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www.orphancameras.com
YOURCAMERA
KNOW
Opening and closing . . .
The exposure controls. .
Aiming and focusing. .
How to hold the camera. . . . . .
Focusing the 700
Free camera modification
Choosing the film
OPERATIONS
Loading the fiIm
H o w t o m a k eu p i " t , r r " . : . . . . .
How to coat prints
Exposure meters
3000 speedfilm outdoors
Time exposures
Flash pictures
The winkJight
Picture troubles
MISCELLANEOUS
Care of the camera.. . .
Print care.
Copiesand enlargements
Repair stations
3
4
4
5
6
6
6
7
10
L2
13
13
13
14
15
16
Rear view shows: (A) film tab in tab slot;
(B) cutter bar; (C) back door lock; (D)
film release switch. Model 700 also has
rangefinder housing shown below.
20
20
20
20
MODEL 700: This camera has an auxiliary
rangefinder to help you get correct focus
and sharp pictures. Use of this device is
explained on page 6. Except for the rangefinder, the camera operates in exactly the
same way as the N{odel 95A.
PI-EASE
Do yourself a big favor and spend a few
minutes reading this booklet before you
take your first picture.
Model 95A cameras were manufactured
from 1954 to 1957: Model 700 cameras
from 1955 to Ig57: Model 95B cameras
from 1957 to 1960. This booklet has been
specially prepared for new owners of used
cameras of those rnodels.
The Model 95A, 95B, and 700 cameras
were almost identical in construction and
with minor variations one set of instructionswill do for all models. Where necessary,
special instructions have been included.
In the time since your camera was manufactured, there have been important
changes in Polaroid Land films and improvements in camera design to assure
better results with those films. For best
results with current films, certain modifications should be made in your camera by
an authorized Polaroid camera repair sta-
2
tion. There is no charge for this work
(paee 6).
Provided that it has not been damaged,
your modified camera will be capable of
and
excellent biack-and-white
making
color pictures.
Because the Polaroid Land camera is the
only camera in the world that develops its
own pictures, it is unlike any other camera
you have ever owned or used. We urge you
to read the instructions carefully, not because the camera is difficult to use - it
isn't - but because it's different.
A few minutes now with this booklet,
practicing the operation of. the camera
before loading it ivith film, will help you to
get good pictures on your first roll.
If you want more information about any
of the material in this booklet, or about
your ca:mera, film, or other equipment,
rvrite to Customer Service. Polaroid Corporation, Cambridge, Mass. 02139.
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YOUR
KNOW
CAMERA
Get acquainted with the camera without
any film in it. First, try opening and closing
the camera a few times.
How to open the camera
Press the front cover latch (arrow) and
the cover will pop open part way. Open the
cover fully so the braces click into place
and lock it open rigidly.
Grip the metal bracket directly under
the shutter housing and start to pull the
shutter slide out.
Pull the slide out all the wzy, until it
locks firmly in place. If the slide is not
pulled out all the way and locked, pictures
will be blurred.
How to close the camera
Always set the distance scale to the
Infinity mark (as shown) before closing the
front cover. If it's not set to Infinity you
may not be able to close the front cover,
and if you do get it closed it may jam so
that you can't open it.
Also, be sure that the front viewfinder
is pushed down before closing the camera.
Squeeze the slide release (black piece)
and push the shutter slide all the way back
into the camera body.
To close the front cover, hold the camera
as shown, press the side braces with both
thumbs to unlock them and then push the
front cover closed.
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The exposure controls
Turn the wheel (A) on the shutter
housing; note that the numbers in the
window (B) change.
On the Model 95A and 700 these are
called the exposurenumbers and they run
from 1 to 8. On the Model 958 they are
called EV numbers and run from 10 to 17.
Except that they are nine numbers higher,
the EV numbers on the Model 95B have
exactly the same function as the exposure
numbers on the 95A and 700.
Number 8 (EV 17) setsthe smallestlens
opening and fastest shutter speed, for use
in brightest sunlight. Turn to ft7 (EV 16)
and you give twice as much exposureas at
#8 (EV 17); turn to ff6 (EV 15) and you
double the exposureagain, and so on. At
#L (EV 10), which is for dimmest light,
you are giving l28X as much exposureas
yo u d i d a t #8 ( E V 17) .
When you turn from a lower number to
the next higher number you cut the exposure in half each time ff7 gives half the
exposure of. fr6, for example, and EV 16
gives half the exposureof EV 15).
Use high numbers (6, 7, 8 or 15, 16, L7)
for subjects in bright light; use low numbers for subjectsin dim light. On page 10
we'll explain how you pick the right exposure number or EV number.
For all pictures except time exposures
the I/B switch (D) must be set to "I"
(Instantaneous, or snapshot). How to
make a time exposure is explained on
pag e 1 3 .
Aiming and focusing
Flip up the rear finder. This is only half
of the viewing system; you also need the
front finder.
The front finder is made up of two wire
frames. Pull it out all the way, by the
outer frame. This will also raise the smaller.
inner wire frame.
Look through the rear finder; you should
see the complete outer frame of the front
finder. This finder setting is accurate for
distant scenicsand other subjects as close
as about 8 ft. However, for subjects closer
than 8 ft. the front finder should be
reset (paee5).
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Subjects closer than 8 ft. may be partly
cut off in the picture unless you adjust the
front finder.
On the back of the shutter housing you
will find the markings 4, 8, INF. Push in on
the inner wire frame until the end of the
wire frame (arrow) is at the desired distance mark (4 ft. here).
The camera actually records slightly
more of the scene than you see in the viewfinder to allow for small errors in centering
and focusing.
Estimate the distance carefully. Then
press down the lever and slide it along the
distance scale until the notch is opposite
the estimated footage (4 f.t. here). For
very accurate settings, measure distance
from the subject to the front of the lens.
How to hold the camera
Pass your left hand underneath the
carrying strap and get a firm grip on the
eamera body. Grasp the front of the camera with your right hand, leaving the index
finger free to press the shutter release.
Your hold will be steadier if you can rest
the calnera on your right shoulder and
against your nose. Get your eye close to the
viewfinder but don't press on it.
Gently squeeze the shutter release lever
until you hear a distinct click. Don't poke
it or jab at it.
For vertical pictures the grip is the same
as for horizontals. In fact, it's easiest to
first hold the camera correctly horizontally
and then just shift to the vertical position.
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Focusingthe 700
The rangefinder on the Model 700 tells
you the distance in feet from the camera to
the subject - it does not set the camera
for that distance.
To learn how the rangefinder works, do
the following: First, set the rangefinder
wheel to the Infinity mark (". ). Now look
through the little window - you will see
a bright spot in the center. Aim the bright
spot at a nearbY subject (a lamP, for
example, 4-5 f.t. away).
You should see two images of the lamp
in the bright spot. Turn the wheel until
the images come together to make one image; the rangefinder now is focused. Look
at the footage markings to get the right
distance and set the distance scale.
C A M E RM
AO D I F I G A T I ( ) N
FREE
Open the back of your eamera (as shown
on page 7) and compare it with the photo.
If your camera does not have the guide
rails (arrows) it should be modified without delay. There is no charge.
Pack your camera carefully and ship it
insured to the nearest authorized Polaroid
camera repair station (page 20) or ask your
dealer to handle the shiPPing.
Enclose a note stating: "Install tracking
guides." Re sure to include your name and
address, clearly printed or typed. Also ask
for an estimate of the cost of any repairs
that the repair station may find necessary.
FILM
C H O O S IA
NG
snapshots
For most black-and-white
you'll get best results with Type 42 (200
speed) film. Use it for both daylight and
flash pictures. For information about using
3000 speed fllm, see page 13.
Your camera can make excellent color
pictures. Ask your dealer for the free
booklet about making color pictures with
roll fllm cameras, or write to Customer
Service, Polaroid Corporation, Cambridge,
Mass. 02139 for the booklet.
(r
Out of focus
ln focus
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H EF I L M
L O A D I NTG
We suggest that you start with a roll of Type
421200 speed) film.
Hold the camera as shown and swing the
back latch lever as far as it will go. The
back will open slightly. Don't open it all
the way yet; first lay the camera on a clean,
flat surface, front dowtr.
Open the outer back and lay it flat. Then
open the inner back panel. If there is a
spool in the negative film chamber (A)
remove it. The larger chamber (B) is for
the positive print roll.
Examine the steel rollers (C) carefully.
They are the heart of the cleveloping -""hanism. The negative and positive materials
pass between these rollers, which squeeze
the developer pods and distribute the developer chemicals evenly between the negative and positive sheets.
It's important to keep these rollers clean.
Use a damp cloth to remove any specks or
deposits that may appear on the rollers as
the camera is used. Inspect the rollers each
time vou load a film.
To open the foil bag, hold it as shown,
tear the top right corner open (there's a
thumb grip mark there) and pull down to
rip the bag open.
Don't grab the film around the middle
when trying to open the foil bag. You may
crush one or more developer pods and ruin
some of your pictures.
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Loading (cont.)
The two rolls that make ob tft" film are
wrapped in a paper leader. Open the seal
that holds the leader closed, unwrap the
leader, and hold the large white positive
roll and the smaller negative roll as shown.
Be careful not to break the clear tape seals
(arrows)on the two rolls. If you do, you're
likely to have seriouspicture troubles later.
Insert the two rolls in the chambersnext
to the bellows.If the larger one sticks, push
it in only by the edges; don't press the
middle of the roll.
Hold the leader straight up (but don't
pull hard) and clos.ethe inner back panel.
The steelroller should be about rAin. from
the small holes in the leader.
Lay the paper leader flat betrveen the
metal guides (arrows) on the inner back.
Check that the white paper is smooth and
flat (A). If there is a deep crease at (A) it
means that part of the leader has been
tucked into the positive roll chamber; open
the inner back again and carefully lift the
leader straight up to remove the crease in
the leader.
Close the outer back; be sure that the
leader stays between the metal guides.
Raise the camera and hold it as shown.
Swing the back latch lever as far to the left
as it will go, squeezethe back cover tightly
shut, and then swing the lever back all the
way to the right. Check both sides of the
outer back to be sure that they are fully
closedand locked.
8
1fu
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IMPORTANT:
Hold the camera as
shown, left hand under the strap and
gripping the top of the camera securely,
but flexibly enough to let it line up with
the direction of your pull when you start
to pull the leader out of the camera. Keep
your thumb off the film release switch.
If you hold the camera in any other way,
you are apt to pull the leader out at an angle
and damage the film.
Pull the leader straight out of the
camera until it stops firmly. I)on't be surprised if you seem to be pulling out a lot of
paper on this first pull. You must pull out
the entire leader (about 15 in.) before the
film stops, but it will stop automatically.
Raise the cutter bar; you should see the
word STOI' (bottom photo). If not, keep
pulling until you see it.
Don't touch the film release switch while
pulling the leader. If you do, the film won't
stop automatically and you'll waste a considerable part of the roll.
Now change your grip on the camera.
You can press the strap end against your
body as you hold the cutter bar tightly
closed with the left thumb and tear the
leader off with your right hand. trlease discard the waste paper carefully - d6n'[ [s
a litterbug.
The most recently manufactured Model
958 cameras have a locking cutter bar;
once it's snapped into place you needn't
hold it down. To unlock the cutter bar. lift
the plastic strip.
Tearing off the leader against the cutter
bar leaves a small white tab, which you will
pull later to develop your first picture.
Never tear ofr the leader with the cutter bar
open. If you do, there'll be no tab for you to
pull to develop your first picture.
The camera is now ready for the first
picture. You can always tell what number
picture is ready by lifting the cutter bar
and looking at the tab.
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A PICTURE
T OM A K E
HOW
We suggest that you make your first
picture of an averagesubject in bright sunlight with the lieht on the subject coming
from behind you, over your shoulder. Use
Type 42 (200 speed) film.
Decide what exposurenumber or EV number to use: Look at the exposure guide
printed on the instruction sheet in the film
package. If your carnerais numbered 1-8,
use the exposure information printed in
black; if it's numbered 10-17, follow the
red numbers. Here you can see that for
averagesubjects in bright sun the correct
setting is 17 or #6, EV 16 or 15.
If you have a Polaroid exposuremeter,
use it as shown on page 13.
S e t e x p o s u r e :T u r n t h e e x p o s u r e c o n trol wheel until the desired number shows
up in the windou\
rtT here.
Focus, aim, shoot: Estimate the distance
carefully and set the distance scale. Center
your subject in the viewfinder. Gently
squeeze the shutter release.
You have taken the picture, but it will not
start developing until you operate the film
release and pull the tab.
Some people have been known to snap
the picture, wait the full development time,
then pull the tab and immediately remove
the print which, of course, is usually a faint,
underdeveloped one. Don't do that. Instead, go through the following steps,
starting below.
I TP
H()W
T OD E U E L O
Release the film: Flip the film release
switch either way. Once is enough, but if
you do it twice it will do no harm. This reieases the stop pins holding the film so you
can pull the tab. Then keep your fingers
off the switch.
Don't touch the film release switch while
pulling the tab.
EX?O3UIE OUIDE: Use this chart if you do not own a meter.
Note: The larger red numbers are for cameras using the Exposure
The
Value (EV) system (also known as Light Value or LVS).
emaller black numbers are for cameras using the original Polaroid
Land Camera numbers (lll to lE) found on llodels 95, 95.\,
100 and 700.
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www.orphancameras.com
Get ready to pull: Turn so as to shield the
camera from direct sunlight. Hold the
camera as shown,left hand under the strap
and gripping the top of the camera securely,
but flexibly enough to let it line up with the
direction of your pull when you start to
pull the tab.
With your right hand, Iift the cutter bar
and get a tight hold on the tab with your
thumb and several fingers.
If you hold the camera in any other way,
you are apt to pull the tab out at an angle
and damage the film.
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I
Pull the tab to start development: Keep
your finger away from the film release
switch . Pull the tab straight out with a
single smooth, decisive motion. This starts
development, so begin timing as soon as
you pull the tab.
Pull it about as hard and rapidly as you
might to pull down a window shade; not
hard enough to pull the shade off the roll
(or the film off the spool) but not slowly
and hesitantly either. The film will stop
automatically.
If the tab will not pull easily, flip the
film release switch again (and don't touch
it afterwards).
If it's still balky, the film may be sticking to the inside of the back door. Open
and closethe door and pull again.
Wait the recommended development time:
While waiting, hold down the cutter bar
and tear off the excess paper. (If you have
a Model 95B with locking cutter bar you
need not hold it down; once pressed down
it locks in position.) Please discard the
paper carefully - don't be a litterhug.
Check the film instruction sheet for exact
development time: This time varies for different types of film, and even the development time for a particular film may change.
Temperature also affects developing times,
so be sure to get the correct development
recommenddtions.
Open the door: When the development
time is up, slide the latch of the back door
and open the door.
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Removethe print: Get your fingernail un=
der the triangular cutout and lift the print
out carefully. Notice that it's lifted out
straight, not at an angle.
Don't let the print fall back on the damp
negative.
Separatethe print by tearing the precut
edge that holds it to the rest of the roll.
Close and lock the back door.
Straighten black-and-white prints: Remove the curl by drawing the print face up
over a straight edge, as shown. DON'T do
this with color prints; if you do you will
crack and damage the surface.
Coatblack-and-whiteprints: Lay the print
face up on a clean, smooth, disposablesurface, such as a piece of paper. Apply the
Print Coater along the entire length of the
print, including edges, borders, and corners, with 6 or 8 overlapping strokes. For
the last two or three pictures in each roll,
pressthe coater hard against the tab end of
the print (not right on the image) for a
moment to releaseextra liquid, then spread
the liquid smoothly acrossthe print.
If a clean, flat coating surface is not
available,flatten the film box and store the
prints in it until you get to a more convenient location.
DON'T coat color prinls
T2
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E X P O S UMREET E R S
The photo at right identifies the different
models of Polaroid photoelectric exposure
meters that have been marketed over the
years. Only (1), the #625, is available new
and this is the one to buy if you need a
meter. The others are discontinued models
but they may turn up in used camera kits.
They arc: (2) #620; (3) PR-23A or PR-23B;
(4) PR-23; (5) PR-22. For information
about any of these meters write to Customer Service, Polaroid Corporation, Cambridge, Mass. 02139.
No matter which of the above meters
you have, keep in mind that it measures
the brightness of the iight reflected from
the subject. Therefore, when taking a reading be sure to bring the meter close enough
to the most important part of your subject
so that the meter's electric eye "sees" only
the subject and not the background. However, don't come so close as to cast a
shadow on the subject.
F I L MO U T D O O R S
3 ( l ( l (Sl P E E D
Type 47 (3000speed)film can't be used
in your camera in daylight without special
You needthe 45 Light Reducer,
accessories.
which fits over the lens; then you use the
same exposures as for Type 42 film.
Cameras that do not have an "L" before
the serial number (on the folding foot under the front cover of the camera) must be
fitted with light seals.To get these and the
43 Light Reducer, seeyour Polaroid Land
cameradealeror write to Customer Service,
Polaroid Corporation, Cambridge, Mass.
02139.
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HOWTOMAKEA TIMEEXPOSURE
Set the I/B srvitch to "8" and the
shutter will stay open as long as the
shutter release is held down. The I/B
switch automatically returns to "I" after
eachexposure.Place the camera on a firm
support. For best results, screw a cable reieaseinto socket (A). Exposures must be
arrived at by trial and error. If the picture
comesout too dark, increasethe exposure
time; if too light, decreaseit.
13
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FLASH
PICTURES
Your camera has synchronization
for
flashbulbs at all exposure numbers (or EV
numbers) and for electronic flash at #4
through #8 (EV 13 through EV 17).
The flashgun wire connection is on the
front of the sliutter housing. Guide the
wire under the bellows and around the
shutter so it can't block the Iens.
The electronic flash connection is on top
of the shutter housing. A special adapter
cord (Polaroid #490) is needed. This is
shown at f.ar right.
If a used flashgun came with your camera be sure it has fresh batteries. The
Polaroid BC flashgun rt202 is the correct
one for your camera. (There were also
similar guns, but gray to match the IVIodel
700 camera, designated ff240.) It is shown
with its diffuser for close work and bounce
flash bracket #290. IJse Press 25 or No. 5
bulbs for black-and-white;
Press 258
(blue) or No. 58 (blue) for color.
The rt202 flashgun can be used for either
direct flash (far right) or bounce flash
(below) with the gun aimed at a white
ceiling 7-9 ft. high. Bounce flash is preferable for all black-and-white snapshots in
average sized rooms with white ceilings of
ordinary height.
The film instruction sheet contains complete, accurate exposure guides for flash
pictures. It's most important to estimate
correctly the distance in feet from the
camera to the subject, as the flash exposure
guides are based on the camera-to-subject
distance.
If 5'su1 camera is numbered 1-8, foilow
the exposure recommendations printed in
black; if it's numbered 10-17 follow the
exposure reeommendations in red.
Direct flash pictures with Typ e 42 fiIm
and Press 25 bulbs will be overexposed if
the subject is closer than 6-7 ft., even at
18. To cut down the light the equivalent
of two exposure numbers, place the
diffuser over the flash gun shield.
Don't try to make flash pictures of your
subjects at ordinary distances with Type 47
(3000 speed) film unless the 4S Light
Redueer (described on page 13) is over the
Iens. Then use the exposure guide for 200
speed fllm.
SHUTTERS E T T I N G F
S O RT Y P E4 2 R O L L S
For No. 5 oorr P
Pres:
r e s s 2 5 F l o s hhbbuullbbsso n
Dist. (Feet)
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4
5 6 8 l0 l5
l 6 x l 6 * 1 7 1 7 l 6 r6 t 5
DIRECT
FLASH
7+
7* I
I
7 7 6
l3
B O U N C EF L A S H
4
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*Use diffuser over
flosh gun.
20
14
5
l2
3
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T H EW I N K . L I G H T
The wink-light is not meant to be a substitute for a flashbulb and it can't light a
large group or a whole room'
#
The wink-light is meant for use only with
Type 47 (3000 speed) film. Its low-powered
repeating flash is designed to "fill in" deep
shadows in subjects up to about 8 ft. away
(examples at right), or to add a little overall light. Try to aim the flash at the
shadowed side of the subject; shooting at
the bright side won't helP at all.
The connecting cord goes to the flash
outlet on the shutter. You should wait at
least 15 seconds between flashes. On the
back of the unit is an exposure guide.
For information about the wink-light
write to Customer Service, Polaroid Corporation, Cambridge, Mass. 02139.
tr
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Without winkJight.
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With wink-light.
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The wink-light flasher #256 plues into
the side of the wink-light and makes it into
a capable flashgun. The reflector swivels
for direct flash (color or black-and-white)
or bounce flash (black-and-white only and
Type 47 pref.erably)' lTse AG-1 flashbulbs
/blue) bulbs
for black-and-white; AL
for color pictures.
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Direct flash
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Bounce flash
SO RT Y P E4 2 R O L L S
S H U T T ES
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F o r A G - 1 F l o s h b u l bosn l y
5 6 8 l 0 r 5 20
3Vz 4
Dist. (Feet)
17 r6 l6 l5 t4 12
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DIRECTFLASH
8 7 7 6 5 3
B O U N C EF L A S H
<---'l -*Use bounce flosh.
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P I C T U RTER O U B L E S
We hope that no single Polaroid Land
camera owner ever encounters all the kinds
of picture taking and camera operation
troubles shown on these pages. However, if
you are faced with one or more of these
difficulties, stop and carefully decide what
you must do to correct the trouble and
prevent it from recurring.
All black: No light reached the film. I'erhaps you made only one exposure but
pulled two tabs in a row. The flash sync
may be inoperative; the shutter may be
broken. If some faint details are visible,
perhaps you used a high exposure number
(EV 16 or EV 17) in dim light where you
should have usedEV 10 or EV 11 Check
all your picture taking steps. 'f'est the
shutter, without film if possible.
All white: No image or a few barely
visible details. If the picture area has an
overall cream tint with china white borders, the film developed correctly bpt the
negative was greatly overexposed or was
light struck in some way.
You may have left the back door open
while pulling the tab. Or perhaps the camera back was opened after loading with
film. If there are faint details, perhaps you
used EV 10 or EV 11 in bright sunlight
when you should have set EV 16 or EV 17.
Or, you were using 3000 speed film when
you thought the camera was loaded with
Type 42 (200 speed) film.
Or, the I/B switch may have been at
"8" instead of at "I".
EXPOSUR
ET
, U R ALLI G H T
ilA
Too dark: IJnderexposed, probably because the camera was set incorrectly.
Follow the exposure guide in the film instruction sheet or use an exposure meter.
To make a lighter picture of the same
subject in the same lighting conditions,
turn the exposure control to the next
lower number.
Too light: Overexposed, probably due to
setting the camera incorrectly. Follow the
exposure guide in the film instruction
sheet. To make a darker picture of the
same subject in the same lighting conditions, turn the exposure control to the next
higher nurnber.
16
a +.,ltl
www.orphancameras.com
O RW I N K - L I G H T
F LEA, S H
EXPOSUR
underexposed.
Too dark: Moderately
Either you misjudged the distance in feet
from camera to subject, or you set the exposure control to the wrong number. Follow the flash exposure guides in the film
exinstruction sheet, or the wink-light
posure guide on the back of the wink-light.
Or, use the same exposure setting but come
closer to the subject.
Too light: Moderately overexposed.
Either you misjudged the distance in feet
from camera to subject or you set the exposure control to the wrong number. Follow the flash exposure guides in the film
instruction sheet or the wink-light exposure
guide on the back of the wink-light. To
make a darker picture of the same subject
from the same distance, turn the exposure
control to the next higher number.
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Burned out: Heavily overexposed even
though the exposure control was set to a
high number. You were too close for direct
flash. Or you tried to use Type 47 (3000
speed) film for direct flash. Follow the
direct flash exposure guides in the film
instruction sheet. Use the flash diffuser for
pictures of close subjects. Don't use 3000
speed film for direct flash.
This can also happen with Type 47 film
and the wink-light. Follorv the exposure
guide on the back of the wink-light.
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PICTURES
FUZZY
Movement, camera or subject: Most likely
to happen in dim light when the shutter
moves slowly, but can happen even in
bright sunlight. Squeeze the shutter release, don't poke at it. If your subject is
moving around rapidly, wait for or ask for
less movement while you shoot.
Be particularly careful when shooting
pictures. These are usually
wink-light
made at very slow shutter speeds.
Subject blurred: If everything else in the
picture is sharp and the subject did not
move, you had the camera set for the wrong
distance. Estimate the distance in feet
carefully and set the distance scale. For
most accuracy with close subjects, measure
from the front of the lens.
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www.orphancameras.com
T A BP U L L I NEGR R O R S
Marks like these: This is called mistracking, and is caused by pulling the tab out at
an angle instead of straight out of the slot.
With moderate mistracking (top photo)
you may save some of the remaining exposures by pulling the remaining tabs very
straight. Once severe mistracking gets
started (right) the rest of the roll probably
will be ruined.
Pull the tab only as shown on page 11.
If your camera doesn't have the tracking
guide rails shown on page 6, have this free
modiflcation done without delay.
Hesitation marks: You slowed down,
hesitated, or stopped in the middle of the
tab pull. Don't stop or hesitate while
pulling the tab. Pull it straight out of the
camera fairly rapidly, smoothly, in one
continuous motion, until the film stops
automatically.
Torn print roll: You pulled the tab too
strongly. When the film reached the stop,
the positive print roll was torn in half and
the print to be developed was dragged part
way out of the slot. When this happens,
throw away the rest of the film, clean the
back of the camera and the rollers. Pull the
tab less violently and follow the tab pulling
instructions on page 11.
Torn negative: Only part of the print is
developed and developer chemicals are
smeared over the rest and inside the camera. The negative roll was torn in half in
some wzy, either due to an error in loading
or pulling the tab at an angle.
Discard the rest of the film. Clean the
rollers and the back of the camera with a
damp cloth. Follow the loading instructions carefully. Pull the tab straight. If
your camera doesn't have the tracking
guide rails shown on page 6, have this free
modification done.
www.orphancameras.com
Film didn't stop: Usually caused by
touching the film release switch while
pulling the tab. Onceyou have releasedthe
film, keep your fingers away from the film
releaseswitch. If it happens when you're
not touching the release, the mechanism
may need to be repaired.
Partial development: If an irregularly
shaped section of the picture stays blank,
it means that the developer pod for that
picture was damaged in some way before
you developed the picture. Perhaps you
broke the pod during loading. NEVER
squeezethe roll of film. Follow the loading
instructions on page 7.
Fogged film: Heavy fogging from the
long edgesof the print towards the middle
is probably due to loading the camera in
bright sunlight, or breaking the negative
roll seal during loading, allowing the negative to partly unroll. Load film out of the
bright sun; don't break the seal on the
negative roll.
If you get a wedgeshapedfog strip at the
tab end of the print, the back door probably was unlatched when you pulled the
tab. If the door was wide open, the entire
print will have an even fog.
Dark stains: Causedby developerchemicals that stick to the print. To avoid this,
lift the picture from the back of the camera quickly; don't let it fall back on the
negative.
If you work fast you can get rid of the
stain. With color, wipe it off immediately
with a dry tissue; with black-and-white,
use the coater liberally, discard the coater
to avoid staining other prints.
-spots:
Usually two or three sets
Seriesof
(pinkish
in color prints). Caused
of spots
by dried developer or other dirt on the
steelrollers. Keep the rollers and the back
of the camera clean.
C A RO
E FT H EC A M E R A
www.orphancameras.com
Rollers: The two steel rollers must be
kept clean and free of foreign matter,
which can causeevenly spacedspots along
the length of the print. Before loading each
roll of film, turn the rollers slowly and remove any foreign deposits.Use a moistened
cloth; scrape hard accumulations loose
with a matchstick or piece of card, never
with anything metallic. Don't use your
fingernails, either.
Interior: Foreign matter also may collect
on the black painted parts of the interior.
Clean those parts in the same way as you
clean the rollers.
.i
Lens: Keep both the back and the front
clean, and be particularly careful to avoid
fingerprihts. First blow off loose lint or
dust, then breathe lightly on the surface to
moisten it, gently wipe with a piece of
elean absorbent cotton or wadded facial
tissue. Don't scrub it!
Lubrication: Don't try to oil any part of
your camera.
POIAROIDCAMERA
REPAIRSTATIOI{S
CALIFOR}IIA
(WestDiy,)
PolaroidCorporation
333WestMissionDrive
SanGabriel,
California
91776
R. M. Cudabac
678AHowardStreet
SanFrancisco,
California94105
c0L0nAD0
RockyMountain
CameraReDair
100 E. 20th Avenue
Denver,Colorado80205
0tsTntcT0F corumBtA
StraussPhoto-Technical
Service
930 F Street.il.W.
Washington,
0.C. 20004
FtontDr
SouthernPhoto-Technical
Service
24 SecondStreet.S.
St. Petersburg,
Florida33701
EEORGIA
Pola_r-ojd
(Southeast
Corporation
Div.)
1325LoganCircle,N.W.
Atlanta,GeorSia
30318
rLUlt0rs
Polaroid
(Midwestoiv.)
Corporation
2041N. JaniceAvenue
MelrosePark,lllinois60160
International
Camera
CorD.
844 WestAdamsStreet
lllinois60607
Chicago,
t(El{TUCl(Y
CameraService,Inc.
445 SouthFifth Street
Louisville.
Kentucky
40202
t0ulstAilA
-Repair
Murphy's
Camera
2320-22TulaneAvenue
Neworleans,Louisiana
70llg
MASSACHUSETIS
(Factory)
folaroidCorporation
640Memorial
Drive
Cambridge,
Massachusetts
02139
P R I NC
TA R E
tlxl{EsoTA
Northwest
CameraRepairCo.
209 LqebArcade
Minneapolis,
Minnesota
55402
The Print Coater leaves a hard plastic
coating on your print. If you bend or
creasecoatedpictures, or write on the back
of the print, you can crack this coating,
which can
lead to discoloration along the
'W.rite
cracks.
only on the tab or on the
back along the edges.
As with any photograph it is wise not to
use paste or rubber cement to mount your
pictures. Impurities in many adhesives
may causethe pictures to discolor.Polaroid
Land prints may be stored safely in a
Polaroid Picture Alburn, or in albums
with separate transparent acetate pages.
mtss0ulrl
NewtonJ. oraper
Photographic
Equip.Services
2915S. Brentwood
Blvd.
St. Louis(Brentwood),
Missouri631114
IIEW'ERSEY
MackCameraService
Avenur
1025Commerce
Union,NewJersey07083
iEw Yonx
MackCameraServiceof N.Y.
78 East l3th Street
NewYork.NewYork10003
oilt0
(No.CentralDiv.)
PolaroidCorporation
4640Manufacturing
Road
Cleveland,
0hio 44135
TEXAS
Polaroid
(Southwest
Corporation
Div.)
8919Diplomacy
Row
Dallas,Texas75247
wAslill{GIot
Photo-Tron
ics
223 Westlakel{.
98109
Seattle,Washington
CAl{ADA
Polaroid
Ltd.
Corporation
of Canada,
24 PlywoodPlace
Torontol8
Fi
C O P I EASN DE N I A R G E M E N T S
Excellent copies and enlargements of
black-and-white and color pictures are
available from Polaroid Copy Service.An
order blank is iyrcludedin the film package.
It gives details of prices, sizes available,
mailing, etc.
Printed in U.S.A.
Poloroid@
.
1.
cllctAltD
Polaroid (U.K.)Limited
Q u e e n s w a yH o u s e
0ueensway
Hattield
Hertfordshire
G€NilANY
PolaroidGMBH
Holzhausenstrasse30
F r a n k f u r t /M a i n
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