SVl-600 WELDING POWER SUPPLY

SVl-600 WELDING POWER SUPPLY
F-11-889-C
INSTRUCTIONS for
F-11-889-C
April, 1980
SVI-600
WELDING POWER SUPPLY
DC AMMETER
DC VOLTMETER
VOLTAGE
INDICATOR
SLOPE INDICATOR
LIFTING RING READY-OFF
CONTROL SWITCH
MAIN POWER
"ON" LAMP — Ч ge
ENTRANCE FOR | 4
WELDING OUTPUT | =
CONNECTIONS -
SLOPE CONTROL
HANDWHEEL
VOLTAGE CONTROL
HANDWHEEL
INDUCTANCE
ADJUSTMENT
REMOTE CONTROL ‹
RECEPTACLE
{On Keor Panel)
AUX. 115 Vv. DUPLEX ‹
RECEPTACLE
(On Rear Panel)
HEAVY DUTY STEEL /
CHANNEL BASE
NOTE: For a listing of changes which necessitated
reprinting of this booklet, refer to page 13.
LOUVERED AIR INTAKE
These INSTRUCTIONS are for experienced operators. If you are
not fully familiar with the principles of operation and safe practices
for electric welding equipment, we urge you to read Linde's free
booklet, “Precautions and Safe Practices for Electric Welding and
Cutting,” Form 52-529. Do NOT permit untrained persons to install,
operate, or maintain this equipment. Do NOT attempt to install or
operate this equipment until you have read and fully understand
these instructions. If you do not fully understand these instructions,
contact your supplier for further information. Be sure to read the
Safety Precautions on page 2 hefore installing or operating this
equipment.
I. INTRODUCTION
A. DESCRIPTION
The SVI-600 (P/N 672641) is a three-phase, constant-
potential, transformer/rectifier type d.c. power supply with
continuously adjustable slope, voltage and inductance
controls. Although designed for mig applications, particu-
larly short arc welding, complete flexibility permits this
power source to be used for many other welding processes
within its range of operation. Because its operating charac-
teristics are individually adjustable, this power supply is
specifically tailored to provide high quality welding for all
mig short arc and spray arc, all cored wire, and many sub-
merged arc applications.
The SVI type power supply can be set, within its current
and voltage range, to the most ideal arc characteristics for
any specific application. Slope is continuously adjustable
from flat to steep and it is possible to approach the slope of
Be sure this information reaches the operator.
You can get extra copies through your supplier.
SPECIFICATIONS
Rated Output
100% Duty Cycle
600 amp. @ 37.5 volts d.c.
13 to 47 voits d.c. @ 20 amps. *
5 to 37.5 volts d.c. @ 600 amps. *
(Derate output voltage 10% for
208 volt input.)
115 volts a.c., 15 amps., 60 Hz.
208-230/460 voltsa.c., 60 Hz., 3 ph.
80 amps, — 208-230 volts, a.c.
40 amps @ 460 volts, a.c.
Output Voltage
for 230/460
volt input
Auxiliary Qutput
Input Voltage
Input Current
at Rated Load
Power Factor
at Rated Load
98% or better*
Dimensions
Width 30-1/8-in. (765 mm)
Depth 42-in. (1067 mm}
Height 35-1/8-in. (892 mm)
Weight 955 pounds (433 kg)
*Will decrease when slope control is used.
a constant current type power supply if desired. Voltage
control is variable over a wide range, Continuously variable
inductance provides precise control of the circuit response
and therefore control of puddle characteristics, frequency
of short circuiting in short arc welding, and spatter,
The power supply operates from either a 230-volt or
460-volt a.c. primary input without affecting its rated
output of 600 amperes at 37.5 volts d.c., continuous duty.
The unit may also be operated from a 208-volt primary;
however, when connected to this input, the maximum
output voltage will decrease approximately 10%. Refer to
Specification Table for additional information.
As shown on the front-cover illustration, the front-panel
elements of the power supply include the following basic
features.
1. Ready (On) - Off toggle switch that controls 230-volt
power to the fan motor and 115-volt auxiliary power to
the remote control receptacle, Tl terminal block, the
auxiliary power outlet, and the main contactor.
2. A Voltage Adjustment handwheel which provides full
range control of voltage prior to or during welding. An
indicator, indexed from O through 10, provides a conven-
tent reference for resetting and adjusting this handwheel.
WELDING
1111158 PRODUCTS
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
WARNING: These Safety Precautions are for your protection. Before
performing any installation or operating procedures, be sure to read and
follow the safety precautions listed below. Failure to observe these
Safety Precautions can result in personal injury or death.
1.
PERSONAL PROTECTION - - Skin and eye burns resulting from
body exposure to the electric-arc welding rays or hot metal can be
more severe than sunburn. Therefore:
a. Use a proper face shield fitted with the correct filter and cover
plates to protect your eyes, face, neck and ears from sparks and
rays of the welding arc when welding or observing welding.
WARN bystanders not to watch the arc and not expose them-
selves to the wedling-arc rays or to hot metal.
b. Wear flameproof gauntlet type gloves, heavy long-sleeve shirt,
cuffless trousers, high-topped shoes and a welding helmet or cap
for hair protection to protect the skin from arc rays and hot
sparks or hot metal. A flameproof apron may also be desirable
as protection against radiated heat and sparks.
с. Hot sparks or metal can lodge in rolled up sleeves, trouser cuffs
or pockets. Sleeves and collars should be kept buttoned, and
pockets eliminated from the front of clothing.
d. Protect other nearby personnel from arc rays and hat sparks
with a suitable non-flammable partition.
e. Always wear safety glasses or goggles when in a welding area.
Use safety glasses with side shields or goggles when chipping slag
or grinding. Chipped slag is hot and may travel considerable
distances. Bystanders should also wear safety glasses or goggles.
FIRE PREVENTION - - Hot slag, or sparks can cause serious fires
when in contact with combustible solids, liquids or gases. There-
fore:
a. Remove all combustible materials well away from the welding
area or completely cover the materials with a non-flammable
covering. Such combustible materials include wood, clothing,
sawdust, gasoline, kerosene, paints, solvents, natural gas, acety-
lene, propane and similar combustible articles.
b. Hot sparks or hot metal can fall into cracks in floors or wall
openings and cause a hidden smouldering fire. Make certain tha
such openings are protected from hot sparks and metal.
с. Do not weld, cut or perform other hot work on used barrels,
drums, tank or other containers until they have been completely
cleaned so that there are no substances in the container which
might produce flammable or toxic vapors.
d. For fire protection, have fire extinguishing equipment handy for
instant use, such as a garden hose, water pail, sand bucket or
portable fire extinguisher.
e. After completion of welding, inspect the wark area to make cer-
tain there are no hot sparks or hot metal which could cause a
later fire,
f. For additional information, refer to NFPA Standard 51В, "Fire
Prevention in Use of Cutting and Welding Processes”, which is
available from the National Fire Protection Association, 470
Atlantic Ave., Boston, MA 02210.
ELECTRICAL SHOCK - - Voltages of 110 volts or less can cause
severe burns to the body or fatal shock. Severity of electrical shock
is determined by the path and amount of current through the body,
Therefore:
a. Never allow live metal parts to touch bare skin or any wet
clothing. Be sure gloves are dry.
b. When standing on metal or welding in a damp area, make certain
that you are well insulated by wearing dry gloves and rubber-
soled shoes and standing on a dry board or platform.
c. Always ground the welding machine by connecting a ground
wire between the machine and a good electrical ground.
d. Do not use worn or damaged welding cables. Do not overload
the cable, Use well maintained equipment.
e. When not welding, turn off the equipment. Accidental ground-
ing can cause overheating and create a fire hazard. Do not coil
or toop the welding cable around parts of the body.
f. Be sure the ground cable is connected to the workpiece as
close to the welding area as possible. Grounds connected to
building framework or other remote locations from the welding
area increase the possibility of the welding current passing
through lifting chains, crane cables or various electrical paths,
g. Keep everything dry, including clothing, work area, welding
cables, electrode holder and welding machine. Fix water leaks
immediately,
h. Refer to AWS Standard 249.1 in Item 6 below for specific
grounding recommendations.
4. VENTILATION - - Welding fumes, particularly in confined spaces,
can cause discomfort and physical harm if breathed over an extend-
ed period of time, Therefore:
a. At all times provide adequate ventilation in the welding area by
natural ventilation or mechanical ventilation means. Do not weld
an galvanized, zinc, lead, beryllium or cadmium materials unless
positive mechanical ventilation is provided to prevent breathing
fumes from these materials.
b. Do not weld in locations close to chlorinated hydrocarbon va-
pors coming from degreasing or spraying operations. The heat or
arc rays can react with solvent vapors to form phosgene, a highly
toxic gas, and other irritant gases.
с. If you develop momentary eye, nose or throat irritation during
welding, this is an indication that ventilation is not adequate.
Stop work and take necessary steps to improve ventilation in the
welding area. Do not continue to weld if physical discomfort
persists,
d. Refer to AWS Standard Z49.1 in Нет 6 for specific ventilation
recommendations.
EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE - - Faulty or improperly maintained
welding equipment can result in poor welding work, but most im-
portantly it can cause physical injury or death through fires or
electrical shock, Therefore:
a. Alwayshave qualified personnel perform the installation, trouble-
shooting and maintenance work on the welding machine. Do not
perform any electrical work on the welding machine unless you
are qualified to perform such work,
b. Before performing any maintenance work inside the welding
machine, disconnect the machine from the electrical power
SOUrce,
с. Maintain welding cables, grounding wire and connections, power
cord and welding machine in safe working order. Do not operate
the welding machine or equipment in a faulty condition.
d. Do not abuse the welding machine or accessory equipment. Keep
the equipment away from heat sources such as furnaces, wet
conditions such as water puddles, oil or grease, corrosive atmos-
pheres and inclement weather.
e. Keep all safety devices and cabinet covers in position and in
good repair.
f. Use the welding machine for its intended purpose and do not
modify it in any manner.
ADDITIONAL SAFETY INFORMATION - - For more information
on safe practices for setting up and operating electric welding equip-
ment and on good working habits, ask for a free copy of Linde's
“Precautions and Safe Practices for Electric Welding and Cutting”,
Form 52-529, Refer to the National Fire Prevention Association
INFPA) Standard 51B for “Fire Prevention in use of Cutting and
Welding Processes.” The following publications which are available
from the American Welding Society, 2501 N.W. 7th Street, Miami,
FL 32125, are recommended to you:
a. “Safety in Welding and Cutting' - AWS Z49.1 (ANSI).
b. “Recommended Safe Practices for Gas-Shielded Are Welding’
- AWS A6.1
c. “Safe Practices for Welding and Cutting Containers That Have
Held Combustibles” - AWS A6G.O.
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3. A Slope Adjustment handwheel which provides full range
contro] of the slope for the power supply. An indicator,
indexed from O through 10, provides a convenient refer-
ence for resetting and adjusting this handwheel.
4. A Continuously Adjustable Inductor Control knob for
regulating inductance either before or during the welding
operation. The inductor is equipped with two manually
connectable taps which provide two ranges of induct-
ance to suit various welding applications. Refer to
Section ||, Paragraph Е.
5. A Pilot Lamp is provided that glows when primary
power is applied to the power supply.
6. A Voltmeter (0-50 volts d.c.) and an ammeter (0-800
amps. d.c.) provide a direct and continuous indication of
open circuit and welding voltages and welding current.
7. Welding Cable Connections are safely located inside the
cabinet to prevent accidental contact.
On the rear panel of the power supply (Figure 7), a stan-
dard seven-pin control receptacle is provided for connection
to a remote welding control and wire feeder assembly. Also
rear-panel mounted are the 115-volt auxiliary power duplex
receptacle and the 15-amp. control circuit fuse holder.
The internal components of the power supply include a
primary power input terminal board; a three-phase auto-
transformer (with an auxiliary 115-volt single phase control
winding); a variable transformer for adjusting voltage
output; a variable reactor for controlling the slope of the
volts vs ampere characteristic curve; a step-down transform.
er for transforming high voltage a.c. input to low voltage
a.c. output; a fuse-link protected bridge rectifier assembly
for rectification of a.c. input to d.c. welding current: and a
continuously adjustable inductor assembly to control the
rate of welding current rise. Note that an optional inductor
bypass assembly kit may be installed to provide easier
welding starts for certain applications (see Section II-G,
Optional Features).
This power supply is designed with a low center of gravity
for ease in moving and handling. Sufficient clearance and
reinforcement at the base permit lifting with a fork-lift
truck; a pair of eyebolts provided on the top cover permits
lifting with a crane or hoist.
B. VOLT-AMPERE CHARACTERISTICS
The volt-ampere curves shown in Figure 1 are used to
represent the static output characteristics for the power
supply. The slant of these curves is referred to as the slope’
and is generally defined as the ‘voltage drop per 100 am-
peres of current rise.” These curves show the open-circuit
voltage available at any given output current for the mini-
mum and maximum settings of the combined voltage and
slope controls. Values for other settings will fall between
the minimum and maximum curves. The static volt-ampere
slope is not affected by the inductor rheostat setting.
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0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600
D.C. QUTPUT CURRENT (AMPERES)
Fig. 1 - Volt Ampere Curve, SV1-600
Il. INSTALLATION
Proper installation can contribute materially to satisfactory
and trouble-free operation of the welding machine. It is
suggested that each step in this section be studied carefully
and followed as closely as possible.
A. UNPACKING AND PLACEMENT
1. Immediately upon receipt of the power supply, it should
be inspected for damage which may have occured in
transit. Notify the carrier of any defects or damage at
once.
2. Carefully remove the power supply from the shipping
container. Do not use any lever device that might
damage the machine. Check the container for any loose
parts. Remove all packing materials.
3. Check air passages at front and rear of cabinet for any
packing materials that may obstruct air flow through the
power supply.
4. If the machine is not to be installed immediately, store it
in a clean, dry, well-ventilated area.
5. The location of the welding machine should be carefully
selected to insure satisfactory and dependable service.
Using the lifting eyebolts, or a fork-lift truck, place the
power supply in the desired location. Choose a location
relatively close to a properly fused source of electrical
power.
6. The machine components are maintained at proper
operating temperatures by forced air which is drawn
through the cabinet by the fan unit on the rear panel.
Locate the machine in an open area where air can
circulate freely at front and rear openings. Leave at least
two feet of clearance between the rear of the power
supply and wall or other obstruction. The area around
the unit should be relatively free of dust, fumes and
excessive heat. It is desirable to locate the unit so the
cover can be removed easily for cleaning and mainte-
nance.
B. PRIMARY (INPUT) ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS
+ + + + + WARNING + + + + *
Precautionary measures should be taken to provide maxi-
mum protection against electrical shock. Be sure that all
power is off by opening the line {wall} disconnect switch
when primary electrical connections are made to the power
supply.
This welding power supply is a three-phase unit and must
be connected to a three-phase power line. If possible, the
power supply should be operated on a separate circuit to
assure that performance of the machine is not impaired
by reduced line voltage due to an overloaded circuit.
1. A line disconnect switch, with fuses or circuit breakers,
should be provided at the main power panel (see Figure
3). The primary power input should have four conductors
(three power leads and one ground wire). The wires may
be heavy rubber-covered cable, or may be run in a solid
or flexible conduit. Refer to the following table for
recommended input conductors and line fuse sizes.
2. For access to input terminal board remove the screws
securing the side panel on the left side of the power
supply cabinet.
Recommended Sizes
For Input Conductors And Line Fuses
Rated Input Input Fuse | Ground
Conductor Size Wire
Volts Amps AWG Amps AWG
208 80 3 125 3
230 80 3 125 3
460 40 8 60 8
NOTE: Local code requirements should be followed
if they specify sizes other than those listed above.
3. Thread the input conductor cables from the wall discon-
nect switch through the plastic grommeted hole in the
rear panel (see Figure 3). Secure the cables with the
clamp provided on the chassis base so that tension from
the outside will not be transmitted to the terminal board
panel. Connect conductors to terminals L1, L2 and L3
on the input terminal board, using UL listed pressure
wire connectors. Separate sets of terminals are provided
for 230 and 460 volt inputs (see Figure 2). If a 208
volt input source is used, connect the conductors to the
230 volt terminals. Connect the ground wire to the
grounding lug provided on the chassis base near the
input terminal board. It is of the utmost importance
that the chassis be connected to an approved electrical
ground to prevent accidental shocking.
460 Lt 230
«60 L2 230
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Fig. 2 - Input Terminal Board
C. SECONDARY (OUTPUT) WELDING CONNECTIONS
+ + + + + WARNING + + + + *
Before making any connections to the power supply
output terminais, make sure that all primary input power
to the machine is deenergized (off) at the customer’s
disconnect switch.
Open the left side panel to gain entry to the welding output
terminals inside the power supply. Thread the welding
cables through the two grommeted holes provided on the
top left front panel, and connect them to the output termi-
nal studs located behind the bail. (See reference callout on
Figure 7 for location of these terminals.) It is recommended
that the welding cables be kept as short as possible, and be
of adequate current carrying capacity (4/0 AWG). Make
sure output connector adaptors are clean and tight.
Most mig welding (spray and short arc) is done with reverse
polarity (DCRP). This means that the wire feeder power
cable (electrode) is positive (+) and the workpiece is nega-
tive (-). Weld penetration is deeper with reverse polarity
than with straight polarity.
D. REMOTE CONTROL CONNECTIONS
The 115-volt power for operation of this unit and its asso-
ciated controls is provided by an auxiliary winding of the
autotransformer. As wired, the auxiliary winding will sup-
ply 115 v.a.c. power when the nominal input voltage of the
power supply is 230 or 460 volts (refer to wiring diagram).
In this case the 115-volts is provided from terminals
ATR-A-X 1 and ATR-A-X 2 of the auxiliary winding. When
the nominal input voltage is 208 volts, a minor wiring change
is required to obtain the 115 volts. After making this
change, as outlined below, the 115 volts will be supplied
from terminals ATR-A-X 1 and ATR-A-X 3 of the auxiliary
winding. Modification can be carried out as follows:
1. Disconnect and tape the heavy white wire (from
ATR-A-X 2) attached to terminal PL-1 on the pilot lamp.
Note that another small white wire (from F1-1) is also
attached to this terminal; DO NOT DISCONNECT THIS
WIRE.
Customer's Fused Line Disconnect Switch
CAUTION: Make sure ali input power is
disconnected before performing any
operation inside the power supply.
Customer's Remote Control
Cable Connection To J2
Receptacle, or T1 Terminal Block.
«48 ин = ШО 0НО НН =
Customer's Three
Phase Line Voltage
Connections (Including Ground)
TB Voltage Changeover
Terminal Board.
Cable Clamp
Chassis Ground Connection
T1 Terminal
Block
svi-600% [][]
Jo
er Work Piece (—)
‘Welding Cable {+)
Fig. 3 - Interconnection Diagram
2. Locate heavy red wire (from ATR-A-X 3) in the wire
harness by the pilot lamp and connect it to terminal
PL-1. This completes the modification for 115-volt
control power from a 208-volt primary input power line.
E. POWER SUPPLY AND WIRE FEEDER INTERCON-
NECTING CABLES
A seven-pin remote control receptacle (J2), at the rear of
the power supply, receives a mating connector from a wire
feed control unit. Auxiliary 115-volt power is provided for
operation of the control unit from pins J2-1 and -2 of the
control receptacle and a ‘controlled’ 115-volt circuit is fed
back to receptacle pins J2-2 and -3 to operate the main
contactor coil. As a safeguard, each of these circuits are
interlocked to contacts of the ready-off control switch.
This switch also controls the operation of the cooling fan.
The control receptacle requires one of the following inter-
connecting cables:
1. A 6-ft., 4-cond. Cable, amp to amphenol (P/N 996735)
for connecting to MIG-31, -34, -35.
2. A 25-ft., 4-cond. Extension Cable, amp to amp (P/N
996734).
3. A 10-1t., 4-cond. Cable, amp to amphenol (P/N 996741)
for connecting to Boom Welder.
If preferred, or if the type of wire feeder, control assembly,
or other auxiliary apparatus used do not contain plugs, they
may be connected directly to T1 Terminal Block inside the
power supply (bypassing J2 receptacle). Simply run the
auxiliary apparatus cable through the strain relief fittings
provided (on the rear panel) and connect to Ti terminal
block. Refer to the schematic (Fig. 10) and wiring (Fig. 11)
diagrams for correct connections.
NOTE: The contact pins for J2 receptacle can easily be re-
moved for replacement purposes by using a special
Amp Removal Tool (Amp PIN 91124-1), which
can be purchased locally from an Amp Corp.
distributor.
F. INDUCTANCE RANGE CONNECTIONS
The inductor is equipped with two reconnectable taps
which provide two inductance ranges. The standard low
range tap (X3), provides the inductance for the majority
of carbon steel welding applications. The optional high
range tap (X4), provides the higher inductance required for
welding of stainless and high-carbon steels. The tap termi-
nals are selected by connecting the flexible lead provided in
the unit. Note that, as shipped from the factory, the flexi-
ble lead is connected to the X3 terminal to provide the low
inductance range. If so required, connect the flexible lead
to the X4 terminal.
G. OPTIONAL INDUCTOR BYPASS KIT
This kit assembly (P/N 635164) provides the power supply
with automatic capability for supplying low inductance
for good arc starting and high inductance for stable metal
transfer with little spatter during welding. Additional
information regarding kit components, electrical circuitry,
maintenance and troubleshooting are provided in Linde
instruction booklet Form 11-791.
Mounting holes for installation of this kit are provided on
the right rear side of the chassis base next to the fan shroud
(see Figure 6 right side view).
IH. OPERATION
CAUTION: Never, under any circumstances, operate the
power supply with the cover removed. In
addition to the safety hazard, improper cooling
may cause damage to internal components,
A. DUTY CYCLE
Every Linde power supply has a duty cycle current rating
indicated on the machine nameplate, and listed in the
specification table. The duty cycle of a power supply is that
percentage of a ten minute period at which a machine can
safely operate for a given output current rating. The
SVI-600 is rated at 100 percent. The 100 percent duty
cycle means that the unit may be operated at its rated load
continuously with no adverse effect on the machine.
B. SEQUENCE OF OPERATION
To operate a properly installed SVI-600 power supply
proceed as follows:
1. Make sure you are adequately protected before you start
welding. Welders goggles and gloves should always be
worn,
2. Make sure the welding cables from the output terminals
have been correctly connected and fastened securely.
3. Close the main (wall) disconnect switch or circuit
breaker to provide three-phase power. The main power
pilot lamp will light.
4. Set the voltage control (VTR) and the wire feed speed
potentiometer on the welding control to the positions
which will provide the approximate voltage and current
required for the work to be done.
5. Set the slope control (VSR) to provide the desired
amount of volt-ampere slope at your operating point.
(Minimum slope at ‘0’, maximum slope at ‘10°.)
6. Set the variable inductor (IND) to provide the desired
amount of inductance.
7. Set the ready-off toggle switch to the READY position.
This will start the cooling fan and apply power to the
control circuitry (through the remote control recep-
tacle or TI terminal block}.
8. Operate the torch switch on the welding equipment and
commence welding.
9. Observe the voltmeter, ammeter, and nature of the weld.
If necessary, readjust the slope, voltage, inductance,
and/or current (wire feed potentiometer) as required.
C. EFFECT OF SLOPE, VOLTAGE AND INDUCTANCE
IN MIG WELDING
Short arc welding (short circuit metal transfer) and spray
arc welding (free flight or spray metal transfer) are two
variations of the basic mig (metal inert gas) process. Each
has its own specific requirements and each is best suited for
a particular purpose. Short arc welding operates on generally
lower arc voltages and amperages than spray arc, it also pin-
points the arc heat and produces a small fast freezing weld
puddle. The spray arc method provides an intensely hot,
higher voltage arc and high deposition rates.
The SVI type power supply provides complete control of
Slope (S), Voltage (V) and Inductance (I). The technique of
adjusting an SVI welding power supply, to obtain the best
possible short or spray arc weld, can be learned best by
considering the individual effect of voltage, slope, and
inductance addition on the overall result. The proper
adjustment of all three is necessary to achieve the optimum
in weld quality and power source utility.
1. Effect of Voltage
With the slope set at extreme flat position and the inductor
at minimum setting the unit functions as a straight constant
potential power supply. An erratic, stubbing arc is produced
with excessive spatter, lack of weld puddle fluidity, pro-
nounced freeze lines with a convex weld bead. These short
arc results are typical of constant-potential machines with
relatively flat slope. Increasing the arc voltage gives a vio-
lent puddle, considerable spatter and more fluidity, but
freeze lines are not as prominent, and the welds are slightly
less convex.
2. Effect of Slope
The addition of a substantial amount of down slope to the
straight constant potential operation described in Section
IH-C-1 lowers the short-circuit current, thereby reducing
the violent, explosive action which occurs when a short-
circuit takes place. It also reduces the current variations
accompanying arc length changes. However, if the down
slope is increased too much, the short-circuit current can be
insufficient to start an arc. Because slope affects the operat-
ing point, the open circuit voltage should be increased upon
adding down slope to maintain the same arc voltage used
for the straight constant-potential operation described in
Section [II-C-1,
The arc produced by the addition of down slope to straight
constant potential operation is more stable, with less weld
puddle agitation and spatter. Arc force is reduced, and the
puddle is wider and more fluid. Freeze lines are less pro-
nounced, coalescence to the parent metal is good, and the
weld bead is flatter. If the arc voltage is now lowered
(slope unchanged) the spatter is slightly increased, the
puddle fluidity and wetting are decreased, and the weld
bead is more convex. Increasing the arc voltage (slope
unchanged) decreases arc force, reduces spatter, increases
fluidity and tends to flatten the bead.
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3. Effect of Inductance
The addition of the correct amount of inductance to either
of the operations described in Section I[II-C-1 or 2 will
control the speed of response of the current in the power
supply and produces a very stable arc with minimum arc
force, a more fluid puddle, very little puddle agitation and
almost no spatter. The weld bead will have very fine ripple
formation, concave surface and good coalescence to the
parent metal. Increasing the inductor setting slows the
response of the power supply further and permits softer arc
starts using either flat or steep slope. This method is pre-
ferred over the slope method for short arc welding.
D. SHORT ARC WELDING CONDITIONS
Variables such as the joint fit-up, the composition of the
metal being welded, the welding machine itself, the wire
feed rate and the desired linear welding speed, as well as the
operators individual technique will exert some influence
upon the control settings finally adjudged to provide
optimum results, but these settings can be ascertained by
trial and observation. The correct arc welding current and
voltage settings will not be indicated on the meters until the
actual welding operation is in progress.
The addition of slope (S) reduces the short circuit current
and hence, limits the final amount of pinch force and
spatter. However, it is necessary that sufficient pinch force
be applied by control of slope so that the arc is cleanly
ignited after each short. The optimum slope, as measured
by the short circuit current, for Short-Arc welding varies
with the wire type and diameter.
When the pinch force is applied too rapidly, the spatter will
be great. This can be compared to squeezing an open
toothpaste tube slowly or rapidly. Squeezing rapidly, the
toothpaste is ejected violently; squeezing slowly, it just
oozes out. Greater inductance slows down the rate of
current rise and thereby reduces spatter.
In Short-Arc welding an increase in inductance (I) will
decrease the number of short circuit metal transfers per
second (provided no other changes are made) and increase
the arc energy. The increased arc energy makes the puddle
weiter and more fluid.
A decrease in inductance (I) will increase the number of
short circuits per second and decrease the arc energy. The
decreased arc energy makes the puddle less fluid.
E. SPRAY ARC WELDING CONDITIONS
Spray-arc welding conditions are not nearly as critical as
those for short-arc welding. The inductance control is
primarily useful in obtaining softer arc starts. Trial and
observation should serve adequately to establish optimum
control settings. Sample runs can be made with slope
contro] set at extreme flat position and inductor control at
minimum setting. Additional welds can be made with the
slope control set near the mid-point of the slope range.
From this setting, adjustments can be made in either
direction to obtain the best results.
In spray arc welding the addition of some inductance to an
SVI-power supply will produce a softer, more usable start
without reducing the final amount of current. When slope is
added to reduce the violence of the start by limiting the
short circuit current, it is not possible to get the full con-
stant potential output of the power source. The use of in-
ductance to control Mig spray arc starts permits the opera-
tor to use the full constant potential output of the power
source as required by many Mig spray arc applications.
Figure 4 illustrates how control of the rate of current rise,
by use of the inductor, in a SVI power supply set for con-
stant potential (flat slope) can affect a Mig spray arc start.
When the current rises rapidly, the arc start will be harsh
and, in some cases, the end of the electrode will be blasted
off. When the speed of current rise is reduced by increased
inductance, the start is soft and blasting of the electrode is
minimized or eliminated.
MIN. INDUCTOR
A
fi
=
q 1/60 SEG
CURRENT YS. TIME
MAX. INDUCTOR
и“
= 1/60 SEC.
I
CURRENT VS. TIME
Fig. 4 - Arc Starts
IV. MAINTENANCE AND TROUBLESHOOTING
If this equipment does not operate properly, stop work
immediately and investigate the cause of the malfunction.
Maintenance work must be performed by an experienced
person, and electrical work by a trained electrician. Do not
permit untrained persons to inspect, clean, or repair this
equipment. Use only recommended replacement parts.
A. MAINTENANCE
The mechanical system of the power supply is extremely
simple and requires little maintenance. lt is recommended,
however, that the unit be cleaned and inspected at regular
intervals, the interval depending upon the type of service
and cleanliness of the installation. For average conditions,
an inspection at least twice each year is desirable. The
suggested procedure is as follows:
I. Deenergize the power supply by placing all primary and
control power switches in the OFF position. These
switches should be locked out and tagged if possible.
2. Remove top cover and side panels.
3. Dust and dirt accumulations are one of the main causes
of malfunctions. Therefore, the interior of the power
supply and all air passages should be blown out periodi-
cally with low pressure air.
4, Check all electrical and mechanical connections for
tightness and cleaniiness.
5. The fan motor bearings are permanently lubricated for
life and should not require any attention.
6. Check the variable transformer and slope reactor brushes
and commutator (sliding surfaces) for wear and clean-
liness. The sliding surface of the commutator is [ubri-
cated at the factory with a special protective coating
which should not be removed. If dirt or grime are
present on the exposed windings, wipe with a clean
dry cloth. Resurfacing should not be attempted without
first consulting the factory. DO NOT, UNDER ANY
CIRCUMSTANCES, DRESS THE SLIDING SURFACE
WITH ABRASIVES OF ANY KIND.
7. Inspect drive screws, miter gears and/or chain drive of
brush holder; wipe clean if necessary. Lubrication is not
normally required. If necessary, use a very light machine
oil sparingly. Excessive lubrication can contaminate
brushes, sliding surfaces or windings.
B. TROUBLESHOOTING
If the power supply is operating improperly, the following
troubleshooting information may be used to locate the
source of the trouble.
+ + + + + WARNING + + + + +
Be sure that all three-phase primary power and possible
low voitage {115V) remote contro! power to the machine
have heen deenergized. Open main disconnect switch or
circuit breaker and disconnect seven-pin plug from remote
control receptacle before attempting inspection or work
inside of the power supply.
1. SYMPTOM: No output.
a. No incoming three-phase power.
. Blown line fuse(s).
. Ready-OFF Switch in OFF position.
. Poor connections at output terminals.
Secondary fuse links open.
Contactor fails to close.
mo ao o
2. SYMPTOM: Line fuse blows when main line switch is
closed.
a. Improper line connection.
b. Shorted primary coils.
3. SYMPTOM: Secondary fuse blows when contactor
energizes,
a. Shorted or damaged rectifier diode(s).
b. Shorted output terminals.
4. SYMPTOM: Limited output or low open-circuit voltage.
a. Inadequate three-phase input power.
. Open connection to the power rectifiers,
Poor terminal connection.
. One phase open.
Conductors connected to 460 volt terminals, but
input power is 230 volts.
One of secondary fuses open.
g. One variable transformer (VTR) or variable reactor
(VSR) phase open.
h. Accumulation of dirt on variable transformer or
variable reactor commutators.
5. SYMPTOM: Loss of voltage while welding.
a. Blown line or rectifier fuse due to overload.
b. Rectifier failure.
c. Transformer failure.
d. Blown control circuit fuse (no contactor control).
6. SYMPTOM: Loss of current while welding voltage
remains normal.
a. Wire drive not feeding properly.
7. SYMPTOM: Contactor not operating,
a. Faulty contactor.
. Blown control circuit fuse.
External welding control circuit incomplete.
. Open lead to contactor coil.
Ready-OFF Switch in OFF position.
о ео с
ar
ooo oo
If none of the above troubles can be located readily, a
systematic troubleshooting approach may be followed by
using first, the Reference Voltage Procedure and second the
Diode Testing Procedure, which follow. Be sure to exercise
caution when making these troubleshooting tests. In any
case, follow your local electrical code or maintenance
procedure.
REFERENCE VOLTAGE PROCEDURE:
The reference voltage procedure can be followed by using a
voltmeter to measure the “reference voltages” provided on
the schematic diagram. These checks must be made with
the machine in a “power-on/no load” condition, so make
sure to exercise extreme care while making the tests. Start
at the primary input board and check for 208-230/460
volts input. Then, in order, check the reference voltages on
the schematic. If voltage does not appear, or if unbalanced
voltages appear between phases, the trouble is located be-
tween the last normal check-point and the first abnormal
check point.
DIODE TESTING PROCEDURE:
The silicon diodes used in this power supply are hermeti-
cally sealed. However, as the result of improper operation
EA 5
or damage incurred during shipment, the diodes may fail,
resulting in limited or poor machine performance. The fol-
lowing test data chart will serve as an extremely useful tool
with which to check normal and abnormal machine opera-
tion. This chart shows open-circuit voltages which are typi-
cal of certain “trouble” conditions. Please note that ‘trouble’
conditions other than those shown on the chart may also
produce similar abnormal voltage readings (refer to the
general troubleshooting information previously described).
Unless you have already checked out the unit for troubles
which may lie ahead of the bridge rectifier circuit (by
following the Reference Voltage Checklist), do not assume
that a sub-normal voltage is necessarily due to a faulty
diode or a blown fuse. The procedure for checking follows:
I. Turn the voltage set knob (VTR) clockwise to high
MAX. (The inductance set knob need not be disturbed
since it does not affect the open-circuit voltage.)
2. Set the slope control (VSR) to its minimum amount of
volt-ampere slope (Zero setting on the vernier indicator).
3. Close the main contactor by energizing its control coil.
Normally, this can be done by operating the torch
switch on the welding equipment without feeding the
wire,
4. Read the voltmeter on the front panel and note the
open-circuit output voltage. Check these voltages against
those shown in the Diode Test Data Chart to diagnose
the problem.
Diode Test Data Chart
D.C. VOLTS OUTPUT
Use column which corresponds to actual input voltage*
Column 1 Column 2 Column 3
200—220V 220—240V 240—260V
400—440V 440—480V 480—520V
535--555\/ 555—595 \ 595—615V
43 48 53
CONDITION: Machine in good operating condition.
36 | 40 | 44
CONDITION: An open diode results in reduced output.
28 | 31 | 34
CONDITION: A shorted diode will cause a fuse to open.
This results in single phase input and reduced output.
OR
Two diodes open in the same phase results in single
phase input and reduced output.
OR
One fuse blown in phase, results in single phase input
and reduced output.
“Before reading output voltage, determine actual input volt-
age with a voltmeter known to be accurate, Example: If
actual input from a nominal 230-volt line is less than 220
volts (but at least 200 volts) use Column 1, if actual input
from a nominal 460-volt line is greater than 480 volts use
Column 3.
DIODE SERVICING:
If a ‘trouble’ condition has been diagnosed to be a fauity
diode(s), the following procedure is suggested for replace-
ment and testing.
1. Remove the top and side panels of the power supply.
2. Locate the bridge rectifier assembly containing the indi-
vidual silicon diodes (see Figures 6 and 8).
3. Determine which diode(s) is at fault so that one of the
two mounting plates supporting the rectifier assembly
can be removed for easy accessibility.
4. Remove the six bolts which secure the rectifier assembly
to the mounting plate. (The internal bus work will pro-
vide sufficient support for the rectifier.) Carefully
remove the plate, Note that the transient voltage capaci-
tor (C1) and resistor (R2) assembly are located on the
right-side rectifier mounting plate. This assembly and its
wiring connections will automatically be disconnected
from the rectifier when the mounting plate is removed.
Be sure you reconnect the capacitor leads upon comple-
tion of the diode testing and reassembly of the bridge.
5. Unbolt and remove fuse-links F? and F3 from their
holders. This opens all electrical continuity connections
from the transformer circuitry, thus isolating the bridge
rectifier. Be sure to reconnect the fuse-links upon
completion of the diode testing.
6. With ohmmeter on ‘RX1’ scale, place negative lead on
positive (lower) heat sink and touch positive lead to
each pigtail terminal. Meter should read a low resistance
of 7 to 10 ohms on each diode.
7. Reverse leads and check each diode. All readings should
show high resistance of a few thousand ohms or higher.
8. Carry out same test for diodes in negative (upper) heat
sink.
Diodes are good when they show low resistance in one
direction and high resistance in the opposite direction.
They are bad when they show no or very low resistance in
both directions (shorted), or if they show very high resis-
tance in both directions (open).
CAUTION: When replacing diodes make sure that mount-
ing surfaces are clean. Silicon grease, similar
to Dow-Corning No. 340 silicon heat sink
compound or equivalent, should be used to
coat mounting surfaces. Use a torque wrench to
tighten the diode nurs (275 inch-pounds/23
Joot-pounds minimum torque, 325 inch-
pounds/27 foot-pounds maximum torque). If
à torque wrench is not available care should be
taken that diode nuts are tightened only until
firm,
V. REPLACEMENT PARTS DATA
. All replacement parts are keyed on the illustrations which follow. Order replacement parts by part number and part name,
as shown on illustrations. DO NOT ORDER BY PART NUMBER ALONE,
. Many of the parts on the illustrations, particularly electronic parts, are ‘vendor items.” This means that they are standard
commercial parts made by and purchased from other manufacturers. If you order from these outside sources, use the
manufacturer's part number as shown in the Electrical Parts List.
. Always state the series or serial number of the machine on which the parts are to be used. The serial number is stamped on
the unit nameplate,
. Indicate any special shipping instructions.
_ Order replacement parts from the Linde office or distributor nearest you.
(2) LIFTING RiNG- TOP PANEL - 672639 WARNING DECAL - 2091514 *
672786
SW, TOGGLE SWITCH- 672508
SILKSCREENED DATA { Y
PLATE- 676427 A
AM, AMMETER-672671
—
LINDE -
5V1-500 cv/0€
u POWER SUPPLY —
+5
"+
a
PLY, PILOT LIGHT
672542
on
{2)INDICATOR LENS
672504
VM,VOLTMETER-647289
WARNING DECAL*%
995227
INDUCTANCÉ
ENTRANCE FOR
OUTPUT WELDING
CABLE
includes:
(2) RUBBER
GROMMET- 993426
INDUCTANCE KNOB-
206217!
—— SIDE PANEL - 672636
(2) CONTROL HANDWREEL
672516
SIDE PANEL- 672636 —— ”
FRONT PANEL-876422
Xx
Replace Decal if it Becomes Excessively Worn or Lost,
Fig. 5 - SV1-600 Power Supply (Front View)
10
dl AD EE a —
EEA lr = -_ da
RH, RHEOSTAT я zu sc REAR PANEL
675507 \ 5 ie | a+ FEAR PA
Re a TT Rl ~~ FAN SPIDER
RENE A (W/Shroud)
IND,INDUCTOR ee Uh > A pour 016330
672651
* E FM, FAN MOTOR
RI,RESISTOR / 7 5.7 NA PO = > M 672057
Includes: 7 а В EEE SO TE DT
RESISTOR % 77 SE LE
17225150
Ar FAN BLADE
a | pu 672189
SHUNT-672715 SDTR, STEPDOWN
TRANSFORMER
672555
BR, BRIDGE E. a !
RECTIFIER assy SS iar PB — LOCATION OF
(See Fig. 8) 3 В To 7 д К! - 635164
cri te uy №... MEN [See Installation
Section IT-6)
Fig. 6 - Right Side View
J2, RECEPTACLE | MC. CONTACTOR VTR, VARIABLE TRANSFORMER
674560 672669 672572 (See Fig. 9)
(ORECEPT. CONTACTS | EN
67456
JI RECEPTACLE
647298 ON
OUTPUT TERMINAL dei “Mt b №:
CONNECTIONS — | CA Eo — | | — VOLTAGE
STHS6 Lu pl № A. AW INDICATOR
FI,FUSE-89W73 > A ‘ | $ BPE ED EAND-672901
FUSEHOLDER — E] :
634709
TI, TERMINAL
BLOCK-95W31 ——
TB, TERMINAL
BOARD ASSY
675667 7
STRAIN RELIEF
97W63
LL a
SLOPE
INDICATOR
BAND-672902
ATR, AUTO
TRANSFORMER
ASSY-672560
SNAP BUSHING ad
647294 (Not Visible)
VSR, VARIABLE
SLOPE
REACTOR
E Ч 672616
a u (Scc Fig. 9)
CABLE CLAMP A
598358
TERMINAL LUG
64736!
Fig. 7 - Left Side View
11
(2) FUSE LINK-672577
RESISTOR ASSY
672602
INCLUDES:
RESISTOR-
17225150
F3 F2
NEG.(-) HEATSINK-673343
(6) SILICON RECTIFIER
672384,0R7,8,9,10,11,12—#—
(6) SILICON RECTIFIER
672259 DRI,2,3,4,5,6 -——»
(6) CAPACITOR-672348
CAPACITOR-672772
POS. (+) HEAT SINK-673343
(2) MOUNTING PLATE SUPPORT -672180 —J
—J
Fig. 8 - Bridge Rectifier Assembly, P/N 674093 {Front View)
DRIVE SHAFT- 672624 COLLAR SET-67249l CENTER BRACE
BAIL (Aer)
COLLAR SET -
VARIABLE SLOPE 672491 (Hidden)
RÉACTOR-672615
a 8 — (4) MITER GEAR-
(4) MITER GEAR- 672455
Вы ¥ am -
(4) PIN-62350395 — - Pr de (4) PIN-62350395
BRUSH STOP ADJ.
BRUSH ASSY. (Ref)
672571 . | À
Includes : 7 a. lo La
(12) BRUSH- nd ” > Y MON — (2) DRIVE SCREW
672670 1: $ > “ 67261
(12) SPRING-
672465 BRUSH ASSY.
; | 1672571
y A | Includes!
> cw / | ee 4 (12)BRUSH-672670
Зет E ны a“. le” BRN" | (I2)SPRING-672463
DRIVE SHAFT-672607 VARIASLE TRANSFORMER- 672564
Fig. 9 - Variable Slope Reactor and Variable Transformer
12
a] ого ее
+= го i ria val A hae, WL py
EA E UN =
Symbol
AM
C1
С2-7
ОВ 1-6
DR7-12
F1
F2, 3
Ji
J2
MC
PL1
R1, 2, 3
RH
SW
T1
VM
Part No.
672671
672772
672343
672259
672384
89W73
672577
647298
674560
672669
672542
17225150
672507
672508
95W31
647289
ELECTRICAL PARTS LIST
Description
D.C. Ammeter, 0-800 amp scale, 50 MV, shunt rated.
Capacitor - A.C. Paper-Qil, 10 mfd (Fixed), 200 - 365 V.A.C., General Electric Co., P/N 45F 170.
Capacitor - Ceramic Disc, .01 mfd., 1000 WVDC, Spraque Prod., P/N 5HKS10.
Silicon Rectifier (Forward) - 300 amp., International Rectifier, P/N 300U25A.
Silicon Rectifier {Reverse} - 300 amp., International Rectifier, P/N 300UR25A,
Fuse (Control) - 15 amp., 32 volts, Bussman Mfg. Div., Type AGC 15 amp.
Fuse (Link) - 500 amp., 250 volt, Bussman Mfg., P/N LKN 500.
Receptacle - 115 volt, Pass 8: Seymour Cat. No. 5242.
Receptacle - Amp Incorp., Cat. No, 206227-A, 7-Pole Female unit.
Contactor - 50 amps., Square ‘D’ Co., P/N 8910M03 (Form Y 127).
Pilot Light - 125V.A.C., Industrial Devices Inc., P/N 2610A43.
Resistor - 8 watt, 500 ohm - Ohmite Mfg. Co., P/N 1526.
Rheostat - 200 watt, 12 ohm - Memcor, P/N XR7210 (Special).
Switch, Toggle - 3 P.S.T., Cutler Hammer, Cat. No. 7611K4.
Terminal Block - 12 pole, General Electric Co., Р/№ 151020112.
D.C. Voltmeter - 0-50 volt scale, 1000 ohm/volt.
LITERATURE CHANGES
The “A” edition of this booklet covered the following changes:
1. In units manufactured after June, 1970, the Inductor Assembly (P/N 672651) was equipped with two reconnectable taps
providing two inductance ranges.
The “B” edition of this booklet covered units built after August, 1974, and included the following changes:
1. The welding output terminals were moved inside the cabinet to prevent accidental contact.
2. R1, Resistor P/N 17225150 replaced P/N 599632.
3. Optional Inductor Bypass Kit Assembly P/N 635164 was relocated from the right front corner of the base to the right
rear corner.
An insert, (printed in June, 1975) covered units manufactured after June 1, 1975 and included the following changes:
a. J2 Receptacle P/N 674560 replaced P/N 90W43.
b. Terminal Board P/N 675667 replaced P/N 672450.
The “C” edition of this booklet covers the following changes:
1. T1 Terminal Block P/N 95W31 has been added to the rear panel in units manufactured after October, 1977 for ease in
connection of auxiliary apparatus (this change covered in an insert, printed in December, 1977).
2. PL2 Pilot Light P/N 672542 has been deleted.
13
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15
WARRANTY
Union Carbide warrants to the end-user customer that it will repair or replace, any parts or components of any Union Carbide
manufactured electric welding apparatus, power supply or gas apparatus (hereinafter called “Equipment”) that fail due to
defects in materials or workmanship under normal use, within the periods designated below. Union Carbide also warrants that
all such Equipment will conform to any promises and affirmations of fact made on the container and label. Union Carbide’s
obligation under this warranty shall be limited to the repair or replacement at its option, F.O.B. place of manufacture, of any
components or parts of the Equipment that prove to be defective upon Union Carbide’s examination. Returned goods
shall be at customer's risk and expense.
This warranty does not cover any Equipment or part or component thereof that has been altered or subject to misuse or
accident, or improper installation, maintenance, or application. In addition, Union Carbide's warranty on any goods delivered
hereunder that are not manufactured by Union Carbide is limited to extending to the end-user customer such warranty as is
offered by the original manufacturer to the extent such warranty is assignable. Parts subject to replacement due to normal
wear and deterioration and routine mechanical, electrical and electronic adjustments are a responsiblity of the purchaser and
are not covered by this warranty.
THERE ARE NO EXPRESS WARRANTIES OTHER THAN THOSE SPECIFIED HEREIN. NO WARRANTIES BY UNION
CARBIDE (OTHER THAN WARRANTY OF TITLE AS PROVIDED IN THE UNIFORM COMMERCIAL CODE) SHALL
BE IMPLIED OR OTHERWISE CREATED UNDER LAW INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, WARRANTY OF MER-
CHANTABILITY AND WARRANTY OF FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Under no circumstances shall Union
Carbide be liable for any special, indirect or consequential damages. The remedy hereby provided shall be the exclusive and
sole remedy of the purchaser of the Equipment and Union Carbide authorizes no other person or party to assume for it any
other obligation or liability in connection with the Equipment. No claim of any kind, whether or not based on warranty or
negligence, as to the Equipment shall be greater in amount than the purchase price of the Equipment in respect to which the
claim is made.
Union Carbide’s obligations under the warranties provided above require that the end user customer give Union Carbide
oral or written notice of the Equipment failure not later than forty-five (45) days after such failure.
The Warranty periods for the Equipment shall be as follows:
Electric Welding & Cutting Apparatus and Power Supplies
Mig Wire Feeders and all Power Supplies with 60% or higher 2 yrs. from date of purchase by
duty cycle rating except Plasma Arc Units. end-user customer
Other Electric Welding Apparatus and Power Supplies 1 уг. from date of purchase by
except as noted above. end-user customer
Torches, Remote Controls and Repair* Parts including 90 days from date of purchase by
Printed Circuit Boards, end-user customer
*For equipment beyond the warranty period.
Gas Apparatus
Manual Welding & Cutting Torches. 90 days from date of purchase by
end-user customer
All Oxy-Fuel Gas Welding & Cutting Apparatus except as 1 уг. from date of purchase by
noted above. end-user customer
eE WELDING
CARBIDE PRODUCTS UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION
LINDE DIVISION
F-11-889-C 80-0835 4/80 2.5M Printed in U.S.A. Box 6000, Florence, SC 29501
— a della dear - 2. hc o ds ss —— o Di A E ss aa as
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