IDentiPASS™ HARDWARE INSTALLATION MANUAL

IDentiPASS™ HARDWARE INSTALLATION MANUAL
IDentiPASS™
ACCESS-CONTROL SYSTEMS
HARDWARE
INSTALLATION
MANUAL
www.identicard.com
© Copyright 2000-2006 by IDenticard Systems, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
Table of Contents
Shaded entries are sections exclusively describing prior-version hardware and
procedures involving these prior-version components. See pages A-1 through A-5.
Section A – Key Product Information and Features
Additions and Upgrades
ETL Listing and Certification
Trademark Acknowledgements
Requirements and Recommendations
Important Note About this Manual
System Overview
Product Description
A-1
A-1
A-2
A-2
A-4
A-5
A-6
A-6
Section B – Site and Equipment Preparation
PC Site Preparation
Environment
Telephone Lines
AC Power
Conditioning Equipment
Static Electricity
B-1
B-1
B-1
B-1
B-2
B-2
B-2
Section C – Power and Wiring Requirements
Power Requirements
Wiring and Cable Requirements
Wiring Diagram
C-1
C-1
C-1
C-3
Section D – Series 9000
 Panel Installation
Location
Panel Cabinet Mounting
Overall Diagram of the Series 9000 Panel
Reset Switch (SW1)
SW2 Switch Settings
Grounding
Power Installation and Battery Backup
Relays
Door Position Inputs
Request To Exit (RTE) Inputs
D-1
D-1
D-1
D-2
D-3
D-3
D-4
D-7
D-12
D-18
D-20
Section E – Communications
General Description
Serial Ports
System Architecture
Connecting RS-232 Directly to the Board
E-1
E-1
E-1
E-2
E-2
Table of Contents
Page i
Rev. 1/01
Connecting the RS-232-to-RS-485 Converter
Connecting the RS-232-to-RS-485 Converter to a Leased-Line Modem
Using Modems
Data Broadcast
Using a Multiport Board
Establishing Communications
Replacing an IDenticard® RS-232-to-RS-422 Converter
Jumper Settings
Specifications of the IDenticard RS-232-to-RS-485 Converter
E-3
E-5
E-5
E-5
E-6
E-7
E-8
E-8
E-9
Section F – Card Reader Installation
Readers Supported
Reader Expansion Card
Voltage Selection
Checking the Voltage
Proximity Readers (Not Direct-Connect Type)
Magnetic-Stripe Surface-Mount Reader
Magnetic-Stripe Flush-Mount Reader
Bar-Code ABA Reader
Direct-Powered Proximity Readers
Wiegand Readers
Proximity Wiegand-Output Readers (Separate Power Supply Required)
Proximity Encryption-Output Readers (Separate Power Supply
Required)
Surface-Mount Track 2 Reader/Keypad
Enhanced Reader Module (ERM)
Keypad with Faceplate (Stand-Alone)
Smart Card Readers
Stand-Alone Proximity Readers
PanelClock
F-1
F-1
F-1
F-3
F-5
F-5
F-6
F-9
F-11
F-15
F-18
F-21
F-25
Section G – Remote Input/Output Panel Installation
Description
Location
Panel Cabinet Mounting
Switches SW1, SW2 and SW3
Power Installation and Battery Backup
Communications to the Series 9000 Panel
Checking Start-Up
Input Points
Indicator LEDs
Relays
Connecting Devices with Coils to the Remote I/O Relays
G-1
G-2
G-2
G-2
G-2
G-4
G-5
G-9
G-9
G-10
G-10
G-11
Table of Contents
F-29
F-33
F-34
F-35
F-39
F-43
Page ii
Rev. 1/01
Section H – Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
9000 Panel Overall Diagram
9000 Panel Power Supply Detail
9000 Panel Input Point Detail
9000 Panel Relay Detail
9000 Panel Card Reader Detail
9000 Panel RS-485 Communications Detail
Communications and Wiring Options
Remote I/O Panel Overall Diagram
Remote I/O Input Point Detail
9000 Panel and Remote I/O Specifications
9000 CPU Board Connectors and Switches
H-1
H-2
H-3
H-4
H-5
H-6
H-12
H-13
H-14
H-15
H-16
H-17
Section I – RS-232 Communications Port
Description
Installation
Local Printer Control
Connecting the Serial Device
Modem Control
Using a Local Printer
RS-232 Communications Port Card [For Use with Non-ETLCertified 9000 Panel Only]
Description
Installation
Local Printer Control
Connecting the Serial Device
Modem Control
Using a Local Printer
I-1
I-1
I-1
I-1
I-2
I-3
I-6
I-7
Section J – Extended Distance Reader Kit
Understanding the Function of the Extended Distance Reader Kit
Choosing Correct Reader Formats
Understanding EDRK Specifications
Installing the EDRK Units
J-1
J-1
J-2
J-2
J-3
Section K – IDenticard RF Reader Extender
RF Reader Extender Programmer
Using the Programmer Software
Wizard Setting Screens
Troubleshooting
Technical Specifications
Glossary of Terminology Used in the IDenticard RF Reader Extender
Instructions
Settings Log
RF Reader Extender Used with a Mag-Stripe Reader
RF Reader Extender Used with a Wiegand Reader
K-1
K-1
K-2
K-3
K-11
K-12
K-13
Table of Contents
I-7
I-7
I-8
I-8
I-9
I-13
K-17
K-18
K-19
Page iii
Rev. 3/05
Appendix A – Electrical Specifications
Input Power
Batteries
AA-1
AA-1
AA-2
Appendix B – Servicing and Maintenance
Battery Maintenance and Replacement
Fuse Maintenance and Replacement
AB-1
AB-1
AB-3
Appendix C – Drawings and Specifications for Non-ETL-Certified
Hardware
9000 Panel Overall Diagram
9000 Panel Power Supply Detail
9000 Panel Input Point Detail
9000 Panel Relay Detail
9000 Panel Card Reader Detail
9000 Panel RS-485 Communications Detail
Communications Without a Multiport Board
Communications Using a Multiport Board (DigiBoard®)
Remote I/O Panel Overall Diagram
Remote I/O Input Point Detail
9000 Panel and Remote I/O Specifications
AC-1
Appendix D – IDenticard Modem Programmer
About These Instructions
What Does This Program Do and Why Use It?
Prerequisites
How Do I Use This Software?
Troubleshooting
AD-1
AD-1
AD-1
AD-1
AD-1
AD-4
Appendix E – IDenticard NetLink Programmer
About These Instructions
What Does This Program Do and Why Use It?
What Is the NetLink Converter?
How Do I Use This Software?
Cabling Scheme for RS-485 Communications
Troubleshooting
NetLink Setup with Gateways
AE-1
AE-1
AE-1
AE-1
AE-2
AE-6
AE-7
AE-9
Appendix F – Sample Door Wiring Configuration
AF-1
Appendix G – Installing Increased Cardholder Capacity
Installing Increased Cardholder Capacity on the ETL-Listed Series 9000
Panel
General Information
Installation Instructions
AG-1
AG-1
Table of Contents
AC-2
AC-3
AC-4
AC-5
AC-6
AC-7
AC-8
AC-9
AC-10
AC-11
AC-12
AG-1
AG-1
Page iv
Rev. 3/05
Diagram
Installing Increased Cardholder Capacity on the Prior Version of the
Series 9000 Panel
General Information
Installation Instructions
Diagram
Table of Contents
AG-2
AG-3
AG-3
AG-3
AG-5
Page v
Rev. 3/05
List of Illustrations
Shaded entries are illustrations exclusively depicting prior-version hardware and
procedures involving these prior-version components. See pages A-1 through A-5.
Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) Test Certificate
Power Supply Connections to the Series 9000 Panel
Series 9000 Panel Cabinet
Overall Diagram of the Series 9000 Panel
Reset Switch (SW1) and DIP Switch (SW2) Locations
Panels and PC Ports
Grounding the Series 9000 Panel
Address Settings for DIP Switch SW2
Power Installation and Battery Backup
Terminal Block Locations for Remote I/O and RS-485 Communications
Request-To-Exit (RTE) Inputs
Lithium Battery
DC Backup Battery Installation
Relay Locations and Specifications
Connecting a Door Strike
Suppressor Kit Installation
Suppression Using a Diode
Isolation Relays
Door Position Inputs
Wiring a Door Position Switch to a Door Position Input
Request-To-Exit (RTE) Inputs
Normally-Closed RTE Wiring
Normally-Open RTE Wiring
Series 9000 System Architecture
Connecting RS-232 Directly to the Board
RS-232-to-RS-485 Converter
Connecting the RS-232-to-RS-485 Converter
Communications Using a Data Broadcast
Communications Using a Multiport Board
Replacing an IDenticard RS-232-to-RS-422 Converter
RS-232-to-RS-485 Converter Jumper Settings
Reader Expansion Card
Non-ETL-Certified Reader Expansion Card
Reader Voltage Selection Switches
Reader Voltage Selection Jumpers on Non-ETL-Certified Components
Magnetic-Stripe Surface-Mount Reader
Wiring the Magnetic-Stripe Surface-Mount Reader
Magnetic-Stripe Flush-Mount Reader
Wiring the Magnetic-Stripe Flush-Mount Reader
List of Illustrations
A-3
C-3
D-1
D-2
D-3
D-4
D-4
D-5
D-7
D-10
D-11
D-11
D-12
D-13
D-14
D-16
D-16
D-17
D-18
D-19
D-20
D-21
D-21
E-2
E-3
E-3
E-4
E-5
E-6
E-8
E-8
F-1
F-2
F-3
F-4
F-6
F-7
F-9
F-10
Page vi
Rev. 1/01
Bar-Code ABA Reader
Mounting the Bar-Code ABA Reader
Wiring the Bar-Code ABA Reader
Reader Parameters in Reader Setup
Wiring Direct-Powered Proximity Readers
Wiring Wiegand Readers
Wiring Proximity Wiegand-Output Readers
Wiring Proximity Encryption-Output Readers
Surface-Mount Track 2 Reader/Keypad
Wiring the Surface-Mount Track 2 Reader/Keypad
Wiring the Enhanced Reader Module (ERM)
Keypad with Faceplate (Standalone)
Smart-Card Readers
Wiring Smart-Card Readers
EntryProx Reader
Wiring the EntryProx to the Series 9000 Panel
PanelClock
Mounting PanelClock
Wiring PanelClock
Setting the PanelClock DIP Switch
Remote Input/Output Panels
RI/O Switches SW1 and SW3
RI/O Panel Address Settings
RI/O Panel Address Switch (SW1) Settings
Power Installation and Battery Backup
Wiring the RI/O to the 9000 Panel Using the Three-Wire Configuration
Wiring the RI/O to the 9000 Panel Using RS-485
Wiring the Non-ETL-Certified RI/O to the 9000 Panel
Wiring the RI/O to the Non-ETL-Certified 9000 Panel
Wiring the Non-ETL-Certified RI/O to the Non-ETL-Certified 9000 Panel
RI/O Input Points
RI/O Relays
Suppressor Kit Installation in an RI/O
Suppression Using a Diode in an RI/O
Isolation Relays in an RI/O
9000 Panel Overall Diagram
9000 Panel Power Supply Detail
9000 Panel Input Point Detail
9000 Panel Relay Detail
9000 Panel Card Reader Detail – Magnetic-Stripe Readers
9000 Panel Card Reader Detail – Reader-Keypad Combinations and Keypads
9000 Panel Card Reader Detail – Proximity Readers
9000 Panel Card Reader Detail – Smart-Card Readers
9000 Panel Card Reader Detail – Wiegand Readers
9000 Panel Card Reader Detail – Bar-Code Readers
9000 Panel RS-485 Communications Detail
List of Illustrations
F-11
F-12
F-13
F-13
F-16
F-18
F-23
F-27
F-29
F-31
F-33
F-34
F-35
F-37
F-39
F-42
F-43
F-45
F-46
F-47
G-1
G-3
G-3
G-3
G-4
G-6
G-7
G-7
G-8
G-8
G-9
G-10
G-11
G-12
G-13
H-2
H-3
H-4
H-5
H-6
H-7
H-8
H-9
H-10
H-11
H-12
Page vii
Rev. 1/01
Communications and Wiring Options
Remote I/O Panel Overall Diagram
Remote I/O Input Point Detail
9000 Panel and Remote I/O Specifications
9000 CPU Board Connectors and Switches
RS-232 Communications Port and Chip
Connecting a Printer or Display to the RS-232 Port
Connecting Remote Sites Using Modems
Connecting a Modem and a Printer to a Series 9000 Panel
Connecting a Modem to the RS-232 Port
Connecting a Printer to the RS-485 Port
RS-232 Communications Card [For Use Only with Non-ETL-Certified Series 9000
Panels]
Connecting a Printer or Display to the RS-232 Port Card
Connecting Remote Sites Using Modems
Connecting a Modem and a Printer to a Non-ETL-Certified Series 9000 Panel
Connecting a Modem to the RS-232 Port Card
Connecting a Printer to the RS-485 Port on a Non-ETL-Certified Series 9000 Panel
EDRK Operation and Arrangement
Wiring the Central Unit
Wiring the Remote Unit
Wiring an EDRK and a Series 9000 Panel for Use with a Mag-Stripe (Non-Wiegand)
Reader
Wiring an EDRK and a Series 9000 Panel for Use with a Wiegand Reader
Wiring an EDRK and a Series 9000 Panel via an RS-232 Connection for Use with a
Mag-Stripe Reader
Wiring an EDRK and a Series 9000 Panel via an RS-232 Connection for Use with a
Wiegand Reader
RF Reader Extender Used with a Mag-Stripe Reader
RF Reader Extender Used with a Wiegand Reader
9000 Panel Overall Diagram
9000 Panel Power Supply Detail
9000 Panel Input Point Detail
9000 Panel Relay Detail
9000 Panel Card Reader Detail
9000 Panel RS-485 Communications Detail
Communications Without a Multiport Board
Communications Using a Multiport Board (DigiBoard®)
Remote I/O Panel Overall Diagram
Remote I/O Input Point Detail
9000 Panel and Remote I/O Specifications
NetLink Converter
NetLink Cabling for RS-485 Communications
NetLink Set-Up with Gateways
Sample Door Wiring Configuration
List of Illustrations
H-13
H-14
H-15
H-16
H-17
I-1
I-2
I-3
I-4
I-5
I-6
I-7
I-8
I-10
I-11
I-12
I-14
J-1
J-3
J-5
J-7
J-8
J-9
J-10
K-18
K-19
AC-2
AC-3
AC-4
AC-5
AC-6
AC-7
AC-8
AC-9
AC-10
AC-11
AC-12
AE-1
AE-6
AE-7
AF-2
Page viii
Rev. 1/01
Section A — Key Product Information and Features
Additions and Upgrades
Thank you for choosing the IDenticard® Series 9000 Access Control System! Our on-going
commitment to quality and to the latest technology has produced redesigned and upgraded Series
9000 components. The main features of the panel have not changed, but we have made the
enhancements listed below.
We are also pleased to announce that our new, upgraded hardware has been ETL listed for
compliance with UL294, CE and CSA standards. See page A-2 for details.
The improvements:
• Surface mount technology to reduce the size of the panel board, reduce power consumption
and increase battery backup time.
• Pin-for-pin compatibility with the existing panel board means there is no need to relearn
board layout, and it allows replacement of an old board with the new design. The new
control panel will retrofit into existing installations. All existing devices will connect to the
new board using the same connectors.
• DIP switches now replace jumpers for setting card reader voltages.
• RS-485 communications can be used with the new Remote I/O Board. The old Remote I/O
will also work with the new panel, allowing use of the new panel in existing installations.
• An RS-232-to-RS-485 converter is built into the board, allowing direct connection to the
polling PC if the panel is within 50 feet of the PC.
• The RS-232 Communications Port Board has been replaced by a chip that is installed in a
socket on the board for use with autodial modems.
• The panel power transformer is now connected to the panel via a convenient quick-connect
connector.
• The AC and DC fuses are now more convenient and easier to insert and remove.
• A new Reader Expansion Card and Remote I/O Board have been designed for the new
panel. They are intended for use only with the new panel and cannot be used with previous
versions of the 9000 panel. Any previous version of the Reader Expansion Card will not
work with the new panel.
• The Reader Expansion Card has been redesigned to utilize a ribbon cable and a keyed
connector to prevent misaligned connections.
• The panel is now contained in a new, smaller, gray-colored enclosure that is also used to
contain the new Remote I/O boards.
Please contact IDenticard Technical Support at 800-220-8096, [email protected] or on the
Web at www.identicard.com/support with any questions on these product improvements.
Key Product Information and Features
Page A-1
Rev. 5/03
ETL Listing and Certification
Our Series 9000 panel has been redesigned and upgraded, as have several of the auxiliary boards
and other optional components that are used with it. We are proud that the Series 9000 board
and these auxiliary components have been ETL listed as certified to meet UL294, CE and CSA
standards.
The next page shows an electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) test certificate verifying that with
minor modification, our Series 9000 panel met the EMC standard used for CE certification. The
modifications were simple and consisted solely of snapping compact ferrite EMI-suppression
core assemblies onto the cables in the panel enclosures. The assemblies used for the certification
testing (manufactured by Fair-Rite Products Corporation) show as items 1-4 under the heading
Product Modifications on the certificate. These assemblies should be snapped on the cables as
close to the terminal points as possible. The only ferrite cores required for use are:
• a single ferrite assembly on the ribbon cable connecting the reader expansion card to the
Series 9000 panel board (see page F-1);
• a single ferrite assembly on the cable connected to TB8 on the remote input/output board
(see page G-6);
• a single ferrite assembly on the cable running from the remote input/output board to TB8 on
the Series 9000 panel board (see page G-6);
• a single ferrite assembly on the Card Reader E cable (TB4 on the Reader Expansion Board
(see page F-1) at the connector.
Trademark Acknowledgements
IDenticard®, Series 9000 and IDentiPASS are trademarks of IDenticard Systems, Inc.
Microsoft®, Windows®, and Windows NT® are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
MIFARE® is a registered trademark of Philips Semiconductors.
ProxPoint, MiniProx, ThinLine II, ProxPro, MaxiProx, MultiProx and EntryProxare trademarks of
HID Corporation.
PowerProxI, MasterProx, SecureProxI, SecureProxII, SlimLine, ValueProx, SelfTest and
QuickFlash are trademarks of Motorola.
DigiBoard® is a registered trademark of Digi International.
Key Product Information and Features
Page A-2
Rev. 1/01
Key Product Information and Features
Page A-3
Rev. 1/01
Requirements and Recommendations
This system has been designed and engineered with state-of-the-art precision to achieve optimum
performance. Getting superior performance from your Series 9000, however, depends upon
making sure that it is installed expertly, with the same degree of care and thoroughness that went
into its design and manufacture.
Over the years we have found that more than 90% of the service calls we receive stem from
improper installation procedures and ill-advised short cuts. Therefore, we have taken special
pains to make this installation manual as complete, as clear, and as easy to follow as possible.
Please always read each section thoroughly before starting the installation steps it describes.
Follow the guidelines exactly as given without assuming that you can skip over any part of this
manual.
There are five principles to keep in mind throughout your installation:
1. Remember that neatness counts! Neat, carefully planned installations not only look more
professional, but they also perform better. Neatly placed wires cut down on the possibility of
electrical interference.
2. Maintain easy accessibility. Mount all panel cabinets in clean and easy-to-reach locations.
3. Use proper shielding. Avoid bare wires or shields in panel cabinets.
4. Keep wires clear. Neatly tie wires along the cabinet’s inside edge. Do not allow them to
touch the circuit board.
5. Use separate housings. Designate a separate cabinet for all external components such as
power supplies, relays, etc. The panel cabinet should be reserved exclusively for the panel
only.
By following these guidelines precisely, you will gain your best assurance of years of outstanding
service and reliability... and of lasting customer satisfaction.
The information contained in this manual is accurate at the time of publication; however, it is our
intention to continually strive for improved product quality and performance. Therefore,
IDenticard Systems Corporation reserves the right to change specifications without notice or
obligation.
IDenticard Systems Corporation
Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA
Key Product Information and Features
Page A-4
Rev. 1/01
Important Note About This Manual
This manual contains instructions, specifications and drawings for both the new, improved
product components and their previous versions. To allow you to readily distinguish between
material in the manual that applies to the new components and material that concerns the
previous versions, we have adopted the following text format conventions:
All instructions, specifications and drawings appearing in normally formatted text – as
this paragraph and the previous one are written – relate to the improved products, unless
otherwise noted in the text. These products were launched starting the second half of
February 2000.
Any instructions or other specifications given directly in the body of the instruction text
that relate solely to the previous version of the product will be highlighted in a thick-lined
box like this paragraph. For drawings, long specification lists or other material that
cannot be suitably enclosed in a border, appropriate headers will appear at the tops of the
relevant pages or above the drawings, etc.
The table below indicates visible distinguishing characteristics that will help you determine
whether the components you are installing are the most recent or the previous versions.
Component
Series 9000 panel enclosure
Series 9000 panel board
Remote input/output board
(RI/O)
Reader Expansion Card
New, ETL-Listed Panel
The enclosure is gray with the
ETL and CE listing sticker on the
side.
Jumpers have been replaced with
DIP switches; no jumpers are
used anywhere on the 9000 panel.
The square, white reset button is
SW3, and some distance away
from it is a vertically mounted 6switch DIP switch labeled SW1.
The card is a long rectangle with
4 terminal blocks for the readers
all located along the bottom edge
of the board.
Previous Panel Version(s)
The enclosure is black with no
ETL sticker on it.
Jumpers are used in many places
on the panel.
The round, white reset button is
S1, and immediately adjacent to
it is a horizontally mounted 8switch DIP switch labeled S2.
The card is nearly square, with 2
terminal blocks on the bottom
edge and another 2 on the lefthand edge.
We hope by making our manual serve for both system versions that we will eliminate potential
confusion in the field during installation and use.
Key Product Information and Features
Page A-5
Rev. 1/01
System Overview
Your system is a distributed database access control and alarm monitoring system. Smart
microprocessor controllers, hereinafter referred to as 9000 panels, gather information from card
readers, alarm input devices and control relays to make decisions based on programming. The
panels communicate with a personal computer, or PC. You will use the PC to program the
panels and receive panel transactions, which are displayed and stored as history.
Your system can expand as your needs grow to accommodate over 2,000 readers, control 18,000
relays, and monitor 18,000 alarm points. The system grows by adding panels.
Adding panels allows you to
expand the Series 9000 as
your needs grow.
Product Description
PC
IDENTICARD ITEM CODES: F60-PCSU OR F60-PCMU
The computer must be a commercially manufactured IBM or 100% IBM-compatible PC.
PANEL
IDENTICARD ITEM CODES: F55-9CTLR/6 OR F55-92RDR/6
The 9000 panel is a dual microprocessor controller with the following standard features:
Key Product Information and Features
Page A-6
Rev. 1/01
•
•
•
•
•
•
Capacity to support up to four card readers and/or keypads
Eight dedicated RTE inputs
Eight four-state supervised door position alarm input points
Eight SPDT relays
6000 cardholder database
4000 transaction buffer
Optional upgrades to the panel permit expansion of the database to accommodate 12,000, 22,000
or 64,000 cardholders. (Expansion beyond 22,000 cardholders will result in some loss of panel
features.)
REMOTE I/O PANEL
IDENTICARD ITEM CODE: F55-RIO/BRD
This microprocessor-controlled panel adds 16 four-state supervised input points and 16 SPDT
relays to the 9000 panel. Up to four Remote I/O panels may be added, enabling the 9000 panel to
handle 72 input points and 72 relays. A Remote I/O panel may be located up to 4000 feet from
its 9000 panel.
READER EXPANSION CARD
IDENTICARD ITEM CODE: F55-RDR/EXPD
This circuit board plugs into the four-reader 9000 panel and allows the connection of four
additional readers (for a total of eight).
ENHANCED READER MODULE (ERM)
IDENTICARD ITEM CODE: F55-ENHNCRDR
When an IDenticard keypad is used with the Series 9000, this ERM interface board is required.
Additional features include an audible beeper and a two-color LED. The ERM may be located
up to 2000 feet away from the 9000 panel and may be used to extend the distance (up to 800 ft.)
of a standard reader.
3-WAY COMMUNICATIONS PORT
IDENTICARD ITEM CODE: F55-232COMM/
A chip installed in a socket on the Series 9000 panel enables an RS-232 serial port on the panel
to be used to send transactions to a local printer and/or to control a dial-up modem.
3-WAY SERIAL BOARD
IDENTICARD ITEM CODE: F55-232COMBD
This circuit board plugs into the Series 9000 panel and provides an RS-232 serial port used to
send transactions to a local printer and/or to control a dial-up modem.
Key Product Information and Features
Page A-7
Rev. 1/01
RS-232-TO-RS-485 COMMUNICATIONS CONVERTER − INTERNAL
This conversion capability is built into the board, allowing direct connection to the polling PC if
the panel is within 50 ft. of the PC. If the distance between the PC and the first panel is more
than 50 feet, an RS-232-to-RS-485 Converter must be used.
RS-232-TO-RS-485 COMMUNICATIONS CONVERTER − EXTERNAL
IDENTICARD ITEM CODE: F55-485/CONV
This external unit can be used with all the Series 9000 panels and converts the RS-485 signal
from the panel to an RS-232 signal for communicating with the PC. This unit must be used with
prior version Series 9000 panels. With the latest version of panels, it is used only if the distance
between the PC and the first panel is more than 50 feet. This converter is also used with shorthaul or leased-line modems, line drivers and/or fiber-optic transceivers. It does not work with
dial-up modems.
CARD READERS
These devices are used to read a unique card number from a cardholder’s badge. The number is
sent to the 9000 panel, which makes the decision of whether or not to grant access. The Series
9000 can use the following reader types:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Magnetic stripe
Barcode
Proximity
Smart card
Wiegand
Keypad
Key Product Information and Features
Page A-8
Rev. 1/01
Section B — Site and Equipment Preparation
To ensure an expeditious installation and start-up for your new system, you must take the steps
given in this section to prepare your site. Begin preparations for installing your Series 9000 by
making certain that those who will serve as primary operators are familiar with the Microsoft®
Windows® environment.
PC Site Preparation
You will need the following at the location where your system PC(s) will be installed:
• Dedicated power lines and grounded outlets
• Telephone lines for voice and optional modem communications
• Power conditioning/UPS system
• Static electricity protection
• Working copies of Series 9000 or IDentiPASS software
Environment
Check the operating environment and power requirements for your equipment. To ensure that
your hardware will function safely and properly, place each hardware component in a suitable
operating environment with an appropriate power source. Consult the users manual or operations
manual provided with your computer for specific requirements for:
• Temperature/humidity
• Maximum altitude
• Power source
• Power frequency
• Power consumption
• Heat dissipation
Telephone Lines
Install a telephone alongside your PC so that operational and troubleshooting instructions may be
given directly to the system operator. Any arrangement that requires a third party to relay
instructions to the system operator will be wholly unsatisfactory.
You may also wish to install a modem line for your computer. This allows you to receive
software updates from the factory and may assist in troubleshooting sessions.
Site and Equipment Preparation
Page B-1
Rev. 1/01
AC Power
Use dedicated power lines for all Series 9000 hardware components. Connect ONLY Series
9000 components to these lines. Electrical outlets should be standard 3-wire (NEMA 5-15R)
grounded outlets, with the ground wire connected to an earth ground.
!
NOTE: If you connect the ground wire to conduit ground, be sure that the conduit
ground is an earth ground.
Conditioning Equipment
Because your computer is sensitive to power fluctuations, power conditioning equipment is
required on all power lines connected to Series 9000 equipment.
UPS
The best protection against power fluctuations is a regulating uninterruptable power supply
(UPS). In addition to protecting against damage from power surges and voltage spikes, a UPS
also protects against data loss. Unexpected termination of the Series 9000 program is one of the
worst things that can happen; data can be lost and files corrupted. This happens when:
•
The computer unexpectedly loses power (power outage).
•
The computer is shut off or rebooted without exiting the Series 9000 program.
In the event of a power outage, a UPS usually will provide your computer with power for about
10 to 20 minutes. This allows you to perform an orderly shutdown of the Series 9000 program
and your computer. A UPS is not intended to keep your system running for hours.
OTHER POWER CONDITIONING DEVICES
Many devices are available to protect equipment from various irregularities, such as electrical
noise and voltage spikes. These devices include line-surge suppressors (also called power
conditioners and line filters) and ferroresonant isolation transformers.
Connect all hardware components through at least one of these devices to protect them from
minor power surges. These devices offer some protection and are inexpensive, although they
have the following disadvantages:
• They do not protect hardware components from large power surges.
• Data held in RAM is lost if there is a power failure.
• System maintenance costs are higher with line-surge suppressors than with uninterruptable
power supplies. However, costs are lower with suppressors than with no power
conditioning devices at all.
Static Electricity
Make sure the operating environment for all Series 9000 hardware is free of static electricity.
We strongly recommend that you take the following protective measures:
Site and Equipment Preparation
Page B-2
Rev. 1/01
•
•
•
Treat carpets with antistatic chemicals (available as sprays found at most computer stores).
Use an antistatic mat connected to ground under your computer desk or table. Do not use
plastic or other synthetic carpet protectors near system equipment. Such protectors generate
large amounts of static electricity.
Ground equipment through a one-megaohm resistor to bleed off the static slowly and
prevent a static discharge from conductive surfaces.
Site and Equipment Preparation
Page B-3
Rev. 1/01
Section C — Power and Wiring Requirements
Power Requirements
SERIES 9000
 PANEL AND REMOTE I/O PANEL
One duplex 110 VAC grounded outlet is required within three feet of a panel. A dedicated
circuit is recommended for maximum reliability. Each panel comes with a power filter that plugs
into the outlet and a 14 VAC, 40 VA transformer that plugs into the power filter.
Each panel comes with a power filter that plugs into the outlet and a 12 VAC, 20 VA transformer
that plugs into the power filter.
The 9000 panel and remote I/O panel are microprocessor-based controllers. As with all
computers, they are sensitive to power fluctuations which exist in many applications.
Consequently, a power filter or conditioner MUST be used for these panels. The power filters
that come with your panels are effective against minor voltage disturbances. A more
sophisticated (and expensive) power conditioner, such as a Sola minicomputer regulator, may be
necessary for extremely “dirty” power.
!
WARNING! Do not plug any equipment other than the 9000 panel into the filtered
power. Doing so could dirty the power supplied to the 9000 panel and cause
unreliable operation.
SUPPLYING MULTIPLE PANELS
If your panels are grouped together, you can use one power conditioner to provide clean power to
all of them. Each panel consumes 20 VA, so your power conditioner must be sized to handle the
power consumption of all the panels. Hard wire the outlets, or use outlet strips to provide filtered
AC to all the 9000 panel transformers. DO NOT attempt to power more than one panel with the
same transformer.
RS-485-TO-RS-232 CONVERTER
One 110 VAC grounded outlet within 6 feet. (See page E-3 for more details.)
Wiring and Cable Requirements
!
IMPORTANT! Drops to panels must ALWAYS be included in all wiring lengths
specified here and anywhere in this manual.
PC TO 9000 PANEL(S)
For RS-485 Communications
2-pair (4-conductor), 18-22 AWG, stranded with overall shield. West Penn No. 3651 (22 AWG),
West Penn No. 3151 (20 AWG), West Penn No. 3751 (18 AWG).
Maximum length: 4000 feet of wire from the RS-485 converter to the furthest panel.
Power and Wiring Requirements
Page C-1
Rev. 1/01
For RS-232 Communications
3-conductor, 18-22 AWG, stranded, with overall shield. West Penn No. 301 (22 AWG), West
Penn No. 302 (20 AWG), West Penn No. 303 (18 AWG).
Maximum length: 50 feet.
3-conductor, 18-22 AWG, stranded, with overall shield. West Penn No. 301 (22 AWG), West
Penn No. 302 (20 AWG), West Penn No. 303 (18 AWG).
Maximum length : 50 feet.
CARD READERS TO 9000 PANEL (DIRECT WIRE WITHOUT READER ENHANCEMENT MODULE)
5-conductor, 18-22 AWG, stranded with overall shield. West Penn No. 3855 (22 AWG), West
Penn No. 3262 (20 AWG), West Penn No. 3280 (18 AWG).
Maximum length: 800 feet.
CARD READER/KEYPAD OR READERS USING THE READER ENHANCEMENT MODULE TO 9000
PANEL
4-pair (8-conductor), 18-20 AWG, stranded with overall shield. West Penn No. 3153 (20 AWG),
West Penn No. 3753 (18 AWG).
Maximum length: 2000 feet.
REMOTE I/O PANEL TO 9000 PANEL
For RS-485 Communications
2-pair (4-conductor), 18-22 AWG, stranded, with overall shield. West Penn No. 3651 (22 AWG),
West Penn No. 3151 (20 AWG), West Penn No. 3751 (18 AWG).
Maximum length : 4000 feet.
For Communications Using the Current Loop
3-conductor, 18-22 AWG, stranded, with overall shield. West Penn No. 301 (22 AWG), West
Penn No. 302 (20 AWG), West Penn No. 303 (18 AWG).
Maximum length : 2000 feet.
3-conductor, 18-22 AWG, stranded, with overall shield. West Penn No. 301 (22 AWG), West
Penn No. 302 (20 AWG), West Penn No. 303 (18 AWG).
Maximum length : 2000 feet.
INPUT (ALARM) POINT FROM PANEL TO CONTACT DEVICE
One twisted pair, 18-22 AWG stranded. Shield is recommended, but not necessary. West Penn
No. 291 (22 AWG), West Penn No. 292 (20 AWG), West Penn No. 293 (18 AWG)
Maximum length: 1000 feet.
OUTPUT (RELAY) WIRING
One twisted pair, 18 AWG stranded; shield recommended but not necessary. West Penn No. 293.
Maximum length: 1000 feet.
Power and Wiring Requirements
Page C-2
Rev. 1/01
!
!
NOTE: Shielded cable is required for RS-485 communications, card readers, and
Remote I/O panels. Although not necessary for operation, shielded cable for
input/output wiring is recommended. Shielding reduces the risk of radio frequency
electrical noise (RFI) generated by the panel and inhibits interference with outside
electronic equipment, such as radio paging systems.
WARNING! Do NOT connect primary power supply to a circuit controlled by a
switch.
Wiring Diagram
Pilot
Lamp
Power Supply
Primary AC Mains
1
2
3
4
Primary Fuse
220-240 VAC
Power Connector
Secondary
Low Voltage
14 VAC
9000 Panel: TB11
R I/O Panel: TB6
Power and Wiring Requirements
Page C-3
Rev. 1/01
Section D — Series 9000
 Panel Installation
IDenticard® Item Codes: F55-9CTLR/6 or F55-92RDR/6
F60-94REVG or F60-92REVG
Location
For wiring convenience, locate the Series 9000 panel near the doors and alarm monitoring points
it will control. Often clusters of panels may be installed in one area. This makes power
distribution and servicing easier. If you are mounting a new panel in an existing black cabinet, it
will still mount in the old cabinet. All existing devices will connect to the new board using the
same connectors. Due to the smaller size of the board, however, you may need to allow for an
additional 6 inches of wire inside the cabinet to reach some of the board connectors.
Panel Cabinet Mounting
The gray panel cabinet has top and
bottom mounting flanges on each end
for ease of installation. It must be
located in an area protected from
moisture and temperature extremes (see
page H-16 for specifications). Hold the
cabinet in place and mark the hole
locations. Do any drilling with the
cabinet removed.
Remove the circuit board from the
cabinet before drilling or enlarging
conduit holes. Do not allow bits of
metal from drilling, filing or punching
to come into contact with the circuit board.
!
!
IMPORTANT! Mount the cabinet in a secure location that is easily accessible.
Ideal locations are an electrical closet, utility closet, or telephone room. Mounting a
panel in areas above a ceiling is not recommended.
WARNING!
• Do not mount the cabinet within 6 feet of high voltage transformers.
• Do not run high voltage (110 VAC) into the cabinet.
• Do not mount ANY auxiliary power supplies, transformers, relays, etc., inside
the panel’s cabinet. Auxiliary power supplies (e.g., for door strikes, proximity
readers, isolation relays, etc.) must be installed in a separate cabinet.
• Ground the cabinet to an earth ground.
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-1
Rev. 1/01
Overall Diagram of the Series 9000 Panel
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-2
Rev. 5/03
Reset Switch (SW1)
The reset switch is a white button located toward the upper
left section of the circuit board. Pressing this button
restarts the program in the panel. This is like rebooting a
computer. Pressing reset will NOT erase the memory of
the Series 9000 panel. If the 9000 panel locks up or
behaves strangely, try pressing the reset button.
On earlier 9000 panels, the reset switch is labeled S2 and
is to the left of the back-up battery connection, J18.
SW2 Switch Settings
SW2 is a dual in-line package (DIP) switch located on the circuit board as shown. Nine separate
switches, labeled 1 through 9, are contained in SW2. Switches 1 through 6 select the panel
address. Switches 7 to 8 are discussed on page I-1. Switch 9 is used with the Remote
Input/Output Board and is discussed in Section G.
!
IMPORTANT! Any changes made to SW2 while the panel is powered will have no
effect until the reset button (SW1) is pressed. It is always necessary to reset the
panel after changing the address/options switch SW2.
SPEED (BAUD RATE)
The speed at which the panel sends and receives data is called the baud rate. The baud rate is set
using switches 7 and 8 of DIP switch S1. All Series 9000 panels in your system must be set to
9600 baud by turning both switches 7 and 8 of S1 OFF. Be sure to set the PC port to 9600 baud
when configuring your Series 9000 software.
ADDRESS
The panel address provides unique communications to any single panel within the network of
panels on a particular port of the PC. Each panel must have an address (1-64) that is
different from any other panel on the same port. A duplicate address on a different port is
permissible (e.g., Port 1, Panel 1, and Port 2, Panel 1).
The address number is set using SW2 switches 1 through 6. Refer to the chart on page D-5 for
the switch settings.
The address number is set using S1 switches 1 through 6. Refer to the chart on page D-5 for the
switch settings.
Although not mandatory, it is recommended that you start at address number 1 for your first
panel and go up in numerical order for all other panels on the port. It is not important that the
numbers be in any order based on the panel’s distance or physical connection point on the
RS-485 network so long as no two panels on the same port share the same address.
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-3
Rev. 5/03
The example below shows five panels on port 1 (a total of 64 are possible), and three panels on
port 2. Note that there are two panel 1’s, panel 2’s and panel 3’s in this system; this is
permissible because they are not on the same port. In this way, it is possible to control 512
panels with the Series 9000 (8 ports × 64 panels per port = 512).
Grounding
!
IMPORTANT! All panels that
are hard-wired to the same
RS-485 network must be at the
same ground potential.
Grounding is necessary to minimize the
chance of damage, data loss, or improper
operation from electrical interference,
including static electricity.
Ground the panel cabinet to a good cold
water (earth) ground by running a 12gauge wire to the unpainted grounding
stud located inside the bottom of the
cabinet. Be sure to also ground the drain
wires of all shielded cables to the
grounding stud.
Connect 12-gauge cold-water ground
wire and all cable shields here.
BOTTOM MOUNTING FLANGE
Early Series 9000 cabinets do not have a grounding stud. Ground these cabinets by running the
ground wire to one of the mounting screws on the flange outside the cabinet. Be sure to scrape
the paint away to ensure good contact. Connect the drain wires of shielded cables to that point.
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-4
Rev. 1/01
Use switches 1-6 in SW2 to set the address of the panel as detailed below.
Address 1
2
Switches
3 4 5
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
on
on
off
off
on
on
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on
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on
on
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6
Address 1
on
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33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
on
off
on
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2
Switches
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6
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Series 9000 Panel Installation
on
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Page D-5
Rev. 1/01
DETECTING A GROUND LOOP
A ground loop will occur when there is a large difference in voltage between the local ground
and a distant ground. This may result when panels are located a great distance away from each
other and are powered by separate electrical services, which is common in large buildings. A
ground loop causes current to flow through the ground wire, which may burn it and interfere
with data communications. If you connect a ground wire and see a spark, the current is too great
and a ground loop exists. A ground loop can be detected with a VOM (volt-ohm meter) as
detailed below:
1. With the VOM set on AC volts, check for voltage between the two grounds that you plan to
connect. If there is a voltage of 5 volts or greater, there may be a ground loop. Set the meter
on DC volts and recheck.
2. Connect the grounds, and watch for sparks. Sparks indicate a high current flow in the ground
wire. If sparks occur, you may have chosen a poor ground for the panel cabinet. Options to
remedy the situation:
• Check to see if there is an alternate ground and use that ground.
• An improper ground at the electrical service entrance may be causing the ground loop.
Contact an electrician or the electric company to see if it can be corrected.
• If the problem cannot be resolved, “float” the panel by removing the local ground and use
a ground from another panel.
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-6
Rev. 1/01
Power Installation and Battery Backup
!
DANGER! NEVER CONNECT POWER (AC OR BATTERY) TO THE PANEL
UNTIL ALL OTHER WIRING CONNECTIONS HAVE BEEN MADE AND THE
9000 PANEL BOARD HAS BEEN GROUNDED.
!
WARNING! An AC line filter that suppresses EMI, RFI, and surge interference
MUST be used. A filter is supplied with your system. Do not attempt to plug the
transformer into an unfiltered outlet. Severe damage to the controller may result.
Plug
ONLY
into
filtered
AC
power!
Connect battery cable to back-up battery.
Observe polarity when connecting to battery.
Push the mating amp connector onto J1.
It is polarized and will only fit one way.
Connect 12-gauge cold-water ground wire and all
cable shields to grounding lug provided in cabinet.
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-7
Rev. 5/03
POWER FILTER
Each panel includes a power filter. This filter prevents harmful electrical noise and interference
(present in many electrical systems) from affecting the operation of the panel. A filter is
necessary and MUST be used. Simply plug the filter into your outlet, then plug the AC
transformer into the filter.
The filter supplied with your panel will provide protection against minor voltage disturbances,
such as small spikes and RFI noise. It cannot protect against low-voltage conditions or severe
voltage fluctuations. You may need to use a regulating voltage conditioner, such as a Sola
minicomputer regulator or UPS, to protect against more serious voltage problems.
!
WARNING! Do NOT plug anything other than the panel’s 14-volt transformer into
the filter. Do NOT plug the panel’s transformer into an unfiltered receptacle.
CONNECTING THE AC TRANSFORMER
The Series 9000 panel is powered from a 14 VAC, 40 VA UL-listed Class 2 plug-in transformer
(Item Code F57-PWR/TRAN) that comes with your system. The transformer has a four-foot
cable attached. Be sure the transformer is unplugged before wiring this connection.
1. Remove the quick-connect plug from TB11 on the board.
2. Nip off the spade terminals from the cable and pass the leads from the transformer through
the knockout you have selected. Connect them to TB11, pins 3 and 4 on this connector.
Refer to the drawing on page D-7 for more details.
3. Insert this connected plug into terminal block TB11 on the panel.
The 9000 panel is powered from a 12 VAC, 20 VA UL listed Class 2 plug-in transformer that is
packed with your system. The transformer comes with a four-foot cable attached with two 1/4inch female spade terminals. These terminals are connected to the panel circuit board at two
push-on spade terminals marked T1 and T2, located next to the large black heat sink on the
upper-right of the circuit board. Refer to the drawing in Appendix C on page AC-3 for details.
Be sure that the transformer is unplugged before pushing the connectors into place. The
necessary power is 12 VAC (11.5 - 13.8), 20 VA. AC is non-polarized so it does not matter
which connector goes on which spade.
!
WARNING! Do not connect anything other than 14 VAC to the 9000 panel. To do
so may damage the panel beyond repair.
Do not try to power more than one panel from a single transformer. The transformer’s internal
fuse will not handle the current required by more than one panel.
AC FUSE
A nonreplaceable fuse is built inside the transformer. Be careful not to short the wires of the
transformer while it is plugged in; the fuse is very sensitive and will blow out without even a
spark from the wires. To determine whether the transformer is functioning, check the output
voltage of the transformer with a VOM set to AC volts. If you get no output, the fuse is probably
blown, and the transformer must be replaced.
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-8
Rev. 1/01
POWERING THE PANEL
Before powering the panel, check to be sure that:
• ALL wiring connections have been completed − DO NOT continue to wire a panel that is
powered
• No bare wires or shields are touching the circuit board
• The address switch (SW2) is set to the desired address number
The address switch (S1) is set to the desired address number and baud rate
• The enclosure is grounded to a good earth ground
Plug the transformer into a filtered 110 VAC outlet. Be sure that you have first connected the
AC power to TB11. A pilot lamp is supplied with this product, and is located on the front of the
panel. When the lamp is green, this indicates AC power is present on the circuit board.
CONFIRMING START-UP
When power is first applied, a properly operating 9000 panel starts running its program. A series
of events takes place when the program starts:
• The RAM memory is reset (takes about 30 seconds).
• The two on-board processors establish communications (DS48 (yellow) goes out after 5
seconds).
• Remote I/O boards are searched for and polled (DS21 (green) blinks and DS1 (red) blinks if
a Remote I/O board is found.
• The two on-board processors establish communications (DS20 goes out after 5 seconds).
• Remote I/O boards are searched for and polled (DS3 blinks and DS2 blinks if a Remote I/O
board is found.
• The RS-485 port (TB9) becomes active and will establish communications with the PC.
• By watching the LED indicators on the panel you can confirm that the panel has started
normally. If for some reason the program does not run, the panel will not function, and the
LEDs will not light.
The next section describes checks and tests to confirm that the 9000 panel has powered up and is
running normally.
CHECKING START-UP
1. Apply AC power to the 9000 panel and observe that the AC power LED is lit.
2. Press and release the reset switch (SW1). Immediately upon release of the switch, DS48
(yellow) will light for one second and DS21 (green) will blink several times as the panel
searches for any Remote I/O boards that may be attached. DS21 will blink six times and go
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-9
Rev. 1/01
Remote I/O communications
RS-485 communications
out if no Remote I/O boards are attached and powered. If an I/O board is found, both DS21
and DS1 (red) will begin blinking at a rapid rate (about 20 times per second).
Press and release the RESET switch (S2). Immediately upon release of the switch, DS20
will light for one second and DS3 will blink several times as the panel searches for any
Remote I/O boards that may be attached. DS3 will blink six times and go out if no Remote
I/O boards are attached and powered. If an I/O board is found, both DS3 and DS2 will begin
blinking at a rapid rate (about 20 times per second).
3. The reset routine will be completed approximately 30 seconds after applying power (or
pressing the reset switch). The panel will now start communicating with the PC if it is being
polled. Be sure to enable the panel’s address number in the Series 9000 program (see page 19 of the Series 9000 Operations Manual). When it has started, the panel will send a
“requesting download” message to the PC every five minutes until it receives its first
programming instruction.
A panel that has not been programmed is not very functional. Many functions, such as card
readers, need programming instructions from the PC to operate. However, request to exit
(RTE) is a function that is built into the panel and can be tested. A good way to determine
whether a panel is running is to test RTE.
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-10
Rev. 5/03
4. Test RTE by activating RTE A by momentarily connecting a 1K-ohm (1000 ohm) resistor
between pins 1 and 2 of TB10. Ensure that relay K1 (DS27) pulses on for 5 seconds when
RTE A is activated.
Ensure that relay K1 (DS12) pulses on for 5 seconds when RTE A is activated.
RTE functioning will prove that the panel is running normally. You may now connect the
DC backup battery, insert the lithium RAM backup battery (as described in the following
sections), and begin programming the panel.
If RTE will not function, the 9000 panel is not running its program. Press the reset switch
and retry.
INSTALLING THE LITHIUM BATTERY
The 9000 panel is equipped with a 3.6-volt
lithium battery (Item Code F60-3.6V/BAT) that
will hold the panel’s memory for up to 15 days
in the event of a total power failure (both AC
and DC battery backup). The battery is not
factory installed so it will not be drained during
the time the panel is not powered. The lithium
battery is not rechargeable. Install it only
AFTER you have completely installed and
powered the panel.
Insert the battery into the clip holder as shown,
making sure that the + end of the battery is
inserted in the + end of the holder. DO NOT
INSERT THE BATTERY BACKWARDS.
!
IMPORTANT! Do not install a AA flashlight battery in the socket − its voltage is
too low.
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-11
Rev. 1/01
INSTALLING THE DC BACKUP BATTERY
Be sure to observe polarity when connecting to battery.
Push the mating amp connector fully on to socket J1. The
connector is polarized and will only fit one way.
A 12-volt 7.0-AH gel cell battery (Item Code F60-12V/BAT7) will allow the panel and its card
readers (except proximity readers) to operate for up to 14 hours in the event AC power fails. The
battery is placed on the shelf in the door of the panel cabinet.
!
IMPORTANT! Some proximity readers are powered by a separate power supply
and are not backed up by this battery.
First, connect the RED wire on the battery cable to the red-coded, positive (+) terminal spade on
the battery. Next, connect the BLACK wire on the battery cable to the black-coded, negative (-)
terminal spade on the battery. When each is correctly and securely connected, then plug the
mating connector at the other end into J1 on the panel.
!
WARNING! Do not attempt to use the backup battery to power any other devices
such as proximity readers, relays, door strikes, etc. This may damage the panel.
Relays
The Series 9000 panel can control a maximum of 72 relays: eight on the panel, and 64 on four
remote I/O boards. Each of the eight relays built on the 9000 panel can be associated with a card
reader and will pulse ON when a valid card is read. Wiring the relay to a door strike or gate
allows the cardholder to enter by using the reader associated with the relay.
Relays may also be controlled by time zones programmed into the software, or manually from
the PC. It is possible that you may have some relays that are not used by card readers. These are
“free” relays and may be used for other purposes, such as linking with input points for causeand-effect actions and controlling devices other than entry points such as lights, video cameras,
autodialers, etc.
!
IMPORTANT! Relays 9-72 are always free and cannot be associated with a card
reader.
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-12
Rev. 1/01
RELAY SPECIFICATIONS
• Contact type
• Configuration
• Maximum voltage
• Maximum current
•
•
•
•
•
•
1 form C dry contact
single-pole double-throw (SPDT)
35 VDC (AC volts not allowed)
1 amp
Recommended wire type is 1
twisted pair, 18 AWG, with
shield.
Only DC devices may be
connected to the Series 9000’s
relays. Isolation relays (see page
D-17) must be used for
controlling AC devices or
devices drawing more than one
amp.
A filtered DC power supply
must be used to provide power to
locks, door strikes, isolation
relays, etc.
A suppressor kit (see page D-16)
must be installed across any coil
connected to the Series 9000’s
relays.
Terminal blocks TB1 and TB2
may be removed from the board
for ease of wiring by pulling
outward. DO NOT PULL UP.
Shown is the default setting for
reader control. You may assign
a different relay to any reader
using the Reader Setup program
at the PC (see page 3-6, Series
9000 Operations Manual).
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-13
Rev. 1/01
CONNECTING AN ENTRY POINT (DOOR STRIKE)
This example shows relay 1 connected to a fail-secure (requires power to unlock) strike. This
relay is normally controlled by reader A, unless the default setting has been changed. Notice that
the filtered DC power supply, which is not supplied by IDenticard, is necessary because all
relays are dry contact and do not supply power; they only act as a switch. The normally open
contact is used when connecting a fail-secure strike.
A valid card presented to reader A will pulse relay 1 and unlock the door.
!
WARNING!
• Use only a filtered DC power supply. A simple transformer with rectifier is not
acceptable because it supplies pulsating DC and will damage the suppressor kit.
• Do not attempt to use the battery or power supply of the 9000 panel to power
locks.
• Do not plug the door strike power supply into the filtered 110 VAC that powers
the 9000 panel.
• Do not run the door strike control wires in the same cable with card reader or
input point wiring. It may be in the same conduit, but must be separate from
other cables.
USING MAGNETIC LOCKS
Electromagnetic locks can only be released by shutting off the power that holds them locked. Do
not rely on the Series 9000’s reader and RTE device alone. These devices will not operate if the
panel fails. It is recommended to use a key switch on the outside of exterior doors to break the
power connection to the lock in the event of an emergency.
!
IMPORTANT! We strongly recommend that you be familiar with all national and
local codes and follow the requirements pertinent to your installation.
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-14
Rev. 1/01
CARD READER/RELAY ASSIGNMENTS
Reader
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
Relay
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Each card reader (A-H) controls a relay (1-8) on the 9000 panel. The default assignments are
shown above. When wiring an entry point, be sure to use the correct relay for the card reader at
the entry point.
CHANGING THE READER/RELAY ASSIGNMENT
You may control one entry point (door) with two card readers, such as with antipassback, where
an IN reader and OUT reader are on opposite sides of the same door. In this example, you would
control the same relay with both readers.
For example, if a door is entered using reader A, and exited using reader B, wire the door lock to
relay 1 and change reader B’s relay from 2 to 1. Now both readers will operate the same relay.
Be sure to also change the door position point for reader B.
COIL FLYBACK VOLTAGE SUPPRESSION
All coils generate large spikes of voltage when they are shut off. This is known as flyback and
can be in the thousands of volts. It is necessary to suppress flyback voltage when connecting
coils to the 9000 panel.
!
WARNING! Do not connect unsuppressed coils to a Series 9000 panel. Flyback
interference can cause severe damage to the 9000 panel, memory loss, and erratic
operation.
Devices that have coils are:
• Door strikes
• Magnetic locks
• Relays
• Gates/Turnstiles
• Bells
IDenticard supplies a suppressor kit (Item Code F55-SUPP/KIT) with each card reader that must
be installed across the coil of the access point device. Additional suppressor kits may be ordered
from IDenticard.
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-15
Rev. 1/01
INSTALLING THE SUPPRESSOR KIT
The suppressor kit is a small black tube with a red wire and black wire attached to one end. The
wires must be connected in parallel with the coil that is connected to the 9000 relay.
!
WARNING! The suppressor kit is polarity-sensitive. Connect the RED wire to the
POSITIVE side of the coil and the BLACK wire to the NEGATIVE side. DO NOT
CONNECT THE SUPPRESSOR KIT TO AN AC COIL.
Connect the suppressor kit as shown above. It is important to place the suppressor kit as close to
the coil as possible. For door strike installations, the suppressor kit can often be placed inside
the doorjamb, next to the strike.
USING A DIODE TO SUPPRESS A COIL
You may use a reverse-biased diode, such as a 1N914, to suppress a coil. Connect the cathode
(striped) end of the diode to the positive side of the coil and the anode end to the negative side as
shown below. Diodes are very effective at suppressing flyback but are dangerous if they are
connected backward.
!
WARNING! A diode that is connected backward (cathode to the minus side), or
connected to AC will act as a short. Damage to the 9000 panel will result. Use
diodes only if you know how to connect them correctly.
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-16
Rev. 1/01
WHEN NOT TO USE SUPPRESSION
It is not necessary to use flyback suppression on noninductive devices. These devices do not
create flyback voltage and include:
• Lamps
• Solid-state beepers
• Solid-state control devices for doors, gates, turnstiles, etc.
• Magnetic locks with built-in suppression (if in doubt, use a suppressor kit)
USING ISOLATION RELAYS
It may be necessary to control devices that cannot be directly connected to the 9000 relay. Such
devices include:
• AC devices, such as door strikes, gates, turnstiles, etc.
• High-current devices drawing more than one amp
• Highly inductive loads, such as motors
Use an “isolation relay” to control devices that may not be directly connected to the 9000 panel’s
relays. An isolation relay prevents the interference by these devices from reaching the Series
9000 equipment.
The drawing above shows an isolation relay connected to the 9000 panel controlling an AC door
strike. The AC strike could not be directly connected to the 9000 relay contacts.
The isolation relay must be installed in its own cabinet.
!
IMPORTANT! Do not put an isolation relay or any other relays, power supplies, or
devices inside the Series 9000 cabinet.
You must provide a 12 VDC power supply for the isolation relay. Install a suppressor kit across
the coil of the isolation relay, because this coil is connected to the 9000 panel. It is not necessary
to suppress the device being controlled by the isolation relay.
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-17
Rev. 1/01
Door Position Inputs
The Series 9000 panel has eight supervised door position inputs: one for each of its eight card
readers. They are designed to be connected to a normally closed switch (closes when the door is
closed) in series with a 1000-ohm end-of-line resistor.
The system will report a “Door Forced Open” alarm for an unexpected opening of the switch. A
“Door Ajar” alarm will be reported if the door is not closed within a preset time after a valid card
has been read, or RTE has been used. See page 5-1 of the Series 9000 Operations Manual for a
complete explanation of the door position application.
STARTING THE DOOR POSITION SHUNT TIME
The shunt time for each point is started by the associated reader (and RTE point). The default
settings appear in the table below. If you are controlling the door with two readers, using
antipassback for example, it may be necessary to change the point association so that either
reader shunts the same point. See page 3-6 of the Series 9000 Operations Manual for details.
Reader/RTE…
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
Shunts Point…
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-18
Rev. 1/01
CONNECTING DOOR POSITION INPUTS
Connect the normally closed contact switch to
the desired input point and its return (common),
as shown at right. The example at right shows the
connection to point 1. Card reader A and
RTE A would control this door and start the
shunt time for point 1.
Be sure to use the correct point for the door.
For example: Use point 3 if you are monitoring
door C.
Observe the following points:
• All input points are supervised and must be
terminated with a 1K-ohm 5% resistor in
series with a normally closed (N.C.) switch.
• All even numbered input terminals are at ground (common).
• The terminal blocks may be removed for ease of wiring by pulling outward. DO NOT
PULL UP.
• Recommended wire type to be used with all input points: 1 twisted pair, 18-22 AWG,
shielded.
LED INDICATORS
Each input point has three possible hardware states, depending on the resistance value sensed
between the point and its return. Two LEDs are used to indicate the state of the point. The
LEDs always show the hardware state, even when the point is programmed to be disarmed.
The three hardware states are:
State
Normal
Door Forced Open
Trouble
LED lit
none
red
yellow
Resistance
1K ohm ± 20%
open circuit
0 ohm (shorted)
The fourth state, Door Ajar, is a software-derived condition that occurs when the door is found to
be open longer than the shunt time after a cardholder has entered using a reader or exited using
RTE.
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-19
Rev. 1/01
RESISTORS
The Series 9000 panel includes 1K-ohm resistors. Install a resistor in series with, and as close to,
the alarm switch as possible. Many security switches already have 1K-ohm resistors installed.
Do not use the separate resistor supplied with the panel if this is the case.
UNUSED INPUT POINTS
Keep unused input points in the Normal state by terminating them with 1K-ohm resistors at the
panel. Do not leave them open, which would cause the panel to report a Door Forced Open state.
USING DOOR POSITION INPUTS AS GENERAL PURPOSE ALARM POINTS
The door position inputs may be used as alarm points to monitor devices other than entry points.
However, keep the following in mind:
•
•
•
You cannot use a delay (shunt) time because the shunt time for points 1 through 8 is started
by a card reader or RTE. Only alarm points 9 through 72 on Remote I/O boards use an
independent shunt time.
The alarm transaction will display “Door Forced Open” and cannot be changed to read
“Alarm.”
There is no “Line Cut” state. “Door Forced Open” will be generated if the wires are cut.
Only points 9 through 72 on Remote I/O boards have a Line Cut state.
Request To Exit (RTE) Inputs
The 9000 panel has eight RTE inputs (A-H). Using RTE shunts the associated door position
input and optionally pulses the associated relay to unlock the door.
RTE DEVICES
All request to exit devices contain switches (contacts) that change state when RTE is desired.
Common RTE devices are:
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-20
Rev. 1/01
•
•
•
•
Panic bars containing microswitches
Motion detectors
Palm buttons
Pressure mats
RELAY OPTIONS
RTE may be selected to shunt the door position point AND pulse the relay (unlock the door), or
just shunt the Door Position point without unlocking the door. The way RTE works depends on
the type of switch used for RTE.
To Shunt Door Position and Pulse the Relay
This wiring option works with a magnetic lock
or a door strike. See the warning on page D-D22 concerning wiring magnetic locks in this
fashion. Use a normally closed (N.C.) switch in
series with a 1K-ohm resistor. RTE will shunt
the door position input point and unlock the door
when the switch opens. The relay should be set
to power the door strike to unlock when pulsed.
The example at right shows a normally closed
switch wired to RTE A. Activating the switch
will pulse Relay 1 and shunt door position
point 1.
To Only Shunt the Door Position Input Point
This wiring option is used for exits that the 9000
panel simply monitors and does not control, for
example, where a motion sensor might be used
as the RTE. Use a normally open (N.O.) switch
in parallel with a 1K-ohm resistor. RTE will
shunt the door position input point but will NOT
unlock the door when the switch closes.
The example at right shows a normally open
switch wired to RTE A. Activating the switch
will shunt door position point 1. Relay 1 will
not pulse.
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-21
Rev. 1/01
USING RTE WITH MAGNETIC LOCKS
Electromagnetic locks can only be released by breaking the power that keeps them locked.
However, Request to Exit operates to unlock an electromagnetic lock only as long as the 9000
panel is running. In an emergency, such as a fire, RTE will not operate − and the door will
not unlock − if the 9000 panel is damaged, or has otherwise failed.
!
WARNING! Do not rely on RTE alone to provide exit for a magnetic lock. You
MUST allow for a FAIL-SAFE way of breaking the power connection to unlock the
door.
A recommended method is to use a double pole switch as the RTE device. Wire one pole to the
9000 panel for RTE. Wire the other pole directly to the magnetic lock. Even if the 9000 panel
fails, activating the RTE device will break power to the lock and allow the door to open.
!
IMPORTANT! We strongly recommend that you be familiar with all national and
local codes and follow the requirements pertinent to your installation.
Series 9000 Panel Installation
Page D-22
Rev. 1/01
Section E — Communications
General Description
To program panels and receive transactions, a communications link must be established between
the PC and the Series 9000 panels in your system. This link requires both software and
hardware. At this point, if you have not already done so, load the Series 9000 software into the
system PC. Refer to the separate manuals, the Series 9000 Operations Manual or the IDentiPASS
Set-Up and Operation Manual, for these instructions and on how to use these software
applications to set up and configure 9000 panels. This Communications section will detail the
necessary steps to install and connect the hardware components with occasional reference to
features of the software when needed.
The computer’s RS-232 serial ports are used to communicate with the panels. Each serial port can
support up to 64 panels. A maximum of 256 panels is possible using eight ports. However, the
RS-232 signals must be converted to RS-485 to make communication possible to the panels. The
next section discusses the different ways that this communication can be accomplished.
Serial Ports
You may install a multiport communications board in your computer to provide up to eight serial
ports for use with the Series 9000 system. These ports are referred to as Port 1 through Port 8 by
the Series 9000.
RS-232 COMMUNICATIONS
The serial ports on your PC use RS-232 communications. RS-232 can be converted to RS-485
using an IDenticard® RS-232-to-RS-485 Converter (Item Code F55-485/CONV) (see page E-3),
or RS-232 can be wired directly to the panel using terminal block TB12, if the distance from the
PC to the panel is less than 50 feet (see page E-2). Modems and line drivers may also be
connected to RS-232 to provide communications to distant sites.
RS-485 COMMUNICATIONS
RS-485 is the method of communication used by Series 9000 panels. As mentioned above, there
are two ways to convert RS-232 to RS-485 in a Series 9000 system. When installing RS-485
wiring, use a 2-pair shielded cable (one pair for transmit, one pair for receive). The panels can be
wired in a multidrop fashion, a star configuration, or a combination of both.
Using Fiber Optics
When using fiber optics for RS-485 communications, you must wire a 120-ohm resistor across the
data-input pins (R+ and R-) on the fiber unit on the PANEL side of the connection. Refer to the
fiber optics manufacturer’s documentation and specifications for details on any resistor that may
need to be wired across the data-input pins on the fiber unit on the COMPUTER side of the
connection. Only daisy-chain configurations of panels may be used with fiber optics. Do NOT
connect panels in a star configuration when using fiber optics.
Communications
Page E-1
Rev. 5/03
!
IMPORTANT! The maximum total length of cable from the converter to the panel(s)
is 4000 feet. To find the total length of cable, you must add together the lengths of the
cables going to each panel, being sure to include the lengths of the cables used for
drops to the panels.
NETLINK
Series 9000 panels can also be connected via the IDenticard NetLink converter, if the system PC is
connected to a LAN or WAN. NetLink is a TCP/IP network connection that replaces the COM port
and RS-232-to-RS-485 Converter. Using a supplied cable, an RS-485 connection is made from the
NetLink converter to the panels. The NetLink converter (Item Code F55-NETLINKSP or F55NETLINK) is connected to the Ethernet data network and assigned an IP address for
communications with the Series 9000 system server. The maximum wiring distance between a hub
and a converter is 328 feet (100 meters). Instructions to install the NetLink Converter are included
with the NetLink unit itself. See Appendix E for more information and instructions on programming
the NetLink Converter using the IDenticard NetLink Programmer software.
System Architecture
The diagram above shows a small, typical Series 9000 system. Five panels are connected to the
COM1 serial port through the RS-232-to-RS-485 Converter, and two are connected via a NetLink
converter. Every panel has a unique address, assigned by port and panel number (see page D-5 for
addressing).
Connecting RS-232 Directly to the Board
If the distance between your controlling PC and the first 9000 panel is less than 50 feet, then you
can wire RS-232 communications directly from your PC to the panel by wiring a cable from your
PC serial port to TB12 on the panel. You do not need to use an RS-232-to-RS-485 Converter for
this connection, again, as long as the distance between your controlling PC and the first panel is
less than 50 feet. Communications are RS-232 from the PC to the first panel, but are RS-485 to all
subsequent panels from that first panel.
Non-ETL-certified 9000 panels do not have this direct wiring capability. An RS-232-to-RS-485
Converter must always be used for this connection with the prior version of the panel.
Communications
Page E-2
Rev. 5/03
The terminal block pinouts are as given below for wiring the PC port (DTE) to the panel.
Pin on TB12
on Panel
Pin 1
Pin 2
Pin 3
!
Function on
Panel
TXD
RXD
Ground
Pin on Serial
Port
Pin 2
Pin 3
Pin 5
Function on
Serial Port
Output
Input
Ground
IMPORTANT! If the distance between the PC and the first panel is more than 50
feet, then an RS-232-to-RS-485 Converter must be used for this connection.
The diagram below shows how to connect more than one panel when the first panel is connected
directly to the PC using the RS-232 port.
DB-9F SERIAL
PLUG*
2
3
Use two twisted pair with
overall shield; one pair for
transmit, one for receive.
Do not connect shield to
pin 5 (ground) on any
panel! Trim shield flush
with insulation.
5
Grd R T
Grd R- R+ T- T+
Grd R T
Grd R- R+ T- T+
Grd R T
Grd R- R+ T- T+
3 2 1
5 4 3 2 1
3 2 1
5 4 3 2 1
3 2 1
5 4 3 2 1
TB12
PANEL 1
TB9
TB12
TB9
TB12
PANEL 2
TB9
PANEL 3
*The pinouts shown on TB12 are used when connecting the panel to a computer ( DTE) serial port.
If connecting to a DCE serial device, use the following pinouts: connect pin 2 to TB12-2, connect
pin 3 to TB12-1 and connect pin 5 to TB12-3.
Connecting the RS-232-to-RS-485 Converter
The converter is used to interface RS-485 communications from the 9000 panels to RS-232
communications at the PC’s serial port. The converter may also be connected to a short-haul or
leased-line modem (not a dial-up modem) at a remote site.
Because the converter’s LEDs are a valuable aid in troubleshooting, it is recommended that a
converter be used and located near the PC where it can be viewed from the keyboard.
Communications
Page E-3
Rev. 1/01
The RED power indicator (PWR) is always lit when the converter is plugged into 110 VAC.
The GREEN TX lamp flashes whenever the PC sends data to the panels. Under normal use it
will flash rapidly about 15 times per second. Each flash is a poll being sent to a panel.
The YELLOW RX lamp flashes whenever a panel transmits data to the PC. Under normal use it
will match the green LED as the panels answer polls. Under no circumstances should either LED
be on continuously.
A five-foot cable is included with the converter, and is used to connect the converter to the PC’s
serial port. Connect the 25-pin female end of this cable to the RS-232 Data 25-pin male
connector located on the back of the converter and the other end to the 9-pin serial port of the
PC. Serial ports always use male connectors. You may need a 9-pin-to-25-pin adapter if your
computer’s serial port is 25 pin.
Connect the converter’s RS-485 port to the RS-485 cable wired to your 9000 panels. The
connector is removable for ease of wiring. Ensure that the shield drain wire of the RS-485 cable
is NOT connected to ground on either the converter or any panels, as the diagram below shows.
Communications
Page E-4
Rev. 1/01
Connecting the RS-232-to-RS-485 Converter to a Leased-Line
Modem
The RS-232 cable supplied with your converter is for a DTE (data terminal equipment) port as found on
your PC. It will not work with a DCE (data communications equipment) port as found on modems and line
drivers. You must either configure the converter’s data port for DTE (see jumper settings on page E-8), or
use a null-modem cable. The pin configuration of a null modem cable is shown on the previous page as
“CONV To DCE.”
Using Modems
Leased line modems are used to extend the RS-232 communications signal from the PC to remote Series
9000 Panels. When more than one panel is connected to the modem, the first panel must be set up as a
“master” panel. The other panel(s) must be connected to the master and set up as the “slave” panel(s).
!
IMPORTANT! Slave panels cannot make the master panel call the PC when events occur on
them.
Whenever using modems connected to the new version of the Series 9000 Panel, you must run the
IDenticard Modem Programmer to program the modems. See Appendix D, page AD-1, for more details
and instructions on using the Modem Programmer.
The modem equipment used depends on the distance and phone line available. Use short-haul modems
(line drivers) whenever possible. This type of modem is the most inexpensive and reliable and requires a
dry pair of lines from point to point. Distance is limited to about 5 miles.
If you are unfamiliar with data communications equipment, it is recommended that you find a local
specialist to perform the data communications part of the job. The data that is being sent is RS-232 at 9600
baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, no parity.
Data Broadcast
A data broadcast may be necessary when connecting more than one RS-232 device to a single serial port, as
in the example below.
Communications
Page E-5
Rev. 5/03
Using a Multiport Board
Four or eight RS-232 ports may be provided for Series 9000 communications by installing a
multiport board in the PC. Since each port is isolated, it is advantageous to distribute your 9000
panels across several ports, even though they all could be put on one port (64 panels or fewer).
The Series 9000 will use ports that are installed using Windows drivers. The installation
procedure depends on the brand and model of board you are using.
Communications
Page E-6
Rev. 5/03
Establishing Communications
1. Start the Series 9000 program and configure the serial ports as required. With the converter
connected to the serial port and no panels connected to the converter, observe that the green
TX lamp blinks about twice per second. This is the PC polling the panels that you have
requested in Port/Panel Setup in the Series 9000 software. If the green LED is not blinking,
there is a problem, and you should check the following:
• Is the converter’s red power LED lit? If not, check to make sure that the power
supply is plugged into your AC outlet and the power cable is plugged into the 12VDC
connector on the converter.
• Did you enable the correct port information using the Port/Panel Setup program? If
you enabled the panels correctly, they should be reporting off-line.
• Are you connected to the correct port on the back of the PC?
• Are you using the correct cable? Remember that the factory cable will not work with
most modems.
• There may be a hardware problem with your serial card.
2. Connect the panel(s). Make sure any address switches (SW2 (see page D-5)) on the panel(s)
are set correctly. The panel should start answering its polls. Both the TX and RX lamps
should start blinking rapidly, and the software should report the panel(s) as ON-LINE on the
system PC screen. These conditions indicate correct two-way communication to and from
the panels. If you encounter a problem, check the following:
• Did you set the panel’s address switch BEFORE applying power (see page C-3)?
• If you already had power applied, did you press the reset button (SW1) after setting
the address?
• Are the matching address numbers set up in the Series 9000 software program
(Port/Panel Setup)?
• Is DS23 on the panel blinking, indicating that polls are reaching the panel? If not,
there may be a problem with the wiring.
!
NOTE: Most communication problems result from a mistake made in connecting
the house wiring to the panels. Please be sure to double-check your work.
For more information on troubleshooting communications when using modems, see the
Troubleshooting Guide found on IDenticard’s FTP site: ftp.identicard.com. Once you reach the
site, install the guide by double-clicking to run “9000Troubleshootingguide.exe.” After the guide
is installed in the folder you selected on your PC, double-click on “TableofContP1.pdf” in that
folder to open the table of contents for the .pdf files relating to modems. Then select from the
table of contents list the topic you need more help with.
Communications
Page E-7
Rev. 1/01
Replacing an IDenticard RS-232-to-RS-422 Converter
MODEL F55-485/CONV
DCE RS-232 DATA
T+
T-
R+
R- GND
1
2
3
4
5
GREEN
IDenticard-supplied cable
from old converter
WHITE
BLACK
RED
SHIELD
Do not connect
shield to pin 5!
Trim shield
flush with
insulation.
To replace an older style RS-232-to-RS-422 Converter, perform the following steps:
1. Disconnect the RS-232 data cable (the cable that goes from the PC to the converter) from the
old converter and plug it into the RS-232 Data port of the new converter.
2. Disconnect the RS-422 cable from the old converter and cut off the MALE 25-pin connector
and discard. Strip back the insulation to expose the four colored wires plus the shield.
Connect the RS-422 cable to the converter as shown above. Do not connect the shield to pin
5 on the converter.
Jumper Settings
The jumper switches located on the circuit board
inside the RS-232-to-RS-485 Converter are used to
change the converter’s configuration for special
circumstances.
JP1: TRI-STATE ENABLE/DISABLE
• OUT (default): The converter’s transmitter is
always enabled, allowing it to be the master and
the panels to be slaves.
• IN: The converter’s transmitter is held in the
tri-state (high impedance) mode until it has data
to transmit. This “slave” converter may be
placed on the RS-485 bus to convert back to
RS-232.
JP2: DATA PORT CONFIGURATION (DCE IS DEFAULT)
Move both jumpers to the DTE side to configure the RS-232 data port as a DTE port.
Communications
Page E-8
Rev. 1/01
Specifications of the IDenticard RS-232-to-RS-485 Converter
Connectors:
RS-232 Port — DB25 female
RS-485 Port — 5-pin removable terminal block
RS-232 DCE
2 receive data
3 transmit data
7 signal ground
Power
Size
Weight
Environment
RS-485
1
T+
2
T3
R+
4
R5
GROUND
12 VDC at 150 mA (115 VAC transformer included)
1.5″ H × 5″ W × 5.5″ D
8 oz
Temperature:
42 to 100°F
Humidity:
5% to 80 % noncondensing
Communications
Page E-9
Rev. 1/01
Section F — Card Reader Installation
Readers Supported
Four entry-point devices (card readers) can be supported by the Series 9000 panel. Another
four may be added by using a Reader Expansion Card, allowing a total of eight entry-point
devices per panel.
Each reader on the 9000 panel is represented by the letters A through H in the Series 9000
software and the numbers 1 to 8 in IDentiPASS. (For ease of reference here, only letters will
be used.) The letter of a reader is determined by the port (connector) to which the reader is
wired. Reader ports A through D are on the 9000 panel itself (located along the bottom edge),
and ports E through H are on the plug-in Reader Expansion Card.
The Series 9000 panel will support the following access point devices:
IDenticard® proprietary encrypted format
• Magnetic stripe
ABA format
Mag-stripe ABA emulation
• Infrared bar code
Mag-stripe encryption emulation (requires external power supply)
• Proximity
Wiegand 26- or 37-bit (IDenticard proprietary encrypted) format
(requires external power supply)
• Direct-connect proximity Wiegand 26- or 37-bit (IDenticard proprietary encrypted) format
(powered from 9000 panel)
Wiegand 2601 standard format
• Wiegand 26 bit
IDenticard proprietary encrypted format
• Wiegand 37 bit
MIFARE® technology
• Smart card
With or without card readers
• Keypad
Reader Expansion Card
Four additional entry-point devices can be added to the 4-reader
9000 panel by installing a Reader Expansion Card (Item Code
F55-RDR/EXPD). The Reader Expansion Card cannot be
used with the 2-reader panel. Connector J2 on the card plugs
into J2 on the panel using a ribbon cable. Either terminal on the
cable can be plugged into the board or the card. The Reader
Expansion Card may be factory installed, or field installed at a
later time.
!
DANGER! BE SURE TO DISCONNECT ALL
POWER –AC AND DC – TO THE 9000 PANEL
BEFORE INSTALLING THE READER
EXPANSION CARD!
To install the card after all power has been disconnected:
Card Reader Installation
Page F-1
Rev. 1/01
1. Locate the tab on the side of one of the ribbon cable terminals and plug the terminal into
socket J2 on the panel board, making sure you insert the tab on the cable terminal into the
slot on J2 that faces the middle of the board. Inserting the tab into the slot guarantees that the
terminal is properly plugged into the board.
2. Plug the other end of the cable into the card, aligning the tab in the card socket in the same
way.
3. Fasten the new card onto the panel using four 6-32 × 1.25 inch screws.
4. Check the voltage selection switches to make sure they are correct (see page F-3).
5. Power the 9000 panel and download if necessary.
Connector J14 on the Reader Expansion Card plugs
into J17 on the panel. The card is secured by four 632 × 1.25 inch screws. The Reader Expansion Card
may be factory installed, or field installed at a later
time.
DANGER! BE SURE TO DISCONNECT
ALL POWER –AC AND DC – TO THE
9000 PANEL BEFORE INSTALLING
THE READER EXPANSION CARD!
DIAGRAM OF PREVIOUS VERSION
!
To install the card after all power has been
disconnected:
1. Locate J17 on the 9000 panel and J14 on the
expansion card. Press the card into place. Make
sure that the mounting screw standoffs on the
card are centered with the holes in the 9000
panel.
WARNING: It is possible to improperly
install the card with the connector off by
one pin. If this happens, the standoffs will
NOT be centered with the holes. Make
sure they are centered. NEVER power up
the panel unless you are certain the card is
properly plugged in! If it is not, damage to
the panel WILL result!
!
3. Fasten the card to the 9000 panel using four 6-23
× 1.25 inch screws through the standoffs.
4. Check the voltage selection jumpers to make sure
they are correct (see page F-4).
5. Power the 9000 panel and download if necessary.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-2
Rev. 1/01
Voltage Selection
Most readers are powered from the 9000
panel. You must select the proper voltage at
each reader port by using DIP switch SW4.
On the Reader Expansion Card, use
DIP switch S1.
Either 5 VDC or 9.6 VDC may be selected
for each reader port. With the exception of
proximity readers that require separate power
supplies, all IDenticard readers that are
directly wired to the panel require
5 VDC. The Enhanced Reader Module
requires 9.6 VDC, so select this voltage if
you are wiring an Enhanced Reader Module
to the reader port.
Each DIP switch has 4 switches, and each of
these four is used to select the voltage
present across pins 4 and 5 of the reader
ports. The switches control the
voltage as given in the following:
Reader
Switch Off
Switch On
A
B
C
D
9.6 VDC
9.6 VDC
9.6 VDC
9.6 VDC
5 VDC
5 VDC
5 VDC
5 VDC
E
F
G
H
9.6 VDC
9.6 VDC
9.6 VDC
9.6 VDC
5 VDC
5 VDC
5 VDC
5 VDC
9000 Panel – SW4
SW4-1
SW4-2
SW4-3
SW4-4
Reader Expansion Card – S1
S1-1
S1-2
S1-3
S1-4
!
IMPORTANT! If installing a non-IDenticard reader, be sure to refer to the
installation instructions for the specific reader you are installing to determine the
correct voltage for that reader.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-3
Rev. 5/03
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE 9000 PANEL AND READER EXPANSION CARD!!
Most readers are powered from the
9000 panel. You must select the
proper voltage at each reader port by
using jumpers located on the circuit
board as shown.
Either 5 VDC or 9.6 VDC may be
selected for each reader port.
Jumpers J1 through J4 are used to
select the voltage present across pins
4 and 5 of the reader port. 5 volts
DC is selected when the jumper is
in. Pull the jumper off to select 9.6
volts DC.
The following jumpers select the
voltage for the following readers:
J1
J2
J3
J4
9000 panel
Reader A
Reader B
Reader C
Reader D
J1
J2
J3
J4
Reader Expansion Card
Reader E
Reader F
Reader G
Reader H
Card Reader Installation
Page F-4
Rev. 1/01
Checking the Voltage
Use a multimeter set to DC volts to check the voltage at each reader port. Pin 4 is positive
voltage and pin 5 is ground. Verify proper voltage BEFORE connecting the card readers.
Proximity Readers (Not Direct-Connect Type)
Because of their high current requirement, some proximity readers are NOT powered from the
9000 panel. A separate power supply must be installed to provide the proper voltage (12 or
24 VDC) and current for the readers used. Only linear, regulated power supplies with less than
100 mV ripple may be used for powering proximity readers.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-5
Rev. 1/01
Magnetic-Stripe Surface Mount Reader
IDenticard Item Codes: F55-9RH/2
F55-RH/II
DESCRIPTION
Reads high coercivity mag-stripe cards. Track 2 is standard unless otherwise specified. Includes
cast aluminum back box for surface mounting. Two LEDs indicate reader status. The green
LED indicates a valid (passing) card read. The amber LED indicates power. The card reader is
weather-protected for use indoors or outdoors. The maximum distance from the card reader to
the 9000 panel is 800 feet.
With the card reader in a horizontal position and the magnetic stripe facing down, the card is
swiped from right to left in the direction of the arrows molded into the reader.
CABLE REQUIREMENTS
5-conductor, 18-22 AWG, stranded, with an overall shield. Maximum distance is 800 feet.
!
IMPORTANT! Shield is important and must be used.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-6
Rev. 1/01
SPECIFICATIONS
• Temperature:
• Humidity:
• Life:
• Power:
-30°C to 70°C operating temperature
10% to 100% operating and storing humidity
300,000 passes in a clean environment
5 VDC at 20 mA
MOUNTING
The surface mount card reader and faceplate are mounted into a heavy aluminum casting that is
mounted to a wall or pedestal. Four 1/4-inch diameter mounting holes are provided in the back
of the casting. The type of mounting hardware used depends upon the mounting surface.
WIRING ENTRANCE
A wiring hole is NOT provided in the casting. You must drill the appropriately sized hole to
accommodate either the cable or conduit. It is best if you can run the cable through the back of
the casting. Mounting of the casting should be neat, with no wires exposed to vandalism. If you
cannot wire from behind, it is recommended that conduit be used. Drill the entrance hole
through either end or the bottom of the casting. Make sure that the hole is toward the back far
enough that it cannot be seen with the faceplate installed.
READER POSITION
The reader may be installed either horizontally or vertically. It has been found that a vertical card
swipe is easier when using the reader from a car, such as in parking lot applications.
WIRING THE READER
All surface mount readers are wired
using a 5-pin terminal strip (TB-R)
located at the bottom of the small
circuit board on the back of the
reader faceplate. Connect the reader
as shown to the desired reader port
on the 9000 panel. Connect the
shield of the reader cable to ground
at the panel. Be sure that the DIP
switch used to select the voltage is
UP – set for 5 volts.
Be sure that the voltage selection
jumper is IN – set for 5 volts.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-7
Rev. 1/01
TESTING THE READER
1. Enable the reader using Reader Setup (see page 3-1, Series 9000 Operations Manual). Be
sure to select “Mag Stripe Enc.” or “ABA/Barcode,” depending on which type of card
encoding you are using.
2. Swipe a card through the reader. The green LED will pulse on if the card number is
programmed to pass. The reader will NOT indicate a failing card, but will send a transaction
to the PC. Verify that each card swipe produces a transaction.
TROUBLESHOOTING
If the reader fails to operate, check the following:
Hardware-Based Issues
1. Check the voltage at pins 4 (plus) and 5 (ground) at the card reader for 5 VDC. Be sure that
the DIP switch used to select the voltage is UP for the reader port.
Be sure that the voltage selection jumper is IN for the reader port.
2. Be sure that the panel is communicating with the PC; check the RS-485 LEDs on the control
panel and system converter.
3. Be sure that you are inserting the card correctly into the reader. Swipe the card in the
direction of the arrows with the magnetic stripe toward the pick-up head (wide portion of the
reader).
Software-Based Issues
1. If you are using an ABA card, be sure to enter the card parameters. Be sure to enter a First
Byte of Sitecode position of “1,” even if you are not using a site code. (A site code, however,
is strongly recommended for all installations.)
2. If the LED fails to operate, be sure that you have selected “Standard” under Style in Reader
Setup.
3. Did you enable the reader using Reader Setup? You must enable the reader before it will
operate. Be sure that you have enabled the correct reader on the correct panel.
4. Be sure that Reader TZ and Keypad TZ on reader setup are both set to “0.”
Experience has shown that reader malfunctions in new systems are almost always caused by a
mistake in wiring. Double-check the wiring connections to ensure that they are correct.
You may get an error stating that the card will not read. A card that “won’t read” very often is
actually a card that fails because of a programming error, not due to a card or reader problem.
Check first to be sure that programming is not the cause.
For more information on troubleshooting this kind of reader, see the Troubleshooting Guide
found on IDenticard’s FTP site: ftp.identicard.com. Once you reach the site, install the guide by
double-clicking to run “9000Troubleshootingguide.exe.” After the guide is installed in the folder
you selected on your PC, double-click on “TableofContP1.pdf” in that folder to open the table of
contents for the Adobe (.pdf) files relating to readers. Then from the table of contents list, select
the topic you need more help with.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-8
Rev. 1/01
Magnetic-Stripe Flush Mount Reader
IDenticard Item Codes: F55-RHFLMNT2
F55-BSFLMNT2
DESCRIPTION
Reads high-coercivity mag-stripe cards. Track 2 is standard unless otherwise specified. Its slimline design allows it to be mounted on narrow mullion strips (1.75 inches wide) or, with the
optional back box (Item Code F60-FLMNTBOX), this reader may be mounted in a hollow wall.
Two LEDs indicate reader status. The green LED indicates a valid (passing) card read. The
amber LED indicates power. The card reader is weather-protected for use indoors or outdoors.
The maximum distance from the card reader to the 9000 panel is 800 feet.
With the card reader in a vertical position, swipe the card from top to bottom with the magnetic
stripe facing to the right.
CABLE REQUIREMENTS
5-conductor, 18-22 AWG, stranded, with an overall shield. Maximum distance is 800 feet.
!
IMPORTANT! Shield is important and must be used.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-9
Rev. 1/01
SPECIFICATIONS
• Temperature:
• Humidity:
• Life:
• Power:
-30°C to 70°C operating temperature
10% to 100% operating and storing humidity
300,000 passes in a clean environment
5 VDC at 20 mA
MOUNTING
The flush mount card reader may be mounted in one of two ways:
Mullion Strip (or Similar Surface) Without the Use of the Back Box
1. Mark the two mounting holes and wireway hole using the template provided. Drill and tap
two 10-32 mounting holes and drill a 1/4-inch diameter through-hole for the reader cable.
2. Mount the reader faceplate to the mullion strip with two 10-32 stainless steel socket head cap
screws provided with the reader.
Hollow Wall Using the Optional Back Box
1. A cutout must be made in the wall to accommodate the back box. Wiring may enter the box
from either the top or bottom. A 7/8-inch knockout is provided on either end of the box. The
physical dimensions of the back box are 1.375″ W × 3.5″ L × 2.0″ D. The cutout should be
1/16 inch larger than the actual back box dimensions. The cutout should also provide a
mortise so that the mounting tabs of the box are flush with the wall. Templates are provided
to assist in locating the mounting holes.
2. The back box is fastened to the wall using four #6 flathead screws (not included). Flathead
screws must be used so that the faceplate will fit against the wall without leaving a gap.
3. The reader and faceplate are mounted to the back box using two 10-32 stainless steel socket
head cap screws provided with the reader.
WIRING THE READER
The reader is provided with a short color-coded cable and a 10-pin terminal block. Connect the
block onto the reader cable and into the panel wiring to the desired reader port as shown below.
Connect the shield of the reader cable to ground at the panel. Be sure that the DIP switch used to
select the voltage is UP - set for 5 volts.
Be sure that the voltage selection jumper is in (set for 5 volts).
TERMINAL BLOCK
STROBE
NOT USED
DATA - YELLOW
+5 V - RED
DATA
+5V
GROUND
NOT USED
GROUND - BROWN OR BLACK
PROCEED LED - ORANGE
NOT USED
PROCEED LED
NOT USED
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
STROBE - GREEN
9000 READER PORT
TESTING AND TROUBLESHOOTING
Follow the instructions for the surface mount reader on page F-8.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-10
Rev. 1/01
Bar Code ABA Reader
IDenticard Item Code: F55-RH/TKBAR
DESCRIPTION
A weatherproof, bidirectional-swipe bar code reader, using infrared technology, which emulates
the IDenticard ABA mag-stripe reader. Supports Code 128, Code 3 of 9, UPC, Interleaved 2 of
5, and Code-A-Bar. A two-color LED indicates reader status. Green indicates a valid (passing)
card read. Red indicates power. The reader is surface-mounted and does not require a back box.
With the bar code facing the wide portion of the reader, the card is swiped through the slot in
either direction.
!
NOTE: Because this is a high security infrared reader, it will not read bar codes
printed with carbonless ink.
CABLE REQUIREMENTS
5-conductor, 18 AWG, with an overall shield. Maximum distance is 400 feet if powered from
the panel and 800 feet if powered locally at the reader.
!
IMPORTANT! Shield is important and must be used. Because of the current that
bar code readers draw, no higher than 22 gauge wire may be used.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-11
Rev. 1/02
SPECIFICATIONS
• Temperature:
• Humidity:
• Light source:
• Power:
• Symbologies supported
•
•
•
•
•
Maximum number of digits
Bar code density
Bar code centerline
Maximum skew
Cable attached
-30°C to 70°C operating temperature
10% to 100% operating and storing humidity
Infrared
5 VDC at 80 mA
Code 128, Code 3 of 9, UPC, Interleaved 2 of
5, and Code-A-Bar
10 digits plus 4-digit site code
Low to moderate
0.5 inch from edge of card
2 degrees
4 foot length
MOUNTING
1. Decide where you will mount the reader.
A template is provided to help you
determine the mounting position and
mark the holes to be drilled.
The reader is bidirectional; it will read
bar codes in either direction. This gives
you a great deal of flexibility in
mounting.
If installed in a vertical position, we
recommend that the LED be at the top.
If installed in a horizontal position, we
recommend that the LED be at the right.
2. Drill two holes 5.25 inches apart for mounting screws. Also drill a 0.5-inch diameter hole for
the reader cable. A template is provided for your convenience. If drilling into metal you may
tap the mounting holes to accept 10-24 screws.
3. The reader cable must be spliced into your cable. Do this before mounting the reader.
4. Mount the reader using the two 10-24 screws provided. After the reader has been tested,
place the label on the reader to cover the mounting screws.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-12
Rev. 1/01
WIRING THE READER
The reader is provided with a four-foot
color-coded cable. You must splice this
onto your reader cable. Connect the shield
of the reader cable to ground at the panel.
Connect the reader as shown to the desired
reader port on the 9000 panel. Be sure that
the DIP switch used to select the voltage is
UP - set for 5 volts.
Be sure that the voltage selection jumper is
IN (set for 5 volts).
!
NOTE: The blue and orange wires are NOT used. Be sure that they do not come in
contact with the shield or with each other. Insulate their ends with electrical tape.
TESTING THE READER
1. Enable the reader using Reader Setup (see page
3-1, Series 9000 Operations Manual). Be sure to
select “ABA/Barcode.” Set up the reader
parameters for the 5 digit test cards as shown at
right.
2. Swipe the card through the reader. The LED will
turn from red to green if the card number is
programmed to pass. The reader will NOT
indicate a failing card, but will send a transaction
to the PC. Verify that each card swipe produces a
transaction.
TROUBLESHOOTING
Check the following if the reader fails to operate:
Hardware-Based Issues
1. Check the voltage between the red (positive) and black (negative) wires at pins 4 and 5,
respectively, on the card reader for 5 volts DC. Be sure that the DIP switch used to select the
reader port voltage is UP.
Be sure that the voltage selection jumper for the reader port is IN.
2. Be sure that you have connected both the shiny black wire and the yellow wire to ground.
3. Be sure that the panel is communicating with the PC.
4. Be sure that you are inserting the card correctly into the reader. Swipe the card in either
direction with the bar code toward the wide portion of the reader.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-13
Rev. 1/01
Software-Based Issues
1. Did you enable the reader using Reader Setup? You must enable the reader before it will
operate. Be sure that you have enabled the correct reader on the correct panel.
2. Be sure that Reader TZ and Keypad TZ in Reader Setup are both set to “0” and that you
checked “Enable Reader” and did NOT check “Enable Keypad.”
3. Be sure to enter the correct reader parameters. Be sure to enter a First Byte of Sitecode
position of “1,” even if you are not using a site code. (A site code is, however, strongly
recommended for all installations.)
4. If the LED fails to operate, be sure that you selected “Standard” under Style in Reader Setup.
Experience has shown that reader malfunctions in new systems are almost always caused by a
mistake in wiring. Double-check the wiring connections to ensure that they are correct.
You may get an error stating that the card will not read. A card that “won’t read” very often is
actually a card that fails because of a programming error, not due to a card or reader problem.
Check first to be sure that programming is not the cause.
For more information on troubleshooting this kind of reader, see the Troubleshooting Guide
found on IDenticard’s FTP site: ftp.identicard.com. Once you reach the site, install the guide by
double-clicking to run “9000Troubleshootingguide.exe.” After the guide is installed in the folder
you selected on your PC, double-click on “TableofContP1.pdf” in that folder to open the table of
contents for the Adobe (.pdf) files relating to readers. Then from the table of contents list, select
the topic you need more help with.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-14
Rev. 1/01
Direct-Powered Proximity Readers
IDenticard Item Codes: F60-HPPT (ProxPoint
)
F60-HMP or F60-HMPA (MiniProx
)
F60-HTL or F60-HTLA (ThinLine II
)
F60-A/5003 or F60-A/5002 (ValueProx
)
F60-A/5033 or F60-A/5032 (SlimLine
)
F60-A/5053 or F60-A/5052 (WallSwitch)
F60-A/603A or F60-A/6032 (SecureProx
 I)
F60-A/605A or F60-A/6052 (SecureProx
 II)
DESCRIPTION
Proximity readers require no contact between the card and the reader antenna. IDenticard’s
proximity readers use a passive card (the card has no battery) that is activated by entering the
magnetic field around the reader. Read range can be as short as three inches or as great as 36
inches, depending on the model of reader used.
The 9000 panel will support direct-powered one-piece proximity readers that provide the
following output:
The standard 2601 format used by many Wiegand devices.
• 26 bit
IDenticard’s proprietary high-security Wiegand card format. Only
• 37 bit
Wiegand-type card readers using IDenticard 37 bit cards use this format.
CABLE REQUIREMENTS
5-conductor, 18-22 AWG, with an overall shield. Maximum distance is 800 feet.
!
IMPORTANT! Shield is important and must be used.
VOLTAGE SELECTION
!
IMPORTANT! Be sure to refer to the installation instructions for the specific
reader you are installing to determine the correct voltage for that reader.
In most cases, direct-powered proximity readers will operate on the 9.6 VDC supplied by the
9000 panel. Separate power supplies are not required. The DIP switch used to select the voltage
for the desired reader port on the 9000 panel should be DOWN – set for 9.6 volts.
Remove the voltage selection jumper for the desired reader port on the 9000 panel.
MOUNTING AND SPECIFICATIONS
Refer to the manufacturer’s instructions for your readers.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-15
Rev. 1/01
WIRING THE READER
Wiegand-output readers use a minimum of four wires. A fifth wire is often used to control an
LED. The signals are:
Data 0
Data 1
+9.6 VDC
Ground
LED control
Green
White
Red
Black
Brown
IDenticard’s Wiegand-output direct-powered proximity readers have a short cable that ends in
colored wires. You must splice this cable onto your reader cable. Connect the shield of the
reader cable to ground at the panel.
The reader may have other wires that are not used. Be sure to insulate them from the others.
!
IMPORTANT! Do not cut these unused wires flush with the shield. If you do, they
may short out to the shield or each other.
Connect the reader as shown above to the desired reader port on the 9000 panel. Be sure that the
DIP switch used to select the voltage is DOWN - set for 9.6 volts.
Be sure that the voltage selection jumper is OUT (set for 9.6 volts).
TESTING THE READER
Enable the reader using Reader Setup (see page 3-1, Series 9000 Operations Manual). Be sure to
select “Wiegand 26” under Type for the standard Wiegand 26-bit format or “Wiegand 37” when
using IDenticard’s proprietary encrypted 37-bit Wiegand cards.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-16
Rev. 1/01
Self Test
Motorola ASR-series proximity readers have an internal diagnostic routine to assure reader
operation at start-up. When power is first applied to a reader, it will “beep and flash” twice to let
the installer know that it has performed an internal check and appears to be functioning properly.
If the reader start-up routine determines one of the critical memory devices inside the reader has
failed, the reader will emit a “chirping” sound for about 8 seconds.
QuickFlash
The Motorola ASR-series proximity readers also have another internal diagnostic feature called
QuickFlash. When a card is presented to a reader, the LED will flash, and the beeper will be
activated for 100 milliseconds, regardless of the card’s access status. This feature gives the user
immediate feedback that the card was read and the data was sent to the 9000 panel. After the
100-millisecond QuickFlash period, the panel takes over LED control as usual.
The LED will activate if the card number is programmed to pass. The reader will NOT indicate a
failing card, but will send a transaction to the PC. Verify that each card swipe produces a
transaction.
TROUBLESHOOTING
Check the following if the reader fails to operate:
Hardware-Based Issues
1. Check the voltage at the card reader for the recommended voltage.
2. Be sure that the panel is communicating with the PC.
3. Be sure that you have wired the reader correctly. Check to see that DATA 0 is wired to pin 2,
not pin 3, on the 9000 reader port. Pin 3 is not used for Wiegand readers but is used for every
other reader type.
Software-Based Issues
1. Did you enable the correct reader type under Type in Reader Setup in the 9000 software? Be
sure that you have enabled the correct reader on the correct panel.
2. Be sure that Reader TZ and Keypad TZ on Reader Setup are both set to “0” and that you have
checked “Enable Reader” and NOT checked “Enable Keypad.”
3. If the LED fails to operate, be sure that you selected “Standard” under Style in Reader Setup.
Experience has shown that reader malfunctions in new systems are almost always caused by a
mistake in wiring. Double-check the wiring connections to ensure that they are correct.
You may get an error stating that the card will not read. A card that “won’t read” very often is
actually a card that fails because of a programming error, not due to a card or reader problem.
Check first to be sure that programming is not the cause.
For more information on troubleshooting this kind of reader, see the Troubleshooting Guide
found on IDenticard’s FTP site: ftp.identicard.com. Once you reach the site, install the guide by
double-clicking to run “9000Troubleshootingguide.exe.” After the guide is installed in the folder
you selected on your PC, double-click on “TableofContP1.pdf” in that folder to open the table of
contents for the Adobe (.pdf) files relating to readers. Then from the table of contents list, select
the topic you need more help with.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-17
Rev. 1/01
Wiegand Readers
IDenticard Item Code: F55-WIEG/RDR
DESCRIPTION
The 9000 panel will support Wiegand readers (and emulations) that accept cards using
the standard 2601 open format used by many Wiegand devices, or IDenticard’s proprietary highsecurity 37-bit Wiegand card format. IDenticard’s Wiegand reader accepts either format.
CABLE REQUIREMENTS
5-conductor, 18-22 AWG, with an overall shield. Maximum distance is 800 feet.
!
IMPORTANT! Shield is important and must be used.
MOUNTING AND SPECIFICATIONS
Refer to the manufacturer’s instructions for your readers.
WIRING
Wiegand readers use a minimum of four wires. A fifth wire is often used to control an LED.
The signals are:
Data 0
Green
Data 1
White
+5 VDC
Red
Ground
Black
LED control (optional)
Brown
POWER REQUIREMENTS
Wiegand readers require 5 VDC. The reader may be powered directly from the 9000 panel
provided that the current is no more than 100 mA. Check the manufacturer’s specifications to
verify that your reader meets these requirements.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-18
Rev. 3/01
Some readers use a built-in terminal strip to connect the reader cable; others may have a short
color-coded cable exiting the reader. IDenticard’s Wiegand card readers use the cable. You
must splice this cable onto your reader cable. Connect the shield of the reader cable to ground at
the panel.
Connect the reader as shown to the desired reader port on the 9000 panel. Be sure that the DIP
switch used to select the voltage is UP – set for 5 volts.
Be sure that the voltage selection jumper is IN (set for 5 volts).
TESTING THE READER
1. Enable the reader using Reader Setup (see page 3-1, Series 9000 Operations Manual). Be sure
to select “Wiegand 26” under Type for the standard Wiegand 26-bit format or “Wiegand 37”
when using IDenticard’s proprietary encrypted 37-bit Wiegand cards.
2. Swipe the card through the reader. The LED will activate if the card number is programmed
to pass. The reader will NOT indicate a failing card, but will send a transaction to the PC.
Verify that each card swipe produces a transaction.
!
NOTE: A slight delay of up to two seconds in processing the card read is normal
when the reader is enabled for 26 bit; 37 bit has no delay.
TROUBLESHOOTING
Check the following if the reader fails to operate:
Hardware-Based Issues
1. Did you enable the correct bit format? Be sure that you have enabled the correct reader on
the correct panel.
2. Check the voltage at the card reader for 5 VDC. Be sure that the DIP switch used to select
the voltage is UP.
Be sure that the voltage selection jumper is IN.
3. Be sure that the panel is communicating with the PC.
4. Be sure that you have wired the reader correctly. Check to see that DATA 0 is wired to pin 2,
not pin 3 on 9000 reader port. Pin 3 is not used for Wiegand readers but is used for every
other reader type.
Software-Based Issues
1. Be sure that Reader TZ and Keypad TZ on Reader Setup are both set to “0” and that you have
checked “Enable Reader” and NOT checked “Enable Keypad.”
2. If the LED fails to operate, be sure that you selected “Standard” under Style in Reader Setup.
Experience has shown that reader malfunctions in new systems are almost always caused by a
mistake in wiring. Double-check the wiring connections to ensure that they are correct.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-19
Rev. 1/01
You may get an error stating that the card will not read. A card that “won’t read” very often is
actually a card that fails because of a programming error, not due to a card or reader problem.
Check first to be sure that programming is not the cause.
For more information on troubleshooting this kind of reader, see the Troubleshooting Guide
found on IDenticard’s FTP site: ftp.identicard.com. Once you reach the site, install the guide by
double-clicking to run “9000Troubleshootingguide.exe.” After the guide is installed in the folder
you selected on your PC, double-click on “TableofContP1.pdf” in that folder to open the table of
contents for the Adobe (.pdf) files relating to readers. Then from the table of contents list, select
the topic you need more help with.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-20
Rev. 1/01
Proximity Wiegand-Output Readers (Separate Power Supply
Required)
IDenticard Item Codes: F60-MLTPXSCR or F60-MLTPXBCR (MultiProx
)
F60-A/610A or F60-A/6102 (MasterProx
)
F60-A/620A or F60-A/6202 (PowerProx I
)
F60-HPP or F60-PPKP (ProxPro
)
F60-HMX (MaxiProx
)
F60-A/1102 (Surface Mount)
F60-VIR26 (Vehicle Identification System)
DESCRIPTION
Proximity readers require no contact between the card and the reader antenna. IDenticard’s
proximity readers use a passive card (the card has no battery) that is activated by entering the
magnetic field around the reader. Read range can be as short as three inches or as great as 36
inches, depending on the model of reader used.
POWER REQUIREMENTS
These proximity readers are NOT supplied voltage from the 9000 panel. A separate power
supply must be installed to provide power (and battery backup) for the readers. Check the
manufacturer’s instructions for your reader model to see if the reader requires 12 VDC or 24
VDC.
Sizing the Power Supply
One power supply may power several proximity readers. Check the manufacturer’s
specifications to find the current draw of the reader. Add the current draw of all the readers you
wish to power from one supply, and add 20% as a protection factor. You must choose a power
supply that will handle the total amperage for the readers. It is recommended that no more than
four readers be on a common power supply, because a failure in the supply will affect all readers
on the supply.
The type of power supply is important to ensure maximum read range from your reader. A linear
(nonswitching) regulated power supply must be used. Ripple voltage must be less than 100 mV.
MOUNTING THE READER ANTENNA
Follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Some general guidelines are:
• Do not mount the reader near metal. A closed metal loop (frame) around the reader or
metal lath, pipe, wiring, etc., behind the reader may affect operation. The most common
symptom is a read range that is shorter than expected. Make sure that the reader is at least
one foot away from large amounts of metal. Check the manufacturer’s instructions for
details.
• If mounting the reader behind a nonferrous wall, be sure that the reader has adequate read
range to read the card from outside the wall.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-21
Rev. 1/01
•
The reader should be accessible for servicing. It is not desirable to bury the reader in
concrete or to drywall over it without providing an access panel from the other side. Be
careful of metal plates used for access panels.
If mounting readers on both sides of a door, do not place the readers directly opposite each
other on each side of the wall. They will interfere with each other.
The long-range readers (24-36 inch range) are particularly sensitive to metal, correct
grounding, and outside interference. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions closely.
•
•
CONNECTING THE OUTPUT TO THE 9000 PANEL
Depending on the model, your proximity reader may be a one-piece reader (antenna and
electronics in one unit) or a two-piece reader (separate antenna and remote electronics). Connect
these units together and to the power supply as shown in the manufacturer’s instructions that
come with your readers. Wire the output of the reader (or remote electronics) to the desired 9000
reader port as described under “Connecting to the 9000 Reader Port” below.
!
IMPORTANT! Be sure to connect the negative side of the power supply to the
signal ground (pin 5) of the 9000 reader port.
!
WARNING! Do not attempt to power proximity readers from the 9000 panel.
Damage to the panel may result.
USING THE MANUFACTURER’S INSTRUCTIONS
IDenticard provides a proximity reader built under license of Motorola Corporation to have a
custom output that emulates IDenticard’s proprietary magnetic-stripe encryption reader. This
emulation provides a high level of security and keeps card numbers and site codes compatible
with those used for magnetic-stripe cards.
From an electrical standpoint, the readers use Wiegand output. Be sure to follow Wiegand
instructions when using Motorola’s instructions.
The terminology used by Motorola in its instructions corresponds to the terminology used in this
installation manual as given in the chart below.
Motorola Terminology
Data 0 Out
Data 1 Out
Access System Controller
Host Controller
Series 9000 Terminology
Data 0
Data 1
9000 panel
9000 panel
Card Reader Installation
Page F-22
Rev. 1/01
CABLE REQUIREMENTS
5-conductor, 18 AWG, with an overall shield. Maximum distance is 800 feet. See the
manufacturer’s instructions for the cable between the antenna and the remote electronics.
!
IMPORTANT! There may be a significant voltage loss in long cable runs, especially
when using high-current readers, such as the extended range type. Be sure that you
have the correct operating voltage present at the reader for proper operation.
CONNECTING TO THE 9000 READER PORT
Follow this diagram for connecting the signals to the 9000 panel. The beeper IN line is NOT
used by the 9000.
TESTING THE READER
1. Enable the reader using Reader Setup (see page 3-1, Series 9000 Operations Manual).
Depending on your reader, be sure to select “Wiegand 26” under Type for the standard
Wiegand 26-bit format or “Wiegand 37” when using IDenticard’s proprietary encrypted 37bit Wiegand cards. Also select “Standard” under Style.
2. Verify that the reader passes the QuickFlash and SelfTest as described in the
manufacturer’s reader manual. See page F-17 for a discussion of these two features.
3. The LED will turn green for at least three seconds if the card number is programmed to pass.
QuickFlash will indicate ALL card reads, but the LED will not indicate a failing card. Verify
that each card read produces a transaction at the PC.
TROUBLESHOOTING
Be sure that the reader passes its SelfTest and QuickFlash. If it does not, the problem is in the
reader system and not with the 9000 system.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-23
Rev. 6/01
If the reader fails to operate with the 9000 panel, check the following:
Hardware-Based Issues
1. Be sure that you have wired the reader correctly. Check to see that DATA 0 is wired to pin 2,
not pin 3, on the 9000 reader port.
2. If the read range is shorter than expected, check the following:
• Did you follow the manufacturer’s grounding instructions?
• Did you use a linear power supply with low ripple?
• Is the voltage at the reader within acceptable limits?
• Is reader interference being caused by metal or another reader?
3. A close magnetic field (within 6 feet) may interfere with reader operation and cause poor read
range. Magnetic fields may be generated by:
• Television sets or computer terminals.
• Radio transmitters.
Software-Based Issues
1. Did you enable the reader as a Wiegand reader (“Wiegand 37”) using Reader Setup? The
reader will not generate transactions until it is enabled.
2. Be sure that Reader TZ and Keypad TZ in Reader Setup are both set to “0” and that you have
checked “Enable Reader,” and NOT checked “Enable Keypad.”
3. Be sure that you have not enabled the reader as a mag-stripe reader (“Mag Stripe Enc.” in
Reader Setup).
4. Be sure that the 9000 panel is communicating with the PC.
5. If the LED fails to operate, be sure that you selected “Standard” under Style in Reader Setup.
Experience has shown that reader malfunctions in new systems are almost always caused by a
mistake in wiring. Double-check the wiring connections to ensure that they are correct.
You may get an error stating that the card will not read. A card that “won’t read” very often is
actually a card that fails because of a programming error, not due to a card or reader problem.
Check first to be sure that programming is not the cause.
For more information on troubleshooting this kind of reader, see the Troubleshooting Guide
found on IDenticard’s FTP site: ftp.identicard.com. Once you reach the site, install the guide by
double-clicking to run “9000Troubleshootingguide.exe.” After the guide is installed in the folder
you selected on your PC, double-click on “TableofContP1.pdf” in that folder to open the table of
contents for the Adobe (.pdf) files relating to readers. Then from the table of contents list, select
the topic you need more help with.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-24
Rev. 1/01
Proximity Encryption-Output Readers (Separate Power Supply
Required)
IDenticard Item Codes: F60-A/6203 (PowerProx I
)
F60-A/6103 (MasterProx
)
F60-A/110 or F60-A/1103 (Surface Mount)
F60-VIR37 (Vehicle Identification System)
DESCRIPTION
Proximity readers require no contact between the card and the reader antenna. IDenticard’s
proximity readers use a passive card (the card has no battery) that is activated by entering the
magnetic field around the reader. Read range can be as short as three inches or as great as 36
inches, depending on the model reader used. IDenticard’s readers are custom-built to emulate
IDenticard’s proprietary high security mag-stripe encryption output.
POWER REQUIREMENTS
These proximity readers are NOT supplied voltage by the 9000 panel. A separate power supply
must be installed to provide power (and battery backup) for the readers. Check the
manufacturer’s instructions for your reader model to see if the reader requires 12 VDC or
24 VDC.
Sizing the Power Supply
One power supply may power several proximity readers. Check the manufacturer’s
specifications to find the current draw of the reader. Add the current draw of all the readers you
wish to power from one supply, and add 20% as a protection factor. You must choose a power
supply that will handle the total amperage for the readers. It is recommended that no more than
four readers be on a common power supply, because a failure in the supply will affect all readers
on the supply.
The type of power supply is important to ensure maximum read range from your reader. A linear
(nonswitching) regulated power supply must be used. Ripple voltage must be less than 100 mV.
MOUNTING THE READER ANTENNA
Follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Some general guidelines are:
• Do not mount the reader near metal. A closed metal loop (frame) around the reader or
metal lath, pipe, wiring, etc., behind the reader may affect operation. The most common
symptom is a read range that is shorter than expected. Make sure that the reader is at least
one foot away from large amounts of metal. Check the manufacturer’s instructions for
details.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-25
Rev. 1/01
•
If mounting the reader behind a nonferrous wall, be sure that the reader has adequate read
range to read the card from outside the wall.
The reader should be accessible for servicing. It is not desirable to bury the reader in
concrete or to drywall over it without providing an access panel from the other side. Be
careful of metal plates used for access panels.
If mounting readers on both sides of a door, do not place the readers directly opposite each
other on each side of the wall. They will interfere with each other.
The long-range readers (24-36 inch range) are particularly sensitive to metal, correct
grounding, and outside interference. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions closely.
•
•
•
CONNECTING THE OUTPUT TO THE 9000 PANEL
Depending on the model, your proximity reader may be a one-piece reader (antenna and
electronics in one unit) or a two-piece reader (separate antenna and remote electronics). Connect
these units together and to the power supply as shown in the manufacturer’s instructions that
come with your readers. Wire the output of the reader (or remote electronics) to the desired 9000
reader port as described under “Connecting to the 9000 Reader Port” below.
!
IMPORTANT! Be sure to connect the negative side of the power supply to the
signal ground (pin 5) of the 9000 reader port.
!
WARNING! Do not attempt to power proximity readers from the 9000 panel.
Damage to the panel may result.
USING THE MANUFACTURER’S INSTRUCTIONS
IDenticard provides a proximity reader built under license of Motorola Corporation to have a
custom output that emulates IDenticard’s proprietary magnetic-stripe encryption reader. This
emulation provides a high level of security and keeps card numbers and site codes compatible
with those used for magnetic-stripe cards.
From an electrical standpoint, the readers use Wiegand output. Be sure to follow Wiegand
instructions when using Motorola’s instructions.
The terminology used by Motorola in its instructions corresponds to the terminology used in this
installation manual as given in the chart below.
Motorola Terminology
Data 0 Out
Data 1 Out
Access System Controller
Host Controller
Series 9000 Terminology
Strobe signal
Data signal
9000 panel
9000 panel
Card Reader Installation
Page F-26
Rev. 1/01
CABLE REQUIREMENTS
5-conductor, 18 AWG, with an overall shield. Maximum distance is 800 feet. See the
manufacturer’s instructions for the cable between the antenna and remote electronics.
!
IMPORTANT! There may be a significant voltage loss in long cable runs, especially
when using high-current readers, such as the extended range type. Be sure that you
have the correct operating voltage present at the reader for proper operation.
CONNECTING TO THE 9000 READER PORT
Follow this diagram for connecting the signals to the 9000 panel. The beeper IN line is NOT
used by the 9000.
TESTING THE READER
Enable the reader using Reader Setup (see page 3.1, Series 9000 Operations Manual). Be sure to
select “Mag Stripe Enc.” under Type and “Standard Reader” under Style.
Verify that the reader passes the QuickFlash and SelfTest as described in the manufacturer’s
reader manual. See page F-17 for a discussion of these two features.
The LED will turn green for at least three seconds if the card number is programmed to pass.
QuickFlash will indicate ALL card reads, but the LED will not indicate a failing card. Verify
that each card read produces a transaction at the PC.
TROUBLESHOOTING
Be sure that the reader passes its SelfTest and QuickFlash. If it does not, the problem is in the
reader system and not with the 9000 system.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-27
Rev. 6/01
If the reader fails to operate with the 9000 panel, check the following:
Hardware-Based Issues
1. Be sure that you have wired the reader correctly. Check to see that DATA 0 is wired to pin 3,
not pin 2, on the 9000 reader port.
2. If the read range is shorter than expected, check the following:
• Did you follow the manufacturer’s grounding instructions?
• Did you use a linear power supply with low ripple?
• Is the voltage at the reader within acceptable limits?
• Is reader interference being caused by metal or another reader?
3. A close magnetic field (within 6 feet) may interfere with reader operation and cause poor read
range. Magnetic fields may be generated by:
• Television sets or computer terminals.
• Radio transmitters.
4. Be sure that the 9000 panel is communicating with the PC.
Software-Based Issues
1. If the LED fails to operate, be sure that you selected “Standard” under Style in Reader Setup.
2. Did you enable the reader as “Mag Stripe Enc.” under Type using Reader Setup? The reader
will not generate transactions until it is enabled.
3. Be sure that Reader TZ and Keypad TZ in Reader Setup are both set to “0” and that you have
checked “Enable Reader,” and NOT checked “Enable Keypad.”
4. Be sure that you have not enabled the reader as a Wiegand reader (“Wiegand 26” or
“Wiegand 37” in Reader Setup.
Experience has shown that reader malfunctions in new systems are almost always caused by a
mistake in wiring. Double-check the wiring connections to ensure that they are correct.
You may get an error stating that the card will not read. A card that “won’t read” very often is
actually a card that fails because of a programming error, not due to a card or reader problem.
Check first to be sure that programming is not the cause.
For more information on troubleshooting this kind of reader, see the Troubleshooting Guide
found on IDenticard’s FTP site: ftp.identicard.com. Once you reach the site, install the guide by
double-clicking to run “9000Troubleshootingguide.exe.” After the guide is installed in the folder
you selected on your PC, double-click on “TableofContP1.pdf” in that folder to open the table of
contents for the Adobe (.pdf) files relating to readers. Then from the table of contents list, select
the topic you need more help with.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-28
Rev. 1/01
Surface-Mount Track 2 Reader/Keypad
IDenticard Item Code: F55-9RH2/KP
DESCRIPTION
Magnetic stripe swipe reader and keypad with housing, two-color LED and beeper. Includes
internally mounted enhanced reader module. Reads high-coercivity mag-stripe cards. Track 2 is
standard, unless otherwise specified. Includes black cast aluminum back box for surface
mounting. The reader is weather-protected for use indoors or outdoors. The maximum distance
from the reader to the 9000 panel is 2000 feet.
USING THE KEYPAD
The keypad may be enabled in either of two ways:
1. To require a personal identification number (PIN) to be entered after a valid card read. This
option provides the highest security.
Using Reader Setup, check both “Enable Reader” and “Enable Keypad.” Be sure to select
“Enhanced” under Style. With the reader in a horizontal position and the magnetic stripe
facing down, swipe the card in the direction of the arrows. An invalid card read will cause
the right LED to turn RED.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-29
Rev. 1/01
A. Using a valid card (programmed to pass), swipe the card through the reader. Two
short beeps signal that the card has been read. You now have 10 seconds to enter the
PIN as described in step B.
B. Using the keypad, enter the PIN programmed for that cardholder, and then press the #
key. Be sure the beeper chirps for every keystroke. Access will be granted and the
right LED will turn green if the PIN is correct when you press the # key.
If you make a mistake, press * (the clear key) to start over and simply re-enter your PIN.
!
NOTE: The cardholder’s Time Zone and Reader Group must be valid to proceed to
step B above. You will not hear the two short beeps if an invalid card is read.
2. To function as either a swipe or a keypad reader.
Using Reader Setup, check both “Enable Reader” and “Split Keypad Use.” Access may be
granted by either swiping the card through the reader or entering the card number – not the
PIN – using the keypad and pressing the # key. Be sure the beeper chirps for every keystroke.
CABLE REQUIREMENTS
Four-pair (eight-conductor), 18-22 AWG, with an overall shield. Maximum distance is 2000
feet.
SPECIFICATIONS
• Temperature
• Humidity
• Reader Life
• Power
• Keypad type
• Keypad life
-30°C to 70°C operating temperature
10% to 95% operating and storing humidity
300,000 passes in a clean environment
9.6 VDC at 40 mA
Membrane, weather sealed
N/A
MOUNTING
The surface-mount card reader and faceplate are mounted into a heavy aluminum casting that is
mounted to a wall or pedestal. Four 1/4-inch diameter mounting holes are provided in the back
of the casting. The type of mounting hardware used depends upon the mounting surface.
WIRING ENTRANCE
A wiring hole is NOT provided in the casting. You must drill the appropriately sized hole to
accommodate either the cable or conduit. It is best if you can run the cable through the back of
the casting. Mounting of the casting should be neat, with no wires exposed to vandalism. If you
cannot wire from behind, we recommend that conduit be used. Drill the entrance hole through
either end or bottom of the casting. Make sure that the hole is toward the back far enough that it
cannot be seen with the faceplate installed.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-30
Rev. 1/01
WIRING THE READER
The reader/keypad is wired using an
8-pin terminal strip (TB1) located on
the circuit board on the back of the
reader faceplate. Connect the reader
as shown. Connect the reader cable
shield to ground at the 9000 panel.
Be sure that the DIP switch used to
select the voltage on the 9000 panel
is DOWN - set for 9.6 volts.
Be sure that the voltage selection
jumper is set for 9.6 volts (OUT).
Be sure the
9000 panel
DIP switch is
set for 9.6
volts DOWN!
TESTING THE READER AND KEYPAD
1. Enable the reader using Reader Setup (see page 3-1, Series 9000 Operations Manual). Check
“Enable Reader” and “Split Keypad Use.” Be sure to select “Enhanced” under Style. This
will enable the reader and keypad as separate devices and make testing easier.
2. Swipe a card through the reader. The right LED will pulse RED for an invalid card or
GREEN for a valid card. Enter a card number using the keypad, then press the # key. Be
sure that the beeper chirps for every keystroke. The right LED will pulse RED for a failing
number or GREEN for a passing number. The left amber LED is a power indicator and is
always on.
!
NOTE: It is normal for the beeper to sometimes sound, and the right LED to light,
when the reader is first connected before it is enabled and used. Enable the reader
and press a key, or swipe a card to reset the beeper and start proper reader
operation.
TROUBLESHOOTING
The card reader does not operate.
Hardware-Based Issues
1. Did you set the voltage-selection DIP switch to 9.6 volts? The DIP switch must be DOWN.
Be sure that the voltage selection jumper is set for 9.6 volts (OUT).
Check the voltage at the reader between pins 3 (+) and 4(-) of TB1. You should read 9.6 ±.5
VDC.
2. Are you sure that the panel is communicating with the PC?
3. Are you swiping the card correctly through the reader?
Card Reader Installation
Page F-31
Rev. 1/01
Software-Based Issues
1. Did you enable the reader using Reader Setup? Be sure that Split Keypad Use is not selected.
2. Enable the reader as “Mag Stripe Enc.” or “ABA/Barcode,” depending on the card used.
3. Verify that Reader TZ is set to “0” on the Reader Setup screen.
The keypad does not operate.
1. Did you select “Split Keypad Use” using Reader Setup? You must do this to activate the
keypad.
2. Did you select “Enhanced” under Style using Reader Setup? The keypad will not operate if
you select “Standard.”
3. Verify that Keypad TZ is set to “0” in Reader Setup. Placing the keypad on a Time Zone will
deactivate it.
Two-color LED (on right) and beeper will not operate.
1. Select Enhanced under Style for the reader. The keypad, beeper and LED will not function if
you select “Standard.”
2. Did you set the voltage-selection DIP switch to 9.6 volts? The DIP switch must be DOWN.
Did you pull out the voltage selection jumper? It must be out.
Check the voltage at the reader between pins 3 (+) and 4(-) of TB1. You should read 9.6 ±.5
VDC.
Experience has shown that reader malfunctions in new systems are almost always caused by a
mistake in wiring. Double-check the wiring connections to ensure that they are correct.
You may get an error stating that the card will not read. A card that “won’t read” very often is
actually a card that fails because of a programming error, not due to a card or reader problem.
Check first to be sure that programming is not the cause.
For more information on troubleshooting this kind of reader, see the Troubleshooting Guide
found on IDenticard’s FTP site: ftp.identicard.com. Once you reach the site, install the guide by
double-clicking to run “9000Troubleshootingguide.exe.” After the guide is installed in the folder
you selected on your PC, double-click on “TableofContP1.pdf” in that folder to open the table of
contents for the Adobe (.pdf) files relating to readers. Then from the table of contents list, select
the topic you need more help with.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-32
Rev. 1/01
Enhanced Reader Module (ERM)
IDenticard Item Code: F55-ENHNCRDR
An ERM is needed to interface a keypad with the 9000 panel. Since the ERM can be wired up to
2000 feet from the panel, it is sometimes used to extend the distance of a card reader, which
permits only an 800-foot maximum wiring distance.
!
IMPORTANT! The ERM is built into the IDenticard Series 9000 Surface Mount
Magnetic Stripe Track 2 Reader/Keypad (F55-9RH2/KP). It must be mounted
externally for all other keypad-reader applications.
VOLTAGE SELECTION
The ERM operates on 9.6 VDC. The DIP switch used to select the voltage for the desired reader
port on the 9000 panel should be DOWN.
Remove the voltage selection jumper for the desired reader port on the 9000 panel.
READER STYLE
When using an ERM, select “Enhanced” under Style in Reader Setup in the Series 9000
software.
CABLE REQUIREMENTS
• ERM to keypad
• ERM to card reader
• ERM to 9000 Panel
15-conductor, 18-22 AWG, stranded, shielded. Max. length is 20 feet.
5-conductor, 18 AWG, stranded, shielded. Max. length is 800 feet.
4-pair or 8-conductor, 18 AWG, stranded, shielded. Max. length is
2000 feet.
CONNECTING CARD READERS TO THE
ENHANCED READER MODULE
Follow the instructions for connecting
the card reader to the 9000 panel.
Instead of connecting the reader to the
panel, connect it to the reader port on
the Enhanced Reader Module (TB5).
Refer to the connection diagram at
right.
!
TO BUZZER
ON REMOTE
KEYPAD
NOTE: The Proceed LED
built into the card reader
cannot be used. You may
provide separate LEDs
wired to the ERM as shown
here.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-33
Rev. 1/01
Keypad with Faceplate (Stand-Alone)
IDenticard Item Code: F55-9K/PAD
DESCRIPTION
A stand-alone keypad with brushed aluminum faceplate that fits in a single gang electrical box
(not included). Includes Enhanced Reader Module (external mount) and beeper. This keypad
may be used without a card reader, or be mounted separately for use with any reader other than
the Magnetic Stripe reader.
WIRING
Wire the keypad to the Enhanced Reader Module as shown on page F-33.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-34
Rev. 1/01
Smart Card Readers
IDenticard Item Codes: F55-SMRTKITA or F55-SMRTKITW (Kits)
M60-SMRTRDRA or M60-SMRTRDRW (Reader only)
DESCRIPTION
A smart card is a card with an embedded microprocessor chip that stores data and can run small
computer applications. IDenticard’s smart card readers utilize MIFARE® contactless technology
to receive cardholder-specific data from a smart card presented to the reader. This data is then
used for identification and access purposes. Contactless technology means that the card does not
need to actually come in physical contact with reader, much like a proximity reader. The current
IDenticard standard reader outputs are ABA or 26-bit Wiegand.
The unit has three LEDs and a buzzer. A yellow LED and a buzzer indicate a successful card
read. A green LED indicates access granted, while a red LED indicates access is not granted.
CABLE REQUIREMENTS
6-conductor, 20 AWG, stranded, maximum diameter of individual wire: 0.059 inch (1.5 mm).
The cable is connected to a 6-pin connector that plugs into the back of the reader. The maximum
cable length is 400-500 feet.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-35
Rev. 6/01
POWER REQUIREMENTS
The reader uses 5.0 VDC, 50-80 mA. The reader can be powered directly from the new version
of the 9000 panel for cable runs of 400 feet or less. Runs over 400 feet up to the maximum of
500 feet may necessitate a separate local 5 VDC power source. If the reader is powered from the
panel, the DIP switch used to select the voltage for the desired reader port on the 9000 panel
should be UP.
A separate power supply may be required when the reader is connected to the previous version of
the 9000 panel. The voltage selection jumper must be IN if the reader is able to be powered from
the panel.
SPECIFICATIONS
• Temperature
•
•
•
•
Operating temperature:
0-50°C
Storage temperature:
10-70°C
Minimum:
0.394
inch (10 mm)
Reading distance*
Maximum:
1.181 inch (30 mm)
Typical:
0.787 inch (20 mm)
Operating frequency and speed 13.56 MHz at 106k baud
In accordance with ISO 781112-1986, Track 2; data is
Data structure
encrypted and protected against recording and “replayattack.”
Black ABS plastic housing; dimensions without
Reader housing
connectors: 2.795″ W × 2.795″ H × 0.827″ D
* In practical applications, contact provides the best read. Since the card-reader transaction is completed in
milliseconds, the contact necessary is minimal.
MOUNTING
The reader can be installed in either a surface-mount or flush-mount configuration. Surface
mounting of the reader requires the wall-mount kit, and the wall mount box (similar in design to
a junction box) is needed for a flush-mount installation. The kit and box are both available from
IDenticard. The reader is water-resistant, except for the 9-pin connector. When mounting a
reader outside, this connector must be protected, or the edges of the reader mount must be made
watertight.
WIRE ENTRANCE
The wiring enters the wall-mount kit (surface mount) from the rear and the wall-mount box
(flush-mount box) from the side. You may need to drill wire-access holes in the receptacles as
needed. The type of mounting hardware you use depends on the mounting surface.
WIRING THE READER AND PANEL
Refer to the diagram on the next page for the pin numbering used on the connector plug. Then
refer to the charts after the diagram to wire the reader and the panel for your specific application.
Note that not all pins are currently used and that the wired six-pin plug is inserted into the 9-pin
socket so that the first three pins on the socket remain open.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-36
Rev. 6/01
Pins 1-3
are NOT
used!
1
2
3
4
5 6
7
8
9
ON
All DIP switches
are always OFF!
1
2
3
4
5 6
7
8
Your connector
must be inserted to
cover pins 4-9!
ABA Format
Smart Card
Reader Pin
Pin 4
Pin 5
Pin 6
Pin 8
Pin 9
Function
Ground
Clock
Data
Proceed LED
+5 VDC
Series 9000
Panel Pin
Pin 5
Pin 1
Pin 3
Pin 8
Pin 4
ABA Format Used with Enhanced Reader Module (for Use with Keypad)
Smart Card
Reader Pin
Pin 4
Pin 5
Pin 6
Pin 9
Function
ERM Pin
Ground
Clock
Data
+5 VDC
Pin 5
Pin 1
Pin 2
Pin 3
Function
Series 9000
Panel Pin
Pin 5
Pin 2
Pin 1
Pin 8
Pin 4
Wiegand Output
Smart Card
Reader Pin
Pin 4
Pin 5
Pin 6
Pin 8
Pin 9
Ground
Data 1
Data 0
Proceed LED
+5 VDC
Card Reader Installation
Page F-37
Rev. 6/01
TESTING THE READER
1. Enable the reader using Reader Setup (see page 3-1, Series 9000 Operations Manual). Be
sure to select “ABA/Barcode or Wiegand 26,” depending on which type of card encoding you
are using.
2. Present a card to the reader. The yellow LED and buzzer will indicate a successful card read,
and the green LED will light if the card number is programmed to pass. Verify that each card
presented produces a transaction.
TROUBLESHOOTING
Hardware-Based Issues
1. Check the voltage at the card reader for 5 VDC. Be sure that the DIP switch used to select
the voltage is UP for the reader port.
Be sure that the voltage selection jumper is IN for the reader port.
2. Be sure that the panel is communicating with the PC; check the RS-485 LEDs on the control
panel and system converter.
3. Be sure that you are presenting the card within the reader’s read range.
Software-Based Issues
1. If you are using an ABA card, be sure to enter the card parameters. Be sure to enter a First
Byte of Sitecode position of “1,” even if you are not using a site code. (A site code, however,
is strongly recommended for all installations.)
2. If the LED fails to operate, be sure that you have selected “Standard” under Style in Reader
Setup.
3. Did you enable the reader using Reader Setup? You must enable the reader before it will
operate. Be sure that you have enabled the correct reader on the correct panel.
4. Be sure that Reader TZ and Keypad TZ on reader setup are both set to “0.”
Experience has shown that reader malfunctions in new systems are almost always caused by a
mistake in wiring. Double-check the wiring connections to ensure that they are correct.
You may get an error stating that the card will not read. A card that “won’t read” very often is
actually a card that fails because of a programming error, not due to a card or reader problem.
Check first to be sure that programming is not the cause.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-38
Rev. 6/01
Stand-Alone Proximity Readers
IDenticard Item Codes: F55-EPFOBKIT or F55-EPISOKIT (Kits)
M60-HEPSAU (Reader only)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
*
0
#
IDenticard
R
DESCRIPTION
This stand-alone reader provides a single-door access-control system in one unit that is capable
of integration into a Series 9000 panel system using 26-bit Wiegand format. IDenticard
Systems offers and supports the HID EntryProx Stand-Alone Access-Control Reader, which
features a 12-position keypad for PIN entry or programming, an RTE pushbutton, and a
detachable antenna module that can be mounted up to 10 feet away from the control unit, indoors
or outdoors. The keypad is disabled, however, when the EntryProx is wired to a Series 9000
panel.
The EntryProx is compatible with all HID proximity cards and keyfobs. However, when the
EntryProx is connected to the Series 9000 panel, only 26-bit cards may be used. The unit can
indicate “door ajar” and/or “forced door” conditions with an alarm output relay.
When used as a stand-alone card reader, the EntryProx stores (in FIFO sequence) up to 2000
users and 1000 time-stamped transactions, which can be printed via an IR link to an optional
handheld HP printer. When the EntryProx is connected to the Series 9000 panel, however, the
card information is automatically sent to the panel.
CABLE REQUIREMENTS
Power Supply Cable
2-conductor, 18-22 AWG, stranded, shielded. Gauge depends upon cable length and other
devices to be powered via the cable. Refer to the manufacturer’s separate instructions for
specific details on the proper gauge of wire to be used.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-39
Rev. 1/01
Remote Antenna Cable
4-conductor, 22 AWG, stranded, unshielded. A remote antenna cable is required only if the
antenna is installed up to 10 feet away from the stand-alone unit. The maximum distance is 10
feet.
Wiegand Interface Cable
5-conductor, 22AWG, stranded with overall shield. An interface cable is required to wire the
stand-alone unit into a Series 9000 panel. See page F-42 for the steps to program the reader
when wiring it to the Series 9000 panel. This programming is required for operation with a
panel.
Door Lock Cable
2-conductor, 18-22 AWG, stranded, unshielded (gauge depends upon cable length and other
devices to be powered via the cable).
Door Monitor Cable
2-conductor, 18-22 AWG, stranded, unshielded (gauge depends upon cable length and other
devices to be powered via the cable).
Request To Exit Cable
2-conductor, stranded, unshielded (if using a remote switch).
POWER REQUIREMENTS
A separate linear, filtered and regulated power supply of 10-15 VDC at 500 mA is recommended.
The door lock and any other devices connected to the reader must have a separate power supply
or supplies as they require.
SPECIFICATIONS
• Operating temperature
• Reader housing dimensions
-22°F to 150°F
2.75″ W × 5.25″ H × 1.375″ D
MOUNTING
The reader can be installed using one of three possible installation configurations: wall mounting,
glass mounting, or a secure installation. Although this reader is designed to function
independently of a Series 9000 panel and system, you may need to take future panel-wiring
requirements into consideration when choosing the mounting location, method and configuration.
Refer to the manufacturer’s separate Installation/Programming Manual for a complete discussion
of these installation configurations and specific considerations in mounting this reader.
An option in mounting is to mount the reader and its antenna on opposite sides of a doorjamb. In
this way, the keypad is available for use on the secure side of the door and the proximity card
alone on the other.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-40
Rev. 1/01
WIRING THE READER AND PANEL
Refer to the diagram on page F-42 for wiring the reader. The reader is wired to the Series 9000
panel like any other proximity Wiegand-output reader requiring a separate power supply. See
also page F-21 and refer to the manufacturer’s separate instructions for specific details in wiring
this reader.
Note that not all wires are used when wiring the EntryProx to a panel. All unused wires should
be trimmed flush with their insulation and individually taped over. Then tape the unused wires
together to prevent them from accidentally contacting any other component inside the reader.
!
IMPORTANT! The EntryProx reader’s default programming is for stand-alone
use. It must be reprogrammed via its keyboard before it can function with a Series
9000 panel.
Configure the reader for use with a Series 9000 panel by entering the EntryProx program mode.
The table below lists the necessary steps and explanations.
1. Press 99 + # + Master
Code + *
(See Note below.)
2. Press 30 + #
3. Press 3 + #
4. Press 1 + # + * + *
5. Press *
Activates EntryProx program mode. The yellow LED
blinks slowly.
Selects “Set/Clear Standard Options.”
Selects Option 3: “Stand-Alone” or “Wiegand”
operation.
Selects “Wiegand” (0 selects stand-alone and is the
default).
Ends the program mode.
Note: The default Master Code for the EntryProx is 1234. The manufacturer recommends changing this code at
installation to a user-defined value. See Chapter 3 of the manufacturer’s Installation/Programming Manual for
further details on programming the unit.
As mentioned in Step 1 above, the blinking yellow LED indicates that the unit is in program
mode. If the unit does not “understand” the desired programming, or if a mistake is made in
entering the program steps, the yellow LED will stay steadily lit. In this event, press * to clear
the error and then enter the programming code again. When the yellow LED stops blinking and
is completely off, the unit is no longer in program mode.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-41
Rev. 1/01
WIRING THE ENTRYPROX TO THE SERIES 9000 PANEL
BLUE - NOT USED
BROWN - LED
WIRES NOT USED
P1
P3
Reader Terminal Block on 9000 Panel
RED - +12 VDC
BLACK - -12 VDC
BLUE - NOT USED
GREEN - NOT USED
GRAY - NOT USED
12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
WHITE - DATA 1
GREEN - DATA 0
P2
+
-
POWER
SUPPLY
BATTERY
P4
RED - BICOLOR LED
BLACK - BICOLOR LED
WHITE - ANTENNA +
WHITE - ANTENNA -
TESTING THE READER
It is recommended to test the reader before permanently mounting it in its final location. Refer to
the manufacturer’s Installation/Programming Manual for specific reader-testing and
troubleshooting procedures.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-42
Rev. 1/01
PanelClock
IDenticard Item Codes: F55-CL1DKIT (kit) or F60-CCK1 (clock only)
F55-CL4DKIT (kit) or F60-CCK4 (clock only)
DESCRIPTION
PanelClock is a time-display device that can be mounted near a card reader. It is ideal for use
with IDentiTIME as part of a time and attendance system. The PanelClock itself is available in
two sizes: a clock with one inch high LCD numerals and a clock with four inch high numerals.
The time on PanelClock is displayed in conventional 12-hour format.
The time displayed on the clock is the time set in the Series 9000 panel, that is, it is always the
same as the panel time. Consequently, card swipes and transactions in the access-control
software have time stamps matching the time displayed on the PanelClock. Users can be assured
that the time they see on the display is the time that their attendance record will show. If
PanelClock loses communication with the panel for any reason, the clock will stop displaying the
time and display “EEEE” to indicate interrupted communications.
Up to 32 PanelClocks can be connected to a single Series 9000 panel via the Clock Driver
(IDenticard Item Code F60-CCDRV), which is necessary to connect PanelClock to the panel.
Communications between the Clock Driver and the Series 9000 Panel are RS-232. It is therefore
necessary to install the RS-232 Communications Port Chip on the ETL-certified Series 9000
panel (or the RS-232 Communications Port Card on the prior-version panel) to enable the
RS-232 port. See Section I of the Series 9000 Hardware Installation manual for more
information on the installation and use of the RS-232 Communications Port Chip or Card
(IDenticard Item Codes F55-232COMM/ or F55-232COMBD, respectively). See also the
heading “Setting the DIP Switches” on page F-47 for important information on setting DIP
switch SW2 on the panel to allow PanelClock to function.
Communications between the Clock Driver and PanelClock itself are RS-485.
Card Reader Installation
Page F-43
Rev. 1/01
CABLE REQUIREMENTS
PanelClock to Clock Driver
The PanelClock is shipped with a wire harness that is used to connect it to the Clock Driver unit.
The harness has a tab connector at one end that plugs into the PanelClock itself. One twisted pair,
18-22 AWG may be used for splicing at the other end of the harness if needed to connect the
PanelClock to the Clock Driver. The maximum cable length for these RS-485 communications is
4000 feet.
The Clock Driver requires a 12 VDC power source. Use two-conductor cable, 18 AWG for this
wiring, and observe polarity as shown in the drawing on page F-46.
Clock Driver to Series 9000 Panel Connection
It is recommended to use different cables for the data wiring and power wiring. Use twoconductor cable, 18-22 AWG with overall shield to connect the Clock Driver to the Series 9000
Control Panel. The maximum cable length for these RS-232 communications is 50 feet.
It is possible to power the PanelClock from the Clock Driver, but not over large distances.
Consequently, it is recommended that the PanelClock have a separate 12 VDC (10.5-13.8 VDC)
power source. Use two-conductor cable, 18 AWG to connect the PanelClock to the power source.
POWER REQUIREMENTS
A dedicated 12 VDC power source is required for the Clock Driver and should be mounted near
the Clock Driver unit for ease in connecting the power wires to it. As mentioned above, the
PanelClock itself can be powered from this same power supply. However, if the distance
between the source and PanelClock is great, the power at the clock will probably be inadequate.
For reliable operation, power the PanelClock from a separate 12 VDC source.
SPECIFICATIONS
PanelClock with One Inch High LCD Numerals
• Power
12 VDC (±15%) at 100mA (maximum)
-40°F to 185°F (-40°C to 85°C )
• Operating Temperature
RS-485 2-wire network
• Communications
(PanelClock to Clock Driver)
PanelClock with Four Inch High LCD Numerals
• Power
12 VDC (±15%) at 300mA (maximum)
-40°F to 185°F (-40°C to 85°C )
• Operating Temperature
RS-485 2-wire network
• Communications
(PanelClock to Clock Driver)
Clock Driver
• Power
• Operating Temperature
• Communications
(Clock Driver to 9000 panel)
12 VDC (±15%) at 100mA (maximum)
-30°F to 140°F (-34°C to 60°C)
RS-232
Card Reader Installation
Page F-44
Rev. 1/01
MOUNTING
PanelClock with One Inch High Numerals
Mount the PanelClock near the access control reader that is being used for time and attendance.
Splice wire as needed onto the harness ends to run to the Clock Driver. As shown in the diagram
below, this model of the PanelClock is mounted over a standard single-gang electrical box.
Top View of Wall-Mounted Installation
standard single-gang electrical box
wall
time and attendance
reader
harness
Top View of Finished Wall-Mounted
Installation
wall
PanelClock
time and attendance
reader
PanelClock with Four Inch High Numerals
This PanelClock may also be mounted near the access control reader that is being used for time
and attendance. However, because of the size of its display, which is visible from up to 100 feet
away, it is also appropriate to mount it in a high-visibility location, which may be distant from a
reader. Splice wire as needed onto the harness ends to run to the Clock Driver. As shown in the
diagram below, this model of the PanelClock can be mounted over a standard single outlet box or
an octagonal outlet box.
B
outline of
single outlet
box - use
holes "A"
A(&B)
B
A(&B)
outline of
octagonal
outlet box use holes
"B"
knockout
B
B
Card Reader Installation
Page F-45
Rev. 1/01
Clock Driver
The Clock Driver may be mounted in accordance with site requirements and all applicable local
and municipal codes. Be sure to mount it in such a way as to allow the circuit board to be slid
out from the plastic holder if necessary.
!
IMPORTANT! Do NOT mount the Clock Driver inside the Series 9000 panel
enclosure.
WIRING
The diagram below shows how a single PanelClock is wired to the Clock Driver and then that
Clock Driver to the Series 9000 Control Panel. In this diagram, for reference, the PanelClock is
shown as supplied by the same power source as that powering the Clock Driver. See page F-44
for IDenticard Systems’ recommendation concerning whether these units should be powered
separately or from the same source. When the PanelClock is powered separately, the red and
black wires from the PanelClock connector are connected to another 12 VDC power source and
not connected to the pins on the Clock Driver as shown here.
+
-
12 VDC
Power
Source
To use a separate power supply for the
PanelClock, connect these wires to that
supply, not to the Clock Driver terminal
block pins as shown here.
RS-232:
Max. 50 ft.
cable length
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
RS-485:
Max. 4000 ft.
cable length
TB13 on Series 9000 panel
Connector on PanelClock
A B CD
A
red - (+)12 VDC
B
black - ground
C
green - RS-485(-)
D
yellow - RS-485(+)
Card Reader Installation
Page F-46
Rev. 1/01
SETTING THE DIP SWITCHES
As mentioned on page F-43, the RS-232 Communications Port Chip or Card must be installed on
the Series 9000 Panel to enable the RS-232 communications between the panel and the Clock
Driver. In addition to installing this chip, the DIP switch SW2 on the Series 9000 Control Panel
must be set appropriately for communications to work.
5
6
7
ON
4
ON
ON
3
OFF
ON
2
ON
1
OFF
ON
ON
ON
Individual switches SW2-1 through SW2-6 are for addressing the panel. See page D-5 in the
Series 9000 Hardware Installation manual for these settings. Set SW2-7 to OFF, which enables
RS-485 communications via TB9 on the Series 9000 Panel. Set SW2-8 to ON, which enables
the PanelClock to function via TB13 (as shown in the drawing on page F-46).
8 9
SW2
As an example, the drawing above shows the DIP-switch settings for a panel with an address of
3 to which PanelClock is connected. SW2-9 indicates that an RI/O Board is connected using
RS-485.
TROUBLESHOOTING AND TESTING
Check the following if the PanelClock fails to operate after installation:
1. Verify that the panel and the Clock Driver have been wired correctly. Be certain that the
wiring harness connector is inserted properly in the PanelClock, and that any necessary
splices are good.
2. Make certain that the RS-232 Communications Port Chip (or Card) is installed on the Series
9000 panel and is properly inserted in the correct chip socket. See Section I of the Series
9000 Hardware Installation manual for information on the installation and use of the RS-232
Communications Port Chip or Card.
3. Verify that the DIP switch settings are correct: SW2-7 must be OFF and SW2-8 must be ON
for PanelClock to be able to function via the RS-232 port on the panel (TB13).
Card Reader Installation
Page F-47
Rev. 5/03
Section G — Remote Input/Output Panel Installation
IDenticard® Item Code: F55-RIO/BRD
DS50
4
DS11
DS48
DS9
DS46
DS7
DS44
AC In
DS18
DS42
DS3
DS5
DS37
TX
DS17
RX
DS1
AC In
5
Pilot Lamp - Black
Pilot Lamp - Red
6
DS16
DS14
DS12
DS10
DS8
DS4
DS6
DS2
7
FU1
8
DIP
Switch
(SW1)
ON
Reset
(SW2)
1
TB1 Inputs
3
DS52
DS13
2
9
3
1
0
4
5
P1 - DC
Battery
Backup
6
7
8
1
12 13 14 15 16
1
Board addresses 1 to 4 are shown
(SW1-1 thru SW1-3). SW1-4 thru
SW1-8 must always be ON.
ON
8
8
ON
7
7
ON
ON
6
6
ON
ON
5
5
ON
RS-485 TRS-485 T+
OFF
4
4
ON
ON
3
3
ON
ON
ON
RS-485 RRS-485 R+
TB8 RS-485
Communications
1
ON
2
2
OFF
1
OFF
ON
1
ON
4
ON
ON
6
6
ON
5
5
ON
ON
4
4
ON
OFF
3
3
ON
3
ON
2
2
ON
1
1
OFF
ON
ON
2
ON
1
7
ON
7
ON
8
ON
8
2
3
TB7 Returns
ON
Ground
7
3
DS54
DS15
2
2
DS56
4
TB6 - AC Main
Power
(14 VAC)
FU2
DS41
1
DS43
6
DS45
5
DS47
4
DS49
3
DS51
TX
2
DS53
RX
1
1
DS55
4
D35
D34
D33
Relay
15
Relay
14
Relay
13
5
D36
D31
D30
D29
Relay
11
Relay
10
Relay
9
D32
D27
D26
D25
Relay
7
Relay
6
Relay
5
D28
D23
D22
D21
Relay
3
Relay
2
Relay
1
D24
6
7
8
Relay
16
TB4
N.O. N.C. CO N.O. N.C. CO N.O. N.C. CO N.O. N.C. CO
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
0
1
12
1
Relay
12
TB5
N.O. N.C. CO N.O. N.C. CO N.O. N.C. CO N.O. N.C. CO
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
0
1
12
1
Relay
8
TB3
N.O. N.C. CO N.O. N.C. CO N.O. N.C. CO N.O. N.C. CO
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
0
1
12
1
Relay
4
TB2
N.O. N.C. CO N.O. N.C. CO N.O. N.C. CO N.O. N.C. CO
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
0
9
1
12
1
THE DIAGRAM BELOW SHOWS THE PREVIOUS VERSION OF THE
REMOTE I/O BOARD.
Remote Input/Output Panel Installation
Page G-1
Rev. 3/05
Description
An auxiliary microprocessor-controlled panel which, when wired to a Series 9000 panel, adds
16 four-state supervised input points and 16 SPDT relays to the 9000 panel. Up to four Remote
I/O panels may be added to a 9000 panel, allowing the control of 72 inputs and 72 relays per
controller. Any input point may be linked to any relay on the same 9000 panel for “cause and
effect” action.
Location
For wiring convenience, the Remote I/O panel may be located near the devices it is to monitor.
When RS-485 communications are used between an ETL-certified RI/O and 9000 panel, the
RI/O can be located within a maximum of 4000 cable-feet of the 9000 panel to which it is wired.
If RS-232 communications are used, the maximum cable length is 2000 feet.
If the prior (not ETL-certified) version of the Remote I/O board is used in the current loop
configuration, the total wiring length is a maximum of 2000 feet.
Panel Cabinet Mounting
The gray panel cabinet has top and bottom mounting flanges for ease of installation. It must be
located in an area protected from moisture and temperature extremes (see page H-16 for
specifications). Hold the cabinet in place and mark the hole locations. Do any drilling with the
cabinet removed.
Remove the circuit board from the cabinet before drilling or enlarging conduit holes. Do not
allow bits of metal from drilling, filing or punching to come into contact with the circuit board.
!
!
IMPORTANT! Mount the cabinet in a secure location that is easily accessible.
Ideal locations are an electrical closet, utility closet or telephone room. Mounting a
panel in areas above a ceiling is not recommended.
WARNING!
• Do not mount the cabinet within 6 feet of high voltage transformers.
• Do not run high voltage (110 VAC) into the cabinet.
• Do not mount ANY auxiliary power supplies, transformers, relays, etc., inside
the panel’s cabinet. Auxiliary power supplies (e.g., for door strikes, proximity
readers, isolation relays, etc.) must be installed in a separate cabinet.
Switches SW1 and SW2
Two switches, the RESET switch SW2 and the DIP switch SW1 are located on the Remote I/O
circuit board as shown in the diagram at the top right of the next page.
Remote Input/Output Panel Installation
Page G-2
Rev. 8/04
DS3
DS4
DS17
RX
DS1
DS2
DS18
DS37
TX
DIP
Switch
(SW1)
Reset
(SW2)
FU1
ON
1
RESET
The RESET switch (SW2) is a white button
located near the middle of the board. RESET
restarts the program running in the panel. If the
Remote I/O panel fails to operate, press RESET.
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
ON
6
ON
7
ON
8
8
ON
ON
5
7
ON
OFF
4
6
ON
ON
3
5
ON
ON
2
4
ON
1
ON
4
ON
ON
OFF
3
ON
OFF
2
ON
3
1
ON
8
8
ON
ON
7
7
ON
ON
6
6
ON
ON
5
5
ON
OFF
4
4
ON
ON
3
3
ON
2
2
ON
1
OFF
ON
2
ON
1
1
ADDRESS
Each Remote I/O board on a 9000 panel must be
set to a unique address number starting at one (1)
and no higher than four (4). You may not have
two Remote I/O boards on the same 9000 panel
set to the same number. See the illustration at
left below.
Board addresses 1 to 4 are shown
(SW1-1 thru SW1-3). SW1-4 thru
SW1-8 must always be ON.
ON
SW1 is a dual in-line package (DIP) switch located on the board as shown above. Eight separate
switches, labeled 1 through 8, are contained in SW1. Switches 1 through 3 select the Remote I/O
panel’s address number as shown on the right below. Switches 4 through 7 are not used and must be
ON. Switch 8, when set to OFF, selects the three-wire configuration, sometimes termed the “current
loop.” If switch 8 is ON, RS-485 communications via TB8 are enabled. Refer to the figure at right
below for the address switch settings, and note that in these examples SW1-8 is ON. See page G-6
for wiring configurations.
Start at address number 1 for your first Remote I/O panel and go up in numeric order for all other
Remote I/Os connected to the Series 9000 Panel.
PANEL 1
PANEL 4
ON
7
ON
8
Remote Input/Output Panel Installation
ON
6
8
ON
ON
5
7
ON
OFF
4
6
ON
ON
3
5
ON
ON
2
4
ON
1
ON
ON
ON
OFF
3
ON
OFF
2
ON
1
ON
8
8
ON
ON
7
7
ON
ON
6
6
ON
ON
5
5
ON
OFF
4
4
ON
ON
3
3
ON
2
2
ON
1
OFF
PANEL 3
ON
ON
1
DEFINING
ADDRESSES
USING THE
ADDRESS
SWITCH (SW1)
PANEL 2
ON
Page G-3
Rev. 7/05
Power Installation and Battery Backup
!
DANGER! NEVER CONNECT POWER (AC OR BATTERY) TO THE PANEL
UNTIL ALL OTHER WIRING CONNECTIONS HAVE BEEN MADE.
POWER FILTER
A power filter is included with your Remote I/O and is necessary to prevent harmful electrical
noise and interference from affecting panel operation. A filter is necessary and must be used.
Simply plug the filter into your outlet, and then plug the AC transformer into the filter.
The filter supplied with your panel will provide protection against minor voltage disturbances,
such as small spikes and RFI noise. It cannot protect against low-voltage conditions and severe
voltage fluctuations. You may need to use a regulating voltage conditioner, such as a Sola
minicomputer regulator or UPS, to protect against more serious voltage problems.
An AC line filter that suppresses EMI and surge
interference must be used. A filter is supplied with your
system. Do not plug the transformer into an unfiltered
outlet. Severe damage may result.
A green pilot lamp is supplied with this product
and is located on the front of the cabinet. It is
wired to pins 1 and 2 of TB6 and indicates AC
power is present on the panel.
Remote Input/Output Panel Installation
Page G-4
Rev. 8/04
!
WARNING! Do NOT plug anything other than the panel’s 40-VA transformer into
the filter. Do NOT plug the panel’s transformer into an unfiltered receptacle.
CONNECTING THE AC TRANSFORMER
The Remote I/O panel is powered from a 14 VAC, 40 VA UL-listed Class 2 plug-in transformer
that is included with your system. The transformer comes with a four-foot cable. Connect the
transformer cable to the panel circuit board at connector TB6, which is located on the right edge
of the circuit board. Refer to the drawing on page G-4 for details.
Be sure that the transformer is unplugged before pushing the connector into place. The power
needed is 14 VAC (11.5 – 16.0) at 40 VA.
!
WARNING! Do not connect any panel to current other than 14 VAC. To do so
may damage the panel beyond repair.
Do not power more than one panel from a single transformer. The transformer’s internal fuse
will not handle the current required by more than one panel.
INSTALLING THE DC BACKUP BATTERY
A 12-volt, 7.0-AH gel cell battery will allow the Remote I/O panel to operate for 8-12 hours in
the event AC power fails.
First, connect the RED wire on the battery cable to the red-coded, positive (+) terminal spade on
the battery. Next, connect the BLACK wire on the battery cable to the black-coded, negative (-)
terminal spade on the battery. When each is correctly and securely connected, then plug the
mating connector at the other end into P1 on the panel as shown above.
!
WARNING! Do not use the back-up battery to power any other devices, such as
proximity readers, relays, door strikes, etc. Doing so may damage the panel.
Communications to the Series 9000 Panel
Up to four Remote I/O panels may be connected to a 9000 panel using a multidrop or starconnected wiring method similar to RS-485. Communications must be hard-wired, limited to a
4000 foot total cable length (or 2000 feet if using the current loop configuration), and can be
extended by modems or amplifiers ONLY if using RS-485 communications.
Communications must be hard-wired, limited to a 2000-foot total cable length and cannot be
extended by modems or amplifiers.
CABLE TYPE FOR COMMUNICATIONS FROM REMOTE I/O TO THE 9000 PANEL.
For RS-485 Communications
2-pair (4-conductor), 18-22 AWG, stranded, with overall shield. Maximum length : 4000 feet.
Remote Input/Output Panel Installation
Page G-5
Rev. 1/01
For Communications Using Three-Wire Commnunications
3-conductor, 18-22 AWG, stranded, with overall shield. Maximum length: 2000 feet.
3-conductor, 18-22 AWG, stranded, with overall shield. Maximum length: 2000 feet.
WIRING THE 9000 PANEL TO THE REMOTE I/O
The diagrams and discussions in the next subsections explain the various methods for wiring a
Remote I/O Board to a Series 9000 Panel. There are five variants, which require different pinouts. Each diagram shows the necessary wiring configuration.
Any terminal block may be removed for easier wiring by pulling it outward – do not pull up on
terminal blocks. Ground the shield at the 9000 panel. Do not run the communication cable
parallel to high voltage lines or near fluorescent light fixtures. Doing so may result in unreliable
communications.
!
IMPORTANT! DIP switch SW2-9 on the Series 9000 Panel (Rev. M or later)
MUST be OFF in order to use three-wire communications. DIP switch SW2-9 on
the Series 9000 Panel MUST be ON when RS-485 communications are used.
TB8 on Remote I/O 2
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
TB6 on Remote I/O 1
1 2 3
TB8 on 9000 Panel
Remote Input/Output Panel Installation
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Wiring the 9000 Panel to the Remote I/O Using the Three-Wire Configuration
This variant is particularly useful when wiring
a 9000 panel into a system with a mixed string
of ETL-certified and prior-version Remote I/O
panels. It is not possible to use both the threewire configuration and RS-485
communications on the same run of RI/O
panels. If one RI/O must be wired using the
three-wire configuration, then all RI/Os must,
even if some of them are ETL-certified RI/O
panels. In the example at right, the first RI/O
is not an ETL-certified panel, while the second
one is. The three-wire conductor is wired from
pins 1-3 on TB8 on the 9000 panel to pins 1-3
on TB6 on the non-ETL RI/O panel. The cable
then continues and is wired into pins 1-3 on
TB8 on the ETL-certified RI/O panel.
Page G-6
Rev. 7/05
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
TB8 on 9000 Panel
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
TB8 on Remote I/O 1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
TB8 on Remote I/O 2
Wiring the 9000 Panel to the Remote I/O Using RS-485
This variant is used when wiring a 9000 panel
into a system of all ETL-certified Remote I/O
boards. The RS-485 communications
employed by these panels require 4-conductor
wire for the connections. In the example at
right, both RI/O boards are ETL-certified
models. The 4-wire conductor is wired from
pins 6-9 on TB8 on the 9000 panel to pins 4-7
on TB8 on the RI/O panel. The cable then
continues and is wired into pins 4-7 on TB8 on
the next RI/O panel. Be sure that switch
SW5-3 is ON as shown to enable RS-485
communications.
TB6 on Remote I/O 2
1 2 3
1 2 3
TB8 on 9000 Panel
Remote Input/Output Panel Installation
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
TB6 on Remote I/O 1
Wiring the 9000 Panel to the Prior-version Remote I/O Using the Three-Wire Configuration
This variant is for wiring a 9000 panel into a
system of all prior-version Remote I/O panels. It is
similar to the first variant discussed above in that
only the three-wire configuration is used. In the
example at right, both RI/O boards are priorversion panels. The three-wire conductor is wired
from pins 1-3 on TB8 on the 9000 panel to pins 1-3
on TB6 on the first RI/O panel and then on to pins
1-3 on TB6 on the next RI/O board. Be sure that
switch SW5-3 is OFF as shown to enable the threewire configuration.
Page G-7
Rev. 7/05
Wiring the Previous Version of the 9000 Panel to the Remote I/O
This variant is used when wiring an older 9000
panel into a system of all ETL-certified RI/O
boards or into a mixed string of ETL-certified and
non-ETL-certified Remote I/O panels. Only the
three-wire configuration is possible on the older,
prior-version 9000 panels. In the example at right,
the first RI/O is not a ETL-certified panel, while
the second one is. The three-wire conductor is
wired from pins 1-3 on TB8 on the 9000 panel to
pins 1-3 on TB6 on the older RI/O panel. The
cable then continues and is wired into pins 1-3 on
TB8 on the ETL-certified RI/O panel. There is no
DIP switch on the older version of the 9000 panel
for selecting a communications mode.
Wiring the Previous Version of the 9000 Panel to the Prior Version of the Remote I/O Using the
Three-Wire Configuration
This variant is for wiring an older 9000 panel into a
system of all prior-version Remote I/O panels.
Again, only the three-wire configuration can be
used. In the example at right, neither the Series
9000 panel nor either RI/O board is an ETLcertified panel. The three-wire conductor is wired
from pins 1-3 on TB8 on the 9000 panel to pins 1-3
on TB6 on both RI/O boards. As before, there is no
DIP switch on the older version of the 9000 panel
for selecting a communications mode.
Remote Input/Output Panel Installation
Page G-8
Rev. 7/05
Checking Start-Up
!
IMPORTANT! Before powering the Remote I/O panel, complete all wiring and set
the address switch.
Apply power to the Remote I/O panel. The red power indicator LED DS1 should light. The
9000 panel will begin communicating with its Remote I/O panels within one minute. The TX
and RX LEDs D2 and D4 (located near the top middle of the Remote I/O panel, above DIP
switch SW1) should both start flashing rapidly. This indicates that communications have been
established.
If communications cannot be established, try the following:
• Press the RESET switch (SW1) on the 9000 panel and on each Remote I/O panel.
• Check your wiring connections carefully.
• Disconnect all but one Remote I/O and try to establish communications. One faulty or
incorrectly wired Remote I/O panel may prevent communications to all Remote I/O panels.
Input Points
Wire type is 18-22 AWG with overall shield.
At least 1 pair is required for 1 point.
A multiconductor cable may serve more than 1
point.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
All input points are 4-state supervised and must be
terminated with 1K ohms for normal state.
A normally closed switch must be used along with two
1K-ohm, 1/4 watt 5% resistors as shown at right.
The terminal blocks may be removed for ease of wiring
by pulling outward. Do not pull up.
The alarm state must be produced by providing 2K ohms
of resistance between the alarm point on TB1 and a
return on TB7.
All points on TB7 are common returns.
Remote Input/Output Panel Installation
Page G-9
Rev. 1/01
The Remote I/O panel has 16 general purpose, four-state supervised input points that become
added to the 9000 panel’s input points. Each input point is designated by a number determined
by the address of the Remote I/O panel. Input points monitor devices which have normally
closed (N.C.) contacts, such as a switch or motion detector. Two 1K-ohm resistors are installed
at the switch so that the point can be supervised.
Indicator LEDs
The state of the input point is determined by the resistance value detected by the Remote I/O
circuitry. Each input point has two LEDs (shown on page G-9) that show the hardware state of
the input point. These LEDs show the point’s current hardware state regardless of whether the
point is shunted by software. The four hardware states are:
State
Normal
Alarm
Trouble
Line Cut
LED lit
None
Red
Yellow
Both
Resistance
1K ohm ± 20%
2K ohm ± 20%
0 ohm (shorted)
open circuit
Relays
The Remote I/O panel has 16 relays that become added to the 9000 panel's relays. Each relay is
designated by a number determined by the address of the Remote I/O panel.
Relay indicator LEDs show green when the relays are on.
Remote Input/Output Panel Installation
Page G-10
Rev. 1/01
RELAY SPECIFICATIONS
Contact type
Configuration
Maximum voltage
Maximum current
•
•
Form C dry contact
Single-pole double throw (SPDT)
35 VDC (AC volts not allowed)
1 amp
Recommended wire type is 18 AWG, 1 twisted pair with shield.
Only DC devices may be connected to the 9000’s relays. Isolation relays (see page G-13)
must be used for controlling AC devices or devices drawing more than one amp.
A filtered DC power supply must be used to provide power to locks, door strikes, isolation
relays, etc.
A suppressor kit must be installed across any coil connected to the 9000’s relays.
The terminal blocks may be removed from the board for ease of wiring by pulling outward.
DO NOT PULL UP.
•
•
•
Connecting Devices with Coils to the Remote I/O Relays
COIL FLYBACK VOLTAGE SUPPRESSION
All coils generate large spikes of voltage when they are shut off. This is known as flyback and
can be in the thousands of volts. It is necessary to suppress flyback voltage when connecting
coils to the 9000 panel.
!
WARNING! Do not connect unsuppressed coils to a Remote I/O board. Flyback
interference can cause severe damage to the Remote I/O, memory loss, and erratic
operation.
Devices that have coils are:
• Door strikes
• Magnetic locks
• Relays
• Gates/Turnstiles
• Bells
IDenticard supplies with each card reader a suppressor kit
(Item Code F55-SUPP/KIT) that must be installed across
the coil of the access point device. Additional suppressor
kits may be ordered from IDenticard.
INSTALLING THE SUPPRESSOR KIT
The suppressor kit is a small black tube with a red wire
and black wire attached to one end. The wires must be
connected in parallel with the coil connected to the
Remote I/O relay.
Remote Input/Output Panel Installation
Page G-11
Rev. 1/01
!
WARNING! The suppressor kit is polarity-sensitive. Connect the RED wire to the
POSITIVE side of the coil and the BLACK wire to the NEGATIVE side. DO NOT
CONNECT THE SUPPRESSOR KIT TO AN AC COIL.
Connect the suppressor kit as shown on page G-11. It is important to place the suppressor kit as
close to the coil as possible. For door strike installations, the suppressor kit can often be placed
inside the doorjamb, next to the strike.
USING A DIODE TO SUPPRESS A COIL
You may use a reverse-biased diode, such as a 1N914, to suppress a coil. Connect the cathode
(striped) end of the diode to the positive side of the coil and the anode end to the negative side as
shown below. Diodes are very effective at suppressing flyback but are dangerous if they are
connected backward.
!
WARNING! A diode that is connected backwards (cathode to the minus side), or
connected to AC will act as a short. Damage to the Remote I/O board will result.
Use diodes only if you know how to connect them correctly.
WHEN NOT TO USE SUPPRESSION
It is not necessary to use flyback suppression on noninductive devices. These devices do not
create flyback voltage and include:
• Lamps
• Solid-state beepers
• Solid-state control devices for doors, gates, turnstiles, etc.
• Magnetic locks with built-in suppression (if in doubt, use a suppressor kit)
Remote Input/Output Panel Installation
Page G-12
Rev. 1/01
USING ISOLATION RELAYS
It may be necessary to control devices that cannot be directly connected to the Remote I/O relay.
Such devices include:
• AC devices, such as door strikes, gates, turnstiles, etc.
• High-current devices drawing more than one amp.
• Highly inductive loads, such as motors.
Use an “isolation relay” to control devices that may not be directly connected to the Remote I/O
relays. An isolation relay prevents interference that these devices may create from reaching the
Remote I/O panel and other Series 9000 equipment.
The drawing above shows an isolation relay connected to the Remote I/O board controlling an
AC door strike. The AC strike could not be directly connected to the Remote I/O relay contacts.
The isolation relay must be installed in its own cabinet.
!
IMPORTANT! Do not put an isolation relay or any other relays, power supplies, or
devices inside the Remote I/O board cabinet.
You must provide a 12 VDC power supply for the isolation relay. Install a suppressor across the
coil of the isolation relay, because this coil is connected to the Remote I/O board. It is not
necessary to suppress the device being controlled by the isolation relay.
Remote Input/Output Panel Installation
Page G-13
Rev. 1/01
Section H — Series 9000
 Hardware Drawings and
Specifications
9000 Panel Overall Diagram
H-2
9000 Panel Power Supply Detail
H-3
9000 Panel Input Point Detail
H-4
9000 Panel Relay Detail
H-5
9000 Panel Card Reader Detail
H-6
9000 Panel RS-485 Communications Detail
H-12
Communications and Wiring Options
H-13
Remote I/O Panel Overall Diagram
H-14
Remote I/O Input Point Detail
H-15
9000 Panel and Remote I/O Specifications
H-16
9000 CPU Board Connectors and Switches
H-17
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Page H-1
Rev. 1/01
9000 Panel Overall Diagram
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Page H-2
Rev. 5/03
9000 Panel Power Supply Detail
Plug ONLY into
filtered AC power!
Connect battery cable to back-up battery.
Observe polarity when connecting to battery. See
instructions. Push the mating amp connector onto J1.
It is polarized and will only fit one way.
Connect 12-gauge cold-water ground wire and all
cable shields to grounding lug provided in cabinet.
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Page H-3
Rev. 5/03
9000 Panel Input Point Detail
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Page H-4
Rev. 1/01
9000 Panel Relay Detail
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
All relays are Form-C, dry
contact SPDT rated for 1 amp
maximum at 35 VDC maximum.
Recommended wire type is 1
twisted pair, 18-22 AWG, with
shield. Maximum distance is
1000 feet.
Only DC devices may be
connected to the Series 9000’s
relays. Isolation relays (see page
D-17) must be used for
controlling AC devices or
devices drawing more than one
amp.
A filtered DC power supply must
be used to provide power to
locks, door strikes, isolation
relays, etc.
A suppressor kit (see page D-16)
must be installed across any coil
connected to the Series 9000’s
relays.
Terminal blocks TB1 and TB2
may be removed from the board
for ease of wiring by pulling
outward. DO NOT PULL UP.
Shown is the default setting for
reader control. You may assign
a different relay to any reader
using the Reader Setup program
at the PC (see page 3-6, Series 9000
Operations Manual).
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Page H-5
Rev. 1/01
9000 Panel Card Reader Detail
MAGNETIC-STRIPE READERS
WIRE TYPES
Mag-Stripe Surface Mount
5 Cond., 18 - 22 AWG with overall shield.
Max. distance: 800 feet.
+5.0 VDC
Reader Data
Brown or Black
Red
Yellow
Green
Reader Strobe
Color-Coded Cable from Reader
Orange
Ground
Proceed LED
Ground
+5.0 VDC
Reader Data
Reader Strobe
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Terminal Block on Reader
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Proceed LED
1 2 3 4 5
Reader Terminal Block on 9000 Panel
Reader Terminal Block on 9000 Panel
Standard Surface-Mount MagStripe Reader
Flush-Mount Mag-Stripe Reader
Mag-Stripe Flush Mount
5 Cond., 18 - 22 AWG with overall shield.
Max. distance: 800 feet.
Page H-6
Rev. 1/02
9000 Panel Card Reader Detail
READER-KEYPAD COMBINATIONS AND KEYPADS ALONE
WIRE TYPES
Reader Data
Reader Strobe
Terminal Block on Reader
+5.0 VDC
1 2 3 4 5
Ground
Terminal Block on Reader
Proceed LED
Keypad (Must Use Enhanced Reader Module)
From Keypad to ERM
15 cond., 18 - 22 AWG, stranded with overall
shield. Max distance: 20 feet.
From Reader to ERM
5 cond., 18 AWG, stranded, with overall shield.
Max. distance: 800 feet. (See Section F in Series
9000 Hardware Installation manual.)
From ERM to 9000 Panel
4 or 8 cond., 18 AWG, stranded with overall shield.
Max. distance: 2000 feet.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Reader Terminal Block on 9000 Panel
Reader Terminal Block on 9000 Panel
Enhanced Card Reader/Keypad
Combination
Keypad Reader Alone
Reader-Keypad Combination
8 cond., 18 - 22 AWG with overall shield. Max.
distance: 2000 feet.
Key Data
Clock
Data/Load
Enable
Ground
+9.6 VDC
Reader Data
Reader Strobe
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Page H-7
Rev. 1/02
9000 Panel Card Reader Detail
PROXIMITY READERS
WIRE TYPE
+
Data 0 Out
Data
Data 1 Out
Cable from Reader
DC Power In (-)
Strobe
Power
Supply
Red - DC Power In (+)
Brown
DC Power In (-)
Black
Green
Data 0 Out
White
Data 1 Out
Color-Coded Cable from Reader
Multicolor LED In
Proceed LED
Brown
Ground
Black
+9.6 VDC
Red
Green
Data 0
White
Data 1
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Color-Coded Cable from Reader
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Multicolor LED In
Ground
+
Reader Terminal Block on 9000 Panel
Reader Terminal Block on 9000 Panel
Reader Terminal Block on 9000 Panel
Proximity Reader with Separate
Power Supply
DC Power In (+)
-
Direct-Powered Proximity
Reader
Power
Supply
Proceed LED
-
Encryption Proximity Reader
5 cond., 18-22 AWG with
overall shield. Max.
distance: 800 feet.
Page H-8
Rev. 1/02
9000 Panel Card Reader Detail
SMART CARD READERS
WIRE TYPE
6 cond., 20 AWG, stranded.
Max. distance: 400-500 feet.
Smart Card Reader - ABA Output
with Enhanced Reader Module
Smart Card Reader
ABA Output
Smart Card Reader
Wiegand Output
Reader Terminal Block on 9000 Panel
TB5 on ERM Board
Reader Terminal Block on 9000 Panel
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 2 3 4 5
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Proceed LED
Ground
+5.0 VDC
Terminal Block on Reader
Data 1
Terminal Block on Reader
Data 0
DC Power In (-)
+5.0 VDC
Data
Clock
Proceed LED
Ground
+5.0 VDC
Data
Clock
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Terminal Block on Reader
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Page H-9
Rev. 1/02
9000 Panel Card Reader Detail
WIEGAND READERS
WIRE TYPE
Proceed LED
Brown
Ground
Black
+5.0 VDC
Red
Green
Data 0
White
Data 1
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Color-Coded Cable from Reader
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Reader Terminal Block on 9000 Panel
Wiegand Reader
5 cond., 18-22 AWG with overall shield. Max.
distance: 800 feet.
Page H-10
Rev. 1/02
9000 Panel Card Reader Detail
BAR-CODE READERS
WIRE TYPE
Proceed LED
Brown
Ground
Yellow or Black
+5.0 VDC
Reader Data
Red
Purple
Green
Reader Strobe
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Color-Coded Cable from Reader
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Reader Terminal Block on 9000 Panel
Bar Code Reader
5 cond., 18-22 AWG with overall shield. Max.
distance: 800 feet powered locally, 400 feet
powered from Series 9000 Panel.
Page H-11
Rev. 1/02
9000 Panel RS-485 Communications Detail
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Page H-12
Rev. 1/01
Communications and Wiring Options
A self-healing loop can also be
used. Connect the RS-485 from
the last panel back to the start of
the communication line.
NOTE: If using a self-healing
loop, maximum distance can
only be 2000 feet.
RS-485, max. 4000 ft.
RS-232-to-RS-485
Converter
RS-232
Workstation
9000 Panel
9000 Panel
9000 Panel
LAN/WAN TCP/IP
Autodial
Modem
Hub
RS-232, max. 50 ft.
Hub
Multiport Card
Fiber optic transmitter
RS-485
NetLink Converter
9000 Panel
9000 Panel
9000 Panel
9000 Panel
Fiber optic transmitter
RS-232-to-RS-485
Converter
Voice-Grade
DTMF
Telco Line
Pair of Copper Wire
Short-Haul
Modem
Short-Haul
Modem
RS-232-to-RS-485
Converter
Line Leased from Phone Company
Autodial
Modem
Leased-Line
Modem
Leased-Line
Modem
9000 Panel
9000 Panel
9000 Panel
9000 Panel
RS-232-to-RS-485
Converter
9000 Panel with
RS-232 COM Chip
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Page H-13
Rev. 1/01
Remote I/O Panel Overall Diagram
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Page H-14
Rev. 1/01
Remote I/O Input Point Detail
Wire type is 18-22 AWG with overall shield.
At least 1 pair is required for 1 point.
A multiconductor cable may serve more than 1 point.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
All input points are 4-state supervised and must be
terminated with 1K ohms for normal state.
A normally closed switch must be used along with two
1K-ohm, 1/4 watt 5% resistors as shown at right.
The terminal blocks may be removed for ease of wiring
by pulling outward. Do not pull up.
The alarm state must be produced by providing 2K
ohms of resistance between the alarm point on TB1
and a return on TB7.
All points on TB7 are common returns.
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Page H-15
Rev. 1/01
9000 Panel and Remote I/O Specifications
PHYSICAL DIMENSIONS OF SERIES 9000 HARDWARE
Component
Weight
Width
Depth
Height
9000 panel in enclosure
16
lbs
17.75 in 5.00
in 18.125
Remote I/O panel in enclosure
10
lbs
12.0
in 4.25
in 6.0
Flush-mount reader & faceplate
8
oz
1.75
in 1.38
in 5.5
Flush-mount back box
6
oz
1.375
in 2.0
in 3.75
Surface-mount reader & housing
3.5
lbs
7.0
in 3.63
in 3.75
Keypad (surface mount)
1
lb
2.75
in 2.5
in 5.25
Card reader/keypad combo
3.75 lbs
7.0
in 3.63
in 3.75
Smart card reader
4.7
oz
2.78
in 1.25
in 2.78
Barcode reader
1
lb
5.05
in 1.7
in 1.54
Wiegand (swipe reader)
1
lb
5.3
in 1.7
in 2.3
Proximity readers
See manufacturer’s manual for specifications.
in
in
in
in
in
in
in
in
in
in
ELECTRICAL REQUIREMENTS
Communications converter
Input voltage:
120 VAC
Series 9000 panel
Input voltage:
Power:
14 VAC
40 VA
Remote I/O panel
Input voltage:
Power:
14 VAC
40 VA
ENVIRONMENTAL SPECIFICATIONS (FOR ABOVE EQUIPMENT WITH EXCEPTION OF CARD
READERS)
•
•
•
Temperature
Humidity
Altitude range
42°F to 100°F, operating
20% to 80% noncondensing, operating and storing
-1000 ft to 8000 ft operating, up to 25,000 ft storing
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Page H-16
Rev. 1/01
9000 CPU Board Connectors and Switches
TB1 — RELAYS — K1-4
TB1-1
K4, N.O.
TB1-2
K4, N.C.
TB1-3
K4, COM
TB1-4
TB1-5
TB1-6
K3, N.O.
K3, N.C.
K3, COM
TB1-7
TB1-8
TB1-9
K2, N.O.
K2, N.C.
K2, COM
TB1-10
TB1-11
TB1-12
K1, N.O.
K1, N.C.
K1, COM
TB2 — RELAYS — K5-8
TB2-1
K8, N.O.
TB2-2
K8, N.C.
TB2-3
K8, COM
TB2-4
TB2-5
TB2-6
K7, N.O.
K7, N.C.
K7, COM
TB2-7
TB2-8
TB2-9
K6, N.O.
K6, N.C.
K6, COM
TB2-10
TB2-11
TB2-12
K5, N.O.
K5, N.C.
K5, COM
TB3 — DOOR POSITION INPUTS.
TB3-1
Input 1
TB3-2
Return 1
Input
Ground
TB3-3
TB3-4
Input
Ground
Input 2
Return 2
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Page H-17
Rev. 1/01
TB3-5
TB3-6
Input 3
Return 3
Input
Ground
TB3-7
TB3-8
Input 4
Return 4
Input
Ground
TB3-9
TB3-10
Input 5
Return 5
Input
Ground
TB3-11
TB3-12
Input 6
Return 6
Input
Ground
TB3-13
TB3-14
Input 7
Return 7
Input
Ground
TB3-15
TB3-16
Input 8
Return 8
Input
Ground
TB4 — READER A
TB4-1
Strobe/Data 1
TB4-2
Data 0
TB4-3
Data
TB4-4
Reader Voltage (+5 V or +9.5 V)
TB4-5
Power Ground
TB4-6
Enable
TB4-7
Data/Load
TB4-8
LED/Clock
TB4-9
Key Data
Input
Input
Input
Power
Ground
Output
Output
Output
Input
TB5 — READER B
TB5-1
Strobe/Data 1
TB5-2
Data 0
TB5-3
Data
TB5-4
Reader Voltage (+5 V or +9.5 V)
TB5-5
Power Ground
TB5-6
Enable
TB5-7
Data/Load
TB5-8
LED/Clock
TB5-9
Key Data
Input
Input
Input
Power
Ground
Output
Output
Output
Input
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Page H-18
Rev. 1/01
TB6 — READER C
TB6-1
Strobe/Data 1
TB6-2
Data 0
TB6-3
Data
TB6-4
Reader Voltage (+5 V or +9.5 V)
TB6-5
Power Ground
TB6-6
Enable
TB6-7
Data/Load
TB6-8
LED/Clock
TB6-9
Key Data
Input
Input
Input
Power
Ground
Output
Output
Output
Input
TB7 – READER D
TB7-1
Strobe/Data 1
TB7-2
Data 0
TB7-3
Data
TB7-4
Reader Voltage (+5 V or +9.5 V)
TB7-5
Power Ground
TB7-6
Enable
TB7-7
Data/Load
TB7-8
LED/Clock
TB7-9
Key Data
Input
Input
Input
Power
Ground
Output
Output
Output
Input
TB8 — RI/O INTERFACE AND TAMPER SWITCH INPUT
TB8-1
RX to RI/O TX (TB8-2)
TB8-2
TX to RI/O RX (TB8-1)
TB8-3
Ground to RI/O Ground (TB8-3)
Input
Output
Ground
TB8-4
TB8-5
Tamper Switch
Tamper Switch
Input
Ground
TB8-6
TB8-7
TB8-8
TB8-9
RS-485 TXD+ to RI/O RXD+ (TB8-4)
RS-485 TXD- to RI/O RXD- (TB8-5)
RS-485 RXD+ to RI/O TXD+ (TB8-6)
RS-485 RXD- to RI/O TXD- (TB8-7)
Output
Output
Input
Input
Series 9000™ Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Page H-19
Rev. 9/05
TB9 — NETWORK RS-485 INTERFACE
TB9-1
TXD+ to other CPU TB9-1
TB9-2
TXD- to other CPU TB9-2
TB9-3
RXD+ to other CPU TB9-3
TB9-4
RXD- to other CPU TB9-4
TB9-5
Signal Ground (connected to enclosure ground)
Output
Output
Input
Input
Ground
TB9-1
TB9-2
TB9-3
TB9-4
TB9-5
TXD+ to RS-232-To-RS-485 Converter TB3
TXD- to RS-232-To-RS-485 Converter TB4
RXD+ to RS-232-To-RS-485 Converter TB1
RXD- to RS-232-To-RS-485 Converter TB2
Signal Ground (not connected to converter)
Output
Output
Input
Input
Ground
TB9-1
TB9-2
TB9-3
TB9-4
TB9-5
Master Panel TXD+ to Slave Panel TB9-3
Master Panel TXD- to Slave Panel TB9-4
Master Panel RXD+ to Slave Panel TB9-1
Master Panel RXD- to Slave Panel TB9-2
Signal Ground (connected to enclosure ground)
Output
Output
Input
Input
Ground
TB10 — REQUEST TO EXIT INPUTS.
TB10-1
Input A/1
TB10-2
Return A/1
Input
Ground
TB10-3
TB10-4
Input B/2
Return B/2
Input
Ground
TB10-5
TB10-6
Input C/3
Return C/3
Input
Ground
TB10-7
TB10-8
Input D/4
Return D/4
Input
Ground
TB10-9
TB10-10
Input E/5
Return E/5
Input
Ground
TB10-11
TB10-12
Input F/6
Return F/6
Input
Ground
TB10-13
TB10-14
Input G/7
Return G/7
Input
Ground
TB10-15
TB10-16
Input H/8
Return H/8
Input
Ground
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Page H-20
Rev. 5/03
TB11 — AC POWER ENTRY AND PILOT LAMP
TB11-1
Pilot Lamp
TB11-2
Pilot Lamp
TB11-3
Power Input
TB11-4
Power Input
Power
Power
Power, 14 VAC
Power, 14 VAC
TB12 — PC PORT, RS-232 TO PC, DTE
TB12-1
TXD
TB12-2
RXD
TB12-3
Ground
Output
Input
Ground
TB13 – MODEM PORT INTERFACE, RS-232, DTE
TB13-1
RXD
TB13-2
TXD
TB13-3
RTS
TB13-4
CTS
TB13-5
DTR
TB13-6
DSR
TB13-7
CD
TB13-8
Signal Ground
Input
Output
Output
Input
Output
Input
Input
Ground
J1 — BATTERY INPUT, 12 V GEL CELL
J1-1
+12 V
J1-2
Power Ground
Power
Ground
SW1 — RESET SWITCH
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Page H-21
Rev. 5/03
SW2 — CONFIGURATION DIP SWITCH, 9-POSITION
OFF
SW2-1
Panel Address
SW2-2
Panel Address
SW2-3
Panel Address
SW2-4
Panel Address
SW2-5
Panel Address
SW2-6
Panel Address
ON
Panel Address
Panel Address
Panel Address
Panel Address
Panel Address
Panel Address
Switches SW2-7 and SW2-8 function in combination as given in chart below to control TB13.
SW2-7:OFF
SW2-7:OFF
SW2-7:ON
SW2-7:ON
SW2-8:OFF
SW2-8:ON
SW2-8:OFF
SW2-8:ON
RS-485 normal communications normal communications printer at 9600 baud master panel port to
RS-232
SW2-9
(slave panel setting)
printer at 9600 baud
RI/O Uses RS-232
PanelClock
modem
slave panels
modem
RI/O Uses RS-485
SW4 — READER VOLTAGE SELECT DIP SWITCH, 4 POSITION
OFF
ON
SW4-1
Reader A, 9.6 V
Reader A, 5.1 V
SW4-2
Reader B, 9.6 V
Reader B, 5.1 V
SW4-3
Reader C, 9.6 V
Reader C, 5.1 V
SW4-4
Reader D, 9.6 V
Reader D, 5.1 V
Series 9000 Hardware Drawings and Specifications
Page H-22
Rev. 5/03
Section I – RS-232 Communications Port
IDenticard® Item Code: F55-232COMM/
Description
A secondary communication port can be added to the Series 9000 panel by installing the
RS-232 Communications Port Chip. This chip is designed to enable an RS-232 port and is
plugged into socket U34 on the 9000 panel. Your serial device is then connected to TB13, which
is an 8-pin connector.
Use the RS-232 port to:
•
•
Send Series 9000 panel transactions to a local serial printer
Control a U.S. Robotics (or Hayes AT-compatible) dial-up modem
Installation
1. Disconnect all power (AC and
DC) to the panel.
2. Locate U34 on the panel and
insert chip into socket. Inserting
this chip will enable the port.
!
IMPORTANT! Chip must
be inserted correctly with
the notch to the left.
3. Connect your serial device to
TB13.
4. Use switch SW2-7 to select the
type of communications. The
switch should be set to ON to connect this port to an autodial
modem. The switch should be
set to OFF to connect this port to a printer.
Switch SW2-8 should remain OFF for printer or modem operation.
5. Power the 9000 panel and download if necessary.
Local Printer Control
A listing of local real-time transactions on the 9000 panel can be obtained by connecting a serial
printer, display terminal or both to the RS-232 serial port. Transactions are sent out the serial
port as they occur. If the panel is off-line, its buffer will continue to store transactions for
uploading to the PC as normal. Transactions sent to the local printer cannot be buffered by the
panel.
RS-232 Communications Port
Page I-1
Rev. 5/03
Some display terminals provide a buffered printer port. This allows the connection of both a
CRT and printer. Check with your local computer products dealer for details.
Connecting the Serial Device
BLACK
7
20
5
4
3
TRANSMIT
GREEN
GROUND
Provided to connect the RS-232 port to
your printer or CRT is a 10-foot cable
consisting of a 25-pin female connector
configured for DCE on one end and two
color-coded wires on the other end.
Connect the GREEN wire to TB13-2 and
the BLACK wire to TB13-8. The distance
may be extended to 100 feet by splicing in
customer-supplied cable. Use cable
suitable for RS-232 data communications.
Typical RS-232 cable is 3-conductor, 1822 AWG, shielded. Line drivers or
modems may be used to extend the
distance even further.
1
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
O O O O O O O O
TB13
SETTING THE PARAMETERS OF THE SERIAL DEVICE
You must set up your printer to match the output of the 9000’s serial port. Select 9600 baud,
eight data bits, one stop bit, no parity.
SAMPLE PRINT-OUT
Mon
Tue
Tue
Tue
Tue
06/07/1999
06/08/1999
06/08/1999
06/08/1999
06/08/1999
17:00:37
07:11:51
08:30:02
08:39:21
08:39:21
Card 0000000327
Card 0000000327
Panel
Panel
Panel
Panel
Panel
01
01
01
01
01
Point 2
Reader C
Point 2
Point 2
Reader B
Time Zone Relay Off
Access granted
T/Z Card Activate
Time Zone Relay On
Access granted
Explanations:
• On Monday, June 7, 1999, relay 2 on Panel 01 turned off at 5:00:37 PM because its Time
Zone ended at 5:00 PM.
• On Tuesday, June 8, 1999, card 327 was granted access through Panel 1’s Reader C at
7:11:51 AM.
• Relay 2’s Time Zone went active at 8:30:02 AM, but the relay was not turned on because it
is set for “First Card Unlock.”
• Relay 2 turned on and is under Time Zone control because Card 240 was granted access
through reader B at 8:39:21 AM.
RS-232 Communications Port
Page I-2
Rev. 1/01
Modem Control
An autodialing remote 9000 panel installation is achieved by connecting a U.S. Robotics (Hayes
AT-compatible) 9600 baud dial-up modem, using a voice-grade dial-tone phone line, to the RS232 serial port. If desired, a local printer also may be connected to the 9000 panel (TB9) to
provide a real-time transaction listing of the 9000 panel.
The example above shows a typical 9000 installation where 5 panels are hard-wired to COM1 of
the PC at the main building. Three remote sites are controlled by the main system using U.S.
Robotics modems. Each remote panel requires a modem connected to a voice-grade touch-tone
phone line using an RJ11 modular jack. At the PC, COM2 is connected to a similar modem.
Four phone lines, each with its own number, are required in this example.
RS-232 Communications Port
Page I-3
Rev. 1/01
USING A MODEM AT THE REMOTE SITE
Requirements
• Modem
External (stand-alone) U.S. Robotics or Hayes AT-compatible modem, 9600 baud or faster.
Do not use a PC-card or rack-mount style modem.
• Phone Line
Voice-grade dial-tone line using DTMF (touch-tone) connected to an RJ11 modular jack.
!
IMPORTANT! Modems must be capable of at least 9600 baud with no
compression.
Standard voice-grade dial-up phone lines are used to communicate with a remote 9000 panel
equipped with the RS-232 Communications Port Chip and a modem. A serial printer may be
connected to the RS-485 port of the 9000 panel to provide a local listing of panel transactions.
Install the RS-232 Communications Port Chip, following the instructions on page I-1.
SELECTING MODEM OPERATION
Set switch SW2-7 on the 9000 panel to ON to configure the RS-232 port for modem use.
ASCII Printer
Hayes AT-Compatible
Modem
RJ11 Phone Jack
RS-232 Communications Port
Page I-4
Rev. 5/03
CONNECTING THE MODEM
Before the modem can actually begin communications, you must program the modem and the
controlling PC using the IDenticard Modem Programmer. Complete instructions for using this
software are given in Appendix D, page AD-1.
SHIELD
WHITE
BLACK
GROUND
RED
DB25
MALE
RXD
TXD
RTS
CTS
DTR
DSR
CD
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
O O O O O O O O
TB13
7
8
20
6
4
3
2
A 10-foot cable is provided with the RS-232 Communications Port Chip to connect the modem’s
RS-232 DCE port to the RS-232 serial port (TB13) on the 9000 Panel. Connect the 25-pin male
connector to the modem’s 25-pin female connector. Connect the other end of the cable to TB13
on the panel as shown in the drawing above. Be sure to observe the color coding. The distance
may be extended to 50 feet by splicing in customer supplied cable. Use cable suitable for RS232 communications. Typical RS-232 cable is 3-conductor, 18-22 AWG, shielded.
Connect the modem to the phone line following the manufacturer’s instructions.
FIRST TIME POWER-UP
Turn on the modem and power the 9000 panel only after all connections are made. In
approximately one minute, the panel will initialize the modem and place it in the AA
(autoanswer) mode. In this initial state, the panel is waiting for a call from the PC to get its
initial programming. The panel cannot yet dial out (because it does not yet know the PC’s phone
number).
When the PC calls the panel for the first time, a password and a list of phone numbers for the
panel to dial are set in the panel. The password ensures that only the 9000 PC can communicate
with the panel. Hackers or crackers using other programs, or even other 9000 systems, cannot
communicate with the panel or interfere with its operation.
RS-232 Communications Port
Page I-5
Rev. 1/01
Using a Local Printer
A local real-time transaction listing of the 9000 panel transactions is obtained by connecting a
serial printer, display terminal, or both to the RS-485 port of the 9000 panel. Even though the
port is not RS-232, most printers will work without the use of an RS-485-to-RS-232 converter.
When modem operation is selected, transactions are sent out the panel’s RS-485 serial port
(TB9) as they occur. The panel’s buffer will continue to store transactions for uploading to the
PC as normal. Transactions sent to the local printer cannot be buffered by the panel.
!
WARNING! Because there is no handshaking or flow control to the printer, be sure
that your printer is fast enough to keep up with transaction printing, or transactions
may be lost.
SETTING UP YOUR PRINTER
You must set-up your printer or CRT to match the output of the 9000’s serial port. Select 9600
baud, eight data bits, one stop bit, no parity.
CONNECTING THE PRINTER
Build a printer cable (up to 50 feet long) following the diagram below. Connect the cable to the
printer and to TB9 of the 9000 panel as shown in the diagram. See page I-2 for a sample printout of transactions.
RS-232 Communications Port
Page I-6
Rev. 1/01
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE 9000 PANEL AND RS-232 COMMUNICATIONS PORT CARD!!
RS-232 Communications Port Card
IDenticard Item Code: F55-232COMBD
Description
A secondary communication port can be added to the Series 9000 panel by installing the RS232 Communications Port Card, which is designed to provide an RS-232 port. Connector P1 on
the serial board plugs into J16 on the 9000 panel and provides an RS-232 serial port. The card is
secured by two 6-32 × 1.25 inch screws, and may be factory-installed or field-installed later.
Use the RS-232 port card to:
• Send 9000 panel transactions to a local serial printer
• Control a U.S. Robotics (or Hayes AT-compatible) dial-up modem
Installation
1. Disconnect all power (AC and DC) to
the 9000 panel.
2. Locate J16 on the 9000 panel and P1
on the serial board. Place the board on
the panel, making sure that the
mounting screw standoffs on the board
are centered with the holes in the 9000
panel. Then press the card into place
(P1 into J16).
!
WARNING! It is possible to
improperly install the card with
the connector off by one pin. If
this happens, the standoffs will
NOT be centered with the holes.
Be sure that they are centered.
If the card is incorrectly
installed, damage to the card and
panel may result when power is
applied.
3. Fasten the card to the 9000 panel using two 6-32 × 1.25 screws through the standoffs.
4. Set switches S1-7 and S1-8 as given in the table below to select how the card is used (see
page AC-2 in Appendix C to locate switch).
OFF
ON
Switch S1-7
Printer connected
Modem connected
OFF
ON
Switch S1-8
Printer at 9600 baud
Printer at 1200 baud
5. Power the 9000 panel and download if necessary.
RS-232 Communications Port
Page I-7
Rev. 1/01
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE 9000 PANEL AND RS-232 COMMUNICATIONS PORT CARD!!
Local Printer Control
!
NOTE: Firmware Version 1.35 or later is required.
A listing of local real-time transactions on the 9000 panel can be obtained by connecting a serial
printer, display terminal, or both to the RS-232 serial port. Transactions are sent out the serial
port as they occur. If the panel is off-line, its buffer will continue to store transactions for
uploading to the PC as normal. Transactions sent to the local printer cannot be buffered by the
panel.
IMPORTANT! Because there is no handshaking to the printer, be sure that your
printer is fast enough to keep up with transaction printing, or transactions may be
lost. A minimum print speed of 150 cps is necessary at 1200 baud.
!
Select 9600 baud only if you are sending transactions to a display terminal (CRT).
Some display terminals provide a buffered printer port. This allows the connection of both a
CRT and printer. Check with your local computer products dealer for details.
Connecting the Serial Device
Provided to connect the RS-232 port to your printer or CRT is a 10-foot cable consisting of a 25pin female connector configured for DCE on one end and two color-coded wires on the other
end. Connect the GREEN wire to TB1-1 and the BLACK wire to TB1-5. The distance may be
extended to 100 ft. by splicing in customer supplied cable. Use cable suitable for RS-232 data
communications. Typical RS-232 cable is 3-conductor, 18-22 AWG, shielded. Line drivers or
modems may be used to extend the distance even further.
RS-232 Communications Port
Page I-8
Rev. 1/01
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE 9000 PANEL AND RS-232 COMMUNICATIONS PORT CARD!!
SETTING THE PARAMETERS OF THE SERIAL DEVICE
You must set up your printer to match the output of the 9000’s serial port. Select 1200 or 9600
baud, eight data bits, one stop bit, no parity.
SAMPLE PRINT-OUT
Mon
Tue
Tue
Tue
Tue
06/07/1999
06/08/1999
06/08/1999
06/08/1999
06/08/1999
17:00:37
07:11:51
08:30:02
08:39:21
08:39:21
Card 0000000327
Card 0000000327
Panel
Panel
Panel
Panel
Panel
01
01
01
01
01
Point 2
Reader C
Point 2
Point 2
Reader B
Time Zone Relay Off
Access granted
T/Z Card Activate
Time Zone Relay On
Access granted
Explanations:
• On Monday, June 7, 1999, relay 2 on Panel 01 turned off at 5:00:37 PM because its Time
Zone ended at 5:00 PM.
• On Tuesday, June 8, 1999, card 327 was granted access through Panel 1’s Reader C at
7:11:51 AM.
• Relay 2’s Time Zone went active at 8:30:02 AM, but the relay was not turned on because it
is set for “First Card Unlock.”
• Relay 2 turned on and is under Time Zone control because Card 240 was granted access
through reader B at 8:39:21 AM.
Modem Control
!
NOTE: Firmware Version 2.01 or later required.
An autodialing remote 9000 panel installation is achieved by connecting a U.S. Robotics (Hayes
AT-compatible) 9600 baud dial-up modem, using a voice grade dial-tone phone line, to the RS232 serial port. If desired, a local printer also may be connected to the 9000 panel (TB9) to
provide a real-time transaction listing of the 9000 panel.
RS-232 Communications Port
Page I-9
Rev. 1/01
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE 9000 PANEL AND RS-232 COMMUNICATIONS PORT CARD!!
The example above shows a typical 9000 installation where 5 panels are hard-wired to COM1 of
the PC at the main building. Three remote sites are controlled by the main system using U.S.
Robotics modems. Each remote panel requires a modem connected to a voice-grade touch-tone
phone line using an RJ11 modular jack. At the PC, COM2 is connected to a similar modem.
Four phone lines, each with its own number, are required in this example.
RS-232 Communications Port
Page I-10
Rev. 1/01
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE 9000 PANEL AND RS-232 COMMUNICATIONS PORT CARD!!
USING A MODEM AT THE REMOTE SITE
Requirements
• Modem
External (stand-alone) U.S. Robotics or Hayes AT-compatible modem, 9600 baud or faster.
Do not use a PC-card or rack-mount style modem.
• Phone Line
Voice-grade dial-tone line using DTMF (touch-tone) connected to an RJ11 modular jack.
!
IMPORTANT! Modems must be capable of at least 9600 baud with no
compression.
Standard voice-grade dialup phone lines are used to
communicate with a remote
9000 panel equipped with
the RS-232 Port Card and a
modem. A serial printer
may be connected to the
RS-485 port of the 9000
panel to provide a local
listing of panel transactions.
Install the RS-232 port card
following the instructions
on page I-I-7.
SELECTING MODEM
OPERATION
Set switch S1-7 on the 9000
panel to ON to configure the
RS-232 card for modem
use.
If you are connecting a local
serial printer to the 9000
panel, set switch S1-8 to
ON to select a baud rate of
1200, and OFF to select a
baud rate of 9600.
RS-232 Communications Port
Page I-11
Rev. 1/01
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE 9000 PANEL AND RS-232 COMMUNICATIONS PORT CARD!!
CONNECTING THE MODEM
A 10 foot cable is provided with the RS-232 card to connect the modem’s RS-232 DCE port to
the RS-232 serial port on the RS-232 card. Connect the 25 pin male connector to the modem’s
25 pin female connector. Connect the other end of the cable to TB1 on the card as shown in the
drawing above. Be sure to observe the color coding. The distance may be extended to 50 feet by
splicing in customer supplied cable. Use cable suitable for RS-232 communications. Typical
RS-232 cable is 3-conductor, 18-22 AWG, shielded.
Check to be sure also that the jumpers at J3 are configured correctly as shown in the diagram.
Connect the modem to the phone line following the manufacturer’s instructions.
FIRST TIME POWER-UP
Turn on the modem and power the 9000 panel only after all connections are made. In
approximately one minute, the panel will initialize the modem and place it in the AA
(autoanswer) mode. In this initial state, the panel is waiting for a call from the PC to get its
RS-232 Communications Port
Page I-12
Rev. 1/01
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE 9000 PANEL AND RS-232 COMMUNICATIONS PORT CARD!!
initial programming. The panel cannot yet dial out (because it does not yet know the PC’s phone
number).
When the PC calls the panel for the first time, a password and a list of phone numbers for the
panel to dial are set in the panel. The password ensures that only the 9000 PC can communicate
with the panel. Hackers using other programs, or even other 9000 systems, cannot communicate
with the panel or interfere with its operation.
Using a Local Printer
A local real-time transaction listing of the 9000 panel transactions is obtained by connecting a
serial printer, display terminal, or both to the RS-485 port of the 9000 panel. Even though the
port is not RS-232, most printers will work without the use of an RS-485 to RS-232 converter.
When modem operation is selected, transactions are sent out the panel’s RS-485 serial port
(TB9) as they occur. The panel’s buffer will continue to store transactions for uploading to the
PC as normal. Transactions sent to the local printer cannot be buffered by the panel.
!
WARNING! Because there is no handshaking or flow control to the printer, be sure
that your printer is fast enough to keep up with transaction printing, or transactions
may be lost.
Select 9600 baud only if you are sending transactions to a display terminal (CRT). Some display
terminals provide a buffered printer port. This allows the connection of both a CRT and printer.
Check with your local computer products dealer for details.
SELECTING THE BAUD RATE (SPEED)
Select the baud rate of data sent to the printer by setting switch S1-8 to ON for 1200 baud or
OFF for 9600 baud.
SETTING UP YOUR PRINTER
You must set-up your printer or CRT to match the output of the 9000’s serial port. Select 1200
or 9600 baud, eight data bits, one stop bit, no parity.
RS-232 Communications Port
Page I-13
Rev. 1/01
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE 9000 PANEL AND RS-232 COMMUNICATIONS PORT CARD!!
CONNECTING THE PRINTER
Build a printer cable (up to 50 feet long) following the diagram below. Connect the cable to the
printer and to TB9 of the 9000 panel as shown in the diagram. See page I-I-9 for a sample printout of transactions.
RS-232 Communications Port
Page I-14
Rev. 1/01
Section J - Extended Distance Reader Kit
IDenticard® Item Code: F60-EDRK
Understanding the Function of the Extended Distance Reader Kit
The Extended Distance Reader Kit (EDRK) lets you extend the total wiring distance between a
card reader and the Series 9000 Panel to 10,000 feet (3048 meters). The EDRK consists of a pair
of PC boards – a Central unit connected to the IDentiPASS Panel and a Remote unit connected to
the reader. The units can then be wired to communicate via either RS-485 or RS-232.
A single twisted pair is used to connect the two EDRK units via RS-485.
You can optionally connect the Central and Remote units via RS-232 to a pair of connected
external devices, such as fiber-optic drivers or short-haul modems. Fiber optics or telephone
lines are then used for the communication between the units. Modems on dial-tone voice lines
cannot be used. The distance limit between the units then is a function of the external devices
used. When fiber-optic lines are used, two-state (send and receive) RS-232/fiber-optic
conversion devices are required at each end. The distance can be extended by using repeaters.
The EDRK provides the following features at the remote access point:
•
•
•
Interface for one magnetic-stripe, bar-code, proximity, Wiegand or smart-card reader
(stand-alone keypads and keypads built into proximity readers are supported; the
IDenticard® magnetic-stripe-keypad combination reader is not)
Input points – one for door position and the other for RTE
Relays – a physical relay on the board to control the door lock and a solid-state output that
can be connected to an existing relay to control an auxiliary DC device
In other words, you can wire all the standard hardware to control a door – reader, lock, input
point and RTE – to the Remote EDRK unit up to 10,000 feet (3048 meters) from the panel.
The Central unit of the EDRK provides a physical relay that can be configured to control an
alarm. It also provides a solid-state output that can be connected to an existing relay to control
an auxiliary DC device.
A DIP switch on the EDRK allows you to select whether your cards and readers use Wiegand
format or ABA format. Two regulated +8-to-+24 VDC power supplies are required, one to
power the Central unit and the other the Remote unit.
The reader port on the Remote unit accepts signals from the card reader and transmits them to
the Central unit where they appear at its reader port. These reader signals are then sent to the
Series 9000 Panel as any reader’s signals are.
Extended Distance Reader Kit
Page J-1
Rev. 9/05
Choosing Correct Reader Formats
The eight-switch DIP switches on the EDRKs allow you to select whether you are using
Wiegand format or ABA format. RS-232 or RS-485 communications can be used with either of
these selections. See any of the connection drawings on pages J-5 to J-8 for the DIP switch
settings. Be sure to set the DIP switches on both EDRK units as instructed.
Use the ABA setting with the following IDenticard readers:
•
•
•
•
Magnetic-stripe readers using encryption
Magnetic-stripe readers using ABA
Bar-code readers
Proximity readers (readers using magnetic-stripe encryption emulation, NOT proximity
readers using Wiegand)
Smart-card readers using ABA emulation
•
The Wiegand setting must be used to interface with the following readers:
•
Readers using any Wiegand bit format supported by the IDentiPASS Panel (contact
IDenticard Pre-Sales Technical Support at 800-233-0298 for an updated list)
Proximity (Wiegand output)
Smart-card readers using Wiegand output
•
•
!
•
•
•
IMPORTANT! The following readers CANNOT be used with the EDRK:
Keypads using the IDenticard Enhanced Reader Module
Readers with keypads using the Enhanced Reader Module
Readers using the Enhanced Reader Module
Understanding EDRK Specifications
The following specifications apply to each of the two EDRK units:
•
Power Required
+8 to +24 VDC, regulated, at 100 mA nominal
•
Input Points
Two binary unsupervised input points
•
Relay (physical)
One SPDT Form-C dry-contact, 36 V at 1 amp
•
Relay (solid-state)
One low-power output point
•
Relay Contact Rating
2 A at 125 VAC
•
Card Reader Used
One ABA or Wiegand reader (not provided with EDRK)
•
Communications
Cable (RS-485)
One twisted pair, 18-26 AWG, shielded or unshielded (not provided
with EDRK)
Extended Distance Reader Kit
Page J-2
Rev. 9/05
•
Communications
Cable (RS-232)
Cable with stripped wires at one end to connect to EDRK board and
standard DB-9 connector at other (provided with EDRK)
•
Maximum Wiring
Distance between
EDRK Units
Up to 10,000-foot (3048-meter) cable length when using RS-485 or
50 feet (15 meters) using RS-232 between Central and Remote units.
When using fiber-optic devices, check your device specifications for
the distance limit.
•
Dimensions
(each unit)
3.00″ W × 2.81″ H × 1.06″ D
(7.62 cm W × 7.15 cm H × 2.70 cm D)
•
Operating Temperature -30°F to 140°F (-34°C to 60°C)
Installing the EDRK Units
INSTALLING FOR TESTING PURPOSES
We suggest that you connect and power the units on a bench before you install them in the
field. Connecting and powering the EDRK in this test fashion allow you to check wiring
connections and configuration, as well as to monitor operation on both the Central and Remote
units. Any potential difficulties can be remedied in advance much easier than if the units are
installed and separated by a large distance.
Diagrams showing pinouts, LEDs and panel-EDRK-door connections start on the next page. The
wiring illustrated and discussed in this Section J is for standard door wiring in an IDentiPASS
system. See original EDRK equipment manufacturer’s documentation for other wiring options.
5
To test-install the EDRK to verify proper operation:
1. Unpack the units and inspect for shipping damage.
2. Using separate power supplies, apply power to each unit using the same
power configuration that will be utilized in the final installation.
3. Connect the RS-485 communication lines (Line +) and (Line -) between the
Central and Remote units.
4. Check the LED indicators to verify normal operation. With the
communication lines connected, the Diagnostic LED should flash rapidly in
green, and the power LED should be steadily lit in green. See the drawing in
the subsection “Locating the Pins and LEDs” on page J-4 for illustrations
of the LEDs and details on their illumination states.
5. Set the DIP switch on both the Central and Remote units corresponding to the
type of reader data format to be used. See one of the connection drawings for
an illustration of the DIP switch and its settings.
6. If a reader and panel are available at the test bench, connect the reader to the
Remote unit and connect the Central unit to the panel. Use a test badge to
verify that the panel can receive badge reads from the reader, and that the
Strike / LED signals are operating as expected.
7. If means to test RTE and door-position input function are available at the test
bench, connect the Remote unit to these means and connect the Central unit to
the panel. Test that RTE and door opening/closure function as expected.
Extended Distance Reader Kit
Page J-3
Rev. 9/05
LOCATING THE PINS AND LEDS
Relay, COM
Relay, N.O.
Aux. Output 3
R
Relay, N.C.
REMOTE
UNIT
36 V @ 1 A
Relay
RS-232 RX
RS-485 Line -
Diagnostic LED
RS-485 Line +
Ground
Power LED
Not Used
LED
Data 1 / Data
Data 0 / Clock
RS-232 TX
Not Used
DIP Switch
Not Used
ON
Aux. Input 2
+5 VDC
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Aux. Input 1
Ground
+8-24 VDC
Relay, N.O.
Relay, COM
Relay, N.C.
Aux. Output 1
C
!
IMPORTANT!
All terminal block pins are identified assuming
units are powered and communicating.
CENTRAL
UNIT
36 V @ 1 A
Relay
RS-232 RX
RS-485 Line -
Diagnostic LED
RS-485 Line +
Ground
Power LED
Data 0 / Clock
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
+5 VDC
RS-232 TX
Data 1 / Data
DIP Switch
LED In
ON
Aux. Output 2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Aux. Input 3
Ground
+8-24 VDC
Power LED
LED lit with a steady green light indicates that the unit is powered.
LED off indicates that the unit has lost power. An interruption in power at one unit does NOT cause a change
in the Power LED at the other unit.
Diagnostic LED
LED lit with a rapidly blinking green light indicates that the units are communicating.
LED lit with a red light indicates that the units are not communicating. An interruption in power and/or
communications at one unit DOES cause a change in the Diagnostic LED at the other unit:
• The Diagnostic LED on the Central unit blinks red slowly to indicate loss of communication at either
unit or loss of power at the Remote unit.
• The Diagnostic LED on the Remote unit is lit with a steady red light upon loss of communication at
either unit or loss of power at the Central unit.
LED off indicates that that unit has lost power. The Power LED will also be off.
Extended Distance Reader Kit
Page J-4
Rev. 9/05
WIRING THE CENTRAL EDRK UNIT TO THE SERIES 9000 PANEL – ABA READER WIRING
1000
ohms
Note B
Note B
16
1000
ohms
... 5
4
3
2
1
2
3
TB3
4
...
16
!
Reader Port
TB4
1
Relay, COM
Relay, N.C.
Aux. Output 1
Note A
C
Relay, N.O.
36 V @ 1 A
Relay
RS-232 RX
RS-485 Line -
Diagnostic LED
RS-232 TX
4
5
6
7
8
Note A
Clock
Not Used
Data
Not Used
DIP Switch
LED In
ON
Not Used
Aux. Output 2
+5 VDC
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Aux. Input 3
Ground
+8-24 VDC
Keep Switches 1 through 5, and 7 and 8 OFF.
Set Switch 6 to select ABA/magnetic-stripe
format as shown below.
Note C
3
Ground
Power LED
Note A
Note B
2
CENTRAL
UNIT
RS-485 Line +
The EDRK is shown wired to
Reader 1, Input 1, RTE 1 and
Relay 1 here solely for ease of
illustration. EDRKs can be
wired to work with any
Readers-Inputs-RTEs-Relays
1-8 on the panel.
3
4
5
6
OFF
OFF
2
OFF
OFF
1
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ABA/
MagneticStripe
OFF
+8 - 24 VDC
External
Power
Source
1
IDentiPASS
(Series 9000)
Panel
Only one wire required
for connection, as long
as DIP Switch 3 is OFF!
Note C
...
Input/Alarm
Port
IMPORTANT!
All terminal block pins are
identified assuming units are
powered and communicating.
TB1
5
Relay
Port
10 11 12
1
TB13
Request-ToExit (RTE) Port
7
8
See “Wiring the Central EDRK Unit to the Remote EDRK Unit” on page J-7 for details.
Resistance MUST be wired at PANEL as illustrated for proper EDRK function. Do NOT wire
resistance for supervision at device.
Relay on Central unit functions to allow activation of an alarm triggered when communications
fail. When communications fail, pin labeled “N.O.” becomes “N.C.” and pin labeled “N.C.”
becomes “N.O.” This function permits wiring of alert device to switch on as result of state
change.
Extended Distance Reader Kit
Page J-5
Rev. 9/05
WIRING THE CENTRAL EDRK UNIT TO THE SERIES 9000 PANEL – WIEGAND READER WIRING
1000
ohms
Note B
Note B
16
1000
ohms
... 5
4
3
2
1
2
3
TB3
4
...
16
!
Reader Port
TB4
1
Relay, COM
Relay, N.C.
Aux. Output 1
Note A
C
Relay, N.O.
1
IDentiPASS
(Series 9000)
Panel
Only one wire required
for connection, as long
as DIP Switch 3 is OFF!
Note C
...
Input/Alarm
Port
IMPORTANT!
All terminal block pins are
identified assuming units are
powered and communicating.
TB1
5
Relay
Port
10 11 12
1
TB13
Request-ToExit (RTE) Port
3
4
5
6
7
8
CENTRAL
UNIT
36 V @ 1 A
Relay
RS-232 RX
RS-485 Line -
2
Diagnostic LED
RS-232 TX
RS-485 Line +
Note A
Ground
Power LED
Data 0
Not Used
Data 1
Not Used
DIP Switch
LED In
ON
Not Used
Aux. Output 2
+5 VDC
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Aux. Input 3
Ground
+8-24 VDC
Keep Switches 1 through 5, and 7 and 8 OFF.
Set Switch 6 to select Wiegand format as shown
below.
The EDRK is shown wired to
Reader 1, Input 1, RTE 1 and
Relay 1 here solely for ease of
illustration. EDRKs can be
wired to work with any
Readers-Inputs-RTEs-Relays
1-8 on the panel.
Note A
Note B
Note C
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
Wiegand
OFF
ON
+8 - 24 VDC
External
Power
Source
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
See “Wiring the Central EDRK Unit to the Remote EDRK Unit” on page J-7 for details.
Resistance MUST be wired at PANEL as illustrated for proper EDRK function. Do NOT wire
resistance for supervision at device.
Relay on Central unit functions to allow activation of an alarm triggered when communications
fail. When communications fail, pin labeled “N.O.” becomes “N.C.” and pin labeled “N.C.”
becomes “N.O.” This function permits wiring of alert device to switch on as result of state
change.
Extended Distance Reader Kit
Page J-6
Rev. 9/05
WIRING THE CENTRAL EDRK UNIT TO THE REMOTE EDRK UNIT
!
IMPORTANT!
All terminal block pins are identified assuming
units are powered and communicating.
Relay, N.C.
Note A
R
If communicating
using RS-485,
wire only this
communication
connection !
Use shielded
twisted pair, 22
AWG (0.325 mm2)
or better.
Wiring length: up
to 10,000 feet
(3048 m).
Relay, COM
REMOTE
UNIT
36 V @ 1 A
Relay
Aux. Output 3
Relay, N.O.
RS-485 Line -
Red
Black
RS-232 RX
Diagnostic LED
RS-232 TX
RS-485 Line +
Green
Ground
Power LED
Not Used
LED
Note A
If communicating
using RS-232, wire
only this
communication
connection,
following the
color-coding
shown here!
Use supplied cable
with DB-9
connector.
Not Used
Data 1 / Data
DIP Switch
Not Used
ON
Data 0 / Clock
Aux. Input 2
+5 VDC
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Note A
8
Aux. Input 1
Ground
+8-24 VDC
Set Switch 6 to match Central
unit setting. Keep all other
switches off.
+8 - 24 VDC
External
Power
Source
Relay, N.O.
C
Note B
Relay, COM
Relay, N.C.
Aux. Output 1
If communicating
using RS-485,
wire only this
communication
connection !
Use shielded
twisted pair, 22
AWG (0.325 mm2)
or better.
Wiring length: up
to 10,000 feet
(3048 m).
Plug these
DB-9
connectors
into RS-232
communication
devices.
CENTRAL
UNIT
36 V @ 1 A
Relay
RS-232 RX
RS-485 Line -
Diagnostic LED
RS-232 TX
RS-485 Line +
Ground
Power LED
Not Used
+5 VDC
Black
Green
Data 0 / Clock
Not Used
Not Used
Red
Data 1 / Data
DIP Switch
LED In
Note B
ON
Aux. Output 2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Aux. Input 3
Ground
+8-24 VDC
If communicating
using RS-232, wire
only this
communication
connection,
following the
color-coding
shown here!
Use supplied cable
with DB-9
connector.
Keep Switches 1 through 5, and 7 and 8 OFF.
Set Switch 6 to select either Wiegand or
ABA/magnetic-stripe format as shown below.
Note A
Note B
5
OFF
OFF
OFF
1
2
3
4
5
OFF
OFF
4
OFF
OFF
3
6
7
8
OFF
OFF
2
OFF
OFF
1
OFF
OFF
7
8
ON
ON
ABA/
MagneticStripe
OFF
Wiegand
OFF
ON
+8 - 24 VDC
External
Power
Source
6
See “Wiring the Remote EDRK Unit to the Door” on page J-8 for details.
See the sections “Wiring the Central EDRK Unit to the Series 9000 Panel – ABA Reader Wiring”
or “Wiring the Central EDRK Unit to the Series 9000 Panel – Wiegand Reader Wiring” on pages
J-5 or J-6, respectively, for details.
Extended Distance Reader Kit
Page J-7
Rev. 9/05
WIRING THE REMOTE EDRK UNIT TO THE DOOR
!
IMPORTANT!
Refer to “Relays” in Section
D of the IDentiPASS
Hardware Installation Manual
for details and requirements
for wiring locks!
IMPORTANT!
Wire door-position inputs
normally closed!
!
External
Power
Source
Door-Position
DoorStrike
Lock
Note A
IMPORTANT!
Wire RTEs
normally closed!
!
Input
Request to Exit
Reader
!
IMPORTANT!
All terminal block pins are identified assuming
units are powered and communicating.
Relay, N.C.
R
400-800 ft (121-243 m) total wiring distance, depending on reader
Door
Relay, COM
Note C
Relay, N.O.
Aux. Output 3
Note B
REMOTE
UNIT
36 V @ 1 A
Relay
RS-232 RX
RS-485 Line -
Diagnostic LED
RS-232 TX
RS-485 Line +
Note B
Ground
Power LED
Not Used
LED
Not Used
Data 1 / Data
DIP Switch
Data 0 / Clock
+5 VDC
Not Used
ON
Aux. Input 2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Aux. Input 1
Ground
+8-24 VDC
Keep Switches 1 through 5, and 7 and 8 OFF.
Set Switch 6 to select either Wiegand or
ABA/magnetic-stripe format as shown below.
Note A
Note B
Note C
5
OFF
OFF
OFF
1
2
3
4
5
OFF
OFF
4
OFF
OFF
3
6
7
8
OFF
OFF
2
OFF
OFF
1
OFF
OFF
7
8
ON
ON
ABA/
MagneticStripe
OFF
ON
Wiegand
OFF
+8 - 24 VDC
External
Power
Source
6
Separate power sources for readers are strongly recommended. Do not power a reader via the “+5
VDC” pin on the Remote EDRK unit. See reader documentation for power requirements.
See “Wiring the Central EDRK Unit to the Remote EDRK Unit” on page J-7 for details.
Normally open wiring is illustrated for use with door-strike lock. Wire normally closed for
magnetic locks.
Extended Distance Reader Kit
Page J-8
Rev. 9/05
MOUNTING THE UNITS
!
WARNING! Do NOT mount the Central unit inside the Series 9000 Panel
enclosure. Electrical interference could cause panel malfunctions.
Mount the Central unit(s) in a NEMA-approved electrical box close to the panel. Slide or snap
the EDRK board out of its plastic holder and fasten the holder to the back of the electrical box or
removable backplane. Be sure to allow enough room around the circuit board to allow the
terminal block connectors to be removed for wiring. Snap the EDRK board back into its holder.
Following the recommendations and procedures given above, mount the Remote unit(s) in a
NEMA-approved electrical box protected from moisture. The Remote unit may be placed up to
400-800 feet (121-243 meters) (wiring length) from the card reader. The wiring length that can
be used depends on the card reader.
POWERING THE UNITS
Each EDRK unit requires its own separate power supply. Each unit requires +8 to +24 VDC and
draws 100 mA (nominal) of current. A regulated power supply with battery backup is
recommended.
You may power multiple Central units from the same power supply, as long as the power supply
used is large enough to handle all of the EDRKs you need to power (see the section
“Understanding EDRK Specifications” on page J-2).
!
WARNING! Do not attempt to power the Central unit from the Series 9000 Panel
or its battery. Damage to the panel may result.
Extended Distance Reader Kit
Page J-9
Rev. 9/05
WIRING THE CENTRAL UNIT TO THE SERIES 9000 PANEL
Wiring to the Panel Reader Port
Refer to the diagrams in “Wiring the Central EDRK Unit to the Series 9000 Panel – ABA Reader
Wiring” on page J-5 and “Wiring the Central EDRK Unit to the Series 9000 Panel – Wiegand
Reader Wiring” on page J-6 for details on wiring the EDRK to reader ports on the panel. When
wiring the Central unit to the panel, treat the Central unit’s reader port as if it were on the reader
itself.
!
IMPORTANT! Be sure to use shielded cable for these connections!
!
CAUTION! Note the differences between wiring ABA -format readers and
Wiegand -format readers to the reader port of the Series 9000 Panel. Be sure that
you use the diagram on page J-5 to wire an ABA reader. Use the diagram on page
J-6 to wire a Wiegand reader.
If your reader uses Wiegand format, keep Switch 6 OFF on the Central unit DIP switch. See
the diagram in “Wiring the Central EDRK Unit to the Series 9000 Panel – Wiegand Reader
Wiring” on page J-6.
If your reader is a magnetic-stripe reader using ABA format or other ABA-format reader, turn
Switch 6 ON on the Central unit DIP switch. See the diagram in “Wiring the Central EDRK
Unit to the Series 9000 Panel – ABA Reader Wiring” on page J-5.
Wiring to the Door-Position Input Point Port
Wire connections from the Central unit to the Door-Position Input Point port on the Series 9000
Panel as shown in the diagrams on pages J-5 or J-6. This port is labeled “Input/Alarm Port” in
this diagram.
!
CAUTION! Wire a 1000-ohm resistor at the Door-Position Input Point port on the
panel as shown in the diagrams! Door-position input points in EDRKs are not
supervised. The resistor provides the supervision and must be wired at the panel
and not at the device.
Extended Distance Reader Kit
Page J-10
Rev. 9/05
Wiring to the Request-to-Exit (RTE) Port
Connect only one wire from the “Auxiliary Output 1” pin on the Central unit to the Request-toExit port on the Series 9000 Panel as shown in the diagrams on pages J-5 or J-6. As noted on the
diagrams, only one wire is needed for this connection as long as Switch 3 on the DIP switch is
kept in the default “OFF” position.
!
CAUTION! Wire a 1000-ohm resistor at the Request-to-Exit port on the panel as
shown in the diagrams! RTE points in EDRKs are not supervised. The resistor
provides the supervision and must be wired at the panel and not at the RTE device!
Wiring the Central-Unit Relay
By default, the relay on the Central unit is triggered by a loss of communications between the
two units. You may wire the pins of the relay (see drawings) to an alarm device if you wish.
Follow the third-party manufacturer’s recommendations and instructions for wiring any alarm
device.
The EDRK is supervised in such a way that the relay is energized when the Central and Remote
units are communicating. The relay turns OFF if communications are lost. When
communications fail, the normally open terminal-block pin switches to closed and the normally
open terminal-block pin switches to open. This functioning permits wiring of an alert device to
activate as a result of this state change.
Extended Distance Reader Kit
Page J-11
Rev. 9/05
WIRING THE CENTRAL UNIT TO THE REMOTE UNIT – COMMUNICATIONS USING RS-485
Using a twisted-pair, connect one wire to the “Line +” pin and the other wire to the “Line -” pin
on the Central unit. See the drawing in “Wiring the Central EDRK Unit to the Remote EDRK
Unit” on page J-7.
Connect the other ends of the wires to the same “Line +” and “Line -” pins at the Remote unit.
Be sure that “Line +” goes to “Line +” and “Line -” goes to “Line -”. Do NOT cross the plus (+)
and the minus (-). Up to 10,000 feet (3048 meters) of unshielded line may be used.
WIRING THE CENTRAL UNIT TO THE REMOTE UNIT – COMMUNICATIONS USING RS-232
Connect the bare wires at the end of one of the cables supplied with the EDRK to the “RS-232
RX,” “RS-232 TX” and “Ground” pins on the Central unit only as shown in the drawing in
“Wiring the Central EDRK Unit to the Remote EDRK Unit” on page J-7.
!
CAUTION! Disregard any label on the cable showing pinouts! Those pinouts are
NOT used for wiring to the EDRK! Use ONLY the pinouts shown in the drawing on
page J-7!
Plug the DB-9 plug into a RS-232/fiber-optic conversion device, short-haul modem or other
suitable RS-232 (DCE) device. Use telephone cable or leased lines when connecting the EDRK
to a modem.
!
IMPORTANT! A dial-tone voice-grade phone line CANNOT be used.
The maximum total distance over which RS-232 can be used is a function of the devices used for
the communications.
Follow the instructions given above to connect the other supplied cable to the to the “RS-232
RX,” “RS-232 TX” and “Ground” pins on the Remote unit only as shown in the drawing in
“Wiring the Central EDRK Unit to the Remote EDRK Unit” on page J-7. Be sure also to heed
the “Caution” and “Important” alerts. Plug the DB-9 plug into the other RS-232 (DCE) device.
Extended Distance Reader Kit
Page J-12
Rev. 9/05
WIRING THE REMOTE UNIT TO THE READER
First, ensure that the reader is separately powered in accordance with its manufacturer’s
recommendations, requirements and instructions.
!
IMPORTANT! Do not power a reader via the “+5 VDC” pin on the Remote EDRK
unit. Do not power a reader via the Series 9000 Panel.
Second, refer to your reader’s installation manual for requirements and instructions on the
recommended cable for the reader and the recommended maximum wiring distance. Readers
from IDenticard should provide normal functioning when wired between 400 and 800 feet (121243 meters) (total copper length) from the Remote unit. However, wiring distances of less than
400 feet (121 meters) may be encountered, depending on the reader, the reader technology,
wiring conditions, reader mounting or reader environment.
Use the drawing in “Wiring the Remote EDRK Unit to the Door” on page J-8 to wire the reader
to the Remote unit.
If your reader uses Wiegand format, keep Switch 6 OFF on the Remote unit DIP switch. See
the diagram in “Wiring the Central EDRK Unit to the Series 9000 Panel – Wiegand Reader
Wiring” on page J-6.
If your reader is a magnetic-stripe reader using ABA format or other ABA-format reader, turn
Switch 6 ON on the Remote unit DIP switch. See the diagram in “Wiring the Central EDRK
Unit to the Series 9000 Panel – ABA Reader Wiring” on page J-5.
WIRING THE DOOR-LOCK RELAY, DOOR-POSITION INPUT POINT AND REQUEST-TO-EXIT
Refer to the drawing in “Wiring the Remote EDRK Unit to the Door” on page J-8 for the wiring
needed to connect the Remote unit to the door-lock relay, door-position input point and requestto-exit (RTE). Note and follow all “Important” alerts appearing in this diagram.
The relay on the Remote unit is a SPDT switch with Form C dry contacts rated for a maximum
of 36 VAC or VDC at 1 amp. Wire this relay to control the entry point lock (door-strike lock,
magnetic lock, etc.). The LED output will sink to ground (the LED will be ON) when the doorstrike relay (relay 1) is ON.
Wire the door-position input and RTE as shown in “Wiring the Remote EDRK Unit to the Door”
on page J-8. Use a normally closed RTE contact.
Extended Distance Reader Kit
Page J-13
Rev. 9/05
Section K — IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
The IDenticard RF Reader Extender is a state-of-the-art, 900-MHz frequency-hopping, spreadspectrum modem. When the RF Reader Extender Kit is incorporated into new or existing access
control installations, terminal devices (DTEs) up to 1500 feet (457 meters) apart become capable
of handling high-speed, wireless, two-way communications.
The RF Reader Extender is offered as two kits that contain the following:
F55-RFEXKITM
(Mag-Stripe)
F55-RFEXKITW
(Wiegand)
two RF modems
two 10″ × 8″ NEMA 4X enclosures
1 pair of RS-232 mag-stripe EDRKs
two RF modems
two 10″ × 8″ NEMA 4X enclosures
1 pair of RS-232 Wiegand EDRKs
IDenticard RF Reader Extender Kits provide a practical and reliable alternative to using a
twisted pair to wire a reader, RTE and input point to a Series 9000 Panel. A specific
application ideally suited to the RF Reader Extender is the installation of access control in a
parking lot. A reader can be installed at the lot gate and connected to the remote EDRK unit
connected to an RF Reader Extender. No underground wires need to be run since the RF
modems handle the communication between the central and remote EDRK units. In addition to
eliminating the need to run a twisted pair cable between the two EDRK units, using the RF
Reader Extender offers:
•
•
•
Greater flexibility and capability to place or relocate terminal equipment
Greater ease of installation
The ability to communicate through walls, floors, and many other obstacles
A pair of RF Reader Extender modules can link two terminal devices. Multiple independent
networks can operate concurrently, so it is possible for unrelated communications operations to
take place in the same or a nearby area without sacrificing privacy, functionality or reliability.
RF Reader Extender Programmer
RF Reader Extender Programmer software allows the user to program IDenticard RF Reader
Extender Kits to transmit serial data without direct, wired communications connections. This
program can be used in almost any situation where an asynchronous serial interface is used and
data intercommunication is required. This software program greatly eases the configuration and
setup of the modems, and makes programming individual commands into the modems
unnecessary.
IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
Page K-1
Rev. 1/01
Using the Programmer Software
Before placing the two RF units and wiring them to the EDRKs, you will need to program them
both. As you will soon learn, one unit will be the master unit and the other the slave. Program
one and then the other at the system PC and verify their programming, following the instructions
given here before installing them. Be certain to label the master unit “Master” and the slave
“Slave” as you program them. This labeling will prove valuable later in troubleshooting.
When you start the software you will first see the screen shown above, which presents two
buttons, “Wizard” and “Manual.” If you are familiar with programming RF units, click on
“Manual” and you may jump to page K-10 of these instructions. If not, or if you need help
setting up the RF units, click on the “Wizard” button.
Clicking the “Wizard” button starts the installation wizard, which will ask you a series of
questions. Each question relates to a setup option and is explained on the screen. For each
option screen, you may accept the defaults that show or enter your own settings. See the full
screen example below. Note that this wizard offers the “Back” button option in the event you
find you need to go back to change settings after you have continued forward through a few
screens.
IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
Page K-2
Rev. 1/01
Wizard Setting Screens
COM PORT SELECTION
Shown above is the communications port selection window, where you select the
communications port the RF Reader Extender unit will be connected to. The unit automatically
selects the serial baud rate. The unit performs what it calls an “autobaud” operation, determines
the current DTE baud rate setting and adjusts itself to match.
The available communications port choices are communications ports 1 through 4. Choose the
appropriate port for your system and click “Next.”
PACKET PARAMETERS
Packet parameters define the characteristics of the internal packets, or frames, that are
transmitted. Since adequate care must be taken in determining these settings to maintain system
reliability and optimum performance, change them from the defaults shown only if requested by
IDenticard Technical Support. Packet parameters will vary depending on the modem’s operating
capacity and environment. The individual fields in this screen are discussed below:
IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
Page K-3
Rev. 1/01
Minimum Size
This setting has a range of 0 to 255 and defines the number of bytes to accumulate from the DTE
before transmitting a packet. Setting this value to 0 ensures that all characters sent by the DTE
are immediately transmitted. The value may not exceed the maximum packet size.
Maximum Size
This setting has a range of 1 to 255 and defines the maximum number of bytes from the DTE
which should be encapsulated in a packet. This value should be greater than the minimum packet
size, but not smaller than is necessary for reliable communications. If the wireless link is
consistently good and stable, a maximum size of 255 will yield the best throughput (depending
on the higher level protocols of the connected equipment). However, if the link is poor (e.g.,
experiencing excessive interference) and data is frequently retransmitted, the maximum packet
size should be reduced. This reduction decreases the probability of errors within packets, and
reduces the amount of communications traffic in the event that retransmissions are required.
Since a smaller packet size results in proportionally higher overhead and lower overall
throughput on a good connection, the maximum packet size should only be reduced if many
errors are being detected by CRC.
Retry Limit
This setting has a range of 0 to 255 and determines the number of attempts made to retransmit
data that failed the CRC checksum operation. Once the limit is reached, the modem will give up
and discard the data. If the wireless connection is poor and data often needs to be retransmitted, a
modem could be “tied up” trying to retransmit, thus holding up pending data.
FREQUENCY HOPPING
Hopping Pattern
Since the RF Reader Extender is a frequency-hopping modem, the carrier frequency changes
periodically according to one of twenty pseudo-random patterns selected by defining the
Hopping Pattern in this screen. A value from 1 to 20, inclusive, can be used to select the pattern.
It is important that both units be programmed with the same hopping pattern or the
communication link will fail. The default is 1.
IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
Page K-4
Rev. 1/01
Hopping Interval
This option determines the interval at which the modems change channel. Again, it is vital that
both reader extenders have the same hopping interval setting or the communication link will fail.
The default is 200 msec.
The possible settings are:
25 msec
50 msec
100 msec
150 msec
200 msec
250 msec
300 msec
350 msec
WIRELESS LINK RATE
The Wireless Link Rate determines which parameter, speed or range, is optimized in the
communications over the RF link. The possible mode settings are Turbo and Fast. Depending on
the application requirements, each mode offers distinct maximum throughputs (expected
performance) and optimized parameters as follows:
Mode
Turbo
Fast
Expected
Performance
96 kbps
60 kbps
Optimized
Parameter
Speed
Range
Generally, the lowest rate that provides sufficient bandwidth should be selected. For example, if
the DTEs are set to communicate at 19.2 kbps, then the wireless rate can be set to fast (with the
added advantage of slightly greater range). If the DTEs require nearly 115.2 kbps of sustained
bandwidth, then the wireless rate should be set to Turbo (setting it to Fast would “bottleneck”
data transmissions in the wireless link). Note that there is a trade-off among speed, performance
and range; that is, increased speed reduces range and increased range reduces speed.
IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
Page K-5
Rev. 1/01
OPERATING MODE
For communication via an EDRK, two RF Reader Extender units are needed. One must be set
up as the master, and the other as the slave. It is in this window that these settings are defined.
Two setting options appear in the drop-down box: “Master – Point-to-Point” and “Slave – Pointto-Point.” “Point-to-Point” refers to a configuration in which a master unit communicates with a
single slave unit. Only this configuration works with the Series 9000 Panels; it does not matter
which unit is set as the master and which is the slave. What is important is that they be labeled
once they are programmed (see page K-2).
As the warning in the screen indicates, there can be only one master, and consequently, only one
slave for each EDRK pair. In addition, for the master and slave units to communicate, the
following parameters must be set to the same values for both:
Wireless link rate
Network address
Unit address
Hopping pattern
Hopping interval
Encryption key
(discussed on page K-5)
(discussed on page K-8)
(discussed on page K-8)
(discussed on page K-4)
(discussed on page K-5)
(discussed on page K-9)
Master – Point-to-Point
One unit in a point-to-point link should be set as the master; consequently, the other modem
must be designated as the slave. During operation, it makes little difference which is which,
especially if data is generally transmitted unidirectionally at any given moment.
Slave – Point-to-Point
The terminal in a point-to-point network that is not set as the master must then be the slave. The
slave communicates with the master, whose settings it matches (see above).
In point-to-point operation, the slave modem acknowledges all packets of data sent by the
master, and vice versa. These acknowledgements, along with CRC error checking, ensure that
data is passed through exactly once, and that it is not corrupted.
IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
Page K-6
Rev. 1/01
POWER OUTPUT LEVEL
The power output level determines the power at which the RF Reader Extender transmits. The
RF Reader Extender is super-sensitive and so can operate at very low power levels. We
therefore recommend that the lowest power necessary be used. Using excessive power
contributes to unnecessary “RF pollution.” The default is 1 mW.
The possible settings are:
1 mW
10 mW
100 mW
1000 mW
Ideally, you should test the communications performance between units, starting from a low
power level and working upward until the RSSI is sufficiently high and a reliable link
established. Although the conditions will vary widely among applications, typical applications
for each setting are described below:
Power Level
1 mW
10 mW
100 mW
1000 mW
(1 watt)
Application
For in-building use, typically provides a link up to 300 ft (91 m) on the
same floor or up/down a level. Outdoors, distances of approx. 6 miles
(10 km) can be achieved if high-gain (directional) antennas are placed
high above ground level and are in direct line of sight.
200-500 ft (61-152 m) indoors, 5-9 mi (8-15 km) outdoors.
400-800 ft (122-244 m) indoors, 9-15 mi (15-25 km) outdoors.
Typically provides communications up to a distance of 1000 ft (305 m)
or more in a building on the same floor or up/down a few levels,
depending on its construction (wood, concrete, steel, etc.). In ideal lineof-sight conditions, up to 19 mi (30 km) or more can be achieved. Note
that only an antenna with a gain of no more 6 dBi may be used; any
higher violates FCC rules. See IMPORTANT warning below.
IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
Page K-7
Rev. 1/01
!
IMPORTANT! FCC Regulations allow up to 36 dBi effective radiated power
(ERP). Therefore, the sum of the transmitted power (in dBm), the cabling loss and
the antenna gain cannot exceed 36 dBi, using the values below for the calculation:
1 mW
10 mW
100 mW
1000 mW
=
=
=
=
0 dBm
10 dBm
20 dBm
30 dBm
For example, when transmitting 1 watt (30 dBm), with cabling losses of 2 dB, the
antenna gain cannot exceed 8 dBi (36 - 30 + 2 = 8). If an antenna with a gain higher
than 8 dBi were used, the power setting would have to be adjusted appropriately.
Violation of FCC regulations can result in severe fines.
ADDRESS SETTINGS
Address Header
The Address Header parameter is not used in programming the RF Reader Extender for use in
Series 9000 Panel systems. Be certain that this parameter is set at “Disabled.”
Unit Address
The unit addresses in point-to-point operation must be the same on both the master and slave
units and different from the addresses used for all other master-slave pairs in your setup. The
range of valid unit addresses is 0 to 65535, inclusive.
Network Address
The network address defines the network that individual units are a part of. By assigning a
network address to a network, its operation can be isolated from that of any other concurrently
operating network in the vicinity using the same hardware. The network address provides a
measure of privacy and security as well. Only units sharing the same assigned network address
interchange the communications for that network. The range of valid network addresses is 0 to
65535, inclusive.
IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
Page K-8
Rev. 1/01
To enhance privacy and reliability of communications where multiple networks may operate
concurrently in close proximity, choose an atypical value, something meaningful yet not easily
selected by chance or coincidence. The default setting is 1.
Encryption Key
The encryption key provides a measure of security and privacy in communications by rendering
the transmitted data useless without the correct key on the receiver. The range of valid
encryption keys is 0 to 65535, inclusive.
Be certain that both the master and slave units within the network are programmed with the same
encryption key to ensure successful communications.
REVIEW OF ALL SETTINGS
Clicking “Next” in the Encryption Key window opens the Wizard Complete window shown
below in which you are prompted to review all the settings you have entered to program the
units. Clicking “OK” opens the window shown at the top of page K-10, where all the settings
are summarized, and you can review them.
IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
Page K-9
Rev. 1/01
If you are not using or did not use the wizard to program the units, it is this window above that
opens when you click the button “Manual” in the opening screen of the software (see page K-2).
Ensure that all shown settings appear correctly and as desired. Make any corrections needed
directly in this screen. Holding your cursor over any item in this window causes the tool tip for
that item to appear with its definition of the item in question. If you need to return to the wizard
for any change(s), click on “Wizard” in the “File” menu, and click the “Next” buttons as before
to advance to the point you need. Continue advancing to reach this setting review window. Note
also the blue hyperlink to IDenticard’s Technical Support web site for further information and
assistance.
When you are certain all settings are correct and are ready to program a unit, click “Program RF
Unit.” A window appears asking you to confirm whether the unit is ready to program. Click
“Yes” if ready. The window dims while the software programs the units, which can take up to a
full minute to complete. Watch the front panel of the RF Reader Extender during the
programming. As long as the red RD light on the panel is lit or blinking, let the program run and
wait for it to complete. The software will tell you if it failed to program the unit, but the
software does time out after 65 sec.
When that unit is successfully programmed, you will see a confirmation window, and you click
on the “OK” button to confirm. Again, be sure you have labeled whether the unit just
programmed is master or slave, and then program the other unit, following all the programming
steps given here and using the same parameter settings as required. When you are done, enter all
the programming information for both units in the Settings Log on page K-17.
After both units are programmed, connect one to each EDRK, using the ribbon cable provided
with the EDRK. No rewiring of the cable is necessary; simply plug in the 9-pin connector on the
cable into the socket on the RF Reader Extender. Refer to the diagrams on pages K-18 and K-19
as well as Section J of this manual, Extended Distance Reader Kit, for additional specific
information on the use and wiring of EDRKs.
IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
Page K-10
Rev. 1/01
Troubleshooting
•
If a unit does not program right away, or if you get an error message, try clicking the
“Program RF Unit” button again. Many times a second attempt is successful. If the unit
still will not program, close the programmer software, unplug both the serial cable and
power cord, plug them both back in, open the software, double-check the settings and try
programming again.
•
If the units can be programmed, but do not communicate when installed, test them by
putting them side by side. If they still cannot communicate, review all their settings to be
sure that the settings are identical. You can view both sets of settings by selecting “Read
Unit” from the “File” menu or by using the shortcut key Crtl+R. If the units can
communicate when placed side by side, but not when installed, and you have verified that
all necessary settings are identical, try changing from turbo to fast on each unit. If that does
not solve the problem, increase the power on each unit one increment at a time until
communications can be established.
•
If you are using more than one pair of RF Reader Extenders, and a transaction on one unit
comes in on all the units, check your unit address settings. Be certain that you have not
assigned the same unit address setting to all the RF modems. Each unit in a master-slave
pair must have the same unit address to communicate, but unit addresses must be unique for
each master-slave pair. See page K-8.
•
If you have two separate RF Reader Extender setups in two individual, but relatively close
buildings, and get a read in one building that produces a transaction in the other, check your
network address settings. Be certain that you have not assigned the same network address to
both RF modem setups. Each facility MUST have a unique network address setup to
communicate. See pages K-8 and K-9.
•
If communication with the remote unit is intermittent with occasional signal bars displaying
on the unit, the hopping pattern, hopping interval or both may not be set to identical values.
Review these settings for the central and remote units and correct any mismatch. Read each
of the units using the RF Programmer function shortcut key Ctrl+R. An alternative is to
note all parameter settings in a Settings Log (see page K-17) as you program the units and
refer to the log to verify any settings in question.
IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
Page K-11
Rev. 1/01
Technical Specifications
ELECTRICAL AND COMMUNICATIONS SPECIFICATIONS
Data Interface
Asynchronous serial port, TTL levels
Signals
Signal Ground, TX, RX, DCD, DSR, DTR, RTS, CTS
Bandwidth / Data Rate 2,400-115,200 bps, uncompressed half-duplex;
approx. 100 kbps sustained in intelligent asymmetrical fullduplex transmission mode
Communications Range 1500 feet (457 meters)
Power Requirements
5 VDC, 1.0 amp
Power Consumption
600 mA at 1 watt transmit, 200 mA receive
Operating Frequency
902-928 MHz
System Gain
135 dB
Sensitivity
-105 dBm
Power output
1 mW, 10 mW, 100 mW, 1 W (user-selectable or adaptive)
Spreading Code
Frequency hopping
Hopping Patterns
20 pseudo-random, (user-selectable)
Error Detection
CRC-16 with auto retransmit
PHYSICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Modem Dimensions
3.5″ × 2.1″ × 1″ (90 mm × 53 mm × 25 mm)
(L×W×H)
Enclosure Dimensions
10.4″ × 8.9″ × 6.3″ ( 264 mm × 226 mm × 160 mm)
(H×W×D)
Modem Weight
7 oz (200 grams)
Enclosure + Modem
4.2 lb (1.9 kg)
Weight
Operating Temperature -30 to 55ºC
Storage Temperature
-40 to 90ºC
IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
Page K-12
Rev. 1/01
Glossary of Terminology Used in the IDenticard RF Reader
Extender Instructions
Asynchronous
communications
A method of telecommunications in which units of single bytes of
data are sent separately and at an arbitrary time (not periodically
or referenced to a clock). Bytes are “padded” with start and stop
bits to distinguish each as a unit for the receiving end, which need
not be synchronized with the sending terminal.
Attenuation
The loss of signal power through equipment line and cables, or
other transmission devices. Measured in decibels (dB).
Bandwidth
The information-carrying capacity of a data-transmission medium
or device, usually expressed in bits/second (bps).
Baud
Unit of signaling speed equivalent to the number of discrete
conditions or events per second. If each signal event represents
only one bit condition, then baud rate equals bits per second
(bps). This is generally true of the serial data port, so baud and
bps have been used interchangeably in this manual when referring
to the serial port. This is not always the case during the DCE-toDCE communications, where a number of modulation techniques
are used to increase the bps rate over the baud rate.
Bit
The smallest unit of information in a binary system, represented
by either a 1 or 0. Abbreviated “b.”
Bits per second (b/s or bps)
A measure of data transmission rate in serial communications.
See also baud.
Byte
A group of bits, generally 8 bits in length. A byte typically
represents a character of data. Abbreviated “B.”
Characters per second (cps)
A measure of a data transmission rate for common exchanges of
data. A character is usually represented by 10 bits: an 8-bit byte
plus two additional bits for marking the start and stop. Thus, in
most cases (but not always), cps is related to bits per second (bps)
by a 1:10 ratio.
CRC
Acronym for Cyclic Redundancy Check. An error-detection
scheme for transmitted data. Performed by using a polynomial
algorithm on data, and appending a checksum to the end of the
packet. At the receiving end, a similar algorithm is performed and
checked against the transmitted checksum.
IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
Page K-13
Rev. 1/01
Crossover cable
A cable that allows direct DTE-to-DTE connection without
intermediate DCEs typically used to bridge the two
communicating devices. Can also be used to make cabled DCEto-DCE connections. The name is derived from “crossing” or
“rolling” several lines, including the TX and RX lines, so that
transmitted data from one DTE is received on the RX pin of the
other DTE and vice-versa. (Also known as rollover, null-modem,
or modem-eliminator cable.)
Cyclic redundancy check
See CRC.
Data communications
equipment (DCE)
A device that facilitates a communications connection between
Data Terminal Equipment (DTEs). Often, two or more
compatible DCE devices are used to “bridge” DTEs, which need
to exchange data. A DCE performs signal encoding, decoding
and conversion of data sent/received by the DTE and
transmits/receives data with another DCE. A common example is
a modem. (Also referred to as Data Circuit-Terminating
Equipment, Data Set.)
Data terminal equipment
(DTE)
An end-device which sends/receives data to/from a DCE, often
providing a user interface for information exchange. Common
examples are computers, terminals and printers.
dBm
Abbreviation for “decibels referenced to one milliwatt (1 mW).”
A standard unit of power level commonly used in RF and
communications work. n dBm is equal to 10(n/10) milliwatt, so
0 dBm = 1 mW, -10 dBm = 0.1 mW, -20 dBm = 0.01mW, etc.
DCE
See Data Communications Equipment.
DTE
See Data Terminal Equipment.
Flow control
A method of moderating the transmission of data so that all
devices within the communications link (DTEs and DCEs)
transmit and receive only as much data as they can handle at
once. This prevents devices from sending data that cannot be
received at the other end due to conditions such as a full buffer or
hardware not in a ready state. This is ideally handled by hardware
using flow-control and handshaking signals, but can be controlled
also by software using X-ON/X-OFF (transmitter on/off)
commands.
IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
Page K-14
Rev. 1/01
Frequency hopping
A type of spread-spectrum communication whereby the carrier
frequency used between transmitter and receiver changes
repeatedly in a synchronized fashion according to a specified
algorithm or table. This minimizes unauthorized jamming
(interference) and interception of telecommunications.
Full duplex
Communication in which data can be bidirectionally,
simultaneously and independently transmitted.
Half duplex
Communication in which the communications medium supports
bidirectional transmission, but data can only travel in one
direction at one time.
Handshaking
A flow-control procedure for establishing data communications
whereby devices indicate that data is to be sent and await
appropriate signals that allow them to proceed.
Line of sight
Condition in which a transmitted signal can reach its destination
by travelling a straight path, without being absorbed and/or
bounced by objects in its path.
Master
The station that controls and/or polls a slave station in a point-topoint network. Often functions as a server or hub for the network.
Nonvolatile memory
Memory that retains information written to it.
Null modem cable
See Crossover cable.
Point-to-point
A simple communications network consisting of only two DTEs.
Repeater
A device that automatically amplifies or restores signals to
compensate for distortion and/or attenuation prior to
retransmission. A repeater is typically used to extend the distance
for which data can be reliably transmitted using a particular
medium or communications device.
RS-232
(Recommended Standard
232)
More accurate designation is RS-232C or EIA/TIA-232E.
Defined by the EIA, this is a widely known standard electrical
and physical interface for linking DCEs and DTEs for serial data
communications. RS-232 traditionally specifies a 25-pin D-sub
connector, although many newer devices use a compact 9-pin
connector with only the essential signaling lines used in
asynchronous serial communications. Lines have two possible
states: “high” (on, active, asserted, carrying +3 to +25 V) or
“low” (off, inactive, disasserted, carrying -3 to -25 V).
IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
Page K-15
Rev. 1/01
RTU
Acronym for Remote Terminal Unit. A common term describing
a DTE device that is part of a wide-area network. Often an RTU
performs data input/output and transmits the data to a centralized
station.
Serial communications
A common mode of data transmission whereby character bits are
sent sequentially, one at a time, using the same signaling line.
Contrast with parallel communications where all bits of a byte are
transmitted at once, usually requiring a signal line for each bit.
Shielded cable
Interface medium that is internally shrouded by a protective
sheath to minimize external electromagnetic interference
(“noise”).
Slave
A station controlled and/or polled by the master station for
communications. Typically represents one end of a point-to-point.
Often an RTU is linked by a slave DCE.
Spread spectrum
A method of transmitting a signal over a wider bandwidth (using
several frequencies) than the minimum necessary for the
originally narrowband signal. A number of techniques are used to
achieve spread-spectrum telecommunications, including
frequency hopping. Spread spectrum provides the possibility of
sharing the same band among many users, while increasing the
tolerance to interference and noise and enhancing the privacy of
communications.
Throughput
A measure of the rate of data transmission passing through a data
communication system, often expressed as bits or characters per
second (bps or cps).
IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
Page K-16
Rev. 1/01
Settings Log
Settings Log
(Reproduce this form as needed.)
Location
Panel
Reader
Master
Slave
Master
Slave
Turbo
Fast
RF Unit Serial
Number
Packet Parameters
Minimum Size
Maximum Size
Retry Limit
Frequency Hopping
Hopping Pattern
Hopping Interval
Link Rate
Operating Mode
Master - Point-to-Point
✔
✔
✔
Slave - Point-to-Point
Power Output
mW
✔
mW
mW
mW
Address Settings
Address Header
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Unit Address
Network Address
Encryption Key
IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
Page K-17
Rev. 1/01
RF Reader Extender Used with a Mag-Stripe Reader
IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
Page K-18
Rev. 1/01
RF Reader Extender Used with a Wiegand Reader
IDenticard® RF Reader Extender
Page K-19
Rev. 1/01
Appendix A - Electrical Specifications
Input Power
PRIMARY POWER — NORTH AMERICA
AC Mains Voltage
AC Input Current
Input Fuse Rating
Power Transformer
110-120 VAC, 60 Hz
0.4 amp
1.0 amp
Class 2, isolated, low voltage
PRIMARY POWER — EUROPE
AC Mains Voltage
AC Input Current
Input Fuse Rating
Power Transformer
220-240 VAC, 50 Hz
0.2 amp
0.5 amp
isolated, low voltage
SERIES 9000
 PANEL
AC Input Voltage
AC Input Current
AC Input Fuse Rating
Fuse Location
Wire Gauge:
DC Input Voltage
Current Capacity
DC Input Fuse Rating
Fuse Location
REMOTE I/O PANEL
AC Input Voltage
AC Input Current
AC Input Fuse Rating
Fuse Location
Wire Gauge:
DC Input Voltage
Current Capacity
14 VAC, 50-60 Hz
3 amp
3 amp, 250 volt, slow blow, Type 2AG
glass, subminiature, user replaceable,
Littelfuse P/N 229003S
FU2
16-18 AWG, maximum length: 10 meters
(32.8 feet)
12V gel cell battery
7 amp/hr
3 amp, 250 volt, slow blow, Type 2AG
glass, subminiature, user replaceable,
Littelfuse P/N 229003S
FU1
14 VAC, 50-60 Hz
3 amp
3 amp, 250 volt, slow blow, Type 2AG
glass, subminiature, user replaceable,
Littelfuse P/N 229003S
FU2
16-18 AWG, maximum power cable
length: 10 meters (32.8 feet)
12V gel cell battery
7 amp/hr
Electrical Specifications
Page AA-1
Rev. 1/01
REMOTE I/O PANEL (CONTINUED)
DC Input Fuse Rating
Fuse Location
!
3 amp, 250 volt, slow blow, Type 2AG
glass, subminiature, user replaceable,
Littelfuse P/N 229003S
FU1
WARNING! DO NOT CONNECT PRIMARY POWER SUPPLY TO A CIRCUIT
CONTROLLED BY A SWITCH.
Batteries
GEL CELL
Manufacturer
Model
Voltage
Amperage
Power Sonic
PS-1270
12 VDC
7.0 amp/hr
LITHIUM BATTERY
Manufacturer
Model
Voltage
Amperage
Saft
LS 14500
3.6 VDC
2.1 amp/hr
Electrical Specifications
Page AA-2
Rev. 1/01
Appendix B - Servicing and Maintenance
!
WARNING! Disconnecting the power transformer from the AC mains removes
power from the panel to which it is connected, but all other panels (9000 or Remote
I/O) REMAIN POWERED.
!
AVERTISSEMENT! Déconnecter, de l’alimentation principale, le transformateur
d’alimentation d’un panneau ne supprime que l’alimentation de celui-ci; les autres
panneaux (9000 ou Remote I/O) RESTENT SOUS TENSION.
Battery Maintenance and Replacement
Two types of batteries are used in Series 9000 hardware. Both the 9000 and remote I/O panels
are installed with a 12 VDC gel cell battery (Item Code F60-12V/BAT7). The 9000 panel
contains an additional back-up battery – a small lithium battery (F60-3.6V/BAT).
GEL CELL
This 12 VDC rechargeable battery is used to operate the panel for up to fourteen hours in the
absence of AC power. It is located in the tray inside the cabinet door. The battery should be
checked every year for the proper load. This battery should be replaced within 3 to 5 years of
installation. See page AA-2 for its electrical specifications.
To Check the Battery
Remove battery voltage from the circuit board by unplugging J1 (P1 on remote I/O panel).
Remove battery voltage from the circuit board by unplugging J18 (P1 on remote I/O panel).
Measure the battery voltage by placing a voltmeter (supplied by user) at the battery terminals. A
good battery will read at least 12 volts. The battery should be replaced if the voltage is less than
12 volts.
To Replace the Battery
Unplug J1 (P1 on remote I/O panel) from the circuit board, then remove the battery from the
battery compartment on the door.
Unplug J18 (P1 on remote I/O panel) from the circuit board, then remove the battery from the
battery compartment on the door.
Remove the push-on connectors from the battery and plug them onto the new battery. Be sure
the tab with the black wire is plugged onto the black battery terminal and the red wire onto the
red terminal. Place the new battery in the battery compartment, and plug the battery connector
back into the appropriate socket on the circuit board.
!
Note: A new battery will take 2-8 hours to fully charge.
Servicing and Maintenance
Page AB-1
Rev. 1/01
LITHIUM BATTERY
This battery (3.6 VDC) is NOT rechargeable and is used to maintain the contents of the database
memory in the event of a power failure. It is located on the 9000 panel circuit board to the left of
the relays and switch SW4. This battery should be checked every year for the proper load and be
replaced within 3 to 5 years of installation. See page AA-2 for its electrical specifications.
To Check Battery
Battery voltage must be removed from the circuit board by removing the battery and measuring
its voltage using a voltmeter (supplied by user). A good battery will read at least 3.60 volts and
should be replaced if less.
To Replace Battery
Remove the battery from its holder on the circuit board and replace with a similar battery. Be
sure the tip of the battery (positive terminal) faces the heat sink.
!
IMPORTANT! Be careful to replace with the same type battery (lithium, 3.6 V). It
is NOT the same as an AA-type battery, whose voltage is only 1.5 V.
WARNING! Lithium Battery Replacement and Disposal Warning
DANGER!
!
Danger of explosion if battery is incorrectly replaced. Replace only with the same
or equivalent type recommended by the manufacturer. Dispose of used batteries
according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
AVERTISSEMENT pour la pile au lithium
DANGER!
!
La pile risque d’exploser si elle n’est pas correctement mise en place. Elle ne doit
être remplacée que par une autre pile identique ou équivalente à celle recommandée
par le constructeur. Suivre les instructions du constructeur pour le traitement des
piles usagées.
Servicing and Maintenance
Page AB-2
Rev. 1/01
Fuse Maintenance and Replacement
!
WARNING! Before replacing either fuse on the circuit board, the power
connectors must first be unplugged. The board will then be safe to handle. After the
fuse is changed, be sure to place both connectors back to their original positions.
!
AVERTISSEMENT! Avant de remplacer un fusible quelconque du panneau,
les fiches d’alimentation doivent être débranchées. Le panneau sera ainsi hors de
danger. Une fois le fusible changé, veiller à reconnecter correctement les fiches.
FUSE TYPES
Each panel is equipped with two 3-amp replaceable fuses labeled FU1 and FU2 – one for the AC
input and the other for the 12VDC gel cell input. They are located near the AC power entry
connector on each circuit board (TB 11 on the 9000 panel and TB6 on the remote I/O panel).
They are located near the AC power entry connector on each circuit board (T1-T2 on the 9000
panel and TB6 on the remote I/O panel).
Please refer to Appendix A for information on all fuses.
To Check a Fuse
A fuse needs replacement if the fuse is discolored or you can see a break in the fuse coil.
To Replace a Fuse
Remove both the AC and DC power connectors (TB 11 and J1 on the 9000 panel; TB6 and P1
on the remote I/O panel) from the circuit board.
Remove both the AC and DC power connectors (T1-T2 and J18 on the 9000 panel; TB6 and P1
on the remote I/O panel) from the circuit board.
Pull the blown fuse from its holder and replace. Plug in both power connectors.
Servicing and Maintenance
Page AB-3
Rev. 1/01
Appendix C — Drawings and Specifications for NonETL-Certified Hardware
9000 Panel Overall Diagram
AC-2
9000 Panel Power Supply Detail
AC-3
9000 Panel Input Point Detail
AC-4
9000 Panel Relay Detail
AC-5
9000 Panel Card Reader Detail
AC-6
9000 Panel RS-485 Communications Detail
AC-7
Communications Without a Multiport Board
AC-8
Communications Using a Multiport Board (DigiBoard)
AC-9
Remote I/O Panel Overall Diagram
AC-10
Remote I/O Input Point Detail
AC-11
9000 Panel and Remote I/O Specifications
AC-12
Drawings and Specifications for Non-ETL-Certified Hardware
Page AC-1
Rev. 1/01
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE SERIES 9000 PANEL AND ITS AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT!!
9000 Panel Overall Diagram
Drawings and Specifications for Non-ETL-Certified Hardware
Page AC-2
Rev. 1/01
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE SERIES 9000 PANEL AND ITS AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT!!
9000 Panel Power Supply Detail
Drawings and Specifications for Non-ETL-Certified Hardware
Page AC-3
Rev. 1/01
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE SERIES 9000 PANEL AND ITS AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT!!
9000 Panel Input Point Detail
Drawings and Specifications for Non-ETL-Certified Hardware
Page AC-4
Rev. 1/01
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE SERIES 9000 PANEL AND ITS AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT!!
9000 Panel Relay Detail
Drawings and Specifications for Non-ETL-Certified Hardware
Page AC-5
Rev. 1/01
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE SERIES 9000 PANEL AND ITS AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT!!
9000 Panel Card Reader Detail
Drawings and Specifications for Non-ETL-Certified Hardware
Page AC-6
Rev. 1/01
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE SERIES 9000 PANEL AND ITS AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT!!
9000 Panel RS-485 Communications Detail
Drawings and Specifications for Non-ETL-Certified Hardware
Page AC-7
Rev. 1/01
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE SERIES 9000 PANEL AND ITS AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT!!
Communications Without a Multiport Board
Drawings and Specifications for Non-ETL-Certified Hardware
Page AC-8
Rev. 1/01
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE SERIES 9000 PANEL AND ITS AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT!!
Communications Using a Multiport Board (DigiBoard®)
Drawings and Specifications for Non-ETL-Certified Hardware
Page AC-9
Rev. 1/01
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE SERIES 9000 PANEL AND ITS AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT!!
Remote I/O Panel Overall Diagram
Drawings and Specifications for Non-ETL-Certified Hardware
Page AC-10
Rev. 1/01
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE SERIES 9000 PANEL AND ITS AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT!!
Remote I/O Input Point Detail
Drawings and Specifications for Non-ETL-Certified Hardware
Page AC-11
Rev. 1/01
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE SERIES 9000 PANEL AND ITS AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT!!
9000 Panel and Remote I/O Specifications
PHYSICAL DIMENSIONS OF SERIES 9000
 HARDWARE
Component
9000 panel in enclosure
Remote I/O panel in enclosure
Flush-mount reader & faceplate
Flush-mount back box
Surface-mount reader & housing
Keypad (surface mount)
Card reader/keypad combo
Barcode reader
Wiegand (swipe reader)
Proximity readers
Width
Depth
Height
Weight
16
lb
14.5 in
4.25 in
20.5 in
10
lb
14.75 in
4.25 in
11.0 in
8
oz
1.75 in
1.38 in
5.5
in
6
oz
1.375 in
2.0
in
3.75 in
3.5
lb
7.0
in
3.63 in
3.75 in
1
lb
2.75 in
2.5
in
5.25 in
3.75 lb
7.0
in
3.63 in
3.75 in
1
lb
6.0
in
1.75 in
2.0
in
1
lb
5.3
in
1.7
in
2.3
in
See manufacturer’s manual for specifications.
ELECTRICAL REQUIREMENTS
Communications converter
Input voltage:
120 VAC
Series 9000 panel
Input voltage:
Power:
12 VAC
20 VA
Remote I/O panel
Input voltage:
Power:
12 VAC
20 VA
ENVIRONMENTAL SPECIFICATIONS (FOR ABOVE EQUIPMENT WITH EXCEPTION OF CARD
READERS)
•
•
•
Temperature
Humidity
Altitude range
42°F to 100°F, operating
20% to 80% noncondensing, operating and storing
-1000 ft to 8000 ft operating, up to 25,000 ft storing
Drawings and Specifications for Non-ETL-Certified Hardware
Page AC-12
Rev. 1/01
Appendix D — IDenticard® Modem Programmer
Instructions
About These Instructions
These instructions describe how to use the IDenticard Modem Programmer to program a
modem for use in an IDenticard access control system. These instructions were written
for the installation technician. All material in these instructions was written with the
assumption that the technician has a working knowledge of Microsoft® Windows® (95,
98, NT, 2000) and TCP/IP.
What Does This Program Do and Why Use It?
Any new version of Series 9000 firmware, version 3.40 or later, requires that the panel
side modem be programmed. The IDenticard Modem Programmer will have no effect on
communications with firmware versions prior to 3.40. (The firmware version installed on
your panel appears on the label of the chip in socket U2.) IDenticard Modem
Programmer software eliminates the need to enter archaic command syntax in order to
program the modem. It also makes using HyperTerminal or installing other third party
software on your system unnecessary.
Prerequisites
Before you can use this software, you need to have:
• the modem attached to the modem (RS-232) cable;
• the modem cable attached to the serial port on the computer;
• this software installed on the computer; and,
• if you have a U.S. Robotics modem, the DIP switches set according to the setup
option in the software as described below.
How Do I Use This Software?
Any new version of Series 9000 firmware, version 3.40 or later, utilizes different
initialization strings to use the modem than did previous versions. Before putting a
modem into service on the panel side, you now must program it. This software package
will allow you to easily program both the panel-side and computer-side modems. Be
certain to verify the DIP switch settings on the U.S. Robotic modems when called for in
the instructions.
PROGRAMMING INSTRUCTIONS
1. Install the IDenticard Modem Programmer on your computer system. This
program can be obtained from the IDenticard FTP site, the IDentiPASS CD or the
Partner Support Materials CD.
2. Connect each modem to its own modem (RS-232) cable.
3. Connect each modem to its own power supply cable.
4. Plug one modem’s power supply into the power outlet.
IDenticard® Modem Programmer Instructions
Page AD-1
Rev. 1/01
5. Turn the modem’s power on.
6. Open the IDenticard Modem Programmer software. The main screen appears as
shown in the illustration above.
7. Determine which modem you will set up to be connected on the computer side
and which will be connected on the panel side. Label them.
8. Connect the cable of the modem you wish to program first to the serial port on
your PC.
Programming Hayes-Compatible Modems
1. Click the “Hayes Compatible” radio button in either the Computer Side or Panel
Side box depending on which you are programming first.
2. Choose the appropriate communications port from the COM port drop-down box.
3. Click the “Program Modem” button in the appropriate box, and the Program
Modem? dialog box appears.
4. Click “OK” to initialize and program the modem. Follow the progress in the
Status box. If you receive an error message from the program, please refer to the
troubleshooting section on page AD-4, before contacting IDenticard Systems
Technical Support.
5. The Success! dialog box will appear with the message, “Your Modem has been
Programmed Successfully!” Click “OK.”
6. Attach your modem to either the host computer or the Series 9000 panel,
depending on which modem you just programmed.
7. Repeat these steps 1-6 if you need to program a Hayes-compatible modem for the
other side.
8. Exit the IDenticard Modem Programmer software.
Programming U.S. Robotics Modems
1. Click the “U.S. Robotics” radio button in either the Computer Side or Panel Side
box depending on which you are programming first.
2. Choose the appropriate communications port from the COM port drop-down box.
3. Click the “Program Modem” button, and the Program Modem? dialog box
appears.
4. Click “OK,” and the DIP Switch Setup? dialog box appears.
5. If you know your DIP switches are correctly set, click “OK,” follow the progress
in the Status box and skip to step 7. Otherwise, click “Cancel.”
IDenticard® Modem Programmer Instructions
Page AD-2
Rev. 1/01
6. If you click ‘Cancel,” the dialog box shown above appears.
7. Be sure that the “Setup” radio button is selected, and then check that your DIP
switch settings match those shown. If they match, click “OK.”
8. If they do not, set them as shown in the window above, but do NOT click “OK.”
9. Turn the modem off and back on again to reinitialize the modem with the new
settings.
10. After turning the modem on and off, click “OK.” Clicking “OK” will start the
programming of the modem. Follow the progress in the Status box. If you
receive an error message from the program, please refer to the troubleshooting
section on page AD-4, before contacting IDenticard Systems Technical Support.
11. The Success! dialog box will appear with the message, “Your Modem has been
Programmed Successfully!” Click “OK.”
12. The DIP switch reminder dialog box then appears with a message to double-check
the DIP switch settings for either the panel or the computer, depending on which
you just programmed. Click “OK.”
13. The U.S. Robotics DIP Switch Settings dialog box reappears. Verify that the
software has automatically selected the appropriate radio button for the side you
are trying to program. If not, be sure to select the appropriate radio button,
depending on the side you just programmed. Then check that your DIP switch
settings match those shown.
14. If you need to change the DIP switch settings, you MUST turn the modem off and
back on again after changing them.
15. Attach your modem to either the host computer or the Series 9000 panel,
depending on which modem you just programmed.
16. Repeat these steps 1-15 if you need to program a U.S. Robotics modem for the
other side.
17. Exit the IDenticard Modem Programmer software.
You may view the correct U.S. Robotics DIP switch settings at any time within the
software. From the menu on the main screen, choose “File,” “DIP switch settings.”
Select the appropriate radio button, depending on the side you wish to view, and the
correct settings will appear.
IDenticard® Modem Programmer Instructions
Page AD-3
Rev. 1/01
Troubleshooting
When I attempt to program the modem, I get the following error: “You have selected an
Invalid COM port!” What does that mean?
It means that you have selected a communications port that the computer does not
see as a valid COM port.
When I attempt to program the modem, I get the following error: “The modem has not
initialized in the time allowed!” What does that mean?
It means that you have selected a communications port that does not have the
modem connected to it, or the modem is not responding to the program’s
commands.
How do I know if I am working with a Hayes-compatible modem?
If your modem uses a Hayes AT command set, it is a Hayes-compatible modem.
Most modems that are not U.S. Robotic modems are Hayes-compatible.
I have verified that my U.S. Robotics modem is turned on and attached to the correct
communications port; however, I get a timeout error when I try to program it. Why is
that happening?
It may be because you have set the DIP switches to an incorrect configuration.
Please verify that the DIP switches are set in the proper configuration and try the
programming operation again.
When I attempt to program the modem, I get the following error: "The COM port is
already open!" What does that mean?
It may be because another program has the communications port open. Make
sure that your Series 9000 or IDentiPASS panel service is not running. You will
not be able to use the Modem Programmer if they are running.
When I attempt to program the modem, I get the following error: "Error reading the
COM device!" What does that mean?
You may be attempting to program a device other than a modem. Please be sure
that you have the correct COM port selected and try the operation again.
When I attempt to open the online instructions I get the following error: "Path not
found!” What could be the problem?
You may have deleted or not installed the help file. Please reinstall the software
and try again.
There are no lights on the modem when I attempt to program it. What could be the
problem?
You may not have the modem plugged into the power outlet. Check to make sure
you have power and try the operation again.
I need further assistance. Who can I talk to?
Contact IDenticard Systems Technical Support at (800) 220-8096 or
[email protected] or http://www.identicard.com/support.
IDenticard® Modem Programmer Instructions
Page AD-4
Rev. 1/01
Appendix E – IDenticard® NetLink Programmer
About These Instructions
These instructions describe how to install the IDenticard® NetLink Programmer software onto
your computer or workstation and use it to program the IDenticard NetLink Converter. These
instructions were written for the installation technician with a working knowledge of Microsoft®
Windows® operating systems and TCP/IP.
What Does This Program Do and Why Use It?
The NetLink Programmer is an easy-to-use interface that allows you to program an IP address,
subnet mask and gateway address into a NetLink Converter. Using this programmer software,
you do not need to learn or enter command strings.
What Is the NetLink Converter?
The IDenticard Series 9000, IDentiPASS and Centurion access-control systems are
powerful solutions for controlling who may travel throughout your facility, and when and where
they may go. These systems utilize a distributed database design, employing dualmicroprocessor Series 9000 or Centurion control panels to make smart decisions on system
events. Instructions and records between the host computers and panels are communicated via a
hard-wired RS-485 connection. Other options include the capability of operating on an
analog/digital telco, fiber optic or wireless network.
An alternative to directly wiring the computer to the panel is provided by the IDenticard NetLink
Converter, which is designed to enable communication with the panels over an Ethernet data
network. The host computer must be connected to a LAN/WAN. The NetLink Converter is
plugged into a LAN/WAN data jack located in the area where panels are installed.
An RS-485 connection is provided on the NetLink Converter for direct connection to an RS-485
hardwired panel network. Refer to separate instructions shipped with the NetLink Converter to
install and physically connect the converter unit to the network cabling.
IDenticard Systems offers two models of the NetLink Converter, the F55-NETLINK and the
F55-NETLINKSP. Both models are programmed using the NetLink Programmer, version 5.0.0.
See Figure 1 for illustrations of both models. The F55-NETLINK has an RS-232 port beside the
RS-485 port to offer two independent communications channels. The F55-NETLINK SP has
one port that can be programmed as either RS232 or RS485. It does not have separate RS232
and RS485 ports.
IDenticard® NetLink Programmer Page AE-1
Rev. 1/03
Figure 1. This figure illustrates the two NetLink Converter models for comparison: the F55-NETLINK on
the left, and the F55-NETLINKSP on the right. See text for more information.
How Do I Use This Software?
The NetLink Programmer can be downloaded as a zip file from the IDenticard Systems FTP site:
ftp://identicard.com/support_files/idnetlinkprogrammer.zip. If you download the zip file, extract it
to run the installation program. To install the software from the Centurion CD or the IDenticard
Partner Support Materials CD, run the file SETUP.EXE in the NETLINK PROGRAMMER folder on these
CDs. When you open the software, the main screen appears as shown in Figure 2.
In the upper-left corner of this screen in the NetLink Information group, select the model of NetLink
you are using from the NetLink Model Number drop-down box. “NetLink” selects the two-port
model. As a result, both the Channel 1 Options and the Channel 2 Options groups become active.
You can select which channel you want to configure and program. “NetLink SP” selects the singleport model. This selection deactivates and “grays out” the Channel 2 Options group.
Figure 2. This figure shows the NetLink Programmer window. See text for details.
IDenticard® NetLink Programmer Page AE-2
Rev. 1/03
For the “Connection Type” radio boxes near the top center of the screen, you will need to select
either “Serial Port” or “Network” to indicate whether you are programming the NetLink
Converter through a serial port on the computer or over a network. If “Serial Port” is selected,
select the computer COM port to be used from the “Serial Port” drop-down box at the far top
right of he screen. “Network” is the default selection.
You will not necessarily need to work with all the items appearing on this screen to program the
NetLink Converter. When the NetLink model and the type of connection are selected, many
items on the screen are dimmed.
At least four items are not dimmed. These parameters are listed below and illustrated in Figure
3. The first three items must be obtained from the network administrator of the network where
the NetLink Converter will be installed. You should get this information before you start any
programming.
•
•
•
•
The static NetLink IP address to assign to the converter. Each NetLink Converter must
have its own static (not dynamic) IP address.
The NetLink subnet mask
The NetLink gateway address (if a gateway is used on the network).
The NetLink hardware (HEX) address
Figure 3. This figure shows three parameters whose values must be provided by the network administrator
where the NetLink is installed. See text for details.
At a minimum for serial programming, you must enter an address in the NetLink IP Address
field and select a COM port from the Serial Port drop-down box. At a minimum for network
programming, you must enter addresses in the NetLink IP Address field and the NetLink
Hardware (HEX) Address field.
IDenticard® NetLink Programmer Page AE-3
Rev. 1/03
Enter the values you obtain from the network administrator in the fields illustrated in Figure 3. If
a gateway is used, check the “Use Gateway” check box and enter the address.
The NetLink Hardware (HEX) Address field is beside the Connection Type group of radio
buttons near the top center of the screen (see Figure 2). The values to enter into this field are
found on the printed label on the bottom of the NetLink Converter unit you are connecting.
If you are using a serial port to program the NetLink, read the next section, “Programming
through a Serial Port.” If you are programming the unit over a network, skip to the section
“Programming over a Network,” starting on page 5.
PROGRAMMING THROUGH A SERIAL PORT
First, click the “Serial Port” radio button in the Connection Type group. Any items in the
window that are not needed for programming through a serial port will dim and become inactive.
Serial Port (Required)
Select the serial COM port on the computer through which you are programming from the dropdown box. You must select a COM port.
NetLink IP Address (Required)
You must enter all four octets of the NetLink’s IP address into these boxes. You must get this
static address from your Network Administrator.
!
IMPORTANT! IDenticard software does not support dynamic IP addresses. You
must obtain a static IP address.
Subnet Mask
After entering the IP Address, you may select a subnet mask. It is not always necessary to
change the subnet mask from the default. Change this option only if the Network Administrator
instructs you to do so.
Gateway Address
If the NetLink unit has to operate through a gateway, then that gateway address must be
programmed into the unit. Check the Use Gateway check box if you are using a gateway, and
then fill in the IP address of the gateway device. See Figure 12 on page 16 for help in
determining which gateway address is needed if there is more than one gateway on the network
you are using to program the NetLink.
IDenticard® NetLink Programmer Page AE-4
Rev. 1/03
Figure 4. This detail illustration shows the Connection Type group and the NetLink Hardware (HEX)
Address field. See text for instructions.
PROGRAMMING OVER A NETWORK
First click the “Network” radio button, as shown in Figure 4. Any items on the screen that are
not needed for programming over a network will dim.
IP Address (Required)
You must enter all four octets of the NetLink’s IP address into these boxes. You must get this
static address from your Network Administrator.
!
IMPORTANT! IDenticard software does not support dynamic IP addresses. You
must obtain a static IP address.
Hardware Address (Required)
This is the HEX address printed on the label on the bottom of the NetLink Converter itself. It is
broken up into six pairs of hexadecimal numbers. Enter the last three pairs of numbers in the
boxes in this field.
Subnet Mask
After entering the IP Address, you may select a subnet mask. It is not always necessary to
change the subnet mask from the default. Change this option only if the Network Administrator
instructs you to do so.
Gateway Address
If the NetLink unit has to operate through a gateway, then that gateway address must be
programmed into the unit. Check the Use Gateway check box if you are using a gateway, and
then fill in the IP address of the gateway device. See Figure 12 on page 16 for help in
determining which gateway address is needed if there is more than one gateway on the network
you are using to program the NetLink.
SETTING CHANNEL OPTIONS
The Channel 1 and Channel 2 Options groups are active or dimmed depending on the selection in
the NetLink Model number drop-down box. Selecting “NetLink” enables both these groups.
Enter values in the Channel 1 Options group if you are connecting to the 25-pin port labeled
“CH1”on the NetLink. Enter values in the Channel 2 Options group if you are connecting to the
nine-pin port labeled “CH2”on the NetLink. Selecting “NetLink SP” deactivates the Channel 2
Options group, since the NetLink SP has only one port.
IDenticard® NetLink Programmer Page AE-5
Rev. 1/03
If you are connecting Series 9000 Panels to the NetLink Converter, check the “Series 9000
Panel” check box at the bottom of the Channel Options group you need to use. The fields in this
group display the defaults for the Series 9000 Panel and cannot be edited.
If you are connecting a Centurion Panel to the NetLink Converter, deselect the “Series 9000
Panel” check box for the group you are using. The Channel Options fields become editable.
For a Centurion Panel, the Baud Rate should be set to “9600,” “19200” or “38400.” If you later
find communication problems, reselect a lower baud rate in this drop-down box. Set the
Interface Mode for a Centurion Panel to “RS-232C” or “RS-485 2-Wire,” depending on whether
you are connecting the NetLink Converter to the nine-pin port P1 on the Centurion Panel
(“RS-232C”) or to the two-pin terminal block TB3 (“RS-485 2-Wire”).
The NetLink Converter (F55-NETLINK) has two channels available. The NetLink Converter SP
(F55-NETLINKSP) has one. The table below summarizes the default or recommended
communications and port settings for the two converter models. Note that the settings used for
Series 9000 Panels differ from those used for Centurion Panels.
NetLink
Series 9000 Panel
NETLINK
NETLINK SP
Centurion Panel
NETLINK
NETLINK SP
Channel
Communications
Socket field
1
2
1
RS-485
RS-232C
RS-232C or RS-485
6005
6006
6005 or 6006
1
2
1
RS-485 2-Wire
RS-232C
RS-232C or RS-485 2-Wire
6005
6006
6005 or 6006
Figure 5. This detail illustration shows the settings of the Channel 1 and 2 Options groups when connecting
the NetLink to Series 9000 Panels. All settings shown are defaults and cannot be changed.
IDenticard® NetLink Programmer Page AE-6
Rev. 1/03
Figure 6. This detail illustration shows possible settings of the Channel 1 and 2 Options groups when
connecting the NetLink to Centurion Panels. Both connection options, RS-232 (Channel 2) and RS-485
(Channel 1), are shown.
Program NetLink
Once you have selected the connection type (serial or network) and filled in the required fields,
you are ready to program the NetLink unit. Click on the “Program NetLink” button. A dialog
box appears (see Figure 7), asking you to confirm that the IP Address shown is the one you want
to program into the NetLink.
Figure 7. This figure shows the dialog box that appears immediately after the “Program NetLink” button is
clicked. See text for details.
Click “OK” to start programming the NetLink unit. Clicking “Cancel” causes the main screen to
reappear, where you may correct your values or exit the software.
If you selected “Serial Port” under Connection Type as described in the section “Programming
through a Serial Port” and clicked “OK” in the dialog box shown in Figure 7, read the next
section “Serial Programming.” If you selected the “Network” radio button in the Connections
Type group, skip to the section “Network Programming,” which begins on page 8.
IDenticard® NetLink Programmer Page AE-7
Rev. 1/03
Figure 8. The dialog box illustrated here appears as part of serial programming of the NetLink. See text for
details.
Serial Programming
If you are using the serial port to program the NetLink unit, please be sure to read the on-screen
instructions provided in the dialog box illustrated in Figure 8. When you see this box, you must
cycle power on the NetLink unit by unplugging it and plugging it back in. This has the effect of
putting the NetLink in the initial power-up configuration mode.
!
IMPORTANT! If you do not cycle power on the NetLink unit at this point, it will
not initialize.
Your NetLink unit has now been programmed and is ready to be placed into service after the
NetLink Connection Tester program has been run (see the section “NetLink Connection Tester
Program” on page 9).
Network Programming
If you are using the network to program the NetLink unit, be sure that you are connecting the
NetLink to a hub that the computer is plugged into. This will ensure that you have a physical
connection with the NetLink unit. Read and follow the instructions provided in the dialog box
above. Now your NetLink unit has been programmed, and it is ready to be placed into service
after the NetLink connection tester program has been run.
Figure 9. The dialog box illustrated here appears as part of programming the NetLink over a network. See
text for details.
IDenticard® NetLink Programmer Page AE-8
Rev. 1/03
NETLINK CONNECTION TESTER PROGRAM
IMPORTANT! You cannot use the NetLink Connection Tester program on a
Centurion Panel. The program works only with Series 9000 Panels.
!
After programming the NetLink Converter, you must test communications to the panel. The
NetLink Connection Tester program allows you to test communications to one panel at a time
over any NetLink on your system. The communications are tested in one of two ways:
•
•
If your panel does not contain any transactions, the software sends a fixed date and
time of 01/05/99 11:22:33 to the panel. It next sends a request to exit (RTE) to the panel.
After the RTE request, it requests a transaction from the panel.
If your panel contains transactions, the software requests a transaction from the panel.
When the transaction packet returns from the panel, the software performs a redundancy check
and verifies that it received the entire packet. If it did, it sends an acknowledgment to the panel
and displays a success message on the screen. If an error occurred, that error is displayed.
When running a “Poll Panel Continuously” test (see instruction steps at the top of page 10), the
program continues to poll the panel for a transaction.
Using the NetLink Connection Tester
The NetLink Connection Tester installs when the NetLink Programmer software is installed. To
open the NetLink Connection Tester, click “File” on the NetLink Programmer menu and select
“NetLink Tester.” The NetLink Tester window opens, as shown in Figure 10.
To test the communications to a panel:
1. Enter the IP Address you assigned to the NetLink box you are testing in the IP Address
Of The NetLink Box field.
2. Select the port number from the Port Number drop-down box (see the section “Port
Numbers ” on page 10).
3. Select the panel number from the Panel Number drop-down box.
4. Click the “Run Net Test” button.
Figure 10. This figure shows the NetLink Connection Tester window. See text for details.
IDenticard® NetLink Programmer Page AE-9
Rev. 1/03
To do a continuous test of the panel’s communications:
1. Enter the IP Address you assigned to the NetLink box you are testing in the IP Address
Of The NetLink Box field.
2. Select the port number from the Port Number drop-down box (see the section “Port
Numbers ” below).
3. Select the panel number from the Panel Number drop-down box.
4. Check the “Poll Panel Continuously” check box.
5. Click the “Run Net Test” button.
To end the test, simply uncheck the “Poll Panel Continuously” check box.
Port Numbers
The port number selected in the Port Number drop-down box should be the same as that selected
in the TCP Port drop-down box in whichever Channel 1 and 2 Options group was set up to
program the NetLink Converter.
Error Messages
The most common error messages that arise when testing communications are the following:
NetLink Failure
This error tells you that you were unable to contact the NetLink Converter. Check to make sure
that there are no routers, bridges, brouters, switches, firewalls or gateways between the host
computer and the NetLink box that are blocking ports 6005 or 6006. If there are, you need to ask
the Network Administrator at the installation site for assistance.
IDenticard® NetLink Programmer Page AE-10
Rev. 1/03
Panel Failure
This error informs you that the communications to the NetLink Converter are good. However,
you were not able to connect to the panel. Check the wiring to the panel. Possible problems are:
•
•
•
Panel not wired correctly
Incorrect panel selected for testing
Incorrect port selected for testing
Resolve these issues to get a successful test from the panel.
Transaction Failure
This error simply means that the transaction or panel command could not be sent to the panel. It
is normal for this error message to display when you stop a “Poll Panel Continuously” test. In
such a case, this error is of no concern. If, however, this error message appears at any other time,
there may be a more serious problem. Check the network and panel wiring and try the
connection test again.
TCP/IP Failure
This error message indicates that, while the communication with the panel was successful, the
software was unable to close the socket on the local machine. Resolving this issue may require
that you modify or reinstall the TCP/IP on the local machine. Please see the IT administrator at
the installation site for assistance.
IDenticard® NetLink Programmer Page AE-11
Rev. 1/03
General Failure
Although somewhat uncommon, the program can suffer a general NetLink connection test
failure. This error indicates a general error stopped the program. If you get this error, try the
software on another machine or contact the IT administrator at the installation site for assistance.
Other errors may display on the screen during operation of this program. They are usually
related to one of the major errors described above. If you have a question about any of the errors
generated by the program, please contact IDenticard Technical Support at 800-220-8096,
[email protected] or http://www.identicard.com/support.
IDenticard® NetLink Programmer Page AE-12
Rev. 1/03
TB9 on 9000 Panel
25-Pin Male
Connector
7
14
15
21
22
Wire Color
Bare
Green
White
Red
Black
TB-9 Pins on
Series 9000
Panel
5
3
4
1
2
1 2 3 4 5
Pins:
Red
21
22
Black
Green
14
White
15
Bare
7
TB3 on
Centurion
Panel
1 2
25-Pin Male
Connector
14
15
21
22
Wire Color
Green
White
Red
Black
TB-3 Pins on
Centurion
Panel
1
2
*
**
Pins:
21
22
14
15
Red
Black
Green
White
*Wire a jumper between pins 14 and 21 on the 25-pin
connector.
**Wire a jumper between pins 15 and 22 on the 25-pin
connector.
Figure 11. This figure shows the cabling scheme for RS-485 communications to a Series 9000 Panel (top
chart and diagram) and a Centurion Panel (bottom chart and diagram).
IDenticard® NetLink Programmer Page AE-13
Rev. 1/03
Troubleshooting
I cannot communicate with the NetLink unit when I have it connected to my computer’s serial
port. What’s wrong?
Try the Loop Back Tester on the computer’s serial port to make sure it is communicating.
I cannot communicate with the NetLink unit when I have it connected to the network. What’s
wrong?
Ensure that the network port that you are plugging into works correctly. You can do this
by plugging another network device into it and verifying its use.
I get “Error Adding the ARP Entry.” What does that mean?
Try programming the unit again. This error indicates that the static IP address could not
be added to the ARP table. If another try does not work, try using another computer to
program the NetLink. If programming still fails after repeated attempts, please contact
IDenticard Technical Support.
I get “ARP Entry List File Could Not Be found!” What does that mean?
Try programming the unit again. This error indicates that the program could not locate
the Entry List file in your computer’s temporary directory. If the program still fails after
repeated attempts, please contact IDenticard Technical Support.
I get “Winsock Error. The socket was forcibly disconnected.” What does that mean?
Try programming the unit again. This error indicates that the NetLink Converter has
disconnected from your machine. This could be due to a network error, or the NetLink
unit may need repair. If the program still fails after repeated attempts, please contact
IDenticard Technical Support.
Every time I attempt to program the NetLink unit, it gives me a failure. What could be the
cause?
You may not have a physical connection with the NetLink unit. Verify that the cables are
connected properly and attempt the operation again. If the program still fails after
repeated attempts, please contact IDenticard Technical Support.
When I run the Net Test Program, the first box is checked, but nothing else happens, and I get an
error.
You may experience that error if the program can create the socket on your machine but
cannot communicate with the NetLink unit.
When I run the Net Test Program, the first two boxes are checked, but nothing else happens, and
I get an error.
You may experience that error if you have connected to the NetLink unit, but not to the
panel. Verify that your cable and its connection to the panel are good.
IDenticard® NetLink Programmer Page AE-14
Rev. 1/03
When I run the Net Test Program, the first three boxes are checked, but nothing else happens,
and I get an error.
You may experience that error if the program was able to connect to the panel but was
unable to close the socket properly on your machine. You may want to check your
TCP/IP settings.
I get a socket error when I run the Net Test Program. What does this socket error mean?
Please visit http://www.sockets.com/err_lst1.htm#ErrorsInNumericOrder for more
information on what your particular socket error means. The error number you get
identifies the specific error that is occurring.
The IP address of my panel computer is 192.168.10.10, and I’ve programmed the NetLink for
17.254.3.131, the IP address I was directed by the network administrator to use. I cannot
communicate with my NetLink unit. What is wrong?
Verify that the appropriate gateway is programmed in. Refer to the gateway diagram on
the next page and consult with the network administrator.
I set up my NetLink to be programmed through the serial port. I clicked “Program NetLink,” but
the unit doesn’t work.
Be sure to cycle power on the NetLink unit after programming through the serial port.
Simply unplug the unit and plug it back in. This reinitializes the NetLink unit.
I want to program my NetLink through my serial port, but the unit will not program. What is
wrong?
Be sure to connect the serial cable to the "Channel 1" connector on the NetLink unit. If
you do not then you may not be able to correctly program the NetLink Converter.
I need further assistance. Who can I talk to?
Contact IDenticard Systems Technical Support at (800) 220-8096 or
[email protected] or http://www.identicard.com/support.
IDenticard® NetLink Programmer Page AE-15
Rev. 1/03
WITH ONE GATEWAY
Hub
GATEWAY 1
Panel Service
(IDentiPASS software)
or
Series 9000 Server
(Series 9000 software)
NETWORK
CLOUD
Program the NetLink with the
TCP/IP address of the gateway.
IDenticard Systems, Inc.
IDenticard Systems Inc.
9000 Panel
NETLINK CONVERTER
WITH TWO OR MORE
GATEWAYS
Hub
GATEWAY 1
Panel Service
(IDentiPASS software)
or
Series 9000 Server
(Series 9000 software)
9000 Panel
Program the NetLink with the
TCP/IP address of the last
gateway before the panel, in this
example, Gateway 2.
NETWORK
CLOUD
IDenticard Systems, Inc.
IDenticard
Systems Inc.
NETLINK CONVERTER
GATEWAY 2
Figure 12. This figure illustrates NetLink setup with gateways.
IDenticard® NetLink Programmer Page AE-16
Rev. 1/03
Appendix F - Sample Door Wiring Configuration
The diagram on the next page shows a sample layout for wiring a door in a typical application.
Shown schematically on this diagram in addition to the door and its lock are a door-ajar sensor, a
card-swipe reader, a Series 9000 panel, a fire-alarm controller panel, a motion detector, a
monitoring camera, an alarm, and an uninterruptable power supply.
!
IMPORTANT! This diagram is given by way of example ONLY. It is absolutely
necessary to be thoroughly familiar with all safety and building codes for the area in
which any installation is done to be certain that access and egress are possible as
dictated by code in emergencies and when the Series 9000 system might be disabled
in any way.
To make the door secure, include the following:
1. Series 9000 Panel
2. Reader
3. Lock (relay pulse time 0-255 sec)
4. Door Input Point (shunt time 0-255 sec)
5. Request To Exit (RTE)
To make the door safe, include the following:
1. Normally open RTE to shunt the input point
2. RTE to mechanically break power to the lock
3. Uninterruptable Power Supply (UPS) on lock power supply (depending on code)
4. Connection to fire alarm panel to break power to the lock
5. Isolation relay for AC lock
Other possible enhancements:
1. Bell to alert for door ajar or door forced conditions
2. Camera using relay or device drivers
Sample Door Wiring Configuration Page AF-1
Rev. 1/01
Fire Alarm Panel
F
I
C
Series 9000 Panel
Lock
-
+
RTE
UPS
Sample Door Wiring Configuration Page AF-2
Rev. 1/01
Appendix G — Installing Increased Cardholder
Capacity on the ETL-Listed Series 9000 Panel
IDenticard Item Codes: F59-6/12DB (6,000 to 12,000 cardholders)
F59-12/22DB (12,000 to 22,000 cardholders)
F59-22/64DB (22,000 to 64,000 cardholders)
General Information
The Series 9000 panel shipped from IDenticard Systems, Inc. has a standard 6,000-cardholder
capacity, but this capacity can be increased to 12,000, 22,000 or 64,000 cardholders. In the new
ETL-listed version of our Series 9000 board, we have replaced the process of changing chip
configurations and jumpers with a simplified procedure that involves substituting a firmware
chip and installing an additional RAM chip on the panel board.
The firmware chip shipped standard with the new board is in socket U2 and is labeled “6K V
3.XX.” It is the “EPROM-1” chip shown in the diagram at the end of these instructions.
Immediately below socket U2 is a RAM chip (“RAM-1”) in socket U3. Immediately below
socket U3 is socket U4, which is empty in the standard version of the board. To upgrade
cardholder capacity, the 6K EPROM chip is replaced with a chip labeled either “12K V 3.XX,”
“22K V 3.XX” or “64K V 3.XX,” depending on whether you are upgrading to 12,000, 22,000 or
64,000 cardholders, respectively. You then install the additional RAM chip in socket U4 to
complete the hardware upgrade.
Installation Instructions
!
DANGER! Disconnect all power from the panel before performing this upgrade.
Be certain to remove the lithium battery from the panel. Unplug the back-up
battery.
!
WARNING! This field procedure must be done by a qualified technician familiar
with IC replacement techniques. CMOS RAM chips are sensitive to static
electricity. Make sure you are in a static-free area before removing and replacing
chips.
!
IMPORTANT! Installing any cardholder upgrade will erase all memory in the
panel. See under the Software section below for details.
HARDWARE (SEE “DIAGRAM” ON PAGE AG-2)
1. Using a grounded chip puller, carefully remove the EPROM chip from socket U2. If you
have only a screwdriver or similar tool available, be certain the screwdriver blade is inserted
between and chip and socket. If it is inserted between the socket and the board, you will pull
the socket from the board, causing extensive damage.
Installing Increased Cardholder Capacity
Page AG-1
Rev. 5/03
2. Your EPROM upgrade — labeled as 12K, 22K or 64K — is a 28-pin chip with a small notch
on one end. Socket U2 is a 32-pin socket with a similar notch on its left end. Hold the chip
with its notch on the left and make sure the rightmost pair of pins on the chip is carefully
aligned with the rightmost pair of socket holes. Be CERTAIN to install the chip so that the
TWO LEFTMOST pairs of socket holes are OPEN. Insert the chip carefully into the socket
without forcing to be sure that no pin misses a socket hole and bends up under the chip.
3. Carefully insert the 32-pin RAM chip into the 32-pin socket U4, again making sure that the
notch on the end of the RAM chip is on the left.
4. Insert the lithium battery; reconnect the back-up battery and power up the panel.
SOFTWARE (SERIES 9000)
1. When the hardware upgrade is complete, make sure that the panel reports on-line.
2. Since the installation erases the panel memory, you must download from the system PC to
reprogram the panel. Before running the actual download from the Download module, click
on “More” in the Start Download window to open the Selective Download dialog box. Be
sure that “Initialize Panel” is selected along with any other items you wish, or the panel
will not be reprogrammed properly. Click “OK.”
3. Then, in the Start Download dialog box, select the port and panel you have just upgraded,
and click “Download” to reprogram the panel.
SOFTWARE (IDENTIPASS)
1. When the hardware upgrade is complete, make sure that the panel reports on-line.
2. Since the installation erases the panel memory, you must download from the system PC to
reprogram the panel. Click on “Tools” in the menu and then “Download” to open the
Download window. Be sure that “Initialize Panel” is selected along with any other items
you wish, or the panel will not be reprogrammed properly.
3. Select the panel you have just upgraded in the list Panels To Download To: and click “Go” to
reprogram the panel. When “Done” appears below the words “Download Status,” the
download is complete. The box below the Download Status shows the start and stop times of
the download and other information. Click “Close” when the download is complete.
Diagram
Insert the new firmware chip
in this socket.
(Hardware Step 2)
Insert the additional RAM chip
provided in this socket.
(Hardware Step 3)
Installing Increased Cardholder Capacity
Page AG-2
Rev. 5/03
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE SERIES 9000 PANEL AND ITS AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT!!
Installing Increased Cardholder Capacity on the
Prior Version of the Series 9000 Panel
IDenticard Item Codes: F59-DB/1 (6,000 to 12,000 cardholders)
F59-DB/2 (12,000 to 22,000 cardholders)
F59-DB/3 (22,000 to 64,000 cardholders)
General Information
The version of the Series 9000 panel sold by IDenticard Systems before February 2000
(non-ETL-listed panel) has a standard 6,000-cardholder capacity, but this capacity can be
increased to 12,000, 22,000 or 64,000 cardholders. The cardholder capacity depends on the
amount of RAM installed on the panel. There are 3 RAM chips on the panel in sockets U5, U6
and U7. The size of these RAM chips can be 128K or 512K. Jumpers J22, J23 and J24 must be
set according to the size of the RAM in the corresponding socket.
The upgrade to 12,000 cardholders requires the insertion of one 512K chip in socket U7 and two
128K chips in sockets U5 and U6. Whether you are installing the 22,000 or the 64,000
cardholder upgrade, one 512K chip is inserted into each of the sockets U5, U6 and U7. The
programming of these chips determines the cardholder capacity.
Installation Instructions
!
!
!
DANGER! Disconnect all power from the panel before performing this upgrade.
Be certain to remove the lithium battery from the panel. Unplug the back-up
battery.
WARNING! This field procedure must be done by a qualified technician familiar
with IC replacement techniques. CMOS RAM chips are sensitive to static
electricity. Be sure you are in a static-free area before removing and replacing
chips.
IMPORTANT! Installing any cardholder upgrade will erase all memory in the
panel. See under the Software section below for details.
HARDWARE
5. Using a grounded chip puller, carefully remove only the RAM chips you are replacing. If
you have only a screwdriver or similar tool available, be certain the screwdriver blade is
inserted between and chip and socket. If it is inserted between the socket and the board, you
will pull the socket from the board, causing extensive damage.
6. Configure the jumpers as shown on the page 2 for each RAM chip.
7. Install the new chips into the sockets as shown on page 2. Pin 1 is indicated by a small dot
on the bottom left corner of the chip. Install the chip with the dot to the left (jumper side).
Be certain that all pins go easily into the socket. Do not force the chip into place. A
Installing Increased Cardholder Capacity
Page AG-3
Rev. 5/03
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE SERIES 9000 PANEL AND ITS AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT!!
common problem when replacing chips is for a pin to miss a socket hole and bend up under
the chip. Be careful.
8. Replace the EPROM chip — labeled as either 6K, 12K, 22K or 64K, depending on the card
capacity — a 28-pin chip with a small notch on one end. Socket U4 is a 32-pin socket with a
similar notch on its left end. Hold the chip with its notch on the left and make sure the
rightmost pair of pins on the chip is carefully aligned with the rightmost pair of socket holes.
Be CERTAIN to install the chip so that the TWO LEFTMOST pairs of socket holes are
OPEN. Insert the chip carefully into the socket without forcing so that no pin misses a socket
hole and bends up under the chip.
9. Insert the lithium battery; reconnect the back-up battery and power up the panel.
SOFTWARE (SERIES 9000)
4. When the hardware upgrade is complete, make sure that the panel reports on-line.
5. Since the installation erases the panel memory, you must download from the system PC to
reprogram the panel. Before running the actual download from the Download module, click
on “More” in the Start Download window to open the Selective Download dialog box. Be
sure that “Initialize Panel” is selected along with any other items you wish, or the panel will
not be reprogrammed properly. Click “OK.”
6. Then, in the Start Download dialog box, select the port and panel you have just upgraded,
and click “Download” to reprogram the panel.
SOFTWARE (IDENTIPASS)
4. When the hardware upgrade is complete, make sure that the panel reports on-line.
5. Since the installation erases the panel memory, you must download from the system PC to
reprogram the panel. Click on “Tools” in the menu and then “Download” to open the
Download window. Be sure that “Initialize Panel” is selected along with any other items you
wish, or the panel will not be reprogrammed properly.
6. Select the panel you have just upgraded in the list Panels To Download To: and click “Go” to
reprogram the panel. When “Done” appears below the words “Download Status,” the
download is complete. The pane below the Download Status shows the start and stop times
of the download and other information. Click “Close” when the download is complete.
Installing Increased Cardholder Capacity
Page AG-4
Rev. 5/03
ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE REFERS SOLELY TO THE PRIOR VERSION OF
THE SERIES 9000 PANEL AND ITS AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT!!
Diagram
Upgrade to 12,000
Cardholders
Upgrade to 22,000 or
64,000 Cardholders
J22
3
2
1
512K RAM
U7
J22
3
2
1
512K RAM
U7
J23
3
2
1
128K RAM
U5
J23
3
2
1
512K RAM
U5
J24
3
2
1
128K RAM
U6
J24
3
2
1
512K RAM
U6
EPROM
U4
EPROM
U4
Installing Increased Cardholder Capacity
Page AG-5
Rev. 5/03
Contact Information
Partner Number:
Partner Name:
Partner Address
Street
City State Zip
Phone
Fax
Email
Sales Contact
Sales Phone
Sales Email
Technical Contact
Technical Phone
Tech Email
End User Name
End User Address
Street
City State Zip
Phone
Fax
Email
Special Instructions:
System Type
Interface?
Yes
No
Time Zone Worksheet
Zone No.
Name
Start
Time
Partner Number
Partner Name
0
0
Days of Week
Holiday
End Time Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
Link
Partner Number
Relay Setup Worksheet
Partner Name
Port No
Relay
No.
Name
0
0
Panel
Pulse
Time
Time
Zone
First Card
Unlock
Link to Relay
(Port, Panel, Relay)
Action
Relay Group Worksheet
Alarm Group No.
Port
Partner Number:
Partner Name:
0
0
Time Zone
Panel
Port
Panel
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54
37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54
55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72
55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72
Port
Panel
Port
Panel
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54
37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54
55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72
55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72
Port
Panel
Port
Panel
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54
37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54
55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72
55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72
Port
Panel
Port
Panel
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54
37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54
55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72
55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72
Reader setup Worksheet
Partner Number:
0
Partner Name:
Port No.
Reader
Type
Mag Stripe Enc.
ABA/Barcode
Wiegand 26
Wiegand 37
Panel No.
Name
Panel Name
Sitecode 1
ABA Settings
First byte of Card ID
Antipassback
Level:
Hard
In
Soft
Out
Length of Card ID
Default Relay
First byte of sitecode
Length of sitecode
0
2
3
Beeper
On Pass
On Fail
On Both
Elevator
Enable Reader
Enable Keypad
Split Keypad Use
Autolock
Ajar Point
Standard
Enhanced
Reader
Type
Mag Stripe Enc.
ABA/Barcode
Wiegand 26
Wiegand 37
Name
Sitecode 1
ABA Settings
First byte of Card ID
Antipassback
Level:
Hard
In
Soft
Out
Length of Card ID
Default Relay
First byte of sitecode
Length of sitecode
2
3
Beeper
On Pass
On Fail
On Both
Elevator
Enable Reader
Enable Keypad
Split Keypad Use
Autolock
Ajar Point
Standard
Enhanced
Reader
Type
Mag Stripe Enc.
ABA/Barcode
Wiegand 26
Wiegand 37
Name
Sitecode 1
ABA Settings
First byte of Card ID
Antipassback
Level:
Hard
In
Soft
Out
Length of Card ID
Default Relay
First byte of sitecode
Length of sitecode
2
3
Beeper
On Pass
On Fail
On Both
Elevator
Enable Reader
Enable Keypad
Split Keypad Use
Autolock
Ajar Point
Standard
Enhanced
Reader
Type
Mag Stripe Enc.
ABA/Barcode
Wiegand 26
Wiegand 37
Name
Sitecode 1
ABA Settings
First byte of Card ID
Antipassback
Level:
Hard
In
Soft
Out
Length of Card ID
Default Relay
First byte of sitecode
Length of sitecode
Ajar Point
2
3
Beeper
On Pass
On Fail
On Both
Elevator
Enable Reader
Enable Keypad
Split Keypad Use
Autolock
Standard
Enhanced
Reader Group Worksheet
Reader
Group No.
Partner Number:
Partner Name:
Port, Panel and Readers
0
0
Holiday Worksheet
Hol.
No
Name
Partner Number
Partner Name
Date
MM/DD/YY
Hol. No.
0
0
Name
Date MM/DD/YY
Cardholder Worksheet
Partner Number
0
Partner Name
Number
Name
AG1
AG2
AG3
TZ1 RG1 TZ2 RG2 TZ3 RG3
Pin
0
Expir.
mm/dd/yy
AP
Y/N
Add.
Relay
Emer.
Elev
Relay
(A)ctive/
(I)nactive
Alarm Point Setup Worksheet
N=
A=
D=
T=
L=
Alarm
No.
Normal
Alarm
Door Ajar
Trouble
Line Cut
Name
Partner Number
Partner Name
0
0
Port No.
Panel
Shunt Time
Time Zone
Acknowledge
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
Pri
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
Link
(State, Port, Panel, Relay)
Action
Alarm Group Worksheet
Partner Number
Partner Name
Alarm Group No.
Port
Disarm Card
Arm Card
Panel
Port
0
0
Time Zone
Panel
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54
37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54
55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72
55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72
Port
Panel
Port
Panel
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54
37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54
55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72
55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72
Port
Panel
Port
Panel
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54
37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54
55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72
55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72
Port
Panel
Port
Panel
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54
37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54
55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72
55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72
IVIS Plus Information Sheet
0
Partner Number:
Partner Name:
0
System Type:
Card Type & Size:
Tri-Pak
Tri-Pak DC
LaserPak
LaserPak DC
PVC
PVC w/ HE Mag
Paper
IP 1000
Badging
IP 2000
Data Entry
Verification
Printer Type:
Citizen
Ink Jet
DataCard Express
DataCard ICIII
Eltron
Fargo
Other
Table Setup Used:
Blank
ODBC and Network Information
Will System run on Network?
If yes, what network?
What ODBC connection will be used?
What version of driver?
Does customer have driver?
Model #
w/ encoder
w/ encoder
w/ encoder
Partner Number:
Partner Name:
Blank
0
0
Legend: Data Type = T-Text, D-Date, N-Number(Double)
L-Length K-Key DTS-DateTime Stamp MS-Manual Sequence
AS-Auto Sequence DB-Drop Box
Ref Field Name
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
Ref Field Name:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
DT
L
K
DTS MS
AS
DB
Notes
Ref
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Field Name:
Partner Number:
Partner Name:
0
0
CDF File:
Field
Logic:
Bitmap
Logic:
Name
Criteria
=
=
=
Field
Criteria
=
=
=
=
=
Notes:
CDF File:
Field
Logic:
Bitmap
Logic:
Name
Criteria
=
=
=
Field
Criteria
=
=
=
=
=
Notes:
CDF File:
Field
Logic:
Bitmap
Logic:
Notes:
Name
Criteria
=
=
=
Field
Criteria
=
=
=
=
=
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