Operating & Assembly Manual W8ZR StationPro II

Operating & Assembly Manual W8ZR StationPro II
Operating & Assembly
Manual
W8ZR StationPro II
Contact Information: Jim Garland W8ZR
102 Spur Ranch Road
Santa Fe, NM 87540
[email protected]
www.w8zr.net/stationpro
Copyright © 2010-13, W8ZR
All rights reserved
(rev. 2/14/2013)
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Contents
A. Operating Instructions
I. Introduction ………………………………………… 3
II. Specifications ………………………………………. 3
III. Front Panel Controls and Connectors ……………... 5
IV. Rear Panel Connections …………………………... 7
V. RF Relay Unit Connections ………….……………. 10
VI. Installation and Hookup ……………………………11
VII. Operating Instructions and Hints …………………. 13
VIII. A Final Comment from W8ZR ………………….. 15
B. Assembly Instructions
I.
Preparation for Assembly……………………..…. 16
II. Microphone Jack Considerations……………...... 17
III. Front Panel Assembly …………………….…….. 18
IV. Main Circuit Board Assembly ……………...…… 28
V. Rear Panel Circuit Board Assembly ……………. 34
VI. Microcontroller Circuit Board Assembly ………. 36
VII. Final Assembly of the Controller ………………. 40
VIII. Programming and Checkout of the Controller …. 46
IX. Assembly of the RF Relay Unit ………………... 49
X. Assembly of the Transceiver Pods …………....... 53
XI. Final Instructions ……………………………….. 58
Appendix A: Avoiding Ground Loop Complications…..62
Appendix B: Parts & Supplier List ………………….... 67
(download schematic diagrams from
www.w8zr.net/stationpro/download)
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A. StationPro II Operating Instructions
I. Introduction:
The W8ZR StationPro II is a
master station controller that integrates
seamlessly the switching and control
functions of complex amateur stations
consisting of up to three transceivers (or
receiver/transmitter pairs) and up to
three linear amplifiers. With the press of
a switch the StationPro II transfers to a
selected transceiver the operator’s key,
microphone, computer interface,
RTTY/packet, line in/out, speaker, and
numerous other control functions. A second switch transfers the transceiver’s RF output
to a selected linear amplifier, along with the amplifier relay and ALC control voltage.
The StationPro II was designed to be as flexible as possible, so as to
accommodate almost any amateur equipment, from vintage “boatanchor” rigs of the
vacuum tube era to computer-interfaced contemporary transceivers. Operators need not
fear incompatibility between their linear amplifiers and transceivers, since the StationPro
II includes a fast, silent relay driver that can accommodate any amplifier’s relay
requirements. It also incorporates several operator convenience features, including an ID
timer and an amplifier tune-up pulser. Easy firmware upgrades not only allow additional
new features but permit the operator to customize and upgrade the StationPro II as station
equipment changes. The RF relay circuits in the StationPro II introduce negligible VSWR
from 1.8-54 MHz and are conservatively rated at the U.S. legal power limit.
II. Specifications:
RF Relay Circuits
1. Frequency Range: DC – 54 MHz
2. Nominal Impedance: 50 Ω unbalanced (SO-239 connectors)
3. Insertion VSWR: 1.1 or less (DC-30 MHz), 1.2 or less (54 MHz)
4. RF Power Rating: U.S. amateur legal power limit (1500 Watts)
Note: tested at 2500 Watts below 30 MHz, 800 Watts at 54 MHz.
Relay contacts rated at 12A DC continuous, 5000V dielectric rating (to coil)
5. Relay Control Voltage: +12V DC, supplied by control unit.
6. Relay Control Cable: Ethernet CAT5 cable, with RJ-45 connectors
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Data, DC & Audio Control Circuits
7. Transceivers or Receiver/Transmitter Pairs: 3 maximum
8. Linear Amplifiers: 3 maximum
9. Amplifier Relay Control:
-switching time: 3 mS maximum (on), 1 mS maximum (off)
-control voltage (open circuit) 12VDC
-control current (closed circuit) 5 mA
-relay keying limits (Option A or B selected during assembly)
Option A: 400V (AC or DC of either polarity) @ 250 mA maximum
Option B: 200V positive DC only @ 3.5Amperes maximum
10. Microphones: 1 or 2 (up to 7 wires plus GND per microphone)
11. Microphone Connectors: owner’s choice, two 8 pin standard supplied.
12. Headphone Connectors: 1/4 in. & 3.5 mm. (1/8”) stereo, automatic speaker
disconnect
13. Transceiver Control Lines: 24 maximum per transceiver (plus GND)
Microphone (Mic+, Mic-, PTT, + four functions): 7
Speakers/Phones (L/R): 2
Key/Paddle: 2
Line In (mono): 1
Line Out (L/R stereo): 2
Amp Relay: 1
Amp ALC: 1
Computer Serial (TXD, RXD, CTS, RTS): 4
Aux/Spare: 4
14. Transceiver Interface Cable: 25C shielded, w/25 pin D-SUB connectors
15. Transceiver Control Relay Ratings:
max. switched current:
3A, derate as switched voltage increases
max. switched voltage:
125 VDC (25 mA), 150 VAC (100mA)
16. Optional RF Relay Power: 30 VDC maximum (2.5mm DC power jack)
17. Switched DC Output: +12 VDC in series with 1000 Ω resistor
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General Specifications
18. Power Requirements:
12 VDC @ 400 mA nominal (2.5 mm DC power jack )
Fuse (internal): 1A-3AG
19. Dimensions:
Control Unit
Height: 4.2” (10.7 cm), excluding feet
Width: 9.5” (24.1 cm)
Depth: 8.0” (20.3 cm), including front/rear connectors & switches
RF Relay Unit
Height: 5.0” (12.7 cm)
Width: 7.5” (19.1 cm), (excluding mounting flanges)
Depth: 1.5” (3.8 cm) (excluding connectors)
20. Weight:
Control Unit: 5 lbs (2.27 kg)
RF Relay Unit: 1 lb – 10 oz (0.74 kg)
III. Front Panel Controls and Connectors
1. Pwr Switch: Connects +12VDC from rear panel power jack to StationPro
circuitry, through a 1A fuse. Also applies +12VDC (through a series 1000Ω resistor) to a
rear panel jack for controlling an optional master station AC power relay.
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2.Mic Sel. Switch: Switches between two front panel microphones. Each
microphone can have up to 7 audio/control wires. The Mic+ and PTT are independently
switched but the other wires (Mic-, FCN1, etc.) are common to both microphones. As
shown in the drawing, the microphones can have different connector types. Instructions
for wiring the microphone jacks are given in the next section: B. Assembly
Instructions.
3. Key Jack: A key or paddle is connected to this standard 1/4” stereo jack, with
normally open contacts. Keyer paddles should be wired so that the plug tip = dot, and the
plug ring = dash. For convenience, an identical key jack on the rear panel is wired in
parallel with this jack.
4. TX/RX Sel. Switches (3): Depressing one of these momentary action switches
selects a station transceiver or receiver/transmitter pair.
5. Amplifier Sel. Switches (3): Depressing one of these momentary action
switches selects a linear amplifier. Pressing a switch a second time toggles the selected
amplifier off-line, as indicated by a blinking LED and “Amp Bypass” on the LCD.
6. Elapsed Time Switch: This switch has three timer functions: (1) Depressing it
momentarily starts a one-time 10min ID time. (2) Depressing it for 1/2 sec starts a
repeating 10 min. ID timer. (3) Depressing it while turning on the Pwr switch causes an
elapsed time “odometer” to display on the LCD.
7. Swap Switch: This “scratchpad” memory switch recalls the previous
transceiver and amplifier selections. Repeatedly pressing the switch toggles back and
forth between the current transceiver/amplifier selections and the previous selections.
8. Amp Tune Switch: Depressing this momentary action switch injects a pulsed
(50% duty cycle) 1000 Hz tone into the microphone audio circuit of the selected
transceiver. Pressing the switch again turns off the tone, which otherwise will time out
after ten seconds.
9. Phones jacks (2): Twin stereo headphone jacks can accommodate either 1/4 in.
or 3.5 mm (1/8”) stereo headphones (Left = tip, Right = ring). These jacks are connected
to the left/mainRX and right/subRX speaker outputs of the selected transceiver; plugging
in a set of headphones automatically disables the speakers.
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IV. Rear Panel Connections
1. TX/RX1, TX/RX2, TX/RX3 jacks: D-SUB 25-pin male jacks that connect via
breakout “pods” to the station transceivers. The pinouts of these jacks are as follows:
Pin No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Function
Mic +
PTT
Mic Mic FN1
Mic FN2
Mic FN3
Mic FN4
Key - Ring
Key - Tip
Line Out - L
Line Out -R
Spkr - L
Spkr - R
Pin No.
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
Function
Amp Relay
Amp ALC
Aux/Spare 2
Aux/Spare 1
Aux/Spare 4
Aux/Spare 3
Line IN
CAT - CTS
CAT - TXD
CAT - RTS
CAT - RXD
GND
2. KEY Jack: A key or paddle can be connected to this standard 1/4” stereo jack,
with normally open contacts. Keyer paddles should be wired so that the plug’s tip = dot,
and the plug’s ring = dash. An identical key jack on the front panel is wired in parallel
with this jack.
3. LINE IN Jack: This 3.5 mm (1/8”) mono jack is typically connected to the
output from a computer sound card or a TNC. The connected device is routed by the
StationPro to the Line In port of the selected transceiver.
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4. LINE OUT Jack: This 3.5 mm. (1/8”) stereo jack outputs the Line Out port of a
selected transceiver. Normally, the tip would be the left or main receiver line output and
the ring would be the right or sub-receiver output. The jack is typically used to interface
a transceiver’s line output to the input of a computer sound card or TNC.
5. AMP RELAY (3) and AMP ALC (3) jacks: These RCA phono jacks should be
jumpered (use shielded phono cables ) to the relay and ALC jacks of the station’s linear
amplifiers. Because the Amp Relay outputs are buffered by a solid state switching circuit,
the user need not fear compatibility problems between a selected amplifier and
transceiver.
6. AUX1 through AUX4 Jacks: These RCA phono jacks are spares that can be
used for any control purpose by the user. The StationPro routes these jacks to spare pads
on the breakout pod associated with a selected transceiver. They can be used for, e.g.,
band data switching.
7. SPKR-L and SPKR-R Jacks: The station’s speakers should be connected to
these RCA phono jacks and are routed by the StationPro to the speaker output ports of a
selected transceiver. Normally SPKR-L would be used for the main receiver’s speaker
and SPKR-R for the sub-receiver’s speaker. These jacks are disconnected when
headphones are inserted into a front panel jack on the StationPro.
8. PTT Jack: This RCA phono jack is wired in parallel with the PTT line on the
microphone and also with pin 3 of the Packet/RTTY jack. Grounding this line actuates
the PTT circuit of the selected transceiver. A typical use would be to connect a foot
switch to this jack. Note that some transceivers ground their PTT line when transmitting,
so that this jack could be used in this instance for, e.g., external receiver muting.
9. +12 CTRL Jack: This RCA phono jack outputs +12VDC when the StationPro’s
power switch is turned on. The +12V is in series with a 1000 Ω resistor, which limits the
short circuit current to 12 mA. Because of the series resistor, the jack cannot be used to
power 12V accessories. This switched jack is intended to control a (user-supplied) solid
state AC power relay, which can be used as a master station power ON/OFF relay. Below
is a sample circuit diagram using an SPST solid state AC relay. Any solid state relay that
operates with a DC control control voltage of 3-15V (or more) can be used. The relay
should have a load current rating of at least 25A. A DPST solid state relay can be used if
the builder wishes to switch both sides of the 120VAC line.
A convenient way to make this relay master power controller is to mount the solid
state relay in the bottom of a deep duplex outlet box, available at Home Depot or any
electrical supply store. An ordinary duplex outlet (two 120VAC receptacles) is mounted
on the face of the box, and a heavy duty AC power cord exits through one of the side
holes. A fuse holder and an RCA phono jack mount on the other side of the outlet box. A
shielded phono cable connects this phono jack to the 12V SWITCHED jack on the rear
panel of the StationPro, and an outlet strip for the station equipment plugs into one of the
two duplex receptacles. The other duplex receptacle can be wired directly to the 120V
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line, to provide an unswitched 120VAC outlet for station clocks, computer, UPS supply,
etc.
MASTER STATION 120 VAC POWER CONTROLLER
(Note that the .01 µF/1000V bypass capacitors should be 240 VAC line-rated)
10. +24V RLY IN Jack: This 2.5mm DC power jack may be used to connect an
external DC power supply (+15V to +30V) to user-supplied external RF relays. This jack
is not used with the standard RF Relay unit. Some users, however, may prefer to build
their own RF relay units using, e.g., surplus vacuum relays, which typically operate at 2428V. In this case, the StationPro will automatically connect the relays to this external
power source.
11 REM IN & REM OUT Jacks: These RJ-25 jacks are used only when multiple
StationPro IIs (up to a maximum of three) are networked together. Download the
“StationPro II Networking Manual” for additional information. Users who have only one
StationPro II can ignore these jacks.
12. CAT Jack: This female D-SUB 9 pin (DB9) connector is configured as a
standard serial port and should be connected to a serial port on a computer or other
peripheral equipment. The required cable is an ordinary 9-pin serial cable having male
and female DB9 connectors. The StationPro routes this port to the selected transceiver.
The (industry standard) pinout of this connector is as follows:
DB9 CAT Connector
Pin No.
. Function
1
N/C
2
RXD
3
TXD
4
N/C
5
GND
6
N/C
7
RTS
8
CTS
9
N/C
10
13. RELAY CTRL Jack: This RJ45 jack is used to control the StationPro’s
remote RF relays. The jack accepts a standard 8-wire ethernet-type patch cable (with
RJ45 connectors). The cable should be no longer than necessary (5 – 6 ft or shorter), and
preferably shielded. The free end of the cable plugs into a mating connector on the RF
relay unit. Builders of custom RF relay units should refer to the StationPro schematic
diagram for the connector pinout,
14. PACKET/RTTY Jack: This standard 5 pin DIN jack is used to connect
RTTY, Packet, and PSK31 peripherals to the StationPro. The pinout is shown in the
diagram. Note that all of the pins on this jack are in parallel with similarly named pins on
other jacks on the StationPro. The AUX4 pin is not designated for any specific purpose,
but may be configured by the user for an additional function (e.g., squelch, etc.)
15. +12 IN Jack: This DC power jack accepts a standard 2.5 mm DC power plug
(center pin positive), which should be connected to a +12V (nominal) regulated DC
power supply. This power supply can be a station +12V supply used to power other
equipment (e.g., a VHF/UHF FM transceiver), the accessory +12V port on the rear panel
of most transceivers, or even a dedicated wall-wart supply. The power supply should be
rated at 500 mA or greater and have good filtering..
V. RF Relay Unit Connections:
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1. TRX1, TRX2, TRX3 Jacks: These SO-239 (UHF) coaxial cable jacls should be
connected to the antenna jacks on the station transceivers, using 50 Ω coaxial cable.
Because most transceivers are rated at 200W RF or less, RG-58 or RG8X cable can be
useds for these jumper cables. Note that the StationPro grounds the antenna connectors of
transceivers that are not selected.
2. AMP IN (AMP1, AMP2, AMP3) Jacks: These SO-239 (UHF) coaxial cable
jacks should be connected to the RF Input jacks on the station linear amplifiers, using 50
Ω coaxial cable. RG-58 or RG8X cable can be used for these jumper cables. Note that
the StationPro grounds the inputs of amplifiers that are not selected.
3. AMP OUT (AMP1, AMP2, AMP3) Jacks: These SO-239 (UHF) coaxial cable
jacks should be connected to the RF Output jacks on the station linear amplifiers, using
50 Ω coaxial cable. For legal limit amplifiers, it is best to use RG-8, RG-213, LMR-400
or similar coaxial cable for these jumper cables. Note that the StationPro grounds only
the input of non-selected amplifiers. The output of non-selected amplifiers is left floating
as a precaution, even though the StationPro will not allow non-selected amplifiers to be
keyed up. Note also that a bypass relay in the StationPro RF Relay unit routes RF from
the selected transceiver directly to the OUTPUT connector when no amplifier is selected.
4. OUTPUT Jack: This SO-239 (UHF) coaxial cable jack should be jumpered to
the station antenna (or antenna switch).. The coaxial cable should be rated for the
maximum power of any of the station linear amplifiers.
5. CTRL Jack: This RJ45 jack is used to control the RF relays. The jack accepts a
standard 8-wire ethernet-type patch cable (with RJ45 connectors). The cable should be
no longer than necessary (5 – 6 ft or shorter), and preferably shielded. The free end of the
cable plugs into a mating connector on the rear panel of the StationPro Control Unit.
VI. Installation and Hookup
The StationPro II consists of a main control unit, a remote RF relay unit, and three
breakout pods for the station transceivers. Normally the RF relay unit mounts behind the
station operating desk and is connected to the main control unit by a standard 8-wire
ethernet patch cable, terminated with RJ45 connectors. This cable is readily available
from any retail store that sells computer supplies.
The three transceiver breakout pods connect to the main control unit with 25-wire
shielded computer (serial port) cables. For most applications, inexpensive off-the-shelf
computer cables can be used, the kind with molded DB25 connectors on each end (one
male, one female). However, in some applications involving computer control of multiple
transceivers operating SSB or AM, the builder may have to fabricate custom interface
cables having additional shielding. This additional shielding would prevent possible
crosstalk between the high level RS-232C data and the microphone audio. This topic is
thoroughly discussed in the supplementary manual, “Preparing Custom Transceiver
Interface Cables.” However, since wiring cables is tedious, the builder should always
12
try a commercial cable first to see if a problem occurs. Furthermore, there are several
workarounds discussed in the supplementary manual, short of fabricating custom
interface cables.
The diagram below shows how the StationPro II is interfaced to the operator’s
station. It is important to note that none of the rear panel jacks on the StationPro II
controller connect directly to transceivers. All transceiver control functions and inputs
(microphone, key, data, speakers, PTT, etc.) are made via cables coming from breakout
pods which are fabricated during assembly for each model of transceiver. The fabrication
of breakout pods is treated in detail in the next section: B. StationPro II Assembly
Instructions. The jacks on the rear panel of the StationPro II attach to the station’s
peripheral equipment, such as computer, speakers, TNC, and so forth. The StationPro II
automatically routes this peripheral equipment to the selected transceiver. Each
amplifier’s relay and ALC lines also connect to the StationPro II rear panel. Users should
refer to III. Rear Panel Connectons for details about connector pinouts.
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VII. Operating Instructions and Hints
1. Power Up: Once the interconnecting cables are installed and a +12V DC power
source (500mA minimum) is plugged into the +12 IN jack on the rear of the StationPro II
control unit, the StationPro II can be turned on with the front panel PWR switch. The red
LED power indicator will light, and “SP” will be sent in morse code while the LCD
initializes. After about a second, the display will briefly show the firmware revision date,
followed by the previously selected transceiver.
On its initial power up the StationPro II defaults to TX/RX1. On subsequent power-ups
the StationPro II reverts to the previously selected transceiver. The bottom line of the
display shows the selected transceiver, with a confirming 3-tone beep and the sound of
relays clicking. The top line of the display will show “∗ ∗No Amp∗∗” to confirm that no
amplifier has yet been selected. (As a safety precaution, the StationPro II never selects an
amplifier at power up.)
If the user has fabricated an optional solid state relay master power controller (see III.
Rear Panel Connectors, Item 9: +12V Control Jack for details), then all the 120 VAC
station equipment will also be powered up at this time. At this point the transceiver
shown in the display will be “on-line” and ready to operate.
2. Transceiver and Amplifier Selection: Station transceivers and amplifiers are
selected by depressing the appropriate front panel momentary action toggle switches. A
green LED indicator will illuminate above each activated switch and the LCD will show
the selections, as illustrated in the below figure for a vintage Collins transceiver and
amplifier.
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If the switch of a selected amplifier is depressed a second time, the amplifier will be
taken off line and the green LED indicator will blink. The top line of the LCD will show
“BYPASS” to confirm that the amplifier is in a ready mode but is currently off-line.
Depressing the amplifier select switch a third time will bring the selected amplifier back
on line.
The SWAP switch provides a convenient way to recall previous transceiver and
amplifier selections. Pressing this switch toggles between the currently selected
transceiver/amplifier selections and the previous transceiver/amplifier selections. The
SWAP feature provides a handy way to make A-B comparisons between rigs, or to recall
instantly a prior transceiver/amplifier combination. Being able to call up completely
different rigs, automatically transferring all RF coax cables, microphone, key, etc, in a
tenth of a second is guaranteed to impress one’s ham buddies.
3. Elapsed Time Features: Momentarily depressing the Elapsed Time switch
starts a one-time ten minute timer. A beep confirms the selection, and a “∗” symbol
appears on the lower right corner of the LCD to show that the timer is running. After ten
minutes, the controller will send “ID” in morse code and the timer will turn off. If the
Elapsed Time switch is held down for a half second, then a repeating timer is activated.
In this case the LCD will show a “#” symbol in the lower right corner, and the controller
will send “ID” in morse code every ten minutes, until cancelled. An active timer is
cancelled by pressing the Elapsed Time switch, with “K” being sent in morse code to
confirm the cancellation.
If the Elapsed Time switch is held down while the StationPro II is powered up,
then the LCD will briefly show the number of accumulated hours and minutes of
StationPro II use.
One application of this feature is to track the yearly hours of station operation. For
example, the operator can reset the timer to zero on January 1, and twelve months later
have a record of total station activity for the year. The timer is reset to zero by turning on
the StationPro II while holding down the AMP1 switch.
4. AMP TUNE function: Momentarily pressing the AMP TUNE switch injects a
pulsed 1000 Hz tone for ten seconds into the microphone input of the selected
transceiver. The purpose of this pulsed tone, which has a 50% duty cycle, is to permit the
operator to tune up safely a selected linear amplifier without fear of exceeding the
amplifier’s power rating. The plate current, grid current, and power output meters of the
amplifer, which read average values, will show roughly half of their normal values while
the pulser is engaged. While the pulsed tone is active, an LED indicator next to the AMP
15
TUNE switch blinks rapidly and the TRX and AMP LEDs are turned off. Depressing the
AMP TUNE switch before the pulser times out immediately terminates the pulsed tone.
A tune level trimpot on the microcontroller circuit board in the StationPro II
control unit sets the appropriate audio level for the pulsed tone. The correct procedure is
to place the selected transceiver in the SSB mode and turn on the pulser. The level
trimpot is adjusted to give a mid-scale ALC reading on the transceiver’s ALC meter.
5. Networking Multiple StationPro IIs: Up to three StationPro IIs may be
networked, permitting a total of nine transceivers and nine amplifiers to be controlled
(three on each operating desk). Selecting any of the nine rigs will transfer control to that
rig while taking the other eight rigs off-line. The antenna coax line is automatically
transferred to the selected radio, and the key, microphone, speakers, etc., on the relevant
station desk are transferred to the selected radio. The StationPro IIs on the other desks are
deselected and their status is displayed on their respective LCDs.
Pressing any transceiver or amplifer switch on an “off line” desk will activate that
StationPro II and take off line the previously active StationPro II.
There are additional considerations associated with networking multiple
StationPro IIs. Because this topic will be of interest to only a small number of amateurs
having very complex stations, the details of configuring networked controllers are to be
found in a separate maual: Networking StationPro II Configuration Manual.
VIII. A Final Comment from W8ZR
The philosophy underlying the design of the StationPro II is that an initial
investment made in planning and organizing one’s station will pay handsome dividends
in convenience, time savings, and operating pleasure. The ability instantly and reliably to
switch between rigs means that that more time can be spent on the air enjoying the
hobby, and fewer frustrating hours spent crouched behind the operating desk, debugging
dead connections and miswired cables, and worrying about inadvertently throwing the
wrong switch. The StationPro II and its little brother, the StationPro I, have brought for
their designer a new enjoyment and satisfaction to amateur radio. It is sincerely hoped
that other builders will experience this same enjoyment and satisfaction.
Comments, inqiries, and suggestions either about this manual or the StationPro II are
always welcome. Please email Jim Garland W8ZR at [email protected] A great deal of
additional information may also be found on the designer’s StationPro website at
www.w8zr.net/stationpro/ and on the StationPro User Group
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/stationpro/
16
B. StationPro II Assembly Instructions
The W8ZR StationPro II (SP-II) consists of the primary controller unit, plus an external
RF relay unit, and three transceiver interface pods that attach to the controller unit with standard
computer cables. The controller unit contains four printed circuit boards: (1) a main circuit
board, (2) a front panel circuit board, (3) a rear panel circuit board, and (4) a microcontroller
circuit board.
The RF relay unit handles all of the RF switching for the user’s transceivers and
amplifiers. The transceiver “pods” are simple breakout boxes that interface to each connected
transceiver (or receiver/transmitter pair). Builders should allow about 14-16 hours to wire and
test a complete SP-II. You’ll maintain focus and avoid mistakes if you break up the work into
segments.
Note: If you received this manual with your W8ZR kit, then please verify
that the revision date on the Contents page corresponds to the revision date
of the manual at www.w8zr.net/stationpro/download. The W8ZR website
will always have the latest revision number for all documentation and
firmware.
I. Preparation for Assembly
(1) Tools: To build the StationPro II you will need the following tools and small items:
-hookup wire #22AWG, 50ft approx
-small tip soldering iron
-1/32” diameter resin core solder
-isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol & Q-tips
-magnifying glass
-small needle-nose pliers
-small flush-cut wire cutters
-phillips screw drivers (small & medium)
-small flat head screwdriver
-sharp knife or single-edge razor blade
-3/16 in. drill bit (5 mm approx.)
-small flat and round files (optional)
-set of nut drivers (optional)
-regular tip soldering iron (optional)
-1/4 in. heat shrink tubing (optional)
-transceiver cables (see Sec. X)
(2) Hardware: The hardware to assemble your
SP-II is supplied in two hardware packs with the
W8ZR “semi-kits.”
Assembly Hints
1. Make sure your workbench surface is
clean and free of clutter.
3. Inventory and sort parts and read
through the assembly nstructions before
you begin construction. Read the FAQs
page on the W8ZR StationPro website.
2. Use a high-intensity light and magnifying
glass to inspect your solder joints and to
look for solder bridges.
4. To give your work a professional
appearance, install resistors and capacitors
so their color codes and markings all face
the same way.
5. Work carefully and methodically and take
your time. Take pride in your workmanship,
and if you complete a step and it doesn’t
look good, then do it over.
17
Note: additional cabinet hardware is packed with the enclosure for the SP-II control unit.
Threaded aluminum standoffs are supplied by Mouser Electronics as part of your component
order.
HARDWARE PACK 1
Qty 8
2-56 x 3/16” screws
Qty 20
4-40 x 5/16” screws
Qty 28
No. 4 internal lockwashers
Qty 20
4-40 nuts
HARDWARE PACK 2
Qty 8
4-40 x 3/16” screws
Qty 8
6-32 x 1/4”
Qty 8
No. 6 internal lockwashers
Qty 18
No. 4 x 3/8” sht. metal screws
Qty 8
Black No. 6 x 3/8” sht. metal screws
screws
II. Microphone Jack Considerations
Two 8-pin mic chassis jacks are included with your “semi-kit,” and most modern
transceivers (Kenwood, late Ten-Tec, Icom, Yaesu, Elecraft, Flex-Radio) will use these
jacks. Older vintage rigs (earlyTen-Tec, Drake TR-5/7, Johnson Ranger, Collins KWS-1,
Heathkit, etc.) typically used either 4-pin or 2-pin connectors. The mic jacks for all of
these vintage rigs also will fit in the 5/8 in. prepunched holes in the front panel, but must
be supplied by the builder.
Some other vintage rigs, for example the Collins “S-Line”, the Drake “B-Line”
and “C-Line,” and the National NCX-5, use 3/16 in. or 1/4 in. microphone plugs whose
mating jacks require a 3/8 in. hole. If you want to use one of these microphone jacks, then
you should use insulating washers (not supplied) to adapt each jack to the 5/8 in. hole in
the StationPro’s front panel. (Insulating washers will minimize hum pickup – see the next
paragraph and Appendix A: Avoiding Ground Loop Complications.)
18
Any of these microphone jacks can be used with the StationPro, although the two on the left
will require washers to clamp them to the 5/8” hole in the front panel
You can “mix and match” microphone jacks in the StationPro, e.g., using one 8pin and one 4-pin jack. Also, you can easily configure the SP-II so that a microphone
wired for, say, a forty-year-old Collins KWM-2 transceiver, can be used with a modern
Elecraft K3 transceiver, even though the mic connectors are different. Note, however,
that vintage microphones using a single shielded cable to carry audio signals (as opposed
to modern microphones having dedicated mic+ and mic- conductors) are particularly
susceptable to hum caused by ground loop currents. Before installing jacks intended for
such microphones (such as the 2-pin 5/8 in. jack – second from the right in the above
photo), you should carefully read Appendix A: Avoiding Ground Loop Complications
at the end of this manual
III. Front Panel Assembly
The front panel is the most complex part of the entire assembly process, so we
will get it out of the way first. Begin by reading through these instructions. Then identify
the front panel circuit board and, referring to the parts listing shown below, collect all of
the components. (Additional information about each component is in Appendix B: SP-II
Parts List, at the end of this manual. Also, photos of most components are shown in the
step-by-step directions that follow.) Note that components mount on both the front and
rear sides of the front panel circuit board, as indicated by the white silkscreened legends.
Also note that Header H302 is unused, even though its outline is shown on the circuit
board
SPII Front Panel Parts List
IC socket
C301-C307
C308, C309
C310
C311
DS301-DS304,
DS308, DS309
DS306-DS307
18 pin
1000 pF
47 pF
0.1 µF
1 µF
DIP 18 pin IC socket
Capacitor, 50V, epoxy-dipped ceramic, qty 7
Capacitor, 50V, epoxy-dipped ceramic, qty 2
Capacitor, 50V, epoxy dipped ceramic, qty 1
Capacitor, electrolytic, 50V, qty 1
LED
LED
LED, Green, qty 6
LED, Yellow, qty 2
19
DS305, DS310
-J301
J302
J303
P305
K301
P301, P307
P302
LCD
R301
R302-R304
R305-R311
R312
R313
R314
R315, R317, R318
R316
S301
S302
S303-S311
Y301
U301
----------
LED
LED bezels
Key Jack
Phone Jack
Phone Jack
Header
Relay
Header
Header
16x2 LCD
5 KΩ trimpot
2.2 KΩ
1000 Ω
22 KΩ
220 KΩ
4.7 KΩ
10 KΩ
10 Ω
Switch
Switch
Switch
Ceram. Res.
IC
connectors
hardware
hardware
LED, Red,, qty 2
LED mounting clips, qty 10
1/4 in. Stereo NO Phone Jack, qty 1
1/4 in. Stereo NO/NC Phone Jack, qty 1
3.5 mm Stereo NO/NC Phone Jack, qty 1
40 pin, 0.100 male, breakaway header, qty 1
P&B/Tyco V23105, DPDT 12VDC, qty 1
Molex, 26-pin (2x13), 0.100 male header, qty 2
Molex 4-pin 0.156” PCB connector w/locking clip, qty 1
Microtips 16x2 LCD
carbon trimmer potentiometer
Resistor, 5% carbon film 1/4W (red-red-red), qty 3
Resistor, 5% carbon film 1/4W (brown-black-red), qty 7
Resistor, 5% carbon film 1/4W (red-red-orange), qty 1
Resistor, 5% carbon film 1/4W (red-red-yellow), qty 1
Resistor, 5% carbon film 1/4W (yellow-violet-orange), qty 1
Resistor, 5% carbon film 1/4W (brown-black-orange), qty 3
Resistor, 5% carbon film 1/4W (brown-black-black), qty 1
Plastic DPDT paddle, qty 1
Min. toggle, flat lever SPDT, qty 1
Min. toggle, flat lever SPDT mom. action, qty 9
480 KHz ceramic resonator
PIC16C54 custom pre-programmed IC
8 pin mic jacks, qty 2
threaded standoff, round alum., 2-56 x 1/4,” qty 4
2-56 x 3/16” machine screws, qty 8
Front Panel Circuit Board –Front View
20
Front Panel Circuit Board – Rear View
(1) Install the following 1/4 Watt metal film resistors and the 5 KΩ trimpot onto the
circuit board. Note that some resistors mount on the rear side of the board, as indicated on
the silkscreening. Make certain the resistor bodies lie flat against the board before
soldering and align all the resistor color codes in the same direction.
R302-R304
R305-R311
R312
R313
R314
R315,R317,R318
R316
R301
2.2 KΩ (red-red-red)
1000 Ω (brown-black-red)
22 KΩ (red-red-orange)
220 KΩ (red-red-yellow)
4.7 KΩ (yellow-violet-red)
10 KΩ (brown-black-orange)
10 Ω (brown-black-black)
5 KΩ Trimpot
(2) Install the following ten blue epoxy-dipped capacitors and one electrolytic capacitor
onto the circuit board. Make sure you install the capacitors on the front or rear side, as
indicated by the silkscreening, and that you observe the polarity of the electolytic
capacitor.
C301-C307
C308, C309
C310
C311
1000 pF (marked 102 – blue epoxy-dipped)
47 pF (marked 470 – blue epoxy-dipped)
0.1 µF (marked 104 – blue epoxy-dipped)
1.0 µF electrolytic (observe polarity when installing)
(3) Install the 480 kHz ceramic resonator Y301 on the rear side of the circuit board. Bend
the two tabs down, as shown below, so the resonator lies flat against the outline on the
circuit board.
21
(4) Install relay K301 on the front side of the board. Make certain the relay body lies flat
against the board. Hint: solder diagonally opposite pins first, so you can readjust the
relay body if necessary.
(5) Install the 18 pin DIP IC socket at U301 on the rear side of the circuit board. Make
sure the notch on the socket is aligned with the notch on the silkscreening. Do not plug in
the IC yet.
(6) Install two 26-pin headers at P301, P307 and the 4-pin 0.156” PCB connector
w/locking clip at P302 on the rear side of the circuit board. Hint: solder the end pins first
to secure the headers. Then, after you’re certain the headers are seated against the
board, with the pins perpendicular to the board, solder the remaining pins.
(7) Mount the LCD to the front panel, as follows: (Note: the rectangular cutout on the
front panel is sized for the recommended Microtips NC-S16205DFYSAY display. If
other brands of LCDs are used, it may be necessary to file slightly the cutout opening.)
(a) Slide a 16-pin 0.100” header into position J305 on the front side
of the circuit board, but do not solder it yet. (Clip the 16 pins off of a
40 pin breakaway header using wire cutters.)
(b) As shown below, loosely mount the LCD onto the top side of the
circuit board using a 1/4” x 2-56 threaded standoff and two 2-56 x
3/16” screws at each of the four mounting holes. The top of the J305
header pins should fit into the mating holes on the LCD. Do not
solder the pins yet. (You want the screws to be loose enough so you
can center the LCD in its front panel cutout in a subsequent step.
The LCD display mounts on four 1/4” threaded standoffs with 2-56 x 3/16” screws and connects to the
circuit board with the 16 pin header. Be sure to solder both ends of each header pin.
22
(8) Remove all hardware from the nine momentary action toggle switches and discard the
flat washers. Finger tighten one of the nuts against each switch body and then temporarily
secure each toggle switch to the front panel. The lockwashers should be behind the panel,
and the front panel nuts should also be only finger-tight. IMPORTANT: make certain the
bat handles are pointing upward on all the switches, so that the handles are pressed down
to actuate the switch.
(9) In the same way, temporarily mount the SPDT miniature snap-action toggle switch
S302 to the front panel. The switch mounts sideways, in either direction.
(10) DO NOT attach the plastic DPDT AC power switch to the front panel. It will be
installed later.
(11) Temporarily attach the circuit board to the front panel, adjusting the switches as
necessary to make sure their pins fit into the mating holes on the circuit board, and that
the LCD fits into the square cutout on the front panel. Use the slight bit of wiggle room
on the LCD mounting screws to center the LCD into its cutout. When you are certain the
switch bodies are snug against the circuit board, and that the LCD is flush with the front
of the panel, and after you have double-checked that no switches are mounted upside
down, then solder all the switch pins to the circuit board. Now tighten the LCD mounting
screws on the rear side of the printed circuit board
(12) Detach the front panel from the circuit board, taking care not to lose the outer nut
and lockwasher from each switch. Hint: note that the nuts on S302 are slightly smaller
than the nuts on the momentary action switches, so don’t get them mixed up. Now tighten
the top screws on the LCD spacers and solder all the pins on both ends of J305 (32 solder
connections in total).
(13) Mount the plastic DPDT AC power switch S301 on the front panel (it goes either
way). The nut should be finger tight. Now set the front panel aside.
AC Power Switch S301
(14) Identify all the jacks that mount on the front panel: two microphone jacks, the 1/4 in.
key jack (J301), the 1/4 in. headphone jack (J302), and the 3.5mm headphone jack
(J303). As illustrated below, bend the solder lugs out flat on the key jack, so that they
won’t touch the printed circuit board when installed. Don’t mix up the two 1/4 in. jacks;
the J302 jack has a black plastic shell.
23
Left to right: J303, J302, J301, 8-pin Mic
Bend the solder lugs on the key jack (J301) out flat, so they won’t touch the front panel printed circuit
board. If you’re installing your own mic jacks with exposed solder lugs, bend them out flat too.
(15) Before starting, read carefully through the following steps, especially those
pertaining to wiring the 8-pin DIN microphone jacks.The spacing between wires is very
close and it is easy to confuse the pin numbers on the 8-pin jacks. It is strongly
recommended you download “W8ZR’s Wiring Tips for Builders” from the StationPro
“Download Files” page before beginning. Solder a 5 inch length of hookup wire
(approximately) to each pin on all jacks. (You will trim to size, later.) Important: when
you solder the wires to the black 1/4 in. headphone jack (J302), orient the wires so they
emerge from the side of each terminal rather than straight out the back. (See second photo
on next page.) This will increase the rear clearance for this jack, which is tight when the
front panel is installed in the cabinet. Hint: a small length of sleeving or heat-shrink
tubing slipped over each pin of multipin mic jacks will make a neat-looking job (not
shown in below photo. This would also be a good time to read FAQ No. 11 about hookup
wire on the W8ZR StationPro website.)
Different wire colors make it easy to keep track of microphone jack pin numbers.
(16) Loosely attach all the jacks to the front panel and then secure the printed circuit
board to the front panel with the toggle switch hardware. If necessary, adjust the AC
power switch so that its pins fit into their mating circuit board holes. As before, there
should be a nut and lockwasher behind the panel for each of the miniature toggle
switches. Feed all the jack wires though the access holes in the circuit board, as shown in
the following two photos.
24
Detail showing wires from jacks threaded through the access holes on the
front panel printed circuit board. Be sure none of the wires interferes with
the jacks’ operation
(17) Make sure none of the jack wiring interferes with the insertion of plugs. If you have
provided your own 1/4” or 3/16” microphone jacks, be certain that their tabs do not
touch the rim of the circuit board holes. You will need to insert a plug into the jacks to
verify adequate clearance, since the plugs bend the tabs out slightly. If any tabs touch the
hole rims, then file the hole rim with a small needle file to provide clearance. (No filing
will be necessary if you use the supplied 8-pin mic jacks, or other jacks that fit the 0.625”
front panel holes.)
(18) Rotate the jacks so that their wires are oriented adjacent to the matching lettered
pads on the circuit board. The indent on 8-pin microphone jacks should face downward,
and the washer should be behind the panel. Flat washers on 1/4 in. jacks go in front of
the panel. There are no washers on the 3.5 mm headphone jack. Note that the clearance
behind the black plastic 1/4 in. headphone jack will be tight once the front panel is
installed, so do not use a second nut behind the panel on the jack. Now tighten all the
jacks to the front panel, and also tighten the plastic nut on the AC power switch. Take
care not to scratch the panel.
(19) Solder the pins on the plastic AC power switch S301 to the circuit board.
25
(20) Trim the wires from the headphone jacks (J302 and J303) and key jack (J301) to
size (no longer than necessary), tin their ends, and then solder them to their mating pads
on the circuit board (see photo, drawings and tables, below). If you prefer, you can route
the wires from the 3.5 mm phone jack (J303) around the edge of the circuit board, rather
than through the access hole. IMPORTANT: double-check to make sure you have
identified all the wires correctly.
Trim the wires to size (keep them as short as practical) and solder each to its mating pad on the circuit
board. Instructions for wiring the microphone jacks in this photo are given in Step (21), below.
3.5 mm Headphone Jack Pads (J303)
A
B
C
D
E
Tip
Tip (norm. closed contact)
Ring
Ring (norm. closed contact
Common (ground)
26
1/4” Headphone Jack Pads (J302)
F
G
H
J
K
Tip
Tip (norm. closed contact)
Ring
Ring (norm. closed contact)
Common (ground)
Key/Paddle Pads J301 (no drawing shown)
L
Tip (dot)
M
Ring (dash)
N
Common (ground)
(21) Microphone Jack Wiring: The microphone wiring table silkscreened onto the rear of
the circuit board corresponds to the sixteen pads that are centered between the two
microphone access holes. Although some microphones have numerous features (UP,
DOWN, etc.), at a minimum all have at least three conductors: an audio output wire
(Mic+), a PTT wire; and a ground (shield) wire. If a microphone jack has a separate
“Mic Gnd” or “Mic-” wire, then connect it to the Mic- pad and not to GND.
Note that there are four rows of pads labeled FN1-FN4 on the silkscreened table.
These pads, along with the Mic- pads, differ from the Mic+ and PTT pads because both
pads in each row, FN1 for example, are jumpered together on the circuit board. You can
assign the other microphone wires (e.g., UP, DOWN, +V, etc.) to FN1-4, in any order
you like, but be sure to assign the corresponding wires on each microphone to the same
pads. In other words, if you assign FAST to FN1 for Microphone 1, then you should also
assign FAST to FN1 for Microphone 2. The following table shows recommended pad
assignments for common 8-pin microphone pinouts used in contemporary transceivers.
IMPORTANT: if you do not use any of the FN1-4 rows, then jumper an unused
pad on that row to the GND pad. However, if a pad, such as FN4, is used only on one
microphone but not on the other, then do NOT ground the unused FN4 pad. Now trim the
wires from each microphone jack to size, tin the ends, and solder each wire to its pad,
according to the table. Be especially careful to avoid short circuits from loose wire
strands or solder bridges on the Mic+ pads (Pin nos. 1,9) and PTT pads (Pin nos. 2,10).
27
Common 8-pin DIN Microphone Wiring Table
Pad Label
MIC+(Audio Out)
PTT
MIC- (MIC GND)
FN1 (FAST)
FN2 (DOWN)
FN3 (+V)
FN4 (UP)
GND
--------Mic Connector Pin No.------------Elecraft Yaesu Ten-Tec Icom Kenwood
1
8
8
1
1
2
6
6
5
2
7
7
7
7
7
5
4
---4
3
--3
6
2
2
2
5
3
1
-3
4
8
5
5
6
8
(22) Once you have soldered all the wires from the front panel jacks to their mating
circuit board pads, then carefully inspect your work to make sure there are no short
circuits, solder bridges, or unsoldered connections.
(23) Slide six green LEDs through the front panel LED cutout holes so that their leads
pass into the mating holes on the circuit board marked DS301, DS302, DS303, DS304,
DS308, and DS309. Do not solder the LEDS yet. IMPORTANT: The flat side of the
LEDS (the short lead) goes down, as shown on the silkscreened legend.
(24) Similarly, insert two yellow LEDs into DS306 and DS307. Do not solder the LEDs,
and be sure the flat side is down.
(25) Insert two red LEDs into DS305 and DS310 (flat side down). Do not solder the
LEDs.
(26) Snap the LED plastic mounting bezels into their holes on the front panel, taking care
not to let any of the LEDs slip out of their circuit board pads.
(27) Slide the body of the LEDs into the back of the LED bezels until they click into
place. Use a small flat-blade screwdriver to nudge the LEDs into the bezels. Once you
have verified that each LED is seated in its bezel, and that each bezel is pushed flat
against the panel, solder all the LEDs to the circuit board. Hint: if you have trouble
getting the LEDs to snap into the bezels, try bending the plastic tabs on the bezels out
slightly, using a small-blade screwdriver.
(28) Plug the PIC16C54 preprogrammed IC into the 18-pin IC socket at U301. Wear a
grounded wrist strap or touch a grounded surface to avoid damaging U301 with static
electricity. IMPORTANT: Be sure to align the notch on U301 with the silkscreened notch
on the circuit board. Make sure none of the IC pins are bent and that all fit into the mating
holes in the socket. Hint: bend the pins on U301 inward slightly by pressing the IC pins
against a flat surface. This will make the IC easier to install.
28
(29) Clean the flux from the rear of the circuit board with isopropyl alcohol and Q-tips
and then inspect each solder connection using a magnifying glass. Pay particular attention
to the grounds on the LEDs and switches; make sure solder has flowed onto the circuit
board groundplane and isn’t beading up on the pad.
(30) Set aside the completed front panel assembly. Note that Header H302 is unused, and
that no wires are soldered yet to the two speaker holes labeled “O” and “P” in the upper
left of the board.
IV. Main Circuit Board Assembly
Identify the main circuit board, pictured below, and collect all of the components in the
following list. (Refer to the master parts list for additional details about each component.) Note
that all components will install on the top side of the circuit board.
C101
D101–D107, D109
F101
F101
J101-J104
J101-J104
J105, J106
J105-J106
J107
J108, J109
J110
J111
J112
K101–K113
K114
P101, P103
P102
Q101
R102, R103
R104, R105, R106
Main Circuit Board Components
Capacitor 50V epoxy dipped ceramic, qty 1
0.1µF
1N4005
1A/600PIV diode, qty 8
Fuse Clips
PCB mount fuse clips, qty 2
Fuse
Fuse 1Amp 3AG, qty 1
Connector
Molex 0.156” 12-pin top-entry female header, qty 4
Header
Molex 0.156” 12 pin male header, qty 4
Connector
Molex 0.156” 4-pin top-entry female header, qty 2
Header
Molex 0.156” 4 pin male header, qty 2
Connector
2.5mm DC pwr jack, PCB side entry, qty 1
Connector
D-Sub 25 pin male, PCB side entry, qty 2
Connector
D-Sub 9 pin female, PCB side entry, qty 1
Connector
DIN 5 pin female PCB side-entry, qty 1
Connector
RJ45 8pin PCB side-entry, qty 1
Relay
P&B/Tyco V23105, DPDT, qty 13
SS Relay
Clare Optomos PLA140 solid state relay, qty 1
Connector
Molex 26 pin (2x13), 0.100” male header, qty 2
Connector
Molex 4-pin 0.156” PCB male w/locking clip, qty 1
2N3906
PNP gen purpose transistor, qty 1
Resistor, 5% carbon film, 1/4 W (red-red-red), qty 2
2.2 KΩ
1000 Ω
Resistor, 5% carbon film 1/4W (brown-black-red), qty 3
∗∗∗∗∗∗ Parts for optional amp relay keying circuit (delete K114, R106 if used) ∗∗∗∗∗∗
(R101)
(D108)
(Q102)
4.7 KΩ
1N4005
IRF610PBF
Resistor, 5% carbon film 1/4W (yellow-violet-red), qty 1
1A diode, qty 1
MOSFET power transistor, qty 1
29
StationPro Main Circuit Board – Top View
(1) The main circuit board has provisions for a “default” amplifier keying circuit and an
“alternate” amplifier keying circuit, and the builder must choose which circuit to use. The
default circuit (rated at 400V @ 250 mA, AC or DC of either polarity) is recommended
for nearly all applications. The alternate circuit (rated at 3.5A, 200V, positive polarity
only), should only be used for keying very high current, positive voltage relays.
CHOOSE ONLY ONE CIRCUIT! Now install the selected components, as illustrated
below:
Note the white dot on K114. Be sure to get the orientation right when you install this component.
Default Amp Keying Circuit: Install K114 and R106 (brown-black-red). Make
sure the notch on K114 is aligned with the notch on the silk-screened outline.
Note the white dot near pin 1. K114 looks like a 6-pin IC.
30
R101, D108, and Q102 should NOT be installed if the default keying circuit is selected.
Alternate Amp Keying Circuit: Install D108, Q102 and R101 (yellow-violetred). Match the band on D108 to the circuit board pattern, and bend the leads on
Q102 so they line up with the holes in the circuit board. Position Q102 about
1/4 in. above the board. Note that the silkscreened component IDs for these
parts are in parentheses.
(2) Install the remaining 1/4 watt resistors, making sure the resistor bodies are flat against
the circuit board and that color codes are aligned in the same direction:
R102, R103
R104, R105
2.2 KΩ (red-red-red)
1 KΩ (brown-black-red)
(3) Install 1N4005 diodes at D101-D107 and D109 and the 0.1 µF blue dipped epoxy
capacitor at C101. Make sure the diodes bands are oriented as shown on the silkscreened
legends, and do not confuse the value of the capacitor with others that look the same. A
“104” marking on the capacitor indicates a 0.1 µF value.
(4) Install the 2N3906 transistor Q101, taking care to get the orientation correct. Bend the
leads to align them with the holes on the circuit board. The transistor should sit about
1/4” above the board.
(5) Install the thirteen relays K101-K113. Begin by soldering two opposing pins on each
relay so you can make sure the relay bodies seat flat against the circuit board. Then solder
the remaining pins. Solder these one at a time, or you’ll never get them positioned
properly.
Be certain not to miss any pins when you solder the thirteen relays to the circuit board
31
(6) Referring to the photos below, identify the four 12-pin Molex female connectors you
will install at J101-J104 and the two 4-pin Molex female connectors to be installed at
J105 and J106. Now identify the 12-pin and 4-pin straight male headers whose pins will
mate with these connectors.
12-pin Molex 0.156” female PCB connector and matching 12-pin header
As shown below, push a matching male header into each of the six connectors (long pins
go into the connector), making sure the headers are seated fully into the connectors. Now
solder the pins of all six Molex connectors (NOT the header pins) to the main circuit
board (56 pins in all). Be sure you orient the connectors to the silkscreened outline on
the circuit board, and be sure the connector pins go into holes in the round pads in
the circuit board and not in the square pads. (Hint: Solder an end pin on each
connector first, so you can make certain the connector bodies are seated flat against the
main circuit board. Then solder the remaining pins.) Leave the headers plugged into the
connectors; they will be soldered into the microcontroller circuit board in a later step.
(7) Install the Molex 0.156” 4-pin male connector (with locking clip) shown below at
P102.
The Molex 0.156” male connector with locking clip installs at P102
(8) Install the fuse clips at F1. (Hint: Insert the 1A fuse into the clips to hold them in
place and to make sure you don’t install the clips backwards.)
32
Insert the 1A fuse into the fuse clips before soldering them to the circuit board.
(9) Install the two 26-pin (2x13) male headers at P101 and P103. Solder two end pins
first on each header to make certain the body of the header is flat against the circuit
board. Then solder the remaining pins. Clean off the flux with alcohol and then check the
solder joints with a magnifying glass to make sure there are no solder bridges between
pins.
26 pin male headers install at P101 and P103.
(10) Install the six connectors J107-J112 along the rear edge of the circuit board. (See
photo, below.) Make absolutely certain the connectors are seated flat against the board
before soldering the pins; otherwise, they won’t fit properly into their rear panel cutouts.
As before, inspect each solder joint with a magnifying glass to look for cold solder joints
and solder bridges. Some of the connectors have metal mounting tabs, and these should
be soldered to the ground plane on the circuit board. Hint: It takes extra heat to solder
pins and tabs to the ground plane of the circuit board. Be sure to use a large enough
soldering iron and make certain that solder has flowed onto the ground plane.
From left to right, J108, J109, J110, J112, J111, J107
(11) Clean the flux from the circuit board with isopropyl alcohol and Q-tips and then
inspect each solder joint using a magnifying glass. Look especially closely at the multipin
connectors along the rear edge of the circuit board and the two 26-pin headers.
(12) With a pair of wire cutters, cut out 1/8” notches at each rear corner of the circuit
board. Note that the outline of the notches is silkscreened on the board. These notches
allow the circuit board to clear the side brackets on the enclosure.
33
Note the notch cutouts silkscreened on the rear corners of the main printed circuit board
(13) Install 1/2” No.6 threaded standoffs at the six locations (five along the sides, and
one behind J112, the 8-pin RJ45 jack) on the bottom side of the circuit board. Use a 6-32
x 1/4” machine screw and a #6 internal lockwasher under each screw head. Tighten the
screws securely.
(14) Plug six-inch 26-conductor flat ribbon cables into headers P101 and P103. As shown
below, orient the cables so that one flat cable emerges out of header P101 toward the
front edge of the circuit board, while the cable from P103 points toward the rear edge of
the circuit board. Important: Make certain the connectors are aligned properly with their
mating pins on the headers, and are not inadvertently offset. Leave the other ends of the
cables free.
Be certain the ribbon cables are not not accidentally offset from the pins in their mating connectors
(15) Set aside the completed main printed circuit board. Note that if you selected the
default amplifier keying circuit, then no components are installed at (R101), (Q102), and
(D108).
34
V. Rear Panel Circuit Board Assembly
Identify the rear panel circuit board, illustrated below, and the components in the
following list. All components mount on the top side of the printed circuit board.
C401-C419
C420
J401
J402
J403
J404, J405
J406-J409
J410
P403
Rear Circuit Board Components
1000 pF
Capacitor, 200V, qty 19
0.1 µF
Capacitor, 50V, qty 1
Connector
1/4 in 2-circuit PCB phone jack, qty 1
Connector
3.5 mm 1-circuit PCB phone jack, qty 1
Connector
3.5 mm 2-circuit PCB phone jack, qty 1
Connector
triple RCA phono jack (R/Wh/Ye), qty 2
Connector
dual RCA phono jack (R/Wh), qty 4
Connector
2.5 mm DC pwr jack, PCB side entry, qty 1
Header
Molex 26 pin (2x13), 0.100” male header, qty 1
Rear Panel Circuit Board
Rear Panel Circuit Board Components (left to right): J401, J403, J402, J406-J409, J404-J405, and
J410. The 26 pin (2 x 13) header is P403.
(1) Install capacitors C401-C419 (1000 pF/200V) capacitors. Note that one pin of each
capacitor solders to the ground plane, so be sure to use enough heat for the solder to flow.
Then install C420 (0.1 µF/50V), which is next to J410 on the right side of the board. Note
that the 1000pF/200V capacitors have a yellow boxy shape (marked 102), while the 0.1
µF/50V is blue and marked 104.
(2) Install the 26 pin (2x13 pins) male header at P403. Solder diagonally opposite pins
first, to make sure the header is flush against the board.
35
(3) Install connectors J401-J403, and J410. Make sure each connector is seated flat
against the circuit board. This is very important, because any misalignment will keep the
circuit board assembly from fitting properly in its mating holes on the rear panel. If any
of the pins on J410 (the power jack) are too tight to fit into the circuit board pads, then
trim the pins as necessary with wire cutters.
(4) Install the triple RCA phono jacks at J404 and J405, and the double RCA phono jacks
at J406-J409. Again, take care to ensure that the jacks are seated snugly on the circuit
board. They should mount perfectly flush onto the board, and not tilt or lean in any
direction.
Be certain the modular RCA phono jacks are seated flush on the circuit board before you solder their
pins. Otherwise the jacks won’t fit into the cutouts on the rear panel.
(5) Clean and inspect all solder connections. Note that there are three unused pads,
labeled “J411”, “J412”, and “SPARE.” J411 and J412 are in parallel with two of the
RCA Phono jacks (J406 and J407, respectively) and can be used if builders wish to add
other types of connectors to the rear panel (e.g., banana jacks or terminal strips). Set aside
the completed rear panel assembly.
Completed rear panel circuit Board. For future reference, note the orientation of the ribbon cable
(which has not yet been installed).
36
VI. Microcontroller Circuit Board Assembly
Identify the microcontroller circuit board, pictured below, and collect all of the
components in the following list. (Refer to the master parts list for additional details
about each component.) Note that all components will install on the top side of the circuit
board, except for the the headers at P201-P204 and P205-P206. These headers have
previously been inserted into their mating connectors on the main circuit board.
IC socket
C201-C205
C206
C207
C208, C209
D201- D203
J201
J202, J203
K201 –K213
P201-P204
P205, P206
P207
P208
R201
R202
R203, R205
R204
U201
U202
U203
U204
U205
Microcontroller Circuit Board Components
24 pin
24 pin IC socket, qty 1
Capacitor, 50V blue ceramic, (marked 104) qty 5
0.1µF
4700 µF
Capacitor, 16V electrolytic, qty 1
1000 pF
Capacitor, 50V, blue ceramic (marked 102) qty 1
.01 µF
Capacitor, 50V, blue ceramic (marked 103) qty 2
1N4005
1A/600 PIV diode, qty 3
Connector
D-Sub 25 pin male, R/A PCB mount, qty 1
Connector
RJ25 6 pin PCB side-entry, shielded, qty 2
Relay
P&B/Tyco V23105, DPDT 12 VDC, qty 13
Header
Molex 0.156” 12 pin header, qty 4 (prev. installed)
Header
Molex 0.156” 4 pin header, qty 2 (prev. installed)
Header
Molex, 26 pin (2x13) 0.100” male header, qty 1
Header
Molex 5 pin, 0.100”, friction lock
Resistor, 1/4W (brown-black-red), qty 1
1000 Ω
100 KΩ
Resistor, 1/4W (brown-black-yellow), qty 1
10 KΩ
Resistor, 1/4W (brown-black-orange), qty 2
10 KΩ
carbon trimmer potentiometer, qty 1
BS2-IC
Parallax Basic Stamp model BS2-IC
74HC139
IC, dual 4-to-2 line decoder, 16 pin, qty 1
74HC240
IC, octal bus buffer, 20 pin, qty 1
ULN2803A IC, darlington 8 NPN array, 18 pin, qty 1
7805
IC, +5V voltage regulator TO-220 3 pin, qty 1
37
Microcontroller Circuit Board – Top View
(1) Install all of the 1/4 watt resistors, making sure the resistor bodies are flat against the
circuit board and that color codes are aligned in the same direction:
R201
R202
R203, R205
1 KΩ (brown-black-red)
100 KΩ (brown-black-yellow)
10 KΩ (brown-black-orange)
(2) Install a 10 KΩ trimpot at R204.
(3) Install blue epoxy-dipped ceramic capacitors as follows:
C201–C205
C207
C208, C209
0.1 µF / 50V (marked 104)
1000 pF/50V (marked 102)
0.01 µF/50V (marked 103)
(4) Install 1N4005 diodes at D201-D203. Make sure the diodes bands are oriented as
shown on the silkscreened legends.
(5) Install a 24 pin IC socket at U201. Make certain the socket orientation aligns with the
notch on the silkscreened legend.
38
(6) Install the thirteen relays K201-K213. Begin by soldering two opposing pins on each
relay so you can make sure the relay bodies are flat against the circuit board. Then solder
the remaining pins.
Be certain not to miss any pins when you solder the thirteen relays to the circuit board
(7) Install a 26 pin (2x13 pin) header at P207. Solder diagonally opposite pins first, to
make sure the header is flush against the board, and check to make sure you have no
solder bridges between pins.
Be especially careful to avoid solder bridges between the closely spaced pins on the 26 pin header
(8) Install the 0.100” Molex 5 pin header with locking clip at P208. Orient the header so
that it matches the outline on the silkscreened legend.
(9) Install a 4700 µF/16V electrolytic capacitor at C206. Be sure to observe the polarity
of the capacitor. The “+” pad is marked on the silkscreening, whereas the “-“ side is
marked on the capacitor.
(10) Install connectors J201 (25 pin) and J202, J203 (6 pin) along the rear of the circuit
board. Check that these connectors lie flush against the circuit board before you solder
the pins. The spacing between pins is very close, so inspect your work to make certain
there are no solder bridges. Don’t forget to solder the ground plane pins, using extra heat
if necessary.
(11) Install integrated circuits as listed below. Wear a grounded wrist strap or touch a
grounded surface to avoid damaging the ICs with static electricity. Be sure to align the
notch on the ICs with the silkscreened notch on the circuit board. Before you solder the
pins, make sure none of them is bent and that all fit into the holes on the circuit board.
Hint: bend the pins on the ICs inward slightly by pressing the IC pins against a flat
surface. This will make the ICs easier to install.
39
U202
U203
U204
74HC139
74HC240
ULN2803A
(12) Install the 7805 5-Volt regulator at U205. Bend the leads on the 7805 to align with
the pads on the circuit board. The body of the IC should sit about 1/4” above the circuit
board.
The 7805 voltage regulator is vertically mounted and sits about 1/4”
above the circuit board.
(13) Plug the Basic Stamp BS2-IC into the socket previously installed at U201. (Wear a
wrist strap or touch a ground while you handle this component.) Make certain the BS2-IC
is aligned with the notch on the silkscreened legend, and verify that all 24 pins are
properly seated into the socket. Take your time nursing the BS2-IC into its socket and do
not apply excessive pressure. It helps to rock the BS2-IC back and forth slightly while
you insert it.
Verify that its pins are straight before inserting the BS2-IC into its
socket.The white dot on the front of the BS2-IC must be aligned with
the notch on the silkscreening.
(14) Clean the flux from the bottom of the circuit board with isopropyl alcohol and Qtips and then inspect each solder joint using a magnifying glass. Look especially closely
at the multipin connectors along the rear edge of the circuit board, the 26 pin header, and
the pins on the ICs.
(15) With a pair of wire cutters, cut a 1/8” notch at the right rear corner of the circuit
board. Note that the outline of the notch is silkscreened on the board. The notch allows
the circuit board to clear the side bracket on the enclosure.
Use wire cutters to cut a 1/8 in. notch in the right rear corner of the
microcontroller circuit board.
40
(16) With the exception of the six headers at P201–P204 and at P205–P206, which have
not yet been installed, this completes assembly of the microcontroller circuit board.
VII. Final Assembly of the Controller
(1) Retrieve the previously assembled main circuit board, and recall that during assembly
you inserted 12 pin headers at P201–P204, and 4 pin headers at P205–P206 into their
mating connectors. Verify again that these headers are fully seated into their connectors.
Now set the microcontroller circuit board on top of the main circuit board, so that the
pins on the six headers extend into their holes on the microcontroller circuit board. Do
not solder the pins, yet.
(2) Carefully attach the main circuit board and microcontroller circuit board assembly to
the rear panel, taking care not to let the pins on the six headers slip out of their pads.
These boards attach to the rear panel with the eight jack screws that secure the three 25pin DB25 connectors and the 9-pin DB9 connector. Before you tighten the jack screws,
make sure the bodies of the 8-pin RJ-45 (RELAY/CTRL) and 6-pin RJ-25 (REM IN,
REM OUT) connectors fit into their rectangular cutouts on the panel. The jack screws are
rather fragile, so do not overtighten them. Note: do not attach the rear panel circuit
board to the rear panel yet.
The main circuit board and microcontroller circuit board attach to the
rear panel with the eight jack screws that secure the DB25 and DB-9
connectors.
(3) Check again to make sure that the pins on the six headers at P201–P204 and P205–
P206 are still in their circuit board pads. Then solder the end pins on each header so you
can make certain the header bodies are seated flat against the underside of the
microcontroller circuit board. Now solder the remaining pins.
(4) As shown below, attach the left and right side enclosure brackets to the rear panel,
using the 6-32 x 3/8” screws supplied with the enclosure (not with the hardware packs).
Do not use any washers. Note that the lip on the side brackets will fit into the notches
previously cut into the two circuit boards.
41
(5) In the same manner, attach the front panel assembly to the left and right side brackets.
Use the four black 6-32 x 3/8” machine screws supplied with the enclosure, with no
washers. NOTE: When you attach the front panel to the side brackets, inspect carefully
the lugs on the back of the 1/4 in. headphone jack to make sure they don’t bump into the
4-pin Molex header at P102 on the main PCB. If they do, carefully bend the interfering
lugs out of the way. These lugs are brittle, so bend them slowly (to allow stresses to
equalize), no more than necessary, and avoid sharp bends.
(6) Identify the curved bottom cover of the enclosure. It is the cover that
has two small holes that line up with the two threaded standoffs closest to
the front of the main circuit board.
(7) Press the four adhesive-backed feet supplied with the enclosure onto the underside of
the bottom cover.
(8) Attach the bottom cover to the side brackets, using the black No. 10 sheet metal
screws supplied with the enclosure, and secure the two threaded standoffs to the bottom
cover, using 6-32 x 1/4 machine screws and No. 6 internal lockwashers. The lockwashers
go underneath the screw heads. The remaining four standoffs are not attached to the
bottom cover.
(9) Plug the free end of the previously installed 26-conductor ribbon cable from P101 on
the main circuit board to P301 on the front panel circuit board. When properly installed,
the cable should not twist. It should emerge down from the lower end of P301, as shown
below. Don’t forget to check the alignment of the connector with the pins on P301, to
make sure the pins are not inadvertently offset.
42
When properly installed, none of the three ribbon cables should be twisted and all should line up nicely
with their mating headers
(10) Plug one end of a six inch 26-conductor ribbon cable into P207 on the
microcontroller circuit board, and the other end into P307 on the front panel circuit board.
The ribbon cable should point from P207 toward the front of the controller circuit board,
and from P307 toward the bottom of the front panel circuit board. The cable should not
twist. Check the alignment of the connectors at both headers. At this stage of the
assembly, two ribbon cables should be installed fully, and the third ribbon cable (from
P103) should be hanging free.
(11) Following the steps below, prepare and install a short 4-conductor cable to connect
from P102 on the main circuit board to P302 on the front panel circuit board.
(a) Cut four 6 inch lengths of 22 AWG stranded hookup wire, and
strip each end about 3/16 inch. If available, it will be convenient to
use different color wires.
(b) As shown above, identify two 4-pin Molex 0.156” nylon
connector housings (Mouser p/n 538-09-50-3041) and eight crimp
terminals (Mouser p/n 538-08-50-0134). Using needle-nose pliers,
crimp a terminal onto each end of the hookup wires prepared in the
previous step. (Hint: it’s a good idea also to solder the wires to the
terminals. Use the smallest amount of solder necessary for a good
connection.)
43
(c) Snap the terminals into each connector housing. Use a small
flat-bladed screwdriver to push each terminal into the housing. The
terminals only insert one way and will click into place. Be sure
you’re inserting the terminals into their correct hole on the
housing, because once installed they are difficult to remove.
Important: Make sure the wires don’t cross, i.e., pin 1 on one
housing should mate with pin 1 on the other housing. Note that pin
1 is identified on the silkscreened legends.
(d) Plug one end of the cable assembly into P102 on the
main circuit board, and the other end into P302 on the front
panel circuit board. Again, be sure not to cross the wires.
One end of the prepared cable plugs into P302 on the front panel
circuit board.
(11) Identify the miniature round speaker (Mouser p/n 665AS04508MR3R). (Hint: a local source of small speakers is a drugstore or
card shop that sells greeting cards that play songs. Remove the speaker,
save the battery in your junk box, and send the card to your mother-inlaw.) Twist together two 12 inch lengths (approximately) of 22 AWG
44
stranded hookup wire, and strip and tin the ends about 1/4 inch. As shown
below, solder one end of the twisted pair to pads “O” and “P” on the rear
upper corner of the front panel circuit board, and the other end to the
speaker. Either wire goes to either speaker terminal. Position the speaker
on the bottom enclosure cover, underneath the main circuit board; it will
be held in place by the speaker magnet. Note: If you want to try out your
controller before you install a speaker, then you must temporarily solder a
1000 Ω – 2.2 KΩ
Ω resistor between pads “O” and “P” to use as a load.
Otherwise your controller will exhibit erratic behavior.
The magnet in the miniature speaker holds it in place on the steel
bottom cover of the StationPro II enclosure
(12) Following the steps below, prepare a 4-conductor programming cable for your
StationPro II. This cable will connect between a serial port on your computer and the
program port P208 on the microcontroller circuit board. Hint: If your computer does not
have a serial port, you can buy a USB-to-serial adapter from Parallax, Inc. (the company
that makes the Basic Stamp microcontroller) for $15. The item number is 28030 and the
website is www.parallax.com
(a) Cut a 5 ft length (approx) of 4-conductor cable. No shield is required, so
you can bundle lengths of hookup wire together if you don’t have 4-conductor
cable. Strip each end of the cable wires by about 1/8 inch. Hint: You can save
yourself some time by purchasing a ready-made nine wire serial cable with a
molded female DB-9 connector on one end. Clip off and discard the connector
at the other end and then jump to step (e), below.
(b) Assemble the components of a 9-pin serial computer connector (Radio Shack
part numbers are given below):
9-pin D-Sub female connector with crimp terminals (p/n 276-1428)
9-pin shielded D-Sub hood (p/n 276-1513 or 276-1539)
(c) Crimp and solder a terminal onto the wires at one end of the 4-conductor cable.
If your cable has a shield, also attach a terminal to the shield. (Use needle-nose
pliers to crimp the wires.)
45
(d) Crimp and solder a terminal onto each end of a 2 inch length of
hookup wire. You will use this wire as a jumper in a following
step.
(e) As shown above, identify one 5-pin Molex .100” nylon
connector housing (Mouser p/n 538-22-01-2057) and five crimp
terminals (Mouser p/n 538-08-52-0123). Crimp and solder a
terminal onto the wires at the other end of your cable. (Note: if you
are using a ready-made serial cable, then crimp terminals onto the
wires coming from pins 2,3,4,5 of the DB-9 connector. Use an
ohmmeter to verify the pin numbers. Twist and solder together the
wires coming from pins 6 and 7.)
Programming Cable Wiring Diagram
(f) Install the terminals in accord with the above wiring diagram.
The jumper wire you prepared in step (d) goes between pins 6 and
7 on the DB-9 connector. Note that the numbers are as viewed
from the rear side of the connectors, e.g., the side that the cable
emerges from.
46
The programming cable connects to a standard 9-pin DB-9 serial port on your computer.
VIII. Programming and Checkout of the Controller
Before you can use your StationPro II, you must first program the Basic Stamp BS2-IC
microcontroller. Fortunately, doing so is very easy and takes but a few minutes. (Note:
Although I would prefer you do it yourself, as a service I will program your StationPro
for you. The price is $15. Email me for instructions.) You begin by downloading two
programs into your PC. The first is a free editor program from Parallax, Inc., and the
second is the StationPro II firmware from the W8ZR StationPro website. Once these two
programs are downloaded into your PC, the firmware can be transferred to the StationPro
II in a few seconds Here is the step-by-step procedure.
(1) Download and install the free Basic Stamp editor into your PC from
http://www.parallax.com/tabid/441/Default.aspx Choose the version of the editor for
your particular operating system. Versions are available for early and late Windows
operating systems and also Macintosh and Linux.
(2) Download the latest firmware version for the StationPro II from W8ZR’s website:
http://www.w8zr.net/stationpro/. Click on the “Download Files” button on the top banner.
The file name for the firmware has the form StnPro_code_01_27_2011.bs2, where the
“01_27_2011” refers to the release date. Obviously you should download the latest
release date. To download, right click (for Windows) the link and save the file to your
hard disk. The saved file should have the same file name as the original file. When you
open the file, be sure to open it with the Basic Stamp editor and not your browser.
(3) Open the Basic Stamp Editor. Once the Editor is open, then go to “Files” and open the
StationPro II firmware file you have just downloaded. You should see the firmware
program displayed on your screen. The Basic Stamp uses a form of BASIC known as PBASIC. Note that the code has been extensively annotated, in order to facilitate changes,
modifications, and hacking.
47
(4) The downloaded firmware has default entries for transceivers and amplifiers. These
are “Transceiver 1”, “Transceiver 2”, and “Transceiver 3” for the transceivers (or
receiver/transmitter pairs), and “Amplifier 1”, “Amplifier 2, and “Amplifier 3” for the
linear amplifiers. You may use these default entries, but you probably will want to enter
your own station equipment. To change the entries, scroll down to the second page of the
program listing until you see something like the following on your computer screen:
'
========================
'OWNER SUPPLIED DATA -- enter station equipment and fill out with spaces to
'make all descriptions exactly 15 characters. Note that quotation marks
'around each description are required.
DATA @$030, "Amplifier 1
"
'Enter AMP1 Info in quotes
DATA @$040, "Amplifier 2
"
'Enter AMP2 Info in quotes
DATA @$050, "Amplifier 3
"
'Enter AMP3 Info in quotes
DATA @$060, "Transceiver 1 "
'Enter TRX1 Info in quotes
DATA @$070, "Transceiver 2 "
'Enter TRX2 Info in quotes
DATA @$080, "Transceiver 3 "
'Enter TRX3 Info in quotes
Now enter your own station equipment on each of the six lines, between the quotation
marks. There must be exactly 15 characters between the quotation marks, so that shorter
descriptions must be padded out with spaces. Here is an example of a completed table:
DATA
DATA
DATA
DATA
DATA
DATA
@$030,
@$040,
@$050,
@$060,
@$070,
@$080,
"Alpha 9500
"
"QRO HF-2500DX ”
"Drake L4-B
"
"Elecraft K3
"
"TenTec Orion II”
"Collins S-Line "
'Enter
'Enter
'Enter
'Enter
'Enter
'Enter
AMP1
AMP2
AMP3
TRX1
TRX2
TRX3
Info
Info
Info
Info
Info
Info
in
in
in
in
in
in
quotes
quotes
quotes
quotes
quotes
quotes
Next, scroll down to “Part II,” of the Owner Supplied Data section, which gives you the
option of locking out specific amplifier/transceiver combinations. Follow the directions
in the program listing, or skip this step if you do not want to lock out any amplifier
selections. When you are done, press Ctrl+S to save your program. You may revise the
table as many times as you want, as you change your station’s equipment.
(5) Connect a +12V DC power source to the power connector on the back panel of the
StationPro II. Then plug the programming cable into P208 on the microcontroller circuit
board, and connect the other end of the cable to your PC serial port. Note that pin 1 of
P208 is indicated on the silkscreened legend, so don’t hook the connector backwards.
(6) Turn on the power switch on the StationPro II. The red Pwr LED should light, and
also one of the yellow microphone LEDs. Other LEDs may or may not be lighted. The
LCD display should be backlighted, but do not be alarmed if you do not see displayed
text. Check the voltage at TP204 (on the left rear of the microcontroller circuit board), to
verify that it is 4.9V– 5.1V.
(7) If all seems normal, press Ctrl+R on your keyboard to upload the firmware into your
StationPro II. After a few seconds, your computer display will indicate a successful
upload.
48
(8) Turn off the StationPro II for a few seconds and then turn it back on. After a second
or two, you should hear a melodic beep and the sound of relays closing. Now adjust the
contrast trimpot R301 on the back of the front panel circuit board until you see text on the
LCD display.
Having now seen text displayed on the LCD, this
is a good time to celebrate and take your spouse
out to dinner.
(9) Turn off the StationPro II and remove the programming cable.
(10) Mount the rear panel circuit board to the rear panel. The circuit board is attached to
the panel by the hardware on the Key, Line In and Line Out jacks, and by six No. 4 x
3/8” sheet metal screws. Make certain that the RCA Phono jacks are properly centered in
their holes on the panel before you tighten the sheet metal screws. Note that the black
plastic washer on the key jack goes under the nut on the outside of the panel.
The rear panel circuit board attaches to the rear panel with six No. 4 x
3/8” sheet metal screws and the hardware on the jacks.
(11) Plug the free end of the ribbon cable coming from P103 on the main circuit board
into P403 on the rear panel circuit board. The cable should not be twisted.
(12) Attach the top cover to the enclosure, using the black No.10 self-tapping screws
supplied with the enclosure. This completes the assembly of the StationPro II control
unit.
49
Interior view of the completed SP-II Control Unit
IX. Assembly of the RF Relay Unit
Preparation for Assembly: The RF relay enclosure shown below consists of two
interlocking aluminum pieces powder-coated with an extremely durable graphite-colored
finish. Unfortunately, the powder-coating process has an unavoidable overspray into the
interior of the enclosure. Before beginning assembly, therefore, the builder should use the
small strip of emory cloth provided with the hardware packs to sand the powder-coating
off all the screw holes on the inside of the top cover. Doing so will ensure good electrical
contact between the metal cover and the ten SO-239 coax jacks, and also between the
metal cover and the four threaded standoffs that secure the printed circuit board. It is a
good idea, but not strictly necessary, also to sand off the paint on the lip of the top cover,
where the black sheet metal screws secure the two parts of the enclosure together.
(1) Identify the top cover of the RF relay enclosure and mount ten SO-239 UHF coax
jacks to the inside surface, as shown below. Use two 4-40 x 5/16” machine screws, with
internal lockwashers and nuts on each of the SO-239 connectors. The lockwashers go
50
under the nuts. There is a slight bit of wiggle room in the mounting holes, so use it to line
up the connectors so their sides are parallel to one another.
(2) Mount four 4-40 x 1/4” threaded standoffs on the corner holes of the inside top cover,
as shown above. Use 4-40 x 3/16” machine screws, with internal lockwashers under the
standoffs (i.e., between the standoffs and the enclosure, not under the screw heads.)
(3) Identify the RF relay circuit board and collect the components that mount on the
board, listed below. If necessary, refer to the master parts list for more details about each
component.
RF Relay Circuit Board Components
J501
Connector
RJ-45 8 pin, top entry, shielded, PCB jack, qty 1
K501-K510 Relay
Tyco/Schrack RTB14012F SPDT 12A, qty 10
C501-C507 0.01µF
Capacitor 50V blue epoxy-dipped ceramic, qty 7
0.1µF
Capacitor 50V blue epoxy-dipped ceramic, qty 1
C508
D501-D507 1N914A
Si gen. purpose signal diode, qty 7
RF Relay Circuit Board (Top View)
(4) Plug J501, the 8-pin RJ-45 connector, into its holes on the rear side of the circuit
board, but do not solder the pins yet.
51
(5) Temporarily mount the RF relay circuit board onto the inside of the top cover,
making sure the center pin of each SO-239 jack extends into its mating hole on the circuit
board, and that the body of J501 fits through the rectangular cutout on the cover. Because
of variations in manufacturing tolerances, you may need to file slightly the rectangular
cutout for J501 to make sure it fits smoothly into the enclosure lid. Loosely secure the
circuit board to the four corner standoffs with 4-40 x 3/16” screws in order to verify that
the holes line up. Once you’re sure everything fits together properly, solder the pins on
J501. Do not solder the pins yet on the coax jacks. Now unscrew the four 4-40 x 3/16”
screws that you just installed, and remove the circuit board from the enclosure.
(6) In the following steps, all components mount on the top of the circuit board. Install a
0.01 µF/50V (marked 103) epoxy coated ceramic capacitor at C501-C507.
(7) Install a 0.1 µF/50V (marked 104) epoxy coated ceramic capacitor at C508.
(8) Install 1N914A diodes at D501-D507, taking care to observe the diode polarity. The
banded end of the diodes is indicated on the silkscreened legend.
(9) Install RF power relays K501– K510. Install these one at a time and make sure the
body of each relay is flush against the circuit board before you solder the pins.
(10) OPTIONAL STEP. The printed circuit board has provisions for sampling the RF
output from your transceivers and linear amplifiers. Most builders will probably not
need this feature and can omit this step. Note that implementing the RF sampling
feature will require drilling or punching two holes in the RF enclosure in order to
mount two BNC coax jacks. (If desired, users can substitute two RCA phono jacks).
Necessary parts (to be supplied by builder):
BNC Chassis Jacks, qty 2
Capacitor, 15 pF/500V (dipped silver mica), qty 1
Capacitor, 330 pF/ 500V (dipped silver mica), qty 2
Hookup wire or bare tinned wire: 6 in. (approx)
(a) Install the following capacitors:
C509
15 pF/500V, qty 1
C510, C511 330 pF/ 500V, qty 2
(b) Note that the circuit diagram shows a high voltage capacitor C*
which is part of the capacitive voltage divider that samples the RF
from the selected amplifier. This capacitor is built into the circuit
board copper pattern and has a value of 2.8 pF. Physically, this
capacitor consists of two copper pads, each having a capacitance of
1.4 pF and connected in parallel by a copper trace. If in very high
power applications it is observed that the sampled voltage is too
52
great, this capacitor can be reduced to 1.4 pF by cutting the
connecting trace.
(c) Drill or punch two 3/8” holes at a convenient location on the
opposing sides of the enclosure, near the RF pickoff points (see
photograph below), and mount the BNC chassis jacks in the holes.
(d) Connect the BNC jacks to the sample pickoff pads on the
circuit board, using a short length of hookup wire or bare tinned
wire. Also ground the coax jacks to the ground pads on the circuit
board, using another short piece of wire. This completes the
optional step.
The RF relay unit, showing the optional RF sampling
circuit, with side-mounted BNC connector.
(11) Secure the RF circuit board to the four standoffs on the inside top cover of
the enclosure, using 4-40 x 3/16” machine screws and internal lockwashers. Place
the lockwashers between the standoffs and the bottom of the circuit board (NOT
under the screw heads). (Hint: Stick toothpicks into the holes on the standoffs and
lower the lockwashers and circuit board onto the toothpicks. Once everything is
in place, remove the toothpicks and secure the circuit board..)
Lockwashers go between the standoffs and the circuit board and enclosure lid, not under the
screwheads. The lockwashers ensure a good electrical connection between the circuit board
ground plane and the enclosure lid, and also increase the clearance between the bottom of the
circuit board and the SO-239 connector bodies. Note that the lockwashers on the SO-239 jacks
go under the nuts.
53
(12) Make sure all the hardware securing the ten SO-239 jacks is tight, and then
solder all ten center pins of the SO-239 connectors to the circuit board pads. Use
enough heat to make certain the solder flows nicely, but use no more solder than
necessary for a good connection. (You’ll have to unsolder these pins if you ever
want to remove the circuit board, so don’t make the job harder by using too much
solder!)
(13) Attach the cover to the RF relay enclosure using eight No.6 x 3/8” black
sheet metal screws. This completes the assembly of the RF relay unit.
The completed StationPro RF relay unit
X. Assembly of the Transceiver Pods (Three Required)
Each transceiver (or receiver/transmitter pair) connects to the StationPro control
unit via a single 25-wire computer-type serial cable. The free end of this cable terminates
in a “pod,” which is a small breakout box. Short cables go from this breakout box to the
jacks (microphone, key, data, etc.) on the rear and front panels of the transceiver.
Modern transceivers have many different jacks, some of which may not be of
interest to all users. For example, most hams will use the microphone and key jacks, but
many will not use the band data, packet, and transverter jacks. The below photograph
shows the pod for a vintage National NCX-5 transceiver, which uses only a few breakout
connections. At the other extreme, the pod for an Icom 7800 transceiver in a VHF contest
station might use most of the 24 control lines. Thus, builders must decide not only what
radios they will control with the StationPro, but also what features of those radios they
wish to use.
54
(1) Make a Connector List: Before starting to assemble your pods, you should make a list
of the connectors on your transceivers. The list should show the mapping between pin
numbers on the transceiver jacks and the circuit board pads on the Pod circuit board.
Remember, you can always add connectors and features at any time as your interests
change. Here as an example is a connector list for the Elecraft K3 transceiver:
Elecraft K3 Pod Pinout Listing
A. Microphone Jack
Connector Type: 8 pin DIN
Conn. Pin #
6
5
4
3
8
2
7
1
Pod
FN3 (+8)
FN1 (function)
FN2 (DOWN)
FN4 (UP)
GND
PTT
MIC- (GND)
MIC+
B. CAT/DATA Jack
Connector Type DSUB DB-9
Conn. Pin #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Pod
N/C
RXD (ser out)
TXD (ser in)
N/C
GND
N/C
N/C(RTS)
N/C(CTS)
N/C
C. Key/Paddle Jack
Connector Type: 1/4” phone plug
Conn. Pin #
Tip
Ring
Shield
Pod
DOT
DASH
GND
D. Line Out Jack
Connector Type: 1/8” stereo plug
Conn. Pin #.
Tip
Ring
Shield
Pod
Line Out-L (Main)
Line Out-R (Sub)
COM
E. Speakers L/R
Connector Type: 1/8” stereo plug
Conn Pin #
Tip
Ring
Shield
Pod
spkr-L (Main)
spkr-R (Sub)
COM
F. Other Single Pin Connectors (w/shield)
Conn. Type
RCA-RED
RCA-WH
1/8” mono
Pod
Amp RLY
PTT
Line In
G. Unused Pod Connections
Unused
Unused
Unused
Unused
Unused
AUX1
AUX2
AUX3
AUX4
Amp ALC
(2) Selecting Cables and Connectors for Pods: Wiring up multiwire plugs is tedious, so it
si best to use commercially made cables whenever possible. Since you’ve already used
your transceivers and amplifiers without a StationPro, you undoubtedly already have
most of the necessary cables. But if not, since nearly all transceivers have several RCA
phono jacks, you can buy several three foot “stereo cables” and cut them in half.
Similarly, you can also buy 1/8” audio cables with molded 1/8” subminiature connectors.
Ditto for shielded cables with 1/4” stereo or mono plugs. In other words, it should be
possible to purchase most of the needed interface cables for your pods (The one
exception: you will probably have to make your own Pod microphone cable). Using
purchased cables, the pod assembly will be easy and quick.
(3) Install the connectors on the ends of any custom cables you need, and then cut all the
cables to length. Allow 15 inches for cables that plug into rear panel jacks of your
transceivers, and 32 inches for cables that plug into front panel jacks. Strip and tin 3/16”
from the free end of the cable wires.
(4) Install a 25 pin ferrite-filtered D-Sub female connector (Mouser p/n 806-KF22XB25S-NJ) on the pod circuit board. Check the solder joints to make sure there are no
solder bridges, and be sure to solder the mounting tabs to the pod ground plane, using
enough heat for the solder to flow nicely.
(5) Solder the cable ends prepared in step (3) to the appropriate pads on the Pod circuit
board, using the list you prepared in Step (1). Take your time to do a neat job, and be
careful not to overheat the wires which can cause their insulation to melt. Set aside the
Pod circuit board. Hint: for a particularly neat appearance, slip a length of heat shrink
tubing over the cable sleeves, as shown in the previous photograph. It is also a good idea
to label each cable, as shown in the photograph following step (13).
(6) In the next few steps, you will prepare the enclosure for the Pod circuit boards. This is
a small soft plastic box whose sole purpose is to protect the pod wiring, and it is very
easy to work on. It should take you about 15 minutes to prepare one enclosure. The
below photograph shows some tools you may find helpful. Hint: the specified pod
enclosure is a Hammond 1591XXBSBK (Mouser p/n 546-1591XXBSBK), but if you need
an enclosure right away you can use a Radio Shack “Deluxe Project Case” p/n 270-221,
which is nearly the same size.)
56
(7) Attach the lid to the plastic enclosure, and then tape the below templates (another
template copy which you can cut out is at the end of this section, on p. 59) to the front
and rear sides of the enclosure. The bottom of the templates should be aligned along the
bottom edge of the enclosure. Hint: using an artist’s spray mounting adhesive, available
at any arts and crafts store, makes a convenient, removable non-slip way to attach
templates to enclosures.
57
(8) After center-punching the two holes on the front template (any pointed object will
work), then drill or punch two 3/16” holes as indicated. The plastic is soft enough that
you can probably drill the holes by just holding the bit in your hand.
(9) Using a sharp knife or single-edged razor blade, scribe a scratch along the edge of the
cutout for the DB-25 connector. Now remove the template from the front side of the
enclosure.
(10) Drill one or more “starter” holes inside the area of the cutout, and then use wire
cutters to remove the plastic up to the cutout lines which were scratched into the plastic
on the previous step. Use small files to smooth out the jagged edges of the cutout. Hint:
don’t worry if your cutout isn’t a work of art. The cutout has no structural importance,
and once the computer cable is plugged into the pod, any imperfections in your
workmanship won’t be noticeable.
(11) The row of holes along the rear of the enclosure will be made into slots in the next
step and are intended for the transceiver cables to feed through, Generally two or more
cables will fit through a single slot, so you will probably not need to use all the holes.
After you decide how many feedthrough slots you will need, drill or punch 3/16” holes
where indicated on the templates. If you prefer, you can omit the holes and just go
directly to step (9).
(12) Remove the lid from the enclosure. Using wirecutters, cut vertical slots into the
plastic above the holes from the previous step, as illustrated below. If you didn’t drill
holes in the previous step, then bend the flaps inward; the pressure on the cables from the
bent flaps will help secure them.
58
Completed enclosure with five slots, which hold a
total of ten cables (for a Yaesu FT-2000 transceiver)
(13) Mount the pod circuit board on the four posts of the enclosure using No.4 x 3/8”
sheet metal screws. Carefully route the cables through the slots in the rear of the
enclosure, using cable ties (Ty-Wraps) as strain reliefs. Then install the cover on the
enclosure, using the flathead screws provided with the enclosure. This completes the pod
assembly.
Completed pod for an FT-2000 transceiver
XI. Final Instructions
(1) You have now completed all the required modules for the StationPro II. All that
remains is for you to connect together the Controller Unit, the RF Relay Unit and the
transceiver pods, and then to connect your transceivers and linear amplifiers to the
StationPro II. Hookup information is contained in A: StationPro II Operating
Instructions, as well as instructions for operating the StationPro and understanding its
features. You will need to buy three 25 pin computer “serial” cables (male/female
connectors) and one standard 8-pin ethernet cable, all available from any computer or
office supply store, or Radio Shack. These cables should be as short as possible,
consistent with the layout of equipment on your operating desk. It is preferable to use a
shielded ethernet cable, if available.
59
(2) Custom Interface Cable: As noted above, the transceiver pods connect to the
StationPro controller unit using a 25–conductor computer cable. For most situations,
users will be able to use inexpensive “off the shelf” serial cables. However, for a few
situations, specifically when amateurs want to control two transceivers with a computer
that has only one serial port, while also operating SSB or AM, then it may be necessary
to prepare a custom interface cable. The purpose of the custom cable would be to prevent
coupling of computer noise from the RS-232 data into the transceivers’ microphone
circuits. Please refer to Supplementary Assembly Manual: Preparing Custom
Transceiver Interface Cables for a complete discussion of this topic, as well as
assembly instructions for making a custom interface cable if you should need one. Most
builders will not need to make a custom cable.
60
61
62
Appendix A: Avoiding Ground Loop Complications
Until about 1975, most amateur microphones such as the venerable Astatic D104
used a two-conductor shielded cable – one conductor for the microphone audio, and one
for the push-to-talk line. For such microphones, the grounded shield was connected
directly to the transmitter chassis, and both the microphone audio and PTT return currents
flowed through the shield.
This arrangement generally worked satisfactorily so long as the microphone was
plugged directly into a transmitter or transceiver. However, if used with any kind of
switching device, or with push-to-talk circuits that used an AC control voltage, these
microphones were found to be susceptible to hum pickup.
This problem was solved with the introduction of microphones that use two
conductors for the audio, typically called “mic+” and “mic-,” and today virtually all
amateur microphones use this configuration. By using a dedicated “mic-“ wire for the
return audio currents, the low-level microphone voltage is not affected by hum currents
on the shield or chassis of connected equipment. (A move toward low impedance
microphones – 200 ohms is common – also provided enhanced hum immunity and also
allowed longer cable runs than is possible with high impedance microphones.
Understanding How Ground Loop Currents Cause Hum
Numerous currents flow along the chassis of any transceiver or transmitter. In
vintage vacuum tube transmitters, these might include several amperes of 50/60 Hz
filament current, ripple currents from power supply filter capacitors, and 50/60 Hz AC
currents from bypass capacitors on the AC line. When a chassis also carries the
microphone audio return current, the voltages produced by these AC currents can be a
significant fraction of the microphone audio voltage. This AC voltage adds directly to the
microphone audio and appears as hum on the transmitted signal.
When a microphone attaches directly to the mic jack in vintage transmitters this
hum voltage does not cause a problem, because there is typically only an inch or two
between the transmitter’s grounded microphone jack and the grid of the first audio
amplifier stage. However, when a vintage microphone is routed to the transmitter through
a piece of peripheral equipment, such as a VOX adaptor, audio speech processor, or a
switching device such as the StationPro, then the AC hum voltage can be quite
substantial. In these cases the hum voltage is caused by the AC currents that inevitably
flow on the outer surface of the shielded cable that ties the peripheral equipment to the
transceiver. The following diagram shows how these shield currents cause hum when the
StationPro is used in connection with a vintage vacuum tube transmitter that uses its
chassis for the microphone audio return.
63
In the diagram, a microphone is connected to the mic jack and chassis of the StationPro,
which in turn is routed through a shielded interconnect cable to the mic jack and chassis
of the selected transmitter. Although not shown in the diagram, the transmitter is assumed
to be connected to a 120 VAC or 240 VAC line, and the StationPro is also connected, via
the shields of its interconnect cables, to all the other station transmitters and linear
amplifiers (each of which is also connected to the AC line, sometimes to multiple AC
circuits). The inevitable ground current loops resulting from all these interconnected
radios and amplifiers lead to a small (typically a few millivolts) AC voltage difference
between the StationPro chassis and the chassis of the selected transmitter. In essence, the
small AC current flowing on the interconnecting cable shield is a low-impedance hum
voltage source. From the diagram we see that this hum voltage is in series with the
microphone audio voltage, and while it may be only a few millivolts, that is still enough
to be heard on a transmitted signal. Note that this hum voltage is not induced “pickup”,
e.g., from fluorescent light fixtures, or any indication of inadequate shielding. It rather is
caused by AC currents that flow on the outer surface of the interconnecting cable shields.
The diagram below shows why modern microphones with dedicated “mic+” and
“mic-“ connections do not have this problem. In the diagram, there is still an AC voltage
caused by ground current loops, but this voltage is no longer in series with the
microphone audio and therefore causes no hum on the transmitted signal. The bottom line
is that StationPro owners who want to use vintage microphones with simple shielded
cables (and no separate “mic-“ wire) must take careful steps to minimize audio hum in
their AM or SSB transmissions.
How to Diagnose Ground Loop Problems
The easiest way to diagnose a potential ground loop problem with your StationPro
is to jumper the microphone audio pin (mic+) to the ground pin or shield on one of the
StationPro’s mic connectors. Then key up your transmitter or transceiver and listen to
your transmitted signal on a separate receiver. If you hear hum on your signal, even with
the mic audio shorted to ground, then you have a ground loop. There is no need to worry
about this ground loop if you are using a modern microphone with a separate “mic-“
wire, but if you wish to use a vintage microphone having a simple shielded cable, then
you will definitely have to deal with it.
Basic Steps to Minimize Ground Loop Hum
1. Make sure all of your station transceivers or transmitter/receiver pairs are connected to
the same AC circuit and not to separate circuits. (Of course, this will not be possible
when using 120 VAC transceivers and 240 VAC amplifiers.)
64
2. If your transceivers operate off of a +12V power supply, then use that same power
supply to power your StationPro. If your power supply has “floating” positive and
negative output terminals, do not tie the negative terminal to the power supply chassis or
to the AC ground terminal on the power supply.
3. Be careful if using a “wall wart” to power your StationPro, because these often have
high AC ripple voltages on their +12V outputs. Obviously, to minimize hum, you need a
clean +12V power source.
4. Bond the case of the StationPro to the cases of all of your transmitters, receivers, linear
amplifiers, and power supplies with short braided ground straps. It is best not to “daisy
chain” these ground straps from one rig to another, and it is important to use short lengths
and as large a conductor as possible. (For a given ground loop current, a large diameter
conductor will result in a lower hum voltage than a small conductor.) Listen to your
transmitted signal (on a dummy load!) and pick the configuration of ground straps that
minimizes hum. Because all station layouts are different, trial and error is the only
practical way to find the optimal configuration.
Steps to Take If All Else Fails
If the above steps don’t reduce hum to acceptable levels, and you still want to route a
vintage microphone through your StationPro, then you will have to take additional
measures to isolate the microphone audio from the hum voltage produced by ground
loops. Here are suggestions for isolating the microphone audio. Some experimentation
will undoubtedly be required to see which gives the best results.
1. Rewire your microphone (and mic connector) so that the microphone element does not
use the braided shield for its audio return. Unfortunately, this usually entails replacing the
mic cable and connector.
2. If you want to use a “Collins” type two-circuit 3/16 in. mic plug, or a 1/4 in. “stereo”
mic plug, then you can electrically insulate the mic jack body from the StationPro front
panel by using fiber or nylon insulating washers. (Recall that that these jacks mount in a
3/8 in. hole, whereas the StationPro front panel has 5/8 in. holes for microphone jacks.)
The Collins-type 3/16” mic jack is insulated from the
front panel using homemade fiberglass washers on
the front and back sides of the panel
65
As shown in the below diagram, you should jumper the shield terminal on the Collinstype mic jack to the StationPro “Mic-“ header pad on the front panel circuit board, and
then jumper the “Mic-“ pad to the GND header pad on the circuit board with a 50Ω or
100Ω 1/4 Watt resistor. Using this configuration, the ground loop currents which would
otherwise flow through the microphone element are short-circuited by the low resistance
of the mic- wire in the StationPro’s interconnecting transceiver cable, thus reducing the
hum voltage to a negligible value. The purpose of the 100Ω resistor is to create a voltage
divider, using the resistance of the mic- wire as the other resistor in the divider. If the
mic- wire has a resistance of, say, 1Ω, then the hum voltage in series with the
microphone element will only be about one percent of the hum voltage between chasses.
Also, the shield of the microphone is still effectively grounded to the StationPro chassis
through the 100Ω resistor – a low enough resistance to permit the PTT circuit (which also
uses the shield in most vintage microphones) to function.
3. Two-conductor mic jacks that mount in a 5/8 in. hole, commonly used in vintage
transmitters from the 1950s, pose a special problem because one can’t insulate them from
the StationPro’s front panel, as in the previous step. For this situation, you can replace the
2-pin mic connector with a 4-pin mic connector (as used in some vintage Ten-Tec and
Drake transceivers) and wire the connector as in the above diagram. Alternately, you can
use a small audio interstage transformer to decouple the microphone from the ground
loop currents, as shown in the diagram below. With this transformer, the ground loop AC
voltage appears only as a common mode voltage on the transformer windings and does
not result in any hum. A suitable subminiature transformer is the Model XT-1, sold by
Heil Sound at http://www.heilsound.com/amateur/products/hc104/index.htm. This tiny
transformer may be used to convert a modern low-Z mic to the high-Z output required by
most vintage rigs. It may be mounted on the rear of the StationPro’s front panel circuit
board with double-stick foam tape. Suitable 1:1 interstage audio transformers are
available from other sources.
66
4. And finally, if you don’t want to bother with any of the above measures, then you can
always bypass the StationPro’s microphone jacks and plug your vintage microphones
directly into their mating transmitters. For vintage radio collectors, this might be the
preferred (and certainly easiest!) solution anyway, since one can then pair a Collins
microphone with a Collins KWM-2 transceiver, a Drake microphone with a Drake TR-4
transceiver, and so forth.
67
Appendix B: StationPro II Parts & Supplier List
(This list does not contain required SP-II network kit components)
Notes: (1) Primary supplier is Mouser Electronics (www.mouser.com ).
(2) Secondary and alternate suppliers are Digikey Electronics, Allied Electronics, All
Electronics, Jameco Electronics
(3) Patch cables (1 – CAT 5 w/RJ45 connectors, 3 – 25C w/DB25 connectors) are listed
without suppliers, since lengths depend on user’s station. Should be obtained locally.
(4) Note that Mouser part numbers and prices change frequently. Equivalent substitutes
are nearly always available for parts Mouser has on lengthy backorder (email W8ZR).
A. Main Circuit Board (ver C0)
C101
0.1µF
Capacitor 50V Xicon Z5U epoxy dipped ceramic, qty 1
Mouser p/n 21RZ310-RC
Price: $.08/ea, $.069/100, $.053/500, $.046/1000
D101 - D107, D109
1N4005
Fairchild 1A diode, qty 8
Mouser 512-1N4005
Price: $0.05/ea, $0.04/10, $.03/100, $.02/250
F101
Fuse Clips
Keystone 0.25” 3529 PCB fuse clips, qty 2
Mouser p/n 534-3529
Price: $0.14/ea, $0.10/10, $0.08/100, $0.07/500
F101
Fuse
Fuse 1 Amp 3AG, qty 1
Mouser p/n 504-AGC-1
Price $0.30/ea, $0.24/25, $0.22/50
J101-J104
Connector
Molex 12-pin, .156” top-entry header, qty 4
Mouser p/n 538-09-52-3123
Price: $1.75/ea, $1.57/10, $0.41/100, $1.25/500
J105, J106
Connector
Molex 09-52-3043 K.K. 4-pin .156” top-entry header, qty 2
Mouser p/n 538-09-52-3043
Price: $0.60/ea, $0.52/10, $0.33/100, $0.28/500
J107
Connector
2.5mm DC pwr jack, PCB side entry, qty 1
Mouser p/n 806-KLDX-0202-BC
Price: $0.46/ea, $0.44/25, $0.32/100, $0.25/500
J108, J109
Connector
D-Sub 25 pin male, R/A PCB Mount, qty 2
Mouser p/n 636-182-025-113R531 (Norcomp)
68
Price $1.69/ea, $1.62/10, $1.18/100, $1.10/250, $1.05/500
J110
Connector
D-Sub Kycon 9 pin female, R/A PCB Mount, qty 1
Mouser p/n 806-KF22X-E9S-NJ (ferrite filtered)
Price: $3.40/ea, $2.90/25, $2.48/50, $2.00/100
J111
Connector
DIN 5 pin female PCB side-entry, qty 1
Mouser p/n 161-0505E
Price: $1.10/ea, $0.92/10, $0.76/100, $0.69/500
J112
Connector
RJ45 8pin PCB side-entry, shielded, qty 1
Mouser p/n 571-5555153-1
Price $1.09/ea, $0.87/10, $0.71/100, $0.62/500
K101 –K113
Relay
P&B/Tyco V23105, DPDT 12VDC/960 ohm coil, qty 13
Mouser p/n 655-V23105A5003A201
Price: $1.75/ea, $1.58/25, $1.40/50, $1.26/100
K114
SS Relay
Clare Optomos PLA140 solid state relay 400V/250mA
Mouser p/n 849-PLA140
Price $4.34/ea, $3.82/25, $3.48/50, $3.18/100, $2.87/250
P101, P103
Connector
Molex 10-89-7262, 2x13 pin, 0.100 female header, qty 2
Mouser p/n 538-10-89-7262
Price $1.89/ea, $1.65/10, $1.24/100, $0.99/500
P102
Connector
Molex 26-60-4040 K.K. 4-pin .156 header, qty 1
Mouser p/n 538-26-60-4040
Price $0.44/ea, 0.38/10, $0.25/100, $0.20/500
Q101
2N3906
Fairchild 2N3906 PNP gen purpose transistor, TO92, qty 1
Mouser 512-2N3906TA
Price: $0.04/ea, $0.034/10, $0.028/100, $0.020/250
R102, R103
R104, R105, R106
2.2 KΩ
1 KΩ
---
hardware
Resistor, Xicon 5% carbon film 1/4W, qty 10 (min order)
Mouser p/n 291-Value-RC (e.g., 291-4.7K-RC)
Price: $0.09/10, $0.044/200, $.017/1000
threaded spacer, rnd aluminum, (6-32) x 1/2”, qty 6
Mouser p/n 534-3487
Price $0.34, $0.24/100
∗∗∗∗∗∗∗∗∗∗ Parts for optional amp relay keying circuit (delete K114, R106 if used ∗∗∗∗∗∗∗∗∗
69
(R101)
4.7 KΩ
Resistor, Xicon 5% carbon film 1/4W, qty 10 (min order)
Mouser p/n 291-Value-RC (e.g., 291-4.7K-RC)
Price: $0.09/10, $0.044/200, $.017/1000
(D108)
1N4005
Fairchild 1A diode, qty 3
Mouser 512-1N4005
Price: $0.05/ea, $0.04/10, $.03/100, $.02/250
(Q102)
IRF610PBF
MOSFET, N-chan, 200V/ 3.3A,
Mouser p/n 844-IRF610PBF
Price $0.48, $0.39/10, $0.35/100, $0.31/500
B. Front Panel Circuit Board (StationPro II Version A2)
IC socket
18 pin
DIP 18 pin IC socket
Mouser p/n 517-4818-3000-CP
Price $0.22/ea, $0.21/25, $0.18/100 $0.17/200
C301-C307
1000 pF
Capacitor, 50V Xicon, X7R, qty 7
Mouser p/n 21RX510-RC
Price $0.10/ea, $0.084/100, $0.065/500
C308, C309
47 pF
Xicon Z5U epoxy dipped ceramic, qty 2
Mouser p/n 21RD747-RC
Price: $.10/ea, $.082/100, $.063/500, $.055/1000
C310
0.1 µF
Capacitor 50V Xicon Z5U epoxy dipped ceramic, qty 1
Mouser p/n 21RZ310-RC
Price: $.08/ea, $.069/100, $.053/500, $.046/1000
C311
1 µF
Capacitor, Nichicon electrolytic, 50V, qty 1
Mouser p/n 647-UFW1H010MDD
Price: $0.08/ea, $0.06/25, $0.05/50, $0.04/100
DS301-DS304
DS308-DS309
LED-GR
Lumex LED, Green, 5mm, qty 6
Mouser p/n 696-SSL-LX5093LGD
Price: $0.12/ea, $0.10/100, $0.08/500, $0.07/1000
DS306-DS307
LED-YE
Lumex LED, Yellow, 5mm, qty 2
Mouser p/n 696-SSL-LX5093LYD
Price: $0.15/ea, $0.12/100, $0.10/500, $0.08/1000
70
DS305, DS310
LED-RE
Lumex LED, Red, 5mm, qty 2
Mouser p/n 696-SSL-LX5093LID
Price: $0.15/ea, $0.12/100, $0.10/500, $0.08/1000
--
LED bezels
LED mounting clips, qty 10
Mouser p/n 593-CLP125
Price: $0.09/ea, $0.08/10, $0.07/100, $0.06/500
H302
Header
(unused)
J301
Connector
1/4 in. Stereo NO Phone Jack, qty 1
Mouser p/n 568-NYS230
Price $1.08/ea, $0.98/10, $0.88/100, $0/82/500
J302
Connector
1/4 in. Stereo NO/NC Phone Jack, qty 1
Mouser p/n 502-L-114BX
Price $4.66, $3.80/10, $3.10/25, $2.65/100
J303
Connector
3.5 mm Stereo NO/NC Kycon Phone Jack, qty 1
Mouser p/n 806-STX-3150-5C
Price $1.03/ea, $0.69/25, $0.65/100, $0.56/500
P305
Header
SIP 40 pin, 0.100 male, breakaway header, qty 1
Mouser p/n (header) 517-6111TG
Price $0.90/ea, $0.82/50, $0.78/100, $0.74/500
K301
Relay
P&B/Tyco V23105, DPDT 12VDC/960 ohm coil, qty 1
Mouser p/n 655-V23105A5003A201
Price: $1.75/ea, $1.58/25, $1.40/50, $1.26/100
P301, P307
Header
Molex 10-89-7262, 2x13 pin, 0.100 male header, qty 2
Mouser p/n 538-10-89-7262
Price $1.89/ea, $1.65/10, $1.24/100, $0.99/500
P302
Header
Molex 26-60-4040 K.K. 4-pin .156 header, qty 1
Mouser p/n 538-26-60-4040 (tin)
Price $0.44/ea, 0.38/10, $0.25/100, $0.20/500
LCD
16x2 LCD
Microtips 16x2 LCD Ye/Gr backlight 36x80mm
Mouser p/n 668-NC-S16205DFYSAY
Price: $11.51/ea, $9.86/10, $8.49/50, $7.40/100
(alternate) Microtips 16x2 LCD gray backlight 36x80mm
Mouser p/n 668-NC-S16205DFGSAY
Price: $11.51/ea, $9.86/10, $8.49/50, $7.40/100
71
R301
5 KΩ trimpot PIHER 6mm carbon trimmer potentiometer
Mouser p/n 531-PT6KV-5K
Price: $0.28/ea, $0.23/100, $0.22/500
R302-R304
R305-R311
R312
R313
R314
R315, R317, R318
R316
2.2 KΩ
1000 Ω
22 KΩ
220 KΩ
4.7 KΩ
10 KΩ
10 Ω
S301
Switch
Mountain Switch DPDT paddle, qty 1
Mouser p/n 103-4024-EV
Price: $2.90/ea, $2.62/50, $2.47/100, $2.32/500
S302
Switch
Mountain Switch, min. toggle, SPDT, qty 1
Mouser p/n 1055-TA2130-EVX
Price: $2.67/ea, $2.23/50, $2.02/100, $1.84/500
S303-S311
Switch
Mountain Switch, min. toggle, SPDT mom, qty 9
Mouser p/n 108-1MS2T6B1M1QE-EVX
Price: $2.76/ea, $1.93/50, $1.80/100, $1.72/500
Y301
Ceram. Res.
Murata 480 KHz ceramic resonator
Mouser p/n 81-CSB480J
Price: $0.81/ea, $0.70/10, $0.54/100, $0.48/500
U301
BPK-DIP
PIC16C54 LCD serial decoder interface
Seetron Electronics BPK-DIP
Price $9.00/ea
----
hardware
threaded spacer, hex alum,. (2-56) x 1/4”, qty 4
Mouser p/n 534-1797B
Price: $0.78/ea; $0.47/100
Resistor, Xicon 5% carbon film 1/4W, qty 17
Mouser p/n 291-Value-RC (e.g., 291-4.7K-RC)
Price: $0.09/10, $0.044/200, $.017/1000
C. Microcontroller Circuit Board (rev B0)
IC socket
24 pin
DIP 24 pin IC socket
Mouser p/n 517-4824-6000-CP
Price $0.21/ea, $0.20/25, $0.18/100 $0.17/200
C201-C205
0.1µF
Capacitor 50V Xicon Z5U epoxy dipped ceramic, qty 5
72
Mouser p/n 21RZ310-RC
Price: $.08/ea, $.069/100, $.053/500, $.046/1000
C206
4700 µF
Capacitor, Nichicon 16V electro., 16x25mm, qty 1
Mouser p/n 140-REA472M1CBK1625P
Price: $0.83/ea, $0.73/10, $0.64/100; $0.54/500
C207
1000 pF
Capacitor, 50V Xicon, X7R, qty 1
Mouser p/n 21RX510-RC
Price $0.10/ea, $0.084/100, $0.065/500
C208, C209
.01 µF
Capacitor, 50V Xicon, Z7R, qty 2
Mouser p/n 21RZ410-RC
Price $0.10/ea, $0.082/100, $0.063/500, $0.055/1K
D201- D203
1N4005
Fairchild 1A diode, qty 3
Mouser 512-1N4005
Price: $0.05/ea, $0.04/10, $.03/100, $.02/250
J201
Connector
D-Sub 25 pin male, R/A PCB Mount, qty 1
Mouser p/n 636-182-025-113R531 (Norcomp)
Price $1.69/ea, $1.62/10, $1.18/100, $1.10/250, $1.05/500
J202, J203
Connector
RJ25 6 pin PCB side-entry, shielded, qty 2
Mouser p/n 571-5555-154-1
Price $0.99/ea, $0.78/10, $0.71/100, $0.62/500
K201 –K213
Relay
P&B/Tyco V23105, DPDT 12VDC/960 ohm coil, qty 13
Mouser p/n 655-V23105A5003A201
Price: $1.75/ea, $1.58/25, $1.40/50, $1.26/100
P201-P204
Header
Molex KK/0.156” 12 pin header, qty 4
Mouser p/n 538-26-60-2120
Price: $0.77, $0.69/10, $0.66/100, $0.63/500
P205, P206
Header
Molex KK/0.156” 4 pin header, qty 2
Mouser p/n 538-26-60-2040
Price: $0.27, $0.28/10, $0.18/100, $0.15/500
P207
Header
Molex 10-89-7262, (26 pin (2x13) 0.100” male header, qty 1
Mouser p/n 538-10-89-7262
Price $1.89/ea, $1.65/10, $1.24/100, $0.99/500
P208
Header
Molex 5 pin, 0.100”, friction lock, tin-plated
Mouser p/n 538-22-23-2051
Price: $0.48/ea, $0.44/10, $0.29/100, $0.23/500
73
R201
R202
R203, R205
1000 Ω
100 KΩ
10 KΩ
R204
10 KΩ
PIHER 6mm carbon trimmer potentiometer, qty 1
Mouser p/n 531-PT6KV-10K
Price: $0.28/ea, $0.23/100, $0.22/500
U201
BS2-IC
Parallax Basic Stamp model BS2-IC
Mouser p/n 619-BS2-IC
Price: $49.00/ea, $44.00/10, $41.25/25
U202
74HC139
STM dual 4-to-2 line decoder, DIP-16
Mouser p/n 511-M74HC139
Price: $0.39/ea, $0.34/10, $0.30/100
U203
74HC240
STM octal bus buffer, DIP-20
Mouser p/n 511-M74HC240
Price: $0.41/ea, $0.32/10, $0.29/100
U204
ULN2803A
STM darlington 8 NPN array, DIP-18
Mouser p/n 511-ULN2803A
Price: $0.55/ea, $0.504/100, $0.462/250,
7805
STM +5V voltage regulator, TO-220AB
Mouser p/n 511-L7805CV
Price: $0.24/ea, $0.22/10, $0.206/100
Resistor, Xicon 5% carbon film 1/4W, qty 3
Mouser p/n 291-Value-RC (e.g., 291-4.7K-RC)
Price: $0.09/10, $0.044/200, $.017/1000
$0.406/500
U205
74
D. Rear Panel Circuit Board (rev A3)
C401-419
1000 pF
Capacitor, 200V, Mallory, qty 19
Mouser p/n 539-CK05102K
Price $0.27/ea, $0.21/100, $0.19/500, $0.18/1000
C420
0.1µF
Capacitor 50V Xicon Z5U epoxy dipped ceramic, qty 1
Mouser p/n 21RZ310-RC
Price: $.08/ea, $.069/100, $.053/500, $.046/1000
J401
Connector
Neutrik 1/4 in 2-circuit PCB phone jack, qty 1
Mouser p/n 550-20301
Price: $0.66/ea, $0.60/10; $0.51/100
J402
Connector
Kobiconn 3.5mm 1-circuit PCB phone jack, qty 1
Mouser p/n 161-3520-EX
Price: $1.50/ea, $1.00/10, $0.91/100 0.83/500
J403
Connector
Kobiconn 3.5mm 2-circuit PCB phone jack, qty 1
Mouser p/n 161-3507-E
Price: $0.79/ea, $0.53/10, $0.48/100
J404, J405
Connector
Kobiconn triple RCA phono jack (R/Wh/Ye), qty 2
Mouser p/n 161-4319-E
Price: $1.37/ea, $1.14/10, $1.04/100, $0.95/500
J406-J409
Connector
Kobiconn dual RCA phono jack (R/Wh), qty 4
Mouser p/n 161-4219-E
Price: $0.57, $0.44/10, $0.40/100, $0.39/500
J410
Connector
2.5mm DC pwr jack, PCB side entry, qty 1
Mouser p/n 806-KLDX-0202-BC
Price: $0.46/ea, $0.44/25, $0.32/100, $0.25/500
P403
Header
Molex 10-89-7262, 2x13 pin, 0.100 male header, qty 1
Mouser p/n 538-10-89-7262
Price $1.89/ea, $1.65/10, $1.24/100, $0.99/500
---------------
Enclosure
Custom 9”x 4”x 7” custom punched, silkscreened
program port
Connector
Molex 5 pin, 0.100”, crimp terminal housing, qty 1
Mouser p/n 538-22-01-2057
Price: $0.36/ea, $0.31/10, $0.20/100, $0.16/500
E. Chassis/Misc
75
program port
--------------
Molex .100” crimp terminals (tin), qty 5
Mouser p/n 538-08-52-0123
Price: $0.09, $0.08/100, $0.07/500
P101 to P301
P207 to P307
P103 to P403
$$3.01/1000
ribbon cable
3M .100” 26C molded cable assembly, 6”, qty 3
Mouser p/n 517-1M-1010-026-6
Price: $4.72/ea, $4.26/5, $3.86/10, $3.13/200,
Connector Housing
Connector
Molex 4-pin housing, w/locking ramp, qty 2
Mouser p/n 538-09-50-3041
Price: $0.25, $0.21/10, $0.15/100, $0.13/500
--------------
Molex KK/.156” crimp terminals, qty 8
Mouser p/n 538-08-50-0134
Price: $0.08, $0.06/100, $0.05/500, $0.04/1000
Speaker
5 mm x 45 mm dia round speaker
Mouser p/n 665-AS04508MR3R
Price: $2.66/ea, $2.49/25, $1.87/100
-------------
F. RF Relay Switching Unit (ver A2)
----------
Enclosure
Custom silkscreened, prepunched
(Alternate – not silkscreened or punched, Hammond
7.4”x 4.7”x 1.3 “die cast w/flange, qty 1
Mouser p/n 546-1590DDF
Price: $26.58/ea
Coax In/Out
Connector
UHF SO-239 AIM/Cambridge chassis, qty 10
Mouser p/n 601-25-7350
Price $1.33/ea, $1.21/10, $1.06/25, $1.01/100,
Connector
RJ-45 8 pin, top entry, shielded, PCB mount, qty 1
Mouser p/n 571-6116202-1
Price $2.41/ea, $2.19/25, $2.02/50, $1.95/100
$0.95/500
J501
K501-K510
Tyco/Schrack RTB14012F SPDT 12A, qty 10
Mouser p/n 655-RTB14012F
Price $1.73/ea, $1.51/25, $1.36/50, $1.20/100
(alternate – preferred for VHF)
76
Panasonic JW1FSN-DC12V SPDT 10A, qty 10
Mouser p/n 769-JW1FSN-DC12V
Price $2.76/ea, $2.53/25, $2.30/50, $2.07/100
C501-C507
0.01µF
Capacitor 50V Xicon Z5U epoxy dipped ceramic, qty 7
Mouser p/n 21RZ410-RC
Price: $.08/ea, $.069/100, $.053/500, $.046/1000
C508
0.1µF
Capacitor 50V Xicon Z5U epoxy dipped ceramic, qty 1
Mouser p/n 21RZ310-RC
Price: $.08/ea, $.069/100, $.053/500, $.046/1000
D501-D507
1N914A
Fairchild Si signal diode, DO-35, qty 7
Mouser 512-1N914
Price: $0.03/ea, $0.02/10, $0.015/100, $0.01/250
---
hardware
threaded spacer, rnd aluminum (4-40 ) x 1/4”, qty 4
Mouser 534-2025
Price: $0.34/ea, $0.19/100
G. Transceiver Pods – Rev B0 (Quantities are for 3 pods)
----
Enclosure
Hammond 4.4”x 2.5”x 1.1“ plastic enclosure, qty 3
Mouser p/n 546-1591XXBSBK
Price: $4.06/ea, $3.66/10, $3.03/50, $2.62/100
----
cable ties
cable ties, Ty-Wrap or equiv., 4 inch, qty 15
Pod Conn.
Connector
D-Sub 25 pin female, R/A, PCB mount, qty 3
Mouser p/n 806-KF22X-B25S-NJ (Kycon, ferrite filtered)
Price $4.38/ea, $4.09/25, $2.99/50, $2.63/100
H. Miscellaneous Other Hardware & Accessories
Qty 18
Qty 8
Qty 8
Qty 20
Qty 8
Qty 8
Qty 28
No. 4 x 3/8” sheet metal screws (six to secure rear panel circuit board to rear panel,
and twelve to attach pod circuit boards to their plastic cases)
2-56 x 3/16” machine screws (to attach LCD to front panel circuit board)
4-40 x 3/16” machine screws (to secure PCB to RF relay enclosure)
4-40 x 5/16” machine screws (to secure SO-239 coax jacks toRF relay enclosure)
6-32 x 1/4” machine screws (to secure main circuit board to bottom plate of
enclosure)
No. 6 x 3/8” sheet metal screws, black oxide coated (to attach cover to RF enclosure)
No. 4 internal tooth lockwashers
77
Qty 8
Qty 20
No 6 internal tooth lockwashers
4-40 nuts
Note: additional hardware is supplied with the enclosure for the StationPro II control unit.
The following items are to be obtained locally by the builder.
Qty 3
Qty 1
Qty 20
patch cord
patch cord
cablie ties
3’-6’ 25C serial cable w. male/female DB25 connectors
3’-6’ CAT5 patch cord w/RJ45 connectors
4” nom., Ty-Wrap or equivalent
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