User Guide - Literature Library
USER GUIDE
Rockwell Automation Publication HIST-UM001K-EN-E-June 2014
Supersedes Publication HIST-UM001J-EN-P-December 2011
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Table of Contents
Chapter 1
Welcome to FactoryTalk
Historian Classic
What is FactoryTalk Historian Classic? .................................................. 9
Features and Benefits .............................................................................. 9
Intended Audience........................................................................................ 9
Where Can I Go for Help? ....................................................................... 11
Chapter 2
Getting Started
The RSBizWare Architecture .................................................................. 13
Connecting to the Information Services Manager .............................. 14
Using the Information Services Manager in Internet Explorer .. 14
Using the Configuration Console ..................................................... 15
Exploring the User Interface..................................................................... 16
The Report Explorer ............................................................................. 16
The Report Design and Display Work Area ................................... 16
Shortcut Menus ......................................................................................17
Chapter 3
Collecting FactoryTalk Historian
Classic Data
The Plant Model..........................................................................................19
Configuring the Plant Model .............................................................. 20
Configure Time-Series Data Collection ................................................ 22
Types of control connectors for the data collection ...................... 23
Enterprise Connectors .......................................................................... 24
Tutorial ....................................................................................................25
Step 1: Start the Time-Series Data Collection Wizard ........... 25
Step 2: Select the Source and Destination of the Time-Series
Data 25
Step 3: Create or Select Data Points ............................................ 27
Step 4: Configure Collection Parameters ................................... 31
Step 5: Configure Transaction Settings ...................................... 34
Step 6: Create Transactions ........................................................... 36
Organize FactoryTalk Historian Classic Reporting Tags ................. 36
Start Data Collection ................................................................................. 39
Chapter 4
Analyzing FactoryTalk Historian
Classic Data
Create a New RSBizWare Report ........................................................... 41
Insert Text, Pictures, and Hyperlinks ..................................................... 42
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Save the Report ............................................................................................44
Add a Saved Report Object to Your Report ......................................... 45
Configure the Report Object To Use Global Credentials ................ 48
Create a New Chart ....................................................................................51
Step 1: Plan the Chart ........................................................................... 52
Step 2: Select the Data On Which To Report ................................ 53
Step 3: Choose a Chart Type .............................................................. 53
Step 4: Describe the Data ..................................................................... 53
Step 5: Select Summary or Detail ....................................................... 54
Step 6: Select the Fields To Be Charted ........................................... 55
Step 7: Enter the Chart Title .............................................................. 56
Step 8: Filter the Data ........................................................................... 56
Step 9: Insert Your New Chart Into the Report ............................ 59
Create a New Text Report Object .......................................................... 60
Step 1: Start the Text Report Object Wizard ................................. 61
Step 2: Select the Data On Which To Report ................................ 61
Step 3: Group the Records ................................................................... 62
Step 4: Sort the Records ....................................................................... 63
Step 5: Format the Table ...................................................................... 64
Step 6: Name the Report Object ........................................................ 66
Step 7: Filter the Data ........................................................................... 66
Step 8: Insert Your New Table Into the Report ............................. 66
Create a Time-series Chart ....................................................................... 67
Step 1: Create the Report Object ....................................................... 67
Step 2: Name the Report Object ........................................................ 68
Step 3: Add Reporting Tags ................................................................ 68
Step 4: Apply an Analysis Tool ........................................................... 69
Step 5: Customize the Chart Legend ................................................ 70
Step 6: Insert Your New Chart Into the Report ............................ 71
Step 7: Adjust the Time Range ........................................................... 71
Step 3: Add Reporting Tags ................................................................ 73
Step 9: Remove a Reporting Tag or an Analysis Tool ................... 76
Create a Simple Batch/Event Chart ....................................................... 76
Add a Comment to a Value, X-axis, or Y-axis on a Time-series Chart
79
Value Comments ...................................................................................80
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X-axis Comments ..................................................................................81
Y-axis Comments ...................................................................................82
Ad Comment As ....................................................................................84
Export the Report to HTML ................................................................... 84
Load the Report From File........................................................................ 85
Chapter 5
Customizing RSBizWare Charts
and Tables
Customizing Charts ...................................................................................87
Working With the Component Parts of a Chart .......................... 88
Resizing a Component .................................................................... 89
Moving a Component ..................................................................... 89
Deleting a Component .................................................................... 89
Editing the Chart Title or Text Field .......................................... 89
Changing Chart Component Properties .................................... 90
Working With Chart “Pens” .................................................................... 90
Customizing Text Report Objects .......................................................... 90
Show and Hide Columns ..................................................................... 91
Resize Table Columns .......................................................................... 92
Aggregate, Group, Format, Sort, Chart, and Rename Columns 92
Aggregate ............................................................................................93
Group 94
Format 94
Sort
94
Chart 95
Rename 95
Quick Filter...................................................................................................95
Chapter 6
Advanced Reporting Topics
The Excel Add-in ........................................................................................97
Scheduling Report Objects and Reports ............................................. 101
Schedule a Report Object.................................................................. 102
Schedule a Report ............................................................................... 105
View the History of the Scheduled Task ....................................... 109
Analyzing Non-RSBizWare Data ........................................................ 110
Create an External Data Source....................................................... 110
Create a Report Data Source ............................................................ 111
Step 1: Start the Report Data Source Wizard ......................... 111
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Step 2: Give the Report Data Source a Name ......................... 116
Step 3: Select a Database Table or View ................................... 117
Step 4: Choose the Columns That Will Be Included ........... 117
Step 5: Enable the Time Selection Toolbar ............................. 119
Step 6: Specify the Format of the Table or View.................... 120
Step 7: Specify the Role That Each Field Plays In Time-Series
Analysis 122
Step 8: Create a Data Point Configuration Table ................. 123
Chapter 7
Creating RSBizWare Custom
Analysis Tools
6
Why Use Custom Analysis Tools? ....................................................... 125
Intended Audience................................................................................... 125
A Quick Tour of a Sample Custom Analysis Tool .......................... 126
Registering a Sample Analysis Tool ................................................ 127
Using the Sample Analysis Tool for Time-series Analysis ........ 129
What You Need to Know Before You Start ...................................... 129
Analysis Tool Architecture ............................................................... 130
What a Time-series Data Set Looks Like ...................................... 132
Interpreting the Parameters Passed into the Calculate() Function
133
Limitations ........................................................................................... 134
The RSBizWare Calculator COM Interface ..................................... 134
Looking at the Type Library............................................................. 135
Developing Analysis Tools with Visual Basic .................................... 136
Creating a New Project...................................................................... 137
Configuring Important Project Settings ....................................... 137
Referencing the RSBizWare Calculator Component ................ 138
Writing the Calculate() Function................................................... 138
Saving and Compiling the Project .................................................. 140
Trying Out the New Custom Analysis Tool................................ 141
Debugging Custom Analysis Tools in Visual Basic .................... 142
Developing Analysis Tools with Visual C++ .................................... 143
Creating a New Project...................................................................... 144
Referencing the RSBizWare Calculator Component ................ 145
Working with VARIANTs in Visual C++ .................................. 147
Writing the Calculate() Function................................................... 148
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Saving and Compiling the Project .................................................. 151
Trying Out the Custom Analysis Tool.......................................... 153
Debugging Custom Analysis Tools in Visual C++ .................... 154
Why Use Custom Analysis Tools? ....................................................... 155
Chapter 8
Object Permissions
Filter permissions ..................................................................................... 158
Report permissions................................................................................... 158
Report data source permissions ............................................................. 159
Report object permissions ...................................................................... 159
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Table of Contents
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Chapter 1
Welcome to FactoryTalk Historian Classic
What is FactoryTalk Historian The RSBizWare software is a suite of tools and services aimed at
increasing your manufacturing floor effectiveness and profitability
Classic?
with solutions that target performance analysis and improvement
and with data acquisition and integration. FactoryTalk Historian
Classic is just one of the applications that is available within the
RSBizWare software. FactoryTalk Historian Classic is a repository
for historical data, built for today’s networked and distributed
enterprise. Tightly coupled to FactoryTalk Transaction Manager for
data collection, FactoryTalk Historian Classic ships with a
complete, predesigned data model for time-series data logging, and
offers the ability to analyze data from external database tables.
Features and Benefits
FactoryTalk Historian Classic offers the following features and
benefits:
• Rich reporting, graphing, time-series analysis, and querying
functionality provide a complete and easy-to-use solution for
performance analysis.
• A direct link between the shop floor, where data is collected,
and the enterprise, where data can be analyzed and reported
on.
• The ability to embed a report object in any Microsoft ActiveX
container, such as Visual Basic or Internet Explorer.
• The ability to analyze data contained in non-RSBizWare
databases.
Intended Audience
The FactoryTalk Historian Classic User Guide is designed to help
you understand how to access and use the FactoryTalk Historian
Classic product. This document focuses on the end-user functions of
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Chapter 1 Welcome to FactoryTalk Historian Classic
FactoryTalk Historian Classic and does not cover installation and
operation of underlying system services.
This document is intended for the following types of users of the
RSBizWare software:
• RSBizWare administrators
RSBizWare administrators configure the RSBizWare system
so that it can capture performance data for use by report
designers and report users.
They should be familiar with:
• Control systems, process information (line and plant), and
databases.
• Microsoft Windows operating system.
• The location and structure of databases.
• Report designers
Report designers create the reports that will be used by report
users.
They should be familiar with:
• Process information (the physical representation of the
production line and plant).
• Microsoft Windows operating systems.
• Query logic (how to write a database query).
• Web publishing tools.
• The location and structure of databases.
• Report users
Report users make use of the reports created by the report
designer to perform their jobs.
They should be familiar with:
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Welcome to FactoryTalk Historian Classic Chapter 1
• Microsoft Windows operating systems.
Where Can I Go for Help?
Consult the following resources for additional information about
the product:
• Release Notes
The release notes contain current information about the
product, including hardware and software requirements, new
features, known and fixed anomalies.
• RSBizWare Administration Guide
The administration guide helps the RSBizWare administrator
install and configure the software as well as understand the
architecture of the RSBizWare suite and its components.
• Online help
The online help provides general information and step-by-step
procedures for working with the product.
• Rockwell Automation Support Center
The support center provides a variety of services, such as
trainings, webinars, and online support that will improve your
experience using the RSBizWare suite.
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Chapter 1 Welcome to FactoryTalk Historian Classic
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Chapter 2
Getting Started
Before you walk through the examples and tutorials that are
discussed in this book, it is assumed that the RSBizWare
administrator has installed, configured, and started the Information
Services Manager on the server computer.
The RSBizWare Architecture
The RSBizWare architecture is a scalable, multi-tiered, distributed
architecture consisting of a data collection subsystem, an Oracle or
SQL Server database repository, the Information Services Manager,
and clients. Rockwell Automation’s FactoryTalk Transaction
Manager is the embedded engine that collects data from the control
system(s), and the Metrics Server Manager logs it to the predefined
RSBizWare database repository. There are several types of clients,
including the Configuration Console and the Internet Explorer
Web client.
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Chapter 2 Getting Started
The RSBizWare architecture can be configured to run on a single
computer, or it can be distributed across multiple computers. In the
simplest case, the Configuration Console, the Information Services
Manager, the RSBizWare administrative tools used by the
RSBizWare administrator, the database, the Metrics Server
Manager, and the FactoryTalk Transaction Manager data collection
engine run on a single computer. In a distributed setting, these
components may reside on separate computers. Clients connect to
the Information Services Manager using TCP/IP, so they can be
deployed over a LAN, WAN, intranet, or the Internet. The
scalability of the RSBizWare architecture allows many clients to
connect to a single server.
Connecting to the
Information Services
Manager
RSBizWare reports created by the report designer are saved to the
Information Services Manager, and are available online over a
TCP/IP network. If you wish to create and edit RSBizWare reports
using Microsoft Internet Explorer, you need to run the
Configuration Console.
Using the Information
Services Manager in Internet
Explorer
Using Microsoft Internet Explorer to view RSBizWare reports, you
can connect to the Information Services Manager without having
the RSBizWare software installed on your computer. Instead, the
server hosts a special Web page, the Quick Web, to give you access to
the RSBizWare reports stored on the server. This option only allows
you to view RSBizWare reports.
To access the Quick Web, open Internet Explorer, type the Web
address for the Information Services Manager computer, and press
Enter on your keyboard.
The Web address is made up of the name of the server computer and
the HTTP port number used by the server computer, separated by a
colon.
For example, if you were attempting to connect to a server computer
named rsi-rockwell that uses the default HTTP port 8080, you
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would use the following address: http://rsi-rockwell:8080.
Please contact your RSBizWare administrator for the specific
Information Services Manager Web address to which you should
connect.
The first time you try to use the Quick Web, you need to download
several ActiveX controls from the server computer. The download
will begin automatically.
After you have downloaded the ActiveX controls from the
Information Services Manager, you may be prompted to log on. If
prompted, type the user name and password for the account that
your RSBizWare administrator has authorized for you, and then
click OK. A connection to the RSBizWare server is established.
Using the Configuration
Console
If you wish to configure your plant model, manage the collection of
control system data, and/or edit RSBizWare reports, you should
connect to the Information Services Manager via the Configuration
Console. Your RSBizWare administrator must assign a FactoryTalk
Metrics Author license and the appropriate privileges to you before
you will be able to perform these functions.
You must have the Client software installed on your computer
before you can run the Configuration Console. To install the
Configuration Console from the RSBizWare CD, select the
“Minimal” install option.
1. To start the Configuration Console, select Programs >
Rockwell Software > RSBizWare > Configuration Console.
2. If you have not already logged into RSBizWare, the Login
dialog will display. Enter the user name and password for the
account your RSBizWare administrator has authorized for
you. Enter the name of the server computer where the
Information Services Manager is running in the Server box.
Click Login.
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Chapter 2 Getting Started
The status bar at the bottom of the client application shows
your user name, the activations that have been assigned to you,
and the Information Services Manager to which you are
connected.
Exploring the User Interface When you start the Configuration Console, you will notice that the
user interface is made up of two main components: the Report
Explorer and the report design and display work area.
The Report Explorer
The Report Explorer is a hierarchical navigation tool used for
organizing RSBizWare reports that have been saved for future use.
The Report Explorer contains the reports that have been saved on
the Information Services Manager to which you are connected and
for which you have been granted view permissions. Your ability to
modify and delete the reports listed on the Report Explorer is
dependent on the licenses and features that have been assigned to
you by your RSBizWare administrator and the permissions that
have been granted to you by the creator of each individual report.
The Report Design and
Display Work Area
When you click an item in the Report Explorer, the specified
RSBizWare report will display in the work area to the right of the
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Report Explorer. The work area is the region where report designers
can create and modify reports.
Shortcut Menus
Many areas of the application give you access to shortcut menus.
The shortcut menu allows you to perform frequently used
commands without using the main application menu or toolbar
buttons. To view the shortcut menu, you need to right-click in the
area of the desired application. The shortcut menu contains
commands that are appropriate for the selected area. For example, if
you right-click the Report Explorer, the shortcut menu will contain
commands that apply to the Report Explorer.
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Chapter 3
Collecting FactoryTalk Historian Classic
Data
The primary functions of FactoryTalk Historian Classic are to
collect and analyze time-series data. Before the report designer can
create time-series analysis reports for the report user, the RSBizWare
administrator must set up the application to collect data from the
control system. The tutorials in this chapter will help you
understand how to use FactoryTalk Historian Classic to collect
time-series data. We will:
• Configure the plant model for your FactoryTalk Historian
Classic installation
• Configure time-series data collection
• Organize FactoryTalk Historian Classic reporting tags
• Start and stop data collection
The tutorial in "Analyzing FactoryTalk Historian Classic Data (page
41)" will help you understand how to analyze the data that is
collected in FactoryTalk Historian Classic.
The Plant Model
The plant model is made up of activity areas - enterprises, sites, areas,
lines, and workcells - as well as of equipment and labor resources.
The activity areas are based on the terms defined by the Instrument
Society of America (ISA) S95 standard in order to provide common
terminology for improved communication and integration between
control systems and enterprise systems.
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Chapter 3 Collecting FactoryTalk Historian Classic Data
Item
Description
Workcell
A location and/or group of equipment used to perform work in a
manufacturing process. The operations in a manufacturing process
are performed at workcells. A workcell is typically a physical
location and a primary resource (e.g., a machine); however, it may
also represent a logical grouping of primary resources from which a
selection is made.
A collection of one or more workcells that are combined to perform
work. The workcells in a line are either physically located close to
one another, or are related to one another in the production process
(the production result of the first workcell in a line feeds the second
workcell in the line).
A physical, geographical, or logical grouping of lines and/or
workcells within a site, typically representing a main production
capability (e.g., electronic assembly) within a manufacturing
location.
A group of areas, lines, and workcells representing a geographical
location at which products are manufactured.
The highest-level activity area, typically representing the business.
Line
Area
Site
Enterprise
The plant model may be used by all RSBizWare applications in your
organization (FactoryTalk Metrics, FactoryTalk Historian Classic,
and FactoryTalk Scheduler). The enterprises, sites, areas, lines, and
workcells in your plant model are the subjects of your performance
parameter evaluation. For implementations of RSBizWare that
incorporate the FactoryTalk Scheduler application, the plant model
also includes capacity, which is the property of an activity area
describing its availability over time. The performance parameters
can also be configured for resources.
Configuring the Plant Model
NOTE:
To create and edit the plant model, you must be granted the
Organize Plant Model privilege by your RSBizWare administrator.
If you want to have access to sample data, see "Loading Sample
Activity Areas".
To configure the plant model in the Configuration Console:
1. On the Configure menu, click Plant Model.
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The Plant Model dialog box appears.
2. Right-click in the area under the plant model tree, and then
click New Root Enterprise.
A new enterprise is added to the tree.
3. Change the default name to Sample
Enter.
Enterprise,
and then press
4. Right-click Sample Enterprise, and then click New Activity
Area > Site.
A new site is added to the tree.
5. Change the default name to Sample
Site.
6. Right-click Sample Site, and then click New Activity Area >
Area.
A new area is added to the tree.
7. Change the default name to Sample
Area.
8. Right-click Sample Area, and then click New Activity Area >
Line.
A new line is added to the tree.
9. Change the default name to Sample
Line.
10. Right-click Sample Line, and then click New Activity Area >
Work Cell.
A new workcell is added to the tree.
11. Change the default name to Sample
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Chapter 3 Collecting FactoryTalk Historian Classic Data
12. Right-click each activity area that you have created, and then
click Add Capacity.
TIP
The capacity of an activity area describes its availability over
time.
Add capacity for your activity areas so that you can associate
them with time patterns.
13. Click OK.
Configure Time-Series Data
Collection
FactoryTalk Historian Classic uses FactoryTalk Transaction
Manager to collect data from the control system and log it into the
RSBizWare database. A FactoryTalk Transaction Manager
configuration connects any control system from which data will be
collected to the predefined data model used by the RSBizWare
database to store time-series data. The configuration consists of
transactions and the connectors, data points, and data objects
required to implement the transactions.
A transaction is a single exchange of data between the industrial
control system - typically a network of programmable logic
controllers (PLCs) - and a database. An example of a transaction is a
temperature value that is collected from a data point on a
programmable logic controller and logged to a database table.
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A data point is a specific data location or register in the control
system that is made available to FactoryTalk Transaction Manager
transactions. After it is defined, a data point can be used by any
FactoryTalk Transaction Manager transaction.
Types of control connectors
for the data collection
The FactoryTalk Transaction Manager interfaces with the industrial
control system device via a control connector. A control connector is
a Windows service that collects data from a data server, such as a
PLC and sends it to the FactoryTalk Transaction Manager.
You can use the following types of control connectors:
Item
Description
Dynamic Data
Exchange (DDE)
The DDE control connector service is provided for legacy
connections to DDE servers or to provide functionality that is not
supported by the OPC specification.
RSLinx Classic OPC
The RSLinx Classic control connector service is the preferred method
to use when browsing for data tags that reside in Allen-Bradley
Programmable Logic Controllers, except for ControlLogix 555x
processor items. You should use Generic OPC control connectors
with ControlLogix 555x processors.
Generic OPC
The Generic OPC control connector service is used to interface with
items provided by any OPC server that conforms to OPC interface
specifications.
FactoryTalk LiveData FactoryTalk Transaction Manager uses FactoryTalk Live Data to
Connector
communicate with FactoryTalk Live Data servers, such as RSLinx
Classic and RSView Supervisory Edition. FactoryTalk Transaction
Manager connects to the FactoryTalk Directory, which allows
FactoryTalk Transaction Manager to browse the available data
items. This control connector is required if you plan to perform
online edits with your configuration.
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Chapter 3 Collecting FactoryTalk Historian Classic Data
Enterprise Connectors
The FactoryTalk Transaction Manager interfaces with the database
via an enterprise connector. An enterprise connector is a Windows
service that receives data from the FactoryTalk Transaction
Manager and logs it to a database.
The following are the types of enterprise connectors that you can
use:
Item
Description
ODBC
The ODBC enterprise database connector allows you to interface
with virtually any ODBC-compliant database including Microsoft
Access, Microsoft SQL Server 6.5 or later, IBM DB2 or Sybase.
The Oracle Call Interface (OCI) enterprise database connector allows
you to connect to database objects from an Oracle server. If you are
using Oracle OCI, you need to install locally SQL*NET 2.3x or later,
Net8, or Oracle Net services (all from Oracle). You can then connect
to an Oracle database versions 9i through 11g.
The Microsoft OLE DB enterprise database connector should only be
used for interfacing with Microsoft SQL Server. Microsoft OLE DB
allows you to browse an SQL Server database without a data source
name (DSN) and is the preferred method of connection.
The Microsoft COM+ enterprise application connector allows you to
interface with Microsoft COM+ application components. These
components must be integrated into a Windows 2000 COM+
environment. RSBizWare-only applications do not support this
connector. It is for use only with FactoryTalk Transaction Manager
Professional installations.
The FactoryTalk Metrics enterprise application connector is used
only with FactoryTalk Metrics. The connector stores data in the
RSBizWare database.
The SAP enterprise application connector allows you to interface
with SAP R/3 systems modules. RSBizWare-only applications do not
support this connector. It is for use only with FactoryTalk
Transaction Manager Professional installations.
Oracle OCI
Microsoft OLE DB
Microsoft COM+
FactoryTalk
Metrics
SAP
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Tutorial
Item
Description
Time-series Data
Compression
This connector stores time-series data in a pre-defined compressed
format in either an Oracle database or a Microsoft SQL Server
database. The compressed data point records contain binary data
that can only be viewed through FactoryTalk Historian Classic. For a
detailed description of data compression and the Compression
connector, see the Administration Guide, section "Data
Compression".
This tutorial will help you understand how to use the Time-Series
Data Collection Wizard to collect reporting tag data. A reporting
tag is a particular item of collected time-series data—independent of
the method or source of collection—that can be charted in
RSBizWare reports.
For this tutorial, we will be using the Time-Series Data Collection
Wizard to configure FactoryTalk Transaction Manager transactions
that will collect values from the control system and log the values to
a reporting tag in the RSBizWare database.
NOTE
To configure time-series data collection, you must be granted a
FactoryTalk Historian Classic Author license by your RSBizWare
administrator.
Step 1: Start the Time-Series From the Configuration Console menu, select Configure >
FactoryTalk Historian Classic >Time-Series Data Collection to
Data Collection Wizard
display the Time-Series Data Collection Wizard welcome screen.
Click Next on the Welcome dialog box.
Step 2: Select the Source and The Collection Source and Destination dialog box, which allows
you to specify where the time-series data will be collected from and
Destination of the
where it will be stored in the RSBizWare database, will display.
Time-Series Data
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1. The report data source is the database table or view where the
data will be stored. FactoryTalk Historian Classic is capable of
logging data to the FactoryTalk Historian Classic Data Point
Default report data source (the RSDataPointSample table in
the RSBizWare database), the FactoryTalk Historian Classic
Data Point Compressed report data source (the
RSSQL_CMPCOMPRESS table in the RSBizWare
database), or to any other database table or view that your
organization identifies as supporting the required time-series
data model (Advanced option). For this tutorial, accept the
default Historian Data Point Default option.
TIP
For more information about creating additional report data
sources, refer to "Analyzing Non-RSBizWare Data (page 110)".
2. Now you must specify the FactoryTalk Transaction Manager
configuration that will be used to support data collection. The
FactoryTalk Transaction Manager Configuration list contains
the configurations that have been associated with FactoryTalk
Historian Classic for the server to which you are connected. If
we had selected a compression report data source in the
previous step, only FactoryTalk Transaction Manager
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configurations that had Compression Enterprise Connections
would be available here. Since we selected a non-compression
report data source, any FactoryTalk Transaction Manager
configurations that have non-compression (OLE DB, OCI, or
ODBC) enterprise connectors will be available.
3. The Enterprise Connector is the service that will manage the
connection between the FactoryTalk Transaction Manager
configuration and the database. The FactoryTalk Transaction
Manager Enterprise Connection list contains the enterprise
connectors that are available from the configuration that you
selected. From the Enterprise Connection list, select the
OLE-DB_Connector.
4. Click Next to continue.
If the FactoryTalk Transaction Manager configuration is
already running and is enabled for online edits, you can edit
the configuration without stopping it. However, if the
configuration is running and is not enabled for online edits,
the wizard will prompt you to stop the configuration. If you do
not stop the configuration, the Time- Series Data Collection
Wizard cannot make changes to the configuration, and the
wizard will close automatically.
NOTE
The FactoryTalk Transaction Manager Live Data Migration Tool
allows you to convert configurations with non-FactoryTalk data
points into FactoryTalk data points. For additional information
about editing a running configuration and using the FactoryTalk
Transaction Manager Live Data Migration Tool, see the “Online
Edits” topic in the online help.
Step 3: Create or Select Data Next you’ll see the FactoryTalk Transaction Manager to
FactoryTalk Historian Classic Reporting dialog. This dialog enables
Points
you to select the FactoryTalk Transaction Manager data points from
which FactoryTalk Historian Classic will be collecting data and
enables you to specify the FactoryTalk Historian Classic reporting
tags to which the data will be logged.
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1. To select the data points from which data will be collected,
click the Add button. The Select FactoryTalk Transaction
Manager Data Points dialog that is displayed lists the data
points that exist in the FactoryTalk Transaction Manager
configuration. The top of the dialog is simply a set of tools that
you can use to filter the data point list.
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2. To add new data points to the FactoryTalk Transaction
Manager configuration, click the Add/Edit Points button to
display the (FactoryTalk Transaction Manager) FactoryTalk
Data Point dialog box.
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This dialog may look different depending on the type of
control connector that you selected. This dialog allows you to
add data points to the Control Connector and set their
properties.
3. If you were creating new tags from a running FactoryTalk
Transaction Manager configuration, you would select them by
selecting a category of tags from the Folders tree, selecting the
actual tags from the Contents of ‘/” list, clicking the Add
Selected Tag(s) button, and clicking the Apply button. For
now, click Close to exit the dialog and return to the Select
FactoryTalk Transaction Manager Data Points dialog.
4. Highlight the data points for which you want to collect data.
For this tutorial, select the BEND_Breakdown data point
(unscheduled) and the BEND_BreakdownCode data point
(scheduled). Click Select to return to the From FactoryTalk
Transaction Manager to FactoryTalk Historian Classic
Reporting Tags step of the Time-Series Data Collection
Wizard.
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The selected data points have been added to the list of data
points for which you will be creating transactions. Since we are
collecting data from newly selected data points, the
FactoryTalk Historian Classic Reporting Tag column does not
yet contain reporting tag names that will be associated with the
values when they are stored in the database.
5. You can associate each data point with an existing reporting
tag or you can have the application create a new reporting tag
for you. To associate an existing reporting tag with a data
point, you would select the data point from the list and click
the Change button to display the Select FactoryTalk Historian
Classic Reporting Tag dialog. You would then select the
reporting tag with which you want to associate the selected
data point and click OK to close the dialog. This approach is
useful if you have a data point/reporting tag association that
you want to change. For this tutorial, accept the reporting tag
names that the application generates by clicking Next.
Step 4: Configure Collection
Parameters
The next step in the process is to assign collection parameters to the
selected data points. If you have selected data points that are
configured as scheduled, the FactoryTalk Transaction Manager
Scheduled Transaction dialog box will display. If you have selected
data points that are configured as unscheduled, the FactoryTalk
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Transaction Manager Unscheduled Transaction dialog box will
display. If you have selected both scheduled and unscheduled data
points, the FactoryTalk Transaction Manager Scheduled
Transaction dialog box and the FactoryTalk Transaction Manager
Unscheduled Transaction dialog boxes will both be displayed.
Scheduled transactions. Use the FactoryTalk Transaction Manager
Scheduled Transaction dialog box to indicate how often to poll the
control system and log the data to the RSBizWare database (e.g.,
once every 15 seconds).
1. The Simple Scheduled FactoryTalk Transaction Manager
Transaction option is useful if you want to trigger the
transaction on simple scheduled events such as system start up
or system shut down. If you want to set more sophisticated
triggers for the transaction, select the Advanced FactoryTalk
Transaction Manager Transaction option. For this tutorial,
accept the default Simple Scheduled FactoryTalk Transaction
Manager Transaction option and the default Starting Event
(SYS_STARTUP) and Stopping Event
(SYS_SHUTDOWN).
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2. Set the scan rate to 15 seconds. This means we will be
collecting data every 15 seconds between the time the
configuration is started and the time the configuration is
stopped.
3. Click Next to continue.
Unscheduled transactions. Unscheduled transactions are triggered
by a change in the value of the data point that is being logged. The
FactoryTalk Transaction Manager Unscheduled Transaction dialog
box allows you to trigger the transaction when the data point value
goes high, low, or on any change in the data point value.
1. For our example, accept the default On Change option. This
option means that any time our data point value changes, a
value will be logged to the database.
2. Select the Specify Minimum Collection Frequency (MCF)
check box to create a scheduled transaction that will be paired
with your unscheduled transaction. The values from both
transactions will be logged to the same field in the database.
The data from the scheduled transaction will create a
“heartbeat” that will allow us to determine that the
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configuration is still running even if our unscheduled
transaction has not been logged for a while. If you do not use a
minimum collection frequency and your unscheduled
transaction has not been logged for a while (this is called a
deadband), it may be difficult to determine if the FactoryTalk
Transaction Manager configuration is still running.
For additional information on setting a minimum collection
frequency, see the “Deadbanding” topic in the online help.
3. Enter 15 in the Collect Value Every box and accept the default
Seconds option. This will cause the application to collect a
“heartbeat” value every 15 seconds.
4. Click Next to continue.
Step 5: Configure Transaction The FactoryTalk Transaction Manager Transaction Settings dialog
box enables you to specify how the transaction data will be stored in
Settings
the database and to specify how long FactoryTalk Transaction
Manager will wait for the transaction to complete before logging an
error.
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1. The Transaction Storage options allow you to specify how the
data will be stored to the database.
• Cache Transaction File—The FactoryTalk Transaction
Manager will write data values to a file for a specified period
of time or a specified number of transactions. When the file
reaches the specified limit, the Enterprise Connector reads
and processes the records in the file. The Cache
Transaction File option is most appropriate for transactions
that will be logged very often, such as a Scheduled data
point that will be collected every 10 seconds or less.
• Real Time Thread—The FactoryTalk Transaction
Manager will send a message to the Enterprise Connector
for each transaction as it is processed. The Real Time
• Thread option is most appropriate for transactions that will
not be logged very often; for example, an unscheduled data
point that triggers a transaction when its
• The value changes and where the value of that data point
changes infrequently.
Accept the default Cache Transaction File option.
2. The Transaction Timeout fields allow you to control how long
FactoryTalk Transaction Manager will wait for the transaction
to complete before logging an error. The transaction timeout
should be set slightly higher than the length of time it will take
for the data points to be collected, or be set to the length of
time after which the transaction is no longer valid. For
example, if a transaction should complete in 5 seconds but
might take as long as 7 seconds and still be acceptable, you
should set the transaction timeout to 8 seconds. If the
transaction goes past 8 seconds, the transaction will fail, and an
error will be logged.
Accept the default value of 60 seconds.
• Click Next to continue.
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Step 6: Create Transactions
The Summary dialog box gives you a chance to review the
transactions that will be created.
1. If the transactions are correct, click Create.
2. The Results panel displays errors and warnings that occurred
during the generation of FactoryTalk Transaction Manager
transactions, if any. If the creation of transactions results in
errors or warnings, double-click the entries in the summary list
for more information about what went wrong, where the fault
occurred, and the severity of the error.
NOTE
If the configuration that you are working with was a running
configuration that you stopped in the first step of the wizard, the
wizard will prompt you to restart the configuration. After the
configuration is started, FactoryTalk Transaction Manager will
begin to collect data and log it to the RSBizWare database.
3. Click Finish to close the wizard.
Organize FactoryTalk
Historian Classic Reporting
Tags
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As you configure FactoryTalk Historian Classic data collection for
your organization, you most likely will have a large number of
reporting tags to which you are collecting data and from which you
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will be creating reports; therefore, it is a good idea to organize your
reporting tags.
NOTE
To manage time-series reporting tags, you must be granted the Manage
Reporting Tags privilege by your RSBizWare administrator.
1. From the main menu, select Tools > FactoryTalk Historian
Classic > Manage Time-Series Reporting Tags to display the
Time-Series Reporting Tags dialog. This dialog is the starting
point for administering and managing reporting tags.
2. Select the time-series report data source that contains the
reporting tags that you want to modify or organize. To view
the reporting tags that we just created, select the Historian
Data Point Default report data source. The Search Results list
at the bottom of the dialog is refreshed to show the reporting
tags in the selected report data source.
3. When the Search Results list contains too many entries for you
to easily locate the reporting tags that you want to manage, use
the Plant Model Activity Area control, the Reporting Tag
Text Filtering control, or both to narrow the search results.
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To perform an activity area search, click
to the right of
the Plant Model Activity Area box. Use the Plant Model
Browser dialog that is displayed to select the activity area that
you want to search. Click OK to return to the Time-Series
Reporting Tags dialog. The Search Results list is refreshed to
show the reporting tags in the report data source that are
associated with the selected activity area. Our reporting tags
have not yet been associated with an activity area, so a search
by activity area would not return the reporting tags that we
created in the previous tutorial. So click the Clear button if
you selected an area in the Plant Model Browser dialog.
To perform a string search on the names of the reporting tags
in the selected report data source, enter the text that you want
to search for (using an “*” to represent a wild card character)
and click Search Now. Reporting tags that match the search
string are displayed in the list at the bottom of the dialog. For
example, a string search for *BEND* would return the
reporting tags that we created in the previous tutorial.
4. Select the BEND_Breakdown reporting tag from the list and
click Edit to display the Reporting Tag dialog box. Use it to
edit the name of the reporting tag, provide the engineering
units, and associate the reporting tag with an activity area in
the plant model.
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5. Click OK to save your changes and return to the Time-Series
Reporting Tags dialog.
6. Click OK to close the Time-Series Reporting Tags dialog.
Start Data Collection
After you have finished configuring the performance parameters,
and enabled data collection for the activity areas that use a particular
FactoryTalk Transaction Manager configuration, you need to start
the FactoryTalk Transaction Manager configuration to begin the
data collection.
To start the data collection:
1. On the Tools menu, click FactoryTalk Transaction
Manager > Manage FactoryTalk Transaction Manager
Configurations.
The FactoryTalk Transaction Manager Configurations
dialog box appears.
It lists the FactoryTalk Transaction Manager configurations
that have been imported, and the applications to which they
apply. In the dialog box, you can evaluate the running status of
FactoryTalk Transaction Manager configurations that are
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collecting data from the control system, as well as start, stop, or
restart the configurations.
2. Select a FactoryTalk Transaction Manager configuration, and
then click Start.
The configuration is started. The green traffic light icon ( )
indicates that the configuration is running and collecting data
from the control system.
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Analyzing FactoryTalk Historian Classic
Data
FactoryTalk Historian Classic provides a graphical environment in
which to analyze manufacturing process data. This chapter will help
report designers understand how to use FactoryTalk Historian
Classic to create and view RSBizWare reports containing time-series
charts; bar, pie, and line charts; and tables. We will discuss the parts
of a report, look at the sample reports that can be installed with the
software, create a report based on the sample data, and discuss the
creation of more complex reports. FactoryTalk Historian Classic
must be set up by the RSBizWare administrator before you can start
to create reports using real data.
Create a New RSBizWare
Report
In RSBizWare, a report is a complete, formatted document that is
made up of one or more report objects that have been placed in an
HTML document along with text, graphics, and hyperlinks. A
report, saved as an .htm file, is created and edited using the
Configuration Console with a FactoryTalk Metrics Author license.
RSBizWare reports can also be edited using Web-authoring tools
such as Microsoft FrontPage.
An RSBizWare report object shows the data from a database table
or view in a meaningful graphic or tabular presentation. The report
object defines how the data is to be shown to the user. It defines
both the visual representation of the data (e.g., pie chart, bar chart,
table) as well as the data sorting and summarization.
The data for the report object comes from an RSBizWare report
data source. A report data source is a connection to a table or view
within the RSBizWare database or an external database.
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The data in the report object may be restricted by a query (a filter),
made up of one or more search criteria, that determine which
records from the report data source will be shown. The use of a filter
is optional.
To create a new, blank report:
1. Open the Configuration Console.
2. On the File menu, click New Report.
A blank report page appears.
Insert Text, Pictures, and
Hyperlinks
To add a title, a picture, and a hyperlink:
1. Click the report area, and type a title for your report, e.g., My
Company Web Page.
Select the title, and then, on the Report Formatting toolbar,
change the title font to Arial, and the font size to 18.
2. On the Formatting Toolbar, click
the center of the page.
to align the text to
3. Click next to the title (its selection is canceled), and then press
Enter.
4. Right-click the report area, and then click Insert Image.
The Picture dialog box appears.
5. Next to the Picture Source box, click Browse to select the
picture that you want to add to the report.
6. In the Alternate Text box, type a description of the image.
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The alternate text appears as a tooltip when you point to the
image.
7. Under Layout and Spacing, set the display properties of the
picture.
8. Click OK.
The logo appears under the title.
9. Click the image, and then on the Insert menu click
Hyperlink.
The Hyperlink dialog box appears.
10. In the URL box, type the address of the page which will open
when you click the image.
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11. Click OK.
TIP
You can also add a hyperlink to a text. To do so, select the text,
and then, on the Reports Insertable Items toolbar, click
. Then, repeat step 10.
12. On the Report Formatting toolbar, click
the report will look like as a web page.
to see, how
When you point to the image, the alternative text will appear.
NOTE
To edit the report, report objects, and filters, you need to have
the Author license and the appropriate object permissions for the
report, report objects, and filters that are used on the report.
13. On the Report Formatting toolbar, click
editing your report.
Save the Report
44
to go back to
RSBizWare reports are saved as HTML documents on the
Information Services Manager computer to which your
Configuration Console is connected. They appear in the Report
Explorer tree.
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To save the report:
1. On the File menu, click Save Report As.
The Save Report As dialog box appears.
2. In the Report Name box, type a name for your report file.
In this example, the name is My
Company Report.
3. Click Save.
The report appears in the Report Explorer tree.
Add a Saved Report Object to The Configuration Console allows you to view report objects that
other users have created and to add them to your report. For this
Your Report
tutorial, we will add a saved report object that was created when the
sample data was loaded.
1. With the report open in the work area, place your cursor in the
report where you want the report object to appear.
2. On the main menu, select Insert > Existing RSBizWare
Report Object. The following message appears.
Each report object on a report can connect to a different
Information Services Manager in your organization.
Therefore, before you continue, you must identify the server to
which this report object will connect.
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Click Yes to accept the default user name and server.
Click No to connect to a different server and display the login
dialog box where you provide the credentials and the server
that you want to use to author the report object.
For this tutorial, click Yes to accept the default user name and
server. The RSBizWare Report Object Properties dialog box
appears.
3. Use this dialog box to select the report object that you want to
insert in your report.
Item
Description
Report Data Source
The list of report data sources from which the data will be
shown in the report object and to which you have been
granted permissions.
The list of available report objects, grouped by the report
data source from which they get their data. When you
select a report data source, the list of report objects is
refreshed to show only the report objects that are based on
the selected report data source
Report Object
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Item
Description
Filter
Manage Report
Objects
Select Which
Toolbars to Show
options
The list of available filtering criteria.
The button for displaying the Configure Report Data
Sources, Report Objects and Filters dialog box.
Select the check box near the toolbar name which you want
to display on the report. The check boxes allow you to add
toolbars to the report object. The end users of your report
will use these toolbars to adjust the report object to suit
their needs.
The following toolbars can be selected:
• General
• Time Selection
• Status Bar
• Report Data Source
• Report Object
• Filter
4. From the Report Data Source list, select FactoryTalk
Metrics Workcell History. This is the data that will be shown
in the report object.
5. From the Report Object list, select Workcell History.
6. For this example, we will not select a filter, so leave the filter
list blank.
NOTE
Filters are grouped by the report data source for which they have
been created.
7. Select the Status Bar check box. This will cause a status bar to
display at the bottom of the report object. Because each report
object on a report can connect to a different server, the status
bar will indicate the user and server to which the report object
is connected at run time.
8. Click OK to add the report object to the report. The report
object is shown as a simple box outline.
9. Double-click inside the box outline to see the table, and click
Refresh. To populate the report object with data, click the
Refresh button. Your report object should look similar to the
following:
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Configure the Report Object At run time, the RSBizWare report objects on your report will
attempt to connect to an Information Services Manager to access the
To Use Global Credentials
production data necessary to draw the chart, bar graph, etc. The
connectivity settings for each report object specify how they will
connect to the Information Services Manager. When the report user
attempts to view an RSBizWare report that contains multiple report
objects with different connectivity settings, the report users may be
required to log on multiple times before they can see the report.
To avoid repetitive logons on a report, you can set your report
objects to use Global Credentials. Global Credentials use a session
logon to connect to a report object. With a session logon, the user is
prompted for user name and password once for each server that is
encountered. After the user’s credentials (user, password) have been
specified for a server, those credentials are available to any
subsequent report object that is running on that client computer, is
using the Use Global Credentials option, and is attempting to
connect to the same server. The session logon that is established will
remain active until the user specifically logs off, the credentials
expire, or the client computer is rebooted.
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To enable a report object to make use of a session logon, the report
object must be configured to use Global Credentials.
To configure a report object to use Global Credentials:
1. Click the FactoryTalk Metrics Workcell History report object,
and on the main menu, select View > Properties. The Report
Object Properties dialog box appears.
2. Click the Runtime Settings tab.
The Runtime Settings tab enables you to specify how the user
will connect to the server that you selected when you inserted
the report object. When you are configuring the server
connection settings for a report object, you have the following
options:
• Use Global Credentials
This is the default option. Select this option if you want to
use a session logon to connect to this report object.
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• Require user to login
Select this option if you want to require the users to provide
their user name and password to access this report object.
More than one report object on a report with this option
selected will require the user to log on multiple times.
NOTE
Remember that any users who will be viewing the report
must have access to the report data source, report object,
and filter or they will not be able to see the report object.
• Use RSBizWare Server Connection
Select this option if you want to specify the RSBizWare
Server Connection that this report object will use when the
user views the report at run time. You will only be able to
select from Server Connection objects that are configured
to use the same RSBizWare server that you selected when
you added this report object to the report.
NOTE
This option is provided for backwards compatibility only.
It is recommended that you use Global Credentials in
place of RSBizWare Server Connection objects.
• Use the following User and Password
Select this option if you want to specify at design time the
user name and password that the report object will use
when the user attempts to view the report object at run
time. The advantage of choosing this option is that the user
will not have to login to view the data.
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NOTES
By selecting this option, you are granting the specified
user’s application privileges to the runtime user for this
report object. Because the Save Report Object Contents
to File, Add Time-Series Comment, and Edit/Delete
Time-Series Comment application privileges allow action
on report objects, it is important to consider whether the
specified user has these privileges and whether you want
the runtime user to have these privileges.
If you use this option across many report objects and the
security policy for the user is very strict (that is, the
password must be changed frequently), you will need to
change the password setting separately for each report
object. Consider using a less strict security policy (such as
never requiring the password to be changed) for this
user. For more information on security policy, consult the
RSAssetSecurity documentation.
For this tutorial, make sure the Use Global Credentials
option is selected.
3. Click OK to close the dialog box and save your changes.
You will be adding more report objects to this report. If you want
the rest of the report objects on this report to use Global
Credentials, you will need to specify this option for each report
object when you insert the report object.
Create a New Chart
An important feature of the Configuration Console is the ability to
create bar, pie, and line charts from data stored in a report data
source. The purpose of this tutorial is to walk you through the steps
that are necessary to create a chart with the New Chart Wizard. For
this tutorial, you will use the Historian Data Point View report data
source to create a chart showing the average running time per hour
for work cells. This tutorial will also demonstrate how to create a
prompt-at-runtime filter so that the end-user of the report can
choose the work cells that will be charted. Your chart will look
similar to the one shown below.
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Step 1: Plan the Chart
The following table shows a representation of the data we will be
charting.
We will be creating a chart with a bar for each data point; therefore,
the Description field is the series. Notice that one column in our
table (Description) contains all of the data point descriptions, and
the data for the data points is organized in rows. Each row contains
the data value (Value) and the time stamp (TimeStamp) for each
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data point. This will be important to remember when we are using
the New Chart Wizard.
Place your cursor where you want the chart to appear in the report
and select Insert >Chart to display the authoring user name and
server prompt. Click Yes to accept the default user name and server.
The New Chart Wizard will display. This wizard will lead you
through the process of creating a new chart for your RSBizWare
report.
Step 2: Select the Data On
Which To Report
The first step in the New Chart Wizard is to select the report data
source containing the data that we want to chart. The Report Data
Source list contains the report data sources for which you have the
appropriate permissions. Select Historian Data Point View from
the list and click Next to continue.
Step 3: Choose a Chart Type
Next, we you need to specify the type of chart that you want to
create. The vertical bar chart is the default. Click Next to accept the
default and continue.
Step 4: Describe the Data
In the data configuration step, you need to describe the data to the
Chart Wizard. Recall that the data table data is organized in rows for
each work cell (series). This corresponds to the example table shown
in the Chart Wizard for the Rows option.
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If the data points ID or descriptions If the series values (work cell
descriptions) were in the column headers of the table and the
Running Seconds values for each work cell were listed in the column
for that work cell, this would be an example of a table where the
series is in columns. For this type of table, you would select the
Columns option.
However, since you have determined that the data is in rows, make
sure the Rows option is selected and click Next to continue.
Step 5: Select Summary or
Detail
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In this step, you must decide whether you want to chart all of the
values from the table or if you want to apply aggregate functions to
the values. Since you want to summarize a field in the chart (find the
average running time for each hour of the day), accept the default
Summary option and click Next to continue.
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Step 6: Select the Fields To Be In the Chart Fields step, we select the fields from the report data
source that will be shown in the chart. This dialog box would look
Charted
different if we had selected the Columns option in the Data
Configuration step of the wizard.
1. Since we want to have a bar for each workcell and we want the
names of the workcells to appear in the legend, select
Description from the LEGEND list.
2. Select the Value field from the VALUE list. This is the field
that will provide the values for the height of the bars.
3. When you selected the Value field from the VALUE list,
COUNT(Running Seconds) was added to the list at the
bottom of the dialog box. To change the function that is
applied to the field, select the COUNT(Value) field in the
list, click Function, and select AVG from the shortcut menu.
This action changes the function from COUNT(Running
Seconds) to AVG(Running Seconds). The AVG(Running
Seconds) function will return the average running time value
for each workcell.
4. Now we will add Hour labels to the X-axis. This will allow us
to group the average running time values for the workcells by
hour. Select TimeStamp from the X-Axis list.
5. When TimeStamp is added to the list at the bottom of the
dialog, it has no formatting applied to it. Since we only want to
see the hour portion of the timestamp in our chart, we must
apply the HOUR format to the timestamp. To change the
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format to HOUR, select TimeStamp from the list, click
Format, and select HOUR from the shortcut menu.
6. Click Next to continue.
Step 7: Enter the Chart Title
The Report Object Name dialog box appears. You must provide a
unique name for the report object. The name you enter here will
appear at the top of your new chart and will also be the name for this
chart when it is saved as a report object for future use.
1. For this tutorial, enter Historian Data Point
AVG(Value) in the Report Object Name box.
View
2. Click Next to continue.
Step 8: Filter the Data
The Filter dialog box appears. Now you will create a filter that will
specify which records will be charted. Since you only want to chart
the values for certain work cells, you will need to filter out the work
cells that you do not want to chart.
There are two types of filters that you can create:
• The static filter, where you provide all of the filter values when
you create the filter.
• The “prompt-at-runtime” filter which allows the user to select
the filter values every time the filter is used.
For this tutorial, you are going to create a prompt-at-runtime filter
that allows the users to select the work cells that they want to report
on when the report is run.
NOTE
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Prompt-at-runtime filters cannot be used with report objects that will
be scheduled.
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To create a new filter:
1. Click New Filter. The Configure Filter dialog box appears.
2. Enter the name Data
box.
Point Filter in the Edit Filter Name
3. A filter is made up of one or more search criteria. For this
filter, you will create a single criterion. Click Add Criterion.
The Search Criterion dialog box appears.
4. Select the Description field from the Field tree and select the
= operator from the Operator list.
5. Select the Select from a list of existing values for this field
check box. This creates a list of unique values from which the
user can pick report values.
6. Select the By prompting user when filter is run check box.
This makes this a prompt-at-runtime filter.
7. Select the Allow multiple selection from list check box. This
allows the user to select more than one work cell from the list
of values that is created.
8. Select the Required (Must be supplied when filter is run)
check box. Doing this will require the user to specify a filter
value when the report object is run.
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9. Click OK to return to the Configure Filter dialog box. After
you have completed these steps, the Configure Filter dialog
box should look like the example below.
10. Click OK to return to the New Chart Wizard.
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Step 9: Insert Your New Chart Now that you have selected the report data source, created the chart
report object, and created a prompt-at-runtime filter, you are ready
Into the Report
to insert the chart into the report.
To insert the chart into the report:
1. Click Finish to add the chart to the report. The chart is shown
as a simple box outline.
2. To ensure that the filter is properly associated with the report
object, right-click the report object and select Properties.
3. In the Report Object Properties dialog box, select the
Runtime Settings tab and select the Data Point Filter from
the Default Filter list.
4. Click OK to return to the report object.
5. Double-click inside the box outline to see the chart,.
on the Time Selection
Click the All Time Range button
toolbar, set the time range to 4/19/2005 9:00 AM to
4/19/2005 12:00 PM, and click Refresh. When you refresh a
report object that contains a required prompt-at-runtime filter,
the Runtime Report Criteria dialog box will appear. This is
the prompt that was created by the prompt-at-runtime filter.
This dialog box allows the users of your report object to specify
the values that will be displayed in the report object.
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If you did not select the Required check box in Step 8, the
preceding prompt would not appear.
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6. For this tutorial, hold down the Ctrl key on your keyboard
and select all of the Injection Molding data points from the
list.
7. Click OK to display the chart with the data points that you
selected.
Refer to "Customizing RSBizWare Charts and Tables (page 87)" for
information on how to further customize your chart by changing the
title or bar/line colors.
Create a New Text Report
Object
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The Configuration Console gives you the ability to create a text
report object (or table) on your report that displays the data from a
report data source. The purpose of this tutorial is to walk through
the steps that are necessary to create a table in your report. For this
tutorial, you will use the Historian Data Point View report data
source to create a table showing the average value for data points.
Your table will look similar to the one shown below.
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Step 1: Start the Text Report To start the Text Report Object Wizard:
Object Wizard
1. In the Configuration Console, place your cursor where you
want the table to appear in the report.
2. On the Insert menu, click Text Report.
3. Click Yes to accept the default user name and server name.
The Report Wizard appears.
4. Click Next.
Step 2: Select the Data On
Which To Report
To select the data that you want to include in the table:
1. The Report Data Source list box contains the report data
sources for which you have the appropriate permissions. Select
Historian Data Point View from the list.
2. The Report Data Source Fields list contains the fields that are
available for use in your table. Select the Description,
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TimeStamp, and Value fields and then click
selected fields to the Fields in report list.
to add the
Each field that you add to the list will be a column in your text
report object.
3. Click Next.
Step 3: Group the Records
The Grouping Levels dialog box allows you to specify how your
table will be grouped.
1. The fields that we added to the table are listed in the box on
the left side of the dialog box. We can group by any of these
fields. For this tutorial, let’s group the records by TimeStamp
and data point. Select the TimeStamp and Description fields
and click the right arrow button (>) to add fields to the
Grouped fields list on the right side of the dialog box.
2. We want to force the report to group the records by Part first,
so let’s make sure the TimeStamp field is at the top of the
Grouped fields list. If it is not, select TimeStamp and click
the up arrow Priority button (^) until TimeStamp is at the
top of the list.
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3. Since we want to group the records by the hour portion of the
timestamp, select TimeStamp in the box on the right and
click the Grouping Interval button. The Format Field dialog
box is displayed. Select the HOUR format and click OK to
return to the Report Wizard.
4. Click Next to continue.
Step 4: Sort the Records
The Sort Order dialog box allows you to specify the order in which
the columns will be sorted and to calculate totals for columns. Since
we chose to group by TimeStamp and Description, those columns
automatically have a sort order applied to them.
1. To calculate the average downtime value, select the AVG
check box in the Downtime Seconds row.
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NOTE
The weighted average (WAVG) function is an average that takes
into account the proportional relevance of each component
(typically over time), rather than treating each component
equally. Weighted average can be used in any table of
information where the values of a particular column should be
given more or less importance based upon the values of another
column. The weighted average function is ideal for calculating a
time-weighted average OEE value for multiple activity areas. See
the Weighted Average topic in online help for additional
information.
2. For this table, you are not interested in showing the individual
detail records that make up the average downtime; you want to
see only the average downtime per work cell values. Select the
Summary Only option at the bottom of the dialog box.
3. Click Next to continue.
Step 5: Format the Table
The Format Style dialog box allows you to control the appearance of
the table.
1. The Report Style section of the dialog box lets you choose the
color scheme that will be applied to the table or to create a
custom style. For this tutorial, select the Access Northwind
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Invoice style from the Report Style list. A sample of the style
is displayed in the preview window to the right of the list.
2. The Styles by Field section of the dialog box allows you to set
display formats for the individual fields. For this example,
specify the time formatting that is applied to the
AVG(Downtime Seconds) field. Select the field from the list
box and click Customize Selected Field. The Customize
Report Styles dialog box appears.
3. Click the Number tab.
4. Click the Apply the following formatting option and ensure
that No. of digits after decimal is set to 2.
5. Click OK to accept the values and return to the Report
Wizard.
6. Click Next to continue.
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Step 6: Name the Report
Object
On the Report Object Name page, you need to provide a unique
name for the report object.
1. For this tutorial, enter Historian Data Point View Table.
2. Click Next.
Step 7: Filter the Data
On the Filter page, you can use the same filter that you created for
the chart, or you can create a new one. For this tutorial, use the one
created before.
To filter the data:
1. Click Data Point Filter from the Filter list.
2. Click Next.
Step 8: Insert Your New Table You have already selected the report data source, created the table
report object, and selected a filter. The Finish page appears.
Into the Report
To insert your new table into the report:
1. Click Finish to insert the report object.
2. To ensure that the filter is properly associated with the report
object, right-click the report object and then select Properties
from the shortcut menu.
3. On the Report Object Properties dialog box, select the
Runtime Settings tab and select the Workcell Description
Filter from the Default Filter list.
4. Click OK to return to the report object.
The table is displayed as a simple box in the report.
5. Double-click the box outline to view the table. As you did with
the chart, click the Time Range button on the Time Selection
toolbar and set the time range to 4/19/2005 9:00 AM to
4/19/2005 12:00 PM. Click Refresh to run the report object
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Refer to "Customizing RSBizWare Charts and Tables (page 87)" for
information on how to further customize your chart by changing the
title or bar/line colors.
Create a Time-series Chart
One of the primary features of FactoryTalk Historian Classic is the
ability to analyze time-series data. Any data value that is collected
over time is time-series data. A temperature or pressure value that is
collected over time is an example of time-series data. This tutorial
will help you understand how to use FactoryTalk Historian Classic
to analyze time-series process data.
Step 1: Create the Report
Object
To create a time-series chart on your report, place the cursor in the
report where you want the chart to appear and select Insert >
Time-Series Trend Chart from the main menu. When the
authoring user name and server prompt is displayed, click Yes to
accept the defaults. The Configure Time-Series Report Object
dialog box is the starting point for creating our time-series chart.
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Step 2: Name the Report
Object
We must provide a unique name for our time-series chart. For this
tutorial, type Time-series Chart in the Report Object Name box
and select the Include report object name as title on chart check
box. This will cause the name to be shown at the top of the
time-series chart. If you clear this check box, the chart title will
default to “Time-Series Analysis.”
Step 3: Add Reporting Tags
Now, we must select the reporting tags that will be trended on our
time-series chart. A reporting tag is a field within a database table or
view that provides the values that will be charted on our time-series
chart.
The Reporting Tags Available list on the left side of the dialog box
contains the tags that can be added to the chart. The Reporting
Tags Selected list on the right side represents the tags that will be
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shown on the time-series chart. The tabs at the top of the Selected
list represent the Y-axes that are shown in our chart. For example, if
our chart contains two Y-axes, there will be two tabs at the top of the
Reporting Tags Selected list. Since we have just created this
time-series there is only one tab.
For this tutorial, let’s chart the FactoryTalk Historian Classic Demo
– Flow Rate reporting tag.
1. Expand the Reporting Tags by Report Data Source item in
the Reporting Tags Available list and find and expand the
Historian Data Point Default item. Finally, select the
FactoryTalk Historian Classic Demo – Flow Rate item.
2. Click the > button to add the selected reporting tag to the
Reporting Tags Selected list.
Step 4: Apply an Analysis Tool When creating a time-series chart, you may want to find the average
value of a reporting tag or apply some other analysis tool to the tag.
The Analysis Tools column in the Reporting Tags Selected list
shows the analysis tools that have been added to the reporting tags in
the chart.
1. To apply an analysis tool to a reporting tag in the time-series
chart, we will need to add the reporting tag to the list a second
time. Select the reporting tag from the Available list and click
the > button to add the tag to the Selected list again.
2. Now click the <None> text in the Analysis Tools column for
the second instance of the reporting tag. A list containing the
available analysis tools will display. Open the Statistics folder
and select the mean analysis tool from the list.
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TIP
Step 5: Customize the Chart
Legend
If you want to use the Configuration Console to chart a
calculation that is unique to your process, see "Customizing
RSBizWare Charts and Tables (page 87)".
1. Click the Legend tab. This tab enables you to specify the type
of legend that will be shown on the time-series chart. For this
tutorial, accept the default Authoring Legend option.
The Classic Legend is the traditional legend with a color
sample and display name for each reporting tag or analysis tool
that is shown on the chart. If you use the classic legend, report
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users will not be able to change pen colors, line thicknesses, or
other chart styles.
The Authoring Legend is a table that contains the properties
of the chart that you specify here. Users of your report will be
able to customize their view of the chart by changing the values
associated with these properties. This legend provides the
maximum amount of flexibility for your report users.
2. The Fields in this Legend list contains the names of the chart
properties that will be shown on your Authoring Legend. For
this tutorial, accept the defaults.
Step 6: Insert Your New Chart Click OK to add the time-series report object to the report. The
time-series chart will display in the report, but you will not see any
Into the Report
data in the chart. This is because the default time range for a
time-series chart is “the past 2 hours,” but the sample data was
collected between June 30, 1999 11:01 AM and June 30, 1999 1:31
PM. In the next section of the tutorial, we will learn to control the
time range for the data that will display in the chart.
Step 7: Adjust the Time
Range
When you create a new chart or table that is based on a time
selection-enabled report data source, the Time Selection toolbar
shown below will automatically appear at the top of the time-based
report object. The Time Selection toolbar acts like a filter on the
timestamp field that was designated for time selection when the
report data source was created.
The default time selection filter is the past 2 hours. Use the Time
Selection toolbar to define time ranges, start and end date/times, or
time increments for your time-based report objects. The Time
Selection toolbar provides the following buttons:
• The Refresh button
re-executes the report object based
upon the selections made in the Time Selection toolbar. When
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you make a change to the settings on the Time Selection
toolbar, you must click Refresh to view the change.
is used to show all data that has
• The All Times button
ever been collected, without specifying the start and end times.
This is especially useful if you do not know the start and end
date for which data has been collected.
• The Time Range button
enables you to specify the start
and end times to which the data will be restricted. Use this
button if you want to report only on data between a specific
beginning and ending time.
• The Time Span button
restricts time to the past by a
unit of time. This button is useful if you want to show all data
from the past 24 hours, the past 7 days, or the past year. When
you use this button with an auto-refresh chart and data that is
currently being collected, the chart will continue to refresh
with the current date/time as the end time.
• The Past Time from End Time button
uses a unit of
time before the specified end time. For example, this button is
useful if you want to show all data from the week before
August 2, 2005.
• The Future Time from Start Time button
uses a unit
of time after the specified start time. For example, this button
is useful if you want to show all data from the week after
August 2, 2005.
To change a date or time on the Time Selection toolbar, use the
drop-down arrow to the right of the field or type a value directly in
the field.
For our tutorial example, click All Times and then click Refresh. Your
table should look similar to the following:
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When you save your report, the settings that you specified on the
Time Selection toolbar during report authoring will be saved with
the chart. These become the defaults for runtime users and they are
also used when you schedule the report object to be run at a later
date. Scheduling report objects and reports is discussed in Advanced
Reporting Topics (page 97).
NOTE
Step 3: Add Reporting Tags
Although the Time Selection toolbar settings are used when you
schedule the report object, the scheduled output does not show the
Time Selection toolbar. To show the start and end times that are being
used in scheduled report objects, add start- and end-time dynamic text
fields to your report object. Refer to the Add Dynamic Text Fields To a
Report Object topic in the online help for the instructions to perform this
task.
Now, let’s suppose we want to show the Flow Rate reporting tag and
the SUM(Flow Rate) analysis tool on a single chart. These two
reporting tags have very different value ranges; therefore, if we chart
the two reporting tags on the same Y-axis, the scaling of the graph
for SUM(Flow Rate) may distort the graph line for Flow Rate.
To isolate reporting tags or analysis tools with varying value ranges,
we can display one reporting tag on the original Y-axis, create a
second Y-axis on the same chart, and display the analysis tool on the
second Y-axis.
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1. Click the chart in the report work area and select View >
Properties from the main menu. The Configure Time-Series
Report Object dialog box will appear again.
2. First, let’s remove the analysis tool that we added before. We
will not need it for this example. Select the FactoryTalk
Historian Classic Demo – Flow Rate reporting tag that has the
mean analysis tool added to it and click the < button to
remove it from the Reporting Tags Selected list. You should
still have a single instance of the FactoryTalk Historian Classic
Demo – Flow Rate reporting tag in the Reporting Tags
Selected list.
3. Click the Axis tab to display the Time-series Axis dialog box.
This dialog box allows you to control the X- and Y-axis for the
time-series chart.
4. At the bottom of the dialog box, click the Add Axis button to
create a second Y-axis for the chart. The second Y-axis (Y2)
will appear as a second row in the Y-axis table at the bottom of
this dialog box.
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5. Click the General tab. You will notice that there are now two
tabs at the top of the Reporting Tags Selected list. The Y2
tab represents the second Y-axis on the chart. Click the Y2 tab.
6. In the Reporting Tags Available list on the left, locate the
FactoryTalk Historian Classic Demo– Flow Rate reporting
tag and click the > button to add the reporting tag to the Y2
tab. Now add the SUM analysis tool. You will find the tool in
the Cumulative Statistics folder of the analysis tools list.
7. Click OK to close the dialog box and display your chart.
Double-click the report object, click the All Times button,
and click the Refresh button. Change the line color for the Y2
axis to Green. Your chart should look similar to the image
below.
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You will notice that the Y1 axis is shown to the left of the
chart and the Y2 axis is shown to the right of the chart and
that the value ranges for the two lines are very different. If you
had placed the SUM tool on the same Y-axis with the Flow
Rate, the large range of values for the SUM tool would have
distorted the FactoryTalk Historian Classic Demo – Flow
Rate line, making it appear deceptively flat, as shown below.
Step 9: Remove a Reporting
Tag or an Analysis Tool
To remove a reporting tag or an analysis tool from your time-series
chart without opening the Configure Time-Series Report Object
dialog box, right-click the reporting tag (or analysis tool) in the
Authoring legend and select Remove Reporting Tag from the
shortcut menu that is displayed. The reporting tag or analysis tool is
removed from the chart and the chart is refreshed.
Create a Simple Batch/Event Let’s suppose that we are collecting the water temperature from a
process. The process allows the user to enter a Batch ID, specify the
Chart
kettle (or unit) in which to brew the coffee, and select a coffee
recipe. These batch parameters are collected from the control system
with FactoryTalk Transaction Manager transactions and are stored
in the BatchSummary table in the RSBizWare database.
We would like to be able to report on the water temperature from
the process by simply selecting one of these batch parameters, such as
the Batch ID that uniquely identifies the batch, rather than needing
to specify the start time and end time. Additionally, we would like to
be able to specify more than one batch to be displayed on the
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time-series chart in order to see how the batch performed as
compared to other similar batches or perhaps compared to an ideal
batch.
NOTE
This example is for simple batch reporting only. For more information on
setting up the batch parameter data collection, refer to the Rockwell
Automation knowledgebase article titled “Simple Batch Reporting using
RSBizWare Historian 5.0.” For a fully-integrated S88-compliant batch
reporting system, FactoryTalk Batch and FactoryTalk Historian for Batch
are recommended.
1. To create a time-series chart on your report, place the cursor in
the report where you want the time-series chart to appear and
select Insert > Time-Series Trend Chart. The authoring user
name and server prompt is displayed. Click Yes to accept the
default user name and server.
2. The Configure Time-Series Report Object dialog box will
display. On the General tab, name the report object Batch
Analysis and select the Include report object name as title
on the chart check box.
3. Add the Water Temperature reporting tag to the time-series
chart by expanding the Reporting Tags by Report Data
Source item, expanding the Historian Data Point Default
item, selecting the Water Temperature tag, and clicking the >
button.
4. You can configure the time-series chart to prompt
automatically for the batch parameters by selecting the
Prompt for Batch at runtime check box at the bottom of the
dialog box. The user will be prompted automatically each time
this report object is displayed.
5. Now, let's change the Authoring Legend so that it lists the
batch parameters for the batches displayed in the chart. Click
the Legend tab. Make sure the Authoring Legend option is
selected. Select User Field 1, User Field 2, and User Field 3
in the Authoring Legends Field list and click the Add > button
to add the fields to the Fields
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6. in this Legend list. Select the three User Fields in the Fields in
this Legend list and use the arrow buttons to move these fields
up so that they immediately follow the Reporting Tag and
Units fields.
7. To display the relative time of each batch, repeat the same
procedure to add the Relative Time Start and Relative Time
End fields to the Authoring Legend. Use the arrow buttons to
position these fields after User Field 3.
8. Click OK to close the dialog box and display your chart.
9. Double-click the report object and make sure the Time
Selection toolbar is showing a date range that contains data for
the selected reporting tag. This step is important. If your chart
is not showing data, the Batch Prompt dialog box that will be
displayed in the next step will not show any batch prompt
fields. In this example, we can click the All Times button on
the Time Selection toolbar and then click the Refresh button
to display the line that represents the coffee temperature data.
10. This dialog box allows you to select one or more batches for
which you want to compare data without the need to specify
the start time and end time for each batch.
In the first row of the Batch Prompt grid, select the Water
Temperature reporting tag from the list of reporting tags that
have been added to the chart. Using the subsequent fields,
select the batch parameters to identify the batch you would
like to display. For this tutorial, select XYZ100 from the
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Batch ID field. If the selected value for a batch parameter field
is enough to identify the batch uniquely—as is the case with
the Batch ID field for the XYZ100 batch—the fields that
follow will be filled in for you.
TIP
The first batch selected will drive the time axis (X-axis) on the
time-series chart. So for example, if you wish to compare an
actual batch XYZ100 with the IdealBatch, you should select batch
XYZ100 first so that the X-axis reflects the time range when the
actual batch was run.
11. In the second row of the Batch Prompt, again select the Water
Temperature reporting tag from the list of reporting tags and
select the batch parameters for the second batch you wish to
compare, in this case, XYZ101.
12. Click OK to return to the chart in your report.
The batch parameters as well as the start and end times for
both batches are displayed in the Authoring Legend. Notice
that the time axis is controlled by the first batch selected. You
will notice that the values along the X-axis are actual clock
times. If you want to see the times that the data values were
collected relative to the start of the batch (for example, where
the data value at 00:00:04 on the X-axis represents data that
was collected 4 seconds after the start of the batch), select the
Elapsed Time option on the Axis tab of the Configure Time
Series Report Object dialog box.
Add a Comment to a Value,
X-axis, or Y-axis on a
Time-series Chart
1. Time-Series Reporting Tag Annotation allows you to select a
value in a time-series chart in the Configuration Console or
the Quick Web and associate a comment with that value.
There are three different types of Time-Series Reporting Tag
Annotations: value comment, X-axis comment, and Y-axis
comment.
2. For example, suppose you noticed a spike in the data on the
time-series chart that was caused by an operator who
accidentally kicked out the power cord on the machine from
which the data was being collected. When report users see this
chart, they will want to know what caused the spike. Tag
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annotation will enable you to supply information about this
spike to other report users.
NOTE
Value Comments
You must have the Add Time-Series Comment application-level
privilege to perform tag annotation. An Author license is not
required.
A value comment is a comment that is associated with a specific
value within a reporting tag. The value comment provides an
explanation of why the value of a process parameter has deviated
from the norm. For example, a value comment will enable us to
document the spike in our time-series data caused by the power
interruption.
Right-click a point on the Batch Analysis chart from the preceding
section and select Add Comment > Value from the shortcut menu
to display the Value Comments dialog box. It will enable you to
enter a comment for a single value in the time-series chart.
1. The Reporting Tag list will default to the reporting tag nearest
to where you right-clicked in the time-series report object.
Select the reporting tag to which you want the comment to be
applied.
2. The Value field will default to the value nearest to where you
right-clicked in the time-series chart. Select the exact value to
which you want the comment to be applied.
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3. Enter the text of your comment, which is restricted to 255
characters.
4. Click OK to save your comment and close the dialog. The
comment is saved in the reporting tag along with the
date/time when the comment was added and the ID of the
user who entered the comment.
On future displays of this reporting tag, a numbered yellow marker
will indicate the annotated value. When the report user hovers the
mouse pointer over the annotated value, a tool tip will display the
text of the comment. The value comment will show up in every
report object that displays the selected reporting tag value.
X-axis Comments
An X-axis comment is a comment associated with a specific
date/time on the chart and is not associated with a reporting tag.
The X-axis comment provides a date/time limit on the time-series
chart. For example, when tracking the flow rate, an X-axis comment
allows you to indicate the start of the batch.
1. Right-click the start time of the batch in the chart and select
Add Comment > X-Axis from shortcut menu to display the
X-Axis Comments dialog box. This dialog box will allow you
to enter an X-axis comment for the time-series chart.
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2. The Timestamp field will default to a date and time nearest to
where you right-clicked in the time-series chart. Select the
exact date and time to which you want the X-axis comment to
be applied.
3. Use the lists in the Line Properties area to specify the color,
style, and thickness of the line that will be used to indicate
your start of batch.
4. Enter the text of your comment, which is restricted to 255
characters.
5. Click OK to save your comment and close the dialog box. The
comment is saved in the report object along with the
date/time when the comment was added and the ID of the
user who entered the comment.
On future displays of this time-series chart, a vertical line and
numbered yellow marker will indicate the annotated value. When
the report user hovers the mouse pointer over the annotated value, a
tool tip will display the text of the comment. The X-axis comment
will be displayed only on the report object where it was created
Y-axis Comments
A Y-axis comment is a comment that is associated with a specific
value on the chart and is not associated with a reporting tag. The
Y-axis comment provides a value limit on the report object. For
example, when tracking the temperature during a batch process, a
Y-axis comment allows you to indicate the maximum acceptable
temperature for the batch process.
1. Right-click the maximum temperature in the chart and select
Add Comment >Y-Axis from shortcut menu to display the
Y-Axis Comments dialog box. This dialog box will allow you
to enter a Y-axis comment for the time-series chart.
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2. The Value field will default to the value nearest to where you
right-clicked in the time-series chart. Select the exact value to
which you want the Y-axis comment to be applied.
3. Because time-series charts can have multiple Y-axes, you will be
able to associate this comment with a specific Y-axis. Select the
Y-axis with which you want to associate your comment.
4. Use the lists in the Line Properties area to specify the color,
style, and thickness of the line that will be used to indicate
your start of batch.
5. Enter the text of your comment, which is restricted to 255
characters.
6. Click OK to save your comment and close the dialog box. The
comment is saved in the report object along with the
date/time when the comment was added and the ID of the
user who entered the comment.
On future displays of this time-series chart, a horizontal line and
numbered yellow marker will indicate the annotated value. When
the report user hovers the mouse pointer over the annotated value, a
tool tip will display the text of the comment. The Y-Axis Comment
will be displayed only on the report object where it was created.
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Ad Comment As
While the ability to add comments is restricted by an
application-level privilege, the Add Comment As menu item will be
enabled for all users. The Add Comment As feature allows a second
user to add comments without ending the first user’s Configuration
Console or Quick Web session.
For example, if you are viewing a time-series chart in the
Configuration Console or the Quick Web and you recognize a data
value to which a comment needs to be attached but you have not
been assigned the Add Time-Series Comment privilege, you can ask
a supervisor or another user who has the privilege to add the
required comment.
The second user will simply right-click the value in the chart and
select Add Comment As > Value Comment from the shortcut
menu. The Comment Login dialog box is displayed, prompting the
user to enter his user name and password to create a temporary
connection to the server. After he has obtained a temporary
connection to the server, he can enter the required comment. When
he presses OK to close the comment dialog box and save his changes,
his user ID is stored with the comment text and his temporary
connection to the server is terminated.
Export the Report to HTML
When you save your RSBizWare report to the Report Explorer, the
report is saved on the Information Services Manager to which you
are connected. If you want to open and edit your report in an
HTML editor or make the page part of a website, you need to export
the report to an .htm file.
To export the report to HTML:
1. On the File menu, click Export To File.
The Save As dialog box appears.
2. Navigate to the location, in which you want to save the report.
3. In the File name box, type a name for the report file.
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In this example, the name is My
Company Report.
The name of the file and its location is displayed on the title
bar of the Configuration Console.
You now have two copies of the report: one saved as an .htm
file, and the other stored in the Information Services Manager.
The .htm file contains text and some RSBizWare ActiveX
controls. You can edit it in an HTML editor.
Load the Report From File
Once you modify your report in an HTML editor, you can import it
to the Configuration Console.
To load the report from an HTML file:
1. On the File menu, click Load from File.
The Open dialog box appears.
2. Find you report file, and then click Open.
The report is displayed in the Configuration Console.
3. Save the file as an RSBizWare report (page 44).
4. The report is now available on the Information Services
Manager computer.
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Chapter 5
Customizing RSBizWare Charts and
Tables
This chapter will help you understand how to customize charts and
tables that have been added to RSBizWare reports. For this example
it is assumed that you have:
• An RSBizWare report containing chart and table report
objects open in the Configuration Console.
A FactoryTalk Historian Classic Author license. Furthermore, it is
assumed that you have Edit Report and Edit Report Object
permissions for the report and the report objects with which you are
working. The examples in this chapter use two of the report objects
that we created in "Analyzing FactoryTalk Historian Classic Data
(page 41)".
Customizing Charts
You can customize the appearance of the chart in your RSBizWare
report by changing the styles used in the chart, the size of the legend,
the font that is used in the title, the color of the background, and
much more.
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NOTE
Working With the
Component Parts of a Chart
When you make modifications to a report object, all instances of the
report object (such as those on other RSBizWare reports) will reflect the
changes you have made.
Charts typically consist of three components: a title at the top, a
chart in the middle, and a legend at the bottom. The default layout is
fine for most charts, however, you can also change the layout of your
chart if needed. Perhaps the legend would fit better in another place
on the chart, or the legend should be resized because it is too small to
show all of the legend keys.
A chart component must be in edit mode in order to be modified.
To set a chart component in edit mode:
1. Make sure your RSBizWare report is in design mode.
2. Click the chart.
The edit mode on the chart is enabled, and the component will
have eight resizing handles and a highlighted border,
indicating that it is ready to be modified.
3. Click the individual chart components and put them in edit
mode.
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When you finish working with the chart component, click
outside the chart to remove the resizing handles and
highlighted border.
Resizing a Component
To resize a component:
1. Make sure that the sizing handles and highlighted border are
visible around the component.
2. Point to one of the sizing handles, and when the cursor
changes to
, drag the handle until the component is the
desired size.
Moving a Component
To move a component:
1. Make sure that the sizing handles and highlighted border are
visible around the component.
2. Point to the highlighted border, and when the cursor changes
, drag the component to the new location.
to
Deleting a Component
To delete a component:
1. Make sure that the sizing handles and highlighted border are
visible around the component.
2. Right-click the component, and then click Delete or press the
Delete key on your keyboard.
Editing the Chart Title or Text To edit a chart title or a text field:
Field
1. Make sure that the sizing handles and highlighted border are
visible around the component.
2. Right-click the chart title or text field, and then click Edit
Text.
The Set Text dialog box appears.
3. Modify the text and then click OK to save your changes.
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Changing Chart Component
Properties
Examples of standard properties that you can change for chart
components are border style and font style. In addition to the
standard properties, each chart component type has some specific
properties that relate only to its type. For example, the chart legend
has properties that specify how the keys will be displayed within the
legend.
To access the property page for a chart component:
1. Make sure that the sizing handles and highlighted border are
visible around the component.
2. Right-click the chart component and then click Chart Object
Properties.
Working With Chart “Pens”
When you create a chart, the bars, pie slices, or lines of the chart are
drawn with a default style. To make the chart easier to read or more
appealing to users, you can change the color, formatting, and size of
the data series used. For example, you can change the thickness of
the lines in your X-Y chart to make them easier to see.
To customize the chart styles:
1. Make sure that the sizing handles and highlighted border are
visible around the component.
2. Right-click the line, bar, or pie slice that you want to modify,
and then on the shortcut menu click the desired option. The
options available vary depending on what component type
(line, bar, or pie slice) your chart uses. If your chart has an
authoring legend, you can also use the chart property fields
added to the authoring legend to customize colors and styles.
Customizing Text Report
Objects
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When your RSBizWare report contains a text report object or table,
you can interactively show/hide, resize, and rename the columns,
change the grouping and sorting of the columns, and apply aggregate
functions to them. These are shortcuts to features that are normally
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available in the properties dialog box of the report object. The
shortcuts have been created to allow you to quickly change the look
and format of the table.
Your RSBizWare report must be in design mode in order to be
modified.
NOTE
Show and Hide Columns
When you make modifications to a report object, all instances of the
report object (such as those on other RSBizWare reports) will reflect the
changes you have made.
Some report data sources may contain so many columns that they
cannot be shown easily in a table. If you are creating a table for a
report data source with many columns, you can show only the
columns with the information needed by the user.
To hide a column:
• Right-click the column that you want to remove from the
table, and then click Hide Column.
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The columns that are removed from the table can be added again
later.
To show a column that is not currently included in the table:
• Right-click the table and then click Insert Column >
<Column name>.
The column will be inserted to the right of the column that is
selected.
Resize Table Columns
When you add a column to a table, it is assigned the default width.
Sometimes, the default width is too large, resulting in excess white
space, or too small, making the values wrap in the cells. The
column-resizing feature allows you to adjust the column size as
needed.
To resize a column:
1. Point to the grid line to the right of the column that you want
to resize.
2. When the cursor changes to
desired size.
Aggregate, Group, Format,
Sort, Chart, and Rename
Columns
, drag the column to get the
If you have selected the Interactive Grid style for your table, you can:
• Interactively add an Aggregate function column to the table.
• Change the grouping of the table records.
• Apply a format to the selected column.
• Change the sort order of the table.
• Rename the selected column heading.
If your table is not using the Interactive Grid style, you need to
change the table style.
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To change the style of the table to the Interactive Grid style:
1. Click the table, and then on the View menu click Properties.
The Report Object Properties dialog box appears.
2. On the Advanced tab click Format.
3. The Global Report Object Formats dialog box appears.
4. On the Styles tab, in the Style drop-down list select
Interactive Grid.
5. Click OK to return to the Report Object Properties dialog
box.
6. Click OK to return to the report design mode.
Your table should resemble the following sample one:
Aggregate
To apply the SUM aggregate function to a column, right-click the
column header, and then click Aggregate > SUM.
The aggregate functions available on the menu vary from column to
column. Only the functions that apply to a particular column are
displayed. For example, it only makes sense to apply the SUM
function to a numeric field.
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To remove the aggregate function from a column, right-click the
column header, and then click Aggregate > None.
Group
To group by field, right-click the column header, and then click
Grouping > Group 1.
The table records are grouped by the selected column. Each time you
click Grouping in the shortcut menu for additional columns,
additional group numbers are added to the menu. This allows you to
group by as many columns as displayed in your table.
To remove a grouping, right-click the column header, and then click
Grouping > None.
Format
To apply a format to a column, right-click the column header, and
then click Format > format style.
The format styles available on the menu vary from column to
column. Only the formats that apply to a particular column are
displayed. For example, it only makes sense to apply a month, day,
and year format to a date field.
To remove a format from a column, right-click the column header,
and then click Format > <None>. The column data will use the
default format for the data type displayed in the column.
Sort
To apply an ascending (A to Z) order to a column, right-click the
column header, and then click Sorting > Sort 1 > Ascending.
The table records are sorted by the selected column. Each time you
click Sorting in the shortcut menu for additional columns, the
additional sort numbers are added to the menu. This allows you to
sort by as many columns as your table displays.
To remove the sorting order, right-click the column header, and
then click Sorting > None.
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NOTE
Chart
You can also sort the data by clicking the column header; however, the
new sorting order will not be saved when you save your table.
To change the axis on which the chart is graphed, right-click the
column header, and then click Chart > X-axis.
To clear the chart axis, right-click the column header, and then click
Chart > None.
Rename
To rename a column:
1. Right-click the column header, and then click Rename.
The name in the column header is highlighted to indicate that
it is ready to be changed.
2. Enter the new name for the column, and press the Enter key
on your keyboard.
Quick Filter
If you have selected the Interactive Grid style for your table, each
column in the table has a built-in quick filter below the column
heading. The default quick filter for each column is (All).
To create a quick filter:
1. Click the default quick filter to display a list containing all
unique column values.
2. Select the value by which you want to filter.
The table is trimmed using the value as the criterion.
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Chapter 6
Advanced Reporting Topics
In this chapter you will learn about the following:
• The Excel Add-in 97
• Scheduling Report Objects and Reports 101
• Analyzing Non-RSBizWare Data 110
The Excel Add-in
The Excel Add-in allows you to retrieve RSBizWare data (general
reporting or grid data, and time-series data) directly in Microsoft
Excel. After the RSBizWare data has been imported into Excel, you
can use any of Excel’s analysis, charting, or scripting features to
further process the data.
When you install the RSBizWare software on a computer, a custom
RSBizWare toolbar is added to Microsoft Excel. The toolbar allows
you to perform the tasks necessary to retrieve the RSBizWare data.
To specify the Excel and Information Services Manager
connectivity settings:
1. On the RSBizWare toolbar, click
to display the
RSBizWare Connectivity Settings dialog box.
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2. Type the name of the Information Services Manager to which
your Excel workbook will connect.
3. Type the port number that you want to use for RSBizWare
HTTP communications. The default number is 8080.
NOTE
Please contact your RSBizWare administrator for the specific port
number that you should use.
4. Click OK to save your changes and close the dialog box.
A valid connection to the RSBizWare server is made and the
RSBizWareSetup worksheet is created by the Excel Add-in. The
worksheet contains the information required to retrieve data for the
reports that you create in your Excel workbook.
To add and modify reports in your Excel workbook:
NOTE
Each Excel workbook can contain up to 255 RSBizWare reports.
1. To create a new data grid report, select Grid Data in the
Report Type list, and then click
.
The Grid Data Parameters dialog box appears, in which you
can specify the report parameters.
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2. Click Save to save your report.
3. To create a new time-series report, select Time-Series in the
Report Type list, and then click
.
The Time Series Parameters dialog box appears, in which you
can specify the report parameters.
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4. Click Save to save your report.
5. To modify the parameters of a grid or time-series report, click
the column defining the report in the RSBizWareSetup sheet,
and then click
.
6. In the dialog box that appears, modify the desired parameters,
and then click Save.
NOTE
To delete a report from the workbook, click Delete at the
bottom of the dialog box.
7. To refresh the reports, click
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The Report Name List dialog box appears.
8. Select the reports that you want to refresh, or select the
Refresh All Reports check box.
9. Click Update to refresh the selected reports and close the
dialog box.
10. Click
Scheduling Report Objects
and Reports
to save your workbook.
The Configuration Console allows you to schedule tasks to be run at
some time in the future. The scheduling feature allows the valuable
information in the Configuration Console to be used by the entire
company without the cost of a runtime user license. Any report in
the system can be scheduled as a task. The results of the task can be
saved to a file, sent to an e-mail address, or printed. With this
capability, you can set the Schedule Manager to e-mail report objects
to production supervisors every morning, or update your production
statistics in an HTML document that is referenced by your Web
server.
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Schedule a Report Object
To schedule a report object to be run at a later time:
1. Open the Configuration Console.
2. On the Configure menu, click Scheduled Report Objects.
The Scheduled Report Objects dialog box appears.
3. Click Add.
The Schedule Wizard appears.
4. On the Report Object Selection wizard page, select a report
data source, a report object, and an optional filter.
The preview of the selected data appears.
5. Click Next.
The Description and Frequency page appears.
6. In the Task Description box, type the description of the task
that will be performed.
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For this example, type Workcell Production Scheduled Task.
7. Under Frequency, select the desired option to specify the task
frequency.
For this example, select One Time.
8. Click Next.
The Single Execution wizard page appears.
9. In the Date and Time boxes, specify the exact date and time of
performing the task.
10. Click Next.
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The Delivery Method wizard page appears.
11. Select one or more of the following distribution methods:
• E-mail. Select this option to e-mail the task results.
• In the To box, type the e-mail address to which the
results will be sent as an e-mail attachment.
• In the Format list, specify the file format to which the
results will be saved. The available file formats depend on
the type of the scheduled report object.
• Printer. Select this option to send the task results to a
printer.
• In the Printer list, select the desired printer.
The Printer list contains the printers configured on the
computer where the Security Services Manager is
running.
• File. Select this option to save the results to a file on the
computer where the Security Services Manager is running.
Click
to set the path and file name to which you want
to save the results. If you scheduled the task to run more
than once, the file will be overwritten each time the task is
run.
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12. Click Finish.
A message appears informing you that the item has been
successfully scheduled. The messages displays also information
about the date and time of the next occurrence of the item.
NOTE
Schedule a Report
NOTE
To ensure that the scheduled task is successfully performed, you
need to close the Configuration Console if the Report Schedule
Manager and the Configuration Console are running on the same
machine. If you do not close the Configuration Console, the
Report Schedule Manager will cause the disruption of your
current Configuration Console activities and the failure of the
scheduled task.
To schedule a report in the Report Explorer tree, you need to have the
report user and password configured in the Service Console. For more
information refer to the Administration Guide, section "Step 15: Register
the Information Services Manager".
To schedule a report in the Report Explorer tree:
1. Open the Configuration Console.
2. Right-click the desired report in the Report Explorer tree, and
select Schedule.
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TIP
To display the Report Explorer tree, you need to select the Report
Explorer option. To do this, select Report Explorer on the View menu.
The Report Explorer tree will appear on the left side of the Configuration
Console window.
The Report Explorer option is selected by default when you open
Configuration Console.
The Description and Frequency wizard page appears.
3. In the Task Description box, type the description of the task
that will be performed.
For this example, type Workcell Production Scheduled Task.
4. Under Frequency, select the desired option to specify the task
frequency.
For this example, select One Time.
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5. Click Next.
The Single Execution wizard page appears.
6. In the Date and Time boxes, specify the exact date and time of
performing the task.
7. Click Next.
The Delivery Method wizard page appears.
8. Select one or more of the following distribution methods:
• E-mail. Select this option to e-mail the task results.
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• In the To box, type the e-mail address to which the
results will be sent as an e-mail attachment.
• In the Format list, specify the file format to which the
results will be saved. The available file formats depend on
the type of the scheduled report object.
• Printer. Select this option to send the task results to a
printer.
• In the Printer list, select the desired printer.
The Printer list contains the printers configured on the
computer where the Security Services Manager is
running.
• File. Select this option to save the results to a file on the
computer where the Security Services Manager is running.
Click
to set the path and file name to which you want
to save the results. If you scheduled the task to run more
than once, the file will be overwritten each time the task is
run.
9. Click Finish.
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A message appears informing you that the item has been
successfully scheduled. The messages displays also information
about the date and time of the next occurrence of the item.
NOTE
View the History of the
Scheduled Task
To ensure that the scheduled task is successfully performed, you
need to close the Configuration Console if the Report Schedule
Manager and the Configuration Console are running on the same
machine. If you do not close the Configuration Console, the
Report Schedule Manager will cause the disruption of your
current Configuration Console activities and the failure of the
scheduled task.
Each time the Information Services Manager attempts to perform a
scheduled task, a history record documenting the success or failure
of the attempt is written to the database. If your task results are not
distributed to a specific destination, you can view the schedule
history to troubleshoot the problem.
To view the history of the scheduled task:
1. Open the Configuration Console.
2. On the Configure menu, click Scheduled Report Objects.
The Scheduled Report Objects dialog box appears.
3. Select the desired task and click View History.
The Document Schedule History dialog box appears. It
contains a read-only table that displays the history of the
scheduled task. Each record in the table represents an instance
when FactoryTalk Metrics attempted to perform the task. The
table displays the following attributes for each attempt to
execute the scheduled task:
• Report Title. For scheduled reports only. The tree label that
was applied to the RSBizWare report when it was saved in
the Report Explorer tree.
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• Filter. For scheduled report objects only. The name of the
filter that was applied to the RSBizWare report object when
it was scheduled.
• Schedule Description. The name that the user gave to the
task when it was scheduled.
• Log Message. A message from FactoryTalk Metrics
indicating the status of the task (e.g., Scheduled Item
Created, Scheduled Item Dispatched, Scheduled Item Failed).
• Run Results. An additional description of the task results.
For example, if your task failed, the run results may contain
the reason of the task failure.
• Log Date. The date and time when the application
attempted to perform the scheduled task.
Analyzing Non-RSBizWare
Data
The reporting features of the Configuration Console can be applied
to tables or views that exist in non-RSBizWare databases. This is
useful if you have data from other software packages or legacy
systems that you want to analyze in the Configuration Console.
To analyze non-RSBizWare data in the Configuration Console, you
need to create an external data source describing the external
database to the Information Services Manager, and a report data
source describing the table or view from the external database to the
Configuration Console.
Create an External Data
Source
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An external data source is the ODBC connection to the SQL Server
or Oracle database. The external data source provides a link between
the non-RSBizWare database and the Information Services
Manager. External data sources are configured in the Service
Console. For information on how to create a new external data
source, refer to the Administration Guide, section "Administering
RSBizWare servers”.
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Create a Report Data Source A report data source is a connection to a table or view within an
external data source. A report data source describes a table or view to
the Configuration Console. After your report data source has been
created, you can design reports to analyze the data. Refer to
"Analyzing FactoryTalk Historian Classic Data (page 41)" for
instructions on creating reports.
Before you walk through the tutorial, it is assumed that you have
been granted the FactoryTalk Metrics Author license and the Create
New Report Data Sources privilege by your RSBizWare
administrator.
Step 1: Start the Report Data To create a report data source:
Source Wizard
1. On the Configure menu in the Configuration Console, click
Reporting > Report Data Sources, Objects, and Filters.
The Configure Report Data Sources, Report Objects, and
Filters dialog box appears.
2. Under Report Data Sources, click Add.
The Report Data Source Configuration wizard appears.
3. Click Next.
The Report Data Source Name page appears.
4. In the Report Data Source Name box, type the name of the
report data source.
5. (Optional) To define specific permissions for the report data
source, click Permissions. If you do not define them, default
permissions are automatically associated with the report data
source.
NOTE
For more information about the default permissions, refer to the
Administration Guide, section "Administering RSBizWare
servers".
6. Click Next.
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The Choose a Database Table or View page appears.
7. Select the desired database.
The table at the bottom of the dialog box is filled with the
tables and views that exist in the database.
8. Under Name, select the table or view to which you want to
create a connection.
9. Click Next.
The Column Selection page appears.
10. Select the column names that you want to add to the report
data source:
• Under Columns in Table or View, click a column name,
and then click
.
The column is moved under Columns in Report Data
Source.
• To move several columns, press and hold Ctrl, click the
columns, and then click
.
• To move all the columns, click
.
11. (Optional). Under Columns in Report Data Source, rename
the columns:
1. Click the desired column, and then click Rename.
The name becomes highlighted for editing.
2. Change the name, and then press Enter.
12. (Optional). Click Derived Field, and then click Add Derived
Field.
The Add Derived Field dialog box appears.
A derived field is a new field that is a combination or
calculation of existing fields. For example, if your table has the
A, B, and C fields, you can create a D derived field containing
the value calculated from the expression ((A-B)/C * 100).
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1. Under Field Name, type a name for the new field.
2. Under Data Type, select the data type for the field.
3. Under SQL Expression..., do either of the following:
• Type the expression that will be evaluated to produce the
derived field.
• Choose one of available expressions:
Under Columns, click a column name.
Click Add Column to Expression.
The expression from the column appears under SQL
Expression....
If you do not select any expression in the Column list, and
then click Add Column to Expression, the first expression
in the list is added to the SQL Expression box.
13. Click Validate to check for errors.
If there are no errors, the Validate button becomes inactive.
14. Click Add.
The Column Selection page appears.
The derived field is displayed under Columns in Report Data
Source.
15. Click Next.
The Time Selection Toolbar page appears.
16. Under Timestamp Column for Time Selection Toolbar,
select a timestamp field.
17. Click Next.
The Time-series Format page appears.
18. Under Supported Formats, select one of the following
options that best describes your database table or view:
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Select this option:
If:
Table is not in a time-series format.
Your table does not contain any
time-series data. This setting will
disable the time-series analysis and
FactoryTalk Transaction Manager
time-series data collection for the report
data source.
The reporting tag values are stored in a
single column of the table.
Your table has a separate column for
each reporting tag.
Your table contains compressed
time-series data that has been collected
using the FactoryTalk Transaction
Manager Compression engine.
Narrow Format. All Reporting Tags in a
single column.
Wide Format. Each Reporting Tag in
separate column.
Compression.
19. Click Next.
NOTE
If you have selected the Table is not in a time-series format
option, the wizard skips to the last step of the procedure.
The Match Time-series Columns page appears.
20. Specify the role of each database field in the time-series
analysis:
If you have selected this
option:
Specify:
Narrow Format
Wide Format
• The field that contains the reporting tag ID.
• The field that contains the timestamp.
• The field that contains the value.
• One or more fields that contain the
reporting tag values.
• The field that contains the timestamp.
1. Under Time-series Use, click a table cell.
2. From the list, select a role for the cell.
21. Click Next.
The Data Point Configuration Table page appears.
22. Do either of the following:
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• Under Select the Data Point configuration table, select a
table that holds information about the data points.
• Under Or create a new table, click Create Configuration
Table to have a new table created for you.
The table fields are displayed under Match the
configuration...
23. If you have selected an existing table, for each database field
under Column assign a value from the Time-series Use
column.
24. Click Next.
The Completing the Report Data Source Configuration
page appears.
25. Review the summary of the report data source configuration,
and then click Finish.
NOTE
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If the underlying database table or view changes after you have
created your report data source, you need to recreate the report
data source.
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Step 2: Give the Report Data The Report Data Source Name page of the wizard appears.
Source a Name
To name the report data source:
1. On the Report Data Source Name page, enter the name that
you will use to refer to your report data source in the
application. The name must be unique among all report data
sources.
2. (Optional) To define other users' permissions related to your
report data source, click Permissions. For this example, accept
the default permissions that are automatically associated with
new report data sources.
3. Click Next to continue.
NOTE
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For more information about the default permissions, refer to the
Administration Guide, section “Administering RSBizWare
Servers”.
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Step 3: Select a Database
Table or View
The Choose a Database Table or View page (shown below) allows
you to specify the database table or view to which the report data
source is providing a connection.
1. Select the name of the external data source that contains the
table or view. In the example above, the Coffee Datalog Data
external data source was selected.
2. When you select an external data source, the list at the bottom
of the dialog box fills with the tables and views that exist in the
database. Select the table or view to which you want to create a
connection.
3. Click Next to continue.
Step 4: Choose the Columns
That Will Be Included
In this step, you will be selecting from the Column Selection page
the table/view columns that you want to include in the report data
source. Only the columns that you include in the report data source
will be available for users to include in report objects that reference
this report data source.
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1. Highlight the column names that you want to make available
to the user and click the Add (>) button to move the column
names to the Columns in Report Data Source list.
2. Columns that have been added to the Columns in Report
Data Source list can be renamed so the names are more
meaningful to users. To rename a column, select the column
name in the list and click the Rename button. The name is
highlighted to indicate that it is ready to be changed. Type the
new name for the column and press the Enter key on your
keyboard to accept the changes.
3. Now, let’s add a derived field to the report data source. A
derived field is a calculated value that is obtained from an
expression that you provide. For example, if your table has
fields A, B, and C, you could create a derived field called D
that contains the value calculated from the expression
((A-B)/C * 100). To add a derived field to your report data
source, click the Derived Field button and select Add
Derived Field from the shortcut menu to display the dialog
box shown below.
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4. Enter a name for your new field and type the expression or
SQL statement that will be evaluated to produce the derived
field.
5. Click the Validate button to check for errors.
6. Click Add to return to the Report Data Source wizard. Your
derived field will be displayed in the Columns in Report Data
Source list.
7. Click Next to continue.
Step 5: Enable the Time
Selection Toolbar
This step of the wizard allows you to pick the field from the Time
Selection Toolbar page that will be used to restrict the data in the
report object by date and time.
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1. The drop-down list contains all timestamp fields that you
selected to include in the report data source. To enable the
Time Selection toolbar for your report data source, select the
timestamp field on which the Time Selection query will be
run.
2. Click Next to continue.
Step 6: Specify the Format of The Time-series Format page allows you to specify whether the
table is going to be used for time-series analysis (as shown below). If
the Table or View
the table is going to be used for time-series analysis, you must specify
what format the table is in.
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1. Select the option that best describes your database table or
view.
• Select the Table is not in a time-series format option if
the table does not contain time-series data. This will disable
time-series analysis and FactoryTalk Transaction Manager
time-series data collection for the report data source.
• Select the Narrow Format option if the reporting tag
values are stored in a single column of the table.
• Select the Wide Format option if the table has a separate
column for each reporting tag.
• Select the Compression option if your table contains
compressed time-series data that has been collected using
the FactoryTalk Transaction Manager Compression
engine.
For this example we have selected the Narrow Format.
2. Click Next to continue.
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NOTE
If you selected the “not a time-series” option, the wizard will
skip steps 7 and 8. The Review Results page will display a
summary of the new report data source that will be created.
Review your selections and click Finish to create the report data
source.
Step 7: Specify the Role That This step displays the Match Time-series Columns page. In this
step, you will need to specify the role that each database field plays in
Each Field Plays In
time-series analysis. If you selected the “narrow” option in the
Time-Series Analysis
previous step, you will be required to specify the field that contains
the reporting tag ID, the field that contains the timestamp, and the
field that contains the value. If you selected the “wide” option in the
previous step, you will be required to specify one or more fields that
contain the reporting tag values and the field that contains the
timestamp.
1. To specify a role for a field, click the Time-series Use cell and
select a role from the list that will be displayed.
2. Click Next to continue.
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Step 8: Create a Data Point
Configuration Table
The final step of the wizard contains the Data Point Configuration
Table page shown below. Here you set up the data point
configuration table, which is a database table that contains
descriptive information about the reporting tags, including a
reporting tag ID field, a reporting tag description field, and an
engineering unit field. The data point configuration table will be
joined to the report data source table by the reporting tag ID field.
Each time-series report data source must use a different
configuration table.
1. Select a table from the drop-down list or click the Create
Configuration Table button to create a new table. The table
fields will be listed in the grid at the bottom of the dialog box.
2. For each field in the configuration table, click the Timeseries
Use cell and select a role from the list that will be displayed.
This step is not necessary if you used the Create
Configuration Table button to create a new table.
3. Click Next to display the Review Results page. This dialog
box displays a summary of the new report data source that will
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be created. Review your selections and click Finish to create
the report data source.
NOTE
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If the underlying database table or view changes after you create
your report data source, you must recreate the report data source
to take advantage of the changes.
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Creating RSBizWare Custom Analysis
Tools
An RSBizWare custom analysis tool is a user-defined plug-in to the
Configuration Console that allows you to develop custom
computations that operate on time-series data. The result of the
custom analysis tool computations then can be displayed on a
time-series chart.
Why Use Custom Analysis
Tools?
The Configuration Console ships with several standard statistical
analysis tools. Why would you want to develop and use RSBizWare
custom analysis tools? The biggest reason is to allow you to visualize
different types of statistics or calculations that are particular to your
process without having to export the data from the Configuration
Console into another package. While the custom analysis tool
architecture is not as powerful as a fully featured analysis package
such as SAS or Excel, many analysis functions can be quite easily
implemented as custom analysis tools.
Intended Audience
This chapter is intended for individuals who want to make use of
custom analysis tools developed by others, as well as for individuals
who want to develop custom analysis tools to chart specific statistics
or calculations.
This chapter leads you through a quick tour of a custom analysis tool
that ships with the Configuration Console and then discusses how
to build custom analysis tools with Microsoft Visual Basic and
Microsoft Visual C++.
• If you plan to use custom analysis tools that others develop,
you only need to read the Quick Tour section of this chapter.
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• If you plan to develop custom analysis tools, we recommend
that you read the next three sections of this chapter followed
by the section that describes how to develop a custom analysis
tool using your chosen development tool.
NOTE
If you will be using a development tool other than Visual Basic or
Visual C++, make sure you read the RSBizWare Calculator COM
Interface section.
You can use any development tool that supports authoring COM
classes to develop your custom analysis tool. It is assumed that you
have a working knowledge of the development tool you will be
using. The User Guides for Microsoft Visual Basic and Microsoft
Visual C++ provide valuable information on producing COM
DLLs.
While the RSBizWare Custom Analysis Tool plug-in architecture
uses COM, you do not have to be an expert on COM in order to
implement a custom analysis tool. However, some familiarity with
COM is helpful in understanding how custom analysis tools work
under the hood. The following references provide excellent
overviews of COM:
• David Chappell. Understanding ActiveX and OLE. Microsoft
Press, 1996.
• Don Box. Essential COM. Reading, Mass.: Addiston-Wesley
Pub. Co., 1998.
A Quick Tour of a Sample
Custom Analysis Tool
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Before you dive into writing a custom analysis tool, let's look at how
a sample pre-built custom analysis tool is added into the
Configuration Console. It is assumed that you are running the client
and the server on a single computer and that you already have started
the Configuration Console and logged into the Information Services
Manager.
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Registering a Sample
Analysis Tool
Chapter 7
Before you can use a custom analysis tool, you must first register it
with the Configuration Console by doing the following:
1. Select Tools > FactoryTalk Historian Classic > Analysis
Tools from the main menu. The Configure Custom Analysis
Tools dialog box, shown below, is displayed. This dialog box
enables you to manage the custom analysis tools that are
registered on your machine. Initially, the list of configured
analysis tools will be empty.
2. Click Add to register a new custom analysis tool. A file
browser will come up that will allow you to select a DLL or
OCX file that contains one or more analysis tools to register.
RSBizWare ships with two sample custom analysis tools. Both
analysis tools do the same calculation, but one was developed
with Visual Basic, and one was developed with Visual C++.
You will register the one built with Visual Basic.
3. Browse to the \Program Files\Rockwell
Software\RSBizWare\RSBizWare Calculators\VB\VbFlat
directory, select the VbFlat.dll file, and click Open. This will
verify that the DLL you have chosen contains a valid custom
analysis tool.
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4. If the DLL has not yet been registered with the Windows
operating system, the Configuration Console will offer to do
this for you. Click Yes.
5. You will then return to the Configure Custom Analysis Tool
screen where you will see all custom analysis tools that are
present in the DLL you chose.
You will see how the analysis tools get their names in the
development sections. In addition to the name of the analysis
tool, you will also see a series of numbers and letters in braces
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following the analysis tool name. That is a global unique
identifier (GUID), which is what Microsoft Windows uses to
identify software components uniquely. You can ignore the
GUID.
NOTE
If you select a DLL, EXE, or OCX file that does not contain a valid
custom analysis tool, you will see the following message: “The
selected file is not a valid Analysis Tool (it does not contain a
type library).” To fix this with the sample custom analysis tool,
select the correct DLL that contains the custom analysis tool and
try again.
6. Click OK to exit the Configure Custom Analysis Tool screen.
The new custom analysis tool is now registered.
You only need to register a custom analysis tool one time in
the Configuration Console. After a custom analysis tool is
registered, the Configuration Console automatically loads the
custom analysis tool when it is needed.
Using the Sample Analysis
Once you have registered a custom analysis tool, you can use it on
Tool for Time-series Analysis time-series charts just as you would use the built-in analysis tools
that are delivered with the software. See chapter "Analyzing
FactoryTalk Historian Classic Data (page 41)" for information on
how to apply an analysis tool to a time-series chart.
What You Need to Know
Before You Start
RSBizWare installs two sample custom analysis tools. Both custom
analysis tools compute the exact same thing–a weighted average of
the selected data set. One sample analysis tool was written in Visual
Basic and one was written in Visual C++. While the output of each
sample analysis tool is identical, the work involved to develop each
analysis tool is quite different. You will take a quick tour of the
VbFlat sample analysis tool.
The VbFlat sample custom analysis tool was developed in Visual
Basic. To look at the VbFlat project, start Visual Basic and open the
VbFlat.vbp project in the directory from which you registered the
VbFlat.DLL in "Registering a Sample Analysis Tool (page 127)".
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You will see that the Visual Basic project contains only one file–a
Visual Basic class named VbFlatCalculatorClass.
The section on developing a custom analysis tool with Visual Basic
will detail the steps necessary to develop a custom analysis tool, but
you will notice that the name of the class in Visual Basic is the name
that is used in the Configuration Console to display the custom
analysis tool. If you open the class file in Visual Basic, you can
browse the RSBizWareCalculator_Calculate function to get an
idea of the computations this analysis tool performs.
You can start Visual C++ and open the analogous Visual C++
project located in the \Program Files\Rockwell
Software\RSBizWare\RSBizWare Calculators\C++\Flat
subdirectory.
Analysis Tool Architecture
The RSBizWare custom analysis tool architecture is built on COM,
the Component Object Model. COM was chosen as the
architecture for custom analysis tools because it allows custom
analysis tools to be written using any development tool that supports
the creation of COM classes. This gives great flexibility to
developers of custom analysis tools.
Custom analysis tools are COM classes that typically are stored in a
DLL. You can store multiple custom analysis tools in a DLL, and
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you can register multiple custom analysis tool DLLs with a
Configuration Console. Each custom analysis tool will show up
under the Analysis Tool list associated with each reporting tag
selected for use within a reporting object.
To create a custom analysis tool, you need to implement a single
COM interface published by Rockwell Automation:
RSBizWare::IRSBizWareCalculator. What this really means is
that you have to write a single function in the development tool of
your choice that can take a set of data as input and return a
calculated set of data as output. The
RSBizWare::IRSBizWareCalculator interface expects you to
implement one method called Calculate().
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What a Time-series Data Set Usually, RSBizWare custom analysis tools are used to analyze
time-series data sets. Before looking in-depth at how to build a
Looks Like
custom analysis tool, it is essential to understand what a time-series
data set looks like, as you will need to interpret the parameters that
will be passed into your Calculate() function.
Generally, time-series data is made up of three parameters: a data
point (or tag) name, a timestamp and a value. However, the
Information Services Manager has the built-in ability to sample large
data sets on the server side when querying a large number of records.
For example, if you are collecting a data point called Pressure every
10 seconds in a year's time, you will have over 3 million records for
that data point stored in the FactoryTalk Historian Classic
time-series database. Obviously, it is not feasible or useful to send all
3 million records to an RSBizWare client for display. Therefore, the
Information Services Manager uses a sampling algorithm to return
only the number of records necessary to display the data set
accurately on the RSBizWare client. The necessary number of
records to send to an RSBizWare client is actually part of the client’s
request and depends on the size and resolution of the display device
that the client is using. It is based on the number of horizontal
screen pixels the time-series chart will occupy.
When using a sampling algorithm, the RSBizWare server will divide
the requested time range into a number of equally spaced time
buckets. To accurately display the data in the RSBizWare client, the
server then finds the minimum and maximum value of the requested
data point for each time bucket and also finds the number of data
point records that are part of each bucket. The number of data point
records in a sample may be important when developing weighted
analysis tools when the data point is not uniformly sampled. All of
this information is returned to the Configuration Console, and this
same information is passed into the custom analysis tool
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Calculate() function you develop. The following table shows an
example of what an RSBizWare time-series data set looks like.
Data point
Timestamp
Min value
Max value
Sample count
Pressure
Pressure
Pressure
Pressure
Pressure
Pressure
2000-06-20 07:00:00
2000-06-20 08:00:00
2000-06-20 09:02:00
2000-06-20 10:03:00
2000-06-20 11:04:00
2000-06-20 12:05:00
7.5
8.3
8.5
9.5
13.4
17.5
8.3
9.5
9.5
13.4
17.5
16.1
360
360
360
360
360
360
When the Information Services Manager determines that there are
not enough records in the requested time-series data set to
necessitate sampling, the server will forego the sampling algorithm
and return the raw data point records to the client. In this case, the
minimum and maximum values will be identical and the count of
data points per sample record will be 1.
Interpreting the Parameters When you write a custom analysis tool, the time-series data set
Passed into the Calculate() parameters described above are passed into the Calculate()
function you implement:
Function
• X-Axis input array–This array contains double precision
floating point values, which are the X-axis values of the data
set. For time-series templates, the X-axis is always a set of date
values. Date values are represented in the Configuration
Console in COM DATE format, which means they are double
precision floating point values. You will typically not do
computations with X-axis values for time-series templates.
• Y-Axis Minimum input array–This array contains double
precision floating point values which are the minimum values
of each X-axis sample of the data set.
• Y-Axis Maximum input array–This array contains double
precision floating point values which are the maximum values
of each X-axis sample of the data set.
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• Count input array–This array contains double precision
floating point values, which are the counts of the number of
samples for each X-axis sample of the data set. When the
Information Services Manager determines that sampling is not
required, the counts will be 1.
When implementing the Calculate() function, your job is to fill
up two output parameters which will contain the X and Y values of
your custom analysis tool algorithm.
• X-Axis output array–This array is generated by the custom
analysis tool and contains double precision floating point
values. It generally has the same, or a subset of, the X-axis
values that were passed in the X-axis input array data set.
• Y-Axis output array–This array is generated by the custom
analysis tool and contains double precision floating point
values. It contains the Y value produced by the algorithm in
the custom analysis tool.
Limitations
The RSBizWare custom analysis tool toolkit currently limits you to
doing calculations with a single input variable. Also, you cannot
store permanently any additional parameters that your custom
analysis tool may require.
The RSBizWare Calculator
COM Interface
RSBizWare custom analysis tools are developed using COM, the
Component Object Model. As mentioned at the beginning of this
chapter, COM was used primarily because it allows custom analysis
tools to be developed with any development tool and language that
supports creating COM classes.
The RSBizWare custom analysis tool architecture defines an
instance of a COM Category, which is a way for RSBizWare easily
to find all custom analysis tools that have been registered on a
machine. When you use the Configuration Console to register a
custom analysis tool (as you did with the sample VbFlat analysis
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tool), the Configuration Console automatically generated a COM
Category entry for the analysis tool for you.
Looking at the Type Library
As mentioned in "Analysis Tool Architecture (page 130)",
developing an RSBizWare custom analysis tool requires you to
implement a specific COM interface called
RSBizWare::IRSBizWareCalculator.
To implement an RSBizWare custom analysis tool, you will need a
COM Type Library so that your development tool knows the syntax
of the function you need to write. The type library for the custom
analysis tools is installed and registered with the Configuration
Console. The type library file is called RSBizWareCalculator.tlb and
is located by default in the \Program Files\Rockwell
Software\RSBizWare directory.
Normally, you do not need to know the exact location of this file.
Rather, your development tool will allow you to browse the list of
registered COM classes. The RSBizWare custom analysis tool
interface shows up in developer tools as RSBizWareCalculator 1.0
Type Library. An example of this in Visual Basic is shown below.
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The RSBizWare::IRSBizWareCalculator interface requires you to
implement a function called Calculate(). COM uses the Interface
Definition Language (IDL) to describe the syntax of functions in a
language independent manner. The IDL for the Calculate()
function follows:
[id(1), helpstring("method Calculate")]
HRESULT Calculate([in] VARIANT xInArray,
[in] VARIANT yMinInArray,
[in] VARIANT yMaxInArray,
[in] VARIANT CountInArray,
[in, out] VARIANT* xOutArray,
[in, out] VARIANT* yOutArray);
The parameters used in the Calculate() function are those
described in "Interpreting the Parameters Passed into the
Calculate() Function". You will notice that the data types of all
parameters are VARIANTs. A VARIANT data type can hold many
types of values, including strings, integers, and arrays. In this case,
each of the parameters are
arrays of numbers, but the VARIANT data type was still used
because it allows the exchange of data between Visual Basic and
C++, and it allows for dynamic data types when the output of an
analysis tool is a single value.
Note that the last two parameters are marked as [in, out]. They
actually are output only parameters but Visual Basic needs the [in,
out] designator in order to work properly.
Developing Analysis Tools
with Visual Basic
136
Visual Basic is the easiest tool to use when developing a custom
analysis tool. Visual Basic does a good job of handling the
VARIANT data type used by the custom analysis tool interface.
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Creating a New Project
Chapter 7
To create a new custom analysis tool in Visual Basic, do the
following:
1. Start the Visual Basic application.
2. If the New Project dialog box is not automatically displayed,
select File > New Project from the Visual Basic menu.
3. Select ActiveX DLL from the list on the New Project dialog
box and click OK. You will be placed in the Visual Basic code
editor with a default project name and a default class name
created for you.
4. For this example, you are going to write an analysis tool that
plots the negative values of the data set, so change the name of
the default class from Class1 to NegativeCalculator.
Configuring Important
Project Settings
You will now configure the project settings that are needed when
you compile the project. The name of an RSBizWare custom
analysis tool is determined by the Visual Basic project and class
names using the format VisualBasicProjectName.ClassName.
Therefore, it is important to give your custom analysis tool a
meaningful project and class name that will identify it uniquely in
the Configuration Console as follows:
1. Change the project name from the Visual Basic default name,
by selecting Project >Project 1 Properties from the menu.
The Project1 - Project Properties dialog box is displayed.
2. Change the project name on the General tab to MyDemo.
3. Leave the rest of the settings on this page to their defaults.
4. Click OK to save the project settings.
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Referencing the RSBizWare
Calculator Component
Next, you must specify to Visual Basic that you are going to be
implementing an RSBizWare custom analysis tool as follows:
1. Add a reference to a COM or ActiveX object in Visual Basic
by selecting Project >References.
2. In the References dialog box, scroll down the list of all
registered COM interfaces until you see the
RSBizWareCalculator 1.0 Type Library. Select it and click
OK.
3. Specify to Visual Basic that a particular class is implementing
the RSBizWare::IRSBizWareCalculator interface by adding
the following implements statement in the code window and
pressing the Enter key:
1.
Implements RSBizWareCalculator
4. In the top left list in the code window, select
RSBizWareCalculator. Visual Basic will generate a default
implementation of the only method in the interface:
Calculate(). You now have an empty shell for writing the
Calculate() function.
Writing the Calculate()
Function
Now that the RSBizWare custom analysis tool interface is registered
with the Visual Basic project, you are ready to implement the
Calculate() function. Writing the Calculate() function involves
a few basic steps:
1. Accessing the passed in data set from the Configuration
Console.
2. Computing the desired algorithm.
3. Returning an output data set to the Configuration Console.
If you look at the parameters passed into the Calculate() function,
you will see that they match the parameters listed in the IDL code
shown in "Looking at the Type Library (page 135)". (Note that
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carriage returns and line continuation characters were added to this
code for readability.)
Private Sub RSBizWareCalculator_Calculate( _
ByVal xInArray As Variant, _
ByVal yMinInArray As Variant, _
ByVal yMaxInArray As Variant, _
ByVal CountInArray As Variant, _
xOutArray As Variant, _
yOutArray As Variant)
End Sub
The only real difference from the IDL code is that Visual Basic
converted the generic [in] and [in, out] IDL keywords into the
ByVal and ByRef syntax that Visual Basic uses. (The ByRef keyword
is the default if neither ByVal nor ByRef is specified.)
The purpose of the analysis tool is to compute the negative value of
each Y-axis value that was passed into the function. To do this the
program must loop through each value passed in and create a
corresponding output value that is the same numeric value except
with the sign changed (for example, you'll be turning the value 5.3
into -5.3).
To complete the Calculate() function, do the following by adding
the specified code to the function:
1. Determine the size of the output array. The Configuration
Console does not assume that the output array will be the
same size as the input array. In this case, the program will
return X and Y arrays of the same size, but the program must
still allocate the arrays in the Calculate() function as follows:
' In this calculator, we will return the same size of array
' as was passed in
ReDim xOutArray(0 To UBound(yMinInArray)) As Double
ReDim yOutArray(0 To UBound(yMinInArray)) As Double
The Visual Basic Ubound() function returns the upper bound
of the passed in array.
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2. Change the Y values to negative values. This task would be
simple if you were dealing with single data points; however,
you have to take sampling into consideration because the
passed in data set may be sampled. If it is, the program must
contain an algorithm to determine the value to make negative.
In this program, you negate the average of the minimum and
maximum value passed in for each sample:
' Set the output Y value equal to the negative y input
' value for every X (timestamp) value that was passed in
' In case we are sampling, we will use the average of the
' min and max value that was passed in
Dim i As Integer
For i = 0 To UBound(yMinInArray)
xOutArray(i) = xInArray(i)
yOutArray(i) = -1# * (yMinInArray(i) + yMaxInArray(i)) / 2#
Next i
The -1# and 2# values are Visual Basic's default way of displaying
floating point numbers. The values were typed in as -1.0 and 2.0
respectively.
The full Calculate() function along with the entire sample project
is installed with RSBizWare in the \Program Files\Rockwell
Software\RSBizWare\RSBizWare Calculators\VB\NegativeCalc
directory. You should refer to this sample project to see the exact
form of the code in the Calculate() function.
Saving and Compiling the
Project
Before you can try out the new custom analysis tool, you have to save
the Visual Basic project and compile the DLL as follows:
1. Select File > Save Project to save the project. If you haven't
saved the project yet, you will need to select a directory. Since
you already set the project properties when you created the
project, the name of the project already should be set to
MyDemo.
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2. To compile your project, select File > Make MyDemo.dll.
You will be prompted for a directory to save the DLL to. As far
as the Configuration Console is concerned, it does not matter
where the DLL resides on the machine, so pick the directory of
your choice.
Once you have saved and compiled your project for the first time,
you should change the Version Compatibility of the project as
follows:
1. Select Project > MyDemo Properties. The MyDemo-Project
Properties dialog box is displayed.
2. Select the Component tab and change the Version
Compatibility selection to Binary Compatibility.
3. Save and recompile your project.
If you use No Compatibility or Project Compatibility and register
the custom analysis tool in the Configuration Console and then
recompile the custom analysis tool in Visual Basic, you will have to
re-register the analysis tool in the Configuration Console.
Trying Out the New Custom
Analysis Tool
Register your MyDemo custom analysis tool DLL as you did with
the sample VbFlat analysis tool (as described in "Registering a
Sample Analysis Tool (page 127)"). Once the analysis tool is
registered, you can use the MyDemo.NegativeCalculator analysis
tool with the FactoryTalk Historian Classic Demo - Pressure data
point.
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If your database does not have this data point, you have not installed the
FactoryTalk Historian Classic sample data. To do this, run the DB Load
Wizard from the Start menu by selecting Programs > Rockwell
Software > FactoryTalk Tools > Database Wizard. Follow the
directions in the help to install the FactoryTalk Historian Classic sample
data into the database you are using.
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Your report object should look like this:
If the name of your custom analysis tool in the Configuration
Console is not what you expected (MyDemo.NegativeCalculator),
then you may not have renamed the default project or class name in
the Visual Basic project. If you did not rename these, then your
analysis tool may be named Project1.Class1. You can go back to
Visual Basic, change the names, and recompile your project. Then
when you unregister and register the custom analysis tool in the
Configuration Console, the name should show up correctly.
Debugging Custom Analysis
Tools in Visual Basic
You may find that a custom analysis tool that you develop does not
calculate as expected on the first try. When custom analysis tools are
producing incorrect values, the easiest way to find the problem is to
debug them with the Visual Basic debugger.
To set the debugger up, do the following:
1. Access the Visual Basic project settings for your custom
analysis tool under Visual Basic's Project menu item and select
the Debugging tab.
2. Select the Start program option, select the Configuration
Console executable (\Program Files\Rockwell
Software\RSBizWare\RSBizWare Production Client.exe)
as the program to run when the debugger starts, and click OK.
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After the debugging settings are complete, you can set one or more
breakpoint in your Visual Basic Calculate() function. When you
then run the project, the Configuration Console will start up.
Create a time-series chart using the analysis tool you are debugging
(you may have to first register the analysis tool if you haven't yet).
When the chart calls the analysis tool, your breakpoints should be
called in Visual Basic. You can then step through your Visual Basic
code, using the full features of the Visual Basic debugger.
The complete source files for this project are installed with
RSBizWare in the \Program Files\Rockwell
Software\RSBizWare\RSBizWare Calculators\VB\NegativeCalc
directory.
Developing Analysis Tools
with Visual C++
Developing custom analysis tools with Visual C++ provides several
benefits over using Visual Basic:
• Fewer dependencies. Distributing a Visual Basic custom
analysis tool requires the distribution of the Visual Basic
runtime DLL MSVBVM60.DLL. The method you will use to
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develop the C++ analysis tool should require no other
distribution DLLs.
• Decreased Memory Usage. The Visual Basic
MSVBVM60.DLL adds a considerable memory footprint to a
custom analysis tool. The Visual C++ custom analysis tools
are very memory efficient and, with no dependencies, they
require loading no other DLLs.
• Increased Performance. If you are doing extensive
computations in your custom analysis tools, you may notice a
significant performance increase by using Visual C++.
These benefits come with a trade-off–developing custom analysis
tools in Visual C++ is more complicated than using Visual Basic.
Visual Basic handles VARIANT data types more intuitively than
Visual C++ does. Plus, Visual Basic hides the underlying COM
details much better than Visual C++.
The final choice in deciding which tool to use comes down to
deciding if you can live with Visual Basic's increased memory and
performance overhead. For most analysis tools, the performance
difference is not that noticeable.
Creating a New Project
To create a new custom analysis tool in Visual C++, do the
following:
1. Start the Visual C++application.
2. Select File > New.
3. Under the Projects tab, select ATL/COM AppWizard, name
the project NegativeC (since it will be the C++
implementation of the analysis tool you did in the Visual Basic
tutorial), and click OK.
4. You now have the option of selecting the executable form of
this project. You will be creating an in-process DLL for the
custom analysis tools, so select the Dynamic Link Library
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(DLL) option. Leave the check boxes at the bottom of the
screen cleared as shown in the example.
5. Click Finish and then click OK on the next screen. Visual
C++ will create the shell of the project for you.
You now have an empty COM DLL from which you can build the
analysis tool.
Referencing the RSBizWare
Calculator Component
The way to implement a custom analysis tool in Visual C++ is to
create a new COM class and then implement the
RSBizWare::IRSBizWareCalculator interface in the new COM
Class.
To create a new COM class and implement the interface, do the
following:
1. Select Insert > New ATL Object. The ATL Object Wizard
dialog box is displayed.
2. Select Simple Object from the Objects list and click Next.
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3. Specify NegativeCalc as the short name of this class. Filling in
the Short Name field will fill in default values for the rest of
the fields on the screen.
4. Click OK to complete the creation of the class. Visual C++
then will create a new empty COM class.
5. To make the class implement the
RSBizWare::IRSBizWareCalculator interface, access the Class
View tab in C++, expand the NegativeC classes folder,
right-click the CNegativeCalc class, and select Implement
Interface from the shortcut menu.
6. You will see a message from Visual C++ warning that it could
not find a type library for the project. Click OK, browse the
displayed list of available type libraries, select
RSBizWareCalculator 1.0 Type Library (1.0), and click OK.
7. When you select the RSBizWareCalculator 1.0 Type Library,
you will be prompted to select the COM interfaces from that
type library that the class will implement. In this case there is
only the IRSBizWareCalculator interface in the type library.
Select it and click OK.
1. Visual C++ adds declarations for the interface into the
header file of the new CNegativeCalc class. It also adds an
empty Calculate() function to the class since the class
now implements the IRSBizWareCalculator interface.
You are almost ready to write the Calculate() function in C++.
But first you need to understand how Visual C++ deals with
VARIANT data types.
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Working with VARIANTs in
Visual C++
Chapter 7
Visual C++ supports the VARIANT data type, but VARIANTs are
not handled as elegantly in Visual C++ as they are in Visual Basic.
When RSBizWare is installed, a set of C++ source code files that
contain utility functions are also installed. In the Variant.cpp file,
there are functions that are useful when handling VARIANT data
types. These files are installed in the \Program Files\Rockwell
Software\RSBizWare\RSBizWare Calculators\C++\utility
directory.
To use these VARIANT functions in your program, do the
following:
1. Copy the Variant.h and Variant.cpp files from the utility
directory (\Program Files\Rockwell
Software\RSBizWare\RSBizWare Calculators\C++\Utility,
by default) to your project's source directory.
2. Add the Variant.cpp file to your project's Source Files (by
right-clicking the Source Files folder, selecting Add Files to
Folder from the shortcut menu, and selecting the file).
3. Include Variant.h before the class definition in the
NegativeCalc.h header file (by adding an #include
“Variant.h” statement to the NegativeCalc.h header file).
An excerpt of the Variant.h include file is listed below that describes
the utility functions implemented in the Variant.cpp file.
// Returns TRUE if a VARIANT has a type of VT_ARRAY|R8
// (array of doubles).
bool IsVariantDoubleArray(VARIANT *varray);
// Returns the number of elements in the array contained in a //
VARIANT.
long GetVariantDoubleArraySize(VARIANT *varray);
// Converts a VARIANT 1-dimensional SafeArray of doubles to a
// non-variant double array.
bool ExtractVariantDoubleArray(VARIANT *varray, double *vals,
int sizeVals, int *numVals);
// Converts a non-variant double array to a VARIANT 1// dimensional SafeArray of doubles
void CreateVariantDoubleArray(double *vals, int numVals,
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VARIANT *varray);
You will use these utility functions when you write the Calculate()
function in the next section.
Writing the Calculate()
Function
Writing the Calculate() function (contained in the
NegativeCalc.h file) in Visual C++ involves the same basic steps
described in the Visual Basic section:
1. Accessing the passed in data set from the Configuration
Console.
2. Computing the desired algorithm.
3. Returning an output data set to the Configuration Console.
The parameters passed into the Calculate() function match the
parameters listed in the IDL code you previously looked at :
STDMETHOD(Calculate)(VARIANT xInArray,
VARIANT yMinInArray,
VARIANT yMaxInArray,
VARIANT CountInArray,
VARIANT * xOutArray,
VARIANT * yOutArray)
...
The syntax that Visual C++ uses to implement the function may
look strange at first, but it is the standard way to declare methods in
COM classes when using the Active Template Library (ATL)–a
library that simplifies much of the boilerplate code necessary when
writing COM classes.
The purpose of the analysis tool is to compute the negative value of
each Y-axis value that was passed into the function. To do this, the
program needs to loop through each value passed in and create a
corresponding output value that is the same numeric value except
with the sign changed (for example, the program must turn the value
5.3 into -5.3).
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The first thing the program must do is check that valid output
pointers were passed into the Calculate() function. The following
code is created automatically for Calculate() function by Visual
C++:
if (xOutArray == NULL)
return E_POINTER;
if (yOutArray == NULL)
return E_POINTER;
To complete the Calculate() function, do the following by adding
the specified code to the function (contained in the NegativeCalc.h
file):
1. Determine the size of the output array. The Configuration
Console does not assume that the output array will be the
same size as the input array. In this case, the program will
return X and Y arrays of the same size, but the program must
still allocate the arrays in the Calculate() function. The
following code determines the size of the input arrays by using
the GetVariantDoubleArraySize() utility function:
// Convert input args to double arrays
long xInSize = GetVariantDoubleArraySize(&xInArray);
long yMinInSize = GetVariantDoubleArraySize(&yMinInArray);
long yMaxSize = GetVariantDoubleArraySize(&yMaxInArray);
long countInSize = GetVariantDoubleArraySize(&CountInArray);
2. Extract the data from the input arrays. Remember, the data is
passed in as a series of VARIANTs which contain arrays of
double precision floating point numbers. Another VARIANT
utility function (ExtractVariantDoubleArray()) is used to
convert the VARIANTs into arrays of C++ native double
precision floating point numbers:
// Create double arrays to hold the values in the VARIANT
// array input args
double *xIn = new double[xInSize];
double *yMinIn = new double[yMinInSize];
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double *yMaxIn = new double[yMaxSize];
double *countIn = new double[countInSize];
// Integer to hold data values
int actualNum;
// Convert VARIANT arrays to non-VARIANT arrays
bool xInRet = ExtractVariantDoubleArray(&xInArray, xIn,
xInSize, &actualNum);
bool yMinRet = ExtractVariantDoubleArray(&yMinInArray, yMinIn,
yMinInSize, &actualNum);
bool yMaxRet = ExtractVariantDoubleArray(&yMaxInArray, yMaxIn,
yMaxSize, &actualNum);
bool countInRet = ExtractVariantDoubleArray(&CountInArray,
countIn, countInSize, &actualNum);
3. Create the output arrays. Since an output value is needed for
each input value, the size of the output arrays will be the same
size as the input arrays:
// Create temp double arrays, which can be destroyed after
// they are converted to VARIANT arrays by
// CreateVariantDoubleArray()
double *xOut = new double[xInSize];
double *yOut = new double[xInSize];
4. Change the Y values to negative values. This task would be
simple if you were dealing with single data points; however,
you have to take sampling into consideration because the
passed in data set may be sampled. If it is, the program must
contain an algorithm to determine the value to make negative.
In this program, you negate the average of the minimum and
maximum value passed in for each sample:
// Set first
for (int i =
{
xOut[i]
yOut[i]
}
point of horizontal line in output arrays
0; i < xInSize; i++)
= xIn[i];
= -1.0 * (yMinIn[i] + yMaxIn[i]) / 2.0;
5. Convert the output variables (xOut and yOut) into
VARIANTs so that they can be passed back to the
Configuration Console. Another VARIANT utility function
(CreateVariantDoubleArray()) is used to do this:
// Convert the temp double arrays to VARIANT arrays to return
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// to caller
CreateVariantDoubleArray(xOut, xInSize, xOutArray);
CreateVariantDoubleArray(yOut, xInSize, yOutArray);
6. Having completed the data algorithm, the only thing left to do
is to clean up the temporary variables used during the
computations. Make sure that you use the array delete
operator (delete[]) when deleting the temporary arrays,
otherwise your custom analysis tool will leak memory each
time it is run.
delete
delete
delete
delete
delete
delete
[]
[]
[]
[]
[]
[]
xOut;
yOut;
xIn;
yMinIn;
yMaxIn;
countIn;
The full Calculate() function along with the entire sample project
is installed with RSBizWare in the \Program Files\Rockwell
Software\RSBizWare\RSBizWare Calculators\C++\NegativeC
directory. You should refer to this sample project to see the exact
form of the code in the Calculate() function.
Saving and Compiling the
Project
There is one more piece of functionality you need to add to the
custom analysis tool DLL. Earlier, you saw how instances of
RSBizWare custom analysis tools belong to something called a
COM Category. To make sure the new custom analysis tool registers
as part of the category, do the following:
1. Copy the Register.h and Register.cp p files from the utility
directory (\Program Files\Rockwell
Software\RSBizWare\RSBizWare Calculators\C++\utility,
by default) to your project's source directory.
2. Add the Register.cpp file to your project's Source Files (by
right-clicking the Source Files folder, selecting Add Files to
Folder from the shortcut menu, and selecting the file).
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3. Include Register.h before the class definition in the
NegativeCalc.h header file (by adding an #include
“Register.h” statement to the NegativeCalc.h header file).
Before compiling the project, you need to alter the project settings as
follows:
1. Select Project > Settings.
2. On the dialog, select Win32 Release MinDependency from
the Settings For list at the top of the dialog box.
3. Select the C/C++ tab and remove the macro named
_ATL_MIN_CRT at the end of the Preprocessor definitions
box. (Note that this macro was removed from the example
project.)
4. Click OK to save your changes.
5. You are now ready to compile the project. You have several
options when compiling a COM DLL in Visual C++.
• It is recommended that you compile the project in debug
mode while developing the custom analysis tool. This will
allow you to step into the Calculate() function when it is
called from the Configuration Console. You will see how this
is done in "Debugging Custom Analysis Tools in Visual C++
(page 153)".
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• After the custom analysis tool is debugged, it should be
recompiled in non-debug mode for production use and
distribution. There are several choices of non-debug
compilation in Visual C++. You should select the Win32
Release MinDependency compilation mode. This minimizes
the dependencies of the compiled DLL so you don't have to
ship any other DLLs with the custom analysis tool.
To compile the project, select Build > Rebuild All.
Trying Out the Custom
Analysis Tool
Register your NegativeC custom analysis tool DLL as you did with
the sample VbFlat analysis tool (as described in ). The DLL will be
under either a Debug or ReleaseMinDependency directory,
depending on the mode in which you compiled the DLL.
After the analysis tool is registered, you can use it on a time-series
report object with the FactoryTalk Historian Classic Demo Pressure data point. Your report object should look like this.
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Debugging Custom Analysis
Tools in Visual C++
If your custom analysis tool does not work in the Configuration
Console the first time, you may need to debug your Calculate()
function. The easiest way to do this is to use the Visual C++
debugger when running the Configuration Console as follows:
1. Select Project > Settings from the menu.
2. On the Project Settings dialog box shown below, select the
Debug tab. Make sure you have the Win32 Debug selected
from the Settings For list.
3. On the Executable for debug session box, click the arrow
button to browse and select the Configuration Console
executable (\Program Files\Rockwell
Software\RSBizWare\RSBizWare Production Client.exe).
4. Click OK to save your changes.
Now, when you debug the project, the Configuration Console will
be started. You then can set debug breakpoints in your Calculate()
function. When you use your custom analysis tool in a time-series
chart, your breakpoints will be called in Visual C++. You can then
use the full power of the Visual C++ debugger to track down your
problem.
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Why Use Custom Analysis
Tools?
Chapter 7
The RSBizWare installation creates a directory structure that
contains samples and utility files that are useful when creating
custom analysis tools. The directory contents are described below.
• \RSBizWare Calculators: This is the root directory of the
Calculator SDK on the DVD.
• \RSBizWare Calculators\VB\NegativeCalc: The complete
Visual Basic project files for the NegativeCalc custom analysis
tool described in this chapter
• \RSBizWare Calculators\C++\NegativeC: The complete
Visual C++ project files for the NegativeC custom analysis
tool described in this chapter.
• \RSBizWare Calculators\C++\utility: This directory
contains C++ source files that implement utility functions
that are very useful when developing custom analysis tools
with Visual C++. One set of files (Variant.cpp, Variant.h)
contains functions that operate on VARIANT arrays. The
second set of files (Register.cpp, Register.h) contains functions
that register a custom analysis tool properly using COM
categories.
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Chapter 7 Creating RSBizWare Custom Analysis Tools
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Chapter 8
Object Permissions
An object permission is a privilege that is granted to security groups
or individual users that allows access to a specific object within the
client application. An example of an object permission for which
users and groups can be given privileges is the ability to edit a
particular report object. For example, if a user is granted the Edit
Report Object permission for the report object called Test Report
Object, then they will be able to make and save changes to that
report object.
Individual users can have object permissions granted to them, and
they can inherit object permissions from the security groups to
which they belong. For example, if a group has been granted the Edit
Report Object permission for the Test Report Object, users
assigned to that group are also able to edit the report object.
Object permissions are granted through the Configuration Console.
For more information, refer to the Configuration Console online
help.
You may also set the baseline permissions that will be given to a
certain group or user for every instance of an object type that is
created in the Configuration Console. For example, if you want a
user to have permission to edit every report object that is ever
created in the client application, you need to set the Edit Report
Object default security permission on the Report Object type for
the particular use . After you have assigned default permissions to a
type of object, the creator of a new object of that type may choose to
revoke an individual user’s permissions to his newly created object.
NOTE
Rockwell Automation Publication HIST-UM001K-EN-E-June 2014
Revoking permissions is performed in the Configuration Console. For
more information, refer to the Configuration Console online help.
157
Chapter 8 Object Permissions
Default object permissions are granted through the Service Console.
For information, refer to the RSBizWare Administration Guide,
"Configuring default object permissions".
Filter permissions
There are the following filter permissions:
Item
Description
Delete Filter
Allows the selected users or groups to delete the filter.
Author Licenses only.
Allows the selected users or groups to make changes to the filter.
Author Licenses only.
Allows the selected users or groups to grant security permissions for
the filter to other users or groups.
Author Licenses only.
Allows the selected users or groups to view the filter.
Edit Filter
Edit Filter Security
View Filter
Report permissions
There are the following report permissions:
Permissions
Description
Delete Report
Allows the selected users or groups to delete the report.
Author Licenses only.
Allows the selected users or groups to make changes to the report.
Author Licenses only.
Allows the selected users or groups to grant security permissions for
the report to other users or groups.
Author Licenses only.
Allows the selected users or groups to view the report.
For the user or group to be able to view the report, you must make
sure that the permissions for the report data sources, report objects,
and filters (optional) used on this report are also set for the selected
user or group.
Edit Report
Edit Report Security
View Report
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Object Permissions Chapter 8
Report data source
permissions
There are the following report data source permissions:
Item
Description
Allow <All> Filter Selection Allows the selected users or groups to select the (all) filter
from any column filter list associated with a report data
source.
Delete Report Data Source Allows the selected users or groups to delete the report data
source.
Author Licenses only.
Edit Report Data Source
Allows the selected users or groups to make changes to the
report data source.
Author Licenses only.
Edit Report Data Source
Allows the selected users or groups to grant security
Security
permissions for the report data source to other users or
groups.
Author Licenses only.
View Report Data Source
Allows the selected users or groups to view the report data
source.
Report object permissions
There are the following report object permissions:
Permission
Description
Delete Report Object
Allows the selected users or groups to delete the
report object.
Author licenses only.
Allows the selected users or groups to make
changes to the report object.
Author licenses only.
Allows the selected users or groups to grant security
permissions for the report object to other users or
groups.
Author licenses only.
Allows the selected users or groups to view the
report object. The report object will be available for
use by the selected users or groups.
Edit Report Object
Edit Report Object Security
View Report Object
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Rockwell Automation Publication HIST-UM001K-EN-E-June 2014
Index
Customizing Text Report Objects 90
A
A Quick Tour of a Sample Custom Analysis Tool
126
Ad Comment As 84
Add a Comment to a Value, X-axis, or Y-axis on
a Time-series Chart 79
Add a Saved Report Object to Your Report 45
Advanced Reporting Topics 97
Aggregate 93
Aggregate, Group, Format, Sort, Chart, and
Rename Columns 92
Analysis Tool Architecture 130
Analyzing FactoryTalk Historian Classic Data 41
Analyzing Non-RSBizWare Data 110
C
Changing Chart Component Properties 90
Chart 95
Collecting FactoryTalk Historian Classic Data 19
Configure the Report Object To Use Global
Credentials 48
Configure Time-Series Data Collection 22
Configuring Important Project Settings 137
Configuring the Plant Model 20
Connecting to the Information Services
Manager 14
Create a New Chart 51
Create a New RSBizWare Report 41
Create a New Text Report Object 60
Create a Report Data Source 111
Create a Simple Batch/Event Chart 76
Create a Time-series Chart 67
Create an External Data Source 110
Creating a New Project 137, 144
Creating RSBizWare Custom Analysis Tools 125
Customizing Charts 87
Customizing RSBizWare Charts and Tables 87
Rockwell Automation Publication HIST-UM001K-EN-E-June 2014
D
Debugging Custom Analysis Tools in Visual
Basic 142
Debugging Custom Analysis Tools in Visual
C++ 154
Deleting a Component 89
Developing Analysis Tools with Visual Basic
136
Developing Analysis Tools with Visual C++ 143
Documentation Feedback 164
E
Editing the Chart Title or Text Field 89
Enterprise Connectors 24
Exploring the User Interface 16
Export the Report to HTML 84
F
Features and Benefits 9
Filter permissions 158
Format 94
G
Getting Started 13
Group 94
I
Insert Text, Pictures, and Hyperlinks 42
Installation Assistance 164
Intended Audience 9, 125
Interpreting the Parameters Passed into the
Calculate() Function 133
161
Index
L
Limitations 134
Load the Report From File 85
Looking at the Type Library 135
M
Moving a Component 89
N
New Product Satisfaction Return 164
O
Object Permissions 157
Organize FactoryTalk Historian Classic
Reporting Tags 36
Q
Quick Filter 95
R
Referencing the RSBizWare Calculator
Component 138, 145
Registering a Sample Analysis Tool 127
Rename 95
Report data source permissions 159
Report object permissions 159
Report permissions 158
Resize Table Columns 92
Resizing a Component 89
Rockwell Automation Support 164
S
Save the Report 44
Saving and Compiling the Project 140, 151
162
Schedule a Report 105
Schedule a Report Object 102
Scheduling Report Objects and Reports 101
Shortcut Menus 17
Show and Hide Columns 91
Sort 94
Start Data Collection 39
Step 1
Create the Report Object 67
Plan the Chart 52
Start the Report Data Source Wizard 111
Start the Text Report Object Wizard 61
Start the Time-Series Data Collection Wizard 25
Step 2
Give the Report Data Source a Name 116
Name the Report Object 68
Select the Data On Which To Report 53, 61
Select the Source and Destination of the
Time-Series Data 25
Step 3
Add Reporting Tags 68, 73
Choose a Chart Type 53
Create or Select Data Points 27
Group the Records 62
Select a Database Table or View 117
Step 4
Apply an Analysis Tool 69
Choose the Columns That Will Be Included 117
Configure Collection Parameters 31
Describe the Data 53
Sort the Records 63
Step 5
Configure Transaction Settings 34
Customize the Chart Legend 70
Enable the Time Selection Toolbar 119
Format the Table 64
Select Summary or Detail 54
Step 6
Create Transactions 36
Insert Your New Chart Into the Report 71
Rockwell Automation Publication HIST-UM001K-EN-E-June 2014
Index
Name the Report Object 66
Select the Fields To Be Charted 55
Specify the Format of the Table or View 120
Step 7
Adjust the Time Range 71
Enter the Chart Title 56
Filter the Data 66
Specify the Role That Each Field Plays In
Time-Series Analysis 122
Step 8
Create a Data Point Configuration Table 123
Filter the Data 56
Insert Your New Table Into the Report 66
Step 9
Insert Your New Chart Into the Report 59
Remove a Reporting Tag or an Analysis Tool 76
T
The Excel Add-in 97
The Plant Model 19
The Report Design and Display Work Area 16
The Report Explorer 16
The RSBizWare Architecture 13
The RSBizWare Calculator COM Interface 134
Trying Out the Custom Analysis Tool 153
Trying Out the New Custom Analysis Tool 141
Tutorial 25
Types of control connectors for the data
collection 23
U
Using the Configuration Console 15
Using the Information Services Manager in
Internet Explorer 14
Using the Sample Analysis Tool for Time-series
Analysis 129
V
Value Comments 80
View the History of the Scheduled Task 109
W
Welcome to FactoryTalk Historian Classic 9
What a Time-series Data Set Looks Like 132
What is FactoryTalk Historian Classic? 9
What You Need to Know Before You Start 129
Where Can I Go for Help? 11
Why Use Custom Analysis Tools? 125, 155
Working With Chart 90
Working With the Component Parts of a Chart
88
Working with VARIANTs in Visual C++ 147
Writing the Calculate() Function 138, 148
X
X-axis Comments 81
Y
Y-axis Comments 82
Rockwell Automation Publication HIST-UM001K-EN-E-June 2014
163
Rockwell Automation Support
Rockwell Automation provides technical information on the Web to assist you in using its products.
At http://www.rockwellautomation.com/support/ you can find technical and application notes, sample code, and links to
software service packs. You can also visit our Support Center at https://rockwellautomation.custhelp.com/ for software
updates, support chats and forums, technical information, FAQs, and to sign up for product notification updates.
In addition, we offer multiple support programs for installation, configuration, and troubleshooting. For more
information, contact your local distributor or Rockwell Automation representative, or visit
http://www.rockwellautomation.com/services/online-phone.
Installation Assistance
If you experience a problem within the first 24 hours of installation, review the information that is contained in this
manual. You can contact Customer Support for initial help in getting your product up and running.
United States or Canada
1.440.646.3434
Outside United States or Canada Use the Worldwide Locator at http://www.rockwellautomation.com/rockwellautomation/support/overview.page, or contact your local
Rockwell Automation representative.
New Product Satisfaction Return
Rockwell Automation tests all of its products to help ensure that they are fully operational when shipped from the
manufacturing facility. However, if your product is not functioning and needs to be returned, follow these procedures.
United States
Outside United States
Contact your distributor. You must provide a Customer Support case number (call the phone number above to obtain one) to your
distributor to complete the return process.
Please contact your local Rockwell Automation representative for the return procedure.
Documentation Feedback
Your comments will help us serve your documentation needs better. If you have any suggestions on how to improve this
document, complete this form, publication RA-DU002, available at http://www.rockwellautomation.com/literature/.
Rockwell Automation maintains current product environmental information on its website at
http://www.rockwellautomation.com/rockwellautomation/about-us/sustainability-ethics/product-environmental-compliance.page.
Rockwell Automation Publication HIST-UM001K-EN-E-June 2014
Supersedes Publication HIST-UM001J-EN-P-December 2011
Copyright © 2014 Rockwell Automation Technologies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
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