MIDI Commands - Mission Engineering

MIDI Commands - Mission Engineering
Table of Contents Welcome .................................................................................................................................................................................. 5 From Liquid Foot Pro to the + Series, what is new? ................................................................................................. 5 Summary of Recommendations ...................................................................................................................................... 6 Feature Summary ................................................................................................................................................................. 7 Operating Guidelines .......................................................................................................................................................... 8 Which CABLES Should Be Used? ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 8 Expression Pedal Ports 1-­‐4 ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 8 Expansion Jack A & B ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 9 MIDI IN ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 9 MIDI OUT (MIDI IN and Power) .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 9 Care and Cleaning ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 10 Maintenance .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 10 Installing Add-­‐On Modules .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 10 Product Support ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 10 The Basics of MIDI ............................................................................................................................................................. 11 What is MIDI? ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 11 MIDI Channels .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 12 Putting it together ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 12 Command: PROGRAM CHANGE (PC) .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 12 Command: CONTINOUS CONTROLLERS (CC) ............................................................................................................................................................................ 13 Special Commands During Power Up ......................................................................................................................... 15 The Basics of Setting Up and Programming the LF+ ............................................................................................. 16 Where Do You Start? .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 16 The User Interface ............................................................................................................................................................ 18 Buttons ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 18 Special Key Combinations ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 18 Other Button Descriptions: ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 19 The MENU User Interface ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 20 The Main Menu Order: ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 21 EDITING NAMES ................................................................................................................................................................. 22 PROGRAMMING COMMANDS ......................................................................................................................................... 22 2 The Structure of Programming Commands ................................................................................................................................................................................. 23 Command Types ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 24 MIDI Commands ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 27 Programming Examples ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 28 Programming a Guitar Tuner Display (with user selecting the CC#) ..................................................................................................................... 28 Clever Page Flipping Made Easy .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 28 SELECTING COLORS .......................................................................................................................................................... 31 TIPS AND TRICKS .............................................................................................................................................................. 32 Copying Items from one location to another ...................................................................................................................................................................... 32 Saving IA State changes made to an active preset .......................................................................................................................................................... 32 MODE Menu ......................................................................................................................................................................... 33 Enter Mode menu ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 33 Page ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 33 Preset ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 34 Song ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 35 Set List ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 36 External Device Control (Direct Mode) ................................................................................................................................................................................. 36 Preset Menu ........................................................................................................................................................................ 38 Selecting a Preset ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 38 Copy/Paste ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 38 Editing the Preset ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 39 Song Menu ........................................................................................................................................................................... 44 Selecting a Song .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 44 Copy/Paste ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 44 Editing the Song .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 45 Set-­‐List Menu ...................................................................................................................................................................... 48 Selecting a Set-­‐List ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 48 Copy/Paste ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 48 Editing the Set-­‐list .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 49 Pages Menu ......................................................................................................................................................................... 51 Selecting a Page .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 52 Copy/Paste ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 53 Editing the Page .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 53 Defining Button Functions .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 55 Function Types ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 56 3 Example Definitions: ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 57 SAMPLE PAGE LAYOUTS ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 61 IA Slot Menu ........................................................................................................................................................................ 63 Selecting a IA Slot ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 63 Copy/Paste ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 64 Editing the IA Slot Parameters ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 64 Global Menu ........................................................................................................................................................................ 72 EXPRESSION PEDAL PROGRAMMING ................................................................................................................................................................................... 80 Utility Menu ......................................................................................................................................................................... 83 FIRMWARE LOADING ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 83 EXTERNAL AUTO LOAD ............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 84 MEMORY BACKUP / SNAPSHOTS ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 85 Erasing the Memory ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 85 Sysex Menu .......................................................................................................................................................................... 87 Selecting a Sysex ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 87 Copy/Paste ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 88 Editing the Sysex Parameters ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 88 MIDI Implementation ...................................................................................................................................................... 90 4 Welcome Welcome and thank you for your purchase of a Liquid Foot+ Series MIDI controller. We hope you enjoy the product and have many years of great use from it. Like other Liquid Products, the Liquid Foot+ Series controller was designed to be flexible and full featured. As time goes on, additional features and functions will be added. You can expect to receive these benefits for free in the form of firmware updates that you can downloaded from the web-­‐site, and install in seconds. Please check the download section of our web-­‐site www.FAMCmusic.com for the latest firmware, user guide and other supporting information and utilities as they become available. Thank you for your support and enjoy your Liquid Foot+ Series MIDI Controller. This Quick Start Guide will give you the basics of using the controller. NOTE: While this guide will show prompts and discuss buttons and the meaning of prompts on the 12+, it should be assumed that the LED version (LF+ 12) acts in the same exact way. In fact, we attempted to have both devices act as if they were the same device. They are interchangeable in user options, programming and expansion possibilities. Recently we have extended the interoperability and as of v1.55 of firmware, all LF+ Series controllers are now 100% compatible. This means you can program your rig for one device, and simple copy the programming via the editor to any other LF+ device and it will function immediately. From Liquid Foot Pro to the + Series, what is new? The + series of controllers take all of the great features of the PRO line, and add a few major concepts, and several new hardware features. The + series introduces the concept of PAGES. There are 50 pages available in the controller. These pages can be switched at anytime, via menu commands, an assigned button command, or via MIDI programming. Each page contains setup parameters along with the ability to program up to two functions for each of sixty (60) physical switches. While the controller itself will not have sixty switches, it will have access to those switches via MIDI commands, or the connection of an expander or another LF+ product. Each controller can be assigned to start at any particular physical button number, allowing for massive flexibility in your layout design. 5 While a Page contains the programming for the buttons, the buttons themselves have various parameters as well as functionality as defined in the active page. A button can be programmed to act like a preset switch, and IA (effect) switch, a menu command, a page switching function, and more. There are over 20 special commands that can be assigned to a button slot. Again, two slots exist for each button on a page. There are many enhancements, added features and tons of flexibility, like the option to control the color of display for ANY and ALL buttons, and Slots. You define the function, the color and the layout-­‐-­‐-­‐ or just use any of the pre-­‐built pages to get started right away. Summary of Recommendations PLAY. PLAY. PLAY. Then PLAN. PLAN. PLAN. Get used to the LF+ controller. Play with commands, features, pages, etc… Modify global settings to get used to the feature rich customization and flexibility offered. Once you are comfortable-­‐ then plan your layout, your functions. Then program. Taking time to plan your layout on paper will greatly enhance your ability to get up and running quickly. Users tend to share ideas and help solve user related problems along the way, so participate on the public forum which can be found by clicking the forum ICON on the home page of the FAMC, Inc. website. (www.FAMCmusic.com) 6 Feature Summary Pages (60) •  60 Buttons Buttons (60) •  2 functions Functions (120) •  Preset, IA-­‐Slot, Special Commands Set-­‐Lists (128) •  Group of up to 60 Songs Songs (254) Presets (384) •  Group of up to 24 Presets •  20 commands, Many Parameters IA Slots (60 Switches) •  20 ON/OFF commands, MANY parameters Sysex Messages (254) •  16 Bytes each, can be linked together Physical Buttons Devices on Network •  up to 60 per Master •  9 controllers, 15 add-­‐on modules 7 Operating Guidelines Which CABLES Should Be Used? Expression Pedal Ports 1-­‐4 Your controller comes with four (4) expression pedal ports. Any pedal wired for expressional pedal usage (TRS Stereo cable). Any standard POT in the range of 5k – 25k should work fine. Proper wiring will have the wiper (center of POT) connected to TIP of TRS plug. The Sleeve will be on the lower (heel position) and the ring will be in the upper (toe position). Wiper(T) Heel position (lower end of POT)(S) Toe position (upper end of POT)(R) [Plug to expression pedal] If you are using the expression pedal as a button, then you can either use a standard a standard button (connecting Tip to Sleeve momentarily during the button press). There are many buttons on the market that are fully compatible with the LF+ port. You may also set an expression pedal port to process two buttons. Both buttons should be connected to the same plug and wired together as follows: 1K ohm Resistor 1.8K ohms Resistor RING(R) Sleeve (S) SLEEVE (S) Button #2 Button #1 TIP(T) TIP (T) 8 Expansion Jack A & B Your controller comes prepared to integrate expansion models and other peripherals that will be developed. The expansion modules come with instructions indicating the proper wiring configuration. The expansion system was designed so that you will be able to daisy chain from one device to another, allowing up to 50 devices to be connected to each other at one time. Clearly this is overkill, but it’s the Liquid way. When connecting multiple LF+ controllers together, please use a standard CAT-­‐5 (Ethernet) cable from one unit to the next. The signals are NOT compatible with any other manufacturers equipment and should not be used in conjunction with other equipment unless specifically stated by FAMC. These connectors are not compatible with the LF PRO series of controllers. This new interface developed by FAMC will support all Liquid products from this point forward. For more detailed information, please see the “Master / Slave” configurations (Working with Expanders) MIDI IN The MIDI IN connector should be connected to any device that will be used to control the Liquid Foot. This maybe your computer, a midi foot controller, or perhaps another Liquid Foot (See Master / Slave section). The Liquid Foot+ will respond to any valid Sysex messages, any valid master/slave processing and standard midi commands sent to its assigned midi channel (see global menu section). Do not use the MIDI cable system for interconnection between multiple LF+ controllers. See the Expansion Jack A & B section for further information. MIDI OUT (MIDI IN and Power) The Midi Out port normally functions as only a midi out connector. Usually data transmitted from this interface will be from the Liquid Foot itself. In the global menu, you can turn the MIDI THRU ON. When ON, data from the MIDI IN port will repeat on the MIDI OUT port. The MIDI OUT connector is designed to be used as a 5 pin, or as a 7 pin interface. It carries standard MIDI OUT, with the inclusion of MIDI-­‐IN, and Phantom Power (from pins 6/7). DO NOT attempt to power external devices from this interface. If using phantom power, you must deliver at least 9-­‐12V AC/DC, 800ma per LF+ connected. When using this port for MIDI-­‐IN data, DO NOT connect another midi device cable to the MIDI IN of the LF as the system will not process both channels simultaneously. 9 Care and Cleaning Do not use solvents to clean the front or back panel of the unit. A lightly damp (water only) cloth can be used. A soft cloth is recommended as the Anti-­‐Glare LCD screen(s) will scratch if rubbed with an abrasive material. DO NOT use liquids around the unit and do not pour water, solvents or any other type of liquid on the unit. Yes, it is a “Liquid” Foot Controller-­‐ but like most electronic devices, it is not tolerant of Liquids! Go figure. Maintenance Buttons: Periodically tighten the top nuts holding the 8, 12, or 24 buttons on the top of the unit. Normal use and excessive wear and tear could loosen these nuts over time. DO NOT UNSCREW THE BUTTONS FROM THE TOP PANEL FOR ANY REASON. Purposefully loosening the nuts from the buttons could cause damage and will require maintenance from the inside of the device to tighten. Installing Add-­‐On Modules Instructions will be included for the specific add-­‐on module you purchased. NEVER PLUG OR UNPLUG an expansion module or add-­‐on to expansion port A or B without first removing power from all units. Please follow all other installation steps as delivered with the add-­‐on unit. Product Support I know, we don’t read user guides. In fact, in writing this user guide, it is assumed no one will read this very paragraph. Kind of like asking if a tree makes noise when it falls and no one is around to hear it! Should you have questions or issues, please start by referring to this user guide for basic operating information. Also, check www.FAMCmusic.com for the latest firmware, user guide updates, video tutorials and access to the user forums. If your questions are still unanswered, feel free to fill out a trouble ticket on the web and we will provide an answer as soon as possible. 10 The Basics of MIDI What is MIDI? So you bought a MIDI controller and you are now saying, OK, I needed one, but what is it? Where do I start? What is MIDI anyway? MIDI is a very simple communication protocol used for hardware devices to “talk” to each other. Think of this as a language that initially started as a way for musical devices to pass along musically oriented information useful for real-­‐time music message exchange-­‐ messages like “turn a “C” notes of a synthesizer on and off as an example. Think of MIDI mainly as a “language” with specific rules, commands and vocabulary that all devices follow. The MIDI “language” is passed along as a digital signal, and is NOT an audio signal. There are no audio signals found, passed or otherwise used in MIDI. Just simple commands in digital form. Think of MIDI as a beeps and buzzes that you used to hear when using MODEMs that connected one computer to another via phone line. It’s basically the same thing in concept. The language of MIDI is structured into 8 core “messages”, with lots of subsets of those messages. The core messages mostly used are: NOTE ON, NOTE OFF, CONTINOUS CONTROLLER MESSAGES, PROGRAM CHANGES, and SYSEX MESSAGES There are other commands which we will ignore for this quick primer, however, the Liquid-­‐Foot+ Series controllers allows you to address all of the standard midi message types, and the extended ones as well. Devices that speak the language of MIDI also have a specific connector that is designed to support the transmission of MIDI messages and information (called MIDI OUT port). This is the port used to send MIDI commands. Devices that Listen to the language have a specific hardware port referred to as the MIDI IN port. This is the port that receives commands that are being sent from another devic. A third type of connector is the MIDI THRU port. MIDI THRU connectors usually just act like another MIDI OUT port which transmits a copy of whatever message(s) that come into the MIDI IN port of the same device. You can connect as many MIDI devices as you would like in a daisy chain fashion. The MIDI OUT of the first device in your chain will connect to the MIDI IN of the next device. Then that second device will connect its MIDI OUT (OR MIDI THRU) connector to the MIDI IN of the next device in the chain, and so on. There are more complicated signal set-­‐ups 11 (using routers, mergers, etc…), but the basic concept is that MIDI OUT ports will send messages from a device and there needs to be a listening MIDI IN port to receive that data. MIDI Channels Like any other spoken language, the vocabulary (commands discussed above) will be meaningless if we can’t identify specifically who we are talking to in the crowed room. Yelling commands when no one is listening wouldn’t be very rewarding. We essentially would be talking to ourselves (that's not always a bad thing!), but for MIDI-­‐ it is required that someone is listening or nothing will happen. Most commands you will use require that you define who the message is intended to reach. Meaning, if we are sending a command, we need to tell all the devices on the MIDI daisy chain which device we are trying to speak with. The concept of MIDI channels is our way to do that. MIDI allows up to 16 channels in one network. That doesn’t sound like much, however, think about how many MIDI devices you have in your RIG? More than 16? If so, you’re not reading this section and have figured it out by now. Ha. When we connect a device to the MIDI network via cables from a MIDI OUT (THRU) connector to a MIDI IN connector on a device, we would also need to assign a unique MIDI CHANNEL to that device. Usually there is a setting in the device that lets you set the MIDI channel from 1-­‐16. Just make sure each device connected as a different MIDI Channel assigned. The number itself doesn’t matter, there is no real set formula for which channel you assign to which device, just make a note of who is listening to which channel. Putting it together So we have a network of connected devices using MIDI IN and OUT connectors. We have set each device to a specific MIDI channel—great, we are ready to start sending commands to those devices so we can tell them what to do. Well how do we know what MIDI commands a device is listening for? Great question. Usually a hardware device that is compatible with MIDI will have a MIDI IMPLIMENTATION guide somewhere in their user guide. This guide will tell you what messages the device is capable of sending, and also what messages it is listening for. Use the guide to help you define what commands you need to send the device to achieve your desired results. Most of what you will need will be accomplished using either a Program Change (PC) message, or a Continuous Controller (CC) message. Lets look at those two messages below. Command: PROGRAM CHANGE (PC) Lets make some noise on an effects unit! So we know we have to assign the device a MIDI channel. Ok, so now lets say that it’s listening to MIDI CHANNEL 1. Great. We want to select a preset (patch) or memory area of the effects unit to 12 load so we can hear it. That's where the PROGRAM CHANGE message comes in. It's a MIDI standard message for the purpose of telling a device to change patches. It can be used for many things, but you can usually count on this message working as we need it to. Devices handle presets differently, some use Banks, others not. If your device has more than 128 presets (patches) available, then it uses banks in some fashion. If it is less then 128, you need not worry about Banks. Before we begin with Program Commands, lets discuss Banks briefly. All devices can provide different numbers. MIDI in general provides direct access for up to 128 patches. These presets are sometimes numbered from 0 to 127, and other times numbered from 1 to 128. For devices that show presets from 1-­‐128, it is important to know that those numbers are for human readability. The actual MIDI data will be between 0-­‐127. So 1 will actually be a data value of 0 to the MIDI system itself. In devices that support more than 128 presets (patches), the likelihood is that these sounds will be organized into banks, with each bank containing no more than 128 sounds. The MIDI protocol now includes the facility to switch from one bank to another, though some older instruments have non-­‐standard bank change commands. Usually a Bank change requires a CC message (described below). Again, the commands required are usually explained in their MIDI Implementation guide. So now we have the basic understanding. A Program Change message will be made up of 3 parts, (1) The Command “Program Change (PC)”, (2) the MIDI Channel we are talking too, and (3) the Preset (patch) # we want to select ( a number between 0 and 127). Lets create a sample command now. We want to talk to a device on MIDI channel #1. We want to tell the unit to turn on Preset #10. The Command will be “Program Change Midi Channel #1, with Preset 10). Pretty simple right-­‐-­‐-­‐ yep, it is that simple. On the LF+, this Command might look something like this on 2nd line of the LCD: 01 | 01|5|10. The first 01 is telling us that we are programming the first command of the sequence (perhaps the only command). The Second 01 is the midi channel (the screen’s top line say “Midi Chan”. The 5 refers to the 5th midi command, and the top of the screen says “Program #” so you know it's a Program Change. The 10 at the end is the preset # for the program Change message. Not hard once your looking at the screen. Command: CONTINOUS CONTROLLERS (CC) While CC functionality can get complicated, its not that hard to understand for most of your purposes. What are CC messages used for? Ever move an expression pedal up and down to control your Volume? Well, how did the effects unit 13 know to increase the volume when you pressed the expression pedal down? How did it know to lower the volume when you pulled back on the pedal? Another question, how did your effects unit shut off the Delay effect when you pressed a certain button on the MIDI controller? How did it know to turn it back on when you pressed the button again? You guessed it, the CC message is responsible for all of those things. A MIDI Channel can have up to 128 CC messages that it can respond to. They are numbered from 0 to 127. Since we usually assign a single MIDI Channel to one device, it means that any one MIDI device in our system can respond its own CC message from 0 to 127. Not all devices implement all 128 CC messages. Look at the devices MIDI implementation guide to determine which CC messages it will respond to. So how did the expression pedal change the volume? Lets answer that while explaining the CC MIDI message. CC messages have 3 parts to the command. First, we need to tell the command which MIDI channel (device) we are talking to. Next, we need to tell the command which of the 128 CC numbers we are using. Finally, we need to tell the command what data value we are storing in the CC#. CC data values are between 0 and 127. There are a couple of conventions used for the data value worth noting. For commands that use CC numbers to turn things ON and OFF, the data value of 0 usually represents OFF, and 127 represents ON. For effects like volume, the entire range of values (from 0-­‐127) are used to provide relative % of total value. So 0 is NO VOLUME and 127 would be full VOLUME. So putting it together, lets assume a device on channel 1 has assigned CC#7 to Volume. Now we need to tell the speaking device (like the Liquid Foot+ MIDI Controller with the expression pedal connected), that we will transmit the expression pedal values to CC #7 on MIDI Channel 1. When you press the expression pedal, the MIDI CONTROLLER will automatically figure out the position of the pedal (with a value between 0 and 127), and automatically (continuously as you move the pedal) send the commands to the device which will change the volume as you move the pedal. The same concept is true for turning effects on and off. Lets say an effects unit assigned CC#12 to Delay. We could send a CC command to CC#12 as the CC number, with a value of 127 (ON). This will tell the effects unit to turn ON the delay. If we sent a CC command to CC#12 with a data value of 0 (OFF), then the effects unit will shut of the delay effect. On the LF+, this Command might look something like this on 2nd line of the LCD: 01 | 01|4| 012 | 127. The first 01 is telling us that we are programming the first command of the sequence (perhaps the only command). The Second 01 is the midi channel (the screen’s top line say “Midi Chan”. The 4 refers to the 4th midi command, and the top of the screen says “CC #” so you know it's a Continuous Controller. The 12 is the CC# (our delay per above), and the 127 is the Data Value (ON). So we have a CC#12 Message on MIDI Channel #1 with a Data Value of 127 (ON). Not too bad! 14 Special Commands During Power Up Powering on the Unit will always bring you back to the point you were last at before it lost power. Same preset, mode, etc… There are certain commands that you can trigger by pressing buttons while powering on the unit. Press and hold the following buttons while powering on the unit. Do not let go of the buttons until the unit completes its startup process and the LCD changes to reflect your special command: MENU System: Force the unit to enter Menu system before B8 do anything else. Force unit to wait for MIDI Firmware before doing B7 anything else. Expression Pedal Testing. LCD Display will show read-­‐out B6 on a scale from 0-­‐409. All buttons not pressed should default to 409. B1 Force Preset Mode as startup mode B2 Force Song Mode as the startup mode Force Expander mode as the startup mode, and set the B3 unit as an expander + + + CAREFUL. THIS PERMENENT. This will reset the unit to B6 B7 B8 B5 all default settings and Page definitions, and it WILL completely ERASE all of your programming to the system defaults. + + + CAREFUL. THIS PERMENENT. This will reset the unit to B4 B1 B2 B3 all default global settings. This will NOT erase your presets, songs, set-­‐lists, pages, IA-­‐Slots, or Sysex Messages. 15 The Basics of Setting Up and Programming the LF+ Where Do You Start? A device with so much flexibility can be overwhelming to start using. Where do you begin? Lets begin with the concepts of the LF+, and then go through some steps. The LF+ Series of Controllers have several interrelated sub-­‐systems working in tandem to achieve simple to very complex setups. We need to understand the building blocks of these sub-­‐
systems before we can just jump in. PRESETS: One of the basic building blocks of the LF+ is the concept of a Preset. The LF+ has 384 Preset locations that you can use to be the kickoff point for a certain “sound”. Presets have a set of parameters that control their behavior, and also allow you to “define” how your equipment in your MIDI RIG should be set-­‐up. Each preset has its own settings, programming commands and initial settings for your MIDI equipment. This concept essentially allows you to create “sounds” (presets) by loading program changes, setting the state (ON or BYPASS) of each of your effects, and much more. Each Preset will always have access to all 60 of the IA-­‐Slots (discussed below). This means that Presets can define which state to put each of your 60 IA-­‐Slots and further will change those IA-­‐Slots when the preset is selected. So it is important to think about what sounds and configurations you need to have access to. Each unique version of a sound, or initial setup of your IA-­‐Slot commands will be defined in a unique Preset. IA-­‐SLOTS: Instant Access (IA) Slots serve two purposes in the LF+ Controllers. First off, there are 60 of these Slots that you can program. While there are some very powerful and complex programming that can be applied to these Slots, in the most basic of uses, a single IA-­‐Slot would be used to turn an effect ON and OFF. So for each effect that you potentially want to control (either VIA a button on the controller, or via a setting within a preset), you will need to create an IA-­‐Slot. All sixty (60) IA-­‐Slots are always available to a preset. This means that when you load a preset, if its told to process the initial states of IA-­‐Slots, the preset will Update the state (turn it ON/OFF, etc…) and will send those commands. It does not matter if you have a button on the controller available to control the IA-­‐Slot, Presets that are told to work with IA-­‐
Slots will always process them. IA-­‐Slots that are assigned to buttons on the controller will be available for the user to toggle (or other). 16 SONGS: There are 254 song locations in the LF+. Each Song can have a specific set of 24 presets, which are put in whatever order you define for that particular song. By selecting a song, you are telling the LF+ to re-­‐arrange the presets to match the order defined in the song. Songs are simply a folder of presets put into a particular order. SET-­‐LISTS: Set-­‐Lists are similar to songs. But unlike songs which sort presets into a particular order, Set-­‐Lists do a sorting of songs in a particular order that you define per preset. So when using the LF+ in Set-­‐List mode, the first thing you will do is load the Set-­‐List. The system will know that you ordered the Songs into a particular order. Now as you press SONG UP or SONG DOWN buttons, you will scroll through the songs in the order that you set for the set-­‐list. When you select a song, the system will then have access to the presets (in the order) that you loaded into the Song definition. PAGES: There are 50 pages that you program and have access to at any time. What is a page? Well imagine your controller being a blank slate of buttons. Those buttons need to be assigned things to do. Pages are used to define a set of behaviors, and a set of things that each button can do. In fact, on each page, a button can do up to two different things. When your needs become very complex, using pages and flipping between pages allows you to redesign the “layout” in real-­‐time of your controller. Pages can even be programmatically changed at a song, preset, or IA-­‐Slot level. What can you assign to a button? Good question. There are four types of items, (1) a Preset holder, (2) an IA-­‐Slot, (3) a special command (like BANK UP, etc…), and switch page commands. With the ability to utilize two commands per button, you can image putting a BANK UP as function #1, and BANK DOWN as function #2 on the same button-­‐ depending on the behavior you set for that particular button, its possible to tap the button for Bank UP, and double tap the button for bank down. You used one button to do two powerful things! 17 The User Interface Buttons The Interface on the LF+ 12, LF+ 12+, and Pro+ are identical in almost all regards. One obvious difference being that the LCD’s above the buttons on the 12+ will display prompts and additional information that you will not see on the 12. There are only a handful of functions available on the 12+ that do not exist in the 12, and those features will be highlighted in the User Guide. Special Key Combinations 1 12 Buttons 1 through 12 will be identified as
through . Special Commands are a combination of buttons held together. They are: 2 MENU: 3 + 6 SCROLL: + PAGE SHIFT: 18 PAGE SHIFT: or it is referenced as + PAGE or it is referenced as 6 + SCROLL 11 2 or it is referenced as 7 10 MENU for 12, 12+, Pro+ PAGE or it is referenced as for JR+ Other Button Descriptions: SAVE 4 = SELECT = EXIT = MENU LEFT 2 = MENU RIGHT 3 = SCROLL LEFT 6 = SCROLL RIGHT 7 = UP 5 = DOWN 8 4 1 = 19 The MENU User Interface One of the first things you will want to do is configure your new unit. Almost all functions are found in the menu system. 2 3 From any operating mode, press both + together to enter the menu system. When the first line of the main LCD begins to display the menu title, you may let go of both buttons. MAIN: [SEL] Function
Mode
MENU LEFT Once in the menu system, you will notice the white. EXIT MENU RIGHT and buttons are now lit SELECT You will also notice that the and buttons are now lit yellow/orange. These colors indicate we are in a menu and also indicate that the button itself is usable in the current MODE/SCREEN we are on. Thus, we can press the MENU LEFT or RIGHT, EXIT, and/or SELECT buttons. MENU LEFT To scroll backwards in a list to the beginning of the current options available, press MENU RIGHT forward through a menu list, press 20 . . To scroll The Main Menu Order: 2 3 + 3 3 3 3 3 3 MAIN: [SEL] Function
Presets
MAIN: [SEL] Function
Songs
MAIN: [SEL] Function
Setlists
MAIN: [SEL] Function
Pages
MAIN: [SEL] Function
IA-Slots
MAIN: [SEL] Function
Global
2 2 2 2 2 2 MAIN: [SEL] Function
Utility
3 MAIN: [SEL] Function
Mode
2 21 MAIN: [SEL] Function
Sysex
3 2 EDITING NAMES Presets, Songs, Set-­‐Lists, IA-­‐Slots, Pages and Sysex messages allow the entry of long names (16 characters), and nick names (8 characters). SCROLL LEFT Use the SCROLL RIGHT and DOWN UP buttons to pick the letter position, and use the UP buttons to select the letter. Holding and DOWN or key will begin a fast scroll. Let go of the 9 button and press again to slow scroll. All but the JR+ allow you to Press 9 for 2 seconds and let go and the entire name will be cleared. Pressing you want to begin editing from the start again. to jump from [SPACE] to “A” to “a”. Hold
12 will restore the last saved name in case PROGRAMMING COMMANDS Presets and IA Slots can hold up to 20 programming commands, while songs can have up to 10 commands. A programming command is either a MIDI command (Note On, Note Off, CC#, PC#, Pitch), or a specific Special Command. Each command may have 0-­‐2 parameters. The display will prompt you to enter such information. The remainder of this section will show the LCD screen as if we were programming a Preset, but the entry of programming commands for IA Slots and Songs is identical. The exception will be that Songs can not process STEP commands and will ignore them if found. 22 All programming steps come to an end when the first EMPTY slot is encountered. Programming commands placed after the first EMPTY slot will be ignored. Keep this in mind if testing parts of the programming commands are needed-­‐ you can temporarily add an EMPTY command to stop processing the commands below it in the sequence. The Structure of Programming Commands Think of programming commands as a sequence of events. The events get triggered one after another until there is a reason to stop. The reasons to stop in this case will be either (1) an EMPTY slot is found, (2) we are processing STEPS and we encountered the next STEP, and finally (3) if we processed the last programming command. Normally programming commands are processed one after another. This only differs when you are programming STEPS. STEPS offer enormous levels of functionality control, but are simple to implement. Every Preset and IA Slot can process up to four STEPS each, with each STEP having the ability to be given a unique name to identify it. On a first press of the preset or IA switch-­‐ Step #1 commands will be processed. A 2nd press will trigger those commands found in STEP #2, etc… Preset MSG # Data to enter Prompt (entering a midi command) MSG01|CC#
01 | 01|4| 002 | 127
An example of a Continuous Change Message: Command Type MIDI CHAN MESSAGE TYPE DATA1 (CC#) VALUE The above command says: Message #1 is a Command Type:MIDI Command (01), which will transmit on MIDI CHAN (01), and will send a CC# message to controller (002), and will send a value of (127 = ON). Preset MSG # Data to enter Prompt (entering a set color command) MSG02|SET COLOR
13 | Green (Dim)
An example of a NON-­‐MIDI Command: Command Type VALUE 23 The above command says: Message #2 is a Command Type:Set Color (13), which will change the current preset to show a green color (dimmed). This will override the default color scheme for this preset only. UP Navigating the creation of a programming command is accomplished by pressing SCROLL LEFT DOWN and to select SCROLL RIGHT a value, and pressing and to move the cursor (data entry position). In the above example, an underline (cursor) is located under the 4, which is a CC# midi command. As you move through the parameters, the PROMPT area will tell you what it is looking for you to enter as far as data. The screen will change based on how many parameters need to be entered for a given command. SAVE Press after you complete your edits to the command. The system will save your modifications and move the cursor back to the Message # field so that you can select another Message to edit. Command Types The first parameter you must enter is the Command Type. Most often you will be using command type 1 (MIDI COMMAND). Special Commands will be added as firmware revisions are made available. Check updated firmware user guides for details on specific functions and their related parameters. Commands are processed in the sequence they are programmed. This matters for instance when using steps (command #3). Think of the commands as a set of instructions for the preset, song, or IA Slot to process in a particular order. This will also sequence the order of MIDI commands going to your effects and other MIDI equipment. This will matter if you are using the Delay command (#5). Perhaps you need a 5ms delay between sending one SYSEX message, and a second message. The sequence of events would be a COMMAND TYPE #4 (SYSEX SEND), a COMMAND TYPE #5 (delay), COMMAND TYPE #4 (another SYSEX SEND). Sometimes equipment can’t change presets and process messages instantly. Thus an inserted delay after a preset change message would be the solution. Hence the order matters. Below is a list of the Command Types available: 24 Command Type # 0 1 Command Name EMPTY
MIDI COMMAND
# of Params 0 1-­‐2 2 3 G-TUNER
STEP
1 0 4 5 6 7 SYSEX SEND
DELAY (MS)
LAST PRESET
LAST PAGE
1 1 0 0 8 9 CHANGE PAGE
PRESET TRIG
1 1 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 IA ON TRIG
IA OFF TRIG
IA TOGGLE
SET COLOR
STORE PRESET
RECALL PRESET
TRIG 1st BP
GO GLOBAL
EXP PDL CC
EXP SEND VAL
EXP SEND CUR
IA Resend
EXP PDL MIDI
Sys SnapShot
Sys Restore
1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 2 2 1 1 2 0 0 Description Signifies that no command is placed in the current Programming Message A standard MIDI Command will be programmed (CC#, PC#, NOTE ON/OFF, etc..) Puts the controller into TUNER DISPLAY mode Tells the controller that we are beginning a step (or another step) and will process all the following commands until (1) another step is reached, (2) end of programming Sends a SYSEX message—and will process all linked SYSEX messages as well Will delay processing by [x] milliseconds before continuing the processing Will jump to the last Preset used prior to currently selected preset Will change the Active Page to the LAST PAGE prior to the currently active page Will change the Active Page to the selected Page Will immediately trigger another preset after completing the current processing Will change and trigger the selected IA Slot to the ON state and process it Will change and trigger the selected IA Slot to the OFF state and process it Will Toggle the state of the selected IA Slot and then process it Will change the Physical Button (if mapped) to the specified color Will Store the Current Preset # into a memory location (1-­‐ 4) Will recall and process the preset # which is stored in memory located (1-­‐4) Will immediately trigger the first preset in the currently selected bank Jump to the defined Global Page Override the CC# of an expression pedal (1-­‐4), (CC#) Select Expression pedal, and force the sending of value defined Send the current expression pedal value of pedal (1-­‐4) Resends a specific IA-­‐Slot defined (1-­‐60) Allows you to override Exp Pedal Port (1-­‐4) with a new Midi Chan # (1-­‐16) Will store the current state (preset, song, etc…) like a camera. Restore later. Takes a previous Snapshot (command 23) and restores back to snapshot 25 25 EXP Change IA
2 26 27 IA Color Change
MTC Activate
2 0 28 29 Status #1 Color
Auto TapTempo
1 2 30 0 31 32 33 Resend Initial
IA-Slots
STORE SONG
RECALL SONG
CHANGE SONG
34 Function Swap
0 35 EXP Slot2 MIDI
2 36 EXP Slot2 CC#
2 37 EXP Slot2
INVERT
1 26 0 0 1 Tells an expression pedal (1-­‐4) programmed as IA trigger to change IA it controls (1-­‐60) Forces an IA-­‐Slot (1-­‐60) to change to a specific color on the button Forces the LF to act as a Master Time Clock if current song is programmed for it. The MTC will also locate the song pointer upon starting MTC mode Sets the Status #1 on 12/12+/Pro+ to a specific color Will automatically trigger an IA-­‐Slot(1-­‐60) 4 times at a specific delay (250-­‐
1000 ms). Editor has a BPM-­‐>MS conversion utility on the Song screen Will automatically resend all Initial IA Slots as defined in current Preset Stores the current song being used into a temporary memory Forces the LF to change Songs to the stored song from command #31 Forces the LF to change to song (1-­‐254). If in set-­‐list mode-­‐ this will switch to the Song only if its found in the set-­‐list For the current page, this command will quickly swap all Function #1 and Function #2 commands on the current page. This is a toggle command, so issuing the command again will reverse the process. This ordering will disappear when the Page is changed or upon power up. Allows Expression port (1-­‐4) to send a second command with midi channel (1-­‐
16). If this command is used and command 36 is not, then a second midi command will be triggered with this MIDI channel number using the CC# found in the global settings (or last override command issued) Allows Expression Port (1-­‐4) to send a second command with a specific CC (0-­‐
127). If this command is used and command 35 is not, then a second midi command will be triggered with this CC# using the midi channel found in the global settings (or last override command issued) Tells Expression Pedal (1-­‐4) Slot2 to use the inverse value of the main expression pedal programming. This allows one expression pedal to cross-­‐fade two different effects at the same time. Slot2 will go down while the main effect goes up, and vice versa. MIDI Commands MIDI commands are typically at the heart of the processing of presets and IA Slots. As an example, if a user presses a Preset button, typically you would send a Program Change message to some set of equipment. The LF+ series of controllers are much more sophisticated, and will allow you to send any and all available standard MIDI commands. This opens the door to much more functionality, especially when combined with automated sequencers, PC DAW systems, etc… The list of MIDI commands available are: MIDI Command Type # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Command Name # of Params Description NOTE OFF
NOTE ON
PRESSURE
CC#
PC#
AFTER PRESS
PITCH
2 2 2 2 1 2 2 (0x80) Parameters are [NOTE #] [VALUE] (0x90) Parameters are [NOTE #] [VALUE] (0xA0) Parameters are [DATA1] [DATA2] (0xB0) Continuous Controller: Parameters are [CC#] [VALUE] (0xC0) Program Change: Parameter is [PC#] (0xD0) Parameters are [DATA1] [DATA2] (0xE0) Parameters are [DATA1][DATA2] 27 Programming Examples Programming a Guitar Tuner Display (with user selecting the CC#) We have an effects unit compatible to supply guitar tuning information. We need to program an IA Slot to trigger the Tuner. This example assumes we have an effects unit set so the tuner (bypass) is triggered on CC#15. Make sure the effects unit is only transmitting Tuner Data ONLY, and any other type of information is blocked from sending. Below we will program the IA switch (set to TYPE: QUICK TAP) with the following command programming: ON 02|G-TUNER
02 | [015]
Clever Page Flipping Made Easy Turn the Tuner on in the LF+ controller (stay until user exits) Parameter [015] means the tuner is set to CC#15 in the compatible effects unit. Setting to 000 will stop the tuner from issuing automatic MIDI commands to turn on the tuner in the external effects unit. A compatible device must be available and its name defined in the MIDI-­‐CHAN NAME parameter of the global menu. Make sure that a MIDI IN signal is preset for this to work. You must also provide a compatible device name in the midi device name section of the global section. Device names “AXE-­‐FX” and “AXE-­‐FX2” are valid entries for the midi chan name. This command will not work if the device type is not properly named on the global setting screen. The LF+ controller introduces so many ways of implementing Page flipping that we wanted to show one of the non-­‐
obvious ways. Lets assume that we have a song that uses two specific pages unique to the presets of the song (perhaps a looper specific page, and the normal preset/IA page. In this example we will program the song commands with two consecutive change page commands. The first page loaded is actually the second page we will need. We load it first so the controller will save it as the “last page used”. The second command will be the active page to use when the song is loaded. With just these two commands processed at the song level, we have essentially created an easy and flexible layout. With one common button on multiple pages would be a single button assigned to a “last page” function. Press the button and it will cycle between the two pages loaded in the Song. These concepts could be implemented in Presets, Songs or even IA Slots themselves. There are many better implementations, but this actually takes 20 seconds to implement. The programing for the song looks like the following: 28 MSG01|CHANGE PAGE
08 | [011] |LOOPERpg
MSG02|CHANGE PAGE
08 | [010] |MainPage
29 Programming a Preset / IA Slot With Steps This example will allow a preset (or IA Slot) to initially change its color to BLUE, then activate Page #2. When the user presses the Preset / IA Slot again, it will change its color to GREEN, and switch to page #1. If the user presses the button again, it will start over and process STEP 1. This is a simple demonstration to show the use of steps, but its concept becomes powerful as you add functionality to aid in your work flow. The combination of various midi and special commands within steps will allow presets and IA Slots to do many sophisticated tasks outside of simple MIDI triggering. This demonstration (programmed into a preset) uses six (6) commands in total: MSG01|STEP
03 | NO Data
Start by defining a first step MSG02|SET COLOR
13 | Blue (Dim)
Set the Color of the Preset to a dimmed Blue MSG03|CHANGE PAGE
08 | [002] |6P x 12I
Activate Page #2 MSG04|STEP
03 | NO Data
Stop Step 1 commands and start STEP 2 MSG05|SET COLOR
13 | Green (Dim)
Set the Presets color to a dimmed Green MSG06|CHANGE PAGE
08 | [001] |6P x 12I
Activate Page #1 30 SELECTING COLORS The LF+ controllers allow flexibility with regard to button commands, and special function color coding. For instance, Presets can be defined with an Active Preset color, and inactive. Those particular settings are found in the Global menu. Color selection has a common interface and selection criteria. There are seven colors available, and each color can either be set to BRIGHT or DIM. To control the light intensity of the DIM setting, you will find that setting parameter in the Global menu. You will be able to increase or decrease the brightness to match your desired level. Below are your color choices as found in the Page menu whereby you can set the STATUS #1 LED should you choose to have a color turned on when the page being edited is made active. Your color choices will be: Status #1 Color
OFF
Status #1 Color
GREEN (Dim)
Status #1 Color
RED (Dim)
Status #1 Color
Yellow (Dim)
Status #1 Color
Blue (Dim)
Status #1 Color
Purple (Dim)
Status #1 Color
Cyan (Dim)
Status #1 Color
White (Dim)
Status #1 Color
OFF
Status #1 Color
GREEN (Bright)
Status #1 Color
RED (Bright)
Status #1 Color
Yellow (Bright)
Status #1 Color
Blue (Bright)
Status #1 Color
Purple (Bright)
Status #1 Color
Cyan (Bright)
Status #1 Color
White (Bright)
Colors can be set, (1) inside preset programming, (2) inside IA-­‐Slot programming, (3) for Pages, (4) each and every special command can have its own color defined. Groups have colors defined based on the group number (1-­‐7). 31 TIPS AND TRICKS Copying Items from one location to another Copying Presets, Songs, Set Lists, IA Slots, Pages, and SYSEX Messages SCROLL a. When in the menu system and selecting which of the above items you plan to edit, press go. The word [COPY] will display on the screen. UP b. Use the and let DOWN buttons to select the new location to “copy” the item too. SCROLL c. Press again. The work [COPY] will disappear. You have now successfully copied your item from the source to the destination. If you want to cancel a “COPY”, then press the exit button and the word “COPY’ will disappear. Saving IA State changes made to an active preset To copy the current state of IA switches into a memory location, you can enact the SAVE/COPY preset function. 1. Make sure BLOCK SAVE/COPY is turned off in the Global menu. 2. Make your changes. 3. Press and hold the Preset button for 3 seconds or so, the screen will change and ask you to select the location you SAVE want to save to. If you are saving the preset data into the currently active preset, simply press , SAVE otherwise select the new location and press current states into this new location. 32 . This will make a copy of the existing preset, with the MODE Menu Enter Mode menu MAIN: [SEL] Function
Mode
MENU , SELECT Page [SEL]ect a Page
, UP Press SELECT DOWN or to select the page you desire. The screen with show the current page number, SAVE along with the pages full name. Press when you have the desired page highlighted. The selected page will now be the active page until changed by the user, or by a programmed command within a Song, Preset, IA Slot or EXIT Special Button is executed. Press [SEL]ect a Page
05 |4 Pre + 6IA
to abort and keep the currently active page. Page # Full Page Name 33 Preset [SEL]ect Preset Mode
SELECT Press to immediately activate Preset Mode. Preset mode allows you to select banks, presets and IA switches based on the page layout that is active. Preset mode ignores Song and Set-­‐list commands. Special commands BANK UP, BANK DOWN, CONTEXT UP and CONTEXT DOWN are usable while SONG UP/SONG DOWN, SETLIST UP, SETLIST DOWN are not. Typical Preset Mode Display: Current Preset # Preset Full Name 002 Lead Solo 1
IA- ON: 2 (Delay 1)
Ex. Status Line when user presses an IA function: Status Msg (IA turned on) IA # IA nickname 002 Lead Solo 1
BANK ( 005 – 008 )
Ex. Status Line when user presses a bank change: Status Msg (Bank being chosen) Low Preset# in bank High Preset 34 IA Step# active IA Step # IA Step Name IAstep:1 (Step#001) IAON:1 (Reverb 1)
Ex. Status Line with a step function IA is pressed Status Msg (IA Slot State ON) Active IA Slot IA Slot Nickname Song [SEL]ect Song Mode
Song mode activates the Song UP/DOWN button commands. The system will automatically select the current song, and presets will scroll up and down based on the song programming. Up to 24 presets can be programmed per Song. If a Page contains preset buttons beyond 24, they will be ignored. Current Preset # Preset Full Name 002 Lead Solo 1
SNG:Song #001
Ex. Status Line: SNG=SONG Active Song full Name 35 Set List [SEL]ect a Setlist
UP When you select Set-­‐list mode. You will then be asked to select the active set-­‐list. Use the DOWN SELECT buttons to select the desired set-­‐list. Press then taken to the first song in the set-­‐list. [SEL]ect a Setlist
001|Setlist #001
and once you have the desired set-­‐list. You are Setlist # Setlist full Name External Device Control (Direct Mode) External Dev Control
This mode enables the controller to synchronize in real time with an external modules that are compatible. For instance, you if configured one or more IA switches to sync with a FRAX-­‐FX, then in direct mode, the preset buttons will select the preset in the effects unit, and will synchronize the current state of the IA switches to match the current values of the preset. 36 This mode requires configuration. Here is the checklist: 1. Make sure the MIDI Channel Device Name (global menu) is set to “AXE-­‐FX” or “AXE-­‐FX2” (Ultra or II) 2. Make sure MIDI thru is OFF (global menu) 3. Make sure SYSEX send is set to TUNER ONLY on the AXE-­‐FX (I/O Menu) 4. Synchronize each of the IA switch slot(s) that will control an effect from this unit by programming as follows: a. Set as type “STOMP” b. Set proper SYNC Device c. Select the Effect to Sync with 5. Direct mode is less useful then preset mode-­‐ use Auto-­‐Load to load the presets from a FRAX-­‐FX device into preset memory, then use preset mode instead of direct mode if flexibility beyond the basics is required. See Auto-­‐Load for more details. 37 Preset Menu MAIN: [SEL] Function
Mode
MENU MAIN: [SEL] Function
Presets
, press
MENU RIGHT , press
SELECT until Selecting a Preset Select Preset
001: Preset #001
UP The preset menu will allow you to select a preset to (1) Edit, or (2) Copy/Paste. Use the DOWN SELECT buttons to select the preset to Edit or Copy. Press and when ready to edit. Copy/Paste SCROLL Press to begin Copy/Paste. The first time pressed, you will see “(COPY)” on the screen. Use the UP DOWN and SCROLL buttons to select the new location. Press EXIT new location (press 38 to cancel the copy operation from continuing). again to make a copy in the Editing the Preset MENU LEFT MENU RIGHT For the remaining preset parameters to edit, use the and buttons to scroll back and fourth between the settings available. Use the various other lighted buttons to process the editing of the current parameter on the screen. SAVE Press
after each and every change you wish to keep, or it will not commit to memory and your modification will be lost. Always save your changes prior to changing parameters. Edit Full Name
[Preset #001
]
Edit the full name following the User Guide section on “Editing Names”. The full name is used in certain menu commands and is also displayed on the top of the LCD when a preset is active. Edit Nick Name
[Pre -001]
Edit the nick name following the User Guide section on “Editing Names”. Nick names are used in various menu system prompts, as well as displayed at various times on the LCD displays of PRESET buttons. Nick names will also be used in certain special commands. IA Initial States
01 | OFF
|IA -001
IA Initial States
01 | ON
|IA -001
IA Initial States
01 | BYPASS|IA -001
39 Each preset can establish the initial state of each IA Slot (1-­‐60). The state can be OFF, ON, or STANDBY. Use the UP DOWN and SCROLL LEFT buttons to select the IA Slot to program. Use the SCROLL RIGHT SAVE buttons to select the initial State. Press value. and
when you set each state to a different MSG01|EMPTY
00 | No Data
Each preset can trigger up to 20 programming commands (See section on Programming Commands for details). Programming commands must be in sequential order. The processing will stop when the first “EMPTY” command is UP found within a preset. Press DOWN and buttons to select the command to program. Press SCROLL RIGHT to select the next parameter to edit for the current command position. An Underline will SAVE highlight to current parameter being edited. Remember to press Page Default
00 |Use Current
to store your edits. By default, presets will not change the active page being used by the controller. This setting is set to 0. Should you need to modify the page, you can either (1) create a Programming Command, or utilize this parameter to set the specific page to make active. 40 IA Resend Type
IA & Global IA
By default, presets will send both IA states and Global IA state programming when a preset is selected for the first time. This means that the controller will evaluate all 60 IA Slots and determine what commands to send. If an IA switch is set to ON, it will send the ON commands. If the IA switch is set to BYPASS, it will send the OFF commands. If the IA switch is set to OFF (and the global BLOCK OFF MESSAGES is not set to “yes”), then it will send the OFF commands. If the BLOCK OFF MESSAGES in the global menu is set to yes, it will BLOCK the OFF state and not send any messages for that particular IA Slot. While the preset WILL update the actual state of the IA Slots (non-­‐global), it will only process the IA Slot commands based on the setting of this parameter. Your options are to either (1) Not send any IA or Global IA commands, (2) Send only the non-­‐global IA Slots, (3) send only the Global IA slots, or (4) send both the IA and Global IA slots. IA Resend Type
Don’t send IA States
IA Resend Type
IA States Only
IA Resend Type
Global IA Only
IA Resend Type
IA & Global IA
Global Override
NO
The global override setting allows the preset to replace the current global settings with that setting define in the Initial IA State programming for the preset. While there are many uses, one obvious use would allow you to maintain global buttons and define a “GLOBAL” preset which would force the global IA Slots to a known state. Perhaps several presets are created with various “settings”-­‐ allowing for multiple “global” presets to be created and selected by the user. 41 EXP PDL Resend
NO
If you need to resend the current values contained in your expression pedals-­‐ you can turn this feature on. Each time you load this particular preset, it will take the current state of the expression pedals-­‐ and resend the programming commands (if it’s a standard expression pedal configuration (TYPE: continuous controller). By default it will not resend these commands. Reset Pg Functions
NO
Normally changing presets will not effect the page, its layout or its state. You do have the ability to set the Page it should load (see above). However, on certain presets it maybe necessary to keep the currently active page, but reset the functions on each of the buttons to a known state—the default Page programming. Selecting YES on this parameter will force this preset to reset the function order of the Page is it was programmed and not how the board maybe setup as of the time the preset was selected. Act as IA Switch
NO
If you need to create a preset that will not process any IA Slot activity-­‐ then you can set this parameter to YES. By default this is set to NO, which makes the preset behave in the normal manor. Specifically, this preset will NOT update the current state of the IA switches based on the Initial States of the preset when this parameter is set to YES. Block Multiple Press
NO
If a preset does not want to allow itself to be processed more than once in a row, then set this to YES. If Global “BLOCK MULTIPRESS” is set to off, then this parameter will allow you to block multiple presses at a preset level. 42 Step Remember
NO
If you have a preset that has steps, and you need this preset to remember over time what the last step used was, then set this parameter to YES. By default this setting is no, which means that when you first press on a preset, it defaults to STEP1, then Step2, etc… If you change presets and then come back to this preset, it will again start at STEP1. If you set the preset to “Remember”, it will automatically trigger the next STEP from where you left off last time you pressed the PRESET. Edit Step Names
1:[Step#001]
Edit Step Names
2:[Step#002]
Edit Step Names
3:[Step#003]
Edit Step Names
4:[Step#004]
If a preset will utilize STEP commands, then you can create custom names that will show up on the main LCD, and will also show on the button LCD for the preset. This will come in handy should you have for instance a preset that triggers a delay effect with 0%, 25%, 50% and 75% mix values. In this example, perhaps your step names would be “DLY: 0%” for Step 1, “DLY: 25%” for Step 2, “DLY: 50%” for Step 3 and “DLY: 75%” for Step 4. The display will tell you what step you are on as you press the preset. Good labeling goes a long way to keep things simple while you’re playing. 43 Song Menu MAIN: [SEL] Function
Mode
MENU MAIN: [SEL] Function
Songs
, press
MENU RIGHT , press
SELECT until Selecting a Song Select Song
001: Song #001
UP The song menu will allow you to select a song to (1) Edit, or (2) Copy/Paste. Use the DOWN and SELECT buttons to select the song to Edit or Copy. Press when ready to edit. Copy/Paste SCROLL Press to begin Copy/Paste. The first time pressed, you will see “(COPY)” on the screen. Use the UP DOWN and SCROLL buttons to select the new location. Press EXIT new location (press 44 to cancel the copy operation from continuing). again to make a copy in the Editing the Song MENU LEFT MENU RIGHT For the remaining song parameters to edit, use the and buttons to scroll back and fourth between the settings available. Use the various other lighted buttons to process the editing of the current parameter on the screen. SAVE Press
after each and every change you wish to keep, or it will not commit to memory and your modification will be lost. Always save your changes prior to changing parameters. Edit Full Name
[Song #001
]
Edit the full name following the User Guide section on “Editing Names”. The full name is used in certain menu commands and is also displayed on the top of the LCD when a preset is active. Edit Nick Name
[Song-001]
Edit the nick name following the User Guide section on “Editing Names”. Nick names are used in various menu system prompts, as well as displayed at various times on the LCD displays of Song buttons. Nick names will also be used in certain special commands. Trigger Type
Trigger 1st Preset
Trigger Type
ARM Song w/out Trig
When a song is selected, by default it will automatically trigger the first preset in the song. Should you want to select a song, but not automatically load the first preset, set this parameter to ARM. It will then await you follow-­‐on press of any page button which is set to “TRIGGER SCROLL”, or defined as a “SELECT / ENTER” special menu button. 45 Resend/PerPreset
NO
Each song can have its own set of programming which is typically triggered just before the first preset is selected for the song as its activated. There maybe times when you need the programming commands for the song to trigger every time a preset within the song is selected. If this is needed, each song can select the option by changing this value to YES. MSG01|EMPTY
00 | No Data
Each song can trigger up to 10 programming commands (See section on Programming Commands for details). Programming commands must be in sequential order. The processing will stop when the first “EMPTY” command is UP found within a preset. Press DOWN and buttons to select the command to program. Press SCROLL RIGHT to select the next parameter to edit for the current command position. An Underline will SAVE 46 highlight to current parameter being edited. Remember to press allowed in song processing commands. to store your edits. STEPS are not Set Preset Order
01|001:Preset #001
Preset Order # Preset # Preset Full Name Songs are defined by sorting up to 24 presets into a particular order. Each preset Slot is assigned one of the existing presets in memory. You can place any preset in any of the 24 slots. You can use the same preset as many times as you would like. Access to the presets are solely based on “preset” buttons assigned within the current page, or via incoming MIDI PC commands if allowed. If only four presets are available on a particular page, you will only have physical access to trigger the first four presets. UP DOWN Use the
and SCROLL LEFT buttons to select the preset slot # for the song. Use the SCROLL RIGHT and buttons to change the Preset assigned to the Preset Slot #. Press 47 Set-­‐List Menu MAIN: [SEL] Function
Mode
MENU MAIN: [SEL] Function
Setlists
, press
MENU RIGHT , press
SELECT until Selecting a Set-­‐List Select Setlist
001: Setlist #001
UP The set-­‐list menu will allow you to select a set-­‐list to (1) Edit, or (2) Copy/Paste. Use the DOWN SELECT buttons to select the set-­‐list to Edit or Copy. Press and when ready to edit. Copy/Paste SCROLL Press to begin Copy/Paste. The first time pressed, you will see “(COPY)” on the screen. Use the UP DOWN and SCROLL buttons to select the new location. Press EXIT new location (press 48 to cancel the copy operation from continuing). again to make a copy in the Editing the Set-­‐list MENU LEFT MENU RIGHT For the remaining set-­‐list parameters to edit, use the and buttons to scroll back and fourth between the settings available. Use the various other lighted buttons to process the editing of the current parameter on the screen. SAVE Press
after each and every change you wish to keep, or it will not commit to memory and your modification will be lost. Always save your changes prior to changing parameters. Edit Full Name
[Setlist #001
]
Edit the full name following the User Guide section on “Editing Names”. The full name is used in certain menu commands and is also displayed on the top of the LCD when a preset is active. Edit Nick Name
[Set- 001]
Edit the nick name following the User Guide section on “Editing Names”. Nick names are used in various menu system prompts, as well as displayed at various times on the LCD displays of Set-­‐list buttons. Nick names will also be used in certain special commands. Set Song Order
01|001:Song #001
Song Order # Song # Song Full Name 49 Set-­‐lists are defined by sorting up to 60 songs into a particular order. Each preset Slot is assigned one of the existing presets in memory. You can place any preset in any of the 24 slots. You can use the same preset as many times as you would like. Access to the presets are solely based on “preset” buttons assigned within the current page, or via incoming MIDI PC commands if allowed. If only four presets are available on a particular page, you will only have physical access to trigger the first four presets. UP Use the
DOWN and SCROLL LEFT SCROLL RIGHT and 50 buttons to select the preset slot # for the song. Use the buttons to change the Preset assigned to the Preset Slot #. Press Pages Menu Pages are at the heart of the LF+ layout flexibility. There are a total of fifty (50) pages available, each with sixty (60) buttons. Each of the sixty (60) buttons has two programmable functions are individually configured with behaviors that define how the button works, and reacts to those functions. The button can also determine how those functions switch around based on settings defined for the button. This offers a massive amount of customization to the user, but keeps the process of programming such sophisticated layout capabilities very simple. In general it is helpful to understand that any physical switch can be mapped via a page to any type of function available within the controller. Buttons can trigger Presets (up to 60 presets per page). Buttons can trigger IA Slots (up to 60 per page). Buttons can also trigger special commands, such as MENU, SAVE PRESET, Change PAGE, BANK UP, BANK DOWN, etc… Buttons can mix and match any combination of such commands, presets, and so on. This allows the user to establish any layout of the board that is so desired. Why 60 buttons on a page if the largest LF+ controller only has 24 buttons? Because pages allow for expander units (or multiple LF+ devices) to be linked together. This allows a page to be physically spread around multiple LF+ controllers. Up to 12 LF+ controllers can be easy linked together and begin working in a master/master or master/slave mode within a minute of configuring each units SYNC parameters. Very simple, very powerful, and extremely flexible. Buttons on a page could also be linked to buttons on the expression pedal ports. Up to two buttons can be added to each port on the back of the LF+ controller. So it is important to understand that just because you can’t physically get to a button on a page via the top of the Controller itself, you can control buttons on page via the expression pedal ports, extender units, attached LF+ controllers, and even MIDI commands. Buttons can be programmed to handle two separate functions. Function 1 is normally triggered by a foot press of the physical switch. A press and release in a time below that defined in the Global menu (default is set to a press less than 1 second). The 2nd function would be triggered with a foot press that is longer then the set Hold time. When a 2nd function is triggered, there are three settings which control its behavior. When the trigger is set to toggle, the 2nd function becomes the 1st function and vice versa, which essentially toggles the 2 functions back and fourth. When set to Toggle/trigger (default), the button will toggle the functions on the button and then process the function which switches to the active button function. The third option is Trigger Only. With a trigger only setting, function #2 will be triggered, but it will not become the new active function for the switch. 51 You can mix and match any function with any switch. The combination of first function and second are only up to your needs. There are no limitations. In fact, feel free to re-­‐use any of the functions as many times as you desire. There are no limitations as to how you layout your buttons on a page. As an example of this functionality—perhaps a single button has a first special function of Preset UP, and a 2nd function of Preset DOWN. When the user presses a normal tap of the switch, a preset UP command is issued and processed. Press it again and another preset up command is processed. However, when we hold the button for the allocated time and release, the second function is processed and a Preset DOWN command is processed. If we set it to trigger only, then the device will go down one preset, but leave the functionality set as Preset Up. Whereas, if toggle was selected as the button type, then the two functions would now toggle, and the quick press will trigger a Preset DOWN. A walk through of the Page menu: MAIN: [SEL] Function
Mode
MENU MAIN: [SEL] Function
Pages
, press
MENU RIGHT , press
SELECT until Selecting a Page Select Page
001:3 Pre + 6 IA
UP The page menu will allow you to select a page to (1) Edit, or (2) Copy/Paste. Use the SELECT buttons to select the page to Edit or Copy. Press 52 when ready to edit. DOWN and Copy/Paste SCROLL Press to begin Copy/Paste. The first time pressed, you will see “(COPY)” on the screen. Use the UP DOWN and SCROLL buttons to select the new location. Press again to make a copy in the EXIT new location (press to cancel the copy operation from continuing). Editing the Page MENU LEFT MENU RIGHT For the remaining page parameters to edit, use the and buttons to scroll back and fourth between the settings available. Use the various other lighted buttons to process the editing of the current parameter on the screen. SAVE Press
after each and every change you wish to keep, or it will not commit to memory and your modification will be lost. Always save your changes prior to changing parameters. Edit Full Name
[3 Pre + 6 IA
]
Edit the full name following the User Guide section on “Editing Names”. The full name is used in certain menu commands and is also displayed on the top of the LCD when a preset is active. Edit Nick Name
[3P x 6I ]
53 Edit the nick name following the User Guide section on “Editing Names”. Nick names are used in various menu system prompts, as well as displayed at various times on the LCD displays of page buttons. Nick names will also be used in certain special commands. Status #1 Color
OFF
On the Top right of the Controller there are two STATUS indicators. Pages have the ability to set the color of STATUS indicator #1. When the currently edited page is activated, it will force the indicator to the color defined in this parameter. (See the section on selecting colors for descriptions). Dynamic IA-Slots
NO
Normally, pages control the function assignment of buttons based on the parameters (toggle mode) for a particular button. This works for most system setups with commands, special functions and presets. IA-­‐Slots are special function types in the LF+ as it may be desired to have a single button automatically sense what function it should process and automatically change its function for you. This is very powerful and saves the user enormous amounts of time in special programming as well as avoiding the need to create multiple pages for basic auto-­‐toggle behaviors. Dynamic IA-­‐Slots parameter when turned on, tells the page to re-­‐evaluate its function every time a new preset is activated. Using data found in the Initial IA-­‐States for that particular preset, the Dynamic system can determine which function should be available immediately without the user having to press to toggle the function. There are many uses for this, but lets look at a simple example. Lets assume your rig has a chorus and flanger effect. Now normally these two effects would never be used on the same preset, as putting a flanger and chorus together wouldn’t sound very good. Again, just an example. So we know we will have some presets with the Chorus enabled, and others with Flanger effect. Now lets assume our presets have the initial IA-­‐States for each preset set so that when a Chorus is in the preset, it is either set as Bypassed, or ON, and since there is no flanger, the flanger IA-­‐Slot is set to OFF as the initial state. Further, lets assume other presets have the opposite settings, the Flanger is set to ON or BYPASS, and the chorus is set to OFF. If Function #1 on a button is Chorus IA-­‐Slot, and Function #2 is the flanger IA-­‐Slot, and Dynamic IA-­‐Slots is turned on, then the Page will now change the button for you as you switch presets. Those presets with a Chorus-­‐ will automatically make the button process the Chorus IA-­‐Slot. And the presets with a flanger will automatically switch the button immediately on its own so that the button will control the flanger. Think of 54 it like you just changed the name of the button to “modulation” instead of Chorus or Flanger. Why? Because the page will now put the proper modulation IA-­‐Slot on the button each time you change presets. Enable DoubleTap
NO
When two functions are programmed on a particular button, there are two ways to access the second function. By pressing and holding a button down for at least the pre-­‐defined time (global setting 2nd HOLD TIME). However, if you turn this parameter on for the Page, then this page will allow you to double tap the button quickly to trigger function #2. Simple press the but normally to select function #1, and double tap the button (just like double clicking your computer mouse), and function #2 will be triggered. ‘Menu’ Override
000
Each page will allow you to change the behavior of the MENU button combination (B2 + B3). You can select a specific page button (1-­‐60) and that particular page button will be triggered when you select the menu button combination. Please keep in mind that you will not have access to entering the menu from this button combination without either changing pages to a page that doesn’t have this parameter set, pressing a button programmed with the “MENU” function, or powering on while holding down Button #8. Defining Button Functions The flexibility of Pages is created in the Button definition section. For each page, there are sixty (60) individual buttons that can be programmed. Access to these button slots is totally dependent on the availability of physical switches. The 12 and 12+ controller each have 12 physical buttons. This obviously gives you access to 12 of the sixty (60) switches in a Page. With the inclusion of an extender, or another 12 or 12+ controller, you can then have access to another 12 buttons of the sixty (60). So now we have access to 24 of the buttons. And so on. The first button (labeled “1” on the enclosure) usually maps to button one (1) in the Page. With an expander, Button #1 may point to 13, so the main controller handles buttons 1-­‐12, the first expander is set to 13, so it controls buttons 13-­‐24, and so on. The assignment of what Page button is processed by the first physical button is controlled by the Global parameter “Start of Button Map”. 55 DEFINITION(s): Function #1 – is the function processed when the user presses and lets go of the button immediately. Function #2 – is the function processed when the user presses a button for a hold time period and then lets go. Hold Time – the hold time is defined in the global menu parameter “Button Hold Time” When a user presses a button that has two functions defined, the clock will start. The STATUS #2 LED will blink every ½ second. When the Hold Time is exceeded, the switch will process Function #2. If the hold time was less then the programmed delay, then it will process Function #1. If a button does not have a second function-­‐ then it will automatically process function #1, unless told to wait for a button release. What makes this functionality so powerful is that you can program Function #1 and Function #2 to process any command, preset or IA switch available, in any order you see fit. Lets look at the basic structure: (arrow means more parameters avail) Button Slot (BOLD indicates it’s the currently selected) Function #1 Currently Programmed Function 01> 1:Not Defined
0|00|2:Not Defined
Function Type Function #2 Currently Programmed Function Parameter # of currently selected Function (#1 in this case since #1 is BOLD) Function Types 56 Each Function is defined by its Type, followed by a parameter. The following Types exist: Type Parameter Description NOT DEFINED
0 FUNCTION WILL DO NOTHING PRESET
B#XXX
P XXX=1-­‐60: Defined as a Preset Button within the current Bank SYSTEM
FUNCTION
F 1-­‐19 – See SYSTEM FUNCTION LIST BELOW XXX:<IA name>
S XXX=1-­‐60: Defined as an IA Switch using the defined IA Slot XXX:<PG name>
P XXX=1-­‐60: Defined as a Page switch-­‐ will activate a specific Page # *Function Type will display the letter in the Type column PARAMETER NUMBER 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Parameter Description MENU
ENTER/SELECT
CONTEXT UP
CONTEXT DOWN
PRESET UP
PRESET DOWN
BANK UP
BANK DOWN
SONG UP
SONG DOWN
SETLIST UP
SETLIST DOWN
PAGE UP
PAGE DOWN
GLOBAL PAGE
LAST PAGE
LAST PRESET
SAVE PRESET
MODE CYCLE
Will switch to the Menu System Will process Scroll, Bank, Page, Song, Set-­‐list scroll changes PRESET/DIRECT Mode (BANK UP) , SONG/SET mode (SONG UP) PRESET/DIRECT Mode (BANK DOWN) , SONG/SET mode (SONG DOWN) PRESET/DIRECT Mode (PRESET UP) PRESET/DIRECT Mode (PRESET DOWN) PRESET/DIRECT Mode (BANK UP) PRESET/DIRECT Mode (BANK DOWN) SONG/SET mode (SONG UP) SONG/SET mode (SONG DOWN) SET-­‐LIST mode (SET-­‐LIST UP) SET-­‐LIST mode (SET-­‐LIST DOWN) PAGE UP – will move to next page # once scroll is selected PAGE DOWN – will move to previous page # once scroll is selected Activates the defined Global Page Activates the page used prior to the current page Loads the preset used prior to the current one Button will allow user to save/copy preset and current IA States Cycles the current mode (PRESET, SONG, SET-­‐LIST) Example Definitions: 01> 1:Not Defined
0|00|2:Not Defined
01> 1:PRESET B#001
P|01|2:Not Defined
01> 1:MENU
F|01|2:Not Defined
Button NOT ACTIVE: (Function#1 and #2 not defined) Button is a single Preset Button (programmed as the 1st preset) Button will turn on the MENU system when pressed 57 01> 1:001:Reverb 1
S|01|2:Not Defined
01> 1:PRESET UP
F|05|2:PRESET DWN
Button will toggle IA Slot #001 when pressed Normal press will trigger a Preset UP command, while holding the button will trigger a preset DOWN command. There is no limit to how many times a single function, preset, IA Slot or Page change function can be used. Multiple instances of the same function will basically act like a “clone” of each other. All buttons will behave the same way and display the same information. Each button has three (3) behaviors that can be programmed. You can access them by continuing to press SCROLL RIGHT Parameter #1 through all of the editing parameters: 01> 2nd Button Type
On Hold:Trigger Only
01> 2nd Button Type
On Hold:Toggle 1 & 2
01> Button Release
Process on Press
01> Button Release
Wait for Release
By default, a button is set as a Trigger only. Simply put, if two functions exist on a button, and the second function is triggered, it will process the 2nd Function, but will not change the physical layering. Only the information and state of the 1st Function is visible. When “Toggle 1 & 2” is selected, then Function #1 and #2 will switch with each other when the 2nd Parameter #2 58 By default, if only one function is defined for a button, it will start processing as soon as the user pressed the button. By setting this parameter to “Wait for Release”, the controller will not trigger the Function until the user lets go of the button. This will allow a user with a “sticky foot” to just stand on the button until they are ready, and release the button to trigger. This could be useful in time sensitive preset changes. Holding the button down until ready to trigger it. Or it could be to overcome user behavior and the lead foot! Parameter #3 01
Trigger Scroll
Don’t Process Scroll
01
Trigger Scroll
Process Scroll(s)
By default, buttons are not defined to trigger scrolls. What in the world is that? Recall that a button can be programmed to process a Bank UP/DOWN, Preset UP/DOWN, Song UP/DOWN, Page UP/DOWN, Set-­‐List UP/DOWN, CONTEXT UP/DOWN, and so on. These commands are capable of being “ARMED only” by default, or TRIGGERED. Imagine the ability to Change Banks (BANK UP) and press it multiple times without actually changing banks until the proper bank is found. Each of the UP/DOWN functions are called “SCROLL” functions. Any modifications to a SCROLL function are NOT processed until either (1) an ENTER/SELECT button is pressed, or any button that is set to “Process Scroll(s). Perhaps a natural example of this would be preset buttons. It would make sense to leave the BANK UP/DOWN buttons with the default setting of “Don’t Process Scroll”, and set each of the Preset buttons with a “Process Scroll(s)” trigger. In this example, we can BANK UP/DOWN all day, and only see on the LCD what bank we are about to select. Nothing will happen until we press one of the Preset Buttons. Being set to Trigger Scrolls, it will fire the trigger, notice the BANK change, and process it. It will then select the first preset in the Bank that was just activated and load it. Below are a couple DEFAULT PAGES IN A SAMPLE LAYOUT FORMAT (B1-­‐B12 are shown) 59 PAGE%# 001
STATUS
Button%# COLOR
PAGE%NAME
FUNCTION%#1
TYPE PARAM
DESC
3 PRE + 6 IA
FUNCTION%#2
TYPE PARAM
DESC
NICK:
3P x 6I
TRIGGER? Wait%for Scroll
TOGGLE? Release? Trigger?
1 OFF
F
4
Context%Down
0
0
EMPTY
TRIGGER
NO
NO
2 OFF
P
1
Preset%B#001
0
0
EMPTY
TRIGGER
NO
YES
3 OFF
P
2
Preset%B#002
0
0
EMPTY
TRIGGER
NO
YES
4 OFF
P
3
Preset%B#003
0
0
EMPTY
TRIGGER
NO
YES
5 OFF
F
3
Context%Up
0
0
EMPTY
TRIGGER
NO
NO
6 OFF
S
1
IA%001
0
0
EMPTY
TRIGGER
NO
NO
7 OFF
S
2
IA%002
0
0
EMPTY
TRIGGER
NO
NO
8 OFF
S
3
IA%003
0
0
EMPTY
TRIGGER
NO
NO
9 OFF
F
1
MENU
0
0
EMPTY
TRIGGER
NO
NO
10 OFF
S
4
IA%004
0
0
EMPTY
TRIGGER
NO
NO
11 OFF
S
5
IA%005
0
0
EMPTY
TRIGGER
NO
NO
12 OFF
S
6
IA%006
0
0
EMPTY
TRIGGER
NO
NO
60 PAGE%# 002
STATUS
Button%# COLOR
6P x 12I
FUNCTION%#1
PARAM
DESC
FUNCTION%#2
TYPE PARAM
DESC
TRIGGER? Wait%for Scroll
TOGGLE? Release? Trigger?
0
EMPTY
TRIGGER
NO
NO
1
Preset%B#001
P
4
Preset%B#004
TRIGGER
NO
YES
2
Preset%B#002
P
5
Preset%B#005
TRIGGER
NO
YES
3
Preset%B#003
P
6
Preset%B#006
TRIGGER
NO
YES
3
1
Context%Up
0
7
TRIGGER
NO
NO
IA%001
0
S
EMPTY
6 OFF
F
S
IA%007
TRIGGER
NO
NO
7 OFF
S
2
IA%002
S
8
IA%008
TRIGGER
NO
NO
8 OFF
S
3
IA%003
S
9
IA%009
TRIGGER
NO
NO
9 OFF
F
1
MENU
0
0
EMPTY
TRIGGER
NO
NO
10 OFF
S
4
IA%004
S
10
IA%010
TRIGGER
NO
NO
11 OFF
S
5
IA%005
S
11
IA%011
TRIGGER
NO
NO
12 OFF
S
6
IA%006
S
12
IA%012
TRIGGER
NO
NO
4 OFF
NICK:
0
3 OFF
6 PRE + 12 IA
Context%Down
2 OFF
PAGE%NAME
4
1 OFF
TYPE
F
P
P
P
5 OFF
SAMPLE PAGE LAYOUTS SAMPLE ON PAGE TO FOLLOW (Spreadsheet file available for download as well) Print the sheet to follow on next page. 61 PAGE%#%
%%
%
%%
%
PAGE%NAME_____________________________%
%
%
%
%
%
%
STATUS% %%
FUNCTION%#1%
Button%#% COLOR% %% TYPE% PARAM%
DESC%
1% %%
2% %%
3% %%
4% %%
5% %%
6% %%
7% %%
8% %%
9% %%
10% %%
11% %%
12% %%
TYPES:
!
0
P
EMPTY
F
FUNCTION (see Below)
S
IA Slot (switch)
p
NICK:_________________%
PRESET
CHANGE PAGE
62 %
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
TYPE%"F"
NUMBER
Parameter
% %
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
FUNCTION%#2%
TYPE%
PARAM%
DESC%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
1 MENU
11 SETLIST UP
2 ENTER/SELECT
12 SETLIST DOWN
3 CONTEXT UP
4 CONTEXT DOWN
5 PRESET UP
15 GLOBAL PAGE
6 PRESET DOWN
OFF
% %
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
OFF
TRIGGER?% %Wait%for% %Scroll%
TOGGLE?% Release?% Trigger?%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
COLORS:
OFF
OFF
Gd
Green Dim
G%b
Green Bright
13 PAGE UP
Rd
Red Dim
R%b
Red Bright
14 PAGE DOWN
Bd
Blue Dim
B%b
Blue Bright
16 LAST PAGE
Yd
Yellow Dim
Y%b
Yellow Bright
7 BANK UP
17 LAST PRESET
Cd
Cyan Dim
C%b
Cyan Bright
8 BANK DOWN
18 SAVE PRESET
Pd
Purple Dim
P%b
Purple Bright
9 SONG UP
19 MODE CYCLE
Wd
White Dim
W%b
White Bright
10 SONG DOWN
IA Slot Menu There are 60 IA Slots available in the LF+ controller system. IA Slots eventually are placed within a Page to be accessed by the user. An IA (Instant Access) Slot is essentially a set of Programming Commands and various parameters put together to process a particular function. The most obvious example and most commonly used purpose of an IA Slot is to manage an effect (Delay, Drive, Channel of a switcher, etc…). The LF+ controller goes well beyond the basics, and allows the IA Slot to be used for complex Step programming, management of other IA Slots, handling Page changing logic, and so much more. When combined with the many special commands available, you will come up with many uses over time. MAIN: [SEL] Function
Mode
MENU MAIN: [SEL] Function
IA-Slots
, press
MENU RIGHT , press
SELECT until Selecting a IA Slot Select IA slot
001:IA SLOT #001
UP The IA Slot menu will allow you to select a IA Slot to (1) Edit, or (2) Copy/Paste. Use the DOWN and SELECT buttons to select the IA Slot to Edit or Copy. Press when ready to edit. 63 Copy/Paste SCROLL Press to begin Copy/Paste. The first time pressed, you will see “(COPY)” on the screen. Use the UP DOWN and SCROLL buttons to select the new location. Press again to make a copy in the EXIT new location (press to cancel the copy operation from continuing). Editing the IA Slot Parameters MENU LEFT MENU RIGHT For the remaining IA Slot parameters to edit, use the and buttons to scroll back and fourth between the settings available. Use the various other lighted buttons to process the editing of the current parameter on the screen. SAVE Press
after each and every change you wish to keep, or it will not commit to memory and your modification will be lost. Always save your changes prior to changing parameters. Edit Full Name
[IA SLOT #001
]
Edit the full name following the User Guide section on “Editing Names”. The full name is used in certain menu commands and is also displayed on the top of the LCD when a preset is active. If you plan to Sync the IA Slot to an external device (such as an AXE-­‐FX), then keep in mind that by selecting an Effect ID (explained below), it will automatically store the name of the effect selected into the name. Therefore, don’t program the IA Slot name until you’ve selected your effect. If you plan to change the name, do it afterwards. Edit Nick Name
[IA -001]
64 Edit the nick name following the User Guide section on “Editing Names”. Nick names are used in various menu system prompts, the display of certain buttons on the 12+ model and certain special commands. Switch Type
Stomp (ON/OFF)
Switch Type
Momentary
Switch Type
Step
Switch Type
Quick Tap (ON ONLY)
Switch Type
Tap Tempo
IA Switches by default are set to “Stomp (ON/OFF)”. In this common type, pressing the switch that triggers this IA Slot will toggle the state from ON to BYPASS, or OFF to ON. When the state is turned ON, the ON programming commands are processed. In the BYPASS state, the OFF programming commands are processed. If the state is OFF, then the OFF commands are processed only if the Global Parameter “Block OFF IA Process” is set to NO. By default, this feature is set to YES. Stomp switches are controllable by a Page button press, MIDI command, or as synchronized with a master or slave. “Momentary” type switches will process ON messages as soon as the button is pressed. When the user lets go of the button, the button will process the OFF messages. “Step” type switches will process the ON messages and manage steps. The IA begins at step 1, and then based on the number of times pressed, while process the follow-­‐on steps. See the Programming Commands section above for detailed information on how to use and program steps. Steps provide an incredible amount of control, and in many cases will allow one IA Slot to handle several critical functions with one Slot/Switch/Button. 65 “Quick Tap (ON ONLY)” type switches are simply a fast and simple processing of ON messages only. Triggering a Quick tap switch will process the ON messages as fast as possible. An example of this type would be for a guitar tuner, whereby a single function needs to be processed (turn on the tuner, and then exit when done). “Tap Tempo” type switches act like Quick-­‐Tap IA-­‐Slots. The only process ON messages. However, they also keep time and display the “tap tempo” time in both milliseconds (ms) and beats per minute (BPM) on the main LCD display. Midi devices process tap-­‐tempo in various ways, but the main two ways are to use averaging of 3-­‐5 taps, or to take the last two taps to calculate the time. The LF+ supports both methods. The Global menu has a setting “Tap Tempo Display”—you can set it for either Actual value (tap to tap), or Show Average Value (avg time of last 4 taps). Quick CC Program
MIDI Chan: 01
If you are using an IA-­‐Slot as a simple ON/OFF type of effect control, then we can use the quick CC program utility to have the LF+ do the programming for us. There are two parameters we need to answer, the MIDI channel, and 3 the CC# we will use. You can skip the Quick CC Program utility simply by pressing to skip over the feature. If SAVE you would like to program a quick CC IA-­‐Slot, enter the MIDI Channel and press . It will then ask for CC# SAVE you would like to use. Enter the CC# and press again. At this point you are complete—the LF+ will have programmed the ON and OFF messages for you. You can move on to the next IA-­‐Slot if you don’t need to change the other default parameters. ON 01|EMPTY
00 | No Data
Each IA Slot can trigger up to 20 ON programming commands (See section on Programming Commands for details). Programming commands must be in sequential order. The processing will stop when the first “EMPTY” 66 UP command is found. Press DOWN and buttons to select the command to program. Press SCROLL RIGHT to select the next parameter to edit for the current command position. An Underline will SAVE highlight to current parameter being edited. Remember to press to store your edits. OFF01|EMPTY
00 | No Data
Each IA Slot programmed as Type STOMP or MOMENTARY can trigger up to 20 OFF programming commands when in the Bypass or OFF state. (See section on Programming Commands for details). Programming commands must be in sequential order. The processing will stop when the first “EMPTY” command is found. UP DOWN Press and buttons to select the command to program. Press SCROLL RIGHT to select the next parameter to edit for the current command position. An Underline will SAVE highlight to current parameter being edited. Remember to press to store your edits. Set as Global IA
NO
IA Switches are not global by default. An IA Switch can be “Local” or “Global”. Global IA Switches maintain their state regardless of what preset is triggered. Normally a preset is loaded and has been defined with an initial state for each of the 60 IA Slots. This initialization “overwrites” the current status of an IA Slot and replaces it 67 with the presets settings. Global IA Slots on the other hand ignore the Initial states programmed into a preset and maintain their status and state from preset to preset (unless overridden intentionally at the preset level). Global Init IA State
OFF
Global Init IA State
ON
Global Init IA State
BYPASS
Since Global IA Slots ignore preset initial states, it creates an issue whereby we may want a Global IA slot to have a particular starting point when the controller is powered up. This parameter allows you to select either the OFF, ON or BYPASS state as the starting state for the Global IA Slot. Group ID
000
There are times that IA Slots may need to be “Coordinated”. Groups are used to manage a process whereby only one IA slot in a group can be in the ON state at any given time. If a user triggers a Chorus effect which was “grouped” with a Flanger effect, then it is the job of the controller to shut off the flanger (and all other effects tied to the same group) and allow the Chorus to be the only active “ON” effect. A group can have all connected IA Switches OFF or in BYPASS, but only one of the IA Slots in a group can be ON at any given time. There are seven groups available, By default the group is set to 0, which means the IA Slot is not a part of a group. Groups are defined by coloring the switch. Each group has its own color. The active IA Slot in a group will have a bright color while the inactive effects in the group will have the same color, but will be dimmed. There are two ways that the controller manages group connections. Depending on your equipment, you will need to insure the proper processing. The Global Parameter “Group (Make/Break)” defines the behavior. Simply put, in a “Turn Active On 1st” setting, the controller will processing the ON messages of the IA Slot turning on in a group, and will then process the OFF messages for all the IA Slots that are being forced off because of the grouping requirement. In a “Inactive off 1st” mode, the controller will first turn off all IA Slots that are being forced off, before it processes the ON messages of the IA Slot that was triggered ON in the group. 68 Sync ID
NOT SYNC’D
Sync ID
Liquid Tracks
Sync ID
Liquid Reserved
Sync ID
FRAX FX
By default, an IA Slot is not Sync’d with an external device. Sync’ing an IA Slot has several uses, but primarily is used when you want to link an IA Slot, and effect, and the Auto-­‐Load or Direct Mode control of an external device. Simply put, Syncing information allows the controller to get certain information and synchronize the state of the IA Slot to an external input. For instance, lets say we have an IA Slot that will be handling Delay functions on an AXE-­‐FX. We would set the SYNC ID to “FRAX FX”, and then set the EFFECT ID (parameter below) to the Delay. Auto-­‐load would then load the states for each preset for this IA Slot, and it will also program the IA slot with the proper CC# so that you don’t have to program the switch yourself. Sync Effect
Not Available
The Sync Effect defaults to Not available if the IA Slot is not sync’d. If the Sync ID is set to a device, this parameter will let you select the effect to sync with based on the available effects of the external device known to the LF+ Controller. 69 Sync Eff Type
Sync w/ Effect
If using an Axe-­‐FX II or other device that supports in preset multi-­‐options (called X/Y in Axe-­‐FX II), then you can let the LF+ know if this particular IA-­‐Slot will be syncing to the effect itself, or to the X/Y selection of the effect within the preset. LF+ supports both types of sync features. On Color
Green (Bright)
(ON color for this IA Slot) OFF Color
OFF
(OFF color for this IA Slot) Bypass Color
Red (Bright)
(Bypass color for this IA Slot) Blocked Color
Red (Bright)
(Blocked color for this IA Slot) IA Slots default to GREEN for ON, RED for BYPASSED and OFF for the off state. You will update these parameters to customize the IA Slot to your liking. Recall Type
Don’t Recall on Boot
Recall Type
Remember Last Step
IA Switches have the ability to maintain their “Step State”. By default an IA Slot will not recall its last step state when power cycled. All IA Slots will begin on Step 1 for IA Slots with Steps. If “Remember Last Step” is selected, then during power-­‐up, the IA Slot will reconfigure itself to its last known processing state. 70 Edit Step Names
1:[Step#001]
Edit Step Names
2:[Step#002]
Edit Step Names
3:[Step#003]
Edit Step Names
4:[Step#004]
If an IA Slot will utilize STEP commands, then you can create custom names that will show up on the main LCD, and will also show on the button LCD for the IA Slot. This will come in handy should you have for instance a preset that triggers a delay effect with 0%, 25%, 50% and 75% mix values. In this example, perhaps your step names would be “DLY: 0%” for Step 1, “DLY: 25%” for Step 2, “DLY: 50%” for Step 3 and “DLY: 75%” for Step 4. The display will tell you what step you are on as you trigger the IA Slot. Good labeling goes a long way to keep things simple while you’re performing. 71 Global Menu MAIN: [SEL] Function
Mode
MENU MAIN: [SEL] Function
Global
, press
MENU RIGHT , press
SELECT until Button Hold Time
01.0 Seconds
Button Delay
141
72 This Parameter defines the time a button must be held to trigger a 2nd function (if defined). The Status 2 LED will blink every ½ second as reference. See the Editing Page section of the user guide Button delay defines a time delay between button presses. The default settings provides an average delay. If you find the controller does not process your multiple presses fast enough, make the value lower. If the system is processing too fast, increase this number. Sync Mode
OFF
Sync ID
000
Start of Button Map
01
Is Net End Device?
NO
Sysex ID
124
MIDI channel
16
Can be set to OFF, MASTER, MIDI Master/Expander, or Expander Only. By default the controller is set to OFF. Follow the directions on setting up a network to determine the proper setting for your controller. If multiple controllers are connected together in a network, you will need to assign a unique ID to each unit. Defines what Page button will be assigned to physical button #1 on the controller. This should normally be set to 1, but if using the controller as an expander, you may need to set this to 13, 25,36, or 48 depending on the layout. This parameter only needs modification if an add-­‐on module instructs you to. Defines the SYSEX ID of this controller. The default is 124. Defines the receiving MIDI channel for this controller. This value is needed if MIDI control messages are going to be sent by external sequencers or other equipment that is controlling IA Slot states, program changes, etc… 73 EXPRESSION PEDAL PROGRAMMING IS DEFINED BELOW Select EXP Pedal
01 | Continuous
EXP Auto Calibrate
01 | NO
Block Preset Save
NO
MIDI THRU
NO
74 Expression pedals typically have calibrations completed during setup. The LF+ does this as described in the section below, however, if EXP Auto Calibrate is turned on for a particular expression pedal, then when the unit powers on, it will calibrate the pedal in real-­‐time. It is recommended that you rock the expression pedal from top to bottom at least once. It will then be calibrated. This allows the exchange of pedals randomly without the need to re-­‐calibrate. Each of the 4 expression pedals can be set for auto-­‐calibration separately. Buttons Triggering Presets allow the user to hold the preset button for 3 seconds, at which time the preset will automatically trigger a “save/Copy” feature. Allowing the user to save the currently active preset to the current position, or to a new preset location (effectively making a copy). This feature is important is it will save the current IA States into the preset. So you could use this feature during “setup”, whereby a single preset is modified and then saved to an alternate location. Setting this parameter to YES will stop this feature from working. Which maybe desired in a performance when stepping on a preset maybe habit. The MIDI OUT connector has the ability to transmit the data coming into the controller via the MIDI – IN connector. Set this to YES should you desire a MIDI THRU functionality. Normally this should be set to NO. Default Page
01 |3 Pre + 6 IA
Allow MIDI CMDS
NO
Force Resend IA’s
NO
Group (Make/Break)
Turn Active On 1st
Show Bypass as Off
NO
Defines the Default Page to Load during Power-­‐up, and will also be used if a “GLOBAL PAGE” button is triggered. Set to YES if you need to accept incoming MIDI commands to change the controllers preset, or receive CC messages to control IA triggers. This is not to be used for Syncing. When set to YES, it will override individual Preset settings and resend all of the IA’s messages each time a preset is triggered. Reference “IA Slots” section for details on grouping and this feature. When set to Turn Active on 1st, the controller will send the ON commands of an IA Slot prior to sending OFF messages for any other IA Slots within the group. If set to “Inactive off 1st”, the controller will first process the OFF messages of the IA Slots the group is shutting off prior to sending the ON messages of the IA Slot that triggered the group processing. While IA Slots each have individual color controls for their ON, OFF, and BYPASS states, it maybe desirable to force all BYPASS states to simply follow the color scheme defined for the OFF state. 75 CLR LCD when Off
NO
Allow OFF IA Process
NO
Block Pre 2nd Press
NO
MIDI Offset State
01 | NO
76 On expanders or the 12+ model, LCD’s provide information above each button. If this parameter is set to YES, the controller will clear the information when an IA Slot is off. By Default the data will show and the background will be the color set in the IA Slot. When set to YES, the controller will block presets from resending IA Slot commands for all IA Slots that are in the OFF state. When set to NO, presets will follow the rules set within their own parameters. See PRESET section for more details. When set to NO, a user can press and repress a Preset button and it will continue to trigger. This is required if STEPS are programmed. Should you want to block all presets from processing consecutive time the button is pressed, then set this parameter to YES. Some MIDI devices begin their presets at a value of 0, and typically go from 0-­‐127. Other MIDI devices begin at 1, and go from 1 to 128. For each MIDI channel, you can set the Offset. This will allow you program MIDI commands following PC (Program Change) messages that follow the external devices values without being off by 1. Makes editing and programming easier. MIDI Channels usually have a single device attached to it that will be controlled by the LF+. To make programming easier, giving MIDI channels a name (usually of the device MIDI Chan Names
01 | [MIDI -01]
Special CMD Scroll
Independent Scroll
Pre Active Color
Purple (Dim)
Pre InActive Color
Purple (Bright)
connected), the selection of MIDI Channels can be done with common names. Further, there are several RESERVED names that have alternate functionality. “AXE-­‐FX” should be used if an AXE-­‐FX Ultra is connected to the midi channel. “AXE-­‐FX2” should be used if an AXE-­‐FX II is plugged in. This is used for Auto-­‐Load and Direct Control mode. “ECLIPSE” should be used if an eventide is plugged in. For these reserved names, the Program Change system will automatically handle bank selection for you. There are two mode of operation for BANK, PRESET, SONG, SET-­‐LIST and PAGE UP/DOWN commands. By Default, “Follow User Change” is selected, which will update the current value of these Button functions when user changes are made (preset selection, midi programming, etc…). When set to “Independent Scroll”, each of these button types will remain independent from any other input. Changes made to these buttons will be triggered when a Scroll trigger or a “SELECT/ENTER” trigger is encountered. This provides the ability to “ARM” banks, songs, set-­‐lists, pages and presets. This defines the Active color for Presets. When a Preset is currently selected, it will be displayed with this color. This defines the inActive color for Presets. When a Preset is currently not selected and active, it will be displayed with this color. 77 Block Menu Combo
No
Block Page Combo
No
Block Preset Combo
No
Button LCD Line2
Active Func Displays
Tap Tempo Display
Show Actual Value
78 By default, pressing B2 + B3 together will enter the menu system. If you choose to disable this combination, then set this parameter to Yes. By default, pressing B10 + B11 on 12,12+,Pro+ (or B2 + B6 on the JR+) together will enter the page selection menu. If you choose to disable this combination, then set this parameter to Yes. By default, pressing B1 + B5 together will enter the Preset selection system. If you choose to disable this combination, then set this parameter to Yes. For controllers that use LCD screens above each button, you can set the behavior of the display. By default, all the information related to the active feature on the button is displayed using both LCD lines. If you set this parameter to “2nd Func on 2nd Line”, then you will see the nickname of the active function on the top line, and the name of the current second function on the second line. When using an IA-­‐Slot set as Tap-­‐Tempo, each press of the IA-­‐
Slot will display the delay time in the main LCD. You can use this parameter to set the displayed time. The default “Show Actual Value” will display the time between the last two presses. Setting this parameter to “Show Average Value” will MAIN LCD Contrast
050 CONTRASTCONTRAST
PAGE LCD Contrast
000
LED Dim Level
067
CMD CLRS:MENU
Yellow (Dim)
display the tap-­‐tempo average over the last 4 presses. MIDI effects units that accept tap-­‐tempo have different ways of calculating the tap value. LF+ supports both methods. (don’t forget that an IA-­‐Slot set as Tap-­‐Tempo still requires you to program the midi commands for the effects unit. Allows the user to set the contrast for the main LCD. Allows the 12+ to set the contrast of the LCD’s located above each of the buttons. This setting is used by the MODEL 12 to set the contrast for add-­‐on modules. Allows the user to lower or increase the brightness level of the LED/LCD’s to define a “Dim” level. Every special function available and assignable to a Page button Function is capable of having its own color. Scroll through this parameter to find the function you want to modify. By default, all functions are Yellow (Dim). 79 EXPRESSION PEDAL PROGRAMMING Select EXP Pedal
01 | Continuous
This set of parameters allows you to program each of the four built in expression pedal ports. With the screen above, UP DOWN SCROLL RIGHT press and to select the expression pedal port you wish to edit. Press when ready. Next you will need to select the type of expression pedal port you want to setup. Most expression pedal ports operate as Continuous controllers, thus it is the default type. The following is a list of the supported expression pedal programming types available: Continuous pedals are those that transmit a value to a CC#. EXP Pedal Type
Examples of this are Volume and WAH pedals. Once you establish 01 | Continuous
the MIDI chan and the CC# to process, you are complete. The Controller will do the rest. Latch pedals act as ON/OFF switches. When first pressed, the pedal will send an ON message (value=127) to the CC# programmed. EXP Pedal Type
When the pedal is pressed again, it will send an OFF message 01 | Latch
(value=0). Typically a properly wired stomp switch would be attached, however, a pedal could still be used. Momentary pedals act just like a Latch, except that the ON message is sent and the pedal waits for the user to let go of the EXP Pedal Type
button. Once released, the OFF message is sent. 01 | Momentary
80 EXP Pedal Type
01 | Single Shot
EXP Pedal Type
01 | Broadcast
Trigger IA Will turn an IA switch ON EXP Pedal Type
01 | Trigger IA
Toggle IA type allows an external switch to toggle an IA Slot. EXP Pedal Type
01 | Toggle IA
EXP Pedal Type
01 | Button Press
EXP Pedal Type
01 | 2 Button Press
Single Shot pedals simply send an ON message and end once a pedal is activated. This is typically done with a properly attached switch. Broadcast type is a special use—it will send a value to ALL 16 MIDI channels. Button Press type allows an external switch to control a button on the page just as if that button was on the top of the controller. It is a way to add additional button control via external switches. 2 Button Press type is similar to a Button Press in that it does the same thing, however, this type allows 2 buttons to be connected to the LF+ expression pedal port. This allows you to control 2 different buttons that you assign to a single expression pedal port. This mode requires a properly wired 2 button switch (see the section on Expression Pedal wiring). 81 SCROLL RIGHT Press to move to the next parameter. Once an expression pedal type is selected, you will be given a parameter screen to enter the values. MIDI Channel, CC# will be requested. MIDI Channel
01 | 000
CC#
01 | 000
SCROLL RIGHT Press to move to the next parameter. Once an expression pedal type is selected, you will be given a parameter screen to enter the values. MIDI Channel, CC# will be requested. EXP Calibrate
********************
SCROLL RIGHT Press to move to the next parameter. The Calibration screen will now show. Move the expression pedal from TOP to BOTTOM three times. If a properly wired switch is connected, press it three times. SAVE You should notice the scroll bar moving to confirm the pedals flow. Press to save your settings. SAVE Continue to press to store all your settings. You can now go to the top of this section to program the remainder of the used expression pedals. 82 Utility Menu MAIN: [SEL] Function
Mode
MENU MAIN: [SEL] Function
Utility
, press
MENU RIGHT , press
SELECT until FIRMWARE LOADING Load Firmware
Load Firmware
DO NOT USER THIS FEATURE IF YOU ARE PROCESSNG A NORMAL FIRMWARE UPGRADE VIA THE EDITOR. MAKE SURE YOU ARE NOT IN THE MENU SYSTEM AND SELECT FIRMWARE LOAD FROM THE FILE MENU. IF YOU HAVE A NEED TO UPGRADE VIA MIDI, THEN YOU WILL USE THIS FEATURE. DO NOT UNPLUG THE LF+, PRESS ANY BUTTONS, OR DISCONNECT THE POWER DURING THIS PROCESS. YOU COULD DAMAGE THE UNIT DURING THIS PROCESS IF POWER IS LOST. ALWAYS MAKE A BACKUP USING THE MIDI DUMP FEATURE, OR VIA THE PC/MAC EDITOR PRIOR TO AN UPGRADE. Firmware is provided from time to time via download from the website (www.FAMCmusic.com). When the controller is powered up, a welcome screen will tell you the Model of hardware, along with the current version of firmware. Compare this to the latest version available. If a newer version (greater firmware version #), then it is usually recommended that you download the file and do a firmware upgrade. 83 Liquid-Foot+ Series
MODEL 12+ V1.68
MODEL (12+) Firmware Version # (v1.68) SELECT Press to let the controller prepare to receive and process a firmware update. Wait for: Waiting For Firmware
Send firmware file via MIDI. If successfully read, it will automatically update the device and then restart itself. EXTERNAL AUTO LOAD External Auto-Load
External Device Load
This utility allows the automatic capture and programming of compatible external devices. For instance, if you are using an AXE-­‐FX Ultra or II, the LF+ controller can automatically grab preset names, Effects bypass states (IA Slot Syncing), and more. This utility will walk you through the prompts to setup and process an auto load. MAKE SURE of the following: 1. The attached device must have both MIDI IN and MIDI out connections made with the Liquid-­‐Foot Controller. 2. Make sure the external device is set to send TUNER Sysex Data only (specifically no clock data is allowed during programming) 3. Make sure to program your IA Slots with SYNC and SYNC EFFECT parameters set applicable 84 MEMORY BACKUP / SNAPSHOTS The LF+ Series have the ability to Store a snapshot of the current configuration into protected area. This memory can be “recalled” to overwrite the active memory, or swapped back and fourth. This allows for A/B testing of a good configuration, and new configuration being created. It is up to the user to determine and remember which configurations are where. The system will not track A or B, it will just save, restore or swap based on your request. MIDI dumps, transfers and editing work are only handled with the Active memory area and will not impact, protect or otherwise see the storage area. It is plausible to download a certain configuration into the controller. Then Create a snapshot. Then Load another configuration into the controller. Effectively you now have two setups, which when “Swap CURRENT/Stored” is used, will allow A/B’ing of two setups. While you can only access the Active data while running in an operating mode-­‐ it does effectively allow multiple configurations on the fly if required. The MEMORY functions are: Make Memory Snapshot
[SEL] to Program
Restore the Snapshot
[SEL] to Program
Swap Current/Stored
[SEL] to Program
Erasing the Memory Erase MEMORY
[SEL] to Program
85 You will be asked two (2) times if you would like to erase the memory. After the second time, the controller will erase all data in the active memory system (not the storage/snapshot area), and will load default settings to all the databases (Preset, Song, Set-­‐List, Pages, Sysex Messages, Global Settings, etc…) IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT YOU POWER CYCLE AFTER AN ERASE. FULL MIDI DUMP
[SEL] to Program
If you are making a MIDI based backup, then load your MIDI software. Prepare it to receive Sysex dump. When the SELECT software is ready, then press to begin the FULL MIDI DUMP. Store the file in a safe location as it is your backup of the entire controller’s active memory information. If a system restore is required, this file will be used. This utility function will transmit the information out of the MIDI-­‐OUT port. Make sure the computer’s MIDI input cable is connected to the MIDI-­‐
OUT connector of the controller. 86 Sysex Menu Each Sysex message may consist of data from one to sixteen (1-­‐16) bytes. Typically Sysex messages are data commands placed between a header (F0) and footer (F7). In the rare case whereby you have Sysex messages requiring more than 16 bytes, you can link messages together to lengthen the amount of bytes sent. In the case whereby you want to send more than one Sysex at the same time, you can either program multiple SYSEX triggers in the Programming Commands, or you can simply link the SYSEX messages together. Either way will accomplish the same task. Up to 16 Sysex messages can be linked together in a daisy chain format (1 to 2, 2 to 10, 10 to 4, 4 to 15, etc…). The order of the linking is defined within the SYSEX message (see below). MAIN: [SEL] Function
Mode
MENU MAIN: [SEL] Function
Sysex
, press
MENU RIGHT , press
SELECT until Selecting a Sysex Select Sysex
001: SYSEX MSG #001
UP The Sysex menu will allow you to select a Sysex to (1) Edit, or (2) Copy/Paste. Use the DOWN and SELECT buttons to select the Sysex to Edit or Copy. Press when ready to edit. 87 Copy/Paste SCROLL Press to begin Copy/Paste. The first time pressed, you will see “(COPY)” on the screen. Use the UP DOWN and SCROLL buttons to select the new location. Press again to make a copy in the EXIT new location (press to cancel the copy operation from continuing). Editing the Sysex Parameters MENU LEFT MENU RIGHT For the remaining Sysex parameters to edit, use the and buttons to scroll back and fourth between the settings available. Use the various other lighted buttons to process the editing of the current parameter on the screen. SAVE Press
after each and every change you wish to keep, or it will not commit to memory and your modification will be lost. Always save your changes prior to changing parameters. Edit Full Name
[SYSEX MSG #001
]
Edit the full name following the User Guide section on “Editing Names”. The full name is used in certain menu commands and is also displayed on the top of the LCD when a preset is active. Edit Nick Name
[SYX-#001]
Edit the nick name following the User Guide section on “Editing Names”. Nick names are used in various menu system prompts and certain special commands. 88 Set Sysex Link #
000 |
A link code of 000 (default) means that this SYSEX message is not linked, and will not trigger any further messages after it sends its message. Otherwise, select a valid Sysex message to link to. If you link a Sysex message to itself, it will loop for 16 iterations before it exists. This is NOT recommended under any circumstances. For each Sysex message, we need to program from 1 to 16 bytes of data. Each byte can have a value from 0 to 7F (hex) UP or 0-­‐127 (DEC). This is done by programming one byte at a time. Using the SCROLL LEFT DOWN and buttons SCROLL RIGHT will select the byte to program. Pressing the or buttons will increase or decrease the data value stored. The display will show the value in both HEX and DEC format. Leave all unused bytes at a value of 0. SAVE DO NOT FORGET TO PRESS MSG
01 |
BYTE # being Edited after each modified byte before moving to the next. Hex:00 Dec:000
VALUE TO STORE 89 MIDI Implementation FEATURE MIDI COMMAND DATA NOTES PRESET MESSAGES BANK CHANGE PROGRAM CHANGE TRIGGER IA ON TRIGGER IA OFF TRIGGER IA BYPASS TRIGGER IA TOGGLE PRESS PAGE FUNCTION #1 PRESS PAGE FUNCTION #2 MTC STOP / PLAY MTC CANCEL (EXIT) MODE CC#0 PC# CC# 1 CC# 2 CC# 3 CC# 4 CC# 5 CC# 6 CC# 7 CC# 8 0, 1, 2 0-­‐127 1-­‐60 1-­‐60 1-­‐60 1-­‐60 1-­‐60 1-­‐60 0, 127 0-­‐127 0 = Bank A, 1 = Bank B, 2 = Bank C Change to preset 0-­‐127 0= STOP command, 127=PLAY Any value will exit MTC MODE * Global “Allow MIDI CMD” must be set to YES for these commands to be accepted and processed
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