Technologies for HP ProLiant 300-series G5 (Generation 5)

Technologies for HP ProLiant 300-series G5 (Generation 5)

Technologies for HP ProLiant 300-series G5 (Generation 5) servers

technology brief, 4th edition

Abstract.............................................................................................................................................. 2

Introduction......................................................................................................................................... 2

Processor technologies ......................................................................................................................... 2

Intel Xeon dual-core and quad-core processors .................................................................................... 2

Xeon dual-core processors ............................................................................................................. 3

Xeon quad-core processor ............................................................................................................. 3

AMD Opteron™ dual-core processor.................................................................................................. 4

New processor socket technology ...................................................................................................... 4

Memory technologies ........................................................................................................................... 5

I/O technologies ................................................................................................................................. 6

PCI Express technology..................................................................................................................... 6

Serial Attached SCSI technology........................................................................................................ 6

HP Smart Array E200 controller ..................................................................................................... 7

HP Smart Array P400 controller ..................................................................................................... 7

SAS and SATA Small Form Factor (SFF) hard drives ......................................................................... 8

Power management ............................................................................................................................. 8

Power meter .................................................................................................................................... 9

HP Power Regulator.......................................................................................................................... 9

High-efficiency power supplies ........................................................................................................ 10

Power Cap.................................................................................................................................... 10

Updated networking technologies........................................................................................................ 10

TCP/IP Offload Engine ................................................................................................................... 10

iSCSI ............................................................................................................................................ 11

Receive Side Scaling (RSS).............................................................................................................. 11

Mechanical design for serviceability .................................................................................................... 11

Improved manageability..................................................................................................................... 12

Latest-generation ProLiant 300 series servers ......................................................................................... 12

ProLiant ML 300 series servers......................................................................................................... 13

ProLiant DL 300 series servers ......................................................................................................... 14

Conclusion........................................................................................................................................ 16

For more information.......................................................................................................................... 17

Call to action .................................................................................................................................... 17

Abstract

This paper describes the major technologies implemented in the latest generation of HP ProLiant 300series servers. These technologies include dual-core and quad-core processors, double data rate-2

(DDR2) and fully-buffered memory modules, the latest serial input/output (I/O) technologies, power management technologies, multifunction network interface cards, mechanical design innovation, and

Integrated Lights Out 2 management.

Introduction

HP constantly advocates, tests, and adopts new industry-standard server technologies that improve the performance, capacity, and reliability of ProLiant servers. This paper summarizes the technologies implemented in the latest generation of the ProLiant 300-series servers, which include:

 Processor technologies

Memory technologies

I/O technologies

 Power management technologies

 Networking technologies

Mechanical design technologies

Management technologies

For complete specifications of all ProLiant-300 series servers, see the HP website at http://www.hp.com/products/servers/platforms

.

Processor technologies

ProLiant 300 series servers use the latest multi-core technologies from Intel and AMD. A multi-core processor has two or four separate execution cores on the same physical die so that it can perform more work within a given clock cycle. To take advantage of multi-core processing, software must be

“multi-threaded” so that it can be spread across multiple execution cores.

Intel Xeon dual-core and quad-core processors

Dual-core Intel ® Xeon™ 3000, 5000, 5100, and 5200 Sequence processors and quad-core Intel

Xeon 5300 and 5400 Sequence processors are based on the Intel Core™ microarchitecture. The

Core microarchitecture uses less power and produces less heat than previous generation Intel processors.

Dual-core processors using Hyper-Threading technology (with the exception of the

Xeon 3000 Sequence processors) can simultaneously execute four software threads, thereby increasing processor utilization. To avoid saturation of the Front Side Bus (FSB), the Intel 5000 chipset widens the interface by providing dual independent buses. The Intel Core microarchitecture features additional technologies that improve per-watt performance and energy efficiency. These technologies include Hardware Virtualization, Enhanced Intel Speed-Step® Technology, Supplemental Streaming

SIMD Extension 3 (SSSE3), and Intel Execute Disable Bit technology.

1

1 For additional information about Intel processors, see the HP technology brief titled “AMD Opteron™ and

Intel® Xeon® x86 processors in industry-standard servers” at http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/C02731435/C02731435.pdf.

2

Xeon d ual-core processors

The 64-bit Intel Xeon 3000 Sequence processors combine performance and power efficiency to enable smaller, quieter systems. Xeon 3000 Sequence processors run at a maximum frequency of 3.0 gigahertz (GHz), with 4 megabytes (MB) of L2 cache per core (Figure 1 left) and a maximum frontside bus speed of 1333 megahertz. These processors are compatible with IA-32 software and support single-processor operation. The latest Xeon 3000 Sequence processors use the Intel 3210 chipset which support Error Correction Code (ECC) memory for a high level of data integrity, reliability, and system uptime. ECC can detect multiple-bit memory errors and locate and correct single-bit errors to keep business applications running smoothly.

The 64-bit Intel Xeon 5000 Sequence processors have two complete processor cores, including caches, buses, and execution states. The Xeon 5000 Sequence processors run at a maximum frequency of 3.73 GHz, with 2 MB of L2 cache per core. The processor supports maximum front-side bus speeds of 1066 megahertz (Figure 1, center).

The 64-bit Xeon 5100 Sequence dual-core processor runs at a maximum frequency of 3.0 GHz with

4 MB of shared L2 cache and a maximum front-side bus speed of 1333 megahertz (Figure 1 right).

The Xeon 5200 processor runs at a maximum frequency of 3.0 GHz with 6 MB of shared L2 cache and a maximum front side bus speed of 1600 megahertz (Figure 2 left).

Xeon 5000, 5100, and 5200 Sequence processors use Intel 5000 series chipsets. These chipsets contain two main components: the Memory Controller Hub (MCH) and the I/O controller hub. The new Northbridge MCH supports DDR2 Fully-Buffered DIMMs (dual in-line memory modules).

Figure 1. Major components of dual-core Intel Xeon 3000, 5000, and 5100

Sequence processors

Xeon quad-core processors

The quad-core Intel Xeon 3200 Sequence processor is the first quad-core processor for single-socket platforms. The Xeon 3200 Sequence processor has two dual cores. Each pair of cores shares a L2 cache. The processors run at a maximum frequency of 2.66 GHz, with 8 MB of L2 cache per core, and support a maximum front-side bus speed of 1066 MHz. This configuration delivers a significant increase in processing capacity utilizing the latest Intel 3210 chipset, which supports DDR2 PC2-

6400 memory and PCI Express I/O slots.

Quad-core Intel Xeon 5300 and 5400 Sequence processors were the first quad-core processors for dual-socket platforms (Figure 2). Xeon 5300 and 5400 Sequence processors have two dual cores.

Each pair of cores shares a L2 cache. The 5300 processor runs at a maximum frequency of 3.0 GHz with 4 MB of L2 cache per dual core. The 5400 processor runs at a maximum frequency of 3.16

GHz with 6MB of L2 cache per dual core. This configuration delivers a significant increase in processing capacity utilizing the Intel 5000 series chipsets. ProLiant 300 series servers use the Intel

5000P and 5000Z chipsets, which support 1066-MHz and 1333-MHz Dual Independent Buses,

DDR2 FB-DIMMs, and PCI Express I/O slots.

3

Figure 2. Dual core Xeon 5200 and quad-core Intel Xeon 5200 and 5300 sequence processors

AMD Opteron™ dual-core and quad-core processors

Dual-core AMD Opteron Rev. F 2000 series processors feature HyperTransport™ technology, which provides a direct, scalable bandwidth interconnect between the processor, the I/O subsystem, and the chipset. The Opteron Rev. F processor runs at speeds up to 3.0 GHz with 1 MB of L2 cache per core (Figure 3). The processor features an integrated memory controller that allows the use of PC2-

5300 (DDR2-667) DIMMs. The AMD Direct Connect™ architecture replaces the FSB with direct communication links between each CPU, between CPU and I/O, and between CPU and memory.

HP will support AMD Opteron quad-core processors upon their availability. AMD states that these processors provide 40 to 70 percent greater performance than its current dual-core processors. For more information about multi-core processors, see the AMD whitepaper titled “Multi-Core

Processors—The Next Evolution in Computing.”

2

Figure 3. Major components of AMD Opteron Rev. F and quad core processors

New processor socket technology

The latest Intel 5000, 5100, and 5200 Sequence processors and AMD Opteron Rev. F processor packages use a processor socket technology called Land Grid Array (LGA) to enable higher CPU bus

2 For additional information about AMD processors, see the HP technology brief titled “AMD Opteron™ and Intel® Xeon® x86 processors in industry-standard servers” at http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/C02731435/C02731435.pdf

4

speeds. The processor package designs no longer have pins. Instead, they have pads of gold-plated copper that touch processor socket pins on the motherboard.

The processors must be carefully installed to avoid damage to the delicate processor socket pins, which could require replacement of the motherboard. HP engineers developed a special installation tool to simplify processor installation and reduce the possibility of damage to the socket pins.

Memory technologies

ProLiant 300-series servers support unbuffered, registered, and Fully-Buffered PC2-5300 (DDR2)

DIMMs as indicated in Table 1. Unbuffered DDR2 DIMMs place the load of all the DDR2 devices on the address bus, so they are typically used in systems with four memory slots or less. Registered and

Fully-Buffered (FB) DIMMs are used in systems with more than four memory slots. Registered DDR2

DIMMs place a maximum of two loads per DIMM on the memory bus, regardless of how many DDR2 devices are on each DIMM. The point-to-point FB-DIMM architecture enables the electrical load (and signal integrity) for each channel to remain constant, even as FB-DIMMs are added.

Table 1. Memory technologies supported by ProLiant 300-series servers

ProLiant server

ML310 G5

DL320 G5p

ML350 G5

DL360 G5

Unbuffered PC2-640

(DDR2-800)

X

X

PC2-5300

(DDR2-667)

Fully-Buffered PC2-5300

(DDR2-667)

X

X

ML370 G5

DL380 G5

X

X

DL385 G2 X

In contrast to the first generation of DDR memory, DDR2 memory devices operate at a lower voltage

(1.8V) to further reduce power consumption.

3

DDR2 devices use both higher clock frequencies to increase data transfer rates and on-die termination control to improve signal quality. At 200 MHz

(double-clocked to an effective frequency of 400 MHz), DDR2 increases memory bandwidth to

3.2 GB/s.

3

For additional information about DDR2 memory technology, refer to the HP technology brief titled “Memory technology evolution: an overview of system memory technologies” at http://www.hp.com/servers/technology.

5

I/O technologies

The latest generation of ProLiant 300 series servers features PCI Express, Serial-Attached SCSI (SAS), and Serial ATA (SATA) I/O technologies. PCI Express allows expansion cards with various capabilities to be added to the system. SAS is a serial communication protocol for direct attached storage devices such as SAS and SATA small form factor (SFF) hard drives.

PCI Express technology

The PCI Express (PCIe) serial interface provides point-to-point connections between the chipset I/O controller hub and I/O devices. Each PCIe serial link consists of one or more dual-simplex lanes. Each lane contains a send pair and a receive pair to transmit data at the signaling rate in both directions simultaneously (Figure 4). PCI Express 1.0 has a signaling rate of 2.5 Gb/s per direction per lane, resulting in an effective maximum bandwidth of 2 Gb/s (250 MB/s) per direction per lane after accounting for 20 percent serial encoding overhead. Therefore, a x4 link—with 4 send and receive pairs—has an effective bandwidth of 2 GB/s and a x8 link has an effective bandwidth of 4 GB/s.

This flexibility allows slower devices to be given a single lane with a relatively small number of pins while faster devices can be given more lanes as required. For example, the latest Smart Array SAS controllers have x4 and x8 PCIe I/O connectors.

Figure 4. PCI Express has an effective bandwidth of 250 MB/s per direction per lane after accounting for the overhead of serializing/deserializing encoding.

Link size x1 x4 x8

Max. bandwidth

(Send or receive)

250 MB/s

1 GB/s

2 GB/s

Total (Send and receive)

500 MB/s

2 GB/s

4 GB/s

Serial Attached SCSI technology

SAS is a point-to-point architecture in which each device connects directly to a SAS port rather than sharing a common bus like parallel SCSI devices. Point-to-point links increase data throughput and improve the ability to locate and fix disk failures. More importantly, the SAS architecture solves the parallel SCSI problems of clock skew and signal degradation at higher signaling rates.

4

ProLiant 300 series servers support SAS and SATA SFF and LFF drives

5

by using the Smart Array

E200, P400, or P800 SAS Controllers (Figure 5). For the 1U ProLiant DL365 and DL360 G5 servers, the controller logic is embedded on a Smart Array E200i or P400i Controller mezzanine card. The

ProLiant ML350 G5 server has the Smart Array E200i controller embedded on the system board.

4

For more information about SAS technology, refer to the HP technology brief titled “Serial Attached SCSI

5 technology” at http://h18004.www1.hp.com/products/servers/technology/whitepapers/proliant-storage.html.

ML310, DL320, and ML350 models support LFF SAS or SATA drives.

6

Figure 5. HP Smart Array P400 (left), E200, and P800 (right) controllers

A battery-backed write cache (BBWC) is available as an option for Smart Array E200 and P400 controllers. The cache buffers disk writes so that disk I/O can be handled efficiently. The battery prevents information in the buffer from being lost in case of an unexpected system shutdown. In the case of a complete system failure, the controller and disks can be moved to a different server, where the controller will flush out the cache to the disks after power has been restored. In the case of a controller failure, the cache module and disks can be moved to a working controller, where the cache will be flushed out to the disks. The battery will last at least two days without receiving any power from the computer.

The controllers support Online Drive Flashing. This feature allows for disk drive firmware updates to be pre-loaded onto the controller. The controller will subsequently flash the firmware onto the disk drives at the next reboot.

HP Smart Array E200 controller

The E200 is designed as an entry level PCIe SAS RAID controller. The E200 controller has a x4 PCIe

I/O connector and is available in full-size and mezzanine card (E200i) form factors. The full-size

E200 card has 8 SAS ports and utilizes DDR1-266 cache memory. The E200i mezzanine card has 4

SAS ports. The E200 supports RAID 0/1 and can be upgraded for RAID 5 with the 128-MB BBWC module.

HP Smart Array P400 controller

The P400 controller is ideal for internal disk storage and storage enclosures that require advanced

RAID capability. The P400 controller has a x8 PCIe I/O connector and supports RAID levels 0, 1,

1+0, and 5. Mirror splitting is available for RAID 1 arrays. This functionality allows the user to split a

RAID 1 mirror into two separate RAID 0 arrays (breaking the mirror). Mirror recombining is the opposite, combining two RAID 0 arrays into a RAID 1 mirror. The BBWC is not required for this feature. RAID 6 (double parity) is available when using the BBWC. Some server configurations include a BBWC on the P400 controller. The BBWC is also available as an option.

7

The BBWC is required for capacity expansion, which allows the user to add a physical disk to an existing array. The controller then recalculates parity and balances the data across the disks. During the expansion, data and logical structures on the array are preserved.

The P400 controller supports recovery. In the event of a failed attempt to flash the controller’s ROM, the recovery ROM reverts to the previous good ROM.

HP Smart Array P800 controller

The P800 controller is HP's first 16 port serial attached SCSI (SAS) RAID controller PCI-Express (PCIe).

It is the highest performing controller in the SAS portfolio and provides new levels of reliability for HP servers through its support of the latest SCSI technology and advanced RAID capabilities. This controller ships standard with RAID 6 Advanced Data Guarding (ADG) and supports over 100 hard drives.

The P800 has 16 total ports of 3G SAS, 2 x4 external connections, 2 x4 internal connections, and one x8 2.5G PCI-Express host interface. The controller supports both internal and external direct attached SAS/SATA drives/enclosures concurrently. It is ideally suited for SAS based servers and storage enclosures that require mission critical reliability and high performance.

SAS and SATA Small Form Factor (SFF) hard drives

SAS architecture enables system designs that deploy high-performance SAS

6

and high-capacity

SATA

7

SFF drives. This capability provides a broad range of storage solutions that give IT manage the flexibility to choose storage devices based on reliability, performance, and cost. rs

SFF 2.5-inch drives offer several advantages over 3.5-inch drives. The smaller physical size of the drives increases the number of gigabytes per U that can be implemented in a server rack. SFF drives have been shown to be more reliable than their larger counterparts, primarily due to their smaller parts and better vibration control.

Using SFF drives also reduces power consumption and heat generation. SFF SAS drives consume approximately half of the power used by a 3.5-inch drive of comparable capacity. This reduction in power consumption allows SFF drives to run cooler than 3.5-inch drives.

SFF drives also deliver higher performance because the smaller platter size reduces seek times because the heads have a shorter distance to travel. The peak data transfer rate for the current generation of SAS drives is 3 Gb/s in full duplex mode. RAID performance naturally benefits from having more spindles; and with SFF, more disks can fit into a given amount of space.

Power management

HP power management tools help to accurately monitor server power usage, improve server power efficiency, and provision power usage of one or more ProLiant servers. These tools include

 Power meter for monitoring server power usage

Power Regulator for higher server efficiency

High-efficiency power supplies

 A new power capping feature for provisioning power to groups of ProLiant servers

6

Please refer to the technology brief “Serial-Attached SCSI technology” available at http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c01613420/c01613420.pdf

for more information about these features.

7

Please refer to the technology brief “Serial ATA technology” at http://www.hp.com/servers/technology

f or more information about these features.

8

Power meter

By integrating a power meter, most ProLiant 300 servers analyze actual server power use. The power meter is accessible through iLO and through external power management software such as HP Insight

Power Manager (IPM). IPM also enables consolidating the power data for multiple servers to a central location. This information can also be used to charge business units or third parties with the actual energy operational costs associated with workload processing.

As of the publication date of this paper, the ProLiant 300-series servers that include the power meter are the ML350 G5, ML370 G5, DL360 G5, DL365, DL380 G5, and DL385 G5. For the most up-todate information, see the HP Power Regulator website at http://h18013.www1.hp.com/products/servers/management/ilo/sup_servers.html

HP Power Regulator

The latest server processors from Intel and AMD have power state hardware registers that are available (exposed) to allow IT organizations to control the performance and power consumption of the processor. These capabilities are implemented through Intel’s Enhanced SpeedStep® Technology and demand-based switching and through AMD’s PowerNow with Optimized Power Management

(OPM). With the appropriate ROM firmware or operating system interface, administrators can use the exposed hardware registers to switch a processor between different performance states (also called Pstates

8

) that have different power consumption levels. For example, HP developed a power management feature called HP Power Regulator that utilizes P-state registers to control processor power use and performance. These capabilities have become increasingly important for power and heat management in high-density data centers, and when combined with data-center management tools like Insight Power Manager, IT organizations have more control over power consumption in the data center.

HP Power Regulator

9

is a standard feature on HP ProLiant servers except for the 100 series. Using the

P-states implemented in the CPUs, Power Regulator allows IT organizations to minimize power consumption, maintain desired performance levels, and maximize facility resources. Power Regulator is implemented in firmware and is therefore not affected by operating system or application upgrades.

Power Regulator can be configured for Static Low Power Mode, Static High Performance Mode, or

Dynamic Power Savings Mode. It can also be set to OS Control mode, to allow for OS control of the processor P-states. With HP Static Low Power Mode, the processors are configured to run continuously in a lower power state. This is useful for customers with power-constrained data centers who require the most efficient use of power for each server. For servers that operate in moderately or minimally loaded environments, there will be little, if any, performance degradation in Static Low Power Mode.

Alternatively, in HP Static High Performance mode, the processors operate continuously at the highest power and performance.

HP Dynamic Power Savings Mode lowers overall server power use without noticeably affecting system performance. With this mode enabled, the system ROM uses CPU performance registers to monitor processor use up to eight times a second which dynamically modifies the frequency and voltage of each processor based on workload. The processor operates in a high power state only when needed, thus reducing the overall system power use.

8 The ACPI body defines P-states as processor performance states. For Intel and AMD processors, a P-state is defined by a fixed operating frequency and voltage.

9 Information available online at http://h18013.www1.hp.com/products/servers/management/ilo/sup_servers.html

9

Dynamic Power Savings Mode is the default Power Regulator Mode for the latest generation of Intelbased 300 class ProLiant servers. As of the publication date of this paper, ProLiant ML370, ML350,

DL360, and DL380 servers support Dynamic Power Savings Mode.

OS Control Mode enables operating systems with OS Power Management features to control the CPU

P-states. When enabled and appropriately configured, the operating system will modify processor frequency and voltage to achieve power savings similar to the HP Dynamic Power Savings Mode.

This is the default mode for HP ProLiant servers with CPUs that do not support HP Dynamic Power

Savings mode.

High-efficiency power supplies

All ProLiant servers are equipped with high-efficiency switch-mode power supplies, when compared to typical power supplies in the industry. For example, a typical white-box server power supply has an efficiency rating between 65 and 70 percent. ProLiant servers can operate with efficiencies of

85 percent or greater when connected to a high-line voltage source.

ProLiant-server power supplies operate at maximum efficiency when connected to high-line input power (200 to 240 VAC). As with typical power supplies in the industry, operating at low line power

(100 to 120 VAC) causes the power supply to operate at a lower efficiency and to draw more current for the same power output.

Power Cap

Using updated iLO 2 firmware (version 1.30) and updated System ROM/BIOS (dated 5/1/2007), selected HP ProLiant servers now have the ability to limit the amount of power consumed. Customers may set a limit in watts or Btu/hr. The purpose of this limit is to constrain the amount of power consumed which reduces the heat output into the data center. The iLO 2 firmware monitors the server’s power consumption, checks it against the power cap goal, and, if necessary, adjusts the server’s performance to maintain an average power consumption that is less than or equal to the power cap goal.

As of the publication date of this paper, the ProLiant 300-series servers that support the Power Cap feature include the ML350 G5, DL360 G5, ML370 G5, and DL380 G5.

Using the IPM v1.10 plug-in to Systems Insight Manager v5.1, customers may set power caps on groups of supported servers. The IPM software statically allocates the group power cap among the servers in the group. The group cap is allocated equitably among all servers in the group based on a calculation using each server’s idle and maximum measured power consumption.

The latest iLO 2 firmware may be found at http://www.hp.com/go/ilo . Updated System ROM/BIOS may be found on the Software and Drivers download page for each server model at http://www.hp.com/go/proliant . The latest Insight Power Manager software may be found at http://www.hp.com/go/ipm .

Updated networking technologies

The embedded NC373i and NC371i Gigabit Server Adapters have been upgraded to include support for TCP/IP Offload Engine technology as well as future support for iSCSI and Receive Side

Scaling.

TCP/IP Offload Engine

The increased bandwidth of gigabit Ethernet networks has resulted in increased demand for CPU cycles to manage the network protocol stack. This means that even a fast CPU will become inefficient in handling application instructions while data is being transferred to or from the network. Computers

10

most susceptible to this problem are application, web, and file servers that are required to devote a large percentage of processing power to dealing with the traffic through the TCP/IP stack.

The TCP/IP Offload Engine, or TOE, helps speed up network-intensive applications by offloading

TCP/IP-related tasks from the processors onto the network adapter. Any ProLiant or blade server with an HP multifunction NIC supports TOE. TOE network adapters are designed with on-board logic to process common and repetitive tasks of TCP/IP network traffic. This effectively eliminates the need for the CPU to segment and reassemble network data packets, which significantly increases application performance of servers attached to gigabit Ethernet networks.

TOE is supported on Microsoft Windows Server 2003 when the Scalable Networking Pack is installed. With the delivery of Windows Server 2008, the TCP/IP Offload Chimney that shipped in the Scalable Networking Pack will be boxed as part of the latest Windows operating system.

iSCSI

iSCSI is a standard that implements the SCSI protocol for interacting with storage devices over a

TCP/IP network. While iSCSI can be implemented over any TCP/IP network, the most common implementation is over gigabit Ethernet. iSCSI serves the same purpose as Fibre Channel in building storage area networks (SANs), but iSCSi avoids the cost, complexity, and compatibility issues associated with Fibre Channel SANs. iSCSi devices (initiators) access storage resources (targets) using the iSCSI protocol. While the target is usually a hard drive enclosure or another computer, it can also be any other storage device that supports the iSCSI protocol, such as a tape drive.

Initiators include software initiators and Host Bus Adapters (HBAs). Software initiators require CPU resources to manage the protocol stack. A more efficient approach is to offload the management of the protocol to an iSCSI HBA, such as the NC373i Integrated Multifunction Gigabit Server Adapter.

An iSCSI HBA appears to the operating system as a SCSI HBA.

The ProLiant Essentials Accelerated ISCSI pack enables the embedded Multifunction NIC on a ProLiant server to run accelerated iSCSI over IP networks. iSCSI allows block-level storage data to be transported over widely used IP networks, enabling end users to access the storage network from anywhere in the enterprise. Additionally, it offloads the iSCSI function to the NIC rather than taxing the CPU of the server. The Accelerated iSCSI Pack is for use with initiator software only, and the licenses are port-based.

Receive Side Scaling (RSS)

The Network Driver Interface Specifications (NDIS) define a common Application Programming

Interface for network interface cards on Microsoft operating systems. Early versions of NDIS did not differentiate between computers with single or multiple CPUs. The result was that one CPU was forced to handle the entire network processing load. NDIS v6.0 includes support for multiple processors.

With NDIS v6.0, RSS can dynamically balance the processing of received network packets across multiple processors. With Windows Server 2003, the installation of Scalable Networking Pack is required for RSS support; however, with the delivery of Windows Server 2008, RSS will be supported as part of the Windows operating system.

Mechanical design for serviceability

Whenever possible, ProLiant 300 series servers use common hardware components. This requires customers to keep fewer spare parts in stock and greatly simplifies ordering and storing replacement parts. Common hardware components include power supplies, SAS and SATA SFF drives, Smart

Array RAID controllers, the Systems Insight Display, and rails and racks.

11

Improved manageability

The latest generation of ProLiant servers features Integrated Lights-Out 2 (iLO 2) remote management, the fourth generation of Lights-Out for HP servers. iLO 2 is a combination of hardware and firmware integrated into the server to provide remote management capabilities over Ethernet. iLO2 is active even when the OS is not operating. The iLO 2 management processor obtains its power from the auxiliary power plane of the server, so it is always available when the server is plugged into a power source. There are three levels of licensing for iLO 2: iLO 2 Standard, iLO 2 Select Packs, and iLO 2

Advanced Packs. Each offers different levels of remote access capabilities. iLO 2

10

provides full graphics support using either a dedicated iLO 2 port or a shared network connection. To allow for easy, direct connection and to aid in troubleshooting, the latest ProLiant 300 series servers have a front video connector in addition to two USB 2.0 ports.

11

Some 300-series servers include a Systems Insight Display located on the front of the unit (see Figure

6). This display puts all system health information on one convenient location without having to open the server. For some servers, the Systems Insight Display is mounted on a hidden slide-out assembly so that it can be viewed by pressing an eject button. As of this writing, models ML370, DL380, DL385,

DL365, and DL360 have Systems Insight Display.

Figure 6.

Systems Insight Display

Latest-generation ProLiant 300 series servers

The latest generation of ProLiant 300-series servers include three tower models—the ML370 G5,

ML350 G5, and ML310 G5—and six dense rack-based models—the DL385 G2, DL380 G5, DL365,

DL360 G5, and DL320 G5p. The ML370 G5 and ML350 G5 servers are also available as rackbased models. Some of these platforms include performance models with the latest performance technologies and enterprise-class availability features pre-installed.

10

For more information about iLO 2, refer to the HP technology brief titled “Integrated Lights-Out technology: enhancing the manageability of ProLiant servers” available at http://www.hp.com/servers/technology.

11

The DL360 and DL365 have one USB port. The ML350 does not offer a front video port.

12

ProLiant ML 300 series servers

ProLiant ML servers are optimized for expansion. The ML370 G5, leader in the 2P performance space, improves on the G4 server with a faster processor, bigger memory footprint, more I/O slots, support for more drives, and improvements in server management. The ML350 G5 provides excellent price/performance features, and it has a bezel featuring access to five media bays and the SFF drives. The ProLiant ML310 G5 server is a secure, affordable foundation for small businesses and remote sites.

Table 2. ProLiant ML 300 server series comparison

ML370 G5 ML350 G5 ML310 G5

Processors

(maximum)

Maximum frequency

Front side bus

L2 cache

Chipset

Memory

Max. memory

Max. internal drives

I/O slots

Disk controller

Network adaptor

Form factor

(2) Intel Xeon 5000,

5100, or 5200 dual-core or

(2) Intel Xeon 5300 or

5400 quad-core

Xeon 5000 – 3.73 GHz

Xeon 5100 – 3.00 GHz

Xeon 5200 – 3.33 GHz

Xeon 5300 – 2.66 GHz

Xeon 5400 – 3.16 GHz

Up to 1333 MHz

2x2MB L2 (Xeon 5000)

1x4MB L2 (Xeon 5100)

1x6MB L2 (Xeon 5200)

2x4MB L2 (Xeon 5300)

2x4MB L2 (Xeon 5400)

Intel 5000P

PC2-5300 DDR2

FB-DIMMs

64 GB

16 SAS or SATA SFF

(2) PCI-X 133 MHz

(7) PCIe x4 (6 available)

Smart Array P400 or

E200

(2) embedded NC373i

Multifunction Gigabit

Adapters with TOE

Tower and 5U rack

(2) Intel Xeon 5000,

5100, or 5200 dual-core or

(2) Intel Xeon 5300 and

5400 quad-core

Xeon 5000 – 3.73 GHz

Xeon 5100 – 3.00 GHz

Xeon 5200 – 1.86 GHz

Xeon 5300 – 2.66 GHz

Xeon 5400 – 2.83 GHz

Up to 1333 MHz

2x2MB L2 (Xeon 5000)

1x4MB L2 (Xeon 5100)

1x6MB L2 (Xeon 5200)

2x4MB L2 (Xeon 5300)

2x4MB L2 (Xeon 5400)

Intel 5000Z

PC2-5300 DDR2

FB-DIMMs

32 GB (dual core)

32 GB (quad core)

8 SAS or SATA SFF or 6

SAS or SATA LFF

(1) PCI X 133 MHz

(2) PCI-X 100 MHz

(3) PCIe x4

Optional kit to add (2) additional PCI X 100 MHz

Smart Array E200i

NC373i Multifunction

Gigabit Adapter with TOE

Tower and 5U rack

Intel Xeon processor 3000

Sequence (Quad-core and

Dual-core) or Intel Core2

E4400 or Intel Pentium

2160 or Intel Celeron 420

Xeon 3200 – 2.4GHz

Xeon 3000 – 2.66GHz

Core2 – 2.0GHz

Pentium – 1.8GHz

Celeron – 1.6GHz

Up to 1333 MHz

Xeon 3200 – 8MB

Xeon 3000 – 4MB

Core2 – 2MB

Pentium – 1MB

Celeron – 512KB

Intel 3210

PC2-6400 unbuffered

(DDR2-800)

8 GB

4 SAS or SATA LFF (Large

Form Factor)

(1) PCIe – x8

(3) PCIe – x1

(1) PCI-X 100 MHz

Integrated SATA RAID

0/1 or

Integrated SAS RAID 0/1

NC326i

5U

13

ProLiant DL 300 series servers

ProLiant DL servers are density optimized for rack installations. The DL380 G5 improves on the G4 server with faster processors and memory, a bigger memory footprint, more I/O slots, support for more drives, and improvements in server management. The DL385 G2 improves on the first generation server by offering the latest AMD processor technology, higher-speed memory, and eight

SAS SFF drives.

The front panels of both servers feature two USB connectors, a video connector, and a clearly visible

Systems Insight Display.

Table 3. ProLiant DL 380 G5 and DL385 G5 server series comparison

DL380 G5

Processors (maximum)

Maximum frequency

Front Side Bus

L2 cache

Memory

(2) Xeon 5000, 5100 or 5200 dual core or

(2) 5300 or 5400 quad-core

Xeon 5000 – 3.73 GHz

Xeon 5100 – 3.0 GHz

Xeon 5200 – 3.3 GHz

Xeon 5300 – 3.0 GHz

Xeon 5400 – 3.16 GHz

1333 MHz

2x2MB L2 (Xeon 5000)

1x4MB L2 (Xeon 5100)

1x6MB L2 (Xeon 5200)

2x4MB L2 (Xeon 5300)

2x4MB L2 (Xeon 5400)

PC2-5300 DDR2 FB-DIMMs

DL385 G5

(2) dual-core AMD Opteron Rev.F 2000 series

3.0 GHz

2x1MB L2

PC2-5300 (DDR2-667)

Chipset

Max. memory

Max. internal drives

I/O slots

Smart Array controller

Network adaptor

Form factor

Intel 5000P

32 GB

8 SFF SAS

(1) low profile PCI-Express x8

(1) PCI-Express x4

(2) PCIe x8 or (2) 64-bit PCI-X

133 MHz

P400 or E200

ServerWorks HT-2100 Northbridge

32 GB

8 SFF SAS

(4) PCI-Express: three x8, one x4

Optional PCIe/PCI-X riser: two PCI-X, one

PCI-e x8

Optional PCIe riser: one x16, one x4

P400 or E200

(2) embedded NC373i

Multifunction Gigabit Adapters with TOE

2U

(2) embedded NC373i Multifunction

Gigabit Adapters with TOE

2U

14

The ProLiant DL365 is an offering in the 1U server space that features AMD Opteron Rev. F processors. The DL365 use the same chassis as the DL360 and, therefore, fits into existing server racks.

The front panels of the servers feature a dedicated USB port, a video port for direct connection, and a

Systems Insight Display mounted on a slide-out assembly. On the DL365, the Systems Insight Display provides system operational status specific to the AMD-based motherboard.

Table 4. ProLiant DL365 and DL360 G5 server series comparison

Processors (maximum)

Maximum frequency

Front Side Bus

Smart Array controller

Network adaptor

(2) AMD Opteron Rev.F dualcore processors with Direct

Connect Architecture

3.0 GHz

L2 cache 2x1 MB L2 2x2MB L2 (Xeon 5000)

1x4MB L2 (Xeon 5100)

1x6MB L2 (Xeon 5200)

2x4MB L2 (Xeon 5300)

2x4MB L2 (Xeon 5400)

Memory PC2-5300 (DDR2-667) PC2-5300 DDR2

FB-DIMMs

Chipset ServerWorks

Northbridge

Intel 5000P

Max. memory 32 GB 32 GB

Max. internal drives 6 SFF SAS or SATA drives 6 SFF SAS or SATA drives

I/O slots (1) PCIe x16 (x8 electrical)

(1) PCIe x8 (x4 electrical)

P400i (RAID 0,1,5) or

E200i (RAID 0,1)

(2) NC373i Multifunction

Gigabit Adapters with TOE

1U

(2) Intel Xeon 5000, 5100, or

5200 dual core with VT technology or

(2) 5300 quad-core

(2) 5400 quad-core

Xeon 5000 – 3.73 GHz

Xeon 5100 – 3.0 GHz

Xeon 5200 – 3.33 GHz

Xeon 5300 – 2.66 GHz

Xeon 5400 – 3.16 GHz

Up to 1333 MHz

(1) PCIe x16 (x8 electrical)

(1) PCIe x8 (x8 electrical)

P400i (RAID 0,1,5) or

E200i (RAID 0,1)

(2) NC373i Multifunction Gigabit

Adapters with TOE

1U Form factor

15

The ProLiant DL320 G5 server is a single socket 1U server for a highly manageable IT infrastructure and for Internet and edge applications for SMB and OEM appliance customers.

Table 5. ProLiant DL320 G5 server series

Processors

(maximum)

Front side bus

L2 cache

Intel Xeon processor 3000 Sequence (Quad-core and Dual-core) or

Intel Core2 E4400 or Intel Pentium 2160 or Intel Celeron 420

1333 MHz up to 8MB of L2 Cache

Memory

Max. memory

Max. internal drives

I/O slots

PC2-6400 DDR2 Unbuffered ECC

8 GB

Up to 2 or 4 LFF (Large Form Factor) SAS or SATA

(1) full-length/full height PCI-Express x8 or optional PCI-X 64/133;

(1) half length/low-profile PCI-Express x8

Embedded SATA controller with RAID 0/1 Disk controller

Network adaptor NC326i PCIe Dual Port Gigabit Adapter

Remote management

Form factor iLO 2

1U

Conclusion

The latest generation of ProLiant 300-series servers continues to build on the success of their predecessors, offering both high performance and reliability. With the introduction of new industrystandard technology, HP has refreshed and expanded its ProLiant 300 Series Server line to take advantage of these advances and to improve on existing features. ProLiant 300 series servers continue to offer customers the most choices in the dual-processor server arena and continue to expand into even more powerful quad-core processors. These servers also reflect the continued movement towards serial I/O technologies by incorporating them as standard features.

16

For more information

For additional information, refer to the resources listed below.

Resource description

ISS Technology Communications webpage

HP Advanced Data Guarding Web site

“Serial ATA technology” technology brief

“Serial-Attached SCSI technology” technology brief

Smart Array P600 array controller

Call to action

Web address http://www.hp.com/servers/technology http://h18004.www1.hp.com/products/servers/proliantstorage/arr aycontrollers/adg/ http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c0

0301688/c00301688.pdf http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c0

1613420/c01613420.pdf http://h18004.www1.hp.com/products/servers/proliantstorage/arra ycontrollers/index.html

Send comments about this paper to

[email protected]

.

© 2005, 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. The only warranties for

HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.

AMD, AMD Opteron, and PowerNow are trademarks of Advanced Micro

Devices, Inc.

Intel, SpeedStep and Xeon are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel

Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries and is used under license.

HyperTransport is a licensed trademark of the HyperTransport Technology

Consortium.

TC071105TB, November 2007

Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project