Document
 ASSEMBLY & OPERATING MANUAL
Workcentre
new
series
МК
SIMIS MI
=
13
Power Tools and
Accessories not included
A FEW WORDS FROM THE MANUFACTURERS ...
You are about to assemble your Workcentre. There's a right way of doing it and there are very many wrong ways.
If you follow these instructions STEP BY STEP as you assemble the Workcentre, you should nave it properly set up within an
hour or two. It is important you observe safety warnings throughout this manual & use safety guards wherever possible. They
are for your protection.
If you ignore or skim through this manual, you could spend a whole day putting it together, and still not get it right. The choice is
yours. |
Proper safety glasses shouid be worn at all times & a dust mask & ear protection used if operating for extended
periods.
After you've finished the assembly, set aside some scrap timber and work your way through the Test Cuts section, and the
operating sections, until you are fully familiar with the machine.
If you have fitted good quality tools and cutters, you should find that the Triton Workcentre is capable of a vast range of functions,
and great precision. With some occasional maintenance, you should get years of trouble-free service.
Make sure we can keep in touch with you, by getting onto the mailing list. Details on the back page.
WORKCENTRE PARTS LIST
1. Workiable 5. Base Channels 9. Rip Guard & Riving Knife 13, Fasteners Bag (including bag of saw clamps)
2. Front Panel 6. Protractor (Mitre Guage] 10. Rip Fence & Clamp Set 14, Table Support Rails & Bag of Tee Handles
3. Rear Panel 7, Plain Work Stop 11. Side Blade Guard (Hinged)
4, Bearing Channels 8.Notched Work Stop 12. Saw Slide Chassis
TERMINOLOGY USED IN THIS MANUAL:
“Front of the workcentre means the end which has the switchbox.
“Left-hand and right-hand side” are when viewed from the front.
. Most dimensions are given in millimetres. (25.4 mm = 1"). A simple conversion table is on the back page.
. Safety warnings are generally given in bold type.
5. Letiers stamped on worktable: R= Rip Mode 0-270 mm (0-1072"), WR = Wide Rip 200-455 mm (8"-18"), C= Crosscut mode
(Formerly called Docking & labelled "D™.)
ASSEMBLING THE WORKCENTRE
Tools required: 100-150 mm (4-6") adjustable wrench or equivalent, Pliers (Preferably long nose), Phillips screw driver.
STEP 1
Assemble the basic frame as shown in Figs. 1 & 1(a) but do not yet tighten up any of the bolis.
Note from Fig. 1(a) where the flat washers are used, and note how the 8 star washers are used under the heads of the a"
nuts.
If you have trouble fitting the 44" nut near the switchbox, either reverse the bolt and nut, or fit the bolt, lay the frame on its
side, and fit the star washer and nut from above.
BN
M AUSSER
co FOOT W/NUT
Fig. 1
Fig. 1(a)
STEP 2
FITTING TABLE SUPPORT RAILS
Fit the Table Support Rails (Part Na. 14) to the end
panels as shown in Figs. 2 and 2(a). The rail with the
~nles fits inside the Front Panel. The rail with the studs
.s into the Rear Panel.
Use the chart, Fig. 2(b), to determine the approximate
table height setting for your power saw. Each of the
graduations printed on the end panels is 2 mm.
Set the rail heights as shown in Fig. 2(c). The top edge
of the rail, as visible through the slot, is your reference
point. In the photographs, the rails are set at 78 mm,
for a 205 mm (8 14”) saw blade.
The black T-handles (shown elsewhere in this manual
as small triangular knobs) should be approximately
horizontal on the front panel. This is to give clear ac-
cess for the two Locking Keys from the fasteners bag,
If a handle is angled when fully tight — as in Fig. 2(d)
— simply loosen it a few turns, give the coach bolt a
quarter-turn, and re-tighten.
Check the fit of the Locking Keys, through both key-
holes of the front table support rail. You may have to
move the rail side-ways slightly. [f removing any ex-
cess epoxy coating, use a scraper or round file —
NOT A DRILL.
aw partially withdraw the keys to allow access for
© table,
STEP 3
TIGHTENING THE BASE
Check that the basic frame is resting on a flat and level
surface. Measure between the diagonal corners at the
top of the frame as in Fig. 3(a). The measurement
should be between 1040 and 1045 mm.
Square up the frame if necessary so the measure-
ments are the same (= 2 mm).
Slide the Table in from the side as shown in 3(a) until
the locking keys are lined up with the holes labeled
“C” — for crosscut, Push the table home onto the rear
panel studs, and fit the locking keys as shown in Fig.3.
Both locking keys should be a similar fit, and the
whole table should be snugly held between the end
panels.
Now you can begin tightening the base nuts and
bolts. Start with the %4&" nuts on the bottom, then the
14" bolts. Note that in tightening the v4" bolts, the
star washers under the nuts dig in and prevent them
‘ning while you tighten, DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN.
STEP 4
TIGHTENING THE BEARING CHANNELS
Unlock the table and gently slide it out. Turn it around
through 180 degrees and place it on top of the alumin-
ium bearing channels. Line up the holes labeled “WR”
with the studs on top of the rear panel, and push the
table home onto the studs. The four T-shaped holes
should now be nearest the front of the workcentre
(switchbox end).
Re-locate the locking keys in the top key-hales of the
front panel, into the holes labeled “R" — for Ripping,
as shown in Fig. 4. Again, the keys and table should be
a snug fit.
Tighten the four 74" bolts as shown in Fig. 4. DO NOT
OVERTIGHTEN.
(To assist the star washers in holding the nuts, you
may have to use pliers or a screwdriver point as a
wedge).
Now tip the Workcentre on its side, and fit the four
mibber feet as shown in Fig. 4 (a). The hexagon nuts
ide the rubber feet must remain visible. Firmly
nend-tighten them.
If you have obtained the optional Folding Stand, as-
semble it now and check the fit of the rubber feet.
They should be a very firm fit. If they are too loose in
the stand, tighten them further, swelling them slightly.
If too tight, check the tube openings for burrs or dents.
SAW SIZE SETTING
mr mm
6%" (155) - 54
7%" (185) - 66
8%" (205) - 78
9%" (235) - 90
10%" (255) -102
ge
ss E
Fig. 2(al
Fig. 2(b)
|!!!
И
5
|
a ||
A
a
lei
mère
wt
Lal
с
—
—
—=.
—
——
—
—
—
==
р,
raie
MI
=
E
=
ig. 2(c)
lin Ee
+
Fig. 3
Fig. 4.
Tu |
= ce |: ol |
Fig.4(a)
Fia.4(b)
Osama Y
STEPS
FITTING THE SLIDE CHASSIS
Re-fit the table in the crosscut mode as in Fig. 3(a).
Place the Slide Chassis on the bearing channels. Slide
it to the end of its travel and two bearings will drop into
the channels. Slide the chassis along to the other end,
and the two remaining bearings will drop In.
Check the slide action of the chassis, and spray some
lubricant such as RP 7 or WD 40 or silicon spray to
ensure a smooth, easy slide. Do not use oil, grease
or graphite as these form a messy paste when mixed
with sawdust.
Practise flipping the chassis over, as in Fig. 5. (If a
bearing does not sit down flat on dropping into the
channel, either bring the chassis down a little more
firmly, or perhaps slightly loosen the bearings’ Nyloc
nut).
STEP G6
FITTING THE SAW
Take your portable saw, and with the power discon-
nected, check that the blade is set at full depth and the
angle adjuster is set at 0 degrees. The spring-loaded
safety guard is not used on the Workcentre, so tie It
back with same cord or a rubber band as shown in
Fig. 6la).
Do not leave the guard permanently tied back, or
the spring will fatigue. Release the guard after you
finish work for the day. DO NOT REMOVE THE
GUARD ALTOGETHER.
Measure the overall length of the saw’s base-plate.
Lengthen the chassis (if necessary) as in Fig. 6 so that
the saw can fit snugly between the walls of the chas-
sis. The chassis can be extended to 425mm for the
longest saws. With smaller saws, it is all right if there is
a gap at the front or back, as shown in Fig. 7(b).
Place the saw in the chassis, with the front of the saw
facing the rear panel. The tip of the blade should be
just entering the central slot in the table. Adjust the
four T-knobs if necessary until the teeth are no more
than 1-2 mm below the table surface at both ends of
the chassis travel.
There are two alignment notches in the chassis direct-
ly above the central slot in the table. The blade should
be roughly lined up with these notches, but must not
enter them. See Fig. 7(b). Turn the blade by hand to
make sure it is free to spin.
STEP 7
FITTING THE CLAMPING BRACKETS
Take the separate packet of saw clamps. Fit the four
L-shaped location brackets (Fig. 7) at or near the four
corners of the saw, and finger tighten the nuts only.
(One of the brackets has a bevelled corner. [t is for
wide based saws as shown in Fig. 7(d)).
Fit the four U-shaped top clamps as in Fig. 7(a), fit a
flat washer and spring washer, and lightly do up the
wingnuts.
Angle the saw blade to 45 degrees using the saw's
own adjuster. (Raise the blade slightly first to clear the
slot in the table). If the saw’s top guard hits one of the
U-shaped clamps, replace both clamps with the shal-
low hook-over clamp and shorter bolt as in Fig. 7(b).
Dans A
a ET
SAW BLADE ALIGNMENT
NOTCHES
=
Fig. 7(b) shows a popular 185mm saw
which has a very short base- plate. A gap
at the back of the base-plate is all right if it
prevents the blade from hitting the slide
chassis. Glue or screw a packing spacer
has shown for additional security.
e shallow hook-over clamp and the
qe
ин
=
ES
6, TN
E";
т.
Ко i
Fig. 7 (c) shows a saw with a deep lip, and
a step at the front of the base-plate. The
saw clamps are mounted on packing
pieces. To cope with the step in the base-
plate, one front clamp is angled against
the corner of the saw. The upper saw
clamp has been modified to suit the
corner of the base-plate.
Fig. 7 (d) shows a saw with a wide base-
plate. The locating bracket with the
bevelled corner is used at the right-hand
front of this saw, to avoid fouling the
raised section of the slide chassis.
short coachbolt are used at the right-hand
rear corner of this saw, because the nor-
mal clamp would prevent the saw tilting to
45 degrees for bevel cutting.
STEPS
CONVERTING TO ATABLE SAW
Remove the table and turn the saw upside down. With
the slide bearings Inside the aluminium channels,
move the chassis until it is roughly mid-way between
the front and rear panels.
Place the table on top, in the table saw position, and
locate the rear panel studs in the holes labeled "WR".
As you lower the table at the front, make sure the rear I = — - 11 EEE CR En
position lug (Fig. 8) under the table engages in the slot y 3 e. N
in the slide chassis. Lower the table fully and insert the т —— Tr ЗАВ
locking keys in the “R" holes. Check that the chassis is © A) EZ à
locked firmly. Now remove the table without moving о — FI] TEIN REAR
the slide chassis and make a mark(s) on the bearing = : - BRE | POSITION
-nnel with a scriber or marker pen, to show you ИЦ
ere to position the chassis for future conversions. El -
A] TL koro НЕА ПРЕ ao TK a ————.—]]!———— —
Fig. 8 (SHOWING UNDERSIDE OF WORKCENTRE)
LE
Unlock the table, lift it at the front, and slide the chas-
sis towards you so that you can lock it in the forward
position. Make another mark(s) on the bearing channel
for future reference.
“ Note: Some tables have a spring latch instead of
the lug shown. The latch is engaged in thedetentin
the end of the chassis. The procedure isthesameas
above
ALWAYS USE THE REAR POSITION FOR RIPPING
AND CROSSCUTTING,
The forward position is only used for cutting angle
mitres and short tapers as described in Page 22.
STEP 9
ADJUSTING THE SAW BLADE ANGLE
Use the adjuster(s) on your portable saw to set the
angle of the blade exactly square to the table, as in
FAY
e blade won't adjust far enough to be square, you
can on most saws file a little out of the end of the
curved adjustment slot of the saw. Or you can put
some thin packing material between the right-hand
side of the saw's base-plate and the chassis. If your
blade reaches the square position and then “slumps”
off-square, see Page 11).
Fig. 9 Dana 5
STEP 10
CENTERING THE SAW
Now you should approximately centralise your saw
blade in the slot. To do so, slightly loosen the four
wingnuts holding the U- shaped top clamps, and
push, pull or twist the saw body until the blade is
roughly central as in 10(b). If you have a fairly thick
saw blade, favour the left of centre — away from the
calibration scales, Final trueing up is in Step 12.
STEP 11
FITTING THE RIVING KNIFE
Make sure your saw chassis is securely locked in the
rear position. Make sure the saw blade is fully extend-
ed upwards, at maximum depth of cut. Remove the
moulded Rip Guard (Part No. 9) from the Riving Knife,
and fit the knife directly behind the blade as shown in
Fig. 11. The knife should be no more than 12 mm
behind the saw blade. If you have a very long saw, or a
very short saw, you may have to reposition the bolt in
the riving knife body.
After passing the U-shaped clamp and wingnut
through the table slot, turn the clamp sideways and
lock the knife in position, as in Fig. 11(a). If any part of
the die-cast body of the knife is slightly above table
level, file it down.
Raise the blade to full height and spin it by hand to
check that it can't hit the body of the riving knife. Get
into the habit of checking this every time you fit the
knife during later operations, and always check that
the slide chassis is locked securely in position.
STEP 12
TRUEING UP THE SAW
Fit the clamping feet and triangular knobs to the Rip
Fence (Part No. 10) as shown in Fig. 12. Place the
fence in the short table slots with the high side of the
fence closest to the blade.
Practise locking the fence in various positions, Dy
turning the clamping feet through 90 degrees and
locking the tri-knobs. Check that the fence locks
positively in both slots. Set the fence in towards the
blade so that the “O” marks on both scales are directly
in line with the reference lines stamped next to the
windows in the rip fence, as shown opposite. Lock the
fence in the “O” position.
Slightly loosen the four wingnuts holaing the saw
clamps and push, pull or twist the saw body until the
saw blade is lightly touching against the rip fence.
Tighten the wingnuts and then try to spin the blade by
hand. The teeth should be very lightly scratching the
fence, equally at the front and back of the blade. If not,
loosen the wingnuts and slightly re-position the saw
on the chassis. Tighten the wingnuts before re-
checking.
STEP 13
CHECKING THE RIVING KNIFE
Now you have to check the alignment of the blade and
the riving knife. First check that both blade and knife
are square to the table. The knife can be bent over
slightly by hand if necessary.
Place two straight pieces of wood against the blade as
shown in Fig. 13. They should be touching the teeth
front and back, and should be clear of the riving knife
on both sides.
Your saw is now in its final position, so firmly tighten
the four wingnuts prior to final clamping of the saw.
(If the above check shows that the riving knife is not
fully behind the blade, you will have to move the saw
sideways slightly, making sure that the blade remains
exactly parallel to the fence. This may cause a slight
error in the calibration scales. Allow for it in future
fence settings).
Page В
Fig. 10(b)
Fig. 11 Fig. 11(a)
rpm
es
MAA 0
STEP 14
FINAL CLAMPING OF SAW
Remove the table and invert the chassis so that the
saw is right- way up. Take care not to Dump the saw.
sow you have to finally position and tighten the four
location brackets, which will ensure that you can in
future remove and re- fit your saw for hand held use in
about 30 seconds, without repeating Steps 12 and 13.
Do one corner at a time. Undo the wingnut, remove
the top clamp and push the L-shaped bracket hard up
against the edge of the saw's base-plate. Fully tighten
the hexagon nut, as in Fig. 14.
DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN.
Replace the top clamp, flat washer, spring washer and
wingnut, and fully tighten the wingnut.
Repeat at the other three corners of the saw, adjusting
the brackets and tightening them down one at a time.
STEP 15
FITTING THE BLADE GUARD
Fit the Blade Guard (Part No. 11) to the two lugs on the
“de chassis (Fig. 15) covering the exposed upper
«ace of the blade.
Nyloc nuts are used so you will have to hold them
while tightening the screws.
The blade guard is designed to protect you from the
blade and arbor nut, and to help contain sawdust. Flip
it aside for sighting up crosscuts.
STEP 16
FITTING THE TRIGGER STRAP
The black plastic Trigger Strap should be the last item
in the fasteners bag. With the saw unplugged, pass
the strap around the trigger as shown in Fig. 16 and
zip it up. To release the strap, press the nib as shown.
If your saw has a safety button, push it first and then
zip up the strap.
With most power saws, the strap can be adjusted so
that it can be slipped on and off the point of the trig-
Jer, as in Fig. 16(a), without having to be undone each
- ne. DO NOT LEAVE YOUR TRIGGER PERMA-
“NENTLY LOCKED ON. When you have finished work
for the day, release the trigger strap and allow the
spring in the saw’s trigger to relax. Otherwise it could
fatigue if left locked on for long periods.
If the trigger strap tends to slide off the hand-grip of
the saw, attach some sandpaper or friction tape to the
hand-grip as shown in Fig. 16(a). A strip of Velcro tape
is another alternative, or you may wish to shape a
block of wood to wedge in against the trigger.
STEP 17
FITTING THE RIP GUARD
Convert the workcentre to the table saw mode, lock-
ing the chassis in the rear position. Double check with
the rip fence set at 0 that the saw didn't shift slightly
during final clamping.
Fit the Rip Guard to the riving knife as in Fig. 17. Refit
the bolt, washer and tri-knob.
the guard is difficult to adjust up and down, spray
the riving knife with some lubricant, such as RP 7, WD
40 or silicone spray lubricant.
Fig. 15
PRESS NIB
TO RELEASE
SANDPAPER
OR FRICTION FE
=
+
hem
=
=i my
==
сн
чл
in
=
se
=
ee
=>
=
м
Бо С
x a
си
ie
= re
ee о
=
ee
ee sa
ms ee
ee
eee
ie
STEP 18
CHECKING THE PROTRACTOR
Check that the Protractor slides freely in the slot which
is parallel to the saw blade. It should be a snug fit, yet
slide smoothly from end to end.
Spray the aluminium strip underneath the protractor,
with some lubricant as above.
IF THE STRIP IS TOO TIGHT:
First check the ends of the strip for burrs, and file them
off If necessary. Remove the strip from the protractor,
and squeeze it in slightly in the jaws of a vice. You can
also cure a slight tightness problem by filing or scrap-
ing some of the epoxy coating off the walls of the slot
in the table.
IF THE STRIP ISTOO LOOSE:
Remove the strip from the protractor and lay it face-
down on a hard, flat surface. Use some steel rod or
tubing between 10 mm and 19 mm in diameter, and
hammering quite firmly at various points along the rod,
slightly widen the strip, as in Fig. 18(b).
Re-lubricate and re-fit the strip to the protractor for
testing.
STEP 19 |
OPERATING THE SWITCH
Before connecting the power, practise switching on
and off. You do not have to raise the Stop Plate. Press
the switch toggle with your index finger to switch the
ower “ON”. Tap the Stop Plate with your hand or
nee to switch "OFF".
GET INTO THE HABIT NOW OF ALWAYS PUSHING
THE STOP PLATE BEFORE PLUGGING IN THE
SAW OR FITTING THE TRIGGER STRAP.
Plug the saw into the switch box, and bring power to
the switchbox via an extension cord.
Before switching on the power, make sure that:
1. the slide chassis is locked from sliding by one of
the lugs welded underneath the table;
2. both locking keys are properly fitted;
3. nothing is touching the saw blade, or is likely to
vibrate into it; and
4, your hands are well clear of the blade.
Switch the power on and off a few times, and
watch the saw blade. If it tends to lurch sideways
slightly when the power comes on, your saw could
have arbor float, or some slack in the mounting(s)
between saw body and saw base. See Page 11.
If the blade vibrates significantly at full speed, it
could be buckled or not seated properly on the
saw’'s arbor. Remove the blade and check it for
flatness with a straight edge at various points
across the centre hole. Check the fit of arbor re-
ducing spacers (if fitted to your blade) and make
sure you have cleaned all sawdust and resin from
the arbor and the arbor washers before re-fitting
the blade.
If the blade quivers briefly while slowing to a stop, it
could be slightly buckled. This should not lead to
poor cuts. However, a pronounced wobble as it
slows down indicates a need for straightening or
replacing the blade.
i Sar ere CEET ee TN y i
e = , а i oe rR Пе ея оо ори ; ee
a moe scie EE НО оон a EE en ete ee pre
as я -
arr nn na pe RCC a ie A E eo mayo +
= = pee ee rt mine - = oR Se ole
EC Ne ЛЕНННЫ, SRE e ноев i E = = NA
A CE ;
EE :
О
E
Fig. 18(a) но Fig. 18(b)
Fig 19a] — Pana À
TEST CUTS —
TABLE SAW MODE
E
CROSSCUTTING
If you haven't obtained the optional Folding Stand, set
up the Workcentre on a stable and rigid base, approxi-
mately 570 mm high.
Fit and adjust the safety guard as In Fig. 20, and put on
safety glasses. Make sure clothing, long hair and jew-
ellery cannot become entangled in the blade.
Take a straight dressed piece of wood and arrow the
straightest edge as shown opposite. Set the protrac-
tor at 0 degrees, and hold the workpiece with the ar-
rowed edge against the protractor, as in Fig. 20.
Push down on the protractor with your other hand.
MAKE SURE YOU DO NOT CREATE A SMALL OFF-
CUT WHICH WILL JAM IN THE SLOT BESIDE THE
BLADE,
Either make the off-cut less than 1 mm wide (a paper-
thin shaving), or more than 6 mm wide.
Make the cut and push the protractor as far as it will
go, so that the workpiece is past the back of the blade.
'f the back of the blade re-cuts, or burns or rubs
"Jainst the workpiece, your saw is mounted slightly
“askew. and its clamping brackets will have to be ad-
justed slightly as in Step 12.
CHECKING YOUR TRY SQUARE
Before checking the cut first check your try square for
accuracy. Find a wide board which has an absolutely
straight edge. Press the handle of the square firmly
against it, and use a sharp pencil to trace the upper
edge of the blade of the square as in Fig. 21. Flip the
square over and press it against the edge again as in
Fig. 22. Compare the blade of the square to the traced
line. Any error in your square is seen as doubled, and
therefore clearly visible.
CHECKING THE CUT
Remove any uncut fibres from the edge of the cut
before taking a reading. Always take the reading off
the face which was resting against the protractor, i.e.
the arrowed face.
If you have an error ALONG the cut as in Fig. 23 re-
Joost the protractor angle slightly and repeat the cut.
_~.ow take a reading ACROSS the cut as in Fig. 24 (off
the face which was resting on the table). If you have an
error, re-adjust the wingnut or knob on the front of
your saw, as in Step 9 on Page 5.
RIPPING TEST
Take a straight piece of wood at least 75 mm wide.
Set the rip fence exactly parallel to the blade. The
readings in both windows must be the same.
Set the fence so that you will create a substantial off-
cut, which will not fall down between the blade and the
slot. (The off-cut should be no less than 6 mm wide).
Keep your fingers well away from the blade (Fig.
25), and hold the arrowed (straight) edge against the
fence during the cut. Keep pushing the workpiece until
it is behind the back of the blade and the riving knife.
If the back of the blade re-cuts, burns or rubs against
the workpiece, either your fence was set slightly
askew, or your saw needs slight adjustment on the
slide chassis. |
, ** the workpiece hits the riving knife and jams, bump
© If the power with your knee and wait until the blade
‘stops before withdrawing the piece. Then re-check
Step 13, Page 6,
f the workpiece was a tight fit between the fence and
the riving knife, you can generally ease the rear setting
of the fence out wards by no more than 1 mm without
losing accuracy.
= 3
Eee eee Er ni Es
ть A Be
CEE a am
E a me ух
м es HE A ee et
A EA EA AC ame re
EMT E a de
DEE щек.
Fig. 24
CONVERTING TO A CROSSCUT SAW
Clear the table of all fittings. Remove the table and
place it to one side.
Invert the slide chassis, so that the saw is right-way up
and facing the rear panel. Turn the table around so
that the T-shaped holes are closest to the rear panel.
Slide the table in under the blade, and insert the lock-
ing keys in the "C” holes.
NOTE: The saw blade will have to be raised slightly
during this operation, to prevent the tip of the
blade scratching the table surface. Either use
the height adjuster on the saw itself, or leave
the two freed bearings lying on top of the
bearing channels (Fig. 26) while you fit the
table.
If using this second method now and in future
conversions, MAKE SURE ALL FOUR BEAR-
INGS ARE PLACED BACK INSIDE THE
CHANNELS BEFORE MAKING A CUT.
FITTING THE WORK STOPS
The Notched Work Stop fits on the left hand side of
the table. (The notch is for the saw blade to pass
through when the blade is angled).
The work stops are meant to be a snug fit. Apply pres-
or try tapping them into position with a piece of wood. ~~
They should click into place positively against the y в
back of the T-shaped holes in the table.
If one of your work stops is too tight, you may have to
slightly loosen the screws holding the nylon lugs in
position. Do not undo the screws more than one turn
or so, because the nylon lugs are very difficult to re-
seat properly if completely removed.
sure low down on the work stops with both thumbs, mn ae HE
Fi o a Ta =
TEST CUTS —
CROSSCUT MODE
Position a piece of wood with its straight face against the plain work
stop. Hold the workpiece with your right hand, and push the saw with
your left hand. Hold the workpiece firmly, pushing it down on the table
and against the work stop, as shown in Fig. 28, and keep fingers well
out of the path of the blade. Squeeze the saw trigger and gently
make the cut, trimming a small amount off. Do not force the saw to cut
too fast, and do not jerk the saw into the cut.
DO NOT PULL THE SAW BACK TOWARDS YOU UNTIL THE
BLADE HAS STOPPED SPINNING. The blade may hit the small off-
cut which you've created, causing possible damage or even injury.
If you find that the back of the blade re-cuts the workpiece wriile the
blade is slowing to a halt, you can move the workpiece sideways away
from the blade as soon as you have cut through.
If your saw has a very long base-plate, it may stop you from complet-
ing the cut. The remedy is to screw two identical straight wooden
packers to the work stops.
Check for square along the cut, and across it as shown in Figs. 23 &
24. You may find an error across the cut, caused by “slump” (or flex) in
the saw. Read about Fig. 29 far the remedy. If you have an error along
the cut, see Figs. 32 to 35.
If you do have significant slump you may be aggravating the problem
by unconsciously twisting the saw hand-grip while pushing the saw.
Try leaving the trigger strapped on, and pushing the back of the slide
chassis rather than pushing the saw itself. This is called the "locked
on" trigger technique. Use the switch on the workcentre.
Рапе 10
| WORK STOP
= ON LEFT SIDE
E E
ELIMINATING SAW SLUMP ENS
Most portable saws have some “slump” in the motor
and blade, caused by flexing or slack in the mountings
between the saw motor and its base-plate. This slump
ould be dealt with to ensure squareness across the
cut in both table saw and crosscut modes, without
having to adjust the wingnut (or knob) on the front of
the saw each time you convert.
If you have an error caused by saw slump, you have
several options.
1. Tighten up the saw as described below: or
2. Obtain a saw Stabiliser Bracket from us (or through
your Triton dealer). The bracket fits over the motor
of all saws, as in Fig. 29(a) and provides good sup-
port for the saw even when raised for rebating
(dadoing) or angled for bevelling; or
3. Adjust both table support rails, so there is a slight
compensating slope in the table as in Fig. 29
The amount of slope depends on the amount of
slump in your saw, but if more than 6 mm of com-
pensating slope is required, we suggest you obtain
the stabiliser bracket. Make several test cuts,
checking for square after each cut.
Always check after adjusting the table or the blade
that there is no chance of the blade hitting the walls
of the slot, or of cutting into the sub-frame bars
underneath the table.
ra st
TIGHTENING UP YOUR SAW
Have the saw right-way up and disconnect the power.
Take hold of the saw motor, and see how much move-
ment there is up and down. The two most common
troublespots are at the front and rear pivots of the saw
motor. The rear pivot point is usually rivetted. Either
find a way of tightening the rivet, or drill it out and
replace it with a snug-fitting bolt and lock nut as in Fig.
30. If the saw is sloppy at the front pivot, either try
tightening the bolt, or put some shim packing between
the saw body and the pivot bracket, as shown in Fig.
a1.
ARBOR FLOAT & POOR BLADES
Arbor float in the saw — movement of the shaft in and
“st — is the major cause of inaccuracy along the cut.
Zr can show up as a high spot (possibly burnt by the
side of the blade), a re-cut, or a slight step in the cut.
Try the remedies shown in Figs. 34 & 35. A fine-
toothed tungsten tipped blade will help minimise the
problem. If you intend to keep the saw for some time,
go for a better quality blade.
Arbor float can sometimes be eliminated by a qualified
power tool serviceman. If your saw is not repairable or
not worth repairing, you should consider upgrading to
a better saw. Please feel free to contact us or our area
distributor for our current brand recommendations.
If you have extensive burning or re-cut problems along Fig. 34 Fig. 35
the cut, it is possible your saw is mounted slightly I ET и
askew on the slide chassis. Check it as explainedin ELLE
Step 12 of the Assembly section. : un — Mo AU 8
© WORKSTOPS AND |
The high spot shown in Fig. 33 will have a correspond-
ing low spot on the off-cut. The curved ridge on the
lower piece of wood is caused either by arbor float, or
by the saw being mounted slightly askew.
| tg. 34 shows how to put some straight packers be-
“tween the workpiece and the work stops. This may
help reduce the effects of arbor float. Fig. 35 shows a
method of cutting a little to one side of the marked
line, and then making a finishing cut in which the blade
is removing less wood than in a full cut, and is there-
fore under less load.
CROSSCUT SAW
RECOMMENDED OPERATING POSITION
Stand on the right hand side of the Workcentre, as in
Fig. 36. Hold the workpiece with your right hand and
push the saw with the left. The operating position
shown in Fig. 37 gives limited hand access for holding
the workpiece, and should be avoided unless the rec-
ommended position is uncomfortable.
Before positioning a workpiece always slide the chas-
sis the full length of its travel to make sure that the
blade is not in danger of hitting the walls of the slot, or
the sub-frame bars underneath the slots.
Push the saw smoothly and gently until you have cut
all the way through the workpiece. DO NOT PULL
THE SAW BACK ONTO AN OFF-CUT. A small off-cut
such as shown in Fig. 38, can easily fall behind the
blade. If hit, it will shatter and cause blade damage,
table damage and possible injury. Allow the blade to
stop spinning before pulling the saw back, but you
may remove the workpiece sideways once you have
cut right through.
To sight up your cuts, flip aside the blade guard and
sight down through the gap in the saw base-plate.
Make a test nick as shown in Fig. 39 if you want to cut
very accurately to a line. If you're not happy about the
position of the nick in relation to your line, move the
workpiece slightly,
Test your cuts for squareness. If you are not happy
with the results, check through the Test Cuts section,
especially Page 11.
ALWAYS WEAR EYE PROTECTION WHEN
OPERATING, AND KEEP HANDS WELL
CLEAR OF THE BLADE.
MULTIPLE CROSSCUTTING
If cutting two or four pieces to the same length, cut
them simultaneously. Line up the dressed ends as in
Fig. 40 and perhaps tape the pieces together. Trim off
the excess at the rough-cut ends with one cut. All four
pieces should then be identical.
MAKE A LENGTH GAUGE
A length of straight wood (such as 42x 19mm for a
185mm saw or 70x19 mm for a 235 mm saw) can be
screwed to both work stops. The first cut through it
will give you a permanent sighting mark for future cuts.
Glue a polyester or fibreglass tailors measure to the
top edge as shown in Fig. 41, and you can quickly set
a stop for accurate repetition cutting. Omm on the
tape is right on the edge of the first cut. Fig. 41 shows
a block of wood being used as a stop. You can im-
prove on this by making a proper stop to slide along
the top of the gauge, with a perpendicular downward
leg.
Page 12
REBATING (DADOING)
Use the adjuster on the back of your saw to raise the
blade. You do not have to drop the table. Raising the
Made is much faster.
1, ebating several pieces identically, it‘s a good idea to
tape them together as shown.
Mave the piece(s) sideways by one blade-width after
each cut.
If you are rebating many pieces, and all the rebates
start and finish the same distance from the ends, you
can reverse the rip fence and lock it in its slots as a
stop. It is all right to do so in this instance because you
are not trapping a solid off-cut between the blade and
the fence.
Try putting a parallel-sided packing spacer between
the workpiece and the work stops. № will bring the
work closer to you and you'll avoid backstrain, while
keeping the work square to the blade. If you have a
saw with a very long base-plate, you'll need a packing
spacer anyway to complete the rebate. See Fig. 34.
Figs. 43 and 44 show two ways of setting saw blade
height. In 43, the blade is raised or lowered until its
lowest tooth is just level with a line drawn on a piece of
scrap. Use this method, rather than a ruler, for setting
the height of the blade/cutter in all modes of opera-
“оп. It allows you to use both hands for adjusting the
“w/router.
Fig. 44 shows a way of finding the exact half-way point
for a halving joint. Make one cut, flip the workpiece
over and make another cut about 3mm away. Keep
adjusting the blade and making fresh cuts until you
have two cuts which would just meet if they were in
line.
DOUBLE CUTTING
For cutting wood thicker than your saw can handle,
you have to lower the table. Use a marker pen to iden-
tify the normal table position, as in Fig. 45. (Undo the
locking keys, or remove the table to make adjustment
easier). The table should be lowered equally at all four
corners. Re-fit the locking keys.
Cut the workpiece a little more than half-way through.
Then turn it over and make the second cut.
Fig. 45 shows the fence being used as a stop to en-
sure the two cuts are in line. DO NOT PULL THE
SPINNING BLADE BACK ON AN OFF- CUT.
If the workpiece is too long to use the fence as a stop,
( Huare a line around the workpiece a little way back
ifom your desired cut line. Make a pencil mark on the
table as in Fig. 45 and use it as a reference mark when
you turn the workpiece over for the second cut. Make
shaving cuts if necessary fo dress off any remaining
step.
PLUNGE CUTTING
If vou have a board between 450 and 700mm wide
you may not be able to fit it between the blade and the
work stops. You can crosscut such wide boards by
making a plunge cut, provided you have a saw with a
smooth yet firm action when the blade is raised and
lowered. If you have such a saw, raise the blade to
admit the wide board.
After sighting up the cut, pull the trigger and plunge
the saw down into the work. Push the saw to the end
of its travel.
With a very wide board (600-700 mm), plunge in about
“alf-way along as in Fig, 46. At the end of the cut, raise
“e blade and remove the board. Turn the board over,
feed it back into the workcentre, and insert the station-
ary blade in the cut you've just made. Fine tune the
pasition of the board, pull the trigger and complete the
cut. (The edges which rest against the work stops
have to be exactly parallel for the two cuts to meet up
perfectly).
Fig. 43
RAISE BLADE
FOR REBATING
PENCIL
RK POSITION
ERING TABLE
LE
=
MITRE CUTTING
Remove the work stops. Fit the Protractor in the slot
as shown in Fig. 47, and lock it in position by loosen-
ing the longer tri-knob several turns and twisting the
locking head (Fig. 48) underneath the table. Check
that itis properly locked.
Sight up cuts by flipping aside the blade guard and
touching the stationary saw blade to your cutting
mark.
HOLD THE WOOD FIRMLY. IT WILL TEND
TO CREEP DURING A MITRE CUT.
Let the blade stop spinning before you pull
the saw back.
FINDING TRUE 45 DEGREES
Take a straight piece of scrap wood. Loosen the short
tri-knob to set the protractor at 45 degrees according
to the scale. Cut 75-100mm off the workpiece and
place the off-cut against the main piece. This doubles
any error in your scale setting. If the resulting joint
gapes at the top (Fig. 49) you need to increase your
protractor setting, i.e. it was probably set at 44 or
44% degrees. If the joint gapes at the bottom (Fig. 50)
you need to decrease the setting.
If the protractor is set correctly, the result will be as in
Fig. 51. In Fig. 52, the workpiece moved slightly during
the cut, causing a slight curve. A curve or gaping can
also be due to arbor float in the saw, or to a poor saw
blade. A good quality tungsten tipped blade is essen-
tial for perfect mitres.
The protractor has two faces, A & B. Two pieces, one
cut against face A and the other cut against face B will
always add up to exactly 90 degrees. This novel fea-
ture is very useful for making picture frames. (More
details on Page 22).
When cutting picture frame moulding or architrave in
the crosscut mode, you may notice some splintering
on the moulded face. Eliminate this by climb cutting
the mitres. First read about climb cutting on Page 15.
Generally speaking, mitres are more comfortably cut
in the table saw mode. The crosscut mode should
generally be used when cutting long, unmanageable
iE Eo such as lengths of architrave or wall lining
board.
BEVEL MITRES (COMPOUND CUTS)
A bevel mitre (or compound cut) is necessary in some
types of roof construction, and for shadow boxes,
splayed legs etc.
Remove the work stops and lock the protractor in its
slot, Tilt the saw blade to the desired angle, and hold
the workpiece against the angled protractor. Use
some packing under the workpiece as shown in Fig.
53
This cut puts a lot of load on the workpiece and on the
saw. Make sure the workpiece doesn't creep during
the cut. If you have arbor float in your saw, or a poor
blade, try making a second shaving cut as in Fig. 35.
Because of the load on the saw, don't aggravate the
problem by twisting the saw's hand-grip. Lock the
trigger on and push the rear of the slide chassis.
A
Y
BEA e
EL Нея
“PROTRACTOR |
Estel: 0
Es ES
BEVEL CUTTING
Use the adjuster on your saw to angle the blade to 45
degrees. You will have to raise the blade out of the slot
“st, either using the blade height adjuster or the ~~ | 5 —
Jlethod shown in Fig. 26, of removing two of the slide — . 5 S/ =a
chassis bearings from the channels. If using the sec- od,
ond method, MAKE SURE ALL FOUR BEARINGS =
ARE PLACED BACK IN THE CHANNELS BEFORE
MAKING A CUT,
i ee EE
pot Ee ela i
SE an
Ce ES
i taie es
pe EN LD а с
a e
EE Tl NE ae
ee ie Ne
EE
ae ane el RE
= cer
EE
Ce т eee cea
A ee A НН)
re + E
3 e =
x en ЗЕ
E
Pe
pi
You will notice that at 45 degrees, the saw blade no
longer reaches the table. DO NOT RAISE THE TA-
BLE. Instead, put some flat packing, such as parti-
cleboard or plywood, under the workpiece to raise it
up to the blade. The tip of the blade will make a score-
line across the packing in your first cut, as seen in Fig.
54.
Before making a cut, CHECK THAT THE SAW
BLADE WILL NOT HIT THE NOTCHED WORK
STOP, Remove the notched work stop if necessary, or
insert some wide packers as in Fig. 34 and stop push-
ing the saw as soon as you have cut through the
workpiece.
=avel cuts put maximum load on the workpiece and a
e saw, Hold the workpiece very firmly. If you have a Fig, 54
step, re-cut or slight burn along the cut, try making a
shaving cut as in Fig. 35. Use the “locked on” trigger
technique.
The angle scales on portable saws are rarely accurate.
Cut two stralght pieces of scrap at 45 degrees, and
see if they form a right angle. Adjust the blade angle
until they do, and make an appropriate scribe mark on
the saw's calibration scale.
Fig. 54 shows a permanent platform which you can
make for bevel sawing and for overhead routing (see
Fig. 103). It has vertical fences at both ends, and they
have sandpaper strips glued on to prevent the work-
piece creeping during sawing/routing. The platform
should be a very snug fit on the table, with no sid-
eways movement. Glue shallow strips or blocks along
both sides of the platform. If it is a snug fit, then the
score line in the platform, the 45 degree bevel cut in
the front fence, and the notch In the rear router fence
will all serve as excellent reference marks for lining up
future cuts.
; CS
or cutting a reverse angle bevel — such as for wall
lining board or for spline grooves — simply feed the Fig. 55
workpiece in from the lefi-hand side as in Fig. 55. You
can achieve any bevel up to 45 degrees by turning the
cr
workpiece onto its opposite face, or by feeding from men om
the opposite side, ; OO AND ELBOW |
; [ UU MUST BE RIGID ;
Cut bevels (and spline grooves) two or four at a time 4 к ; a == 3
for length accuracy.
CLIMB CUTTING
Screw two identical parallel-sided packing pieces to
the work stops as in Fig. 56 so you can start off with
the blade behind the work. Cut with the back of the
blade by pulling the saw slowly towards you.
YOU MUST KEEP YOUR ARM AND WRIST RIGID,
YOU MUST TIGHTLY LOCK THE SAW BLADE
HEIGHT ADJUSTER.
¿e saw will want to "climb up” on the work. You must
Zontrol it firmly. A climb cut should give a smootiher
finish on the top face of the wood, and is useful for
cutting architrave or moulding.
A tungsten tipped blade is essential for clean climb
cutting. Fig, 56
KERFING (BENDING WOOD)
Spectacular effects can be created by kerfing a solid
piece of wood. Make a series of cuts — evenly spaced
— almost all the way through the wood. How much to
leave uncut is a matter for experiment. but it should
generally not be less than 1mm or not more than
5 mm.
Kerfing can be done in the crosscut or table saw
modes. Fig. 57 shows a simple jig which is clamped to
the table in the crosscut mode. It has an adjustable
“finger” which is the width of the blade. After making
the first cut against some packing the finger fits into
each successive cut ta give even spacing.
A
placing the finger with a pencil mark, the width of the
blade, on a work stop packer. The packer must be
taller than the workpiece, and screwed or clamped to
the work stops (Fig. 58).
You line up the cut you've just made with the pencil
mark, and make the next cut. If you want to change
the spacing between cuts, simply move the pencil
mark.
When making kerfing cuts, use the locked on trigger
technique. Feed the saw evenly and slowly. Make sure
the workpiece has plenty of back-up at the exit of the
cut to minimise splintering.
The two top pieces in Fig. 59 are the same thickness, so each reguires
the same number of cuts to form a right angle. You will notice that the
closer the cuts are together, the tighter the radius of the bend.
The number of cuts required varies with the thickness of the wood, the
width of the saw blade, and the amount left uncut. Experiment on an
off-cut of the material you'll be using.
If you find that say 14 cuts gives you less than a right-angle, and 15
cuts gives you more than a right-angle, try making the first and four-
teenth cuts a little wider than the rest.
A
right-angle.
After cutting, use extreme care and patience in bending the wood. If
using dry or hard or short-grained material, try using steam, or rub the
uncut face with hot water as you gently flex the piece more and more
into the desired radius.
Strengthen a Kerf by filling the cuts with body filler, tinted to a similar or
contrasting colour. You can also try mixing the saw- dust witn PVA
glue. Fill the cuts with the kerf open, so that closure will force the filler
into the corners, or use a putty knife to force it in.
GENERAL OPERATING HINTS
S
similar result can be achieved more simply by re-
ee
ce PE DA
joe WEE e. ЗЕ
= E
E
ee i
=
Lh,
re i
complete half-circle should take exactly twice as many cuts as a
AFETY Fig. 59
ex hands outside the bearing channels and well out of the path of the blade. Hold the workpiece firmly, ar use clamps
if necessary.
Never pull the spinning blade back on an off-cut. Allow it to stop spinning before pulling back.
Before making a cut, make a test traverse with the saw without switching on the power, and without the workpiece in
position. This ensures that the blade won't cut anything except the wood.
Wear eye protection. Work in a well-lit, uncluttered environment.
Always disable the workcentre when finished for the day.
Release dy safety guard, remove the trigger strap and unplug the saw. Keep children out of the workshop except when
supervised.
QUALITY OF CUTS
ir
Eliminate arbor float or saw sloppiness, and use a fine toothed TCT blade. (30 — 60 teeth as a general rule).
Feed the saw gently. Use the “locked on” trigger technique, as described an Page 10.
* Test each cut on some scrap first. Make finishing or shaving cuts.
When planning crosscuts, mitres and rebates, consider whether they're best cut in the crosscut made, or in the table saw
mode as on Pages 21 and 22.
If the workpiece is manageable (not toa long, heavy or wide) you may find it more comfortable and easier in the table saw
mode,
Page 16
TABLE SAW
TEN IMPORTANT RULES FOR TABLE
«SAW OPERATION
ME 1
rollow them at all times for safe, accurate work.
RULE +1 Always keep fingers clear of the blade.
Note from Fig. 60 that the right hand is halding the
workplece down on the table and against the fence;
the left hand has the fingers bunched together, out of
line with the blade. Never trail fingers behind the work.
RULE +2 Never reach over or behind a spinning
blade. You must keep the table (and floor) clear of
scraps but switch off the power and wait until the
blade stops before removing scraps or before remov-
ing a workpiece.
RULE +3 Always use the safety guard when
through ripping. Lower it to just allow the workpiece
to pass under (Fig. 60). Make sure when fitting the
blade/riving knife assembly that the blade at full
height will not hit it. Make sure that one of the two lugs
underneath the table is locking the chassis from
sliding.
Y ULE #4 Always use the rip fence when ripping.
A rip freehand, and never feed into the back of the
blade.
RULE +5 Always set the fence exactly parallel to
the blade, and lock it securely in both slots. There is
one exception to this rule. If the workpiece tends to
jam between the fence and the riving knife, you may
increase the rear fence setting by up to 1mm. Fig. 61
shows (exaggerated) an extremely dangerous
misalignment of the blade and fence. The workpiece
will jam and be flung out towards you at high speed.
Make it a habit never to stand in line with the blade.
RULE #6 Always use a push-stick or jig when ripping
narrow pieces. Use a notched push-stick (Fig. 62) and
keep pushing the piece between the blade and the fence
until it Is clear of the blade. Use the other hand, or a piece
of scrap, in front of the blade, to press the workpiece
firmly against the fence. Do not apply pressure against
the side of the blade.
Cor extra safety and accuracy, make a “hold-down” jig
\ ig. 63) or a repetition ripping jig (Fig. 77).
RULE #7 Always keep control of the piece between
the blade and the fence. Best control-is achieved if the
wider part of the workpiece is next to the fence, as in Figs.
60 and ES. Also, you don't have to allow for blade thick-
ness in fence setting.
RULE #8 Always prevent narrow off-cuts jamming in
the blade slot. When ripping a small amount (1-6mm) off
a short piece (Fig. 65) switch off the power just before
finishing the cut. Wait until the blade stops, and break off
the off-cut. Or make twa cuts, resetting the fence, creat-
ing two loads of sawdust rather than a narrow off-cut.
RULE #9 Always make sure the workpiece is well sup-
ported before, during and after the cut. Avoid situations
where the workpiece may become jammed in the blade
slot, as in Tongue & Grooving, edge work on thin material,
and in end grain work (pp. 19 & 20).
RULE #10 Always wear eye protection. Keep long hair,
loose clothing, jewellery etc. from becoming entangled in
.¿1e blade.
“QUALITY OF CUTS
Work with a lowered saw blade (Fig. 64). It is safer and
gives a smoother, less splintered cut. Improve the quality
of your cuts by ripping slightly oversize, then setting the
fence slightly closer to the blade and making a finishing
cut of less than one blade-width.
Fig. 60
ER
7 ;
GUARD NOT SHOWN
Fig. GUARD NOT SHOWN Fig. 65
RIPPING LONG PIECES
When ripping a long piece which will overhang the rear
of the table by more than half its length, either have a
friend help you, or rig up a "tail-out” support. In Fig. 66
the Triton Extension Table is being used for support.
Try to keep the workpiece moving, even slowly, during
a long rip. Pauses can cause slight steps in the cut. A
finishing cut may help (Fig. 64).
RIPPING LARGER SHEETS
For ripping in the range 260 — 455 mm, turn the table
around so that the locking keys fit into the holes label-
ed “WR" — Wide Ripping. Make sure that the lug un-
derneath the table is locking the slide chassis in the
rear position.
Refit the riving knife/rip guard assembly behind the
blade, as in Fig.67. Remove and refit the rip fence so
the low side of the fence is closest to the blade. The
scales from 185 to 455 mm will now be visible in the
windows.
Note the hand positions in Fig. 67. The left hand is
pushing the work against tne не the right hand is
merely supporting the off-cut.
For ripping wider than 455 mm, the Triton Extension
Table attaches to the Workcentre to enable accurate
fence setting to 1225mm from the blade. As well, it
provides excellent support for long beams in the
crosscut or overhead router modes.
Alternatively, for ripping very large sheets, remove the
power saw from the chassis. Remove the trigger strap,
release and check the saw's guard, and use it hand-
held against a guide.
RIPPING THICK WOOD
You can double your maximum depth of cut by turning
the wood over, end for end, making a second cut. If
the blade was square to the table, and if the wood was
dressed square, the two cuts should be in line
The riving knife/guard cannot be fitted for the first cut,
but the riving knife alone must be fitted for the second
cut. When double ripping short or narrow pieces, use
a push-stick and a piece of scrap to form a tunnel as in
Fig. 68, or use the hold-down jig shown in Fig. 63.
PLANING A FACE
A tungsten tipped blade, or a planer blade, can give an
excellent finish on poorly dressed, weather-stained or
painted material. It can also remove a slight step left
after double ripping.
Put the workpiece between the stationary blade and
the unlocked fence so it is lightly touching both blade
and fence. Adjust the workpiece and fence (if neces-
sary) until the readings in both fence windows are the
same. Remove the workpiece and move the fence 1 or
2 mm closer to the blade. Lock it off securely,
Hold the workpiece against the fence and push it past
the blade. Use a piece of scrap and/or a push-stick to
control the workpiece, especially with narrow pieces.
After the first cut, turn the workpiece over end for end
and make a second cut. Fig. 69
PLANING AN EDGE
When planing an edge, keep the blade as low as pos-
sible (Fig. 70) and try not to pause during the cut. Each
piece treated this way will be dressed to the same
width.
For planing bowed lengths of wood, screw a long,
straight wooden extension to the rip fence. Plane the
convex edge first, and then the concave edge. Or tack
a straight piece to the bowed piece, and run the
straight piece along the fence. After dressing one
edge, remove the straight piece and dress the other
edge.
Page 18
=e
PLANING A WIDE SHEET
To remove a small amount from a wide sheet (up to
1225mm wide), use the optional extension table and
nass the sheet between the blade and the fence.
S$ merwise, attach two identical wooden fence liners to
die rip fence on either side of the blade (Fig. 71). Put
some thin packing between the fence and the rear
fence liner, The thickness of packing will determine
how much you plane off with each pass, but the pack-
ing must be no thicker than the saw blade.
Line up the back fence liner with the outside face of
the blade (left-hand side) and lock the rip fence in
position.
Note the hand positions in Fig. 71. Because you have
support directly behind the blade, apply pressure
against the back fence liner as soon as the workpiece
reaches it.
EDGE REBATING
By lowering the saw blade and adjusting the fence,
you can make a wide variety of rebates. In setting
blade height, mark the desired depth of cut on a piece
of wood, Lay the piece alongside the blade, to leave
both hands free for adjusting the saw blade height.
Refer Fig. 43.
Always make the first cut with the wood on edge
2\ 19. 72) and the second cut on the flat (Fig. 73).
=nerwise, a narrow workpiece could jam in the blade
slot just as you finish the second cut, causing an
accident.
The safest method of making the second cut is shown
in Fig. 73. The off-cut will fall harmlessly aside.
The second cut could also have been made with the
fence set in close to the blade. However, the small off-
cut would have become trapped between the blade
and fence, and would have been flung out at high
speed. If using this method, DO NOT STAND DI-
RECTLY IN LINE WITH THE BLADE, and switch off
the power just before completing the second cut. Fin-
ish off with the blade coasting to a halt.
TONGUE & GROOVING
Study the section above, and make two identical re-
bates from opposite faces. This will leave you with a
perfectly central tongue.
[re safety provisions for edge rebating doubly apply
1 "ong ue & grooving.
DO NOT MAKE THE FINAL CUTS WITH THE
WORKPIECE ON EDGE.
The cuts must be made as per Figs. 74 & 75, or the
tongue could jam in the blade slot as you make the
final cut(s), causing a serious accident.
To make a matching, centralised groove, move the
fence outwards by one blade thickness, and make two
cuts from opposite faces. If you have any waste left in
the groove, move the fence out again and make two
more cuts.
Hint: Test tongue & grooving settings on small spare
pieces of the wood you'll be using. If you are joining
long pieces, make the test pieces a loose fit. Other-
wise, you'll have difficulty cramping the long pieces
together.
EDGE WORK ON THIN MATERIAL
If you want to rebate or tongue & groove thin boards,
the work- piece could fall down into the blade slot.
Attach a high fence liner to the rip fence (Fig. 76) to
£'e vertical support to the workpiece, and use a piece
УМОМ or hardboard with a thin slot in it for the blade.
Securely tape it to the table.
A more permanent “mask” can be made, to fit under-
neath the fence, and allow for fence adjustments. Use
ply or hardboard and cut a narrow blade slot and slots
for the clamping fest and windows for the calibration
scales.
aa
PAE
PACKING
BEHIND
BACK
FENCE
ee
НЕ Кой
i
a
re
x
Se
A о оо Оааия
Ся
Sa Ho m
a i te
CUT ON EDG
= + y
se =
Re ee ee
ee
e ee a
PE, e panas NS = = ri SN KR лы Son
- и
hoe ete RR ооо Rr Ка
AA ЛЕНИН НЕЕ НЕС
” FIRST CUTS ON EDGE
ET
A amo,
Fig. 73
+. A =
o
MAKING A REPETITION RIPPING JIG
For ripping narrow pieces safely, either make a hold-
down jig (Fig. 63) or a repetition ripping jig (Figs. 77 &
78)
For the latter, use a thick piece to give good support
on the table. A thinner piece will tend to rock against
the fence. Rebate it as shown in Fig. 78, and attach a
handle and an angled push block. The angle on the
push block will help hold the workpiece down on the
table. You will probably at some stage cut into the
push block, so keep screws or nails above the line of
the blade. Use the jlg to push the work well past the
back of the blade.
WORKING ON END GRAIN
Screw a straight, wide board onto the rip fence, and Fig. 77 Fig. 78
use packing If necessary to get the board exactly
square to the table. Make up a “rider” as shown in Fig.
79 to snugly slide along the top of the board. Use it to
hold the workpiece square to the table as you slide it
past the blade.
If making splined joints or joining end-grain (Fig. 80)
cut all pieces from opposite faces, without changing
the fence setting. This will ensure the grooves line up.
Use contrasting or matching material for the splines. If
making the spline material yourself, see Fig. 65.
Make sure the workpiece cannot jam in the blade
slot during or after the cut. Such an accident is pos-
sible if making a through- tenon in thin material. Use a
“mask” (Fig. 76) or better still, the correct tenoning
method (Fig. 87).
BEVEL RIPPING
Bevels up to about 450 mm wide are best cut in the
crosscut mode (Fig, 54). For longer bevels, use a
router (Fig. 115) or make up a jig as shown in Fig. 81.
Cut four blocks to the angle you want. Trim them to
exactly the same length using a backstop (Fig. 89) and
attach them to a straight board, which is screwed to
the rip fence. Fix a parallel-sided piece of rigid ply or
hardboard to the angled faces. a little taller than the
blocks.
For supporting the bottom edge of the workpiece use
the method shown in Fig. 82 to bevel one long edge of
a board at least 200 mm wide. File a shallow recess in
the bevelled edge for the blade. Adjust the fence so
the angled face is just touching the side of the blade.
Tuck the bevelled edge under the angled face and fix
the board to the table using clamps, or a cleat or bolts
through the spare table slot.
Fig. 82 shows how to bevel narrow pieces where you
cannot use the bottom edge for support. Clamp a
straight piece of scrap exactly square to the back face
of the workpiece. Slide the scrap along the top edae oi
the angled face, which is a little taller than the four
angled blocks.
Before using this jig for a job, practise the hand posi-
tions and techniques on some scrap wood.
RIPPING A TAPER
Never angle the fence to the blade for taper
ripping.
Make up an adjustable jig to angle the workpiece to
the blade. It can be a separate jig, but Fig. 83 shows a
combined repetition and taper ripping jig. The two
pieces are hinged at the front and can be locked open
at any angle, or locked fully closed. The angled push
block holds the workpiece down.
Set the fence exactly parallel to the blade, and slide
the jig and angled workpiece through.
Page 20 Fig. 83
CROSSCUTTING
Make sure the protractor slides freely in the slot. If not,
see Page 8. Lubricate the slider strip.
«ld the timber firmly against Face A of the protractor
„WW shown in Fig. 84, and move it smoothly past the
blade. The back of the blade should not re-cut or burn
the timber. If it does, see Page 9.
AVOID SMALL OFF-CUTS, They could fall down the
blade slot, causing serious damage if they Jam. If you
have to remove say 5mm from a piece, remove it in
two cuts, each of one blade width. This way (shown in
Fig. 85) you reduce the solid off-cut to sawdust. Also
by making one or two shaving cuts you can “creep up”
on your line, ensuring great length accuracy.
NEVER SET THE FENCE AS A STOP AS SHOWN IN
FIG. 86. If the off-cut caught between the spinning
blade and the fence twists even slightly, the blade will
fling it out towards you, causing possible injury and
damage. Two correct ways of setting a stop are
shown in Fig. 88 and Fig. 89.
TENONING
The fence may be used as a stop for tenoning (Fig. 87)
Ey because the blade is lowered and is not cutting all
2 way through the workpiece, i.e. there is no solid
off-cut.
Butt a square-dressed end of the workpiece against
the fence, and make a series of cuts an all four faces,
moving the workpiece away from the fence by one
blade width after each cut.
Before cutting your tenons, it's a good idea to decide
what diameter router bit you will use for the mortices.
Make the tenons to suit the bit, so that the mortices
require only one cut of the router.
If your timber was dressed square, the resulting ten-
ons must all be identical, and must be central and
square on the end of the workpiece.
REPETITION CROSSCUTTING
If you have to crosscut a number of short pieces to the
“ame length, you may set the fence as a stop, but you
i Hist have a spacer block (Fig. 88) screwed or
clamped to the fence. The spacer block gives the off-
cuts room to move, so there is very little chance of
them being jammed and flung out as described above.
Try to make the block a standard thickness, say
20 mm. It will make fence setting easier.
If you are cutting short pieces, you may find that they
tend to dance along the side of the blade, suffering
slight re-cut damage. Cut them against a backstop as
described below, so you can keep firm hand control
over the pieces.
CROSSCUTTING AGAINST A BACKSTOP
Screw a straight extension piece to Face A of the
protractor (Fig. 89) and make the piece high enough
so that it is still strong after a cut or two at full blade -
height. You can clamp a length stop to the extension
je, either side of the blade, and so keep firm hand
= .ntrol over both pieces,
The first cuts through the backstop — generally at O
degrees and 45 degrees — will provide excellent
sighting marks far future cuts.
MITRE CUTTING
Set the protractor at 45 degrees, and lubricate the
slide strip. Hold a straight piece of wood against Face
A of the protractor as shown in Fig. 90, and cut about
100 mm off the end of it. Place the off-cut against the
main piece and see if they form a perfect right-angle.
Adjust the angle if necessary, as per Figs. 49-52.
If the wood you are cutting is flat on both faces, you
can easily cut the opposite mitre by turning the piece
over, end for end, for the second cut (Fig. 91). If you
have a small saw, you may have to lock the slide chas-
sis in the forward position (Fig. 8, P. 5).
MITRE CUTTING MOULDING
If the workpiece cannot be turned over, (picture fram-
ing or deeply contoured architrave) the way to cut the
opposite mitre is shown in Figs. 92 and 93. Make the
first cut with the workpiece held against Face A, and
the second cut with it held against Face B.
You will find that any piece cut on Face A, when
placed against a piece cut on Face B, will always form
a perfect right-angle, whatever the angle of the
protractor. For example, if the protractor was acciden-
tally set at 44 degrees, Face B would give you 46
degrees, Similarly, 25 degrees off Face A will give you
65 degrees off Face B. For cutting wide pieces against
Face B, lock the slide chassis in the forward position.
CUTTING TO ALENGTH STOP
The way to ensure perfect length accuracy when mitre
cutting is to fit an extension fence to Face B of the
protractor, as in Fig. 94, and to use a length stop.
Say you are making a square picture frame. Crosscut
the four pieces roughly to length. Set the protractor at
45 degrees, and test with some scrap as described
above. When satisfied with the angle setting, mitre-cut
one end of each of the four pieces, holding them
against Face A. Then butt each of the ends you have
just cut into the mitred stop which is clamped to Face
B. Make the second cut. All four sides will be exactly
the same length, and the corners should be perfect.
If you are making a rectangular frame, cut the two long
pieces against the length stop, then reset the stop for
the two short pieces. If making a hexagonal frame, set
the protractor at 30 degrees. If making an octagonal
frame, set it at 2212 degrees.
CUTTING MORE THAN 45 DEGREES
Hold the workpiece against Face B for cutting angles
greater than 45 degrees, or for cutting short tapers.
You may have to lock the slide chassis in the forward
position.
If vou have fitted an extension fence as shown in Fig.
95, you should glue sandpaper to it for improved grip.
Note the use of the stop block which can be used if
the workpiece is relatively short. The stop helps you
hold the workpiece, and also ensures that both cuts
(from opposite faces) are exactly opposite each other,
without any need for measuring or marking.
If making a number of symmetrical fence pickets for
example, the pieces may be too long to use a stop
block. Square a line around the workpieces, say
100 mm back from the ends, and establish by trial and
error the correct starting position for the first picket.
When you have found it, translate the squared line
onto the extension fence (Fig. 95) and use it to line up
succeeding pickets. Fig. 95 i a
Page 22
Suc
e
E
=
Ee
Ee
Es
Coe
USING DISCS
FACEPLATE SANDING
f&“ecially fabricated aluminium discs and self-
«.nesive abrasive pads are available from us, or pos-
sibly through your Triton dealer. They are available in
three sizes, 180mm (77), 200 mm (8") and 230 mm (9")
diameter. Arbor size must be specified when ordering.
If you wish to make your own disc, glue coarse and
fine sandpaper to a metal or stone cutting disc avail-
able from your hardware store. Use it as shown in Fig.
96.
Home-made discs will flex a little, so after roughing
out the shape, apply only light pressure to true up the
cut and remove burn marks.
You can use many different types of glue, but Disc
Cement enables you to readily peel off sandpaper
which has become worn or clogged.
METAL CUTTING
If using a metal cutting disc on your saw, generally use
it in the crosscut mode. Protect the table surface from
haing burnt by sparks or hot metal. Preferably clamp
“- work to the table or to the work stops. IT IS ES-
SENTIAL THAT YOU WEAR SAFETY GLASSES.
TILE CUTTING
Fit a stone or ceramic disc to your saw. Because of the
many different tile types, you should experiment in
elther the table saw or crosscut mode to see which
methad is more reliable and/or gives the cleanest
edge.
In the rip made (Fig. 98) a slotted sheet of hardboard is
taped down to the table to protect the paint-work. The
disc just shows above the hardboard. Slide the tiles
face down against the fence, to score the glaze. In the
crosscut mode (Fig. 99) the blade height adjuster Is
loosened, and the disc moved backwards and for-
wards across the tile, cutting a little deeper with each
pass. This is an excellent way of cutting slate or quarry
tiles, but should only be attempted with certain saws.
The saw must have a firm and smooth action when the
blade is adjusted up and down.
IT IS ESSENTIAL THAT YOU WEAR SAFETY
GLASSES. You should also wear a dust mask, or at
fi iyst a handkerchief over your nose and mouth.
FITTING A JIG-SAW
(SABRE SAW)
Fit the jig-saw to the slide plate of the optional Router
& Jig- saw Table, following the separate instructions
(Fig. 100). If you don't wish to disturb the router clam-
ping brackets (if fitted) you can obtain an extra slide
plate from us or your dealer.
Use the jig-saw upside-down in conjunction with the
separate table top (Fig. 101).
In use, don't try to cut a tight radius in thick material.
Rather edge up to the marked line in a series of shall-
— ower cuts, if necessary whittling away the waste.
/-бнар watching the blade to see if you are pushing it
wil-line on corners.
Feed the workpiece slowly, particularly when cutting
along the grain, or when using fine-toothed blades.
Smoking or burn marks on the cut edges indicate the
corners were too tight, or cut too quickly, Overheating
a blade can often dull it rapidly.
Page 23
OVERHEAD
ROUTER
Hemove your saw and saw chassis, and replace it with
the router clamped to its sliding steel plate.
The optional Router & Jig-saw Table now has its own
work table for use in the shaper mode, and dark grey
steel fences have replaced the aluminium fences
shown in this manual, The operating techniques are
the same.
CROSS-TRENCHING (DADOING)
When working with long, wide or heavy pieces (such
as shelving, cupboard sides etc.) cross-trench as
shown in Fig. 102 or 103. If angle-trenching (such as
for louvres, staircases etc.) remove the work stops
and clamp a straight wooden guide across the table at
the desired angle.
The router cutter will probably not reach the work-
piece even at full cutter depth. DO NOT RAISE THE
TABLE. Rather put some flat packing under the work-
piece, or build a platform as in Fig. 103.
If you ever do raise the table, make sure you lower it
again when re-fitting your saw, or you may cut into the
sub-frame bars under the blade slot.
Check that the cutter cannot hit the notched work
stop. Always do a full traverse of the router slide plate,
with the workpiece removed and with the power switched
off
The router cutter will exert strong sideways thrust on the
workpiece. Preferably clamp it in position as in
Fig. 102.
IT the resulting trench is not exactly square to the edge
which was against the work stops, or if it is slightly curved,
the work- piece probably moved during the cut. Try using
a sandpaper faced fence, or make the trench in two
shallow cuts rather than one deep cut.
A block of wood can be clamped to the channel (Fig. 103)
for “blind” or “stopped” trenches. Visibility is obstructed
in this mode, so the way to accurately position your cuts is
as follows:
If the trench is to be the same width as the router cutter,
make a test “nick” on the back edge of the workpiece, and
use trial and error to find the correct workpiece position.
If the trench is wider than the router cutter, use the
technique shown in Figs. 105 and 106 of “creeping
up” to the lines.
We strongly recommend that you make up a platform
as in Fig. 103. If it is a snug fit sideways on the table,
the cutter notch in the fence will provide an excellent
sighting mark for future cuts. To check that the plat-
form is dead flat and in exactly the right plane to the
router cutter, adjust the cutter downwards until it is
just touching the workpiece. Without switching on the
power, slide the router backwards and forwards and
see whether the cutter scrapes evenly over the top of
the workpiece.
If the wood you want to use is bowed, use carpenters
clamps through the centre slot in the table to flatten
and clamp it down, (Fig. 104). The small protrusion at
the base of the clamp will have to be filed off to allow
the clamp to be dismantled for fitting through the slot.
Make sure the clamp(s) does not foul the path of the
router.
If making a trench which is wider than the cutter, the
first cut should be just inside the right-hand line; as in
Fig. 105. Then move the workpiece over slightly and
make a finishing cut.
You can take wider cuts as you work your way over to
the left-hand line, as shown in Fig. 106.
When making fairly deep trenches, make them as
shown in Fig. 107. By making two shallow passes
rather than one deep pass. the cut will be more accu-
rate, smocther, and the cutter will stay sharp longer.
Page 24
Fig.
104
SHAPER TABLE
urn the router upside-down, and place the separate
\Zuter/jig-saw table on top. Fit the extension fences to
the rip fence of your workcentre, as per the separate
instruction sheet with the Router & Jig-saw Table. Al-
ways wear eve protection when operating.
TRENCHING/REBATING (DADOING)
For making a longitudinal groove (Fig. 108), or an edge
rebate (Fig. 109), set the twa fences exactly in line, and
tighten the four wing-nuts. Fit the safety guard.
Keep both hands visibly on top of the workpiece, and
press it down on the table and against the fences
during the cut.
Always feed from the front of the workcentre, and
make the cut in one smooth pass if possible.
Never trail your fingers behind the workpiece in the
vicinity of the cutter.
Wo
PLANING WITH A ROUTER
Use a sharp straight cutter, preferably tungsten
tipped. The rear extension fence is adjustable out-
wards from the rip fence for planing operations. To set
the gap (which will equal the amount you remove with
each pass) loosen the two rear fence wing-nuis, screw
in the thumb-screws equally, and nip up the wing-
nuts.
Make a visual check, using a straight edge, that the
fences are still exactly parallel.
Use a straight edge to adjust the position of the rip
fence, so that the rear fence is exactly in line with the
arc of the cutter. Make this adjustment every time you
set or change the gap at the rear fence.
If the workpiece can be planed in one pass, set a gap
at the rear fence asin Fig. 111.
a wide face requires two passes, make the first pass
"in Fig. 110 with the fences in line, and make the
second pass with the rear fence gapped (Fig. 111) and
the rip fence reset.
If using a cutter taller than the extension fences, make
all cuts with a gapped rear fence.
Both front and rear fences are slotted where they at-
tach to the rip fence, and should be adjusted in as
close to the cutter as possible,
DIRECTION OF ROTATION
The direction of rotation of the cutter must be carefully
considered. Use a marker pen to draw arrows on the
table to remind you which way the cutter spins. You
must always feed against the direction of rotation,
never with it.
In Fig. 112, the work is being fed on the wrong side of
= i> cutter. The cutter will flex aside, “climb up” on the
£s‘rk, and rip it out of your hands. The workpiece
would become a dangerous projectile. Planing cuts
should be made as shown above, with the cutter
mostly between the extension fences.
FENCES
“IN LINE
se
ae
Se ge
Per Se
Pire оон ООО ООН
ee ER
ea i a к: Y
a CE es
| .
Tue
= —
o Pe
E
E e pe r
¿ir
E e
Fig. 109
TAS ae
Ea
= ER с
E mi ; SE ЛВНСНО
+ но RE a e te
: + с e
o su EE E
с 5 tao
ro
a
pe
PARALLEL 3
GAP BEHIND EU
IEEE
nw
ее e
es ee a
Fig. 111
=
my Sn
E +
me Оо тОаАЙИ AE E
ee = Rae en
E SE SE = Th +
AR a АНИ
es ee A олиооий
EL A.
a
my
un mea 5 i = rE
Po E A ET EUA
+ CNN то еда
ео e o
a ee ts =
= оной
ot
mR
MORTICING
Have the two fences exactly in line.
Set the rip fence so that the warkpiece is in approxi-
mately the right position above the cutter. Take a
scrap of the wood you'll be using, and plunge № onto
the cutter as shown in Fig. 113.
Do not set the cutter too high. If you want to make a
mortice say 15 mm deep, make it in three cuts of 5mm
each.
Slide the piece forwards along the fences for a short
distance and inspect the mortice. Re-adjust the rip
fence, if necessary, and repeat the test elsewhere on
the scrap until you are happy with the positioning.
To determine the beginning and the end of the mor-
tice, it is best to work between two stop blocks
clamped to the fences.
If the workpieces are too long to permit stop blocks
front and back, attach a long straight wooden liner to
the extension fences.
Don't bother chiselling your mortices square at the
ends. Round off the tenons instead.
PLANING VENEERED BOARD
When working with veneered board for a table-top or
cupboards, your saw blade may have left a splintered
edge on the underside of the cut. You can achieve a
razor-sharp edge by planing off a small amount as
shown in Fig, 114.
Loosen the rear fence wingnuts and screw In the
thumbscrews equally, until you have a parallel gap of
say 2mm between the rear fence and the rip fence.
Lock off the wingnuts.
Adjust the position of the rip fence so that the rear
fence is exactly level with the arc of the cutter.
Apply pressure equally to the front and rear fences,
but as you finish the cut, transfer all the pressure to the
rear fence, and pull the workpiece through. lí you set — Fig. 114
the gap at 2mm, you will plane off 2mm with each
pass.
BEVELLING WITH A ROUTER FENCES
By fitting a 45 degree bevelling bit, you can achieve IN LINE
extremely smooth bevels on long pieces, especially
veneered particleboard. Have the two extension
fences in line, i.e. no gap at the rear fence.
Adjust the rip fence position so that no more than half
the cutter is protruding from the fences.
By test cutting on an off-cut of the same thickness
material, raise or lower the height of the cutter until
you are achieving a perfect bevel with a sharp, clean
edge.
If you wish to bevel 19 mm thick material, you will need
a cutter at least 40mm across the base. If such a
cutter is unavailable locally, we can supply you with a
T1230 cutter, which has a 2" shank and a base di-
ace of 40mm, It can bevel material up to 20mm
thick.
SHAPING WITH THE FENCES
Decorative cutters generally have a ball-bearing (or
high speed steel) pilot, which is normally used instead
of the fence.
If your workpiece has an uneven edge, or if the sup-
ort for the pilot suddenly disappears — as in the
evel cut piece shown in Fig. 116 — you should use
the rip fence and extensions rather than the pilot.
The two extensions must be in line, and the rip fence
adjusted so that the pilot is just behind the line of the
fences.
When using a decorative cutter against and across the
grain, the wood sometimes shatters or splits. Re-
adjust the rip fence so that less of the cutter is show-
ing, and make two or three shallow passes rather than
one deep pass. Fig. 116
Page 26
FOLLOWING A PILOT
When edge moulding curved, shaped or angled workpieces, you
some- times cannot use the safety guard. In this case, have the
fences on either side of the cutter adjusted in as close to the cutter
== possible for maximum protection, and keep fingers well clear
E the cutter, Hold the workpiece firmly.
Fig. 117 shows the correct way of feeding the workpiece. It is
being fed against the direction of rotation of the cutter.
Fig. 118 shows the wrong way of feeding the workpiece. It is being
fed with the direction of rotation of the cutter. It could snatch the
workpiece out of your hands.
If you want to rout a decorative edge around all four edges of a
workpiece, try to do so in one continuous operation, rather than
starting and stopping. You will have to keep the workpiece in
contact with the pilot at all times. Just take a little care when
rounding the corners, to make sure the workpiece doesn't move
around to the wrong side of the cutter. To start off, plunge the a
workpiece onto the cutter, mid-way along any edge. {
If vou want to decorate only one edge, plunge the workpiece onto iu
the cutter a little way back from the end of the wood, By forcefully
restraining the workpiece, you can inch it back towards you (mov-
ing with the direction of rotation for a moment) until the pilot is
right on the leading corner of the workpiece. Then make the main
cut, feeding the workpiece correctly against the direction of rota-
tion until you reach the other end of the work- piece.
USING A TEMPLATE GUIDE
If you have a template guide supplied with your router, extend it by
push-fitting a short length of tubing onto the raised lip. Preferably
use aluminium or copper tubing of the correct inner diameter. If
you extend the lip to say 5 mm above the table top, use 6 mm thick Ny
ply or hardboard to make your templates. A WRONG SIDE
Unless you have a very sharp, narrow cutter (to remove less ma- sie
terial) the router should not be used to actually cut out the shape. Fig. 118
Use a jig-saw to rough out the shape. Then attach the template to
the workpiece, (using brads or double sided tape) and run the
template face down along the extended lip of the template guide,
for the router to accurately dress the edge. Fig. 119
Sa
ae
Ce
Ea
Зи
O SEAR
Fo N
=
“SHORT SHANKED CUTTERS
In mounting the router upside-down, you are losing about 8 mm of
depth of cut. Partially withdrawing ithe bit from the router
chuck is dangerous. You increase the risk of the cutter snapping,
and you could damage your router chuck. If depth of cut is a
problem with a particular bit, rather remove the router from the
slide plate and use it hand-held. You may also consider upgrading
your router and cutters to 2" shank size. Shanks are generally
longer, and Ve" cutters can offer longer cutting flutes.
GENERAL ROUTER HINTS
SAFETY
“ Always ensure the router bit fitted has adequate clearance between its outer edge & the table before turning router on.
” Always wear eye protection, for extended use wear a dust mask & ear protection.
Never work free-hand. Always use the fences, or a pilot to support and guide the workpiece.
"Never trail fingers behind the workpiece when using the router in the shaper mode.
"Always consider the direction of rotation of the cutter, and feed from the correct side.
Use the safety guard wherever possible.
€
<=: JALITY OF CUTS
© Always keep cutters sharp. If removing a fairly large amount of material, do so in two or more passes, rather than in one
deep pass.
" Make sure the workpiece is clamped or firmly held when using the router in the overhead mode for cross- trenching or
angle-trenching.
© Always test your proposed cut on an off-cut of the wood you'll be using. Page 27
SEMBLY SECTION с eta ia
CONTENTS TEST CUTS SECTION 9-11 кН я ПЕРО И 20
Working on end grain
Bevel ripping 20
CONVERSION TABLE CROSSCUT SAW Taper ripping 20
1 mm = 6" Recommended operating position 12 Crosscutting 21
2 mm = %2" Repetition crosscutting 12 Tenoning 21
3 mm = 1/8" Making a length gauge 12 Setting the fence as a stop 2
5 mm = sa" Rebating (trenching) 13 Crosscutting to a backstop e
6 mm = 4" Double cutting for thick material — 13 Mitre cutting =
8 mm = Yıs" Plunge cutting for wide material 13 Reverse angle mitres 22
10 mm = 346" Mitre cutting 14 Picture framing to a backstop 22
12 mm = Ve" Adjusting the protractor 14 Cutting more than 45 degrees 22
19 mm = 34" Bevel mitreing (compound cuts) 14 Faceplate sanding 23
25.4 mm = 1" Bevelling 15 Tile cutting 23
35 mm = 1%" Reverse angle bevelling 15 Metal cutting 23
40 mm= 114" Climb cutting : e. 8 5 o 5
42 mm=1%e" Kerfing (bending wood В
50 mm=2" le aia OVERHEAD ROUTER
70 mm = 234" Setting the fence 17 Cross-trenching (dadoing) 24
75mm=53 Correct ripping methods 17 Build a routing platform 24
100 mm=4 Lowered blade/finishing cuts 17 Working with bowed boards 24
1BEmm=7"4" Dealing with narrow off-cuts 17 Recommended cutting method 24
200. mm = 8” Ripping long pieces 18 SHAPER TABLE
205 mm =84 Ripping wide sheets 18 Lengthways trenching (dadoing) 25
235 тт = 97%" Double ripping for thick material 18 Planing a wide face 25
260 тт = 10° Planing an edge 18 Morticing 26
425 mm = 16%" Double planing 18 Planing a narrow face 26
450 mm = 1734" Removing a small amount 45 degree bevelling 26
455 mm= 18" from a sheet 19 Shaping (using the fences) oe
570 mm = 22" Edge rebating 19 Shaping (using pilot bits) £
600 mm = 24" Tongue & grooving 19 Using a template guide 27
700 mm= 27" Edge work on thin materials 19 Short shanked router cutters 27
1225 mm = 48" |
| IMPORTANT AMENDMENT | In July 1987 the Router Hole in the Work Table (as shown throughout this
manual) was deleted from production (after Serial No: 93000). A Router & Jig-Saw Table accessory is required to fit either of
these tools into the Work Centre. Some photos in this manual show the previous configuration of the Router Hole, however
general operating instructions for the Router or Jig Saw remain as shown. Fitting instructions are provided with the accessory.
MAKE SURE YOU GET ONTO THE MAILING LIST
If you want us to Inform you of new developments make sure that you fill in and return the enclosed Warranty Registration
Coupon, Please print clearly & ensure your Serial No. (on back panel) and Post Code are shown, That automatically puts you on
the mailing list.
Among the planned developments are a project book, project and training videos, new accessories, and companion products
Send the coupon to the address shown on it within 28 days of purchase.
All specifications are subject to change without prior notice.
WARRANTY
The Triton Workcentre and accessories are fully warranted to be free from factory imperfections in workmanship or
materials for a period of TWELVE MONTHS from purchase.
The bearings and bearing channels are similarly warranted for a period of FIVE YEARS.
This warranty does not extend to servicing which becomes necessary as a result of accident or abuse.
We will repair or replace any defective part(s) returned by pre- paid freight to the address below. Return freight will be paid
by us. Any warranty claims should be referred to us through our distributors in each state (for speediest service) or through
the dealer/retailer from whom you bought the product. Ensure your Phone No. & Serial No. accompanies any query or
claim.
MADE IN AUSTRALIA BY
14-18 MILLS STREET, CHELTENHAM, VIC., 3192. (03) 584 6977, FAX: (03) 584 5510
Text by G. Lewin —J. Holman Photos by M. Szue - P. Saville Printing by Priden Printing Services Pty Ltd 9/87
DISTRIBUTED BY
\ustralia New Zealand U.K.
fic — Triton Mig & Design Co. — (03] 584-6977 H. M. Fogary Lid — Aki — 729301 WM & M Distributors — (0424) 216887
I5SW — Triton Mfg & Design Ca — (02) 72-0244 — (Chnon — 61457
E. — We pat a — a sea — Wit — 687523 USA.
— CL. Kean ón = 7-8011 ii : a Ore Г Вор.
VA — Стовитейне (Aust > (09) 451-8544 Cariada Triton U.S.A. — P.O. Box 87, Oregon Ciy, ORS704
as Argus Agencies
(002) 34-8344 Я Sales — (4161 743-7
1003) 4427977 Grant Broihers Sale (476) 240 PUA 00687
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising