Firestorm: Caen
by Jökull Gislason
Contents
The Caen Campaign
3
Campaign Outcome
12
Firestorm: Caen
Using the Map
How Frestorm works
4
5
6
Turns
13
Firestorm Troops
20
General - Planning Phase
6
Firestorm Terms
26
Commander - Battle Phase
7
The General’s Wargame
Setting up the Campaign
27
28
Firestorm: Caen Campaign Map
32
Strategic Phase
11
Introduction
21 ARMY GROUP
PERSONAL MESSAGE
FROM THE C-in-C
To be read out to all Troops
1. The time has come to deal the enemy a terrific blow in Western Europe.
The blow will be struck by the combined sea, land and air forces of the Allies-together constituting one great Alled team, under
the supreme command of General Eisenhower.
2. On the eve of this great adventure I send my best wishes to every soldier in the Allied team.
To us is given the honour of striking a blow for freedom which will live in history; and in the better days that lie ahead men
will speak with pride of our doings. We have a great and a righteous cause.
Let us pray that “ The Lord Mighty in Battle “ will go forth with our armies, and that His special providence will aid us in
the struggle.
3. I want every soldier to know that I have complete confidence in the successful outcome of the operations that we are now
about to begin.
With stout hearts, and with enthusiasm for the contest, let us go forward to victory.
4. And, as we enter the battle, let us recall the words of a famous soldier spoken many years ago:“ He either fears his fate too much,
Or his deserts are small,
Who dare not put it to the touch,
To win or lose it all.”
5. Good luck to each one of you. And good hunting on the main land of Europe
B.L. Montgomery
General
C.inC. 21 Army Group
I am a great fan of the Firestorm system. Making my Flames
of War battles part of something bigger adds to the pleasure
of the games and brings them into closer context with
history. I find designing these Firestorms fun in itself. To
study a Campaign and identifying the areas of importance,
the units involved and the general evolvement of the fighting
is very interesting and a challenge to capture in a Firestorm
Campaign. So far I have already done both Firestorm: Greece
while I was involved in playtesting Burning Empires and
Firestorm: Lorraine when we were playtesting Blood Guts
and Glory. But Normandy I picked out of special interest.
monumental. In my experience Firestorm campaigns work
better if they are smaller in scope. Smaller campaigns are
also closer to company level and work better with Flames of
War games. I decided to break up the Normandy Campaign
into smaller sections and start with the British and Canadian
landings. I do have plans for further Normandy campaigns
if I have the time. I even have some ideas to link them
together at the end. But that would only be for the most
serious wargamers. Some gamers might think it is appealing
to run huge campaigns but I have found that Campaigns run
best in small timeframes.
When I started I looked at the entire Normandy Campaign
from Operation Neptune, the D-Day landings, to the
closing of the Falaise Pocket but found that task to be too
As with my previous Firestorm Campaigns I started by
reading and rereading a lot of books I could get my hands
on about the landings of Sword, Juno and Gold as well as
ii
the British Airborne landings up to the capture of Caen and
Operation Goodwood. Then I drew up a sketch of the map
and then pondered on the uniqueness of the Campaign and
how to best represent this in Firestorm and Flames of War.
From there I made up just a few special rules that reflect
the actual campaign. If players find that Firestorm Caen
seems like a slogging match and battle of attrition then that
is the desired effect. The first rule I decided to add was a
stacking limit to Firestorm Ground Troops. The British and
Canadians were numerically superior to the Germans but
within the tight confines of Normandy they could not use
their numbers to their advantage. It is very important for
the British and Canadians to push constantly forward to
make room for new reinforcements and try hard to use their
superiority. The second important rule was to introduce
German Tactical Reserves. This would give the Germans
just a little flexibility in defence and at the same time force
the British and Canadians to make the Germans commit
their reserves before attacking on a different axis. I had a
serious time making the beaches work. If the British and
Canadians lost here at the start there would be no Campaign.
A suggestion from Stephen Smith (Tinfish on the forums)
pointed me in the right direction. The beach landings will
always succeed but the degree of their success will affect the
following turns greatly.
I spent many weeks getting this Campaign to work right
and would like to thank my playtest group of Einherjar for
their contribution. It is very important to have fresh minds
handle a Campaign to see where improvement is needed and
my fellow Einherjar did present me with several problems
I did not see by myself. The end result is all the better for
their help.
Do I need Firestorm–Bagration or
Market Garden to play?
Nope. Firestorm: Caen is mostly self-contained. All the rules
you will need are included to play, so it is not necessary to
own Firestorm: Bagration/Market Garden. Downloadable
tokens are provided although you can easily substitute them
with other models.
For those who are familiar with
Firestorm
What is different?
There are a few variations and differences between Firestorm
Caen and previous Firestorms Bagration, Market Garden,
Warsaw, Greece and Lorraine. To help players out here is a
list of the major differences:
Aircraft: Unlike Bagration and Market Garden where
Aircraft work like other Firestorm Troops then in Firestorm
Caen players have a number of sorties available to them
each turn. You can allocate a sortie to an attack or defence.
Sorties are provided for each turn so there is no need to roll
for losses; you always get what is allocated for the turn. Once
used an Aircraft cannot be used again that turn.
Attacker: In Firestorm Caen, the player with the initiative
automatically becomes the attacker in the Flames of War
game; this supersedes any other special rules, both in missions
and army lists. That means that it is possible that an Infantry
Company might attack an Armoured Company for example
in Hasty Attack. Hopefully the addition of Firestorm Troops
will offset any imbalance for the attacker.
Attacks: In this version of Firestorm only the attacking
player can capture an area. If the defender wins, he has done
just that, successfully defended. Also in order to make an
attack you must commit at least one Firestorm ground Troop
to the battle which effectively means you can only attack
from regions containing Firestorm Troops. Empty areas can
still be attacked into and they defend.
Beach Defences: In addition to any Firestorm Troops the
beach areas; Gold, Juno and Sword are defended by off-shore
warships. If the Germans attack the beaches then the Allies
may defend with up to two Firestorm Troops and Naval
Gunfire Support.
Carpet Bombing: In turns 4 and 5 the British can make one
carpet bombing attack in both turns. Hundreds of Lancaster
and Halifax bombers will attack before the start of one battle
in which they are the attacker. Carpet bombing is never used
in defence. This is in addition to any Firestorm Troops used
in that battle and must be announced at the same time as
Firestorm Troops are allocated. After deployment but before
the first turn work out a Preliminary Bombardment as on
page 26 in Normandy Battles.
D-Day: The first turn of Firestorm: Caen is D-Day and plays
differently from any other turn. This includes beach assaults
and the airborne landings. Note that the beach landings will
always succeed. But the outcome of the success will affect
the remaining game. Another thing is that Firestorm Troops
are used very differently during the beach assaults and the
airborne landings so read the first turn carefully.
Firestorm Troops Value: In Firestorm Caen you will have
an option of adding points to your force rather than specific
units. You may not have the correct troops available or would
like to do things a little differently. Each Firestorm Troop
will have a value listed. You will notice that this is less than
the actual value of the unit presented and this is intentional.
Aircraft and Naval Gunfire Support cannot be exchanged for
points.
German Defenders: Only the primary German forces are
represented in Firestorm: Caen but the Germans had a
number of other divisions battling in the Campaign but
these were stretched out and were fed to the fighting in
small groups and rarely fought as a coherent fighting units.
So instead of having their own markers the 272 Infantry
Division, 276 Infantry Division, 277 Infantry Division,
326 Infantry Division, 346 Infantry Division, 352 Infantry
Division, 711 Infantry Division, 716 Infantry Division and
16 Luftwaffe Field Division are represented differently. Every
German defending area is considered to have 1 German
Defender Firestorm Troop. No marker is provided and
the support is variable and ranges from a couple of sniper
teams or minefields to PaK or 8.8cm FlaK guns. Not that
the Germans can never use these for attack and they count
as a Firestorm Troop if used. If the German player wishes
to commit any other two Firestorm Troops then these are
ignored.
German Tactical Reserve: This is a rule that allows the
Germans to keep one or two units uncommitted at the start
of each turn. Each turn will list how many can be placed in
Tactical Reserve for the next turn. Later these may be added
to any battle, one or both to the same battle, either in defence
or attack. Once committed they act like any other Firestorm
Troop with the exception that they must arrive as reserves
in the battle even if there would not normally be any. Once
committed they remain in play as if they had been in the area
they were placed and do not return to the Tactical Reserve.
The German Tactical Reserve is a key to this Firestorm
Campaign. It gives the Germans much needed support since
they lack sufficient forces to be everywhere and at the same
time once the Allies have forced the Germans to commit
their reserve they can change the axis of their attack.
Mini-Campaign: Firestorm Caen is a full Campaign but
rules are provided to run it for smaller groups or two man
play. Never the less each turn has a suggested number of
battles and this number will give you a tight timeframe. More
battles favour the British and Commonwealth troops while
fewer favour the Germans so it is advised to stay within the
frame of the suggested battles.
No Exploitation Moves: There are no exploitation moves in
Firestorm Caen. Every area must be fought for.
Stacking: In Firestorm Caen the maximum number of
Firestorm Troops allowed is three. Neither player may
intentionally go over this limit and if forced to retreat and
there is no area they can retreat to due to stacking restrictions
then the retreating Firestorm Troop is considered destroyed
and placed with the Reinforcements. The troops may have
escaped but have lost their equipment and must await new
materials.
Supply: Allied units trace supply to any of the three beach
areas, Gold, Juno or Sword while the Germans can trace
supply to areas A-6, C-7, D-1, D-3, D-6 and D-7. From
these areas supplies can be traced through any number of
friendly areas to the fighting units. If an area cannot trace
supply it is considered out of supply and must fight as such.
This also presents the danger of Firestorm Troops being
captured.
Turns: Each turn has a number of special rules and it is
suggested that you read the briefing of each turn well. Each
turn also has a suggested number of battles ranging from 3
to 8 in number. There is a reason to this suggested number
of battles and that is to keep the campaign tense and within a
reasonable timeframe. I have played many Firestorm Games
and found this crucial to a good outcome.
Victory conditions: Firestorm Caen uses the standard Victory
Point scoring system where players score points for certain
areas and for destroying Firestorm Troops.
What Forces Should I Play?
Ideally you should play forces from the D-Day Intelligence
Handbooks, Overlord and Atlantik Wall for this Firestorm.
But you should only do this if you agree and have the right
forces. It is more important to have fun, so fight using what
forces you can agree on.
Report Back!
All feedback on the game is happily received and I would love
to hear from you gamers how you find the Campaign. You can
write your reports and comments on www.flamesofwar.com
forum under the Battle Reports and Campaigns section.
THE Caen Campaign
“Believe me, the first 24 hours of the invasion will be decisive. The fate of Germany will depend on it. For
the Allies, as well as for us, this will be the longest day.”
Fieldmarshal Erwin Rommel
Operation Overlord was the code name for the Battle of
Normandy. It was the invasion to liberate Western Europe
from German rule and bring the war to an end. At the
Casablanca Conference Churchill and Roosevelt had already
decided on the unconditional surrender of the Axis as the
only acceptable result. At the Tehran Conference the big
three met, Stalin, Churchill and Roosevelt and the invasion
was set to happen in May 1944.
The landings were hard, despite the fact that Rommel had
not been able to construct the defences to his wishes. On
Sword beach the Allies to relatively light casualties and
managed to push 8 km (5 mi) inland but were met by a
counterattack made by the 21. Panzerdivision. They dug in
and Caen would remain in German hands or contested until
18 July by which time the city was a heap of rubble and
leaving tens of thousands homeless and about 2000 dead.
The attack on Normandy is the largest amphibious invasion
in history with almost 7000 vessels involved. Pas de Calais was
an obvious landing area and the shortest and most accessible
point but this would be obvious to the Germans as well and
the Allies decided against it and went for Normandy. Here
the Americans would land at either side of the River Vire
estuary at two beaches codenamed “Omaha” and “Utah”
while the British and Canadian forces would land to the east
at three beaches codenamed “Sword”, “Juno” and “Gold”.
The Canadian forces landed on Juno beach and the first wave
suffered the second highest casualties of the beaches on DDay. Despite this the Canadians had started their advance
inland within hours of landing with a single troop of tanks
managing to reach their final objective phase line but they
had to retreat having outrun their infantry support.
Montgomery had set ambitious objectives for D-day
including the capture of Caen located 15 km (9.5 mi) inland
from the beaches. Caen had a population of 60.000 and the
centre of political and economic power in the region and
the centre for road and rail networks. The capture of Caen
would severely disrupt the ability of the Germans to fight
and reinforce their armies and open the way to the plains
beyond that were well suited to tank warfare and the Allied
numerical superiority.
The first invading troops were the airborne forces and
Operation Tonga was the codename given to the landing
of the British 6th Airborne Division. The division was to
capture bridges over the Caen canal and the Orne river as
well as attacking and destroying the Merville Gun Battery
and then hold and secure a bridgehead on the east bank of the
Orne and around the bridges until linked up with the Allied
ground forces. The 6th Airborne Division was successful in
all their operations and severely limited the ability of the
Germans to respond to the beach landings. After that they
would form static defences on the left flank of the Allied
bridgehead until mid-August, preforming admirably but
suffering heavy casualties.
It was the veteran 50th Northumbrian Division that landed
at Gold beach. Casualties were at first heavy, partly because
the swimming Sherman DD tanks were delayed. However
the Northumbrians overcame these difficulties and advanced
to the outskirts of Bayeux. After the Canadians it was the
Northumbrians that came closest to achieving its objectives
on D-day.
What followed was as series of operations aimed at expanding
the Allied bridgehead and achieving the breakthrough but the
battle did not go as planned and dragged out for two months
against hard fighting against the Germans. The Germans
devoted most of their reserves at holding Caen and this
sector and therefore the German forces facing the American
invasion were spread thin. Eventually the Americans broke
through and form the southern part of the encirclement of
the Falaise pocket.
On 1 July in an argument with OKW between Keitel and
Rundstedt, Keitel asked “What shall we do?” to which
Rundstedt replied “Schluss mit dem Krieg, Idioten!” which
translates “Finish with the war, idiots!” or sue for peace. For
this Rundstedt was dismissed by Hitler who would recall
him to service on 1 September, just in time for Operation
Market Garden.
FIRESTORM: Caen
Firestorm: Caen covers the Operation Overlord from
Operation Neptune on the 6 June to the end of Operation
Goodwood around 21 July 1944, in the British and
Canadian sector, using the Firestorm system. This campaign
allows you to re-fight part of Operation Overlord on a grand
scale. While the course and outcome of the real battles can’t
be changed, the outcome of your campaign is up to you.
Either side can win. Even if the Allies have an advantage in
initiative then they will be hard pressed to break through the
Axis defence.
No matter who wins, the campaign is a great opportunity to
get in plenty of Flames of War games, play new opponents,
win glory for your army, and perhaps to meet new friends
and rewrite history along the way!
Why Play a Campaign?
The short answer is to play more games, and to have those
games mean something in a bigger context. Rather than just
adding to your tally of wins and losses, your victories could
result in the encirclement of enemy forces, the capture of
a vital territory, or the cutting of the enemy off from their
reinforcements. All of these things happen in the campaign
and they all have a major effect on the games that follow.
Every battle makes an immediate difference to the outcome
of the whole campaign.
As a club or shop, the benefits of a campaign are similar. It’s
a great reason to get together with your friends and play lots
of games. It’s also a good excuse to have a workshop weekend
beforehand and build up the club’s stock of terrain!
The Caen Campaign
Firestorm: Caen uses a map to plot the strategic situation and
show the effects of your table top games on the battles for
Caen. All of the important units, territory, and objectives of
the operation are represented on the map. Your units will
clash at important locations in Normandy with the best
forces from both sides, such as the Leibstandarte SS Adolf
Hitler (LSSAH) and the famous 7th Armoured Division the
Desert Rats.
Campaign Turns
Firestorm: Caen has five Campaign Turns, each turn
consisting of a variable number of battles and representing
a certain period of the campaign. For turns 2 to 5 you will
be asked to roll a D3 (a six sided dice where 1&2 = 1, 3&4
= 2 and 5&6 = 3) and add a number to your roll. This is
the recommended amount of battles for each turn. If you
are running a campaign with more players you might want
to add a few battles to each turn but then make sure that
happen all over the board, if the Allies get too many battles
the Germans will have a hard day. The five turn limit on the
campaign also makes it a realistic commitment for both the
organiser and the players.
Flexibility
As with any Firestorm Campaign you are allowed certain
flexibility. Firestorm: Caen is intended to be fun so if you
all agree then feel free to make small adjustments to fit your
needs. Players use their normal Flames of War forces to fight
battles to capture areas, reinforced by the main combat units
shown on the campaign map. Each game the player makes
a new force to respond to the situation they face, allowing
them to recover from previous defeats and fight on. While
players may lose the support of main combat units destroyed
in previous battles, they always get their core force. This
has the advantage of keeping the campaign fun right to the
end. It is simply not possible for one side to become much
stronger than the other, so every battle is winnable and every
fight counts. This flexibility applies to players as well as their
forces. While fielding a Commonwealth or Axis force is nice
from a historical viewpoint, it doesn’t matter if you don’t
have one, you can fight with any force you have. Firestorm:
Caen is best suited for standard 1000-1500 point games
(I recommend 1250 as an average starting force), but you
certainly can play whatever points you and your opponent
would like. Small games are generally resolved more quickly
and remember that you add the Firestorm Troops to this total
so the games are in effect bigger. This helps generate quick
results which will keep your campaign moving quickly.
Ultimately, the size of your force is not an issue. You can play
big or small battles or anything in between. It is also clever
to play really big team battles from now and then around
key battles. You can even swap sides if you want to (although
turning traitor can mark you as a target for your former
comrades!). All that matters is that you are playing games,
contributing to the campaign’s outcome, and having fun.
Terrain
There are three terrain types in Firestorm: Caen. The battles
took place at the end of the tight Bocage country with most
of the area east of Caen as open farmland, dotted with small
villages and gentle hills. So some areas will be Bocage and
others more open plains. Then there is Caen itself which will
be a heavily damaged city with mostly difficult going and
a lot of cover. In addition to this then the rivers Orne and
Odon run on the borders of areas. If they should be attacked
across they should form part of your terrain, usually in the
defenders advantage. In fact there are a number of other
rivers in the area but they affected the battles to a less extent.
For the beach landings fortifications played a big role and
you should have these available.
What are You Waiting For?
Read through the Firestorm—Caen rules, get everyone
together, organise the venue, and start playing. There’s
nothing else needed to begin, so you can start right away!
using the MAP
The Firestorm: Caen campaign map forms the playing board for the campaign. It is divided into 26 areas. Each area is
numbered with a letter and a number, from A1 to D8. Some areas are also marked with their value in Campaign Victory
Points. Both sides have a Reinforcement Pool where troops that have been destroyed are placed prior to being rebuilt and sent
back into action as well as new units arriving. The map has a Campaign Turn Counter to indicate the current turn (out of 5
turns), a summary of the Turn Sequence, and the Victory Point Control Indicator showing which side is winning.
Rivers as area borders
Supply
If an area is attacked over a river then a river should run
through no-man’s land. This river should have at least one
crossing for every 40 to 60cm / 16” to 24”.
Each side must trace supply to their supply areas. For the
Allies these are the landing beaches, areas A-2, A-3 and A-5.
For the Germans it is the areas to the south and east, A-6,
C-7, D-1, D-3, D-6 and D-7.
Campaign Turn Counter
Turn Sequence Summary
Victory Point Control Indicator
Firestorm Troop Deployment
Refer to each turn description. For the most part deployment
is not set as the Campaign is flexible and there is an influx
of new Firestorm Troops each turn. A full description of the
Firestorm Troops can be found after the Campaign Outcome
chapter.
How Firestorm Works
Commanders
Two Generals
Commanders make up the bulk of players in Firestorm: Caen.
They are the players that actually fight the tabletop battles
that decide the outcome of the campaign. Commanders play
their games of Flames Of War in the Battle Phase. Unlike
other versions Firestorm: Caen can be easily played with only
2 players.
Each side has a General who is in charge of strategy. The
General devises the plan in the Planning Phase for the
Commanders to execute in the Battle Phase. Once the
Commanders have fought all of their games, the two Generals
redeploy and reinforce their armies in the Strategic Phase
ready for the next campaign turn. Once the Generals have
finished their planning, they step into the Commander’s role
during the Battle Phase and play tabletop games. Then they
step back into the General’s role for the Strategic Phase.
Campaign Turn
Turns are the essence of Firestorm: Caen. Each turn is played
differently from the last and are described further on. A
campaign turn consists of three phases: the Planning Phase,
the Battle Phase, and the Strategic Phase. In the Planning
Phase at the start of the turn the Generals decide on their
plans. The Commanders then execute the plans by playing
games in the Battle Phase. There is no limit to the number
of games that can be played in the Battle Phase, and each
Commander can participate in as many battles as they
want to. At the end of the campaign turn, both Generals
reorganise their forces in the Strategic Phase ready for the
next campaign turn.
One Organiser
The campaign also needs an Organiser to set it up and make
sure that everything runs smoothly. The Organiser may
choose to play in the campaign as well if they wish, or they
may simply be the owner of the store where the campaign is
being played. The chief responsibilities of the Organiser are
selecting the scenario that will be played, arranging a suitable
venue, and getting plenty of players involved.
There are three types of participants in Firestorm: Caen: the
Commanders, the Generals, and the Organiser. The rules for
the campaign are separated into three parts corresponding to
these three roles.
GENERAL – PLANNING PHASE
There are many ways of planning a battle and experienced generals will have their own way of doing things. This section
outlines a simple step-by-step approach to planning your campaign that can help you on your way to victory. Choose the
parts that work for you and use them to plan your victory.
1. Determine the Number of Battles
this Turn
First thing you need to do is to determine the number of
battles. This gives you a number between three and eight,
depending on the turn and place the Battle Turn marker on
the correct number. That is the number of Battles for this
turn.
2. Determine Initiative Bonus
The Allies always win on a tied roll throughout the game.
In addition they will get and initiative bonus, +1 for turns
two and three and then +2 for turns four and five. This
reflects the Allied overwhelming Air Superiority and better
logistics.
3. Plan your games
Depending on the size of the group you may want to spend
some time planning ahead and make strategic decisions. But
then you are off to play actual games.
COMMANDER – BATTLE PHASE
The Battle Phase is where you and your Commanders fight their battles.
As the General you are expected to lead your army into battle. Taking your own force onto the battlefield and engaging the
enemy inspires confidence. Once the Planning Phase is finished, its up to you and your Commanders to fight the Battle
Phase. For the rest of the Campaign turn they will fight battles using the three steps of the Battle Phase: Manoeuvre Step,
Combat Step, and After Action Step.
Step ONE – MANOEUVRE
Each Commander fights Flames Of War battles to advance their armies on the campaign map. The more victorious battles
Commanders fight during a Campaign Turn the better chance their army has to win the campaign.
1. Select an Opponent
Your opponents in Firestorm come from the other
Commanders participating in the campaign. Find an
opposing Commander and challenge them to a game of
Flames of War. It doesn’t really matter if the people you play
are on your side or even part of the campaign. If you can’t
find an opposing Commander to play, just grab anyone who
is available as the opposing Commander.
2. Determine Initiative
In Firestorm-Caen the initiative passes from one player to
the other. Both players roll one dice and apply any turn
modifiers. The side that has the higher score wins the
initiative, becomes the attacker and therefore can choose
where the battle will be fought. The attacker must attack but
since only the defender can lose an area the attacker will only
be risking his Firestorm Troops. He will also automatically
be the attacker in any mission played and this supersedes
any other rule including forces that always attack or always
defend.
3. Place a Battle Arrow
After you win initiative, mark the areas on the Campaign
map where you will battle using a Battle Arrow. If you win
the initiative select an area that your side controls to attack
from and an area that the enemy controls to attack into.
Place a Battle Arrow pointing from your area into the enemy
area you are attacking.
Important: In Firestorm-Caen you are only allowed to attack
from areas containing Firestorm Troops. The first must be
a Ground Troop; Aircraft are not sufficient but can be the
second Firestorm Troop. Empty areas always defend and can
add Aircraft.
Note that from the second turn onwards the Germans are
always considered to have at least German Defence present.
This can be used as one of the German Firestorm Troop
options allowed. Otherwise empty defending areas receive
a force to the agreed amount of points but no Firestorm
Troops.
4. Choose Firestorm Troops
Firestorm Troops represent the most powerful units that
fought in Normandy. You can strengthen your force with
these troops. Both the Axis and Allies have Firestorm Troops
to assist their armies in the campaign.
You may add up to two Firestorm Troops from the area
you are fighting in to your Flames of War force. Place these
Firestorm Troops on the Battle Arrow. Treat these Firestorm
Troops as extra Divisional Support choices in your force.
You do not need to have Firestorm Troops to defend. Not
having Firestorm Troops simply means that you will not gain
additional troops for your Flames of War games. Nor do you
have to commit troops even if you have them, except the
attacker must place 1 Firestorm Troop in attack.
There are a few special rules regarding Firestorm Troops in
Firestorm-Caen.
Air support - No player is allowed to select Air Support in
their force list, the only way these units become available is
as Firestorm Troops. This includes all Allied attack Aircraft
and AOP. The Germans have no Air support in the game.
Attack Aircraft are available as special Air Sorties and AOP
are part of the British and Canadian AGRA (Artillery Group
Royal Artillery). The AOP come with the AGRA, they count
as the same Firestorm Troop, and work as normal AOP but
the Attack Aircraft work differently from other Firestorm
Troops. They never start on the Map but can be called as
sorties anywhere to assist in battles. Only one sortie may be
assigned to each battle. Air support counts as a Firestorm
Troop towards the two available. In attack Aircraft can only
be the second unit placed, the first Firestorm Troop must be
a ground unit. Each turn will list the number of available
Aircraft to the Allies. Once used, the Air Firestorm Troop is
placed aside and cannot be used again during turn. There is
no need to roll to destroy Aircraft as every turn starts with
the listed number of sorties available.
Beach Naval Defence - Once taken the areas of Gold,
Juno and Sword are defended by off-shore warships. If the
Germans attack these beaches then the Allies may add Naval
Artillery to their defence. This is in addition to the two
Firestorm Troops allowed and is not represented by a token.
Carpet Bombing - In turns four and five the Allied player
receives one Carpet Bombing attack each turn. This can
be used in attack only. This is in addition to any Firestorm
Troops, so the Allied player can have two Firestorm Troops
and a Carpet Bombing. Declare that you will use Carpet
Bombing at the same time as you declare what Firestorm
Troops you will use. Carpet Bombing represents a preliminary
attack by Halifax Bombers against an area before the attack.
After setting up the game but before starting turn 1, then
resolve a Preliminary Bombardment as listed on page 26 in
the book Normandy Battles.
Firestorm Troop points value - Unlike previous games
Firestorm: Caen gives you an option to add points to your
force rather than the Firestorm Troop listed. So instead of the
platoon listed you may add points to your force. The points
are listed in the upper right corner with each Firestorm
Troop. You will notice that they are of less value than the
Firestorm Troop itself. That is intentional to encourage you
to have the right Troops present but it gives you flexibility
and an alternative if you do not have every unit. Aircraft and
Naval Gunfire Support cannot be exchanged for points.
German Defence Troop - As well as the listed forces and
Firestorm Troops the Germans had a number of other units
present. But like most of their forces these had to be rushed
piecemeal into the defence and rarely could fight as a complete
unit. Instead they are scattered around the countryside. In
the game this has the effect that in defence the Germans are
always considered to have a German Defence Troop present
and this can be used as a Firestorm Troop. If used it counts
as one Firestorm Troop and will give the Germans a variable
defence unit, see the summary for Firestorm Troops.
German Tactical Reserve - In turns two to five the Germans
may hold one or two Firestorm Troops in Tactical Reserve.
This means that the Firestorm Troops are not placed on the
map but held in reserve. During the turn the German player
may place one or both Firestorm Troops into a battle in
either attack or reserve as if the Firestorm Troops had been
the areas. After that they are committed and remain in play
on the map as any other Firestorm Troops but may advance
and retreat as normal. The only drawback is that the must be
placed in reserve in the Flames of War Game even if there
are normally no reserves. Even if the Germans are attackers
they start in Reserve. Normally as regular reserves, if the
mission has Germans in delayed reserve then they must also
be placed in delayed reserve. In missions with other reserves
they are simply added to those reserves and are not rolled for
separately.
5. Check for Supply
An area is considered in supply if it can trace an uninterrupted
line through friendly areas to supply area. This line can be
as long as you want but must be able be traced through
continuous friendly areas all the way. When attacking see
if you are in supply from the area you attack from rather
than into to determine if you are in supply. Otherwise you
must fight Out of Supply. Roll a D6 and consult the Out of
Supply table. The effects last for the duration of the game.
Out of Supply Table
Die Roll
Effect
1 or 2
Moral Reduced – For the duration of the turn all units fight at one lower motivational level,
Fearless become confident, confident become Reluctant and Reluctant Platoons only pass a
Motivation Test on a roll of 6.
3 or 4
Strength Reduced – Before adding Firestorm Troops to your force, you must reduce the size of
your force by 20%, e.g. if you would have fielded a 1250 point force, you now have only 1000
points for the battle. Firestorm Troops are not affected.
5
No Effect
6
Fight to the Death – For the duration of the battle all units fight as they are one motivational level
higher. Reluctant become Confident, Confident become Fearless and Fearless pass all Motivation
Tests on a roll of 2+.
Step two – Combat
Once you are prepared for battle then you must identify your mission, bring your army to the table and battle your opponent
in a Flames Of War game. Make sure both of you add your Firestorm Troops to your forces.
1. Identify Your Mission
2. Play Flames of War Mission
You are now ready to fight a battle. The next step is deciding
on the mission that you will play.
Now is your chance to prove your mettle under fire. Bring
your Flames of War army to the field and vanquish your
foe for the glory of your side. Play the mission as a normal
Flames of War game. You and your opponent should agree on
the size of game. You could fight your battle with 800, 1000,
1250, or more points. You might even want to mix things up
playing different sized games throughout the campaign.
The first turn has several fixed battles with fixed missions,
read the rules for Turn 1 D-Day.
For other battles the best way of choosing which mission
to play is simply to decide with your opponent or roll for a
mission on the Random Mission table page 256 in the MiniRulebook. Or if you agree use any other method.
Important Change: In Firestorm-Caen, the attacker in
Firestorm, the player with the initiative automatically
becomes the attacker in the Flames of War game, this
supersedes any other special rules including forces that
normally Always Attack or Always Defend.
Terrain - The terrain is either Bocage, open plains or city
ruins (Caen). Set up the table accordingly. Bocage should
be heavy terrain with roads and bocage. Open plains should
be more open but with corn fields, small villages and rolling
hills. Caen should be a ruined city and very hard for vehicles
to move around in. If the attack crosses the Odon or Orne
rivers then a river should be placed in No Man’s Land. For
the beaches you will need fortifications and preferably a
special beach table.
Remember, although you both start with the same number
of points, any Firestorm Troops that you add to your force
are in addition to this. This could result in one side being
considerably stronger than the other if the strategic situation
is heavily in their favour. If you find yourself outnumbered
like this, don’t panic. Fight hard and try to hold your
positions while your comrades in other areas take advantage
of your sacrifice to restore the situation.
LEND-LEASE FORCES
Everyone can participate in a Firestorm campaign. If you do
not have the right forces, use your normal force as a Lendlease force sent to support one side or the other.
Forces from any nationality can play in the campaign on either
side. Use the normal Firestorm Troops for reinforcements.
This can result in some unusual force compositions, e.g. A
Soviet Heavy Guards Tank Regiment supported by German
Infantry. Ideally this is best played with their historical forces.
But remember to be flexible and have fun!
Step three – After Action
No job is done until the paperwork is finished!
2. Retreat Defeated Troops
At the end of your battle you need to take note of your Victory
Points. Remove your Battle Arrow from the Campaign
Map, unless there was already a Battle Arrow in place for
these areas when you started your battle and it has not yet
been removed. If there are multiple simultaneous battles in
your area, leave your Battle Arrow in place and wait until
the earlier battles are resolved before completing your After
Action Step.
When you have been defeated in battle you must surrender
the battlefield to your opponent. In order to save your force
from utter destruction retreat is your only recourse.
1. Roll to Destroy
Committing your Firestorm Troops to battle offers great
rewards, but brings great risk. Their destruction in battle will
leave you weakened, hindering your general’s battle plan.
All Firestorm Troops that fought in the battle are at risk
of destruction in the campaign if they are defeated on the
battlefield. While tactical losses can be made good by a
victorious army, a defeated army must conduct a difficult
retreat that can result in the total destruction of its best
troops. For each Firestorm troop used in the battle, regardless
of its fate during the game, the opposing Commander will
roll a die. The score needed to destroy the Firestorm Troop
in the campaign is given on the Roll to Destroy table and
depends on the number of Victory Points that you scored.
Remove any Firestorm Troops that are destroyed from the
Campaign Map and place them in the Reinforcement Pool.
Roll to Destroy
Your
Victory Points
Score needed to Destroy
Enemy Firestorm Troops
6+
4+
5
5+
3 or 4
6
2 or less
No roll
If your opponent scored at least three Victory Points in the
game and scored more Victory Points than you did, then
you have been defeated and must retreat. After rolling for
destruction, all remaining Firestorm Troops in the defeated
Commander’s area must be retreated. Attacking troops
simply return from the area they attacked from while defeated
defending troops must retreat to any adjacent areas of their
choice that are under their control. Retreating units may not
cross a minefield unless they control a road or track over it. If
there are no adjacent friendly-controlled areas to retreat into,
then all of the Firestorm Troops in the area, including any
that were destroyed, are captured and permanently removed
from the campaign. This earns the victorious Commander
extra Campaign Victory Points. Report the capture of these
Firestorm Troops to your General. In case of a 3-3 tie and if
neither scored at least 3 victory points the battle counts as
the defender victory.
3. Advance Victorious Troops
As an attacker vanquishing your foe you have gained control
of his position. To claim your prize, march your forces
forward and take control of the battlefield. As the defender
you have managed to defend your territory and remain in
control but do not capture the attacker’s territory.
If as attacker you defeated your opponent, you now control
the area the defeated forces retreated from. Place a Control
marker on your new area to show that you now control it.
As the victorious Commander, you may move up to three
Firestorm Troops, into the newly-controlled area from any
adjacent areas. The first troops to move into the newlyacquired area must be any surviving Firestorm Troops that
you used in your battle. Once these troops have advanced,
you may select the remaining Firestorm Troops to advance
from any adjacent area. Attacker may also bring into the area
any adjacent Supply Markers and Rommel.
If there were multiple battles being fought in the areas you
were fighting in, it is entirely possible for you to capture an
area from the enemy and occupy it, while another player on
your side loses the area that you just fought out of. While
this can be disturbing, as it often leaves you cut off, such is
the ebb and flow of battle.
Stacking Restrictions - In Firestorm Caen there can only be
three Firestorm Troops in any area. Aircraft, Naval Artillery
and German Defence Troops are not counted. If you are
forced to retreat and you cannot because stacking restrictions
in the available areas then the Firestorm Troops are destroyed
and placed in reserve. In reality the men escaped but had to
leave their equipment and need to be refitted to fight again
and this equipment must be brought in.
10
STRATEGIC PHASE
1. Land Allied Firestorm Troops on
4. Total Victory Points
the beaches
At the end of each turn the Allied player may land
reinforcements on the three beaches, Gold (A-2), Juno (A-3)
and Gold (A-5). These are the only areas his reinforcements
may land and they are subject to stacking rules. A maximum
of three Firestorm Troops may be in an area at any time.
It is imperative that the Allied players advance from the
beaches to make room for new reinforcements. Every turn
the Allies receive new units. These are placed directly in
reinforcements and must be placed on the beaches subject to
stacking restrictions. All Allied Firestorm Troops destroyed
are also placed in reinforcements. It is likely that the Allies
cannot place all the Firestorm Troops during this step and
the reminder must wait one turn or possibly more.
The last thing to do in the Strategic Phase is to total your
Campaign Victory Points. While this does not matter until
the end of the campaign, it is useful to know how well you
are doing as the campaign progresses.
All Allied Firestorm Troops in reinforcements must be placed
on the three beach areas Gold, Juno and Sword subject to
stacking restrictions. This is very different from previous
Firestorms and represents the difficulty of supplying and
reinforcing an army over landing beaches. Along with
stacking restrictions it puts added pressure on the Allies to
push from the beaches to create room for new arrivals.
You receive the number of Campaign Victory Points shown
on the Campaign Victory Point table below for each objective
area that you hold.
2. Deploy new German Firestorm
Troops and Reinforcements.
Likewise the Germans place their Firestorm Troops from
reinforcements, both new units and units destroyed,
anywhere on the map in friendly areas or into German
Tactical Reserve. They are subject to stacking restrictions
and if there are not enough free areas available the reminder
is left in reinforcements. Note that can only happen if the
Allied offensive is extraordinarily successful.
Special Turn 3 - Epsom. Remove Firestorm Troops.
At the end of turn 3: Epsom after all battles have been
fought, the Germans must remove the following Firestorm
Troops from their forces: Panzer Lehr, 2 Panzerdivision and 2
SS Panzerdivision ‘Das Reich’. These are transferred to fight
the US to the west and take no further part in Firestorm:
Caen. If they have been captured before then, it has no
further effect except the Allied players then score points for
capturing them, but you do not need to remove any other
unit instead. The German situation is probably bad enough
in this eventuality.
3. Make Strategic Moves
Redeploying forces before a major offensive provides you with
the flexibility to meet both known and unknown threats.
In Firestorm: Caen you may redeploy your units before the
next turn starts. Both sides starting with the Germans now
can move any units on the map up to three areas, though
friendly areas. They cannot pass through enemy held areas.
During this redeployment it is permissible to exceed stacking
limits while the units move, but at the end of this step there
is still a three Firestorm Troop stacking limit.
Both Generals now total the Campaign Victory Points that
they have earned from capturing and holding objective areas
and capturing Firestorm Troops.
Capturing Objectives
Possession of key locations in Firestorm: Caen is critical to
winning the campaign. These are the important locations
such as roads, airfields and settlements that your army is
fighting for.
Capturing Firestorm Troops
Most units that are mauled in combat are pulled out of
the line and rebuilt before being thrown back into the fray.
However, when a unit is cut off and surrounded, it will be
captured and totally destroyed if it loses a battle.
While Firestorm Troops that are destroyed as a result of
participating in a battle are placed back in the Reinforcement
Pool, those that are surrounded and unable to retreat, because
there are no adjacent friendly areas, are removed from the
game instead. If a Firestorm Troop was surrounded and then
destroyed it also counts as captured. Firestorm Troops that
are surrounded and captured in this way earn the enemy
10 Campaign Victory Points. Firestorm Troops that are
adjacent to friendly areas but cannot retreat due to stacking
restrictions are not captured but count as being destroyed.
Campaign Victory
Point Table
Bayeux Gold Beach Juno Beach Sword Beach
Bréville Tilly-Sur-Seulles
Cheux
Carpiquet
Caen
Caen
Colombelles
Cagny
Villers-Bocage
Evercy
Hill 112
Bourgébus
Verriêres Ridge
Caen-Falaise Road
(A1)
(A2)
(A3)
(A5)
(B5)
(C1)
(C2)
(C3)
(C4)
(C5)
(C6)
(C7)
(D1)
(D3)
(D4)
(D5)
(D6)
(D7)
20 points
30 points
30 points
30 points
20 points
20 points
10 points
20 points
30 points
30 points
20 points
20 points
50 points
50 points
40 points
20 points
50 points
50 points
11
Ending the Campaign Turn
Once you have worked out your victory points, all that remains to do is update the campaign map.
The General with the higher Campaign Victory Point total subtracts the enemy Campaign Victory Point total from their
own, to find out their victory point advantage. Move the Victory Point marker to show which side is winning and by how
much on the Victory Point Indicator on the right edge of the Campaign Map. The last thing to do is to move the Campaign
Turn marker on to the next Campaign Turn at the bottom of the Campaign Map.
CAMPAIGN OUTCOME
The tide has turned! The free men of the world are marching together to Victory!
-Dwight D. “Ike” Eisenhower
At the end of the campaign, the final Campaign Victory Point totals determine the winning side. The extent of the victory
depends on the difference between the two sides’ victory point totals.
The side with the higher Campaign Victory Point total wins the campaign. There are four levels of victory in Firestorm based
on the difference in Campaign Victory Points between the two sides.
ALLIED VICTORY
AXIS VICTORY
The Allied side wins if it has more Campaign Victory
Points then the Axis.
The Axis side wins if it has more Campaign Victory
Points then the Allies.
ALLIED STRATEGIC VICTORY
AXIS STRATEGIC VICTORY
WIN BY 150 CAMPAIGN POINTS
WIN BY 150 CAMPAIGN POINTS
From Mud, through Blood, to the Green Fields Beyond.
Your forces have broken through and are now in terrain
that favors the strengths of the Allied forces and the
German defence is crumbling. Next stop Paris!
Your plans have been vindicated. The Allies have landed
and been contained. All they have is beaches of sand.
With new tanks on their way and V rockets their
foothold will be erased.
ALLIED OPERATIONAL VICTORY
AXIS OPERATIONAL VICTORY
WIN BY 100 CAMPAIGN POINTS
WIN BY 100 CAMPAIGN POINTS
It may not be entirely appreciated now, but your efforts
have tied down the majority of the best German forces
threatened by the possibility of your breakthrough. Your
efforts have laid the ground for an US breakthrough.
By skilful defence and counter-attacks the Allies have
been stopped. You still hold the better ground and any
further Allied attacks will break on the German steel
wall.
This is the historical outcome of the Firestorm: Caen
ALLIED TACTICAL VICTORY
WIN BY 50 CAMPAIGN POINTS
You have now secured a strong bridgehead in Normandy.
Even if the fighting has turned into a battle of attrition
it is an uneven fight and costing the Germans far more
than us. Perseverance will see us through!
AXIS TACTICAL VICTORY
WIN BY 50 CAMPAIGN POINTS
By the hardest efforts of your men the invasion has been
halted. The Allies have not been allowed any lasting
success and your successful defence will hold them back
for weeks to come.
DRAW
The campaign is a draw if the total Campaign Victory Points for both sides are within 50 points.
Once again both armies have fought and exhausted themselves and now need to build up their strength for further offensives
with no end in sight.
12
TURNS
Firestorm: Caen is played over 5 turns. Each turn is played differently to best simulate the actual campaign itself.
Each turn will determine the number of battles, initiative, Firestorm Troops available and the number of Air Sorties as well as
containing information on deployment. Number of battles is optimal. If you play more then it will favor the Allies, less will
favor the Germans. Firestorm: Caen should be a tight campaign and have the feel of a battle of attrition.
MINI-CAMPAIGN
Firestorm: Caen is a full length Campaign. It has anything from 26 to 38 battles. While this may suit a larger group it is
a heavy commitment for smaller groups or two friends. Firestorm: Caen can easily be adjusted to your needs however by
combining the standard game and General’s Game. There are a few ways to do this.
Decide how many battles you will play as Flames of War Battles each turn and roll off for the rest as per a General’s Game.
Players can decide that they can choose to play 1 battle each per turn. After rolling for initiative and deciding on Firestorm
Troops then both players, starting with the attacker can declare that they wish to fight this battle as a Flames of War game. If
neither wishes to fight this battle or has already used up his allotment them roll for the battle.
This can be expanded by extra rules like following a certain Corps or division, such as the Canadian 3rd Division, British
8 Corps for the Allies and 12 SS Panzer Division or I SS Panzer Corps for the Germans. This will place the Generals in
command of a Corps while other battles are rolled off as in the General’s Game.
By mixing up Flames of War games and General’s Games roll offs you can make the Campaign manageable. A word of
caution though, decide how exactly you intend to do it and fix the number of battles you intend to play because it can be
very tempting to play every battle.
As in real war Generals and Commanders can only be in one place and it is left to others to fight elsewhere.
COLOSSAL CRACKS
Once it was obvious that the battle for Normandy would be a hard push for every piece of terrain, and the front had ‘glued
down’ as Monty put it, he devised an operational approach called Colossal Cracks. Montgomery devised a series of jackhammer
attacks in different areas aimed at holding the initiative and imposing his will on the enemy. Montgomery sought to control
the initiative and offensive and preventing the Germans from using infantry to relieve the panzer forces deployed in the front
line. The key to Colossal Crack battles is to alternate thrusts. Typically it started with a medium sized thrust in one area and
when the German reinforcements had been drawn in to undertake a new unexpected blow in a different part of the front to
draw in the remaining reserves before unleashing a Colossal Crack in yet another part of the front
Names of turns
The turns are named after the main operations but there were a number of other smaller operations that took place, such
as Operations Martlet, Windsor and Jupiter. Also the time period given is the one of the actual operation but most turns
will start a little earlier and last longer. It is entirely left to the players to determine the best way to organise their battles
and achieve their objectives.
13
TURN 1: D-DAY - 6 JUNE
OPERATION NEPTUNE & THE AIRBORNE LANDINGS
Number of battles: special – see below
German tactical reserve: none
Initiative bonus: n/a – see below
Special: read the rules below. In addition there are no
german defence firestrom troops in the first turn.
Allied air sorties: none
Turn 1 is the Day of days and unique in the annals of warfare. To best represent D-Day the turn is divided into steps which
must be followed closely. A copy of Normandy Battles is needed to play this section.
Set-up
Set up the map with British Airborne in the DZ/LZ area (B-5), 8 Bgd and 50 Division on Gold Beach (A-2), 2 Can Bgd and
3 Canadian Disivion on Juno Beach (A-3) and 27 Bgd and 3 Division on Sword Beach (A-5).
For Germans place 21 Division on Epron (B-4)
Step I – Operation Tonga
Airborne Assault in area B-5. Remember the night fighting rules.
For the Airborne Assault play Seize and Hold p19 in Normandy Battles
Compare the results of the game with the following table:
Operation Tonga
Outcome
Die Roll in
General’s Game
Result
6-1
6
Success, area captured and Airborne Firestorm Troop in place.
5-2
5
Success, area captured and Airborne Firestorm Troop in place.
4-3
4
Success, area captured and Airborne Firestorm Troop in place.
3-4
3
Marginal success, area captured, but the Airborne Firestorm Troop is destroyed
(place it in the Allied reinforcement box)
2-5
2
Failure, area is not captured, paratroopers scattered about and the Airborne
Firestorm Troop is destroyed (place it in the Allied reinforcement box)
1-6
1
Disaster, area is not captured, Germans capture the Airborne Firestorm Troop.
Step II – Operation Neptune
Once the Airborne Assault has been played out go to the landings on Gold (A-2), Juno (A-3) and Sword (A-5) beaches. These
are played as the Hit the Beach Mission p29 in Normandy Battles but with modified rulesv. These are the landings at Sword,
Juno and Gold. Ideally forces should be a Festungskompanie (Normandy) – Sword Beach and an Assault Company played
on a beach table.
The Allies always capture the beach but a poor result will affect them in the game.
Once the beach landings have been worked out then go to any further battles that the Allies may have earned through
successful beach landings.
In a Firestorm Game use the following rules for Hit the Beach Mission.
Beach landing - equal forces (rather than the 25% rule) but for each 1000 points or part thereof the Allies get one of the
following (each option can only be taken once):
1) Naval Gunfire Support
2) Breaching Group with1 Sherman V, 2 Sherman Crab and 2 AVRE
3) Commando Company with 1 Commando Section
4) 3x Sherman DD tanks
The value of these units is listed under the Firestorm Troops.
Instead of the standard Victory points table on page 28 in Normandy Battles use the following results.
14
Operation Neptune
Outcome
Die Roll in
General’s Game
Result
6-1
6
Major Victory, land the appropriate division and supporting Tank Bde, you may
make one further attack from the beach this turn.
5-2
5
Good progress, land the appropriate division and supporting Tank Bde. You may
make one further attack from this beach this turn but may only do so with one
Firestorm Troop since the other is still tied up in mopping up operations.
4-3
4
Beach Secure. Land the appropriate division and supporting Tank Bgd, but hard
fighting has left you disorganised and you may not attack further from this beach
this turn.
3-4
3
Beach Secure. Land the appropriate infantry division but supporting Tank Bde
is destroyed, place it with the reinforcements for turn 2. Your losses have left you
disorganised and you may not attack further from this beach this turn.
2-5
2
Frightful losses. Land only the appropriate infantry division. The supporting
Tank Bde is permanently lost and counts as being captured by the Germans and is
added to their Victory Point Total. Your losses have left you disorganised and you
may not attack further from this beach this turn.
1-6
1
Utter Chaos. Land only the appropriate infantry division. The supporting Tank
Bde is permanently lost and counts as being captured by the Germans and is
added to their Victory Point Total. Your losses have left you disorganised and you
may not attack further from this beach this turn or the next turn.
STEP III – Exploitation
Once the beach landings have been worked out then go to any further battles that the Allies may have earned through
successful beach landings.
STEP IV – Attack of the 21. Panzerdivision
Once these battles have been worked out the Germans may counter-attack once using the 21. Panzerdivision. The Germans
may decide what area to attack. Work out this battle as normal.
If the 21. Panzer Division is destroyed before the Germans can make their counter-attack then this step is cancelled.
STEP V – Strategic Phase
Now go through the Strategic Phase as normal.
New reinforcements:
ALLIES:
GERMANs (PLACE ANYWHERE):
7 Armoured Division will land on Gold Beach
Panzer Lehr
51 Highland Division will land on Juno
12 SS Panzerdivision
5 AGRA can land on either Gold or Juno if there is room.
Otherwise it goes to reinforcements.
2 Panzerdivision
4 AGRA will land on Sword
(If the Germans recapture a beach then those units go to
reinforcements)
III Flak Korps
The Germans can place 1 Firestorm Troop in Tactical
Reserves for turn 2
15
TURN 2: OPERATION PERCH
7 – 14 JUNE
Number of battles: 3-5 (1d3 + 2)
Allied air sorties: 2
Initiative bonus: allies +1 (and win all ties)
German tactical reserve: 1
Having failed to capture Caen on the first day the British and Canadian forces continued with Operation Perch aimed at
making a breakthrough to the southwest of Caen. The 50th Northumbrian Division was tasked with capturing Bayeux
and advance against Tilly-sur-Seulles while at the same time the 51st Highland Division would move into the Airborne
Bridgehead. Both offensives failed against stiff resistance and to the west of Caen the bocage hedgerows made offensive
operations very hard. Then due to German withdrawals a gap formed in the German frontline named after the Caumont.
General Dempsey ordered the 7th Armoured Division to exploit the opening and seize Villers-Bocage. They were met by the
101st SS Heavy Panzer Battalion and Michael Wittmann and the battle would become legend. On the 19th of June a severe
storm moved over the English Channel giving the Germans much need respite from Allied Air Attacks and disrupting the
Allied supplies and reinforcements effectively ending offensive operations for a while and giving the Germans an opportunity
to reorganize their defence.
Turn 2 is the first normal turn of Firestorm Caen, never the less there are special rules.
From this turn on all German held areas are considered to have a German Defence Firstorm Troop but only in defence.
Special:
Caumont Gap/Villers Bocage: Under severe pressure from American attacks, the 352nd’s left flank collapsed. With its
position no longer tenable, on the night of 9–10 June the division pulled back to Saint-Lô. This withdrawal created a 7.5-mile
(12.1 km) hole in the German lines near the village of Caumont-l’Éventé dubbed by the Allies the ‘Caumont Gap’
If the Allies capture Bayeux in this turn (or start in possession of it) they may immediately capture B-1 and attack Villers
Bocage with only the 7th Armoured Division. This is to exploit the Caumont gap in the German lines. The Germans receive
the SS 101 Heavy Battalion* - Tiger Firestorm Troop in defence. These two are the only Firestorm Troops added to this battle.
This battle is in addition to the number of battles in the turn. If the British lose they must withdraw to B-1. After the battle
both Firestorm Troops can advance and fight as normal.
*For this battle only, replace the standard Tiger I E with Obersturmführer Michael Wittmann and his Tiger. Once the battle
is over it reverts to the normal Firestorm Troop.
Strategic Phase
New reinforcements:
ALLIES (Place on any beach):
GERMANs (PLACE ANYWHERE):
11 Armoured Division - Cromwell
The Germans may place 2 Firestorm Troops in Tactical
Reserve for the next turn.
8 AGRA
31 Tank Bde - Churchill
4 Armoured Bde – Sherman
33 Armoured Bde - Sherman
15 Scottish Division
43 Wessex Division
49 West Riding Division
53 Welsh Division
16
1 SS Panzerdivision – Panther
2 SS Panzerdivision – Panther
9 SS Panzerdivision – Panzer IV
10 SS Panzerdivision – StuG
SS 102 Heavy Tank Battalion - Tiger
If the SS 101 Heavy Tank Battalion has not yet entered the
game then add it to the German Reinforcements.
TURN 3: OPERATION EPSOM
26 – 30 JUNE
Number of battles: 6-8 (1d3 + 5)
Allied air sorties: 3
Initiative bonus: allies +1 (and win all ties)
German tactical reserve: 2
After the delay caused by the storm the 2nd Army launched Operation Epsom on the 26 June. This time the attack would be
carried out by an entire Crops, the 8 Corps under the command of Lieutenant-General Sir Richard O’Connor. The objective
was to secure the high ground south of Caen. The attack was met with strong counterattacks and determined defence but did
manage to cross the Odon south of Caen but later had to withdraw. The Operation did not achieve its objectives but it had
forced the Germans to commit their last reserves and halted their efforts to mass their armour against the beachheads.
This turn marks the high water mark for the Axis.
New reinforcements:
ALLIES (Place on any beach):
GERMANs (PLACE ANYWHERE):
9 AGRA – Canandian
7 Werfer Brigade
2 Canadian Division
8 Werfer Brigade
3 AGRA
The Germans may place 2 Firestorm Troops in Tactical
Reserve for the next turn.
Germans must remove the following from play:
Panzer Lehr
2 SS Panzerdivision
2 Panzerdivision
17
TURN 4: OPERATION CHARNWOOD
8 – 9 JULY
“He who controls Hill 112 controls Normandy”
- Anonymous German
Number of battles: 6-8 (1d3 + 5)
German tactical reserve: 2
Initiative bonus: allies +2 (and win all ties)
Special: 1x carpet bombing see preliminary
bomabardment p26 normandy battles.
Allied air sorties: 3
A month after the invasion Caen still remained in German hands. Montgomery decided to capture the city with a frontal
assault. Three infantry divisions and three Armoured Brigades af the 1 Corps were given the objective to clear the city up to
the Orne river. The attack would be preceded by carpet bombing by several waves of bombers. This assault was costly and
Caen was reduced to rubble. The Germans fought a fighting withdrawal with the 12 SS Panzerdivision holding the rearguard.
But the assault managed to clear Caen to the Orne. Directly following this attack Operation Jupiter was launched by 8 Corps
with the intent to cross the Odon and secure Hill 112. The 8 Corps captured their objectives but faced heavy resistance and
Hill 112 changed hands several times and neither side could secure it and it ended in no-man’s land. Again the breakthrough
eluded the British and Canadian forces and dashed their hopes. Yet although not obvious the operation had achieved a
marked success as once again as the Germans had to commit all their reserves to hold back the attack.
New reinforcements:
ALLIES (Place on any beach):
GERMANs (PLACE ANYWHERE):
Guards Armoured Division – Sherman
The Germans may place 2 Firestorm Troops in Tactical
Reserve for the next turn.
34 Tank Bde – Churchill
59 Staffordshire Division
9 Werfer Brigade
503 Heavy Tank Battalion – King Tiger.
Germans may place up to two units into Tactical Reserve.
18
TURN 5: OPERATION GOODWOOD
18 – 20 JULY
“Either you’re a dead man or you can earn yourself a medal.”
- Hans von Luck to the battery commander of 88mm guns.
Number of battles: 6-8 (1d3 + 5)
German tactical reserve: 2
Initiative bonus: allies +2 (and win all ties)
Special: 1x carpet bombing see preliminary
bombardment p26 normandy battles.
Allied air sorties: 3
Final turn: check victory conditions.
After the costly and hard battles west of Caen the next operation was to the east of the Orne river from the area secured by
the airborne landing. The three armoured divisions, Guards Armoured, 7th Armoured and 11th Armoured were to break
through the German defenses in a push toward Bourguébus Ridge south of Caen. Preceding this major offensive a series
of attacks were made to the east to draw in the German reserves. At the same time the Canadians fought to capture the
remaining German held sections of Caen. On the 18th of June 1,056 Halifax and Lancaster bombers dropped 4800 tons of
high explosives against the German positions followed by a second wave of B-26 Marauders. The armoured divisions then
attacked and pushed hard in spite of heavy tank losses by both well placed FlaK guns and counterattacks including the new
arrived King Tigers. Meanwhile the ruins of Caen were fully liberated, more than 6 weeks after D-day. The British attack
was halted just short of Bourguébus Ridge. Once again the Germans had commit all of their reserves against the British and
Canadian sector and the battles around Caen tied down four German corps at the moment the Americans were about to
launch their offensive Operation Cobra. The battle of Caen was over but heavy fighting was still ahead.
Allied Air Operations
Prior to the Invasion the Allies had launched a massive Air war against Northern France in order to secure Air Superiority that
was vital to the success of the invasion. Directly following the invasion the Allies set up airbases in Northern France, with the
command facilities often in tents. In the weeks to follow until the liberation of Paris the German Luftwaffe was completely
marginalised and Allied air superiority assured. But this came at a heavy price. 4,101 Allied aircraft and 16,724 airmen were
killed or missing in direct connection to Operation Overlord.
19
FIRESTORM TROOPS
British and Canadian TROOPS
Infantry Divisions
100
3rd Division, 15 Scottish Division, 43 Wessex Division,
49 West Riding Division, 53 Welsh Division, 59 Staffordshire Divisions
3
DIV
15
43
49
53
59
SCOTTISH
WESSEX
W. RIDING
WELSH
STAFFORDSHIRE
DIV
DIV
DIV
DIV
DIV
Rated as Confident Trained. Use all the standard British rules
2nd Canadian Division, 3 Canadian Division
2 CAN
3 CAN
DIV
DIV
Rated as Confident Trained. Special: Canadian.
50 Northumbrian Division, 51 Highland Division
50
51
NORTHUMBRIAN
HIGHLAND
DIV
DIV
50 Division is rated as Confident Veteran. Use all the standard British rules.
51 Division is rated as Reluctant Veteran. Use all the standard British rules. Special: Cautious not Stupid.
Reinforce your company with a Rifle Platoon with a Command Rifle/MG team, six Rifle/MG Teams, one PIAT Team and
Light Mortar Team. All Rifle/MG teams have Sticky Bombs. Rated as Confident Veteran.
Range
ROF
AT
Rifle/MG team
Infantry 16”/40cm
2
2
Firepower Notes
6
Light Mortar team 16”/40cm 1
1
4+
Smoke. Can fire over friendly teams.
PIAT team
8”/20cm
1
10
5+
Tank Assault 4
Artillery Group Royal Artillery
200
4 AGRA, 5 AGRA, 8 AGRA, 3 AGRA, 9 AGRA
4 AGRA
5 AGRA
8 AGRA
3 AGRA
9 AGRA
1 CORPS
30 CORPS
8 CORPS
12 CORPS
2 CAN CORPS
Reinforce your company with a Corps Medium Battery, Royal Artillery with a command team, observer team and staff team
and four BL 5.5” and an Auster AOP. Rated as Confident Trained.
Weapon
BL 5.5” gun
- Firing bombardments
Mobility
Range
ROF
Immobile
88”/220cm
32”/80cm -
1
5
Anti-tank Firepower
13 2+
1+
Notes
Bunker Buster
The AGRA may be joined with another four BL 5.5” gun battery from a force list or another AGRA as a combined 8 gun
battery. If this is done it will only have one staff team.
20
Independent Armoured Brigade
200
4 Brigade, 8 Brigade, 27 Brigade, 33 Brigade, 2 Canadian Brigade
4 AMD
8 AMD
27 AMD
33 AMD
2 CAN AMD
BRIGADE
BRIGADE
BRIGADE
BRIGADE
BRIGADE
4 Armoured Bde is rated as Confident Veteran, 8 Bde, 27 Bde and 33 Bde is rated as Confident Trained
2 Canadian Bde is rated as Confident Trained. Special: Canadian
Reinforce your company with a Tank Platoon with two Shermans and one Firefly VC.
Name
Weapon
Sherman I, II or III
M3 75mm gun
Mobility
Front
Range
ROF
Standard Tank 6
32”/80cm
2
Firefly VC
OQF 2 pdr gun
Standard Tank 24”/60cm
6
2
Side
Top
Anti-tank Firepower
4
1
10
3+
4
14
1
3+
Equipment and notes
Notes
Co-ax MG, Hull MG, Tow hook
Semi-indirect fire, Smoke.
Co-ax MG, Tow hook
No HE, Semi-indirect fire.
11 Armoured Division and Guards Armoured Division
11 AMD
GUARDS AMD
DIVISION
DIVISION
250
Reinforce your company with a Tank Platoon with three Shermans and one Firefly VC. Rated as Confident Trained.
Name
Weapon
Sherman I, II or III
M3 75mm gun
Mobility
Front
Range
ROF
Standard Tank 6
32”/80cm
2
Firefly VC
OQF 2 pdr gun
Standard Tank 24”/60cm
6
2
Side
Top
Anti-tank Firepower
4
1
10
3+
4
14
1
3+
Equipment and notes
Notes
Co-ax MG, Hull MG, Tow hook
Semi-indirect fire, Smoke.
Co-ax MG, Tow hook
No HE, Semi-indirect fire.
7 Armoured Division
300
7 AMD
DIVISION
Reinforce your company with a Tank Platoon with three Cromwell IV’s and one Firefly VC. Rated as Reluctant Veteran.
Special: Cautious not Stupid.
Name
Weapon
Cromwell IV
M3 75mm gun
Mobility
Front
Range
ROF
Standard Tank 6
32”/80cm
2
Firefly VC
OQF 17 pdr gun
Standard Tank 24”/60cm
6
2
Side
Top
Anti-tank Firepower
4
1
10
4+
4
14
1
3+
Equipment and notes
Notes
Co-ax MG, Hull MG, Protected Ammo, Tow hook
Semi-indirect fire, Smoke.
Co-ax MG, Tow hook
No HE, Semi-indirect fire.
31 Tank Brigade, 34 Tank Brigade
31 TK BDE
34 TK BDE
CHURCHILL
CHURCHILL
200
Reinforce your company with a Tank Platoon of two Churchill VI and one Churchill III or IV. Rated as Confident
Trained.
Name
Mobility
Front
Side
Top
Weapon
Range
ROF
Anti-tank Firepower
Churchill III or IV
Slow Tank 8
7
2
OQF 6 pdr gun
24”/60cm
3
11
4+
Equipment and notes
Notes
Co-ax MG, Hull MG,Protected ammo,
Tow hook , Wide Tracks
Churchill VI
Slow Tank 8
7
2
OQF 75mm gun
32”/80cm
2
1
3+
Co-ax MG, Hull MG,Protected ammo,
Tow hook , Wide Tracks
Semi-indirect fire, smoke
21
6 Airborne Division 200
6
AIRBORNE
DIV
Reinforce your company with a Rifle Platoon with a Command Rifle/MG team, six Rifle/MG Teams and PIAT team. All
carry Gammon Bombs and have section mortars. Rated as Fearless Veteran.
Team
Range
ROF
Rifle/MG team
16”/40cm
2
Anti-tank Firepower Notes
2
6
Gammon bomb Tank Assault 3
PIAT team
8”/20cm
1
10
5+
Tank Assault 4
Commando Company N/A
Reinforce your company with a Rifle Platoon with a Command Rifle/MG team and six Rifle/MG Teams. Rated as Fearless
Veteran.
Team
Rifle/MG team
Range
ROF
16”/40cm
2
Anti-tank Firepower Notes
2
6
Gammon bomb Tank Assault 3
Independent Armoured Squadron Sherman DD N/A
Reinforce your company with a Tank Platoon with 3 Sherman DD Tanks. Rated as Confident Trained.
Name
Weapon
Sherman DD
M3 75mm gun
Mobility
Front
Range
ROF
Standard Tank 6
32”/80cm
2
Side
Top
Anti-tank Firepower
4
1
10
3+
Equipment and notes
Notes
Co-ax MG, DD tank
Semi-indirect fire, Smoke.
Breaching Group 79 Division N/A
Reinforce your company with one Sherman V, two Sherman Crabs and two AVRE. Rated as Confident Trained.
Name
Weapon
Sherman V
M3 75mm gun
Mobility
Front
Range
ROF
Standard Tank 6
32”/80cm
2
Side
Top
Anti-tank Firepower
4
1
10
3+
Equipment and notes
Notes
Co-ax MG, Hull MG, Tow hook.
Semi-indirect fire, Smoke.
Sherman Crab
M3 75mm gun
Standard Tank 32”/80cm
6
2
4
10
1
3+
Co-ax MG, Overloaded, Mine fail.
Semi-indirect fire, Smoke.
AVRE
Petard mortar
Slow Tank 4”/10cm
8
1
7
5
2
1+
Co-ax MG, Hull MG, Protected ammo. Wide-tracked.
Bunker buster, Demolition mortar, Slow traverse.
Naval Gunfire Support N/A
Reinforce your company with a NGFS Observer rifle team and a battery of four Confident Trained Naval Guns.
Weapon
Naval Gunfire Support
Range
ROF
Unlimited
-
Anti-tank Firepower
6
Notes
1+Naval gunfire Support
Second tactical Airforce N/A
Reinforce your company with Priority Air Support Typhoon Aircraft.
Aircraft
Typhoon
22
Weapon
Cannon Rockets
To Hit
3+
3+
Anti-tank
8
6
Firepower
5+
3+
Notes
German Troops
101. Schwere SS Panzerabteilung, 102. Schwere SS Panzerabteilung
SS 101
200
SS 102
Reinforce your company with a Heavy Panzer Platoon with one Tiger I E. Rated as Fearless Veteran.
Name
Weapon
Tiger I E
8.8cm KwK36 gun
Mobility
Range
Slow Tank 32“/80cm
Front
ROF
9
2
Side
Top
Anti-tank Firepower
8
2
13
3+
Equipment and notes
Notes
Co-ax MG, Hull MG, Protected ammo, Wide Tracks
Slow traverse
1. SS-Panzerdivision ‘LSSAH’, 2. SS-Panserdivision Das Reich
and Panzer Lehr.
1 SS
2 SS
350
LEHR
Reinforce your company with a Panther Platoon with two Panther A. 1. SS and 2. SS are rated as Fearless Veteran. Panzer
Lehr is rated as Confident Veteran.
Name
Weapon
Panther A
7.5cm KwK42
Mobility
Front
Range
ROF
Standard Tank 10
32“/80cm
2
Side
Top
Anti-tank Firepower
5
1
14
3+
Equipment and notes
Notes
Co-ax MG, Hull MG, Wide Tracks
9. SS-Panzerdivision ‘Hohenstaufen’, 12. SS-Panserdivision Hitlerjugend
and 2. Panzerdivison
9 SS
12 SS
250
2 DIV
Reinforce your company with a Panzer Platoon with three Panzer IV H. 9. SS and 12. SS are rated Fearless Veteran.
2. Panzerdivision is rated as Confident Veteran.
Name
Weapon
Panzer IV H
7.5cm KwK40
Mobility
Front
Range
ROF
Standard Tank 6
32“/80cm
2
Side
Top
Anti-tank Firepower
3
1
11
3+
Equipment and notes
Notes
Co-ax MG, Hull MG, Protected ammo, Schürzen
10. SS-Panzerdivision ‘Frundsberg’
300
10 SS
Reinforce your company with a SS-Panzer Platoon with three StuG G. Rated as Fearless Veteran.
Name
Weapon
StuG G / IV
7.5cm StuK40 gun
Mobility
Front
Range
ROF
Standard Tank 7
32“/80cm
2
Side
Top
Anti-tank Firepower
3
1
11
3+
Equipment and notes
Notes
Hull MG, Protected ammo, Schürzen
23
7, 8 and 9 Werfer Brigades
7 WERFER
8 WERFER
9 WERFER
BRIGADE
BRIGADE
BRIGADE
150
Reinforce your company with Armoured Rocket Launcher Battery with a SMG command team Kfz 15 field car, observer
Rifle team, Kübelwagen and three Panzerwerfer 42 rocket launchers and 5 or more crew. Rated as Confident Veteran.
Name
Weapon
Panzerwerfer 42 (Maultier)
15cm RW42 rocket launcher
Mobility
Range
Half-tracked 32“/80cm
Front
ROF
0
-
Side
Top
Anti-tank Firepower
0
0
3
4+
Equipment and notes
Notes
AA MG, Armoured rocket launcher.
Rocket launcher, Smoke bombardment
21. Panzerdivision
200
21
BEUTE
STUG
Reinforce your company with a Beute StuG Platoon with three 7.5cm (Sf ) 39H. Rated as Confident Veteran.
Name
Weapon
7.5cm (Sf ) 39H
7.5cm PaK40 gun
Mobility
Front
Range
ROF
Standard Tank 2
32“/80cm
2
Side
Top
Anti-tank Firepower
2
0
12
3+
Equipment and notes
Notes
AA MG, Unreliable
Hull mounted
503. Schwere Panzerabteilung
300
503 SPA
Reinforce your company with a Schwere Panzer Platoon with one Königstiger (Porsche). Rated as Confident Veteran.
Name
Weapon
Königstiger (Porsche)
8.8cm KwK43 gun
Mobility
Range
Slow Tank 40“/100cm
Front
ROF
14
2
Side
Top
Anti-tank Firepower
8
2
16
3+
Equipment and notes
Notes
Co-ax MG, Hull MG, Overloaded, Unreliable.
Slow traverse.
III Flak Corps
200
III FLAK
KORPS
Reinforce your company with a Luftwaffe Anti-Aircraft Assault Platoon with a Command SMG team and four 8.8cm
FlaK36 guns with extra crew. Rated as Reluctant Trained.
Team
Mobility
Command SMG Team
8.8cm FlaK36 gun
Immobile
Firing bombardments
24
Range
ROF
4”/10cm
3
Anti-tank Firepower
1
6
Notes
Full ROF when moving.
40”/100cm
88”/220cm
(3)
-
13
3
3+
5+
Gun shield. Heavy AA. Turntable.
German Defence Firestorm Troop
100
(Available in all German areas in defence)
272, 276, 277, 326, 346, 352, 711 and 716 Infantry Divisions and 16 Luftwaffe Field Division.
Even before Operation Overlord many of the German Divisions were under strength. Some had a core of veterans, but most
were fleshed out with young and old recruits as the war sapped Germany’s manpower reserves. After the initial landings
the German defences were scattered. Allied Air superiority made all movement hazardous and the lack of available forces
had German units thrown in piecemeal to block the Allied advance and unable to fight at full strength. Never the less
their constant attrition wore down the Allied forces that had to be wary of snipers, anti-tank guns, mortar fire, unexpected
minefields and ambushes.
Consider one German Defence Firestorm Troop to be in all German areas in defence only. They can never be used in attack.
If used it counts as one Firestorm Troop. There is no need to roll to see if it is destroyed and it can never be captured.
Variable Marker:
Roll one die and reinforce your company with the appropriate unit shown below.
Variable Infantry Table
Die Roll
Reinforce your company with the following
1
2x Snipers
2
One HMG nest and 2 Minefields
3
A Grenadier Mortar Platoon with 1 Command SMG team, two Observer rifle teams and four 8cm
GW34 mortar teams. Rated as Confident Trained.
4
A Grenadier Platoon with 1 Command Panzerfaust SMG team, four Rifle/MG teams and a 7.5cm
PaK40 attached. Rated as Confident Trained.
5
A Grenadier Platoon with 1 Command Panzerfaust SMG team, four Rifle/MG teams and a 7.5cm
PaK40 attached. Rated as Confident Trained.
6
A Assault Gun platoon with two StuG G or StuG IV assault guns. Rated as Confident Trained.
Infantry Team
Range
ROF
Command SMG team
4“/10cm
3
Anti-tank Firepower Notes
1
6
Rifle/MG Team
16“/40cm 2
2
6
Panzerfaust
4“/10cm
1
12
5+
Tank assault 6. No move and shoot.
Sniper
16“/40cm
1
0
4+
See snipers.
Full ROF when moving
Bunkers
Mobility
Range
ROF
HMG Nest
Immobile
24”/60cm
6
Gun Team
Mobility
Range
ROF
8cm GW34 mortar
Man-packed
Firing bombardments
24”/60cm
40”/100cm
2
-
2
2
3+
6
Smoke. Minimum range 8”/20cm
Smoke bombardment
7.5cm PaK40 gun
32”/80cm
2
12
3+
Gun shield
Name
Weapon
StuG G / IV
7.5cm StuK40 gun
Medium
Mobility
Front
Range
ROF
Standard Tank 7
32“/80cm
2
Anti-tank Firepower
2
6
Anti-tank Firepower
Side
Top
Anti-tank Firepower
3
1
11
3+
Notes
ROF 2 when Pinned Down.
Notes
Equipment and notes
Notes
Hull MG, Protected ammo, Schürzen
25
FIRESTORM TERMS
After Action Step: The commanders complete the After
Action Step after fighting a battle. Troops advance, retreat or
are destroyed in this step.
Air Sorties: Each turn both sides are provided with a
number of Air Sorties. This is the only Air support available
to players. Players may not purchase Aircraft in their normal
forces. Once sortie can be allocated to each battle and once
used cannot be used again that turn.
Area: The campaign map is divided into areas. All movement
is from one area to another, and all Flames of War battles
take place between two areas.
Battle: Each turn has a variable number of battles listed
in the turn description. Ideally a battle should be played
out before the next battle is determined so it is possible to
advance for the area just captured.
the first turn work out a Preliminary Bombardment as on
page 26 in Normandy Battles
Combat Step: In the Combat Step of the Battle Phase
commanders select the mission that they will play and fight
a Flames of War game.
Commander: Commanders are the players who fight
the Flames of War games that determine the campaign’s
outcome.
Control Marker: Control markers identify areas that you
control. When you advance into an area place a control
marker in it to show that you now control it. At the start
all areas belong to the Germans so only allied markers are
needed.
Battle Arrow: Battle arrows mark battles that are currently
taking place on the campaign map. Place Firestorm Troops
fighting in the battle in the holes on the battle arrow. In
order to make an attack you must support it with at least one
ground Firestorm Troop.
D-Day: The first turn of Firestorm: Caen is D-Day and plays
differently from any other turn. This includes beach assaults
and the airborne landings. Note that the beach landings will
always succeed. But the outcome of the success will affect
the remaining game. Another thing is that Firestorm Troops
are used very differently during the beach assaults and the
airborne landings so read the first turn carefully.
Battle Phase: Each turn the commanders fight Flames of
War games in the Battle Phase. Each game played in the
phase has three steps: the Manoeuvre Step, the Combat Step,
and the After Action Step.
Firestorm Troops: Firestorm Troops are miniatures
representing the key units in the campaign. Firestorm Troops
can be committed to a battle giving extra troops in the Flames
Of War game that decides its outcome.
Beach Defences: In addition to any Firestorm Troops the
beach areas; Gold, Juno and Sword are defended by off-shore
warships. If the Germans attack the beaches then the Allies
may defend with up to two Firestorm Troops and Naval
Gunfire Support.
Firestorm Troops Value: In Firestorm Caen you will have
an option of adding points to your force rather than specific
units. You may not have the correct troops available or would
like to do things a little differently. Each Firestorm Troop
will have a value listed. You will notice that this is less than
the actual value of the unit presented and this is intentional.
Aircraft and Naval Gunfire Support cannot be exchanged for
points.
Campaign Map: The campaign map portrays the area of
Normandy where the Battle for Caen took place. It also
contains a key, the turn sequence, the Campaign Turn
Indicator, the Reinforcement Pools, and a Victory Point
Indicator.
Campaign Turn: The campaign is divided into three
campaign turns. Each Campaign turn is almost a mini
campaign in itself where players act out distinct parts of the
Battle for Caen. In each campaign turn the rules dictated
how initiative is played, the number of Air Sorties is available
and the recommended amount of battles to be played.
Campaign Victory Points: Campaign victory points are
used to measure the success of each side in the campaign.
Campaign victory points are awarded for capturing cities
and other objectives, and for surrounding and capturing
enemy forces.
Carpet Bombing: In turns 4 and 5 the British can make one
carpet bombing attack in both turns. Hundreds of Lancaster
and Halifax bombers will attack before the start of one battle
in which they are the attacker. Carpet bombing is never used
in defence. This is in addition to any Firestorm Troops used
in that battle and must be announced at the same time as
Firestorm Troops are allocated. After deployment but before
26
General: Each side has a General who coordinates the side’s
strategy in the Planning and Strategic Phases.
German Defence Firestorm Troop: All German held areas
are considered to be defended by German Defence Firestorm
Troop. This provides a variable unit added to defence. It must
be used as one of the Firestorm Troops allowed and cannot
be used in attack nor do you need to roll to destroy it or can
it be captured. If the Germans lose an area this Firestorm
Troop is no longer available. If the Germans recapture an
area it becomes available again.
German Tactical Reserve: This is a rule that allows the
Germans to keep one or two units uncommitted at the start
of each turn. Each turn will list how many can be placed
in Tactical Reserve for the next turn. Later these may be
added to any battle, one or both to the same battle, either in
defence or attack.
Reinforcements: At the end of each turn new units become
available as well as Firestorm Troops destroyed after a battle
are placed in the Reinforcement Pool on the Campaign Map.
They are returned to play at the beginning of the next turn,
subject to the Turns specifications and deployment.
Reinforcement Pool: The reinforcement pools at the
bottom of the campaign map hold Firestorm Troops that
were destroyed in the After Action Step.
Stacking: In Firestorm Caen the maximum number of
Firestorm Troops allowed is three. Neither player may
intentionally go over this limit and if forced to retreat and
there is no area they can retreat to due to stacking restrictions
then the retreating Firestorm Troop is considered destroyed
and placed with the Reinforcements. The troops may have
escaped but have lost their equipment and must await new
materials.
Supply: In addition to tracing a line of supply to a supply
areas. These are the three beach areas for the Allies and A-6,
C-7, D-1, D-3, D-6 and D-7 for the Germans.
Turns: Firestorm Caen has five turns, each with several
battles. At the end of each turn both players can perform
certain actions, like receiving reinforcements, moving
Firestorm Troops etc.
Victory Point Marker: The advantage currently held by the
winning side is shown by the position of the victory point
marker on the victory point indicator on the side of the
map.
THE GENERAL’S WARGAME
Generals have used wargames to test their plans for centuries.
Manoeuvring pieces around on maps instead of troops on the
battlefield allows them to fight battles in a matter of hours
rather than days, and at little cost especially if they lose. If
their strategy works, they can then apply it in the real battle.
If it fails, they can come up with another plan before they
have to commit their soldiers’ lives in action.
Order one – planning phase
In The General’s Wargame you command the Axis or Allied
army in the Battle of Caen Campaign June-July 1944. As the
General, you experience the ebb and flow of a large campaign
that will decide the course of the war.
(Repeat for each Battle)
The General’s Wargame is a fast-paced two-player game based
on Firestorm: Caen that takes between a half an hour and an
hour to play. When both players are constantly involved in
planning and executing attacks, time flies and the hardest
question is whether you can fit in another game!
This makes it an ideal game when you have a few spare hours,
but not enough space for a miniatures game, or you’ve just
finished your Flames of War game and have an hour to spare
before you head off home.
Got a quiet evening? Grab a friend and relax with some
drinks and snacks around the kitchen table! Travelling and
want to take a game along? Grab Firestorm: Caen and play
The General’s Wargame.
As well as being a stand-alone game, The General’s Wargame
is a great tool for generals playing the Firestorm: Caen
campaign. Before the campaign begins, you should run
through a few games of The General’s Wargame to test out
your strategies and see how they perform. Just like the real
generals, this experience will help you make winning plans
when the real campaign begins. You can also set up your map
to match the campaign map and try out plans for the next
turn. Run through each strategy a few times to see the most
likely outcome, and then write your battle plan accordingly.
1. Determine the number of Battles
2. Determine Initiative Bonus
3. Plan your games
Order two - battle phase
1. Roll for Initiative
2. Place a Battle Arrow
3. Choose Firestorm Troops
4. Check for Supply
5. Resolve the Battle
6. Roll to Destroy
7. Retreat Defeated Troops
8. Advance Victorious Troops
Order three – Strategic Phase
1. Land Allied Firestorm Troops on the beaches
2. Deploy new German Firestorm Troops
and Reinforcements. – Turn 3 remove Firestorm Troops.
3. Make Strategic Moves
4. Total Your Victory Points
“Decisions! And a general, a commander in chief who
has not the quality of decision, then he is no good.”
-
Bernard Law Montgomery
Whether you play The General’s Wargame on its own or as
part of a Firestorm: Caen campaign, remember above all else
that, like Napoleon, your country needs lucky generals — so
roll good dice.
27
Setting Up the Campaign Map
column is provided on both types of table. Firestorm Troops
are not counted in these battles. From turn 2 onwards both
players roll one dice and after adding any turn modifiers the
player with the higher roll is the attacker.
Order one – planning phase
Set up the campaign as normal.
1. Determine the Number of Battles this Turn
First thing you need to do is to determine the number of
battles for the turn. This is different for some turns so look at
each turn listing as in the normal game. Then place the Battle
Turn marker on the correct number. That is the number of
Battles for this turn.
2. Determine Initiative Bonus
The Allie always win on an tied roll during the game, but in
the second and third turn they also get an initiative bonus
of +1 and a +2 bonus for turns four and five. The first turn
is played out very differently from the rest so go through the
same procedure in that turn as you would do normally.
3. Plan your games
Depending on the size of the group you may want to spend
some time planning ahead and make strategic decisions. But
then you are off to play actual battles.
Order two - battle phase
(Repeat for each Battle)
2. Place a Battle Arrow
After you win initiative, mark the areas on the Campaign
map where you will battle using a Battle Arrow. If you win
the initiative select an area that your side controls to attack
from and an area that the enemy controls to attack into.
Place a Battle Arrow pointing from your area into the enemy
area you are attacking.
Important: In Firestorm-Caen you are only allowed to attack
from areas containing Firestorm Troops. When attacking the
first must be a Ground Troop, Aircraft are not sufficient but
can be the second Firestorm Troop. Empty areas may always
defend and use Aircraft (only one per battle).
If the battle arrow is placed across a border with a river then
the attack takes place over a river and the defender gets a
bonus. Also note there is an additional bonus for defending
in bocage, Caen and on the beaches. This bonus does not
count towards Firestorm Troops and is available even if you
use one or two Firestorm Troops or none in the battle
Conclude the outcome of each battle before going to the
next.
1. Roll for Initiative
For the first turn follow the listed battle sequence, Airborne
landing, Beach landings, any follow up attacks and then the
attack of the 21 Panzerdivision. For the Airborne and Beach
landings the the Allied player rolls one die without any
modifiers and looks up the result in the appropriate table, a
3. Choose Firestorm Troops
Both players now allocate up to two Firestorm Troops to each
battle. The Attacker must commit one ground Firestorm
Troop to the battle.
4. Check for supply
Firestorm Troop Bonuses
Each Firestorm Troop placed on a Battle Arrow and committed to a
battle gives a bonus to your die roll. Use the Firestorm Troop Bonuses
table to determine your bonus for each Firestorm Troop placed on
the Battle Arrow.
UnitPlain Bocage City/Caen
Allied Infantry Division
+1
+2
+2
Airborne Infantry
+2
+2
+2
Allied Tank Division, Panzer IV,
StuG, FlaK Korps, Panther
+3
+2
+1
Werfer Brigade, Churchill Tank
Brigade, Beute StuG
+2
+2
+1
Tiger I E
+3
+2
+2
Königstiger
+4
+2
+1
Sherman Tank Brigade,
Typhoon
+2
+1
+1
German Defense Firestorm
Troop (Area Defence)
28
Special Roll 1 Die; (1-4) +1/(5-6) +2
To be in supply an area must be attacked from
or defended in must be able to trace a line
through friendly areas to a supply source. This
line can go through as many friendly areas as
you like. If an area fights out of supply it suffers
a -2 penalty.
Situation Modifiers
Defending In
Bonus
Bocage/Caen
+1
Defending Over River
+2
Allies Defending Sword, Juno
and Gold Beaches
+2
Carpet Bombing
+2
Out Of Supply
-1
*Carpet bombing is available for 1 battle
for the Allies in attack in turns 4 and 5.
Roll To Destroy
Die roll DifferenceScore Needed to DestroyScore Needed to Destroy
Losing Firestorm TroopsWinning Firestorm Troops
0 (Draw)
6
6
1 or 2
6
6
3 or 4
5+
-
5
4+
-
5. Resolve the Battle
Generals plan to win battles by committing their strongest
and freshest troops against the enemy’s weaknesses. However,
despite the best laid plans of generals, it is fortune that
ultimately decides battles.
The battle is decided on the roll of the dice. Each player
rolls a die and adds the Firestorm Troop Bonuses for the
Firestorm Troops that they committed and any applicable
Situation Modifiers. The higher roll wins the battle. A tie
with both players rolling the same score results in a draw in
which case neither side advances or retreats and counts as a
defensive win
6. Roll to Destroy
Committing your Firestorm Troops to battle offers great
rewards, but brings great risk. Their destruction in battle will
leave you weakened, hindering your general’s battle plan.
All Firestorm Troops that fought in the battle are at risk
of destruction in the campaign if they are defeated on the
battlefield. While tactical losses can be made good by a
victorious army, a defeated army must conduct a difficult
retreat that can result in the total destruction of its best
troops. For each Firestorm troop used in the battle, regardless
of its fate during the game, the opposing Commander will
roll a die. The score needed to destroy the Firestorm Troop
in the campaign is given on the Roll to Destroy table and
depends on the number of Victory Points that you scored.
Remove any Firestorm Troops that are destroyed from the
Campaign Map and place them in the Reinforcement Pool.
7. Retreat Defeated Troops
If the attacker rolls higher with all modifiers he has captured
the area, if it is a tie or the defender rolls higher with all
modifiers the Defender holds on to the area.
After rolling for destruction, all remaining Firestorm Troops
in the defeated Commander’s area must be retreated.
Attacking troops simply return from the area they attacked
from while defeated defending troops must retreat to any
adjacent areas of their choice that are under their control..
If there are no adjacent friendly-controlled areas to retreat
into, then all of the Firestorm Troops in the area, including
any that would normally be destroyed, are captured and
permanently removed from the campaign. This earns the
victorious Commander extra Campaign Victory Points. If
Firestorm Troops cannot retreat into friendly areas due to
stacking restrictions the count as destroyed but not captured.
The men manage to retreat but must leave their equipment
behind and must wait for a resupply to become active
again.
Important Change: In Firestorm-Caen only 3 Firestorm
Troops may be in any given area (in attack the attackers are
considered to occupy the area the attack from). German
Defence Firestorm Troops are not counted, nor can they
be used if three regular German Firestorm Troops occupy a
German area.
8. Advance Victorious Troops
As an attacker vanquishing your foe you have gained control
of his position. To claim your prize, march your forces
forward and take control of the battlefield. As the defender
you have managed to defend your territory and remain in
control but do not capture the attacker’s territory.
If as attacker you defeated your opponent, you now control
the area the defeated forces retreated from. Place a Control
marker on your new area to show that you now control it.
As the victorious Commander, you may move up to three
Firestorm Troops into the newly-controlled area from adjacent
areas. The first troops to move into the newly-acquired area
must be any surviving Firestorm Troops that you used in
your battle (not counting Aircraft). Once these troops have
advanced, you may select the remaining Firestorm Troops to
advance from any adjacent area.
Order three – Strategic Phase
1. Land Allied Firestorm Troops on the beaches
At the end of each turn the Allied player may land
reinforcements on the three beaches, Gold (A-2), Juno (A-3)
and Gold (A-5). These are the only areas his reinforcements
may land and they are subject to stacking rules. A maximum
of three Firestorm Troops may be in an area at any time.
It is imperative that the Allied players advance from the
beaches to make room for new reinforcements. Every turn
the Allies receive new units. These are placed directly in
reinforcements and must be placed on the beaches subject to
stacking restrictions. All Allied Firestorm Troops destroyed
are also placed in reinforcements. It is likely that the Allies
cannot place all the Firestorm Troops during this step and
the reminder must wait one turn or possibly more.
All Allied Firestorm Troops in reinforcements must be placed
on the three beach areas Gold, Juno and Sword subject to
stacking restrictions.
2. Deploy new
Reinforcements.
German
Firestorm
Troops
and
Likewise the Germans place their Firestorm Troops from
reinforcements, both new units and units destroyed,
anywhere on the map in friendly areas or into German
Tactical Reserve. They are subject to stacking restrictions
29
and if there are not enough free areas available the reminder
is left in reinforcements. Note that can only happen if the
Allied offensive is extraordinarily successful.
3. Make Strategic Moves
Redeploying forces before a major offensive provides you with
the flexibility to meet both known and unknown threats.
In Firestorm: Caen you may redeploy your units before the
next turn starts. Both sides starting with the Germans now
can move any units on the map up to three areas, though
friendly areas. They cannot pass through enemy held areas.
During this redeployment it is permissible to exceed stacking
limits while the units move, but at the end of this step there
is still a three Firestorm Troop stacking limit.
4. Total Victory Points
The last thing to do in the Strategic Phase is to total your
Campaign Victory Points. While this does not matter until
the end of the campaign, it is useful to know how well you
are doing as the campaign progresses.
Both Generals now total the Campaign Victory Points that
they have earned from capturing and holding objective areas
and capturing Firestorm Troops.
30
Special Turn 3: Epsom
Remove Firestorm Troops
At the end of turn 3: Epsom after all battles have
been fought, the Germans must remove the following
Firestorm Troops from their forces: Panzer Lehr, 2
Panzerdivision and 2 SS Panzerdivision ‘Das Reich’.
These are transferred to fight the US to the west and
take no further part in Firestorm: Caen. If they have
been captured before then, it has no further effect except
the Allied players then score points for capturing them,
but you do not need to remove any other unit instead.
The German situation is probably bad enough in this
eventuality.
31
STUG
BEUTE
21
DIV
AIRBORNE
6
DIV
BRIGADE
DIV
BRIGADE
3
3 CAN
2 CAN AMD
27 AMD
DIV
NORTHUMBRIAN
50
BRIGADE
8 AMD
2 DIV
LEHR
KORPS
III FLAK
12 SS
30 CORPS
5 AGRA
Gold or
juno if
space
33 AMD
53
WELSH
DIV
49
W. RIDING
DIV
9 SS
10 SS
2 SS
BRIGADE
DIV
DIV
1 SS
4 AMD
WESSEX
15
SCOTTISH
SS 102
BRIGADE
CHURCHILL
43
DIVISION
31 TK BDE
8 CORPS
8 AGRA
11 AMD
add to reinforcements
DIV
2 CAN CORPS
2 SS
2 DIV
BRIGADE
BRIGADE
LEHR
8 WERFER
7 WERFER
12 CORPS
3 AGRA
2 CAN
9 AGRA
Game Trackers
BRIGADE
9 WERFER
DIV
STAFFORDSHIRE
503 SPA
CHURCHILL
DIVISION
59
34 TK BDE
GUARDS AMD
add to reinforcements
add to reinforcements
Special Caumont gap
SS 101
Turn 4 - Charnwood
Turn 3 - Epsom
Air sortie markers
Turn 2 - Perch
Battle Arrows
1 CORPS
4 AGRA
DIV
HIGHLAND
51
DIVISION
7 AMD
reinforcements
Gold
Juno
Germans SWORD
Deployment
Turn 1 - D-Day
Germans
Gold
Game Tokens
Germans
Withdraw
Juno
Germans Paras SWORD
Firestorm: Caen
Germans
150
120
90
60
30
0
30
VICTORY POINT TRACKER
City
D-3
50 VP
EVRECHY
OD
R
ON RIVE
D-4
40 VP
Hill 112
C-3
20 VP
CARPIQUET
60
90
River Border
120
GERMAN SUPPLY
D-5
20 VP
C-5
30 VP
CAEN
C-4
30 VP
BREVILLE
150
B-5
20 VP
C-6
20 VP
DIVES
C-7
20 VP
CAGNY
B-6
A-6
CABOURG
Allied Air Sorties
Perch
Epsom
Charnwood
Goodwood
2
3
4
5
German Tactical
Reserve
1. Select an Opponent
2. Roll for Initiative
3. Place a Battle Arrow
4. Choose Firestorm Troops
5. Check for Supply
6. Identify your Mission
7. Play a Flames of War battle
- or roll for a General’s Game
8. Roll to Destroy
9. Retreat and Capture
Order TwoBattle Phase
German
Reinforcements
1. Land Firestorm Troops on
the beach - remember stacking
limits
2. Deploy new German
Firestorm and Reinforcements.
Turn 3 remove Firestorm troops.
Remember to move German
Firestorm Troops into Tactical
Reserve.
3. Make strategic Moves.
4. Total your Victory points.
8
1. Determine the number of
battles
2. Determine Initiative Bonus
7
4
Order ThreeStrategic Phase
6
5
3
6-8
6-8
6-8
3-5
Special
Battles:
Order OnePlanning Phase
2
1
NUMBER OF BATTLES
D-Day
1
GAME TURN Operation:
GERMAN SUPPLY
Allied Reinforcements
GERMAN SUPPLY
D-7
50 VP
COLOMBELLES
Verrières Ridge
D-6
50 VP
BOURGÉBOUS
EPRON
B-4
A-5
30 VP
BENOUVILLE
DOUVRES
A-4
CAEN
SW
BE ORD
AC
H
QUISTREHAM
s
ad
Plains
D-2
CHEUX
C-2
10 VP
BRETTEVILLE
L’ORGUEILLEUSE
B-3
CREULLY
A-3
30 VP
lai
Bocage
VILLERS
BOCAGE
D-1
50 VP
TILLY-SUR
SEULLES
C-1
20 VP
B-2
A-2
30 VP
ARROMANCHES
e
a
n-F
o
eR
GERMAN SUPPLY
B-1
BAYEUX
A-1
20 VP
D
JUNO
BEACH
FIRESTORM:
Z
Z/
L
GOLD
BEACH
ER
RIV
Ca
ORN
E
SS
E
GERMAN SUPPLY
32
IM
PA
L
AB
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