Symmetricom TimeProvider 100 User manual

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Symmetricom TimeProvider 100 User manual | Manualzz
TimeProvider 100
GPS Timing and Frequency Source Device
User’s Guide
Revision A – March 2009
Part Number 098-00106-000
Symmetricom, Inc.
2300 Orchard Parkway
San Jose, CA 95131-1017
U.S.A.
http://www.symmetricom.com
Copyright © 2009 Symmetricom, Inc.
All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.
All product names, service marks, trademarks, and registered trademarks
used in this document are the property of their respective owners.
Contents
How to Use This Guide
Purpose of This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Structure of This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Conventions Used in This Guide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
Warnings, Cautions, Recommendations, and Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Related Documents and Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Where to Find Answers to Product and Document Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
What’s New In This Guide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
User’s Guide Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Chapter 1
Overview
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
Functional Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Functional Description. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Power Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
RS232 Serial Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
Ethernet Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
E1 Frequency Output Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
1PPS Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
10 MHz Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
Chassis Ground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
GPS (SMA) Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
Chapter 2
Installation and Configuration
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Site Survey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Unpack the Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
Rack Mounting the TimeProvider 100. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
Ground the Shelf. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
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Configuration Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
Apply Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
Establish Serial Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
Log On to TimeProvider 100. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
Check GPS Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
Check Inventory Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
Configure the TimeProvider 100 IP Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
Confirm TimeProvider 100 Network Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
Configure Frequency Outputs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
Installation and Configuration Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
Chapter 3
Part Numbers and Return Information
TimeProvider 100 System and Accessory Part Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
Returning the TimeProvider 100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
Repacking the Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Equipment Return Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Chapter 4
Operations
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Alarms & Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Delay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Transient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Alarm Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Date & Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
TimeProvider 100 Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Event Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Command Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
User Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
System Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Chapter 5
CLI Commands
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
TimeProvider 100 CLI Command Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
CLI Command Keyboard Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Command Line Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
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TimeProvider 100 CLI Command Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
Command User Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
Command Groups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
cli-settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
ping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
switchfirmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
logout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
reboot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
upgrade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Show Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
show active_alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
show alarmconf. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
show clock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
show eia232 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
show gps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
show image. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
show inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
show ipconfig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
show ipstatus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
show log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65
show event log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66
show command log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67
show output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67
show snmp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
show status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69
show users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69
Set Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
set alarmconf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
set clock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
set configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
set gps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74
set ipconfig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
set output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79
set password. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
set snmp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
set user . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
Chapter 6
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Preventive Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87
Safety Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
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Reading LED Conditions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
Upgrading the Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89
Contacting Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
Appendix A
System Messages
System Messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93
Appendix B
Specifications and Factory Defaults
Component Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97
Mechanical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97
Environmental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Transportation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
GPS Antenna Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Serial Port Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Ethernet Port. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
10MHz Analog Output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
1 PPS Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
E1 Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
Factory Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
Electromagnetic Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
Regulatory Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
Appendix C
Installing the GPS Antenna
Antenna Kits and Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
Selecting the Proper Gain Antenna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
Transient Eliminators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110
GPS L1 Inline Amplifier. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110
Antenna Coaxial Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
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Installing Antennas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Antenna Connection Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Planning the Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Antenna Installation Tools and Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Cutting Antenna Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
Installing the Antenna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
Connecting the Cable to the Antenna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Installing the Transient Eliminator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
Installing the Antenna Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Connecting the GPS Antenna. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Antenna Installation Completeness Checklist. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
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1-1
1-2
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
3-1
4-1
4-2
4-3
6-1
6-2
A-1
B-1
B-2
B-3
B-4
B-5
B-6
B-7
B-8
B-9
B-10
B-11
B-12
B-13
C-1
C-2
C-3
C-4
C-5
C-6
Serial Port Connector Pin Assignments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
TimeProvider 100 LED Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
COM Port Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
Signal Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
Signal Type Selection Choices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
Installation and Configuring Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
Component Part Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
RTE Clock Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
TimeProvider 100 Alarms, Events, and Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Alarm Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
Preventive Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87
LED Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
Alarms and Event System Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93
TimeProvider 100 Mechanical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97
TimeProvider 100 Environmental Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
TimeProvider 100 Transportation Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
TimeProvider 100 Operations Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
TimeProvider 100 Power Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
GPS Antenna Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Serial Port Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
LAN Port Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
10MHz Analog Output Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
1 PPS Output Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
E1 Output Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
2.048 MHz Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
General and Communication Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
GPS Antennas with Internal LNA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
Specifications for GPS Antennas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
L1 GPS Antenna Accessory Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
FCC-250B-90-1.5NFNF Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
GPS L1 Inline Amplifier Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Antenna Cable Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
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TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
9
List of Tables
10
TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
098-00106-000 Revision A – March, 2009
Figures
1-1
1-2
1-3
1-4
2-1
2-2
2-3
4-1
4-2
5-1
C-1
C-2
TimeProvider 100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
TimeProvider 100 Functional Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
TimeProvider 100 Hardware Functional Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
TimeProvider 100 Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Location of TimeProvider 100 Product Label. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
Universal Ground Symbol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Pinging the TimeProvider 100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
TimeProvider 100 Clock Modes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
System Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
TimeProvider 100 CLI Command Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Locating the GPS Antenna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
GPS Antenna Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
098-00106-000 Revision A – March, 2009
TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
11
List of Figures
12
TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
098-00106-000 Revision A – March, 2009
How to Use This Guide
This section describes the structure and conventions used in the TimeProvider 100
GPS Timing and Frequency Source Device User Guide. Related TimeProvider 100
documents, contact information for TimeProvider 100 training, and updates made to
the user guide can also be found in this section.
In This Preface

Purpose of This Guide

Structure of This Guide

Conventions Used in This Guide

Warnings, Cautions, Recommendations, and Notes

Related Documents and Information

Where to Find Answers to Product and Document Questions

What’s New In This Guide

User’s Guide Updates
Purpose of This Guide
The TimeProvider 100 User Guide provides detailed information about
Symmetricom’s TimeProvider 100 features, functionality, operations, specifications,
and default settings. Also included are guidelines for installing and configuring the
unit, a description of the Command Line Interface (CLI) command set, guidelines for
maintenance and troubleshooting, and how to contact technical support.
Structure of This Guide
This user guide contains the following chapters and appendixes:
Chapter, Title
Description
Chapter 1, Overview
Describes the features and functionality of TimeProvider 100.
Chapter 2, Installation and
Configuration
Describes the installation and configuration procedures before
using the TimeProvider 100
Chapter 3, Part Numbers and Lists the part numbers and provides return procedures.
Return Information
Chapter 4, Operations
Describes TimeProvider 100 alarms and events, logs, user
sessions, firmware upgrade, and system configurations.
Chapter 5, CLI Commands
Describes the CLI command set.
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TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
13
How to Use This Guide
Conventions Used in This Guide
Chapter, Title
Chapter 6, Maintenance and
Troubleshooting
Description
Contains preventative maintenance and safety consideration
information, where to return a unit if necessary, and how to get
technical assistance.
Chapter A, System Messages Provides suggested corrective action for system messages that
display in response to an event or alarm.
Chapter B, Specifications and Lists the specifications and default settings for TimeProvider 100.
Factory Defaults
Conventions Used in This Guide
This guide uses the following conventions:



Acronyms and Abbreviations – Terms are spelled out the first time they appear
in text. Thereafter, only the acronym or abbreviation is used.
Revision Control – The title page lists the printing date and versions of the
product this guide describes.
Typographical Conventions – This guide uses the typographical conventions
described in the table below.
When text appears
this way...
14
... it means:
Symmetricom Product Document
The title of a document.
CRITICAL
An operating mode, alarm state, status, or chassis
label.
Select File, Open...
Click the Open option on the File menu.
Press Enter
Press;
A named keyboard key.
The key name is shown as it appears on the
keyboard. An explanation of the key’s acronym or
function immediately follows the first reference to
the key, if required.
Username:
Text in a source file or a system prompt or other text
that appears on a screen.
ping
status
A command you enter at a system prompt or text
you enter in response to a program prompt. You
must enter commands for case-sensitive operating
systems exactly as shown.
qualified personnel
A word or term being emphasized.
Symmetricom does not
recommend...
A word or term given special emphasis.
TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
098-00106-000 Revision A – March, 2009
How to Use This Guide
Warnings, Cautions, Recommendations, and Notes
Warnings, Cautions, Recommendations, and Notes
Warnings, Cautions, Recommendations, and Notes attract attention to essential or
critical information in this guide. The types of information included in each are
explained in the following examples.
Warning: To avoid serious personal injury or death, do not disregard
warnings. All warnings use this symbol. Warnings are installation,
operation, or maintenance procedures, practices, or statements, that
if not strictly observed, may result in serious personal injury or even
death.
Caution: To avoid personal injury, do not disregard cautions. All
cautions use this symbol. Cautions are installation, operation, or
maintenance procedures, practices, conditions, or statements, that if
not strictly observed, may result in damage to, or destruction of, the
equipment. Cautions are also used to indicate a long-term health
hazard.
ESD Caution: To avoid personal injury and electrostatic discharge
(ESD) damage to equipment, do not disregard ESD cautions. All ESD
cautions use this symbol. ESD cautions are installation, operation, or
maintenance procedures, practices, conditions, or statements that if
not strictly observed, may result in possible personal injury,
electrostatic discharge damage to, or destruction of, static-sensitive
components of the equipment.
Electrical Shock Caution: To avoid electrical shock and possible
personal injury, do not disregard electrical shock cautions. All
electrical shock cautions use this symbol. Electrical shock cautions
are practices, procedures, or statements, that if not strictly observed,
may result in possible personal injury, electrical shock damage to, or
destruction of components of the equipment.
Recommendation: All recommendations use this symbol.
Recommendations indicate manufacturer-tested methods or known
functionality. Recommendations contain installation, operation, or
maintenance procedures, practices, conditions, or statements, that
provide important information for optimum performance results.
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TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
15
How to Use This Guide
Related Documents and Information
Note: All notes use this symbol. Notes contain installation, operation,
or maintenance procedures, practices, conditions, or statements, that
alert you to important information, which may make your task easier
or increase your understanding.
Related Documents and Information
See your Symmetricom representative or sales office for a complete list of available
documentation.
Note: Symmetricom offers training courses designed to enhance your
knowledge of the TimeProvider 100. Contact your local representative
or sales office for a complete list of courses and outlines.
Where to Find Answers to Product and Document
Questions
For additional information about the products described in this guide, please contact
your Symmetricom representative or your local sales office. You can also contact us
on the web at www.symmetricom.com.
What’s New In This Guide
This is the first release of the TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide.
User’s Guide Updates
When this manual is updated the updated version will be available for downloading
from Symmetricom’s Web site. After downloading, you can view the manual on a
computer or print it using Adobe Acrobat Reader.
Manual updates are available by logging in to Telecom Solutions Support at:
http://www.symmetricom.com/support/online-support//
Note: If you are downloading a manual for the first time, you will need
to register with Symmetricom. If you are currently registered, login
and download the manual update.
16
TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
098-00106-000 Revision A – March, 2009
Chapter 1 Overview
This chapter provides introductory information for the TimeProvider 100.
In This Chapter

Overview

Functional Description
Overview
TimeProvider 100 shown in Figure 1-1 is a low-cost Global Positioning System
(GPS)-disciplined timing and frequency source stand-alone, one Rack Unit (RU)
device. The system receives GPS satellite signals to control an onboard oscillator
and to provide 10MHz and 1 PPS output signals and four channels of E1. With
superior clock holdover performance and its compact size, the TimeProvider 100
enables rapid deployment for remote offices, street cabinets, and wireless base
stations. It is designed to provide precise time and synchronization for locations
where cost and space are a limitation.
TimeProvider 100 features a configurable output signal to support a variety of
framer signals. This provides the flexibility to integrate into specific application
environments easily. This device is fully manageable by local and remote
management using RS232 and its Ethernet port.
Figure 1-1.
TimeProvider 100
With password-protected management capability, users and administrators can
easily and securely configure and monitor the performance of the device using CLI,
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP), and Telnet. TimeProvider 100
supports remote configuration of system settings, automating saving and
restoration, and installation of new software when needed.
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TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
17
Chapter 1 Overview
Functional Overview
With password-protected management capability, TimeProvider 100 can be
configured and monitored using the Command-Line Interface (CLI) accessible
locally with the RS232 connection or remotely via a Telnet connection to enable
rapid migration from Time-Division Multiplexing (TDM)-based to packet-based
timing and synchronization solutions. TimeProvider 100 supports remote
configuration of system settings, automating saving and restoration, and installation
of new software when needed.
Functional Overview
The primary function of TimeProvider 100 is to provide the following GPS
disciplined frequency and timing signals:

10 MHz sine wave

1 PPS (pulse per second)

2.048 MHz square wave

2.048 Mbps E1 (framed and unframed)
In addition, TimeProvider 100 provides the following functions:

Command line interface (CLI)

SNMP traps reporting

SNMP management interface (future)

Logging of alarms and events

Logging all user commands

18
Monitoring of DC power voltages, GPS cable connection, GPS engine states,
and PLL states.
TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
098-00106-000 Revision A – March, 2009
Chapter 1
Functional Overview
GPS
Signal
10 MHz,
1PPS,
(UTC)
Timing Signal Generator
Real-Time Engine (RTE)
E1,
2.048 MHz
E1 Signal Generator
System Clock
NTP Server (future)
NTP Packets
LEDs
Configuration
Alarm/Event Reporting
Log Management
Figure 1-2.
Management :
CLI, SNMP
CLI,
SNMP
TimeProvider 100 Functional Block Diagram
TimeProvider 100 accepts the Radio Frequency (RF) signal from a GPS antenna. In
the Real Time Engine (RTE) circuit, the 1 PPS signal is extracted from the GPS
signal and is used to discipline the 10 MHz oven-controlled crystal oscillator
(OCXO). Both the 1 pulse per second (PPS) and 10 MHz signals are provided as
outputs from BNC connectors.
Note: When using the CLI commands, the RTE (Real Time Engine) is
referred to as “TimeMAX.”
The 10 MHz reference signal and the 1 PPS signal from the RTE circuit are used to
generate 2.048 MHz frequency signals and E1 synchronization signals.
TimeProvider 100 provides multiple E1 frame formats. There are four outputs; each
is independently programmable to output either a framed or unframed
synchronization signal or a square wave clock signal as shown in Figure 1-3.
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TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
19
Chapter 1 Overview
Functional Description
GPS RF
10 MHz Sinewave
1 PPS
Real-Time Engine (RTE)
1 PPS
10 MHz
RS-232 (local access)
Ethernet (management )
Microprocessor
2.048 MHz Clock
System Clock(timestamp)
Framer and
Output Circuit
-48 VDC
LEDs
Four Independently
Programmable Outputs
2.048 MHz Square Wave
2.048 Mbps (E1)
Power Supplies
Figure 1-3.
TimeProvider 100 Hardware Functional Block Diagram
Functional Description
Figure 1-4 is a front view of the TimeProvider 100. All user connections are on the
panel.
Chassis
Ground
1PPS
Connector
10 MHz
Connector
LEDs
E1
Output Ports
GPS (SMA)
Connector
Figure 1-4.
20
Ethernet
Management
Connector
RS232
Serial Port
-48 DC Power
Connector
TimeProvider 100 Front Panel
TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
098-00106-000 Revision A – March, 2009
Chapter 1
Functional Description
Power Connector
A Molex-style connector labeled Power is used to provide -48/-60 nominal volts DC
(labeled Power). When the unit is successfully powered, the PWR LED near the
center of the panel will illuminate green. If the power connection is reversed, the unit
will not be damaged, it simply will not power-up. Startup power will be < 17 watts
and steady-state power is (nominal 25 °C) < 9.5 watts.
The TimeProvider 100 uses –48/-60 nominal VDC power and is not equipped with a
power switch. Power to the unit must be controlled by a Branch Circuit Over-Current
Protection Device to the DC power main.
Warning: To avoid serious personal injury or death, exercise caution
when working near high voltage lines and follow local building
electrical codes for grounding the shelf.
RS232 Serial Port
The DE9 connector labeled RS232 provides a local serial connection to
TimeProvider 100. Through this connection, a Command Line Interface (CLI)
provides configuration and status monitoring capability. The RS-232 serial port
connection is made through a DE9S female connector. This port allows you to
connect to a computer using terminal emulation software for remote monitoring and
control. When connecting to this port, use a shielded direct connect cable. See
Establish Serial Communication, on page 31 for default settings.
Table 1-1 describes the EIA-232 connector pin assignments for the serial port.
Table 1-1. Serial Port Connector Pin Assignments
Pin Number
Signal
2
TX
3
RX
5
Ground
LEDs
The TimeProvider 100 has three LEDs on the front panel of the unit and are
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TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
21
Chapter 1 Overview
Functional Description
described in Table 1-2. Current alarm status can be checked using the show
active alarm command. For more information, see the CLI command, show
active_alarm, on page 61.
Table 1-2. TimeProvider 100 LED Descriptions
Label
Indicator
Description
PWD
Power
Solid Green – -48V power is on
Off – -48V power is off
GPS
GPS tracking status
Solid Green – GPS is locked
Flashing Green – At least one satellite is tracked
Amber– No satellite is tracking
ALM
Alarm
Flashing Green – System is booting
Amber – Minor alarm
Red – Major alarm
Off – No alarm
Ethernet Management
The RJ-45 connector labeled MGMT is the connection supporting communication
into the network over TCP/IP protocol. This same connection is also used for
remote management. Configuration and status monitoring are accomplished using
the MGMT connector.
Note: The NTP feature in the NTP port is currently not implemented.
E1 Frequency Output Connectors
TimeProvider 100 provides four configurable outputs at E1 (2.048MHz) frequencies.
The four independent, separately driven outputs are labeled OUT1, OUT2, OUT3,
and OUT4. Specific signal types are detailed in the CLI command, set output, on
page 79.
1PPS Connector
The BNC connector labeled 1PPS provides one pulse per second (1PPS) signal
synchronized to GPS with 50  impedance and LVTTL signal level.
22
TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
098-00106-000 Revision A – March, 2009
Chapter 1
Functional Description
10 MHz Connector
The BNC connector labeled 10 MHz provides 10 MHz sine wave signal
synchronized to GPS with 50  impedance.
Chassis Ground
Above the GPS (SMA connector) is a connection to chassis ground. A 4mm
Grounding Terminal Stud is located on the TimeProvider 100’s front panel. The
grounding terminal is marked with the universal ground symbol.
GPS (SMA) Connector
The SMA female connector labeled GPS is the GPS antenna connection and used
as GPS input.
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23
Chapter 1 Overview
Functional Description
24
TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
098-00106-000 Revision A – March, 2009
Chapter 2 Installation and Configuration
In This Chapter

Installation

Configuration Setup

Installation and Configuration Checklist
This section provides preliminary installation and configuration procedures for the
TimeProvider 100. Use the Installation and Configuration Checklist, on page 39 to
verify that you have completed the required installation and configuration before
using the TimeProvider 100.
Before you begin to install the TimeProvider 100, review all the information in this
section. If difficulties are encountered during the installation process, contact
Symmetricom Global Services (SGS). Refer to the Contacting Technical Support,
on page 91 for contact information. SGS provides you with technical product
expertise and support, and Customer Service provides support about orders,
Return Material Authorization (RMA)s, and other customer service-related
information.
Installation
This section describes guidelines for surveying a site before installing, unpacking
the unit, rack mounting, and grounding the shelf.
Site Survey
Before you begin installation, determine the shelf location, ensure the appropriate
power source is available (-48/-60 nominal VDC), and ensure that the equipment
rack is properly grounded. Refer to Part Numbers and Return Information, on page
41 for more information about ordering kits for rack mounting of the TimeProvider
100.
The TimeProvider 100 is designed to mount in a 19-inch (48 cm) rack, occupies
1.66 in (40.64 mm, 1 RU) of vertical rack space, and has a depth of 8.0 in (203.2
mm).
Note: 21-inch and 23-inch rack mounting adapters are available as
separately ordered items.
Environmental Requirements
Please refer to the Maintenance and Troubleshooting, on page 87 and
Specifications and Factory Defaults, on page 97 for more information.
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TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
25
Chapter 2
Installation
To prevent the unit from malfunctioning or interfering with other equipment, install
and operate the unit according to the following guidelines:

Operating Temperature: -23 Fto 131 F (–5 °C to +55 °C)

Operating Humidity: <5% TO 95% RH, condensing

Use only shielded cable for the DE9 connector (RS232). Ground appropriately at
both ends, or as required by local standards.
Warning: The shielded cables on the RS232 port must be used to
assure EMC compliance.

Secure all cable screws to their corresponding connectors.
Caution: To avoid interference, you must consider the
electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of nearby equipment when you
install the TimeProvider 100 electromagnetic interference can
adversely affect the operation of nearby equipment.
Refer to Electromagnetic Environment, on page 105 for more
information.
User-Supplied Tools and Equipment
You will need the following tools and equipment to install the TimeProvider 100:

Standard tool used for installation

Cable ties, waxed string or acceptable cable clamps

1 mm² / 18 AWG (minimum) wire at 300 volt insulation for -48/-60 nominal VDC


Shielded cabling of the appropriate impedance required by the specific signal
type for signal wiring.

Mating connectors for terminating signal wiring

Fasteners for mounting the equipment in rack


26
4 mm² / 16 AWG wire to connect grounding lug to permanent earth ground. Use a
UL listed ring lug for earthing ground.
Digital multimeter or standard voltmeter for verifying power connections to the
shelf.
Laptop computer with serial communications software (e.g., Microsoft
Hyperterminal and ProComm Plus) for setting system parameters.
TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
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Chapter 2 Installation and Configuration
Installation
Unpack the Unit
The TimeProvider 100 is packaged to protect it from normal shock, vibration, and
handling damage.
Caution: To avoid electrostatic discharge (ESD) damage to parts that
are packaged with the TimeProvider 100, observe the following
procedures.
Unpack and inspect the unit as follows:
1. Inspect the container for signs of damage. If the container appears to be
damaged, notify both the carrier and your Symmetricom distributor. Retain the
shipping container and packing material for the carrier to inspect.
2. Open the container, being careful to cut only the packaging tape.
3. Locate and set aside the printed information and paperwork that is included in
the container.
4. Remove the unit from the container and place it on an anti-static surface.
5. Locate and set aside small parts which may be packed in the container.
6. Remove the accessories from the container.
7. Remove the anti-static packaging from the unit and accessories.
8. Follow the instructions for assembling the rack mounts to the TimeProvider 100.
See Part Numbers and Return Information, on page 41 for more information.
9. Verify that the model and item number shown on the shipping list agrees with the
model and item number on the equipment. The item number can be found on a
label affixed to the unit. See Figure 2-1 for the location of the label. Contact your
Symmetricom distributor if the model or item number does not match the
information on the shipping list.
For a complete listing of item numbers, see Part Numbers and Return Information,
on page 41.
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27
Chapter 2
Installation
Figure 2-1.
Location of TimeProvider 100 Product Label
Rack Mounting the TimeProvider 100
The installation procedure described in this section provides general guidelines for
installing the TimeProvider 100. Refer to Part Numbers and Return Information, on
page 41 for information about available rack mount kits and mounting adapter
bracket kits.
When installing the TimeProvider 100, always follow applicable local electrical
standards. Use the following steps to mount the TimeProvider 100 in a rack.
1. Attach the rack mounting brackets to the TimeProvider 100 using 6-32 x 1/4-inch
screws.
Note: Using screws other than 6-32 x 1/4 inch could cause damage
to the unit. Always use the proper screws for the equipment rack.
2. Ensure that the mounting brackets on both sides are attached at equal distances
from the front of the unit.
3. Mount the TimeProvider 100 to the front of the equipment rack rails with four
screws and associated hardware.
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TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
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Chapter 2 Installation and Configuration
Installation
Rack Mounting Safety Instructions





Elevated Operating Ambient - If installed in a closed or multi-unit rack assembly,
the operating ambient temperature of the rack environment may be greater than
room ambient. Therefore, consideration should be given to installing the
equipment in an environment compatible with the maximum ambient temperature
of the TimeProvider 100, which is +55 °C.
Reduced Air Flow - Installation of the equipment in a rack should be such that the
amount of air flow required for safe operation of the equipment is not
compromised.
Mechanical Loading - Mounting of the equipment in the rack should be such that
a hazardous condition is not achieved due to uneven mechanical loading.
Circuit Overloading - Consideration should be given to the connection of the
equipment to the supply circuit and the effect that overloading of the circuits
might have on overcurrent protection and supply wiring. Appropriate
consideration of equipment nameplate ratings should be used when addressing
this concern.
Reliable Earthing - Reliable earthing of rack-mounted equipment should be
maintained. Particular attention should be given to supply connections other than
direct connections to the branch circuit (for example, use of power strips).
Ground the Shelf
Ground the TimeProvider 100 using the 4mm Grounding Terminal Stud on the front
of the TimeProvider 100. This Grounding Terminal is marked with the universal
ground symbol, as shown in Figure 2-2.
Figure 2-2.
Universal Ground Symbol
To make ground connections, follow these steps:
1. Connect a 4 mm² / 16 AWG green/yellow striped insulated wire from the
Grounding terminal on the TimeProvider 100 shelf to the Earth Ground on the
rack or cabinet. Connect it to the Earth Ground in accordance with Local
Electrical Codes. The surface of the Earth grounding terminal must be clean of
contaminants and oxidation.
2. Remove 1/4 in. (6mm) of the insulation from both ends of the 4 mm² / 16 AWG
green/yellow stripped wire and coat the conductor with an electrically conductive
antioxidant compound such as Kopr-shield spray. Spray antioxidant compound
on the exposed wire only.
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29
Chapter 2
Configuration Setup
3. Crimp a #10 (4mm) UL listed Ring Lug to one end of the 4 mm² / 16 AWG
green/yellow stripped wire and connect it to the TimeProvider 100
Grounding\Terminal using the 4mm kept nut supplied. Clamp the Ring Lug
between the two flat washers.
4. Clean the connection point on the rack to a bright finish and coat it with an
electrically conductive antioxidant compound such as Kopr-shield spray.
5. Crimp the other end of the green/ yellow stripped wire to a ¼” (6mm) UL listed
Ring Lug and connect to the Earth Grounding terminals using an external star
lock washer between the Ring Lug and rack or earthing point to be grounded.
6. Connect the Ring Lug to the rack or grounding rod by means in accordance with
Local Electrical Codes. Do not connect multiple connectors to the same screw
assembly.
Configuration Setup
Setting up the TimeProvider 100 to receive GPS satellite signals to provide 10MHz
and 1 PPS output signals and four channels of E1 requires very few steps. The
high-level steps needed are:


Apply power to the TimeProvider 100.
Configure the network address of the TimeProvider 100, and confirm successful
connectivity.

Configure TimeProvider 100 signal outputs.

Configure GPS signaling.
After making configuration changes, always use the set configuration save CLI
command to save the latest configuration. See set configuration, on page 72 for
more information.
The configuration actions performed in this section are stored in non-volatile
memory and are retained when the unit is power-cycled.
Apply Power
The TimeProvider 100 should be connected to -48/-60 nominal VDC Mains through
the Branch Circuit Over-Current Protection Device with a maximum 1 amp fuse.
TimeProvider 100 is intended for installation in a Restricted Access Location in
Accordance with Articles 110-26, 110-27 or the National Electric Code
ANSI/NFPA70, or per the applicable code in the country of installation. To connect
power leads to the shelf, follow these steps:
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TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
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Chapter 2 Installation and Configuration
Configuration Setup
1. Remove the fuse from the front panel of the Branch Circuit Over-Current
Protection Device. Replace the fuse at the end of the installation procedure.
2. Wire the provided Molex connector to 1 mm² / 18 AWG UL1007 wire with the
crimp pins supplied. Insert Molex pins into the Molex connector provided. Wire
the other end of the power wires to the Branch Circuit Over-Current Protection
Device.
3. Plug the Molex connector into the TimeProvider 100 and replace the fuse in the
Branch Circuit Over-Current Protection Device. The TimeProvider 100 -48/-60
nominal VDC power connector is keyed to only connect one way.
4. The connector has a latching mechanism. Push the connector in until it clicks into
place. When power is successfully provided, the LED labeled “PWR” will
illuminate green. Descriptions of LED indicators are shown in Reading LED
Conditions, on page 88.
Note: When disconnecting, the latch arm needs to be tilted away from
the “catch” by pressing on the connector and then pulling.
Warning: To avoid serious personal injury or death, exercise caution
when working near high voltage lines and follow local building
electrical codes for grounding the shelf.
Establish Serial Communication
Serial communication with TimeProvider 100 is established so that configuration
can be accomplished. To establish serial communication, follow these steps:
1. Connect a serial cable from the computer’s serial port with theTimeProvider
100’s 9-pin serial port connector labeled RS232.
2. Run your terminal emulation program, and configure the designated COM port
on the computer using Table 2-1.
Table 2-1. COM Port Properties
Settings
Value
Bits per second
9600
Data bits
8
Parity
None
Stop bits
1
Flow control
None
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Chapter 2
Configuration Setup
Log On to TimeProvider 100
Log on is required to configure or view TimeProvider 100 settings. To log on to the
TimeProvider 100, follow these steps:
1. Wait for the system to boot.
2. At the login prompt, type admin, then press Enter.
3. At the password prompt, type tp100, then press Enter.
A successful connection will look like the following example. You will be asked to
type in your user name and password after the system boots up. After typing in the
correct user name admin and password tp100, it will show tp100> for you to type in
command.
Symmetricom TP100
login: admin
Password: *****
tp100>
Note: If you fail to log in after three tries, the system will wait
one to two minutes before you try again.
Log On Tips

admin is the factory shipped user name and tp100 is the factory shipped
password. The set user command can be used to change the user name and
password. See TimeProvider 100 CLI Command Set, on page 56 for more
information.




32
Logon sessions can be initiated using the serial port or remotely using Telnet. If
using Telnet, an appropriate TimeProvider 100 network address needs to be
established before remote sessions can be successful.
A serial session will automatically logout whenever 10 minutes elapse without
any user entry. When a session expires, there will be a logon prompt.
A remote (Telnet) session will automatically logout whenever 10 minutes elapse
without any entry. When a session expires, there will be a logon prompt.
The TimeProvider 100 simultaneously supports up to eight log on sessions.
These eight simultaneous log on sessions can be on the serial port, Ethernet
port, or a combination of both ports.
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Chapter 2 Installation and Configuration
Configuration Setup
Check GPS Status
After logging in to the system, the show gps command can be used to check the
GPS status. The command response is shown in the following example. The
"Number of tracked satellite" information can we used to judge whether the GPS
cable is connected correctly. When the Number of tracked satellite is larger
than zero, the GPS connection is working properly.
tp100> show GPS
GPS information
GPS Position Mode
- Auto
GPS Mask
- 5
GPS Antenna Delay
- 0.00E+00
GPS System Time
- week:1809, second:200730
Number of tracked satellite
- 8
GPS Latitude
- N39:54:12.726
GPS Longitude
- E116:26:45.318
GPS Height
- 134.90
Check Inventory Information
The show inventory command is used to check the inventory information in the
TimeProvider 100 as shown in the following example:
tp100> show inventory
--------------------------------------------------------------------------|Part number
|Serial
|HW Ver
|SW Ver
|FPGA
|Manufacture date |
|---------------|---------|---------|---------|---------|-----------------|
|090-95000-01
| R03009 | 2
|0.0.14
|0x17
|11/14/2008
|
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Configure the TimeProvider 100 IP Address
This step establishes the IP settings of the TimeProvider 100. The LAN connection
labeled MGMT & NTP can be used for configuration of the TimeProvider 100.
The following two examples show how to configure Ethernet ports.
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Chapter 2
Configuration Setup
Setting IP DHCP Mode
In the following example, the MGMT port was used for configuration. After
configuration is done, type show ipconfig to see a list of IP settings as shown.
1. Type the following CLI command and then press Enter.
tp100> set ipconfig MGMT mode dhcp
2. Type the following CLI command and then press Enter.
tp100> set ipconfig MGMT restart.
3. Type the following CLI command and then press Enter.
tp100> show ipconfig
Because the mode is DHCP, the dynamic IP address, gateway and subnet mask are
shown as N/A. In order to find out the real negotiated IP address, use the CLI
command, show ipstatus to check the current Ethernet status. In this case, the IP
address is 192.168.5.69 and the IP subnet mask is 255.255.255.0.
Caution: After making configuration changes, you must use the set
configuration save CLI command to save the latest
configuration. See set configuration, on page 72 for more
information.
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Chapter 2 Installation and Configuration
Configuration Setup
tp100> show ipstatus
MGMT
NTP
Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:B0:AE:01:A4:AB
inet addr:192.168.5.69 Bcast:192.168.5.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:519 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:7 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:41055 (40.0 KiB) TX bytes:1938 (1.8 KiB)
Base address:0xa000
Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:B0:AE:01:A4:AA
inet addr:192.168.2.10 Bcast:192.168.2.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
UP BROADCAST MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:2 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:0 (0.0 B) TX bytes:84 (84.0 B)
Base address:0xc000
Setting IP Static Mode
Use the NTP port for static mode. The NTP port can only be set to static
mode. To set the IP settings with the following settings: IP address =
192.168.2.8, gateway = 192.168.2.1, and IP subnet mask = 255.255.255.0,
follow these steps:
1. Type and the following CLI command and then press Enter.
tp100> set ipconfig NTP ipaddr 192.168.2.8 mask 255.255.255.0 gateway 192.168.2.1
2. To make the settings available, type the following CLI command and then press
Enter:
tp100> set ipconfig NTP restart
Use values appropriate for your network environment.
Caution: After making configuration changes, you must use the set
configuration save CLI command to save the latest
configuration. See set configuration, on page 72 for more
information.
Confirm the setting and status by using the show ipconfig and show status
commands. Use the set ipconfig CLI command to configure IP settings
appropriate to your network. To confirm the IP address values, use the show
ipconfig CLI command. Refer to TimeProvider 100 CLI Command Set, on page
56 for more information.
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Chapter 2
Configuration Setup
Confirm TimeProvider 100 Network Communication
If not already done, a standard RJ45 Ethernet cable should be connected from the
TimeProvider 100 port labeled MGMT into the network connection for 10/100
Base-T.
There are a number of ways to confirm that TimeProvider 100 is now available on
the network. The following is a method available on any Windows® PC:
1. From a PC that is on the same network as the TimeProvider 100, select Start >
Run.
2. In the Run dialog box, select cmd, then click OK. This will initiate a command
session as shown in Figure 2-3.
3. At the prompt, type ping followed by the TimeProvider 100 IP address, then
press Enter. See Figure 2-3. The example shows successful connection.
C:\Documents and Sengs\symmuser> ping 192.168.5.1
Reply from 192.168.5.1: bytes =32 me=4ms TTL=64
Reply from 192.168.5.1: bytes =32 me=2ms TTL=64
Reply from 192.168.5.1: bytes =32 me=2ms TTL=64
Reply from 192.168.5.1: bytes =32 me=2ms TTL=64
Ping stascs for 192.168.5.1:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, lost = 0 <0% loss>,
Approximate round trip mes in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 2 ms, Maximum= 4 ms, Average= 2 ms
Figure 2-3.
Pinging the TimeProvider 100
The response shown in Figure 2-3 shows the TimeProvider 100 IP connection is
working properly.
If ping was not successful, here are some considerations:


36
First, ensure that a physical link has been established from the TimeProvider 100
to whatever it is connected to (likely a switch). The small green LED in the
upper-right-hand corner of the MGMT connector on the TimeProvider 100 (see
Figure 1-4) should be lit solid green. If it is not, there is likely a basic link problem.
Once the physical link is established, ensure that the device linked to the
TimeProvider 100 is capable of running 10/100 Base-T. The TimeProvider 100
will auto-negotiate the rate, but does not support speeds other than 10/100
Base-T.
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Chapter 2 Installation and Configuration
Configuration Setup
Configure Frequency Outputs
The outputs from the 10 MHz and 1PPS BNC ports are fixed and cannot be
configured. Each of the OUT1 to OUT4 BNC ports can be configured independently.
Available output signal types are shown in Table 2-2.
Table 2-2. Signal Types
Signal Type
Output Type
Disable
No Output
e1_ccs_no_ssm
E1, CCS, CRC Disabled, Sa bits set to all 1's
e1_ccs4
E1, CCS, CRC Enabled, SSM Enabled
e1_ccs4_no_ssm
E1, CCS, CRC Enabled, Sa bits set to all 1's
e1_cas_no_ssm
E1, CAS, CRC Disabled, Sa bits set to all 1's
e1_cas4
E1, CAS, CRC Enabled, SSM Enabled
e1_cas4_no_ssm
E1, CAS, CRC Enabled, Sa bits set to all 1's
e1_2048m
E1 2.048MHz
e1_ais
EI AIS
The show output command identifies the current output signal type. The figure
below shows an example of output configurations. "Port" indicates the port number,
"State" indicates the "enable" or "disable" state of the port, "Frametype" indicates
frame type of the output signal, "SSM Bit" indicates the position of the SSM bit, and
"SSM Value" indicates the SSM value (clock accuracy). See show output, on page
67 for more information.
tp100> show output
----------------------------------------------------------------|Port
|State
|Frame Type
|SSM Bit
|SSM Value |
|---------|-----------|--------------------|----------|----------|
|1
|enable
|e1_cas4
|4
|st1
|
|---------|-----------|--------------------|----------|----------|
|2
|enable
|e1_cas4
|4
|st1
|
|---------|-----------|--------------------|----------|----------|
|3
|enable
|e1_cas4
|4
|st1
|
|---------|-----------|--------------------|----------|----------|
|4
|enable
|e1_cas4
|4
|st1
|
------------------------------------------------------------------
The output signal can be observed on an oscilloscope by connecting directly from
the BNC output of TimeProvider 100 to the BNC port of the oscilloscope.
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Chapter 2
Configuration Setup
Set the signal type as desired using the set output PORTn frametype
<selection> SSM-BIT <selection> status <selection> command. The
<selection> choices are shown in Table 2-3.
Table 2-3. Signal Type Selection Choices
Parameter
Selection
PORTn
Port1, Port2, Port3, Port4
Status
Enable, Disable
FRAMETYPE
e1_css_no_ssm, e1_ccs4, e1_ccs4_no_ssm, e1_cas_no_ssm,
e1_cas4, e1_cas4_no_ssm, e1_2048m, e1_ais
SSM-BIT
4, 5, 6, 7, 8
For example, set port1 to e1_cas with crc and ssm bit set to 5, type and enter the
following command:
tp100> set output port1 frametype e1_cas4
tp100> set output port1 ssm-bit 5
The output LED provides high-level indication about output status as shown in
Reading LED Conditions, on page 88.
Caution: After making configuration changes, you must use the set
configuration save CLI command to save the latest
configuration. See set configuration, on page 72 for more
information.
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Chapter 2 Installation and Configuration
Installation and Configuration Checklist
Installation and Configuration Checklist
To make sure that you have properly installed and configured your TimeProvider
100, use Table 2-4 to verify that you have completed the required operations. For
further details about each of the operations, refer to the section shown inTable 2-4.
Table 2-4. Installation and Configuring Checklist
Operation
More Information
TimeProvider 100 Site Survey
Site Survey, on page 25
Unpack Unit
Unpack the Unit, on page 27
Shelf Mounting (optional)
Rack Mounting the TimeProvider
100, on page 28
Shelf Grounding (optional)
Ground the Shelf, on page 29
Apply Power
Apply Power, on page 30
Establish Serial Communication
Complete
Establish Serial Communication, on
page 31
Log On to TimeProvider 100
Log On to TimeProvider 100, on
page 32
Check GPS Status
Check Inventory Information
Check GPS Status, on page 33
Check Inventory Information, on
page 33
Configure TimeProvider 100 IP Address
Configure the TimeProvider 100 IP
Address, on page 33
Confirm TimeProvider 100 Network
Communication
Confirm TimeProvider 100 Network
Communication, on page 36
Configure Outputs
Configure Frequency Outputs, on
page 37
Now that you have completed the required steps to install and configure the
TimeProvider 100 for operation, the Command Line Interface (CLI) can be used for
additional configuration or status monitoring. Refer to TimeProvider 100 CLI
Command Set, on page 56 for further details.
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Chapter 2
Installation and Configuration Checklist
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TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
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Chapter 3 Part Numbers and Return Information
In This Chapter

TimeProvider 100 System and Accessory Part Numbers

Returning the TimeProvider 100
TimeProvider 100 System and Accessory Part Numbers
This section provides part numbers and accessories available for the TimeProvider
100.
Table 3-1. Component Part Numbers
Item
TimeProvider 100Shelf & Installation Kit
Part Number
990-95000-01
Accessories - Antenna Kit
TimeProvider 100 GPS Antenna Kit
990-00075-000
Accessories - Optional
TimeProvider 100 19” Single Rack Mount Kit
093-00090-000
TimeProvider 100 19” Dual Rack Mount Kit
093-00069-000
Mounting Adaptor Bracket Kit - 21" ETSI
093-00011-000
Mounting Adaptor Bracket Kit - 23"
093-00012-000
Returning the TimeProvider 100
You should return the equipment to Symmetricom only after you have exhausted the
troubleshooting procedures described in this user guide, or if Symmetricom Global
Services has advised you to return the unit.
Note: Please retain the original packaging for re-shipping the
product. If the original packaging is not available, contact
Symmetricom Global Services (SGS) for assistance.
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Chapter 3 Part Numbers and Return Information
Returning the TimeProvider 100
Repacking the Unit
Return all units in the original packaging. If the original packaging is not available,
contact Symmetricom Global Services. Use standard packing procedures for
products being returned for repair to protect the equipment during shipment.
Equipment Return Procedure
To return equipment to Symmetricom for repair:
1. Call Symmetricom Global Services (SGS) at 888-367-7966 (toll-free in USA
only), 408-428-7907, or +49 700 3288 6435 in Europe, Middle East, or Africa to
obtain a return material authorization number (RMA) before returning the product
for service.
You can request an RMA on the internet at
www.symmetricom.com/Support/req_repair.htm.
Retain the assigned RMA number for future reference.
2. Provide a description of the problem, product item number, serial number, and
warranty expiration date.
3. Provide the return shipping information (customer field contact, address,
telephone number, and so forth.)
4. Ship the product to Symmetricom, transportation prepaid and insured, with the
Return Material Authorization (RMA) number and item numbers or part numbers
clearly marked on the outside of the container to the address given with the RMA.
Repaired equipment is returned to you with shipping costs prepaid by
Symmetricom.
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Chapter 4 Operations
In This Chapter

Introduction

Alarms & Events

Alarm Levels

Date & Time

TimeProvider 100 Logs

User Sessions

System Configurations
Introduction
Having completed the initial setup and checklist, the unit is now ready for operation.
This section provides information about how to interpret TimeProvider 100
operational status and performance. See the CLI Commands, on page 53 for a
complete list of configuration and query commands with examples and responses
from TimeProvider 100.
The operational status of TimeProvider 100 is dependent on the operational mode
of the RTE clock module. The RTE clock module provides the clock signals (10
MHz and 1PPS) that TimeProvider 100 uses to generate the four telecom outputs.
The seven RTE clock modes as shown in Figure 4-1 are:
1. Power-up—RTE is booting. 10 MHz and 1PPS outputs are not valid.
2. Warm-up—RTE is waiting for 10 MHz OCXO to warm up and stabilize.
3. Never-locked—RTE has not locked to GPS since power-up. 10 MHz and 1PPS
outputs are available, but their quality is not guaranteed. If GPS is not connected,
RTE will remain in this mode.
4. Locked—The OCXO is locked to 1PPS signal recovered from GPS. 10 MHz and
1PPS outputs are valid.
5. Holdover—RTE cannot track to any GPS satellite. 10 MHz and 1PPS outputs
are valid, but in holdover mode.
6. Recovery—RTE has found a GPS satellite and is trying to lock of them. 10 MHz
and 1PPS outputs are valid, but in holdover mode.
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Chapter 4 Operations
Introduction
7. Fail—RTE has a hardware error. 10 MHz and 1PPS outputs are not guaranteed.
When the error is cleared, RTE goes to Holdover mode.
RTE (Real Time Engine) Clock Modes
Power-up
Warm-up
Never-locked
Fail
Locked
(5)
(1)
Notes:
(1) Lost satellites
(2) Found satellites
(3) Lost satellites
(4) Lock achieved
(5) HW error cleared
Holdover
(4) (3)
(2)
Recovery
Figure 4-1.
TimeProvider 100 Clock Modes
The RTE clock module puts out valid clock signals if it is in Locked, Holdover, or
Recovery mode. The RTE clock module puts out invalid clock signals when it is in
FAIL mode.
Table 4-1 describes the seven RTE clock mode conditions and Telecom outputs.
Table 4-1. RTE Clock Modes
RTE Mode
RTE Conditions
TimeProvider 100 Telecom Output
Power-up
RTE is booting up. 10 MHz and 1PPS
outputs are not valid.
Clock quality = DUS (Do not Use for
Sync).
Warm-up
RTE OCXO is warming up and has
not stabilized. 10 MHz and 1PPS
outputs are not valid.
Clock quality = DUS (Do not Use for
Sync).
Never-locked
RTE has not locked to GPS since
power-up. 10 MHz and 1PPS outputs
are available, but their quality is not
guaranteed.
(1) Clock quality = ST3 (Stratum 3) if
TimeProvider 100 has no hardware
faults that affect the telecom outputs.
(2) Clock quality = DUS (Do not Use for
Sync) if TimeProvider 100 has
hardware faults that affect the telecom
outputs.
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Chapter 4 Operations
Alarms & Events
Table 4-1. RTE Clock Modes (Continued)
RTE Mode
RTE Conditions
TimeProvider 100 Telecom Output
Locked
RTE OCXO is locked to a 1PPS
signal recovered from GPS. 10 MHz
and 1PPS outputs are valid.
(1) Clock quality = ST1 (Stratum 1) if
TimeProvider 100 has no hardware
faults that affect the telecom outputs.
(2) Clock quality = DUS (Do not Use for
Sync) if TimeProvider 100 has
hardware faults that affect the telecom
outputs.
Holdover
RTE has lost GPS satellite. 10 MHz
and 1PPS outputs are valid but in
holdover mode.
(1) Clock quality = ST3 (Stratum 3) if
TimeProvider 100 has no hardware
faults that affect the telecom outputs.
(2) Clock quality = DUS if TimeProvider
100 has hardware faults that affect the
telecom outputs.
Recovery
RTE has found a GPS satellite and is
trying to lock with the GPS satellite.
10 MHz and 1PPS outputs are valid,
but in holdover mode.
(1) Clock quality = ST3 (Stratum 3) if
TimeProvider 100 has no hardware
faults that affect the telecom outputs.
(2) Clock quality = DUS (Do not Use for
Sync) if TimeProvider 100 has
hardware faults that affect the telecom
outputs.
Fail
RTE has a hardware error.
10 MHz and 1PPS outputs are not
valid
Clock quality = DUS (Do not Use for
Sync).
Alarms & Events
TimeProvider 100 reports alarms and events related to hardware failures.
Non-alarm events are changes in system configuration and operational mode.
TimeProvider 100 records alarms and events in the Event Log. Up to a 1,000 entries
can be logged, and the oldest entry is deleted first when the log is full. Table 4-2 lists
all alarms, events, and default settings. Event code number 20 (Configuration
Change) includes all the changes to system configuration that are not listed in the
table.
Level
Level identifies the severity of the alarm. It can be critical, major, minor, or event. If
the level is event, it is not reported, but it is recorded and logged. The events
defined in the table (code 20 and 24–29) cannot be changed to alarms. Alarm codes
0 –19 can be changed to events and back to alarms. If an alarm happens, and its
transient parameter is “no,” it will be reported as an active alarm. A SNMP trap will
be generated, and the trap will be logged in the Event log.
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Chapter 4 Operations
Alarms & Events
State
State indicates whether a particular alarm or event should be ignored by the system.
If an event or alarm is disabled, it will not be reported or logged.
Delay
If the delay value is nonzero, the alarm will be reported if it has been active for the
length of time specified by the delay. The event time in the log will be the time when
the alarm first happened and excludes the delay time. If the alarm is cleared before
the delay time is up, the alarm is not reported and logged.
Note: The delay value for alarm TM_SELFTEST (alarm ID #8),
TM_COMM (alarm ID #9) and FPGA_ERROR (alarm ID #12) are
fixed to zero and cannot be changed.
Transient
If the transient parameter is set to “yes,” the alarm will not be reported as an active
alarm and a SNMP trap will not be generated. The alarm is recorded in the Event
log. Event code 20–29 have fixed transient status and cannot be changed.
Note: An event definition can be modified by both the admin
and config user groups. See Command Groups, on page 57 for
information about the CLI command group permissions.
Table 4-2. TimeProvider 100 Alarms, Events, and Configuration
Code
Name
Level
State
Delay
Transient
0
MB_5.5V
5.5V out of range
major
enable
0
no
1
MB_1.2V
1.2V out of range
major
enable
0
no
2
MB_3.3V
3.3V out of range
major
enable
0
no
3
MB_5V
5V out of range
major
enable
0
no
4
MB_1.8V
1.8V out of range
major
enable
0
no
5
10MHZ_LOS
10MHZ signal loss
major
enable
0
no
GPS_ENGINE
GPS engine communication failed or
1PPS missing
major
enable
0
no
TM_EFC
RTE PLL tuning saturated
major
enable
0
no
TM_SELFTEST
RTE self test failed
critical
enable
0
no
6
7
8
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Description
TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
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Chapter 4 Operations
Alarms & Events
Table 4-2. TimeProvider 100 Alarms, Events, and Configuration (Continued)
Code
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
Name
Description
Level
State
Delay
Transient
TM_COMM
MB-TM communication failure
major
enable
0
no
MB_PLL_E1
E1 PLL unlocked
major
enable
0
no
MB_PLL_25MHz
25MHz PLL
unlocked
major
enable
0
no
FPGA_ERROR
Mainboard FPGA
error
major
enable
0
no
FLASH_ERROR
Mainboard flash
memory fault
major
enable
0
no
GPS_CUR
GPS antenna current out of range
minor
enable
0
no
ANT_OPEN
GPS antenna
open-circuit
minor
enable
0
no
GPS_VOL
GPS antenna voltage out of range
major
enable
0
no
ANT_SHORT
GPS antenna
short-circuit
major
enable
0
no
TM_HOLDOVER
RTE in holdover
mode
major
enable
0
no
TM_NEVERLOCKE
D
RTE in neverlocked
mode
major
enable
0
no
CONFIG_CHANGE
Configuration
change
event
enable
0
yes
WARMUP
RTE is in warm-up
state
event
enable
0
no
LOCKED
RTE is in locked
state
event
enable
0
no
RECOVERY
RTE is in recovery
state
event
enable
0
no
MB_FW_DL_FAIL
MB firmware download failed
event
enable
0
yes
MB_FW_DL_SUCC
MB firmware download succeeded
event
enable
0
yes
SWITCH
Switched firmware
image to 1 (2)
event
enable
0
yes
REBOOT
Rebooted system
event
enable
0
yes
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Chapter 4 Operations
Alarm Levels
Table 4-2. TimeProvider 100 Alarms, Events, and Configuration (Continued)
Code
Name
TM_FW_DL_FAIL
28
TM_FW_DL_SUCC
29
Description
Level
State
Delay
Transient
RTE
firmware download
failed
event
enable
0
yes
RTE firmware
download succeeded
event
enable
0
yes
Alarm Levels
Each detected condition can have one of four severity levels: Event, Minor, Major,
and Critical. Each condition has a default severity as shown in Alarms and Event
System Messages, on page 93. The CLI provides several types of configurable
options for each condition. See the set alarmconf, on page 71 for more information.
The basic capabilities are:

Change the severity level of the condition.

Disable or enable any reporting of the condition.

Define an amount of time after detection of the condition before it will actually be
reported.
show alarm-config queries the above settings for all of the conditions. See the
CLI command show alarmconf, on page 62 for more information. These conditions
become manifest in the TimeProvider 100 in three areas:
1. An event log provides history of “entry into” and “exit from” any condition that has
not been configured as disabled. Each entry in the log is timestamped. See show
event log, on page 66 for more information.
2. The show active_alarm query is used to display a list of all active alarms in the
system. The list shows alarms that were activated, but not yet cleared. See show
active_alarm, on page 61 for more information.
3. The ALARM LED indicates the highest severity level of all conditions that are
currently present. As with show alarmconf, the ALARM LED will not respond to
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Alarm Levels
conditions that have been disabled (by user). Table 4-3 shows the relationship
between the highest active severity level and the ALARM LED indication.
Table 4-3. Alarm Levels
Active Alarms
Alarm LED
Status
Description
Event
OFF
Recorded in the Event log.
Critical
Red
Any fault that causes the board to lose
its ability to provide reliable 1PPS or
10MHz output signals.
Holdover for more that 24 hours.
Major
Red
Although the board is providing reliable
1PPS or 10MHz output signals, a fault is
causing the board to lose its ability to
provide reliable E1 output signals.
Minor
Amber
Any other alarm event that does not
qualify as a critical or major alarm.
Up to two of the four E1 output ports
cannot output signals.
When an alarm clears, the alarm condition is no longer present and the following
occurs:



An entry is placed into the alarm log showing that the alarm condition has
cleared.
If the alarm information is included in the show alarm response, it will be
removed from that response.
The Alarm LED logic will execute and may drive a change in the Alarm LED
indication.
For more information, refer to System Messages, on page 93 for alarm message
details.
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Chapter 4 Operations
Date & Time
Date & Time
Use the set time command to set the time and date. The time and date is used for
log entries and some responses.
There is no real-time clock in the TimeProvider 100, so if the TimeProvider 100 is
power-cycled, the time line will be adjusted. The following rules apply and are
intended to keep the time line in the logs from having negative time jumps:




When the TimeProvider 100 powers up, the latest entry in the event and
command logs are checked for date and time. The latest entry is the last one
written into the respective log.
The date and time of the latest entries are compared to see which one contains
the most recent time and date. The most recent date and time will become the
starting point for the internal date and time. In other words, while the unit is
powered, the time line will proceed from that reference.
As entries that will be logged occur, the entries will reflect the current time and
date (based on reference described in the prior bullet). These entries become
candidates for the “latest entry” discovery on the next power-up.
When the CLI command set clock is used, the date and time are immediately
updated. Since this places an entry in the logs, this provides a new timeline basis
for the next power-up. See set clock, on page 72 for more information.
TimeProvider 100 Logs
The TimeProvider 100 provides two types of non-volatile logs: Event and
Command.
Event Log
Event log provides timestamped entries whenever any of the conditions associated
with the events identified in Table 4-2 are set or cleared. Additionally, other
significant actions such as reboot, resetting time (see set clock, on page 72) and
changes to the PLL state also generate log entries. The event log can be viewed
using show log event.
Command Log
Command log provides timestamped entries of user command history. Additionally,
other significant actions such as session log on, session log off, reboot, and
resetting time also generate log entries. The command log can be viewed using
show log command.
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User Sessions
User Sessions
TimeProvider 100 user sessions can occur in two ways:
1. Locally with a serial connection
2. Remotely with a Telnet connection.
Either way, a userID and password are required. All TimeProvider 100 sessions are
enabled with the same userID and a single password. There can be up to eight
simultaneous Telnet sessions. Remote sessions time out after 10 minutes with no
entry. A serial session times out after 60 minutes with no entry.
Logon UserID
The factory default userID is admin and can be changed by an administrator with
the set user command. See set user, on page 83 for more information.
Password
The factory default password is tp100 and can be changed by an administrator with
the set user command. See set user, on page 83 for more information.
To avoid a possible service call to gain access to the TimeProvider 100,
Symmetricom recommends that you record any changes made to the password.
System Configurations
When TimeProvider 100 is first powered up, TimeProvider 100 will load a factory
configuration. Users can modify the configuration parameters and save a backup
copy at any time. The backup configuration in the backup copy can be restored at
any time. During a system reboot, if the backup configuration is available, it will be
used. Otherwise, the factory configuration will be used.
System Configuration
During Power -Up:
If Backup exists
Backup
in FLASH
If Backup doesn’t exists
Current
in RAM
Factory
in FLASH
Save
During Normal Operation :
Figure 4-2.
Restore Backup
Restore Factory
System Configuration
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System Configurations
System configuration modification is done by using any of the CLI commands that
start with set. See CLI Commands, on page 53 for more information. Configuration
restoration includes the following conditions:



52
The “Restore Factory” configuration is a full restore of the factory configuration
which includes the default IP configuration and default user data (user ID and
password).
The “Restore Backup” configuration restores configuration parameters set by the
operation from the backup FLASH, except for the IP configuration and user data
(user IDs and passwords).
The manual RESET button restores only the factory IP configuration and default
user data (user ID and password). The manual RESET button is located on the
back of the TimeProvider 100 unit. Press the RESET button and hold it for 3
seconds to perform the RESET.
TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
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Chapter 5 CLI Commands
In This Chapter

Overview

TimeProvider 100 CLI Command Set

Command Groups

Show Commands

Set Commands
Overview
The Command Line Interface (CLI) is used to display information or configure and
manage the TimeProvider 100 from either a terminal connected to the EIA-232
serial port or the Ethernet port.
The section describes the CLI command conventions, CLI command keyboard
usage, and command-line form. Figure 5-1 shows the general structure of the CLI.
TimeProvider 100 CLI Command Set
set
show
configuration
user
snmp
password
alarmconfig
ipconfig
gps
ip
output
clock
ping
reboot
upgrade
switchfirmware
logout
cli-settings
snmp
eia232
users
alarmconfig
active_alarm
ipconfig
gps
clock
log
output
inventory
status
ipstatus
image
Figure 5-1.
TimeProvider 100 CLI Command Set
TimeProvider 100 CLI Command Conventions
The following are conventions used for the TimeProvider 100 CLI command set.


[ ] – Brackets provide information about the allowed range. The first value is the
minimum, and the last value is the maximum.
{ } – Braces signify more than one parameter data option.
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Overview

| – Vertical bars separate options.

Italics indicates variable data.

All commands are completed by pressing the Enter key.
CLI Command Keyboard Usage
The interface has built-in features for navigating within the CLI command hierarchy
and are as follows:


Press the TAB key or type “?” at the prompt for a list of the available top-level
commands.
Press the TAB key at any time while typing a command. TimeProvider 100 will
respond with the completion of the keyword or available completion choices
based on the letters you type.
– If typing of a keyword is partially complete, the completion will display if it
is unique, otherwise, completion choices will be available.
– If the keyword is complete after pressing the TAB key, the choices for the
next syntax element will display.
For example, typing s at the prompt displays:
tp100> s
Then pressing the TAB key displays:
set
- Changes settings
show
- Displays settings
Continuing with the example, typing se and then pressing the
TAB key, displays set because it is the only possible
command. Next, typing o and then pressing the TAB key,
displays set output as the only possible command
completion. When typing s and then pressing the TAB key, set
output signaltype displays. Finally, pressing the TAB key
results in the signaltype options for set output signaltype
displaying as shown in the following:
54
e1_ccs_no_ssm
- E1, CCS, CRC Disabled, Sa bits set to all 1's
e1_ccs4
- E1, CCS, CRC Enabled, SSM Enabled
e1_ccs4_no_ssm
- E1, CCS, CRC Enabled, Sa bits set to all 1's
e1_cas_no_ssm
- E1, CAS, CRC Disabled, Sa bits set to all 1's
e1_cas4
- E1, CAS, CRC Enabled, SSM Enabled
e1_cas4_no_ssm
- E1, CAS, CRC Enabled, Sa bits set to all 1's
e1_2048m
- E1, 2.048 MHz
e1_ais
- E1, AIS
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Overview


Previously typed commands can be recalled by using the UP ARROW key. You
can recall up to five previously typed commands. Continually pressing the UP
ARROW key will cycle you through the five previously typed commands. After
pressing the UP ARROW key five times, you will go back to the last command
you previously typed. Use the DOWN ARROW key to cycle the five prior typed
commands in the opposite direction.
You can use BACKSPACE to correct keystroke errors, or to reuse parts of a
previously typed command. When using BACKSPACE, the removed characters
will still appear on the screen, but they have been removed to the position shown
by the cursor. When you start typing, the removed characters are overwritten.
Note: Both the TAB key and ”?” have the same function. Both
can be used at any time while typing a command (including at
the prompt) to provide continuation options.
Command Line Format
The command line format is as follows:
[Verb] Command [Parameter] [Data] EOL
[Verb]_ Command_ [Parameter] _ [Data] _EOL (Note: “_” mean one space)
EOL - The parser responds to any
nput line terminator. Possible
terminators are CR, LF, or CRLF.
When the parser receives any of these
terminators, the input is terminated
and the entered command line is
processed.
Data - data input for the parameter.
Parameter - command input defining the particular
command element to be shown or modified.
COMMAND - any valid command listed. The command may be
preceded by a verb to indicate action to be taken.
Verb – defines type of action to be taken with command.
1) SET allows the user to provision defined parameter.
Example: SET GPS
2) SHOW allows the user to display the provisioned state of a
parameter
Example: SHOW GPS
3) Specials like “ping,” “reboot, ” “upgrade” & “logout”
4) “SHOW=?<CR><LF> ” will list entire SHOW commands
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TimeProvider 100 CLI Command Set
Command Line Format Description
Verb – the type of action to be taken with the command.
Parameter – command input that defines the particular command element to be
shown or modified.
Data–The data input for the parameter, if any
EOL– this parser responds to any input line terminator. Possible terminators are
CR, LF, or CRLF. When the parser receives any of these terminators, the input is
terminated, and the command line entry is processed. Pressing the Enter key also
produces EOL.
Command Line Format Example
set output port2 frametype

set = Verb

output =Command

port2 = Parameter

frametype = Data
TimeProvider 100 CLI Command Set
This section provides details for each of the TimeProvider 100 commands. This
section provides a description of the command followed by a series of inputs and
responses to demonstrate the correct operations and use of the command. This
series of inputs and responses for each command shows what a user can type at
the command line and the response from TimeProvider 100 for each entry typed.
The user has choices for various CLI commands. The intent of this section is to
demonstrate how each CLI command functions and how the command can be
used.
Note: When using the CLI commands, the RTE (Real Time Engine) is
referred to as “TimeMAX.”
Command User Levels
The TimeProvider 100 provides a hierarchy of CLI command user levels that permit
an increasing level of access to system parameters. This hierarchy allows the
system administrator to add users who can view information only and not change
system parameters as well as add users who can view and change system
parameters.
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Command Groups
The users assigned to each security level have the following access options:
1. user – user class with read-only permissions
2. config – power user class with read and write permissions
3. admin – administrator user class with read and write permissions and
permission to configure user information
Command Groups
There are eight groups of CLI commands as shown by pressing the TAB key at the
TP100 prompt. Typing a question mark (“?”) after the eight command groups display
provides a description of each command group as show in the following example of
TimeProvider 100 inputs and responses.
Input:
tp100> <tab>
Response:
cli-settings ping set switchfirmware
logout reboot show upgrade
Input:
tp100> ?
Response:
set
-
Configure TP100 settings
show
-
Display TP100 information or settings
ping
-
Determine whether a host is up and display ping statistics
reboot
-
Reboot this TP100
upgrade
-
Download firmware to TP100
switchfirmware
-
Switch between two firmware images
logout
-
Log out from the current session
cli-settings
-
Configure CLI setting
tp100>
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Command Groups
cli-settings
This command is currently used to enable or disable the display more function
which displays more file or log content than what appears on the display. When the
more function is enabled for the cli-settings command, and when using one of
the show CLI commands to display a file or log content, the following applies:

Use the SPACE bar to display the next page.

Use the UP and DOWN arrow keys to scroll up or down one line at a time.

Use the Enter key to show the next line.

Use the letter “Q” on the keyboard to stop or quit displaying further information.
Input:
tp100> cli-settings more <tab>
Response:
Disable
enable
tp100> cli-settings more
Input:
tp100> cli-settings more ?
Response:
enable
- enable MORE support
disable
- disable MORE support
tp100> cli-settings more
Input:
tp100> cli-settings more enable
Response:
tp100>
Input:
tp100> cli-settings more disable
Response:
tp100>
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ping
This command sends one ping to an IP address and waits for up to 5 seconds.
Input:
tp100> ping 192.169.1.10
Response:
Host is alive
tp100>
Response:
Host is not reachable
tp100>
switchfirmware
This command is used to switch between two firmware images in the FLASH
memory.
Input:
tp100> switchfirmware
Response:
Firmware switched to the other image. Reboot to activate selected firmware.
tp100>
logout
This command is used by a user to log out from their session.
Input:
tp100> logout
Response:
Symmetricom TP100
login:
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Command Groups
reboot
This command is used to restart the system without disconnecting power.
Input:
tp100> reboot
Response:
A long sequence of startup messages will display. The process takes approximately
three minutes. When reboot is complete, the TimeProvider 100 prompt tp100>
displays.
upgrade
This command is used to download firmware to TimeProvider 100.
Input:
tp100> upgrade firmware tp100_upd_1.0.8.bz2,ftp:192.168.1.55,admin
Response:
tp100> password:
Response:
Upgrade is in progress...
############################################################
############################################################
############################################################
############################################
Upgrade is successfully completed
tp100>
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Show Commands
Show Commands
This is a group of commands that are used to display various system parameters.
Input:
tp100> show <tab>
Response:
active_alarm
eia232
inventory
log
status
alarmconf
gps
ipconfig
output
users
clock
image
ipstatus
snmp
Input:
tp100> show ?
Response:
snmp
eia232
users
alarmconf
active_alarm
ipconfig
gps
clock
log
output
inventory
status
ipstatus
image
-Display SNMP configuration
- Display EIA-232 port parameters
-Display user list
-Display alarm configurations
-Display active alarms
-Display IP ports configuration
-Display GPS information
-Display UTC date and time
-Display entries of selected log
-Display output configuration
-Display manufacturing information
-Display system status information
-Display IP ports status
-Display firmware image information
tp100> show
show active_alarm
This command is used to display a list of all active alarms in the system. These are
alarms that were activated and not yet cleared.
Input:
tp100> show active_alarm
Response (Example):
2008-11-18, 01:43:06, #16, MAJOR, ANT_OPEN
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tp100>
show alarmconf
This command is used to display the entire alarm and event configuration.
Input:
tp100> show alarmconf
Response:
See Table 4-2 for all alarms, events, default value, and configuration.
show clock
This command is used to display the system date and time in Universal Time
Coordinated (UTC).
Input:
tp100> show clock
Response:
Date and time (UTC)
-
2008-11-18, 08:16:15
tp100>
show eia232
This command is used to display the RS-232 serial port parameters. Serial port
parameters are set at the factory and cannot be changed.
Input:
tp100> show eia232
Response:
--------------------------------------------------------------|Baudrate
|Parity
|Stop bit
|Data length
|
|------------|------------|------------|-----------------------|
|9600
|none
|1
|8
|
---------------------------------------------------------------
tp100>
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show gps
This command is used to display data related to GPS operations. It shows GPS
antenna angle mask, antenna cable delay, GPS time, and the position of the GPS
antenna.
Input:
tp100> show gps
Response:
GPS Information
GPS position mode
- Survey (or Position Hold)
GPS elevation mask (degrees)
- 5
GPS antenna delay
- 0.00000
GPS system time
- (in week, second format)
Number of tracked satellite- 8
GPS latitude
- N39:54:12.786
GPS longitude
- E116:26:45.276
GPS height (meters)
- 140.20
tp100>
show image
This command is used to show the two firmware images and which one is currently
running.
Input:
tp100> show image
Response:
Active image -
1, version 1.0.14
Backup image -
2, version 1.0.16
Next boot image -
2
tp100>
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show inventory
This command is used to display product manufacturing data.
Input:
tp100> show inventory
Response:
Part number
Serial
HW Ver
SW Ver
FPGA
Manufacture date
090-95000-01
R03009
2
0.0.14
0x17
11/14/2008
tp100>
show ipconfig
This command is used to display the configuration parameters of the Ethernet ports.
Note that these parameters are what the operator set, not necessary the current
status of the parameters.
Input:
tp100> show ipconfig
Response:
------------------------------------------------------------------------------|Port#
|Mode
|State
|IP Address
|Gateway
|Netmask
|
|--------|--------|--------|----------------|----------------|----------------|
|MGMT
|static
|enable
|192.169.1.10
|192.169.1.1
|255.255.0.0
|
|........|........|........|................|................|................|
|NTP
|static
|enable
|192.168.2.10
|192.168.2.1
|255.255.255.0
|
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
tp100>
show ipstatus
This command is used to display the current status of the Ethernet ports.
Input:
tp100> show ipstatus
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Response:
MGMT
Link encap:Ethernet
HWaddr 00:B0:AE:95:00:AA
inet addr:192.169.1.10
Bcast:192.169.255.255
UP BROADCAST MULTICAST
MTU:1500
Mask:255.255.0.0
Metric:1
RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:2 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:0 (0.0 B)
TX bytes:84 (84.0 B)
Base address:0xa000
NTP
Link encap:Ethernet
HWaddr 00:B0:AE:95:00:BB
inet addr:192.168.2.10
Bcast:192.168.2.255
UP BROADCAST MULTICAST
MTU:1500
Mask:255.255.255.0
Metric:1
RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:2 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:0 (0.0 B)
TX bytes:84 (84.0 B)
Base address:0xc000
tp100>
show log
This is a group of commands that are used to display the contents of the event log,
alarm log, and the user command history log.
Input:
tp100> show log <tab>
Response:
command
event
tp100> show log
Input:
tp100> show log ?
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Response:
event
-
Show event log entries, lines 1 to 1000
command
-
Show command log entries, lines 1 to 1000
tp100> show log
show event log
This command is used to display the event log and alarm log entries.
Input:
tp100> show log event <tab>
Response:
start
end
tp100> show log event
Input:
tp100> show log event ?
Response:
start
-
Start line of the log to display, line 1 to 1000
end
-
End line of the log to display, line 1 to 1000
<enter>
-
Execute command
tp100> show log event
Input:
tp100> show log event start 7 end 9
Response:
- Line 7, 2008-12-16, 05:59:58, #26, EVENT, SWITCH: switched firmware image to 1
- Line 8, 2008-12-16, 06:03:02, #15, MINOR, ANT_OPEN: GPS antenna open-circuit
- Line 9, 2008-12-16, 06:03:02, #14, MINOR, GPS_CUR: GPS antenna current out of range
tp100>
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show command log
This command is used to display the entries of the user command history log. All
commands entered by users are logged.
Input:
tp100> show log command <tab>
Response:
start
end
tp100> show log command
Input:
tp100> show log command ?
Response:
start
-
Start line of the log to display, line 1 to 1000
end
-
End line of the log to display, line 1 to 1000
<enter>
-
Execute command
tp100> show log command
Input:
tp100> show log command start 7 end 10
Response:
Line 7, 2008-02-17, 00:02:13, [user: admin]: set clock datetime 2008-10-10,10:10:10
Line 8, 2008-10-10, 10:10:13, [user: admin]: show clock
Line 9, 2008-10-10, 10:10:17, [user: admin]: show gps
Line 10, 2008-10-10, 10:10:29, [user: admin]: show status
tp100>
show output
This command is used to display the configuration of the four output ports for the
E1/T1/2048/1544 signals. The 10 MHz and 1PPS output signals are not
configurable and are not included. The SSM value of the TimeProvider 100 output
depends on the following conditions:
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


When 10 MHz is stabilized and the GPS is in Locked mode, the TimeProvider
100 output is in st1 clock mode, and the SSM value = 2.
When 10 MHz is stabilized and the GPS is in Unlocked mode, the TimeProvider
100 output is in st3 clock mode, and the SSM value = 8.
When 10 MHz is not stabilized during warm up RTE mode (regardless of the
GPS status), the TimeProvider 100 output is in DUS (Do not Use for Sync) mode,
and the SSM value = F.
Input:
tp100> show output
Response:
tp100>
show snmp
This command is used to display SNMP manager information.
Input
tp100> show snmp manager
Response:
---------------------------------------------|Index
|Manager
|Trap port |
|---------|----------------------|--------------|
|0
|192.168.81.67
|162
|
---------------------------------------------tp100>
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show status
This command is used to display several key operational parameters of the system.
Input
tp100> show status
Response:
System name
- TP100
Uptime
- 8 hours 40 minutes
System date and time in UTC
Number of active alarms
- 2008-11-18, 11:47:11
- 1
Current TOD source
- GPS
TP100 clock status
LEDS
ALM:red
- locked
- Power:green, GPS:green,
tp100>
show users
This command is used to show the user information.
Input:
tp100> show users
Response:
-----------------------------------------------------|User name
|Access level
|Timeout(seconds)
|
|----------------|----------------|------------------|
|admin
|admin
|600
|
|................|................|..................|
|config
|config
|600
|
|................|................|..................|
|user
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Set Commands
|................|................|..................|
|gg
|admin
|600
|
-----------------------------------------------------tp100>
Set Commands
This is a set of commands that are used to configure various system parameters.
Input:
tp100> set <tab>
Response:
alarmconf
clock
configuration
gps
ipconfig
passworduser
outputsnmp
tp100> set
Input:
tp100> set ?
Response:
configuration - Set system configuration
70
user
- User configuration
snmp
- SNMP configuration
password
- Change password
alarmconf
- Configure Alarm
ipconfig
- Configure Ethernet IP
gps
- Configuration GPS
output
- Configure output port
clock
- Set system clock manually
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Chapter 5 CLI Commands
Set Commands
tp100> set
Caution: After making configuration changes, you must use the set
configuration save CLI command to save the latest
configuration. See set configuration, on page 72 for more
information.
set alarmconf
This command is used to configure alarms. Events are hard coded and not
configurable.
Input:
tp100> set alarmconf code
<tab>
Response:
<alarmcode Integer 0 - 19> - alarm unique ID
tp100> set alarmconf code
Input:
tp100> set alarmconf code 0 <tab>
Response:
delay
level
state
transient
tp100> set alarmconf code 0
Input:
tp100> set alarmconf code 0 ?
Response:
level
- Alarm level: critical, major, minor or event
state
- Alarm state: disable or enable
delay
- Alarm delay value: 0-1000 seconds
transient - Is alarm transient: yes or no
tp100> set alarmconf code 0
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Set Commands
set clock
This command is used to set the system date and time in Universal Time
Coordinated (UTC).
Input:
tp100> set clock datetime ?
Response:
<datetime String 1 - 19> - format: yyyy-mm-dd,hh:mm:ss
Input:
tp100> set clock datetime 2008-11-19,20:52:00
Response:
Not allowed to set. GPS has been locked
tp100>
set configuration
This command is used to restore or save system configuration.
Input:
tp100> set configuration <tab>
Response:
restore
save
Input:
tp100> set configuration ?
Response:
restore - Set system configuration to backup or factory
configuration
save
- Save system configuration to FLASH
tp100> set configuration
Input:
tp100> set configuration restore <tab>
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Set Commands
Response:
backup
factory
tp100> set configuration restore
Input:
tp100> set configuration restore ?
Response:
factory
Use factory configuration
backup
Use backup configuration
tp100> set configuration restore
Input:
tp100> set configuration restore backup
Response:
Note:
Connection may be lost after this operation!
System configuration is restored to backup configuration
tp100>
Input:
tp100> set configuration restore factory
Response:
Note:
Connection may be lost after this operation!
System configuration is restored to factory configuration
tp100>
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Set Commands
Note: (1) “Restore Factory” is the full restoration of factory
configuration, including default IP configuration and default user date.
(2) “Restore Backup” restores all configuration parameters set by the
user from the backup FLASH, except IP configuration and user data
(user IDs and passwords). (3) The manual RESET button restores
only the factory IP port configuration and default user data (user ID
and password). The manual RESET button is located on the back of
the TimeProvider 100 unit. Press the button down and hold it for three
seconds to perform the RESET.
Input:
tp100> set configuration save
Response:
Configuration has been saved
tp100>
set gps
This command is used to configure GPS engine parameters (antenna cable length,
antenna angle mask, and whether search is automatic or manually seeded.)
Input:
tp100> set gps <tab>
Response:
cable-delay
mask
mode
Input:
tp100> set gps mode?
Response:
auto
- Automatic mode
manual
- Manual mode
Input:
tp100> set gps cable-delay ?
Response:
<cabledelay String 1 - 16> - Enter cable delay, 0 to 0.0009 second
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Set Commands
Input:
tp100> set gps cable-delay 0.0001
Response:
tp100>
Input:
tp100> set gps mask ?
Response:
<mask Integer 5 - 89> - Enter mask in degree
Input:
tp100> set gps mask 15
Response:
tp100>
Input:
tp100> set gps mode <tab>
Response:
auto manual
Input:
tp100> set gps mode auto
Response:
tp100>
Input:
tp100> set gps mode manual latitude ?
Response:
<latitude String 6 - 12> - GPS Position Latitude, format: Ndd:mm:ss.ss or
Sdd:mm:ss.ss
Input:
tp100> set gps mode manual latitude N89:56:10 longitude ?
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Set Commands
Response:
<longitude String 6 - 13> - GPS Position Longitude, format: Eddd:mm:ss.ss or
Wddd:mm:ss.ss
Input:
tp100> set gps mode manual latitude N89:56:10 longitude E130:00:00 height ?
Response:
<height String 1 - 7> - GPS position height in meter, format: hhhh.h
Note: TimeProvider 100 only accepts positive height. Negative
heights are not accepted.
Input:
tp100> set gps mode manual latitude N9:6:1 longitude E130:00:00 height 130
Response:
tp100>
set ipconfig
This command is used to configure the IP parameters of the management port and
future NTP port. The parameters are address, address acquisition mode, and
whether the port is enabled.
Input:
tp100> set ipconfig <tab>
Response:
MGMT
NTP
tp100> set ipconfig
Input:
tp100> set ipconfig ?
Response:
MGMT
- Management port
NTP
- NTP port
tp100> set ipconfig
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Set Commands
Input:
tp100> set ipconfig mgmt <tab>
Response:
ipaddr
mode
restartstate
tp100> set ipconfig mgmt
Input:
tp100> set ipconfig mgmt ?
Response:
state
- Ethernet port state: enabled or disabled
restart
- Restart Ethernet port
mode
- DHCP or static
ipaddr
- ip address: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
tp100> set ipconfig mgmt
Input:
tp100> set ipconfig mgmt ipaddr ?
Response:
<ip address String 1 - 16> - ip address: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
tp100> set ipconfig mgmt ipaddr
Input:
tp100> set ipconfig mgmt mode <tab>
Response:
dhcp
static
tp100> set ipconfig mgmt mode
Input:
tp100> set ipconfig mgmt mode ?
Response:
dhcp
- Get IP address from DHCP server
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Set Commands
static
- Set IP address manually
tp100> set ipconfig mgmt mode
Input:
tp100> set ipconfig mgmt mode static
Response:
tp100>
Input:
tp100> set ipconfig mgmt mode dhcp
Response:
tp100>
Input:
tp100> set ipconfig mgmt state <tab>
Response:
disable
enable
tp100> set ipconfig mgmt state
Input:
tp100> set ipconfig mgmt state ?
Response:
enable
- Enable Ethernet port
disable
- Disable Ethernet port
tp100> set ipconfig mgmt state
Input:
tp100> set ipconfig mgmt state disable
Response:
tp100>
Input:
tp100> set ipconfig mgmt restart
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Set Commands
Response:
tp100>
Note: When an Ethernet port is in static mode, set ipconfig
mgmt restart will activate a newly entered IP address. When the
Ethernet port is in the DHCP mode, set ipconfig mgmt restart
will try to acquire an IP address within 60 seconds. Use ipstatus to
confirm the port configuration after using the set ipconfig mgmt
restart command.
set output
This command is used to configure the four telecom output ports. Parameters are
frame type, SSM bit position, and whether the port is enabled.
Input:
tp100> set output <tab>
Response:
port1
port2
port3
port4
tp100> set output
Input:
tp100> set output ?
Response:
port1
- Output port 1
port2
- Output port 2
port3
- Output port 3
port4
- Output port 4
tp100> set output
Input:
tp100> set output port2 <tab>
Response:
frametype
ssm-bit
state
tp100> set output port2
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Set Commands
Input:
tp100> set output port2 ?
Response:
state
- Output port state: enable or disable
frametype - Frame type
ssm-bit
- Specify SSM bit position, 4 through 8
tp100> set output port2
Input:
tp100> set output port2 frametype <tab>
Response:
e1_2048m
e1_ais
e1_cas4
e1_cas_no_ssm
e1_ccs4_no_ssm
e1_cas4_no_ssm
e1_ccs4
e1_ccs_no_ssm
tp100> set output port2 frametype
Input:
tp100> set output port2 frametype ?
Response:
e1_ccs_no_ssm
- E1, CCS, CRC Disabled, Sa bits set to all 1's
e1_ccs4
- E1, CCS, CRC Enabled, SSM Enabled
e1_ccs4_no_ssm
- E1, CCS, CRC Enabled, Sa bits set to all 1's
e1_cas_no_ssm
- E1, CAS, CRC Disabled, Sa bits set to all 1's
e1_cas4
- E1, CAS, CRC Enabled, SSM Enabled
e1_cas4_no_ssm
- E1, CAS, CRC Enabled, Sa bits set to all 1's
e1_2048m
- E1, 2.048 MHz
e1_ais
- E1, AIS
tp100> set output port2 frametype
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Set Commands
Input:
tp100> set output port2 frametype e1_cas4
Response:
tp100>
Input:
tp100> set output port2 ssm-bit <tab>
Response:
4
5
6
7
8
Input:
tp100> set output port2 ssm-bit ?
Response:
4
- SSM bit position 4
5
- SSM bit position 5
6
- SSM bit position 6
7
- SSM bit position 7
8
- SSM bit position 8
tp100> set output port2 ssm-bit
Input:
tp100> set output port2 ssm-bit 6
Response:
tp100>
Input:
tp100> set output port2 state <tab>
Response:
disable
enable
tp100> set output port2
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Set Commands
Input:
tp100> set output port2 state ?
Response:
enable
- Enable port
disable
- Disable port
tp100> set output port2 state
Input:
tp100> set output port2 state disable
Response:
tp100>
set password
The following password permissions apply to the three command-level users:

Admin – can change anyone’s password

Config – can only change their own password

User – cannot change anyone’s password
Input: (admin or config user changes password)
tp100> set password
Response:
Password:
Confirm Password:
tp100>
Input: (admin changes user password)
tp100> set password user haifeng
Response:
Password:
Confirm Password:
tp100>
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Set Commands
set snmp
This command is used to edit the SNMP manager information.
Input:
tp100> set snmp <tab>
Response:
Add
delete
tp100> set snmp
Input:
tp100> set snmp ?
Response:
add
- Add SNMP configuration
delete - Delete snmp properties
tp100> set snmp
Input:
tp100> set snmp add manager ?
Response:
<manager String 1 - 20> - SNMP manager IP address
tp100> set snmp add manager
Input:
Tp100> set snmp delete manager ?
Response:
<manager String 1 - 20> - SNMP manager IP address
tp100> set snmp delete manager
set user
This command is used to add delete or modify user access data.
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Chapter 5 CLI Commands
Set Commands

The user name character must be the following valid characters:
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ0123456789
'-' or '_' (dash or underscore).

The first character in a user name cannot be '-' or '_' (dash or underscore).

The user password character must be the following valid character:
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ0123456789!()
-.?_`~
Input:
tp100> set user <tab>
Response:
add
delete
modify
tp100> set user
Input:
tp100> set user ?
Response:
add
- Add CLI user
modify
- Modify CLI user
delete
- Delete CLI user
tp100> set user
Input:
tp100> set user add name ?
Response:
<name String 1 - 20> - user name, 1 to 20 characters
tp100> set user add name
Input:
tp100> set user add name JKT access-level <tab>
Response:
admin
config
user
tp100> set user add name JKT access-level
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Set Commands
Input:
tp100> set user add name JKT access-level <tab>
Response:
user
- Who can only use 'show' commands
config
- Who can use 'show' and 'set' commands except user
configuration
admin
- Who can use all commands
tp100> set user add name JKT access-level
Input:
tp100> set user add name JKT access-level admin timeout ?
Response:
<timeout Integer 1 - 3600> - Timeout value(1-3600 seconds)
of the user's session, default is 600 seconds
tp100> set user add name JKT access-level admin timeout
Input:
tp100> set user add name JKT access-level admin timeout 650
Response:
Password: tp100tp100
Confirm Password: tp100tp100
Response:
tp100>
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Set Commands
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Chapter 6 Maintenance and Troubleshooting
This chapter describes maintenance and troubleshooting procedures for the
TimeProvider 100.
In This Chapter

Preventive Maintenance

Safety Considerations

Reading LED Conditions

Upgrading the Firmware

Contacting Technical Support
Preventive Maintenance
The TimeProvider 100 requires minimal preventive maintenance. Ensure the unit is
not exposed to hazards such as direct sunlight, open windows, water, or extreme
heat.
Caution: To avoid electromagnetic discharge damage to the circuitry,
never attempt to vacuum the TimeProvider 100.
Caution: To avoid damage, under no circumstances should the
interior chassis of the TimeProvider 100 be allowed to come in
contact with water.
Table 6-1 lists preventive maintenance measures to be performed periodically. Do
not disassemble components just for the purpose of inspection.
Table 6-1. Preventive Maintenance
Item
Chassis
Inspection
Inspect for dirt or foreign
material.
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Corrective Action
Clean the exterior of chassis with
a soft dry cloth.
Interval
Periodically
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Chapter 6 Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Safety Considerations
Table 6-1. Preventive Maintenance (Continued)
Item
Inspection
Corrective Action
Interval
Cables
Inspect for pinched, worn, or
damaged cable.
Replace pinched, worn, or
damaged cable at the first
opportunity.
Periodically
Connectors
Inspect for loose or damaged
connector.
Tighten loose connectors. If
damaged, replace the connector
and the cable, or the cable at the
first opportunity.
Periodically
Safety Considerations
Follow your company’s safety guidelines and policies when working on or around
live equipment. Refer to the National Electric Code ANSI/NFPA70, or per the
application code in the country of installation for more information.
Reading LED Conditions
In Table 6-2, the function of each LED and its color illumination indicators are
described.
Table 6-2. LED Conditions
Indicator
Label
Description
Power Indicator
PWR
Green - Power available
Off - Power not available
GPS tracking status
GPS
Green - GPS is locked
Amber - No satellite is tracked
Flashing Green - At least one satellite is
tracked
Alarm Indicator
ALARM
Off - No alarm is detected.
Flashing Green - The system is booting
Amber - A minor alarm.
Red - A major or critical alarm.
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Chapter 6 Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Upgrading the Firmware
Upgrading the Firmware
TimeProvider 100 firmware can be upgraded remotely from a SFTP or FTP server.
When upgrading the system firmware, use the procedure in this section. See the
CLI command upgrade, on page 60 for more information.
When upgrading the system firmware, follow these procedures:

Verify the current firmware version

Verify the active backup firmware version

Upgrade from a SFTP or FTP server

Switch the boot-up image file

Reboot the system
Verify Current Firmware Version
Use the show inventory command displays the software version that is currently
running. See show inventory, on page 64 for more information. The following
example shows that TimeProvider 100 is running firmware version 0.0.14.
tp100> show inventory
Part number
Serial
HW Ver
SW Ver
FPGA
Manufacture date
090-95000-01
R03009
2
0.0.14
0x17
11/14/2008
Verify Active Backup Firmware Version
Two firmware images are maintained in flash memory to provide a backup in the
event of file corruption. View these images using the CLI command, show image.
For more information, see the CLI command, show image, on page 63.
Use the show image CLI command to see which backup firmware version the
system has stored, which firmware version is currently active, and which version will
be used the next time the unit restarts.
tp100> show image
Active image
-1, version 1.0.5
Backup image
-2, version 1.0.3
Next boot image
-1
Next, you will use one of the upgrade procedures for system firmware upgrade.
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Upgrading the Firmware
Upgrade from SFTP Server
The image file is on the SFTP server, and the file is /root/tp100_udp_1.0.5.bz2.
The server IP is 192.168.81.74, login: root, password: 123456. Since SFTP is
the default server mode, it does not need to be specified. Use the following
command:
tp100> upgrade firmware
/root/tp100_udp_1.0.5.bz2,192.168.81.74,root,123456
Upgrade from FTP Server
The image file is on the FTP server, and the file is /root/tp100_udp_1.0.5.bz2.
Server IP is 192.168.81.75, login: root, password: ABCDEF. Use the following
command:
tp100> upgrade firmware
/root/tp100_udp_1.0.5.bz2,ftp:192.168.81.75,root,ABCDEF
The system will show the upgrade progress as shown in the following example:
tp100> upgrade is in progress…
##########
After the system is finished getting the firmware file, you will see the following
system message:
tp100> upgrade is in progress…
########################################################
########################################################
###############################
Upgrade is successfully completed
tp100>
The entire process takes approximately three to five minutes. TimeProvider 100
continues normal operation during the upgrade process.
Switch Boot-Up Image File and Reboot the System
After the firmware upgrade is completed, use the switchware CLI command to
switch the boot-up image file to the newly upgraded image. See switchfirmware, on
page 59 for more information. To make the newly downloaded firmware active,
restart the TimeProvider 100 system using the reboot command. See reboot, on
page 60.
tp100> switchfirmware
tp100> Reboot
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Chapter 6 Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Contacting Technical Support
Contacting Technical Support
If you encounter any difficulties installing or using the product, contact Symmetricom
Global Services:
U.S.A. Call Center
Symmetricom, Inc.
2300 Orchard Parkway
San Jose, CA 95131-1017
Toll-free in North America: 888-367-7966
Telephone: 408-428-7907
Fax: 408-428-7998
E-mail: [email protected]
Internet: http://www.symmetricom.com
Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA) Call Center:
Symmetricom Global Services EMEA
Fichtenstr. 25
85649 Hofolding
Germany
Telephone: +49 700 3288 6435
Fax: +49 8104 662 433
E-mail: [email protected]
Internet: http://www.symmetricom.com
Latin America
Symmetricom Latin America
Ft Lauderdale, Florida, USA
Telephone: +1 305-895-4301
Telephone: +1 954 385 2416
Fax: +1 954 252 4031
email: [email protected]
Asia and Pacific Rim
Symmetricom Hong Kong Ltd
P.O. Box No. 71
Texaco Road Post Office
Hong Kong
Telephone: + 852 2405 5203
Fax: + 852 2405 5713
email: [email protected]
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Contacting Technical Support
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Appendix A System Messages
In This Appendix

System Messages
System Messages
Table A-1 provides information about the alarm and event messages that display in
response to an occurrence of an event or an alarm. The CLI command, set
alarmconf is used to alter delay, enable state, or define alarm severity and
transient if desired. See set alarmconf, on page 71 for more information.
Table A-1. Alarms and Event System Messages
Alarm
Number
0
1
2
3
4
5
Name
MB_5.5V
MB_1.2V
MB_3.3V
MB_5V
MB_1.8V
10MHZ_LOS
GPS_ENGINE
6
Description
Severity
Level
5.5V out of range
Major
Reboot. If problem persists, return to factory.
1.2V out of range
Major
Reboot. If problem persists, return to factory.
3.3V out of range
Major
Reboot. If problem persists, return to factory.
5V out of range
Major
Reboot. If problem persists, return to factory.
1.8V out of range
Major
Reboot. If problem persists, return to factory.
10MHZ signal loss
Major
Reboot. If problem persists, return to factory.
GPS engine communication failed or
1PPS missing
Major
Reboot. If problem persists, return to factory.
RTE PLL tuning
saturated
Major
Check ambient temperature. Reboot. If problem persists, return to
factory.
RTE self test failed
Critical
Reboot. If problem persists, return to factory.
MB-TM communication failure
Major
Reboot. If problem persists, return to factory.
TM_EFC
7
8
9
TM_SELFTEST
TM_COMM
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Appendix A System Messages
System Messages
Table A-1. Alarms and Event System Messages (Continued)
Alarm
Number
Name
Description
Severity
Level
MB_PLL_E1
Major
Check ambient temperature. Reboot. If problem persists, return to
factory.
25MHz PLL
unlocked
Major
Check ambient temperature. Reboot. If problem persists, return to
factory.
FPGA_ERROR
Mainboard FPGA
error
Major
Reboot. If problem persists, return to factory.
FLASH_ERROR
Mainboard flash
memory fault
Major
Reboot. If problem persists, return to factory.
GPS antenna current out of range
Minor
Check antenna, antenna
cables, and antenna
connections.
GPS antenna
open-circuit
Minor
Check antenna, antenna
cables, and antenna
connections.
GPS antenna voltage out of range
Major
Check antenna, antenna
cables, and antenna
connections.
GPS antenna
short-circuit
Major
Check antenna, antenna
cables, and antenna
connections.
Major
TimeProvider 100 is no
longer tracking GPS signals. Check antenna
installation, antenna,
antenna cables, and
antenna connections.
RTE in neverlocked
mode
Major
TimeProvider 100 has
never locked to GPS
since the latest power
up. Check antenna,
antenna cables, and
antenna connections.
CONFIG_CHANGE
Configuration
change
Event
N/A
WARMUP
RTE is in warm-up
state
Event
N/A
10
E1 PLL unlocked
MB_PLL_25MHz
11
12
13
GPS_CUR
14
ANT_OPEN
15
GPS_VOL
16
ANT_SHORT
17
TM_HOLDOVER
RTE in holdover
mode
18
TM_NEVERLOCKED
19
20
21
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Appendix A System Messages
System Messages
Table A-1. Alarms and Event System Messages (Continued)
Alarm
Number
22
23
24
25
26
27
Name
Description
Severity
Level
Corrective Action
LOCKED
RTE is in locked
state
Event
N/A
RECOVERY
RTE is in recovery
state
Event
N/A
MB_FW_DL_FAIL
MB firmware download failed
Event
N/A
MB_FW_DL_SUCC
MB firmware download succeeded
Event
N/A
SWITCH
Switched firmware
image to 1 (2)
Event
N/A
REBOOT
Rebooted system
Event
N/A
TM_FW_DL_FAIL
RTE
firmware download
failed
Event
N/A
RTE firmware
download succeeded
Event
N/A
28
TM_FW_DL_SUCC
29
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System Messages
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Appendix B Specifications and Factory Defaults
This appendix provides mechanical and electrical specifications, factory defaults,
electromagnetic environment categories and regulatory requirements for the
TimeProvider 100.
In This Appendix

Component Specifications

Factory Defaults

Electromagnetic Environment

Regulatory Requirements
Component Specifications
This section provides the specifications for the TimeProvider 100 components and
input and output signals.
Mechanical
Table B-1. TimeProvider 100 Mechanical Specifications
Parameter
Description
Mounting
19 inch or 23 inch rack with mounting panel
Rack Mounting Position
Front mounting location, unit protrudes 0.75 in. / 4.445cm
Width
8.5 in. / 216 mm
Height
1.75 in. / 44 mm
Depth
8.0 in. / 203 mm
Weight
1.05 kg fully loaded
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Appendix B Specifications and Factory Defaults
Component Specifications
Environmental
Table B-2. TimeProvider 100 Environmental Specifications
Parameter
Description
Storage Environment
As specified in ETSI EN 300 019-2-1 class 1.2
Temperature
-25° to +70°C
Relative Humidity
<10% TO 100% RH, condensing
Shock and Vibration
Class 1.2
Transportation
Table B-3. TimeProvider 100 Transportation Specifications
Parameter
Requirements
Transportation Environment
As specified in ETSI EN 300 019-2-2 class 2.3
Temperature
-40° to +85°C
Relative Humidity
<10% TO 100% RH, condensing
Shock and Vibration
Class 2.3
Operations
Table B-4. TimeProvider 100 Operations Specifications
Parameter
98
Requirements
Operating Environment
As specified in ETSI EN 300 019-2-3 class 3.2
Temperature
-5° to +55°C
Relative Humidity
<5% TO 95% RH, condensing
Shock and Vibration
Class 3.2
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Appendix B Specifications and Factory Defaults
Component Specifications
Power
Table B-5. TimeProvider 100 Power Specifications
Parameter
Description
Input Voltage
-40 VDC to -72 VDC (nominal -48/-60 VDC)
Input Current
OCXO warm-up current 0.5 A for 30 minutes
Steady state current less than 0.3 A
No user-serviceable fuse inside the unit
Protection
Reverse voltage protection
Isolated from case and signal ground
GPS Antenna Interface
Table B-6. GPS Antenna Specifications
Parameter
Description
Signal Type
L1 GPS
Connector Type
SMA, female
Connector Label
GPS
Impedance
50 
Coupling
DC–Center pin provides DC power to the GPS
antenna or on-line amplifier.
Antenna Power Supply Voltage
4.9 VDC to 5.5 VDC (5V nominal)
Antenna Power Supply Current
80 mA maximum
Protection
This port can withstand open or short circuit
without damage or degradation.
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Appendix B Specifications and Factory Defaults
Component Specifications
Serial Port Interface
Table B-7. Serial Port Specifications
Parameter
Description
Transmission Format
Asynchronous
Physical Standard
RS-232
Connector Type
9-pin, female D connector
Connector Label
RS232
Interface
RS-232, data terminal equipment (DTE)
Data Rate
Non volatile
Baud Rate
9600 bps
Data Bits
8
Parity Bit
None
Start Bit
1
Stop Bit
1
Echo
None
Software Flow Control (XON/XOFF)
None
Hardware Flow Control (CTS/RTS)
Off
Ethernet Port
Table B-8. LAN Port Specifications
Parameter
Description
Connector Type
RJ-45
Speed
10/100 Base-T
Connector Label
MGMT
Interface
TCP/IP
Timeout
10 minutes (600 seconds)
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Appendix B Specifications and Factory Defaults
Component Specifications
10MHz Analog Output
Table B-9. 10MHz Analog Output Specifications
Parameter
Description
Output
The 10 MHz output is enabled whenever the
unit is powered up, regardless of the GPS
condition.
Connector Type
BNC, female
Connector Label
10 MHz
Impedance
50 
Waveform
Sine wave (nominal)
Signal Level
3 to7 dBm (0.89 Vpp to 1.42 Vpp)
Coupling
AC
Accuracy
<1 x 10E-12 (24-hour average)
<2 x 10E-10 (5-minute average)
Phase Noise
-82 dBc/Hzat1 Hz offset
-120 dBc/Hzat10 Hz
-140 dBc/Hzat100 Hz
-140 dBc/Hzat1 kHz
-140 dBc/Hzat10 kHz
-145 dBc/Hzat100 kHz
Spurious Noise
Non-harmonic: -75 dBc
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Appendix B Specifications and Factory Defaults
Component Specifications
1 PPS Output
Table B-10. 1 PPS Output Specifications
Parameter
Description
Connector Type
BNC, female
Connector Label
1 PPS
Impedance
50 
Signal Level
TTL
Pulse Width
Positive pulses, 50 microseconds
Coupling
DC
Holdover Stability (Operation without
GPS signals after 48 hours of proper
GPS operation.
< 1 µs offset over 2 hours with 1°C
temperature change
E1 Outputs
Table B-11. E1 Output Specifications
Parameter
Specification
Type
G.703 Sec. 9
Connector Type
BNC
Connector Label
OUT1, OUT2, OUT3, OUT4
Impedance
75 
Framing
Double-framed or multi-framed G.704 or
unframed (AIS)
Bit Rate
2048 Kbps
Signaling
CAS or CCS
SSM, CRC
With or without, per G.704
Line Code Format
HDB3
Output Level
± 2.37V, nominal
Accuracy
± 1.0 x 10 -11 when locked to GPS
Jitter
Jitter 60S, ≤0.05UI = 24.2ns, per G.823, G.812
Wander
Per G.812
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Appendix B Specifications and Factory Defaults
Component Specifications
2.048 MHz Signals
Table B-12. 2.048 MHz Specifications
Parameter
Specification
Type
G.703 (2001) Sec. 13
Connector Type
BNC
Connector Label
OUT1, OUT2, OUT3, OUT4
Impedance
75 
Wave Shape
Square Wave
Level
2.37V, peak-to-peak nominal
Accuracy
± 1.0 x 10 -11when locked to GPS
Maximum Jitter
0.05 UI (60S, 24.2)
Wandering
See the Wander spec for E1 Interface
Return loss
15 dB
Coupling
Transformer coupled
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Appendix B Specifications and Factory Defaults
Factory Defaults
Factory Defaults
Table B-13. General and Communication Parameters
Description
Default Value
Value Range
User Name
admin
20 ASCII characters
User Password
tp100
32 ASCII characters, a minimum of 8
EIA-232 Port
96 bps-8-N-1
Fixed
IP Mode
Static
Static | DHCP
IP Address
192.168.1.15
Valid IPv4 address
Gateway Address
192.168.1.1
Valid IPv4 Address
Network Mask
255.255.255.0
Valid IPv4 Mask
Signal Type (E1)
2.048 MHz
[e1_ccs_no_ssm | e1_ccs4
| e1_ccs4_no_ssm| e1_cas_no_ssm
| e1_cas | e1_cas4_no_ssm | e1_2048m
| e1_ais]
Alarm Delay
zero seconds
0 –1000 seconds
Alarm State
Enabled
Enable | Disable
Note: When using the set configuration restore factory
CLI command, the User Name and User Password does return to the
default value in Table B-13. When using the set configuration
restore backup CLI command, User Name, User Password, IP
Mode, IP Address, Gateway Address, Network Mask, does not return
to the default value in Table B-13.
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Appendix B Specifications and Factory Defaults
Electromagnetic Environment
Electromagnetic Environment
Categories that may be covered here include: Indirect and direct ESD immunity,
Electrical fast transients, radiated immunity, conducted immunity, and surge
protection.

EN55022 1998 Class B
– Radiated Emission Criteria
– Conducted Emission Power Ports
– Conducted Emission Telecom Ports
– Signal Leads Current
– Telecom Leads

EN55024 1998 Class B

EN61000-4-2
– Electrostatic Discharge Immunity

EN61000-4-3
– Radiated Immunity

EN61000-4-4
– Electrical Fast Transient

EN61000-4-5
– Lightning Criteria for Equipment w/ Antenna

EN61000-4-6
– Conducted Immunity DC Power Ports
– Conducted Immunity Telecom Port
Regulatory Requirements
Symmetricom is certified with the following safety compliant certificates:

UL/cUL/CB Scheme

6 of 6 RoHs

GS Mark

CE Mark
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Appendix B Specifications and Factory Defaults
Regulatory Requirements
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Appendix C Installing the GPS Antenna
The GPS L1 Reference Antenna is one component of a complete line of GPS
accessories for your GPS antenna system provided by Symmetricom. These
accessories are designed to deliver precise GPS signals over a wide temperature
range and in harsh environmental conditions.
In This Appendix

Antenna Kits and Accessories

Installing the Antenna

Technical Support
Antenna Kits and Accessories
This section provides a list of antenna kits and accessories as well as descriptions
and associated part numbers.
Selecting the Proper Gain Antenna
When installing the GPS radio receiver, it is important to select the proper gain
antenna and coaxial cable that accounts for the insertion loss between the antenna
and the radio receiver to avoid under-driving or over-driving the radio receiver
antenna input. The gain required at 1575 MHz for a GPS radio receiver input is the
manufacturer’s specification for the radio receiver to acquire satellites, with some
level of signal degradation allowed.
L1 Antenna gains are usually specified as the minimum effective gain. Such
antenna gains can have 4.5 to 10 dB more signal strength at different satellite
azimuths and elevations, depending on their reception pattern. The GPS engine
requires a signal level at the antenna connector input of the chassis to be between
25 dB and 35 dB. This tolerance allows for the signal loss of the internal coaxial
cable and connectors. The optimal signal level at the radio receiver input is 30 dB.
All antenna kits include the GPS L1 antenna, mounting pipe, floor flange, transient
eliminator, pre-assembled coaxial cable (for antenna to transient eliminator), roll of
3M 2150 weatherproof tape, and a right angle adapter. All chassis, antennas,
transient eliminators, and in-line amplifiers have N-type connectors.
All antenna kits supplied use LMR-400, or equivalent, low-loss coaxial cable. Other
types of coaxial cable are available for GPS antenna applications; however, it is
imperative that you calculate the specific cable loss to ensure a signal level
between 25 dB and 35 dB at the antenna connector input. The L1 signal loss of
LMR-400 is 0.167 dB/meter. The L1 signal loss of a 90 V transient eliminator is
typically 0.25 dB.
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Chapter C
Antenna Kits and Accessories
GPS Antenna
Symmetricom offers GPS antennas which are compatible with most commercial
GPS receivers, receive, amplify, and filter the L1 (1575.42 MHz) signal from GPS
satellites. The antenna is housed in a weatherproof package suitable for permanent
installation in an exposed location. For additional transient eliminator protection
requirements, you can install a 250B-90 Gas Tube transient eliminator in series with
the antenna coaxial cable.
The cable between the antenna and the TimeProvider 100 cable should be kept to
the shortest reasonable length. Before using additional cables, verify that the total
antenna system gain is acceptable as described in the Selecting the Proper Gain
Antenna section of Appendix C. The tables listed below provide information about
the antenna:
 Table C-1 lists the item number and provides a brief description of the antenna.


Table C-2 provides specification information for GPS antenna with internal LNA.
Table C-3 lists the item numbers and provides a brief description of the antenna
accessories available for the GPS series antennas.
Table C-1. GPS Antennas with Internal LNA
Part Number
990-00075-000
Description
30 dB Antenna with transient eliminator
Table C-2 provides specifications for GPS antennas.
Table C-2. Specifications for GPS Antennas
Characteristic
Specification
Mechanical
Mounting
4 holes, 1.69 in x 1.69 in (4.3 cm x 4.3 cm) centers,
0.13 in (0.400 cm) mounting holes
Diameter
3.54 in (90 mm)
Height
17.83 in (453 mm), including pipe mount
Weight
< 1.5 lbs (0.7 kg)
Environmental
Temperature
–40 C to +85 C
Relative Humidity
100% Non-Immersed
Altitude
200 ft. (60 m) below sea level to 13,000 ft. (3962 m) above sea level
Electrical
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Chapter C Installing the GPS Antenna
Antenna Kits and Accessories
Table C-2. Specifications for GPS Antennas (Continued)
Characteristic
Specification
Power
4.5 to 5.5 VDC (5 VDC Nominal)
Element
Right Hand Circular
Carrier
L1 (1545.42 MHz)
Bandwidth
10 MHz
Noise Figure
< 2.2 dB
Output Impedance
50 
Gain
>30 dBi (38 dBi typical @ elevation angle 90°)
Table C-3 lists the available accessories for GPS antennas with internal LNA
.
Table C-3. L1 GPS Antenna Accessory Kit
Part Number
Description
58521A-001
1 meter, LMR400 Interconnect Cable, connectorized
58521A-002
2 meter, LMR400 Interconnect Cable, connectorized
58521A-005
5 meter, LMR400 Interconnect Cable, connectorized
58521A-010
10 meter, LMR400 Interconnect Cable, connectorized
58521A-015
15 meter, LMR400 Interconnect Cable, connectorized
58521A-030
30 meter, LMR400 Interconnect Cable, connectorized
58521A-060
60 meter, LMR400 Interconnect Cable, connectorized
58521A-110
110 meter, LMR400 Interconnect Cable, connectorized
58521A-220
220 meter, LMR400 Interconnect Cable, connectorized
12813080-000-0
Crimper Kit, LMR-400 (crimp tool, 2150 tape, LMR preptool,
10 each crimp N-type connectors)
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Chapter C
Antenna Kits and Accessories
Transient Eliminators
Symmetricom offers the 58539A transient eliminator for installations that require
antenna coaxial lead-in protection. The 58539A transient eliminator passes DC
power and frequencies in the 1.5 GHz range with non-downconverter L1 GPS
antennas. In most installations, the transient eliminator mounts near the point at
which the antenna lead enters the facility. Table C-4 provides the transient
eliminator specifications.
Table C-4. FCC-250B-90-1.5NFNF Specifications
Characteristic
Specification
Type
Gas
Response Time
< 2 nanoseconds
Impedance
50 
Insertion Loss
< 0.5dB @ 1,575 MHz
VSWR
< 1.2:1 @ 1,575 MHz
DC Breakdown Voltage
40 Volts
Dissipation Capacity
25,000 Amperes, impulse 8/20 µsec
Connector Type
N-Type
Temperature
–55 C to + 85 C
Relative Humidity
100% Non-immersed
Altitude
200 ft. (60 m) below sea level to 13 000 ft. (3962 m) above
sea level
GPS L1 Inline Amplifier
The GPS L1 Inline Amplifier (58529A) option boosts the signal from the antenna.
Use this amplifier on LMR-400 cables that are longer than 650 feet; it receives
power from the GPS radio receiver through the antenna coaxial cable connections.
Table C-5 provides mechanical and electrical specifications for the amplifier.
Table C-5. GPS L1 Inline Amplifier Specifications
Characteristic
Specification
Mechanical
Connectors, (In/Out)
N-Type
Gain
20 dB  2 dB
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Chapter C Installing the GPS Antenna
Antenna Kits and Accessories
Table C-5. GPS L1 Inline Amplifier Specifications (Continued)
Characteristic
Specification
Dimensions, includes connectors
Length: 3.77 in (9.6 cm)
Electrical
Power
+4 VDC to +13 VDC
Current
< 13 mA
Noise Factor
< 4.3 dB
Antenna Coaxial Cables
Symmetricom provides several low-loss cable types, as well as LMR-400 with
N-type connectors on both ends. Before using additional cables, verify that the total
antenna system gain is acceptable as described in the Selecting the Proper Gain
Antenna section of Appendix C.

Table 3-1 in Chapter 3 of this User’s Guide lists the available GPS antenna kit.

Table C-6 provides antenna cable specifications
Table C-6. Antenna Cable Specifications
Cable Type
Measured Loss
(@1.575 GHz dB
per foot)
DC Resistance
( per foot)
Type Center
Conductor
Flammability
RG213/U
(Belden 8267)
0.093 dB
0.0030
Stranded 13 AWG
U/L CSA
RG213/U
(Belden 8267)
0.093 dB
0.0030
Stranded 2.62 mm2
U/L CSA
UHF/VHF
(Belden 9913)
0.058 dB
0.0027
Solid 10 AWG
UHF/VHF
(Belden 9913)
0.058 dB
0.0027
5.26 mm2
UHF/VHF
(Belden 89913)
0.089 dB
0.0027
Solid 10 AWG
Plenum U/L
CSA
UHF/VHF
(Belden 89913)
0.089 dB
0.0027
5.26 mm2
Plenum U/L
CSA
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Chapter C
Installing Antennas
Table C-6. Antenna Cable Specifications (Continued)
Cable Type
Measured Loss
(@1.575 GHz dB
per foot)
DC Resistance
( per foot)
Type Center
Conductor
LMR-400
0.051 dB
Shield – 0.00165
Center – 0.00139
0.109 inch Solid
LMR-400
0.051 dB
Shield – 0.00165
Center – 0.00139
0.27686 cm2 Solid
Flammability
Installing Antennas
This section provides a procedure for installing a GPS antenna. Before beginning
the installation, review Planning the Installation, on page 112, and gather the
necessary tools and materials described in Antenna Installation Tools and Materials,
on page 115.
Antenna Connection Overview
The TimeProvider 100 chassis has one antenna connection located on the front
panel. The antenna connection is made via a SMA connector, labeled GPS. The
connectors are DC isolated and AC bypassed to frame ground. This connection is
used for a radio receiver antenna connection only. Installation procedures for GPS
antennas are outlined below.
Planning the Installation
Prior to installing the antenna, you should plan the site, antenna location, grounding
scheme, cable route, and all other details.
Locating the Antenna
Use Figure C-1 as a guide to locating the antenna.
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Chapter C Installing the GPS Antenna
Installing Antennas
Antenna position
No single obstruction more
than 12.5% of field of view
Total obstructions
no more than 25%
of field of view
Antenna
field of view
Obstructions
toward Pole
if possible
10°
Mask Angle*
10°
Mask Angle
Horizon
Equator
Pole
* An angle of 10° masks objects up to about 3.5 ft above the
horizon at 20 ft from the antenna (illustration at right).
Figure C-1.
10°
3.5 ft
20 ft
Locating the GPS Antenna
Caution: To avoid damage to the GPS antenna, do not place the
antenna where high-power radio signals are beamed directly at the
unit. Such signals can damage the preamplifier of the GPS antenna.
Warning: To avoid serious injury to personnel or damage to
equipment, exercise caution when working near high voltage lines.
In particular:




Use extreme caution when installing the GPS antenna near,
under, or around high voltage lines.
Follow local building electrical codes for grounding using the
frame ground lug on the TimeProvider 100 chassis.
The in-line amplifier receives 5 VDC power from the GPS radio
receiver, and is supplied on the center conductor of the LMR-400
or equivalent coaxial cable. If the application requires an in-line
amplifier, mount the amplifier/plate assembly where the transient
eliminator would normally be mounted.
Symmetricom does not recommend cutting the antenna cables
provided in the GPS Antenna Kit.
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Chapter C
Installing Antennas
Recommendation: Symmetricom recommends that you consider the
following location and environment influences before installing the
GPS antenna:










If possible, provide the antenna with an unobstructed 360-degree
view of the sky from the horizon.
In general, do not allow obstructions that obscure the horizon (as
viewed from the antenna) by more than 10 degrees, as shown in
Figure C-1.
Locate the antenna well away from, and preferably in a plane
above electrical equipment such as elevators, air conditioners, or
other machinery.
To reduce the risk of lightning damage, do not place the antenna at
the highest point of the building.
Locate the GPS antenna at least 12 feet from metallic objects, if
possible.
Locate the antenna high enough to avoid drifted snow.
Locate the transient eliminator in a protected area to avoid contact
with standing water.
Locate the antenna within 30 feet of the point at which the antenna
cable enters the building.
Allow at least 10 feet of separation distance between GPS
antennas.
Surfaces above the plane of the unit that are between the antenna
and the horizon can produce reflected (multi-path) signals, which
can degrade the performance of the radio receiver.
Developing a Grounding Scheme
In addition to determining where to locate and mount the antenna and cabling, you
should develop a grounding scheme. The purpose of the grounding scheme is to
provide some protection against voltage surges and static discharge. If transient
eliminators are used, they also need to be connected to the perimeter ground
system or bulkhead entrance panel that is connected to the perimeter ground
system.
Caution: To ensure proper grounding, observe these precautions
when installing the antenna:






Allow no sharp bends in the ground conductors.
Ensure that no painted surface insulates the transient eliminator or
grounding clamps.
Ensure that ground conductors are bonded to the metal enclosure
box (if used) and do not enter through an access hole.
Do not use soldered connections for grounding purposes.
Secure all grounding connections with mechanical clamp type
connectors.
In general, follow local building codes when selecting a grounding scheme, wire
size, and installation.
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Chapter C Installing the GPS Antenna
Installing Antennas
Use #6 AWG (13.3 mm) copper ground wire or larger, depending on the distance
to the earth ground electrode. Refer to your local electrical codes for specific
details. In most cases, 1/0 AWG (55.0 mm) ground wire will maintain 1/10 the
resistance of the coaxial shied.
Note: Larger ground conductors provide better transient elimination;
that is, the larger the ground conductor, the less likely the chance of
transients.

Connect transient eliminators, if part of the grounding scheme, to earth ground
through a conductor.
Symmetricom makes no recommendation as to whether to install transient
eliminators. Symmetricom can provide suitable transient eliminators as an option.
Note: Do not connect the outside transient eliminator ground to the
inside equipment rack ground. Doing so can defeat the protection
afforded by the transient eliminator.

Never connect antenna systems to the same earth ground connector as heating
and cooling systems, elevator or pump motors, or other motors or machinery
which can induce noise in the antenna system.
Antenna Installation Tools and Materials
These standard tools and materials are not supplied in the antenna kit, but may be
required for installing the GPS antenna. For a list of antenna kit contents, see Table
C-1.
 Four each 0.25 in (6 mm) fasteners for installing the antenna floor flange

Extra cable ties or acceptable cable clamps

#6 AWG (minimum) copper ground wire

Eight-foot (2.9 m) ground electrode

Custom mounting plates, U-bolts, masonry bolt, and so forth, as needed for
mounting to a tower, roof, or wall of a building

A cable puller may be required for installing the antenna coaxial cable

Digital voltmeter (DVM)
Caution: To prevent damage to connectors, use caution while
pulling cable.
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Chapter C
Installing Antennas
Caution: To avoid damage to the connectors, do not use the
connectors to pull the cable. If at all possible, avoid bundling the
coaxial cable with other cables (and possible noise sources). Use
appropriate cable-pulling devices when pulling the coaxial cable
through conduit or a weather head.
Cutting Antenna Cables
Symmetricom recommends that you coil excess cable to avoid gain mismatch
between the GPS antenna and the radio receiver. Coiling the excess cable also
allows you to use the factory-installed crimped connector.
Symmetricom does not recommend cutting the antenna cables provided in the GPS
Antenna Kits. If you must cut the cables, please ensure that the following
requirements are met.
Be aware of these cable and connector requirements before cutting antenna cables:
Cable Requirements – The total cable length from the radio receiver to the
antenna must not be shorter than the minimum cable lengths indicated in the GPS
Antenna Kits (see Table C-1).
Connector Requirements – The cables provided with the GPS Antenna Kit have
factory installed crimped connectors. If you cut these cables, you must supply and
add a connector. Symmetricom recommends that you use only crimp-style N-type
connectors in the Crimper Kit for this application.
Installing the Antenna
This section provides installation procedures for installing the GPS antenna.
Note: Follow local building electrical codes when installing the GPS
antenna.
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Chapter C Installing the GPS Antenna
Installing Antennas
Antenna
All connectors
are N-type
4 Screws
3/4" Pipe
Floor
flange
Optional 20 dB
In-Line Amplifier
(58529A)
Short
cable
Transient Eliminator
To TimeProvider 100
IMC Module
6 AWG (13.3 mm) minimum. See text.
To buried earth or ground electrode
driven at least 8 ft. (2.44 m) into the earth.
TimeProvider 5000 includes
N-type to SMA adaptor cable
(060-00039-000)
Optional right angle mounting bracket
Figure C-2.
GPS Antenna Installation
To mount the GPS antenna:


To mount the antenna to any stable flat surface, use the floor flange supplied in
the GPS Antenna Kit. The mounting surface and the local building codes
determine the type and number of fasteners, screws, bolts, and so forth, that may
be required.
To secure the coaxial cable to the mast, use one or more 8-inch cable ties or
appropriate cable clamps.
Connecting the Cable to the Antenna
To connect the coaxial cable to the mounted antenna (see Figure C-2):
1. Loosen the four screws securing the top of the antenna in place to gain access to the
connector.
2. Route the shorter antenna coaxial cable from the antenna through the floor
flange (in the lower half of the antenna base) to the unit.
Caution: To avoid damage to the connectors, do not use the
connectors to pull the cable. If at all possible, avoid bundling the
coaxial cable with other cables (and possible noise sources). Use
appropriate cable-pulling devices when pulling the coaxial cable
through conduit or a weather head.
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TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide 117
Chapter C
Installing Antennas
3. Connect the cable to the antenna and run the cable from the antenna through the
slot of the floor flange.
Caution: To avoid damage to internal solder connections, do not
over-tighten the connector.
4. Replace the four screws to secure the top of the antenna in place with the cable
connected.
Installing the Transient Eliminator
If you are installing a transient eliminator, follow these guidelines:

Transient eliminators should be installed in accordance with your antenna system
grounding scheme

Mount the transient eliminator within 30 feet (9 m) of the GPS antenna

If required, mount a second transient eliminator near the GPS antenna
To install the transient eliminator:
Note: Step 6 in the following procedure cannot be done if you cut the
cable (as described in Step 1).
1. If necessary, cut the coaxial cable and install mating connectors (see Cutting
Antenna Cables, on page 116).
2. Using the DVM, measure the resistance between the center conductor and
shield to verify that the center conductor and shield are not shorted together.
3. Connect the longer GPS antenna coaxial cable to the transient eliminator.
4. Connect the ground wire between the transient eliminator and the proper
grounding zone (building ground, master ground bar, or other) for the mounting
location.
Recommendation: Symmetricom does not recommend soldered
connections for grounding purposes. All grounding connections
should be secured with mechanical clamp connectors.
5. Wrap the connectors with weatherproof tape for added protection.
6. Verify that the antenna coaxial cable center conductor is not shorted to the shield of
the cable.
118 TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
098-00106-000 Revision A – March, 2009
Chapter C Installing the GPS Antenna
Installing Antennas
Installing the Antenna Cable
You should install the antenna cable from the transient eliminator to the
TimeProvider 100 using the shortest route possible. Follow all applicable building
and electrical codes to ensure a water-tight and fire-resistant installation.
Caution: To avoid damage to the connectors, do not use the
connectors to pull the cable. If at all possible, avoid bundling the
cable with other cables (and possible noise sources). Use appropriate
cable-pulling devices when pulling the cable through conduit or a
weather head.
Connecting the GPS Antenna
Before connecting the GPS antenna to the TimeProvider 100, see Antenna
Connection Overview, on page 112. Then, follow the instructions below.
1. Before connecting the antenna coaxial cable to the TimeProvider 100, test the
DC resistance between the center conductor and the shield using an ohmmeter.
The reading should be approximately 260  for an active GPS antenna.
If the actual reading is incorrect, you may have a shorted or open cable or transient
eliminator (if installed). Therefore, apply the same measurements directly to the
GPS antenna. This requires disconnecting the antenna cable at the antenna.
Note: The open-circuit range of an individual ohmmeter can cause
readings to vary among meters.
2. Secure the free end of the antenna cable to the appropriate antenna connector
on the rear panel of the TimeProvider 100 using the right angle adapter provided
with the antenna cable.
Recommendation: Symmetricom recommends coiling excess cable
to avoid gain mismatch between the GPS antenna and the
TimeProvider 100. Coiling the excess cable also allows you to use the
factory-installed crimped connector.
Antenna Installation Completeness Checklist
To verify that antenna installation is complete:
 Verify that all power and ground wires are installed correctly and securely
fastened.

Verify that all input and output cables are properly installed.

Verify that all antenna connectors are secure, tight, and weatherproofed.
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TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide 119
Chapter C
Technical Support
Technical Support
See Contacting Technical Support, on page 91 for more information.
120 TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
098-00106-000 Revision A – March, 2009
Index
Numerics
250B-90 gas tube, installing 108
A
accessories 41
crimper kit 109
GPS antenna part numbers 109
L1 amplifier part number 110
alarm levels 48
alarms 45
delay 46
level 45
state 46
transient 46
altitude specifications
GPS antenna 108
antenna
descriptions 108
GPS, connecting 119
installing 116
installing GPS 118
L1 gains, minimum 107
antenna cable
installing 119
C
cable
appropriate cable-pulling devices 116
coaxial 116
coaxial signal loss 107
installing GPS antenna 118
LMR-400 107
check GPS status 33
check inventory information 33
checking GPS status 33
checklist
installation and provisioning 39
CLI command
set clock 72
CLI command set
cli-settings 58
logout 59
ping 59
reboot 60
set alarmconf 71
set configuration 72
set gps 74
set ipconfig 76
set output 79
set password 82
set snmp 83
set user 83
show active_alarm 61
show alarmconf 62
show clock 62
show command log 67
098-00106-000 Revision A – March, 2009
show eia232 62
show event log 66
show gps 63
show image 63
show inventory 64
show ipconfig 64
show ipstatus 64
show log 65
show output 67
show snmp 68
show status 69
show users 69
switchware 59
upgrade 60
CLI commands
command line format 55
command user levels 56
conventions 53
eight groups of commands 57
keyboard usage 54
overview 53
coaxial cables. 116
command log 50
configuration 25
configure frequency outputs 37
configuring
apply power 30
confirming network communication 36
establishing serial communication 31
IP address 33
logging on 32
log on tips 32
setup 30
configuring checklist 39
connecting the GPS antenna 119
connectors 116
requirements 116
crimper kit
GPS antenna 109
crimp-style connectors 116
D
documentation, related 16
E
EIA-232 connector pin assignments 21
electrical specifications
GPS antenna 108
GPS L1 inline amplifier 111
electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) 26
electrostatic discharge (ESD) 27
environmental specifications
GPS antenna 108
event log 50
events 45
TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide 121
Index
F—S
F
firmware upgrade 89
FTP 90
SFTP 90
frequency locked-loop state 44
frequency outputs 37
front panel 20
functional description 20
chassis ground 23
IEEE 1588 remote management 22
LEDs 21
power connector 21
RS232 MGMT serial port 21
T1/E1 frequency output connectors 22
functional overview 18
G
gain, GPS antenna 109
GPS antenna
accessories 109
caution near high voltage lines 113
connecting 119
crimper kit 109
installation 117
installation recommendations 114
installing 116
installing cable 119
low noise amplifier 108
tools and materials 115
with internal LNA 108
GPS L1 amplifier 110
specifications 110
GPS status 33
userID 51
log on tips 32
low noise amplifier. See GPS antenna
M
maintenance
preventive 87
materials and tools
GPS antenna installation 115
mechanical specifications
GPS antenna 108
GPS L1 inline amplifier 110
mounting
GPS antenna specifications 108
O
operations 43
operations overview 43
ordering
GPS antenna accessories 109
overview 17
P
part numbers 41
accessories 41
antennas 108
crimper kit, GPS antenna 109
pin assignments, EIA-232 21
power
GPS antenna specifications 109
preparing antenna site installation 112
product overview, TimeProvider 100 17
purpose of this guide 13
I
R
image file
switch
90
installation 25
checklist 39
completeness checklist, antenna 119
preparing site 112
tools and equipment 26
transient eliminators 118
installing
GPS antenna cable 119
grounding the shelf 29
rack mounting 28
site survey 25
unpacking TimeProvider 100 27
installing the GPS antenna 116
related documentation 16
relative humidity
GPS antenna 108
repacking TimeProvider 100 42
return material authorization number (RMA) 42
returning
procedure 42
returning unit 41
RTE clock modes 44
L
LED
indicator descriptions 88
LNA. See GPS antenna
log on
password 51
122 TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
S
safety considerations 88
satellites
azimuths and elevations 107
gain required 107
service
technical assistance 25
setting date 50
setting IP static mode 35
setting signal type 38
setting time 50
show alarm log 50
show events log 50
098-00106-000 Revision A – March, 2009
Index
T—W
signal strength, antenna gains 107
signal type
set 38
signal types 37
soldered connections 118
specifications
GPS antenna 108
GPS L1 amplifier 110
transient eliminators 110
static mode 35
structure of this guide 13
switch boot-up image file 90
Symmetricom Global Services (SGS) 25
system configuration 51
T
technical assistance 25
098-00106-000 Revision A – March, 2009
temperature
GPS antenna specifications 108
TimeProvider 100 operations 43
transient eliminators 110
installing 118
L1 signal loss 107
specifications 110
U
upgrade
firmware 89
user sessions 51
W
web address 16
TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide 123
Index
W—W
124 TimeProvider 100 User’s Guide
098-00106-000 Revision A – March, 2009

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