicts and consequent inoperability, delete the unused security
folders.
Spectralink 84-Series handsets support the following security policies.
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
device.Wi-Fi.securityMode
None, WEP, WPAPSK, WPA2-PSK,
WPA2-Enterprise
Null
Spectralink 84-Series handsets only. The wireless security mode.
None
If you do not want to use any security method, enter None as the value.
Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP
WEP makes use of up to 4 pre-shared encryption keys. These keys can be either 40 or 104 bits in
length and must consist of only hexadecimal characters. The Spectralink 84-Series handsets do
not support key rotation. During operation, only one key can be used by the phone.
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
device.Wi-Fi.wep.authType
0, 1
0
The Wi-FI WEP authentication type. 0 = Open System, 1= Shared Key
device.Wi-Fi.wep.defaultKey
1 to 4
1
Specifies which of the four keys from device.Wi-Fi.wep.key1 to device.Wi-Fi.wep.key4 is used.
device.Wi-Fi.wep.encryptionEnable
0 or 1
1
String
String
String
String
Null
If 0, WEP encryption is disabled. If 1, WEP encryption is enabled.
device.Wi-Fi.wep.key1
device.Wi-Fi.wep.key2
device.Wi-Fi.wep.key3
device.Wi-Fi.wep.key4
The WEP hexadecimal key with a 40-bit or 104-bit length, as specified by device.WiFi.wep.keyLength.
device.Wi-Fi.wep.keyLength
0 or 1
1
The length of the hexadecimal WEP key. 0= 40-bits, 1= 104-bits.
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Wi-Fi Protected Access Personal (WPA-Personal) and WPA2-Personal.
WPA-Personal and WPA2-Personal use Pre-Shared Key (PSK) for authentication. WPAPersonal uses TKIP for encryption. WPA2-Personal uses AES for encryption.
In both cases, a PSK is used for the authentication. The PSK is a 64-character hexadecimal
key. To make the key easier to configure, a password (sometimes called a passphrase) and the
SSID are used to create the PSK. The Spectralink 84-Series handsets can use either the PSK
or passphrase form in the configuration.
WPA-Personal and WPA2-Personal Encryption
The Spectralink 84-Series handsets can use one encryption policy or the other but
not both at the same time. Spectralink 84-Series handsets run on an SSID that must
not be set for both AES and TKIP; otherwise, the handset will not associate to the
AP.
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
device.Wi-Fi.psk.keyType
The key type: key or passphrase.
device.Wi-Fi.psk.key
The hexadecimal key or ASCII passphrase.
0 or 1
1
string
Null
The WPA(2) PSK key type and key. If the key type is 0, a 256-bit hexadecimal key is used. If the key
type is 1, a string of 8 to 63 ASCII characters is used as the passphrase.
WPA2-Enterprise
WPA2-Enterprise uses the authentication methods defined by 802.1X, which are also used to
authenticate clients. After successful authentication by a RADIUS server, the AP and the client
can negotiate a very secure AES encryption.
There are several Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) types supported by WPA2Enterprise. The Spectralink 84-Series handsets support two common methods: PEAPv0/MSCHAP/-v2 and EAP-FAST. Both of these require that a certificate be installed on the handset
so the phone can authenticate to the RADIUS server (and prevent a man-in-the-middle attack).
•
PEAPv0/-MSCHAP/-v2. The server certificate is issued by a Certificate Authority (CA).
The certificate downloaded to the phone will either be the public certificate of the RADIUS
server or the public certificate of the CA. The CA can be publicly available like Verisign or
a private CA that your organization has set up.
The handset is preloaded with many of the publicly available CA certificates. You can
also store two CA certificates for RADIUS server authentication with the handset.
•
EAP-FAST. The certificate is called a PAC file and is issued by the RADIUS server. This
file can be loaded via the configuration file using a method called ‘out of band
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provisioning’. The certificate can also be loaded directly with the authentication server via
‘in band provisioning’ or over the air directly in a process referred to as ‘Phase Zero
Provisioning’.
Full WPA2-Enterprise authentication can take several seconds. If the phone reauthenticates every time it changes APs, a significant audio gap will be created at each
roam. Instead, the handsets support fast roaming techniques that allow them to derive
keys for the new AP without having to re-authenticate.
There are two fast roaming methods: Opportunistic Key Caching (OKC), which is from
the standards body, and Cisco Client Key Management (CCKM). CCKM is only available
on Cisco wireless infrastructure. The Spectralink 84-Series handsets support both
methods of fast roaming for WPA2-Enterprise.
Settings: Each <device/> Parameter has a Corresponding .set Parameter with
One Exception
Note that each <device/> parameter has a corresponding .set parameter that
enables or disables the parameter. There is one exception to this rule: the
device.sec.TLS.customDeviceCertX.set parameter applies to both
device.sec.TLS.customDeviceCertX.publicCert and to
device.sec.TLS.customDeviceCertX.privateKey.
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
device.Wi-Fi.wpa2Ent.method
2=EAPPEAPv0/MSCHAPv2,
6=EAP-FAST
Null
The Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) to use for 802.1X authentication.
device.Wi-Fi.wpa2Ent.roaming
0=OKC, 1=CCKM
Null
The WPA2-Enterprise fast roaming method. If OKC, Opportunistic Key Caching (OKC) is used. If CCKM,
Cisco Centralized Key Management (CCKM) is used. The fast roaming methods allow part of the key
derived from the server to be cached in the wireless network to shorten the time it takes to renegotiate a
secure handoff.
device.Wi-Fi.wpa2Ent.user
String
Null
String
Null
The WPA2-Enterprise user name.
device.Wi-Fi.wpa2Ent.password
The WPA2-Enterprise password.
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Parameter
Permitted Values
device.sec.TLS.customCaCert1 (TLS Platform
Profile 1)
device.sec.TLS.customCaCert2 (TLS Platform
Profile 2)
string
Default
Null
The custom certificate to use for TLS Platform Profile 1 and TLS Platform Profile 2.
device.sec.TLS.profile.caCertList must be configured to use a custom certificate.
device.sec.TLS.profile.profileSelection.dot1x
PlatformProfile1,
PlatformProfile2
PlatformProfile1
Choose the TLS Platform Profile to use for 802.1X, either TLS Platform Profile 1 or TLS Platform Profile 2.
device.sec.TLS.profile.caCertList1 (TLS
Platform Profile 1)
device.sec.TLS.profile.caCertList2 (TLS
Platform Profile 2)
Builtin,
BuiltinAndPlatform1,
BuiltinAndPlatform2,
All, Platform1,
Platform2,
Platform1AndPlatform2
All
Choose the CA certificate(s) to use for TLS Platform Profile 1 and TLS Platform Profile 2 authentication:
•
The built-in default certificate
•
The built-in and Custom #1 certificates
•
The built-in and Custom #2 certificates
•
Any certificate (built in, Custom #1 or Custom #2)
•
Only the Custom #1 certificate
•
Only the Custom #2 certificate
•
Either the Custom #1 or Custom #2 certificate
device.Wi-Fi.wpa2Ent.eapFast.inBandProv
0 or 1
If 0, the PAC file is initially loaded into to the handset during configuration (called out-of-band). If 1, the
PAC file is automatically loaded form the network (called in-band).
Wi-Fi QoS
If the APs used in your facility enforce admission control or access control, this QoS setting
must be configured. Consult your AP documents for specific information about AP requirements
and the value of this parameter if not null.
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
Device.wifi.acMandatory
0 or 1
Null
If 0, the handset will attempt to connect regardless of whether or not admission control is enforced in the
access point.
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DHCP
Unless you have a compelling reason to use static IP addresses, Spectralink recommends that
you use a DHCP server and configure the server for required settings. The Spectralink
Administrators Guide has additional DHCP settings.
DNS
Set the DNS parameters to appropriate values for your organization. This step is optional. The
DNS parameters can be supplied by DHCP.
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
device.hostname
string
Null
string
Null
string
Null
The device hostname
device.dns.domain
The phone’s DNS domain.
device.dns.serverAddress
The primary server to which the phone directs Domain Name System queries.
device.dns.altSrvAddress
server address
Null
The secondary server to which the phone directs Domain Name System (DNS) queries.
SNTP
The handset maintains a local clock. You can display the time and date during an active call and
when the handset is idle. The clock and calendar must be synchronized to a remote Simple
Network Time Protocol (SNTP) time server. The time and date are not displayed on the handset
until a successful SNTP response is received.
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Set SNTP parameters to appropriate values for your organization. Typically you will establish
the SNTP server name and the GMT offset for your time zone.
Settings: Configuring Your Phone for Local Conditions
Most of the default settings are typically adequate; however, if SNTP settings are not
available through DHCP, you will need to edit the SNTP GMT offset, and (possibly)
the SNTP server address for the correct local conditions. Changing the default
daylight savings parameters will likely be necessary outside of North America.
Disable the local Web (HTTP) server or change its signaling port if the local security
policy dictates. Change the default location settings for user interface language and
time and date format.
Parameter
Permitted Values
Default
device.sntp.gmtOffset
-43200 to 46800
Null
The GMT offset – in seconds – to use for daylight savings time, corresponding to -12 to +13 hours.
device.sntp.serverName
dotted-decimal IP
address or domain
name string
Null
The SNTP server from which the phone will obtain the current time.
Time Zones East of Greenwich
GMT
offset
Time Zone Abbreviations
GMT+1
CET = Central European Time
FWT = French Winter Time (France)
MET = Middle European Time
MEWT = Middle European Winter Time
SWT = Swedish Winter Time (Sweden)
3600
GMT+2
EET = Eastern European Time, USSR Zone 1
7200
GMT+3
BT = Baghdad Time, USSR Zone 2
10800
GMT+4
ZP4 = USSR Zone 3
14400
GMT+5
ZP5 = USSR Zone 4.
18000
GMT+6
ZP6 = USSR Zone 5.
21600
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Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones Deployment Guide
GMT
offset
Time Zone Abbreviations
GMT+7
CXT = Christmas Island Time (Australia)
25200
GMT+8
CCT = China Coast Time, USSR Zone 7
AWST = Australian Western Standard Time
WST = Western Standard Time (Australia)
28800
GMT+9
JST = Japan Standard Time, USSR Zone 8
32400
GMT+10
EAST = East Australian Standard Time
EST = Eastern Standard Time (Australia)
GST = Guam Standard Time, USSR Zone 9
36000
GMT+11
Seconds
39600
GMT+12
IDLE = International Date Line East
NZST = New Zealand Standard Time
NZT = New Zealand Time
43200
GMT+13
NZDT = New Zealand Daylight Time
46800
Time Zones West of Greenwich
GMT
offset
Time Zone Abbreviations
Seconds
GMT-1
WAT = West Africa Time
-3600
GMT-2
AT = Azores Time
-7200
GMT-3
-10800
GMT-4
AST = Atlantic Standard Time (Canada)
-14400
GMT-5
EST = Eastern Standard Time (USA & Canada)
-18000
GMT-6
CST = Central Standard Time (USA & Canada)
-21600
GMT-7
MST = Mountain Standard Time (USA & Canada)
-25200
GMT-8
PST = Pacific Standard Time (USA & Canada)
-28800-
GMT-9
AKST Alaska Standard Time (USA)
YST = Yukon Standard Time (Canada)
-32400
GMT-10
HST = Hawaii Standard Time
HAST Hawaii-Aleutian Standard Time (USA)
AHST = Alaska-Hawaii Standard Time (obs)
CAT = Central Alaska Time
-36000
GMT-11
NT = Nome Time
-39600
GMT-12
IDLW = International Date Line West
-43200
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Save the USB_Setup files
Save the wireless.cfg configuration file and initial 000000000000.cfg file in a separate folder you
will be able to locate when it is time to download them to the phones. We will describe how to
use these files to get your phone onto the wireless network in a later section of the Guide.
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Part III: Deployment
At this point, you have configured the .cfg files for wireless deployment and for the central
provisioning server. The deployment process involves loading these files into their proper
location so that the phone can use them. Deployment is a two-step process. The phones are
loaded with the wireless parameters and then they associate with the wireless LAN and obtain
the rest of the parameters from the central provisioning server. Therefore first we ensure the
central provisioning server is set up and then we download the wireless parameters into the
phones.
•
Setting up the central provisioning server
The top level .cfg files and the site.cfg, group.cfg, any feature.cfg and per-phone or peruser.cfg files must be loaded onto a central provisioning server.
•
Wireless deployment
The phones must be loaded with the wireless parameters before they can associate with
the wireless LAN. This is done with each phone in turn using an initial provisioning
server, usually a laptop, and a microB USB cable that connects the computer to the
phone.
•
Testing the handsets
We recommend deploying just a few phones at first and testing the features to ensure
the parameters have been configured properly. Once you are satisfied that the handsets
work as expected, then you can deploy the rest of them.
•
Deploying additional phones or features
You may need to add new phones or send phones to RMA for service. This chapter
explains how to decommission a phone, add a new or replacement phone and change
the configuration or scenario.
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Chapter 9: Set up the Central
Provisioning Server
This chapter provides basic instructions for setting up a central provisioning server. If you are
new to this process, it is important to read every section in this chapter.
A central provisioning server provides central management of software upgrades, language
support, configuration management, and diagnostic logging. The handsets connect to the
provisioning server over the wireless connection. The provisioning server provides the handsets
with configuration parameters required to operate, such as the call server address, the line
registrations, and the features that you want to enable on each of the handsets you deploy.
The provisioning server can be set up on the local LAN or anywhere on the Internet.
Configuration, log, directory, and override files are normally located on this server. If you allow
the phone write access to your provisioning server, the phone can use the server to upload files
(such as logs, overrides, and call lists) and store the user’s files. The phone is designed such
that if it cannot locate a central provisioning server when it boots up, it will operate with internally
saved parameters. This is useful when the central provisioning server is not available.
Central Provisioning Server Requirements
Depending on the size of the installation, number of 84-Series handsets and any other devices
which use the same server to load files, the power and speed of the server (and its system)
should match the number of devices which will boot at the same time. In an Enterprise
installation it can be common to have hundreds of devices boot and ask for their configuration
files.
The amount of disk space required depends on the number of phones deployed. The
requirements listed here are suitable for up to 1000 phones.
•
O/S: Windows XP SP3 | Windows 2003 Server | Linux/Unix
•
RAM: 2GB or more for workstations to 4GB or more for servers
•
Disk: 1GB or more recommended for sites over 1000 phones
•
Processor: 2GHz or greater
•
Network: 1GB Ethernet recommended
A simple provisioning configuration uses File Transfer Protocol or FTP. Although many FTP
servers are free, they require installation, and use logins and passwords. A free and popular
server, FileZilla Server, is available for Windows. This application has been tested with the UC
Software. See Appendix A for instructions about setting up an FTP server.
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Tip: Choosing a Provisioning Protocol
By default, Spectralink sets FTP as the provisioning protocol on all Spectralink
phones. This guide focuses on the FTP provisioning protocol. Other supported
protocols include TFTP, HTTP, and HTTPS. For more information about using these
other protocols, contact a Deployment Specialist.
Tip: Using RFC-Compliant Servers
Spectralink recommends that you use RFC-compliant servers.
Set up Directories
For organizational purposes, Spectralink recommends configuring separate directories for ease
of management and maintenance. These directories were discussed in earlier chapters in
connection with the top level .cfg files where the directories are named and the path is the
value. Example:
The name of the directory is set in the top level .cfg file and the actual folder must be created on
the central provisioning server.
File Permissions
The phone will attempt to upload log files, configuration override files, and a directory file to the
server if the file is changed. This requires that the phone’s account has delete, write, and read
permissions. The phone will still function without these permissions, but will not be able to
upload files.
Spectralink recommends that the phones have full read and write access to each directory.
Tip: Allowing File Uploads to Your Provisioning Server
Spectralink recommends that you allow file uploads to the provisioning server. File
uploads allow event log files to be uploaded. Log files allow boot and operational
status events to be saved to the server. These log files are very important when
investigating issues or failures. These log files greatly ease our ability to provide
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customer support in diagnosing issues that may occur with the phone operation.
Over-ride files provide backup copies of changes users make to the handset and to
the phone’s configuration through the Web server and/or local user keypad interface.
The phone’s server account needs to be able to add files that it can write to in the log file
directory and the provisioning directory. It must also be able to access files in all directories
mentioned in the <MACaddress>.cfg or 000000000000.cfg file. You may make all other files
that the phone needs to read, such as the application executable and the standard configuration
files read-only through file server permissions if additional security is desired.
Each phone may open multiple connections to the server.
If you know the phone is going to download a file from the server, you should mark the file as
read-only.
Downloading Spectralink 84-Series Software Files to
the Central Provisioning Server
The central provisioning server has been set up as an FTP server. Log into it so that you are in
the root directory.
Download the software from the Spectralink support website.
See the Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephone Release Notes for a detailed description of
each file in the distribution and further information on determining which software release to use.
When you download a software version, a notice will display asking you to accept the download
of the 84-Series software. Read the notice, click the button indicating that you have read the
notice, and click the Submit button to continue the software download.
Extract the files from the distribution zip file. The files will extract with a specific folder hierarchy.
Maintain this hierarchy.
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If you have set up directories in the same folder, they will be included in the above list. The
Config folder contains the templates. You have saved your edited files elsewhere. Leave the
templates here.
View the 84-Series Software Files
Admin Tip
In previous software releases, several software filenames were provided based on
the hardware id of the 84-Series handset. E.g. 3111-36150-001.sip.ld was the
software for the 8440 handset model. With Spectralink Software Release 4.3.x/4.4.x
and later, a unified software file is deployed that is applicable for all hardware models
(the 8440, 8441, 8450, 8452, and 8453 handset models).
If you are upgrading your system or adding 8441/8453 handsets to an existing
installation of 8440/8450/8452 handsets, please consult Appendix B for upgrading
instructions.
One software file pertains to all handset models. This unified file is named slnk84xx.sip.ld.
Copy your custom .cfg files to the appropriate folders
Part II Configuration walked you through the creation of your own central provisioning server
configuration files. Now these need to be loaded onto the server.
Load the central provisioning server .cfg files into the top level of the folder hierarchy. This
includes the 000000000000.cfg or MACaddress.cfg top level files, the site.cfg and any group or
feature .cfg files and any per-phone files.
If you are using User Profiles and have set up a USER_PROFILES Directory, load the per-user
login.cfg files into it. If you have not created a special directory for them, load them into the top
level.
Admin Tip: What about the wireless.cfg file?
The wireless.cfg file and the initial 000000000000.cfg file will be loaded directly into
the handsets via the Micro B USB cable. Do not load them onto the central
provisioning server.
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Ensure the Provisioning Server is available on the LAN
Once the phones get their wireless .cfg file, they will immediately reboot and connect to the
wireless LAN and seek the central provisioning server. Ensure they can find it by checking to
see if it is available on the network.
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Chapter 10: Wireless Deployment
The handsets will be able to associate with the wireless LAN after you download the
wireless.cfg file that contains the wireless parameters into the handsets via a microB USB
cable.
Power Tip: Load files onto provisioning server before doing this step
Once the phones receive their wireless parameters, they will associate with the
wireless LAN and look for the provisioning server. In the last chapter, the provisioning
server was configured and loaded with the .cfg files that the phones will request. Be
sure that step is done before loading the wireless files into the phones.
Identify a Suitable Initial Provisioning Computer
Because the handsets cannot access the wireless LAN before their wireless settings are
configured, you will need to establish a wired connection between a computer and each handset
and load the wireless settings via a USB Micro B connection. We will call this computer the
initial provisioning computer. It is a temporary setup and does not require exceptional resources
in the computer. Only one 84-Series handset is loaded at a time. Requirements are:
•
USB port
•
USB Micro B cable (available from Spectralink)
•
Enough memory for the operation (minimal)
•
FTP installed per Appendix A
Settings: FTP username and password
When you set up the initial provisioning server as an FTP server, use administrator
for the username and admin123 for the password. Ensure all checkboxes are
checked.
•
The original 000000000000.cfg file from the USB_Setup folder.
•
The wireless.cfg file configured in Chapter 7.
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Screen shot of the 000’s file pointing to wireless.cfg.
Enable the Handset’s Network Capabilities
If the initial provisioning computer is not running Microsoft Windows 7, you will need to load a
USB driver so that the computer can detect your Spectralink 84-Series handsets as a USB
network device. Copy the correct 84xx.inf to it, using the steps itemized below, You will add the
handset as a network device with Windows Add New Hardware wizard.
The 84xx.inf file applies to 32-bit computers running Microsoft Windows® XP SP3 and Microsoft
Vista® SP1. If you are using a 64-bit computer running Microsoft Windows Vista operating
system, you must use the 84xx-64.inf file.
Computers running Windows 7 or Linux do not require 84xx.inf or 84xx-64.inf.
To enable the handset’s networking capabilities:
1
Log into the computer as the administrator.
2
Download and copy 84xx.inf onto your 32-bit computer or copy 84xx-64.inf onto your 64bit computer from the Spectralink support site to an accessible location.
When the 84-Series handset is plugged in (using the USB cable) and the computer asks
for a driver, specify the location where you saved the .inf file.
Download the Wireless Configuration to the Handsets
Each scenario has its own set of features to be tested and informs what sample set should be
the first to deploy. Select a sample subset of phones for your initial deployment that will span
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the variety of features you have deployed to different users, or if all users will be deployed with
the same features, choose two phones.
Admin Tip: Ensure the handset is at its default settings
Perform a Reset to Factory. [Navigate to Settings > Advanced Settings > [Default
Password is 456] > Administration Settings > Reset To Defaults > Reset To
Factory.] on any handset that has been modified from its out of the box configuration.
1
Ensure that the initial provisioning computer is functioning as an FTP server.
2
On the initial provisioning computer load the wireless.cfg file into the FTP root directory.
3
Apply power to 84xx handset.
4
Connect micro-USB cable between the 84xx handset and initial provisioning computer.
5
(Conditional) The Found New Hardware wizard opens. Connecting the handset to the
initial provisioning computer launches the Found New Hardware wizard automatically.
The Found New Hardware wizard only displays the first time you use each USB slot on
your computer.
a
Select No, not this time, and click Next.
b
Select Install from a list or specific location (Advanced) and click Next.
c
Select Search for the best driver in these locations.
d
Select the check box for Include this location in the search:
e
Browse to your 84xx.inf or 84xx-64.inf and click Next.
f
The Linux USB Ethernet/RNDIS Gadget is installed.
g
A warning will be displayed indicating this driver has not passed Windows Logo
testing. Select Continue Anyway.
h
Click Finish.
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Depending on the USB port you choose on the initial provisioning computer, you may
also encounter a Windows alert advising you of a higher speed connection available with
a different USB port. You can safely ignore this message or, if you want, you can choose
another USB port on your computer that provides high-speed USB 2.0 support.
Admin Tip: Always use the same USB port.
If a different USB port is used the next time you download .cfg files to the phones, it
will probably indicate it does not have a driver and needs to install one. Therefore use
the same USB port for this operation every time you download these files to the
phones.
6
The handset will download the wireless configuration and then reboot making a tweedle
noise when finished.
7
(Conditional) If handsets do not immediately (within 10 seconds) download and reboot
after plugging the USB into them, you can manually force the configuration download by
navigating to the Settings menu on the handset: Settings> (1)Basic Settings>
(6)Update Configuration > Yes. If you use this option, Updating… remains on the
display until it is finished.
8
Once the handset reboots, disconnect the USB cable from 84xx handset and allow it to
download the rest of its configuration files from the provisioning server.
Caution: Do not disconnect the phone prematurely
When the 84-Series handset reboots it has downloaded its wireless.cfg file and the
USB cable can be disconnected. The phone will boot and connect to the WLAN to
load the rest of its configuration files from the provisioning server.
How long does it take for the handsets to download the rest of the
configuration files?
Note that when handsets connect to the WLAN they will request the rest of the .cfg
files that are located on the provisioning server. The handsets may take 1-10 minutes
to fully configure and be ready for testing or end user functionality.
9
Test the first few handsets to be sure your configuration is working as desired. Go to
Chapter 9 to conduct a test of the phones before deploying the remaining phones.
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Admin Tip: Re-downloading the software
If something has gone wrong and the configuration needs to be edited and the phone
needs to be redeployed, reset factory defaults and start over at step 3 above.
10
Use the Optimizations pointers below if deploying a quantity of handsets.
Optimization Pointers for Quantity Deployment
You can speed up the deployment of the rest of the handsets by following these pointers:
•
Ensure you have a fully charged battery for each handset.
•
All handsets must be in factory default state. If handsets have been modified, return
them to the factory default state.
•
Install batteries and power up all handsets.
•
One at a time, plug the USB cable into each handset. The handset will download the .cfg
file and reboot. Unplug the handset and repeat with next handset.
Caution: Do not overload the APs during initial deployment
A single AP can handle many handsets during this initial configuration time. But may
be over-loaded if too many 84-Series handsets are powered up and loading code or
files. After 15 or so are loaded and fully functional, power off or move the handsets
out of range so the number of handsets using the one AP is limited.
Which Phone Goes to Which User?
At the end of the deployment sequence, you will have a pile of phones to distribute to users
throughout your facility. When you turn on the phone, the screen will display a label below the
status bar. This label is commonly an extension, but it could be a name or a combination of a
name and an extension. Use the label to determine which user should receive the phone. Refer
to your User List as needed.
Storing Wireless Configuration Files
Maintenance chores will require that you occasionally reload a phone with the wireless.cfg file.
Therefore you will want to maintain an initial configuration computer and store the files on it so
that they are easily accessible when you need them. We recommend using a different computer
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than the central provisioning server for this purpose due to usually conflicting FTP requirements
between initial and central provisioning.
The wireless.cfg file and the 000000000000.cfg file in the USB_Setup folder are only used for
the initial deployment of new phones, RMA replaced phones or after a phone is reset to factory
defaults.
During deployment, the 000000000000.cfg and wireless.cfg files should be located on the initial
provisioning computer in the directory identified by the FTP profile administrator with the
password admin123.
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Chapter 11: Testing the Handsets
Once the handsets have associated with the wireless LAN, loaded files from the provisioning
server and registered with the SIP server it should be able to make and receive calls and utilize
all other features that have been configured.
Wireless LAN Association
You can tell if the phone is associating with the wireless LAN by the state of the RF signal
strength bar icons in the upper left hand corner of the display. A phone that is associating with
the wireless network will have 1 to 4 white bars on its RF signal strength indication icon in the
upper left hand corner of the screen when it has fully connected to the WLAN. If the phone
cannot associate with the wireless network, it will display a red X over the RF signal strength
icon.
Test Configured Features
Now is the time to test configured features, one at a time, to ensure they are working on a few
representative phones before deploying all of them.
Caution: Testing parameter interaction is required
Though individual parameters are checked to see whether they are in range, the
interaction between parameters is not checked. If a parameter is out of range, an
error message will display in the log file and parameter will not be used.
Incorrect configuration can put the phones into a reboot loop. For example, server A
has a configuration file that specifies that server B should be used, and server B has
a configuration file that specifies that server A should be used.
To detect errors, including IP address conflicts, Spectralink recommends that you test
the new configuration files on two phones before initializing all phones.
Return to Chapter 9 and finish deploying the rest of the phones.
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Chapter 12: Deploying Additional Phones
or Features
After your initial installation you may decide to add more phones, expand the feature set or you
may need to repair a phone and redeploy it. This chapter covers the sequence of actions you
should take when these situations occur.
Adding New Phones
When you get new phones from the factory, they need to be provisioned and deployed in your
facility in the same manner you used with the first set. This is why we stored your initial
000000000000.cfg and wireless.cfg files on the initial provisioning server—so you could find
them again when phones needed to be added.
You will once again need to determine which Scenario you will be using per the discussion in
Chapter 5. Are these new phones part of an already-established Scenario or are you expanding
your system and deploying mac address specific phones or User Profiles that you did not have
before? You will need to keep track of who will use each phone and the features that will be
provisioned and activated.
Configuration
Configure the new phones according to the instructions for the selected deployment scenario.
At a minimum, you will need to create a new per-phone or per-use file for the new phones. If
you are changing the scenario, consult with a Deployment Specialist before proceeding.
Deployment
Load the new per phone or per user configuration files into the provisioning server just like you
did in Chapter 7.
Set up an initial provisioning computer just as you did in Chapter 8 Follow the directions in
Chapter 8 for loading the configuration into the new phones.
Test
Test the new phones and each feature you have activated before distributing them to the end
users.
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Decommissioning for RMA
Unless specifically directed otherwise by Spectralink Product Support, perform a factory reset to
clear out all facility and personal information on the handsets you will be returning to the repair
center. Any local settings will be lost.
If you have User Profiles configured, all settings reside on the server unless changed locally.
Therefore any individual preferences that are part of the User Profile are preserved.
Receiving Phones from RMA
When phones are received back from RMA as replacement phones, they can be re-deployed
just as if they are new, with a few provisos.
RMA does not change the mac address. Therefore if you are using Group Deployment and
already have the <MACaddress>.cfg file on the provisioning server, it will direct the phone to the
specific user/extension it had before being repaired. Ensure the <MACaddress>.cfg file already
exists or build a new one.
If you are using Flat Deployment, ensure the [MACADDRESS]-ext.cfg file already exists or build
a new one to use for the same or a different user.
Changing Phone Configuration
If you have a User Profile that you want to rename or a <MACaddress>.cfg file that you want to
direct to a different user/extension, you will need to change the appropriate .cfg file.
You may need to add PTT channels or reorganize the groups or perhaps change from using the
generic 00000000000.cfg system as used in Flat Deployment to using the <MACaddress>.cfg
system as defined by Group Deployment. Edit your spreadsheet first to ensure you have the
system design you want and use it to edit the various.cfg files accordingly.
Adding New or Advanced Features
This document covers basic telephony functions and several very popular features. If you need
more information about any of the features or want to deploy additional features, please see the
Spectralink Administrator’s Guide and the various Feature Profiles that will give you the data
you need to configure your system.
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Part IV: Troubleshooting
This chapter contains general troubleshooting and diagnosis information to help you solve
common issues you might encounter when loading the initial parameters, deploying or using the
Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephones in a wireless environment. The handset can provide
feedback in the form of on-screen error messages, status indicators, and log files for
troubleshooting issues.
For detailed information on error messages, log files, handset testing hardware, and handset
issues—along with likely causes and corrective actions— see the Troubleshooting chapter of the
latest Spectralink 84-Series Wireless Telephone Administration Guide.
This chapter covers the following:
•
Determining which .cfg files are loaded
•
Determine which software version is loaded
•
Check for connection to WLAN (initial connection)
•
Check for connection to SIP server
•
Calling using the SIP server
•
Calling using URL dialing when SIP server dialing fails
•
Setting Up Syslog
•
User Accessible Network Diagnostics
•
Wi-Fi Diagnostics
•
Run Site Survey
•
Access Point Issues
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Chapter 13: Basic Troubleshooting
Config Files
Navigate to Settings > Status > Platform > Configuration. The configuration screen displays
the IP address of the server, the protocol being used, the .cfg files and detailed information
about each of the .cfg files.
Provisioning Methods and Override Files
Three provisioning methods exist; the central provisioning server, the Web Configuration Utility,
and the local phone user interface. Only the central provisioning server method can provision all
settings. The Web Configuration Utility and the local phone interface do not offer every setting.
Changes made through the Web Configuration Utility or the phone’s keypad user interface are
stored internally as overrides. These overrides parameters take precedence over settings
contained in the configuration obtained from the provisioning server in this order:
1
Single phone keypad interface
2
Web Configuration Utility
3
Central Provisioning Serfer
If the central provisioning server permits file uploads, override settings created using the Web
Configuration Utility will be saved in a file called <MACaddress>-web.cfg.
When parameters are changed using the phone’s keypad, they are saved in a
<MACADDRESS>-phone.cfg file on the central provisioning server as well as in flash memory.
Caution: Persistence of Web settings
Web configuration changes will continue to override the provisioning server-derived
configuration until they are:
•
deleted through the Reset Web Configuration menu selection or
•
configured using the <device/> parameters
•
the <MACaddress> web.cfg override file on the provisioning server is deleted.
Local configuration changes—made through the phone’s user interface—will continue
to override the central provisioning server-derived configuration until they are:
•
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•
configured using the <device/> parameters
the <MACaddress>-.phone.cfg override file on the central provisioning server is
deleted.
Clearing overrides on a single phone
On the phone, go Settings > Advanced > Administration Settings > Reset to Defaults. Select
one of the following options.
•
Reset Local Configuration
phone user interface
Clears the override file generated by changes using the
•
Resert Web Configuration
Web Configuration Utility.
Clears the override file generated by changes using the
•
Reset Device Settings Resets the phone’s flash file system settings that are not stored
in an override file.
•
Format File System Formats the the phone’s flash file system settings and deletes the
UC Software application, log files, and override files. Note that if the override file is
stored on the provisioning server, the phone will re-upload the override file when you
provision the phone again. Formatting the phone’s file system does not delete the device
settings.
•
Reset to Factory Formats the phone’s flash file system and deletes the device settings.
Caution: Reset to Factory
Do not reset the phone to its factory defaults unless you want to wipe out all
configuration settings and reload them, starting with the wireless.cfg file.
Software Version
Navigate to Settings > Status > Platform > Application > Main.
Wireless Connection
Wireless problems might exist when the phone is first configured via the microB USB cable.
Navigate to Settings > Status > Diagnostics > Warnings.
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Symptom
Problem
No bars
Bars with red X
The phone has not
associated with an AP.
Corrective Action
•
Verify setting in your
wireless.cfg file.
•
If settings are changed,
Connection to SIP Server and Calling
Symptom
Problem
The line icon shows an
unregistered line icon. (red
chack mark)
The line is unregistered.
Corrective Action
•
Verify that the appropriate
configuration parameters are
set correctly.
•
Verify that the call server is
functioning correctly.
Test calling using the SIP server:
Dial the extension of another phone
and press the green dial call button.
When the other phone answers the
call you are now in call and can speak
to the other party. End the call by
pressing the red end call button.
If/when this phone is called it will ring
and display the name or number of
the calling party. Press the green start
call button to answer the call.
Calling using URL dialing when SIP
server dialing fails:
The 84-Series handset can make or
receive calls using the IP address of
another Spectralink phone. To make
a call the phone must be connected
to the WLAN AP (with no red X over
AP signal strength bars), press the
green start call button, then press Dial
Mode soft key, select URL, enter the
IP address of the phone to call,
192.168.2.100 (use the * key for the
dots to separate the IP fields), then
press the start call key. This is a way
to test the phone to ensure it is
working with the WLAN when the SIP
server or its connection is not
established.
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Display
Symptom
Problem
Corrective Action
The time and date are not
displayed.
You have disconnected the
handset from the WLAN or
there is no SNTP server
configured.
Do one of the following:
•
Reconnect the handset to the
WLAN.
•
Disable the time and date
display on the handset:
Select Settings > Basic
Settings > Preferences >
Time & Date. The Time &
Date screen displays.
Scroll to Disable, and then
press the Ok key.
Press the Home key.
1
2
3
The Home Screen no longer
displays the time and date.
Upgrading
Symptom
Problem
The handset does not
upgrade from the central
provisioning server.
The provisioning server is
offline or the handset is
disconnected from the
WLAN.
Corrective Action
•
Verify that the provisioning
server address is correct on
the handset and in the
configuration files.
•
Verify that the Spectralink
84-Series software is
available on the provisioning
server.
•
Verify that the configuration
files are available from the
provisioning server.
•
Verify that WLAN parameters
in the configuration files are
correct.
Setting Up Syslog
For more information on setting up syslog, see the Technical Bulletin Using Syslog for Logging
of Complete SIP Messaging.
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User Accessible Network Diagnostics
You can access the Ping and TraceRoute network diagnostic features through the handset’s
menu.
From the Home Screen, select Settings, and then select Status > Diagnostics > Network.
Parameter values
The following rules apply when you set a parameter with a numeric value outside of its valid
range:
•
If the configuration file’s value is greater than the allowable range, the maximum value is
used
•
If the configuration file’s value is less than the allowable range, the minimum value is
used.
•
If a parameter’s value is invalid, the value is ignored. Invalid parameters values can
occur when enumerated type parameters do not match a pre-defined value, when
numeric parameters are set to a non-numeric values, when string parameters are either
too long or short, or when using null strings in numeric fields.
•
All such situations are logged in the phone’s log files.
A sample entry is: 000026.145|cfg |4|00|Prm|syslog.cfg: Unknown parameter
"log.level.change.lp" found, ignoring.
Settings: Types of parameter values
The configuration parameters available in the Spectralink Software use a variety of
values, including Boolean, integer, enumerated types, and arrays (a table of values).
Each parameter included in the 84-Series template files is listed in this document
along with its description, the default value, and the permissible values. If the value
that has been configured does not match the allowable range of values it will be
ignored and the error is logged in the phone’s mac-app.log file. E.g.
|cfg |4|00|Prm|syslog.cfg: Unknown parameter "log.level.change.lp" found, ignoring.
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Chapter 14: Wi-Fi Diagnostics
The Wi-Fi diagnostics feature enables you to gauge the overall health of the Spectralink
84-Series handsets in relation to the rest of the system, particularly the Access Points (APs).
These Diagnostics screens can be accessed from standby mode but the diagnostics data will
be stale, showing the last update. There is an advantage to having the phone in call when
using diagnostics mode. The data will be updated in real time to show the current data for all
screens. Enter diagnostics mode when in call by calling another phone or answering a call
normally, then press the return key (above the end call key) to access the carousel then the
following:
Select the Settings icon on the Home Screen. Select Status > Diagnostics > Wi-Fi Stats.
You can scroll forward or backward through these screens using the Prev and Next soft keys.
The six Wi-Fi Diagnostic screen selections are as follows:
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Screen 1 (Packet Count)
•
Line 1: Missed receive packet count since power on
•
Line 2: Missed transmit packet count since power on
•
Line 3: Receive retry count since power on
•
Line 4: Transmit retry count since power on
Screen 2 (General Information)
•
Line 1: Service set identifier (SSID) of the current AP
•
Line 2: Last successful transmit data rate
•
Line 3: Transmit power (in dBm)
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Screen 3 (AP List)
•
Line 1: Currently associated AP
The format of this line is as follows: mmmmch-ssaid where:
mmmm—Last 6 bytes of the AP’s MAC address ch—Channel number
ss—Signal Strength
•
Other lines: Other local APs
The format of each line is as follows: mmmmch-ssmnem where:
mmmm—Last 6 bytes of the AP’s MAC address ch—Channel number
ss—Signal Strength
mnem—Mnemonic for the reason code as to why the handset did not hand off to this
AP (For the list of mnemonic reason codes, see Mnemonic Reason Codes below.)
The above screen shot shows the phone connected to the AP Radio MAC ending in
e4ed68 using channel 153 with RSSI of -77dBm
Mnemonic Reason Codes
The following mnemonic reason codes display on the AP Lists (third screen) of the Wi-Fi
Diagnostics:
•
Unkn: Reason unknown
•
Weak: Signal strength too weak or weaker than the currently used AP
•
Rate: One or more requiredc rates are not supported by the AP
•
Full: The AP cannot handle the bandwidth requirements
•
AthT: Authentication timeout
•
AscT: Association timeout
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•
AthF: Authentication failure
•
AscF: Association failure
•
SecT: Security handshake timeout
•
SecF: Security handshake failure
•
Cnfg: The AP is not configured correctly for security, QOS, or infrastructure network
Screen 4 (Association Count/Failure)
•
Line 1: Association count since power on
•
Line 2: Reassociation count since power on
•
Line 3: Association failures since power on
•
Line 4: Reassociation Failure Count since power on
•
Line 4: Reassociation failures since power on
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Screen 5 (Security)
•
Line 1: Count of Message Authentication Code (MIC) Failures since power on
•
Line 2: MAC sequence number of packet causing last MIC error/failure
•
Line 3: Count of Integrity Check Value (ICV) errors since power on
•
Line 4: Count of Traffic Specification (TSPEC) rejections since power on
Screen 6 (Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP)
Information)
•
Line 1: EAP error count since power on
•
Line 2: Last generated EAP error code
•
Line 3: 802.11n: disabled (if shown) or 802.11n: enabled (if not shown)
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Chapter 15: Run Site Survey
The Run Site Survey feature is used to evaluate the facility RF coverage before certifying that
an installation is complete. It can also be used at any time to evaluate coverage by displaying
RF signal strength, to gain information about an AP, and to scan an area for all APs regardless
of the Service Set Identifier (SSID). When Site Survey is run, the 84-Series handset is offline
and not able to receive or initiate a call. The AP information available through the site survey
includes:
•
SSID
•
Beacon Interval
•
AP information regarding support of 802.11d, 802.11h, and other 802.11 amendment
standards as required
•
Current security configuration
From the Home Screen, select Settings, and then select Advanced Settings (456) >
Administration Settings > Diagnostics > Run Site Survey.
The Site Survey uses the user-configured bands/sub-bands for its scanning. If the site survey is
not able to understand which bands are allowed for the scanning, it will not proceed and the
error message Cannot run site survey with current configuration displays.
The Site Survey will not start if:
•
The Wi-Fi is disabled.
•
The regulatory domain is not set.
•
The 5z GHz and 2.4 GHz bands are both disabled.
A summary of the current Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) configuration displays.
On this screen:
•
Line 1: SSID set by user
•
Line 2: Regulatory domain
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•
Line 3: 2.4-GHz band channels, if enabled. Channel range is displayed in parentheses (
).
•
Lines 4 to 7: 5-GHz band channels, if enabled. If a particular band is a Dynamic
Frequency Selection (DFS) channel, (DFS) is displayed.
To start the site survey, press the Start soft key.
There are two modes of display: Summary and Detail. These modes can be selected pressing
the mode desired using either the Summary or Detail soft key.
The Summary screen shows.
•
Line 1 AP Radio MAC and RSSI
•
Line 2 channel and SSID (as configured in 84-Series .cfg files)
•
Up to four APs are displayed.
Press the Detail softkey:
The 84-Series configured SSID Detail screen shows. Use the arrow keys to step through the
APs.
•
Line 1: Radio MAC and RSSI
•
Line 2: channel and SSID
•
Line 3: SSID security info
•
Line 4: WMM info
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•
Line 5: data rates (5.5Mbps is Basic while others are supported)
•
Line 6: Beacon rate (102.4ms), with DTIM = 2
•
Line 7: Capability info: SM=spectrum management enabled, SP=short preamble,
ST=short timeslot, PR=privacy bit enabled, CA=channel agility
Press the All softkey:
The All SSID summary screen shows:
•
Line 1: AP radio MAC and RSSI
•
Line 2: channel and SSID
•
Line 3: 2nd AP Radio and RSSI
•
Line 4: channel and SSID
•
Line 5: 3rd AP radio MAC and RSSI
•
Line 6: channel and SSID
•
Line 7: 4th AP radio MAC and RSSI
•
Line 8: channel and SSID
DTIM
DTIM is the abbreviation for Delivery Traffic Indication Message. This parameter value
indicates the time interval in terms of no beacons at which the AP releases multicast and
broadcast packets to associated clients and associated clients have to be awaken to receive
all of these multicast and broadcast packets.
Update Interval
Site survey display is updated (typically every one second) with the refreshed AP List. It can
become difficult to read the details of the scanned APs, if the update appears too frequently
(especially in All mode). You have the option of freezing the display by pressing the Freeze soft
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key. When enabled, the Freeze soft key will not update the AP list until the Update is again
activated. To activate the Update, press the Update soft key.
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Chapter 16: Access Point Issues
Most, but not all, handset audio issues are associated with AP range, RF signal strength,
positioning, and capacity. Performing a site survey as described in Run Site Survey on page 457 can isolate the AP causing these types of issues. If the handset itself is suspected, conduct a
parallel site survey with a handset that is known to be properly functioning.
In Range/Out-of-Range
Service will be disrupted if a user moves outside the area covered by the WLAN APs. Service is
restored if the user moves back within range. If a call drops because a user moves out of range,
the handset will recover the call if the user moves back into range within a few seconds. If the
call is dropped there is no recovery and the call is lost. If audio stops or gets choppy when the
user moves out of range, this can be remedied by moving back in range.
Capacity
In areas of heavy use, the call capacity of a particular AP may be full. If this happens, audio gets
poor and the user may hear three chirps from the handset. The user can wait until another user
terminates a call, or the user can move within range of another AP and try the call again. If a
user is on a call and moves into an area where capacity is full, the system attempts to find
another AP. Due to range limitations, this may be the same as moving out of range.
Transmission Obstructions
A highly reflective environment (metallic) will cause a multi-path environment. The RF
transmissions will reflect or bounce off metallic objects which cause packet corruption, high retry
rates, Missed and/or Dropped packets. Diversity in the AP using two or more antennas (often
separated by a few feet if possible) will go far to alleviate multi-path environments. It can also
help to lower the AP (out of the ceiling rafters, AC ducting, electrical wiring) so there is a more
direct line of site between the AP and 84-Series handset.
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Part V: Appendices
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Appendix A: Setting up an FTP Server
Read this section if you have never set up a provisioning server before.
A simple provisioning configuration uses File Transfer Protocol or FTP. Although FTP servers
are free, they require installation, and use logins and passwords. A free and popular server,
FileZilla Server, is available for Windows. This application (version 0.9.xx) has been tested with
the Spectralink Software.
Tip: Choosing a Provisioning Protocol
By default, Spectralink sets FTP as the provisioning protocol on all Spectralink
phones. This guide focuses on the FTP provisioning protocol. Other supported
protocols include TFTP, HTTP, and HTTPS.
To set up an FTP server using FileZilla Server:
1
Download and install the latest version of FileZilla Server.
2
After installation, a Connect to Server pop-up displays on your computer. Select OK to
open the administrative user interface.
3
To configure a user, select Edit > Users in the status bar.
4
Select Add.
5
Enter the user name for the phone and select OK.
For example, administrator.
6
Select the Password checkbox and enter a password.
For example, admin123. The phone will use this password to log in.
Admin Tip: Provisioning computer requirement
“administrator” must be used as the username and “admin123” as the password
when setting up the initial provisioning computer. The central provisioning server my
use a different user name and password.
7
Select Page > Shared folders to specify the server-side directory where the
provisioning files will be located (and the log files uploaded).
8
Select Add and pick the directory.
9
To allow the phone to upload logs onto the provisioning server, select the Shared
Folders > Files > select Write and Delete checkboxes, and then select OK.
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10
Determine the IP address of the FTP server by entering cmd in the Run dialog on your
Start menu, and ipconfig in the command prompt.
The IP Address of the FTP server is shown.
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Appendix B: Upgrading Spectralink
84-Series Software
You can upgrade the software that is running on the Spectralink 84-Series handsets in your
organization. The updater, Spectralink software executable, and configuration files can all be
updated on the central provisioning server.
Upgrading Your Phones
Please read the Release Notes before performing the upgrade.
Admin Tip: Which software version to use?
You will need to be sure that you are running the 4.4.x or 4.6.x Lync software release
if your handsets are Lync-compatible and you are using a Lync server for telephony
functions, instant messaging, presence and/or calendaring. Handsets variants sold
without Lync support shall will not run Lync software releases.
Starting with 4.4.0, even numbered releases support Lync, odd numbered releases
do not.
Spectralink 84-Series handset models 8441 and 8453 are shipped from the factory with
software release 4.3.0 (or later) for basic SIP and 4.4.0 (or later even numbered releases) for
SIP with Lync already installed. These models cannot run earlier code versions (as the older
releases do not support these handsets’ personal alarm capabilities). Wherever possible,
Spectralink recommends upgrading to upgrade to the latest available software that supports
your handset type.
Software release 4.2.1 and earlier contained multiple software images with filenames that were
based on the hardware id of the 84-Series handsets. With release 4.3.x or 4.4.x and later, the
release has been simplified to contain a single software image that supports all hardware
models (the 8440, 8441, 8450, 8452, and 8453 models). The filename is slnk84xx.sip.ld for a
SIP release or slnk84xx.lync.ld for the SIP with Lync release.
However the introduction of the single filename requires a transition step when updating
8440/8450/8452 handsets running software 4.2.1 or earlier, because the previous older
software does not know about this new filename.
Handsets running 4.2.1 or earlier will look for a filename using the following algorithm:
First they will look for a file based on the model’s hardware ID For example, an 8440
phone will look for a file named 3111-36150-001 pre-pended to the value of
APP_FILE_PATH (typically set as “sip.ld”).
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If that file can’t be found, then it looks for APP_FILE_PATH as a standalone file (sip.ld or
lync.ld).
If the APP_FILE_PATH parameter is not available, it will use whatever software is
already loaded in the phone.
Therefore we must direct the phone to the new unified filename at the start and it will thereafter
know how to find it.
To upgrade phones running 4.2.1 (or earlier) to Spectralink 84-Series software 4.3.x/4.4.x
or later:
1
Back up your existing application and configuration files.
2
Download the latest software version that corresponds to your handset model. (Lync or
SIP) from the support.spectralink.com website.
3
Log into the central provisioning server
4
Unzip the software. Ensure you do not overwrite any files that you need to keep.
5
Copy your .cfg files back to the root directory.
6
There are two methods to have the existing phones load 4.3.0/4.4.x or later firmware:
a
b
7
Rename the new release firmware image (i.e. slnk84xx.sip.ld or slnk84xx.lync.ld) to
the hardware model of the phones installed at your site. The following list indicates
how to rename the files based on your phone model. If your site contains several
84-Series handset models, simply copy the slnk84xx.sip.ld or slnk84xx.lync.ld file as
many times as needed and rename each copy to match the required file name:
»
8440 - rename to 3111-36150-001.sip.ld
»
8450 - rename to 3111-36152-001.sip.ld
»
8452 - rename to 3111-36154-001.sip.ld
Or change the value of the APP_FILE_PATH parameter in the config files to
slnk84xx.sip.ld or slnk84xx.lync.ld.
Reboot the 84-Series handset or update configuration using the keypad.
a
Configuration file changes and enhancements are explained in the Release Notes
that accompany the software.
Admin Tip
The phones can be configured to periodically poll the provisioning server for changed
configuration files or application executables. If a change is detected, the phone may
reboot to download the change. Contact a Deployment Specialist for assistance in
setting up this option.
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To upgrade phones to Spectralink 84-Series software 4.2.0
1
Back up your existing application and configuration files.
2
Log into the central provisioning server and download the 4.2.0 software from the
website.
3
Unzip the software. Ensure you do not overwrite any files that you need to keep.
4
Copy your .cfg files back to the root directory.
5
Check your top level files and ensure the APP_FILE_PATH=”sip.ld” parameter is in the
000000000000.cfg or <MACaddress>.cfg file.
6
Reboot the 84-Series handset or update configuration using the keypad.
Configuration file changes and enhancements are explained in the Release Notes that
accompany the software.
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Appendix C: Using the Web
Configuration Utility
You can make changes to the phone’s configuration through the Web Configuration Utility. The
utility also permits many application settings to be modified, such as SIP server address, ring
type, or regional settings such as time/date format and language. Some items in the Settings
menu are locked to prevent accidental changes. To unlock these menus, enter the user or
administrator passwords. The administrator password can be used anywhere that the user
password is used. The default user password is 123 and the default administrative password is
456. Spectralink recommends that you change the administrative password from the default
value.
Settings: Limitations of the Web Configuration Utility
You cannot enable / disable blind transfer, call recording, picture frame, corporate
directory (LDAP integration), and phone server redundancy through the Web
Configuration Utility. You must make changes for these features through the
configuration files.
Caution: Overrides
Changes made through the Web Configuration Utility or the phone’s keypad user
interface are stored internally as overrides. These overrides parameters take
precedence over settings contained in the configuration obtained from the
provisioning server.
If the provisioning server permits file uploads, override settings created using the
Web Configuration Utility will be saved in a file called <MACaddress>-web.cfg.
Configuration Using the Web Configuration Utility
1
Get your phone’s IP address.
Select Settings on the handset’s Home screen, and then select Status > Platform >
Phone. Scroll down to see the IP address.
2
Open one of the supported Web browsers.
For a list of supported Web browsers, see the latest Spectralink Web Configuration
Utility User Guide.
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3
Enter the phone’s IP address in the Web browser’s address bar (as shown next).
A Web page similar to the one shown next displays.
4
Log in as Admin.
By default, the administrative password is 456.
A Web page similar to the one shown below displays.
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5
Make the desired configuration changes to the handset’s configuration.
For example, to change the handset’s displayed language to French, do the following:
a
Select Preferences > Additional Preferences.
A Web page similar to the one shown below displays.
6
b
Select French from the Phone Language drop-down list.
c
Select the Save button at the bottom of the page. The language on the handset will
change to French.
Log out of the Web Configuration Utility.
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Exporting Configuration Files
You can export the Spectralink 84-Series handset configuration files using the Web
Configuration Utility.
Caution: Security
Passwords and security keys from the device settings are not exported. These
parameters are listed at the top of the exported file, so they can be found quickly for
editing.
To export configuration files through the Web Configuration Utility:
1
Get your phone’s IP address.
Select Settings on the handset’s Home screen, and then select Status > Platform >
Phone. Scroll down to see the IP address.
2
Open one of the supported Web browsers.
3
Enter the phone’s IP address in the Web browser’s address bar.
4
Enter the appropriate user name and password.
5
To export the configuration files, do the following:
a
Select Utilities > Import & Export Configuration.
b
Select the configuration source that you want to export.
For example, if you want to export the device parameters, select Device Settings.
Selecting All does not include device settings.
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c
Select the Export button.
A pop-up displays on your computer with options to open or save the file.
Save the file in the desired location.
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Appendix D: Software Copyrights and
Open Source Information
Software Copyright
Portions of the software contained in this product are:
Copyright © 1998, 1999, 2000 Thai Open Source Software Center Ltd. and Clark Cooper
Copyright © 1998 by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Copyright © 1998-2008 The OpenSSL Project
Copyright © 1995-1998 Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com). All rights reserved
Copyright © 1995-2002 Jean-Loup Gailly and Mark Adler
Copyright © 1996-2008, Daniel Stenberg, <daniel@haxx.se>
Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software
and associated documentation files (the “Software”), to deal in the Software without restriction,
including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense,
and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to
do so, subject to the following conditions:
The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or
substantial portions of the Software.
OFFER for Source for GPL and LGPL Software
You may have received a Spectralink 84-Series handset from Spectralink that contains—in part—
some free software (software licensed in a way that allows you the freedom to run, copy,
distribute, change, and improve the software).
A complete list of all open source software included in the Spectralink 84-Series handset, as
well as related license and copyright information, is available at http://support.spectralink.com.
You may also obtain the same information by contacting Spectralink by regular mail or email at
the addresses listed at the bottom of this notice.
For at least three (3) years from the date of distribution of the applicable product or software, we
will give to anyone who contacts us at the contact information provided below, for a charge of no
more than our cost of physically distributing, the items listed in “Spectralink OFFER of Source
for GPL and LGPL Software”, which is available at http://support.spectralink.com.
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Contact Information for Requesting Source Code
Spectralink Open Source Manager
2560 55th Street
Boulder, CO 80301
OpenSource@Spectralink.com
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