abc child care 0-2 year old standards center

abc child care 0-2 year old standards center
ABC CHILD CARE
0-2 YEAR OLD STANDARDS
CENTER - BASED
PART II
PROGRAM OBSERVATION
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Page 1 of 15
ANALYSIS OF PROVIDER CAPABILITY TO MEET ABC LEVEL B CHILD CARE RATIOS/GROUP SIZE
0-2 YEAR OLDS
Center-based
STANDARD VI. STAFF-CHILD RATIO: The program is effectively administered with attention to the needs and desires of children, parents and staff.
A.
Staffing patterns shall provide for adult supervision of children at all times and the availability of an additional adult to assume responsibility if one adult must respond to an
emergency. Staff are with children, not distracted by other duties (such as cleaning or cooking). Every attempt shall be made to have continuity of adults who work with
children. Staff-child ratios shall be maintained through provision of substitutes when regular staff members are absent.
ABC LEVEL B STAFF-CHILD RATIOS/GROUP SIZE
EACH ROOM meeting these ratios and group sizes will get
2 ADDITIONAL POINTS ADDED TO THE SCORE.
Ages
Under 1
1-2
2-3
Maximum Ratios
1:5
1:5
1:7
BASIC MINIMAL RATIOS REQUIRED BY STATE
CHILD CARE LICENSING
Group Size
10
10
14
Ages
Under 1
1-2
2-3
Ratios
1:5
1:6
1:8
Calculate staff-child ratio by group. To determine staff needed for mixed age groups, determine number of children by age; divide children in same age category by maximum
ratios for that age; add results for each age to obtain number of staff needed. Fractions shall be rounded up at .1 and above not to exceed basic minimal ratios required by state
licensing.
List all rooms
Group ID
Staff assigned by name
#
children
Age(s) of
children
Calculated staff-child ratio (# of children
divided by # of assigned staff)
MEETS
State Child Care
Licensing
MEETS
ABC Staff-Child Ratios/
Group Size
Yes (0)
Yes (+2)
No (-2)
If NO, -2 pts. per room. If
yes, 0 points per room.
# Staff needed
to meet ABC
ratios
Total Score
Add State Licensing + ABC for
total score per room
No (0)
If YES, +2 pts. per room.
If no, 0 points per room.
Actual Score
Total
Possible Score:
Total # rooms x 2 = ____________________
Comments_________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
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Page 2 of 15
ABC CHILD CARE
0-2 YEAR OLDS STANDARDS
Center-Based
Part II
STANDARD VII. STAFF-CHILD INTERACTIONS: Interactions between children and staff provide opportunities for children to develop an understanding
of self and others and are characterized by warmth, personal respect, individuality, positive support, and responsiveness.
Room ID:
A.
Staff shall frequently interact, be available and
be responsive to children through
(1) active listening (2) giving feedback
Responds to children frequently by touching, holding, hugging,
patting, rocking and keeping a child close to the adult's body.
2.
Responds to children with positive expressions such as smiling.
3.
Speaks often with children even when children are not asking
for attention.
4.
Answers with words when the child shows with his face, body
movements, or uses sounds or words to let the caregiver know
what he wants to say. Examples: Child smiles and the adult
says "You like the little dog, don't you?" (or) Child is pulling
on caregiver's hand and the adult says: "You want to go
outside, don't you?" (or) child says: "Me." and the adult says:
"Do you want to be held?"
5.
Shows patience and is not annoyed/bothered when children try
to be close to the adult or try to communicate in other ways.
Examples: Pulling on an adult's skirt/pants, holding on to an
adult's leg, giving wet kisses, or playing with the adult's
hair/glasses.
6.
Limits conversations with adults. No talking about children in
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Page 3 of 15
Room ID:
Room ID:
Caregiver ID:
Caregiver ID:
Caregiver ID:
Caregiver ID:
Caregiver ID:
Caregiver ID:
Caregiver ID:
Caregiver ID:
Time of
observation:
Time of
observation:
Time of
observation:
Time of
observation:
Time of
observation:
Time of
observation:
Time of
observation:
Time of
observation:
Y
1.
Room ID:
N
Y
N
Y
N
Y
N
Y
N
Y
N
Y
N
Y
N
Room ID:
A.
Staff shall frequently interact, be available and
be responsive to children through
(1) active listening (2) giving feedback
Room ID:
Room ID:
Room ID:
Caregiver ID:
Caregiver ID:
Caregiver ID:
Caregiver ID:
Caregiver ID:
Caregiver ID:
Caregiver ID:
Caregiver ID:
Time of
observation:
Time of
observation:
Time of
observation:
Time of
observation:
Time of
observation:
Time of
observation:
Time of
observation:
Time of
observation:
Y
N
Y
N
Y
N
Y
N
Y
N
Y
N
Y
N
Y
N
front of them such as: "Brian is the best looking child in the
room." "Mandy is spoiled."
7.
Looks directly into children's eyes when talking with them.
8.
Gives appropriate feedback. For infants: When children cry,
grunt, squeal, make letter sounds (goo, da, ma) or use
word/sounds, the adult repeats the sounds or words,
encouraging them to use more sounds/words. The adult uses
sentences to try to say what the child is thinking/trying to say.
Examples: "Did that hurt your finger? Do you want me to pick
you up?" For toddlers and twos: repeats what the child says,
asks for additional information, gives relevant comments to
children's questions/comments.
9.
Listens while a child tries to communicate, i.e. does not walk
away or try to do something else (like wiping tables).
10.
Does not interrupt or talk about something else when a child is
speaking.
SCORING:
Total points per caregiver
Total points per room (total caregiver points)
a.
b.
c.
d.
Sub-total
Total program points for VII A.
(a + b + c + d)
Total possible points for VII A:
(Total number of caregivers x 10)
COMMENTS:
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_
Page 4 of 15
Room ID:
B.
Staff shall initiate conversation with individual children in a positive and inquisitive
manner to model language and stimulate language and thinking skills. Staff use:
(1) questions (2) information sharing (3) positive feedback
Caregiver
ID:
Y
1.
Talks individually with children as they play to let them hear the words for what
they are doing. "Tabathia is patting the bunny." "Sam is pulling himself up on the
chair." "I see Susan smiling at me."
2.
Asks children individually to talk about what they are doing (share experiences).
Until children can say what they are doing, the adult tells him what he is doing.
Examples: The adult says to a child who doesn't talk, "You are holding the
blanket." (or) John says "Walk." and the adult says, "I see you walking." (or) To a
two year old the adult says, "Tell me about your car."
3.
Asks children individually to talk about their ideas about activities or things that
happen. Until children are able to talk about their ideas, the adult says what she
thinks the child's idea is. If the adult guessed the wrong thing, she keeps asking
until the child lets her know it is right. Examples: A child squeals with delight and
the adult says, "You found the rattle!" (or) "Up." says the child and the adult says,
"You want to get up on the chair?" (or) "Where are you taking the bear?" to a two
year old.
4.
Asks children individually to talk about how they feel. Until children can say how
they feel, the adult tells him how she thinks he feels. If the adult guessed the wrong
thing, she keeps asking until the child lets her know she's right. Examples: A child
cries when the adult stops rocking him. The adult begins rocking again and says,
"You didn't like me to stop rocking, did you?" (or) A toddler hugs a stuffed dog
and says, "Doggie." and the adult says, "You love your doggie, don't you?" (or) A
child has fallen and comes to the adult crying. The adult holds the child close and
says, "It hurts doesn't it? Let me help you."
5.
As feelings are discussed the adult offers comfort as needed by rocking a child,
holding/cuddling a child, singing a soft song, hugging a child, or rubbing a child's
back.
6.
As children begin to use sentences, the adult asks children individually open-ended
questions that begin with Why? What? Where? When? or How? and encourages a
child to think. Example: "Where is the truck going?" "What do you need to get for
the kitty?"
7.
Talks to children, sharing information about the things around them and things that
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Room ID:
Caregiver
ID:
N
Y
N
Room ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Y
Y
N
N
Room ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Y
Y
N
N
Caregiver
ID:
Y
Caregiver ID:
N
Y
N
Room ID:
B.
Staff shall initiate conversation with individual children in a positive and inquisitive
manner to model language and stimulate language and thinking skills. Staff use:
(1) questions (2) information sharing (3) positive feedback
Room ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Y
Caregiver
ID:
N
Y
N
Room ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Y
Y
N
N
Room ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Y
Y
N
N
Caregiver
ID:
Y
Caregiver ID:
N
Y
N
are happening. "See the yellow flower. It is a daffodil. Smell the daffodil. Touch
the daffodil."
8.
Talks in a calm, gentle manner (no screaming or yelling).
9.
Listens respectfully to the child even though the child's thinking is faulty.
SCORING:
Total points per caregiver
Total points per room (total caregiver points)
a.
b.
c.
d.
Sub-total
Total program points for VII B.
(a + b + c + d)
Total possible points for VII B:
(Total number of caregivers x 9)
COMMENTS:
10/1/12 - 1
_
Page 6 of 15
C.
Staff shall foster independence, encourage decision-making and use of positive
techniques of guidance. Staff
(1) provide opportunities for children to be responsible
(2) provide choices (3) avoid comparison or criticism
Room ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Y
1.
Opportunities are provided for children to be responsible by doing things for
themselves such as sitting up alone, crawling, walking, drinking from a cup, feeding
oneself (first with fingers and then with utensils), taking out toys, toileting, washing
hands and other self help skills.
2.
Uses positive guidance techniques.
Clarification: To receive credit, one positive strategy must be observed. If one
instance of negative discipline (as defined in Standard II.A.) is observed, credit is
not received.
•
•
•
Examples:
Redirection: One child takes a toy from another. The adult gently takes the child to
another part of the room and gives him another toy. Then she goes back to the child
who had the toy to see if that child is OK.
Anticipation/elimination of potential problems:
Example: If a child is in the biting stage, he is closely watched when near other
children. The adult stays close to act quickly to prevent most biting. Child is
provided many appropriate things on which to chew.
Example: When young children cluster together, there are likely to be disputes over
toys, so the adults will watch for clustering and gently move each child to other
areas of the room and provide toys for each child to use.
Children are given choices as a guidance technique. Examples: A toddler throws a
block. The teacher says, “Blocks are for building. Bean bags are for throwing.
Would you like to build with blocks or would you like to throw bean bags in a
bucket?”
Examples of negative discipline: Confinement to a crib, swing, bouncy seat,
exersaucer, etc. or the use of time out; use of threats such as “Do you want me to
call your daddy?” or “I’ll put the toys away if you can’t share them.”
3.
No's are limited. Children are told what to do rather than what not to do. Examples:
Children are told to walk, instead of "No, don't run." and "Feet stay on the floor",
instead of "No Climbing."
4.
Children are not expected to share, so duplicates of toys are provided.
5.
Children are encouraged/allowed to bring their "loveys" (a blanket, special bear,
pacifier) and keep them as long as they need. The adult treats these items as
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Page 7 of 15
Room ID:
N
Room ID:
Room ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
N
N
Caregiver ID:
N
Y
N
C.
Staff shall foster independence, encourage decision-making and use of positive
techniques of guidance. Staff
(1) provide opportunities for children to be responsible
(2) provide choices (3) avoid comparison or criticism
Room ID:
Room ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Y
N
Room ID:
Room ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Caregiver
ID:
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
N
N
Caregiver ID:
N
Y
important and does not make fun of or try to humiliate a child into giving these up.
6.
Adult handles children carefully when picking up, putting down, holding, and
carrying children. Under no circumstances should children be shaken, jerked
around, or handled roughly in any way.
7.
Staff responds immediately to a crying child. The adult recognizes that a child's cry
is a call for help and that the child is unable to handle the situation by himself. The
adult does not say "Stop crying." "Don't cry." "It's nothing to cry about." or "Only
babies cry." Instead she finds out what the child wants/needs and helps the child
handle his problem.
8.
Staff encourages children to treat each other with kindness and respect.
9.
Children are provided varieties of materials from which to choose.
Children are allowed to choose materials with which to work and play for
as long as they wish.
10.
Children's mistakes are expected and handled as normal, daily happenings.
Examples: "Your spilled the milk, I'll clean it up. Would you like to help?"
11.
Staff encourages children and tells them when or how they have behaved
appropriately, "You helped me pick up the toys, thank you."
12.
Children's mistakes are handled individually and privately as possible. Staff does
not compare children ("Why can't you be good like John?") or criticizes children
("You are so messy, you always spill.")
SCORING:
Total points per caregiver
Total points per room
a.
b.
c.
d.
Sub-total
Total program points for VII C. (a + b + c + d)
Total possible points for VII C:
(Total number of caregivers x 12)
COMMENTS ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
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Page 8 of 15
N
STANDARD VIII. ACTIVITIES: Materials provided encourage children to be actively involved, to experience a variety of developmentally appropriate activities and materials, and to pursue
their interests.
A.
Staff provide a variety of developmentally appropriate materials and activities which address the individual
differences of children and provide materials selected to emphasize concrete learning within a predictable
daily schedule which provides a balance of activities.
1.
Each child must be allowed to reach and use materials in a least restrictive, safe environment at all times.
Clarification: Credit cannot be received if any child is confined in a piece of equipment such as, a high
chair (if not being fed), swing, bouncy seat, crib (if awake), exersaucer, and/or feeding table, for any
amount of time. If swing, bouncy seat, or exersaucer are present, assume that they are used.
2.
Caregiver provides concrete activities that are meaningful to children.
Clarification: All materials observed during the observation must be concrete and meaningful to the
children for the room to receive credit. Credit is not received if one or more of the following is observed
(note in comments section which – a, b, and/or c are observed).
a) No preprinted worksheets or coloring sheets are used. If any of these are used or you see evidence of
use, credit cannot be received.
b) Television, videos, DVD’s and computers are not meaningful materials and would count as separate
non-concrete materials. If a TV is in the room, but not on, assume it is used and do not give credit.
c) Materials designed for older or younger age groups are not meaningful. Credit is not received if
materials are not concrete and meaningful.
Example: Some examples are: For non-walkers; rattles, non-breakable mirrors, cuddly toys, teething toys.
For children who are walking: push toys, stacking toys, soft blocks, and sturdy picture books.
3.
Caregivers provide opportunities for discovery and learning by allowing children to freely choose materials
and actively explore the room.
Clarification: Must see materials being used to receive credit. Children are allowed to choose and use
materials as they are able. Credit can’t be given if any child is confined in a piece of equipment such as, a
swing, bouncy seat, crib (if awake), and/or exersaucer, for any amount of time. If a high chair or feeding
table is used for any purpose other than feeding, credit cannot be received. If any of these are used, you see
evidence of use, or if swing, bouncy seat, or exersaucer are present, credit cannot be received.
4.
Daily routines (sleeping, eating, dressing, diapering, and toileting) are used as pleasant, natural learning
times. Examples: When a child is getting ready to sleep the adult rubs his back, sings a soft song, cuddles
him while rocking, or reads him a story. Diapering is a time to play games, sing songs or use verses, and
to just enjoy talking/playing with the baby. Infants are held/talked to while bottle feeding.
5.
Daily routines (sleeping, eating, dressing, diapering, and toileting) are done individually, based on need.
Examples: Each child is fed when he/she is hungry and not made to wait for others. (For older toddlers
and twos this can be done with supplementary snacks.) Toileting: children are allowed to use the restroom
as the need occurs. Children do not all toilet as a group.
Caregivers and children routinely wash hands with soap and water at appropriate times. Caregivers use the
6.
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Page 9 of 15
Room ID:
Y
Room ID:
N
Y
Room ID:
N
Y
Room ID:
N
Y
N
A.
Staff provide a variety of developmentally appropriate materials and activities which address the individual
differences of children and provide materials selected to emphasize concrete learning within a predictable
daily schedule which provides a balance of activities.
routine as a learning opportunity to model appropriate hand-washing and to teach self-help skills as
children are able.
Clarification: Caregivers and children routinely wash hands (or have hands washed) with soap and water
before preparing/eating a meal or snack, after toileting/diapering and after contacting bodily fluids or
contaminated items as part of the daily routine.
7.
Adults help children learn language by using words to talk about things in the room/outdoors, to talk about
things that happen, to use words/sentences to talk about what a child is doing/feeling.
8.
Adults help children learn language by reading simple stories daily, talking about pictures in books on
display, saying rhymes and verses and singing songs.
9.
Adults help children learn to use language by repeating sounds and words that children say, letting children
know they like to hear them speak (usually nonverbal with a smile), encouraging children to speak more
often, ("I like to hear you talk.") repeating the words children say in complete sentences.
10.
Each child has an opportunity to play in many positions. Examples are: on a carpet/rug, on the floor,
standing at a table/easel, sitting on a cushion/bean bag, sitting on the lap of an adult.
11.
Daily schedule for children under two years: The schedule varies for each child. The adult responds to
children's individual needs and interests using teachable moments as they occur. For two year old children:
The daily schedule has time for independent and peer play and active and quiet play. There are flexible
feeding and resting schedules based on individual needs. Activities are provided for individual children
and small groups. There are no total group activities for this age group.
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Room ID:
Y
Room ID:
N
Y
Room ID:
N
Y
Room ID:
N
Y
N
12.
13.
All children must have daily active outdoor play, weather permitting
Clarification: 0-12 months – must occur at least once a day; 12-36 months – must occur 2 to 3 separate
occasions totaling 60-90 minutes. “Weather permitting” means no falling precipitation, thunder, lightning,
or inclement weather. Inclement weather is defined by the American Academy of Pediatrics, American
Public Health Association, and National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early
Education (2010) as a wind chill factor at or below 15 degrees Fahrenheit or at or above a heat index of 90
degrees Fahrenheit.
Due to the health effects of ground-level ozone, the SC Department of Health and Environmental Control
provides the service of forecasting ozone concentrations to warn the public of unhealthy air and to
encourage people to avoid exposure to unhealthy air. If outdoor play is decreased due to weather, indoor
active play is increased so the total amount of active play remains the same.
The daily schedule is reviewed and children are observed outdoors. The schedule states what caregivers
plan to do if there is inclement weather. Caregivers have a plan for 60-90 minutes of indoor active play on
their posted schedules in case of rain or inclement weather using indoor materials that promote physical
activity and an identified space to use. This would be observed on a day that meets the weather criteria
above.
Caregivers provide opportunities for children to enhance motor development both indoors and outdoors.
Clarification: Children are encouraged to be physically active indoors and outdoors at appropriate times.
Monitor may interview caregiver if not observed.
SCORING:
Total points per room
Sub-total
Total program points for VIII A:
(a + b + c + d)
Total possible points for VIII A:
(total number of rooms x 13)
COMMENTS:
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_
Page 11 of 15
STANDARD IX. PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT: The indoor and outdoor physical environment fosters optimal growth and development through opportunities for exploration and learning.
A.
Materials and Equipment – Indoor
High-quality infant and toddler programs support children’s development by intentionally arranging and organizing spaces for play and learning. Children are drawn into play
activities with toys, materials and others more readily when the environment conveys a positive message. Inviting rooms that are welcoming help children and families transition
from home to group care settings by encouraging exploration and instilling a sense of belonging.
Age-appropriate materials & equipment (indoor) of sufficient quantity, variety and durability shall be readily accessible to children and arranged to promote independent use by
children.
Material Category
Cozy/Book
Manipulatives
Music
Dramatic Play
Blocks
Arts
Sensory/Science
Indoor Activity
# of accessible items
Room ID
Y
1.
Room has sufficient, age appropriate materials so that all children can be actively involved.
Clarification: Only age-appropriate, fully intact, and properly functioning materials that are in
children’s reach and accessible are able to be counted. Enough materials should be available for
several children to be engaged in a similar activity, thus reducing competition. To receive credit,
a minimum of two materials per child must be accessible and no evidence of excessive
competition or children not being engaged.
Examples of appropriate materials for 0-2 year olds are: rattles, rubber or soft blocks, soft balls
for poking and grasping, nesting/stacking toys, cloth and picture books, peg board and large
pegs, xylophone, doll clothes and furnishings, dolls, ring stack sets, large tops, pounding board,
simple puzzles, large crayons and paper, busy boards, squeak toys, cuddly toys, play telephone,
pop-it-beads, materials to promote physical activity such as push and pull toys, rocking boat,
toddler slide, and wheel toys.
2.
Children are provided a variety of materials from which to choose.
Clarification: If credit is not received for sufficient number of materials, credit cannot be given.
Classroom contains at least 2 different kinds of materials from at least 4 of the 8 designated
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Room ID
N
Y
Room ID
N
Y
Room ID
N
Y
N
3.
material types. (Material Categories listed above.)
Materials are safe, in good repair with no missing parts, sharp edges, or rust.
4.
Materials are arranged so children can get materials by themselves without adult assistance.
Children work by themselves with materials or in small groups.
5.
The room is divided into spaces for routines and both active and quiet play that are appropriate
for ages of the children enrolled.
Clarification : The room arrangement addresses children’s needs for sleeping,
diapering/toileting, active play, quiet play, and a private soft, cozy area.
Example: (1) Sleeping; separate area for cribs (2) Diapering/toileting area (3) Active play; open
area with no equipment or obstacles (crawling space, wheel toys, push and pull toys, toddler
slide or rocking boat) (4) Quiet play (puzzles, nesting/stacking toys, books). (5) Private, soft,
cozy area.
6.
Diapering/potty area is located away from bottle/formula/food preparation and serving area.
Diapering is adjacent to hot and cold running water. The cover of the changing table is disposed
of after each change of a soiled diaper.
7.
All infant equipment meets the minimum safety requirements developed by the U.S.Consumer
Product Safety Commission.
SCORING:
Total points per room
Total program points for IX A.
(a + b + c + d)
Total possible points for IX A.
(Total number of rooms x 7)
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Page 13 of 15
a.
b.
c.
d.
Sub-total
STANDARD IX. PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT - Outdoor
B. Materials and equipment - Outdoor play area
Room ID
High-quality infant and toddler program support children’s development by intentionally planning,
equipping, and maintaining safe, age appropriate outdoor spaces for young children to grow and develop.
Emerging motor abilities and skills are supported when outdoor spaces and equipment allow children to
move freely and have appropriate levels of challenge.
1.
Y
Room ID
N
Y
Room ID
N
Y
Room ID
N
Y
N
Age appropriate outdoor equipment is used. (Manufacturer's label may note age
appropriateness).
2.
Materials are in good repair with no sharp edges, rust or other hazards.
3.
The outdoor play area is clean, safe, and free of hazards such as garbage, glass, cans,
overgrowth,
broken structures, loose nails, tree limbs and junked equipment/cars.
4.
There is a variety of age-appropriate outdoor portable play materials/equipment on the
playground sufficient for all children to be actively involved in vigorous play activities.
Clarification: Credit cannot be received if children just wander around with nothing to do
because there is not sufficient equipment for all children. If children are not observed outdoors,
interview staff to determine what additional materials are used outside and how vigorous activity
is encouraged by staff.
Example: Materials/equipment may include portable equipment such as soft balls, obstacle
cones, push and pull toys, and wheeled toys as well as in-ground equipment if it is used in
vigorous activity.
5.
Areas are designated for the safe outdoor play of infants, toddlers and twos. Mats or blankets are
carried out to provide space for non-walkers to sit or crawl.
Clarification: Infants, toddlers and twos have safe outdoor play areas designated for their
exclusive use. Non-mobile infants can play on mats or blankets taken outside and placed on the
ground so that they have freedom of movement. Buggies can only be used for transporting
children between indoors and outdoors.
6.
The outdoor play area is designed to encourage movement without confinement or restriction.
SCORING:
Total points per room
Total program points for IX B.
(a + b + c + d)
Total possible points for IX B.
(Total number of rooms x 6)
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a.
b.
c.
d.
Sub-total
Page 14 of 15
ABC CHILD CARE LEVEL B
SCORING SUMMARY
0-2 YEAR OLD STANDARDS
Facility Name
FEIN#
Part I: 0 - 2 year old Standards
MEETS
YES
NO
Standard I. Regulatory Requirements
Standard II. Administration
Standard III. Staff Qualifications and Development
Standard IV. Health, Safety, and Well-Being
Standard V. Staff-Parent Interaction
Part II: 80% overall compliance required (0-2 year olds)
ACTUAL
POINTS
POSSIBLE
POINTS
Standard VI. Staff-Child Ratios
VI.A.
Standard VII. Staff-Child Interactions
VII.A.
VII.B.
VII.C.
Standard VIII. Activities
VIII.A.
Standard IX. Physical Environment
IX.A.
IX.B.
TOTAL
PERCENT COMPLIANCE: Actual points divided by possible points =
Provider meets Level B standards for 0-2 year olds
YES
NO
If no, state reason why provider does not meet Level B Standards. _______________________________________________________
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