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IBM Reference Configuration
for VMware on System x with
SmartCloud Entry
Understand components of the IBM
Reference Configuration
Learn about infrastructure and
planning steps
Follow preferred practices to
create the solution
Srihari Angaluri
Joshua Jankowsky
George Rainovic
Marco Rengan
Redpaper
Click here to check for updates
ibm.com/redbooks
International Technical Support Organization
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x
with SmartCloud Entry
July 2012
REDP-4853-00
Note: Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in “Notices” on page v.
First Edition (July 2012)
This edition applies to IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry.
© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2012. All rights reserved.
Note to U.S. Government Users Restricted Rights -- Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule
Contract with IBM Corp.
Contents
Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .v
Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
The team who wrote this paper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
Now you can become a published author, too! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Comments welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Stay connected to IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Chapter 1. Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.1 Target usage and market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.2 Design goals and architecture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3 Major components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3.1 IBM System x3650 M4 and x3550 M3 rack servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3.2 IBM DS3524 Storage System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3.3 Networking element . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3.4 VMware Essentials Plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3.5 IBM SmartCloud Entry v2.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
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Chapter 2. Infrastructure and planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2.1 Rack, power, and cabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.2 Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.2.1 Rack and power distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.2.2 Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.2.3 Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.2.4 Virtualization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Chapter 3. Designing the solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1 Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.1 Ethernet switching. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.2 IP routing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.3 Prioritizing network traffic (class of service) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.4 Managing EX2200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2 Storage area network (iSCSI network) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.1 Jumbo frames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3 Storage system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4 IBM System Storage DS3500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.1 RAID controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.2 Expansion for more storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.3 Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15
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24
Appendix A. Configuration steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring EX2200 switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring DS3524 System Storage network access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring DS3524 System Storage storage subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring server hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing vSphere ESXi hypervisor on server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring networking on vSphere ESXi hypervisor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring storage adapter on vSphere ESXi hypervisor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27
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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2012. All rights reserved.
iii
Configuring IBM DS3524 System Storage host to LUN mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring storage on vSphere ESXi hypervisor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing and configuring vCenter server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating VM template with Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing vSphere Management Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing IBM System Storage Plug-In for VMware vCenter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing IBM SmartCloud Entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing IBM SmartCloud Entry fix pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31
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Appendix B. Sample Juniper Networks EX2200 Ethernet Switch configuration. . . . . 35
Related publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Online resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to get IBM Redbooks publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Help from IBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
iv
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
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Notices
This information was developed for products and services offered in the U.S.A.
IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in other countries. Consult
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IBM Director of Licensing, IBM Corporation, North Castle Drive, Armonk, NY 10504-1785 U.S.A.
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PROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR
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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2012. All rights reserved.
v
Trademarks
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vi
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
Preface
IBM® SmartCloud™ Entry provides a fully integrated software stack for transforming a
virtualized environment to a cloud environment. The intuitive self-service portal allows users
to get up and running quickly. Built-in workload metering and additional tools enable tight
controls and planning.
The IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on IBM System x® with SmartCloud Entry
provides an affordable, easy to deploy, private cloud architecture with configurations based on
leading-edge technology from IBM, VMware, and Juniper Networks. The reference
configuration is for midsized companies that need simpler and affordable IT solutions, without
compromising on functionality. IBM and VMware, world leaders in enterprise-class IT
solutions, are now bringing IT solutions tailored to the midmarket.
This IBM Redpaper™ publication provides setup, configuration, and deployment details for
the reference configuration and is intended for IT professionals who are familiar with software
and hardware setup and configuration.
The team who wrote this paper
This paper was produced by a team of specialists from around the world working at the
International Technical Support Organization, Poughkeepsie Center.
Srihari Angaluri is the Lead Architect at IBM Systems and Technology Group in Research
Triangle Park, NC, US. He develops high-end technology solutions for various industries,
using IBM and third-party products and technologies. He has over 14 years of IT industry
experience. Srihari holds a Master of Science degree in Computer Science and a Master of
Business Administration degree from Duke University.
Joshua Jankowsky is a Storage Product Manager at IBM STG Sales & Marketing in
Raleigh, NC, US, with 14 years of experience with IBM and Lenovo in commercial computing
solutions. His areas of expertise include x86 High Volume Servers and Mid-Range Storage
solutions. He holds several patents and regularly presents to clients on value-added
solutions. He holds a degree in Electrical Engineering from Rochester Institute of Technology
and a Masters of Business Administration from North Carolina State University.
George Rainovic is a Juniper Networks Solutions Staff Engineer. He specializes in designing
technical solutions for data center networking. George has more than 15 years of networking
experience in designing, deploying, and supporting networks for network service providers
and business enterprise clients. He holds a Bachelor degree in Electrical Engineering from
the University of Novi Sad, Serbia.
Marco Rengan is a Senior WW Cloud Marketing Manager for System x. Cloud offerings from
IBM System x are comprehensive and based on leading-edge rack and IBM BladeCenter®
servers combined with industry-leading software from IBM, VMware, and Microsoft. Marco
started his career working on hardware, software, and communications design at Motorola
and IBM. He ran his own technology-based company and is now back at IBM in a familiar role
of launching new technologies. He has an MBA from Duke and Masters and Bachelors
degrees in Engineering and Physics.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2012. All rights reserved.
vii
Thanks to the following people for their contributions to this project:
Zach Purser, Darryl E. Gardner, Baker Hull, Michael F. Zarrillo, Chris Floyd
IBM Raleigh
Linda Robinson
IBM Redbooks® graphics specialist
Irena Slywkanycz
ITSO Poughkeepsie Center
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IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
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Preface
ix
x
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
1
Chapter 1.
Overview
IBM SmartCloud Entry provides a fully integrated software stack for transforming a virtualized
environment to a cloud environment. The IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on
System x with SmartCloud Entry provides an affordable, easy-to-deploy private cloud
architecture. Together, IBM and VMware, world leaders in enterprise-class IT solutions, are
now providing IT solutions tailored to the midmarket.
The reference configuration offers the following highlights:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Comprehensive and robust cloud solutions for small and medium-size businesses
Leading-edge technology from IBM System x, VMware, and Juniper Networks
Latest IBM SmartCloud Entry for System x software
Designed to fit into and scale with IBM System x family of solutions
Leading features and preferred practices drive the technology envelope
Simple, easy to install cloud with potentially dramatic IT benefits
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2012. All rights reserved.
1
1.1 Target usage and market
The reference configuration on System x with IBM SmartCloud Entry combines leading
technologies from VMware and Juniper Networks. It creates an affordable yet expandable
cloud system that is easier to deploy in fast-moving data centers. IBM recently announced
SmartCloud Entry for System x, a software cloud solution that crosses platforms on System x,
BladeCenter, and IBM Power Systems™ servers.
Administering IT, in remote branch offices, retail stores, and at departmental office locations,
can be a challenge due to the complexity of maintaining remote systems using a small
administration staff. In these instances, this solution is ideal because of its capability, resilient
design, and lower price point. All of these features are suited for remote and branch offices,
retail stores, and departmental computing.
System x servers offer a balance of power and affordability and are the starting point in the
design of a virtually ready-to-deploy cloud solution. The system architecture is sized to fit the
needs of small and midmarket businesses. In keeping with these goals, the architecture
supports various workloads:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Collaborative
Email and database
Web infrastructure
Web server
IT infrastructure
File server
Decision support
Figure 1-1 shows how this solution can coexist with any existing infrastructure.
User 1
SmartCloud Entry
Self Service Portal
External Network
User n
Existing Datacenter
SmartCloud Entry on
System x based
Datacenter
Figure 1-1 High-level view of IBM SmartCloud Entry for System x software cloud solution
1.2 Design goals and architecture
You can improve the efficiency and usage of your systems by following the current preferred
practices that focus on virtualization and cloud technologies. The resulting solution can
achieve many related goals, including affordability, a smaller footprint, and lower maintenance
costs. This cloud platform conforms to these goals. It achieves them by following an optimized
architecture and a comprehensive design that includes servers, storage, and networking.
2
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
The complete system has the following components:
򐂰 Compute and management servers
Three IBM System x3650 M3 2U servers
򐂰 Storage:
– One IBM System Storage® DS3524, 1 GbE IP-based Small Computer System
Interface (iSCSI) Storage System with dual controllers
– 24 x 300 GB serial-attached SCSI (SAS) drives in the DS3524
򐂰 Networking:
– Two Juniper EX2200, 1 GbE Ethernet top of rack switches
– Three 1 GbE dual-port onboard network interface cards (NICs) with software iSCSI
– Three add-on Peripheral Component Interconnect Express (PCIe) quad-port NICs with
HW iSCSI offload
You can use this hardware to create a cluster that runs VMware vSphere ESXi for the
production VM environment. Management servers run on virtual machines in the VMware
vSphere cluster. Figure 1-2 displays this configuration.
Reference Configuration
for VMware on System x
with SmartCloud Entry
VMware vSphere 4.1 and 5.0
vSphere Essentials Plus Kit
IBM ESXi Plugin v2.3
• Scalable solution starting
at ~50 VMs
• Redundant, converged
network and storage
• iSCSI SAN implementation
for optimized scalability
• Ideal for mixed workload
computing:
- Departmental
- Retail
- Branch office
Juniper Ethernet Switch
2 x 24 EX2200 1 GbE
1 GbE iSCSI Networking
Broadcom 1 GbE NICs
6 ports/server
IBM System x3650 M3
2 Intel Xeon CPUs
72 GB memory
IBM DS3524 Storage
24 x 300 GB 10 k SAS HDD
7.2 TB of storage capacity
Dual controller - iSCSI
Figure 1-2 Hardware components of management and production clusters
Chapter 1. Overview
3
1.3 Major components
In developing this cloud solution stack, the goals of providing a balance between price and
performance optimized the choices of the server, networking, and storage elements. The
result is an optimized cloud solution with high availability, scalable storage, and performance.
The solution is made up of the following components, which are shown in Figure 1-2 on
page 3:
򐂰 Servers: IBM System x3650 rack servers
򐂰 Software:
– IBM SmartCloud Entry v2.3
– VMware Essentials Plus 5.0:
•
vSphere ESXi 5.0
•
vCenter Server 5.0
򐂰 Storage: IBM System Storage DS3524 (iSCSI-based SAN)
򐂰 Network: Converged networking with these products:
– Juniper EX2200 Top of Rack (ToR) switches
– Broadcom iSCSI NICs
򐂰 Infrastructure: Rack, power, and cabling system
1.3.1 IBM System x3650 M4 and x3550 M3 rack servers
The IBM System x3650 M3 server, which is shown in Figure 1-3, is a highly available,
high-performance platform that is ideal for virtualization and cloud.
Figure 1-3 IBM System x3650 M3 rack server
The 1U x 3550 M3 design provides the same virtualization capabilities as the 2U x3650 M3,
but in a more compact design. If you do not need the additional internal storage or I/O
expansion slots, you can substitute the x3550 M3 into the reference configuration. Both
System x servers offer innovative, energy-smart engineering to help lower operational costs.
Two ways exist to reach the optimized performance that you need for a virtualized
environment whenever speed and high availability are concerns. The first way to achieve
higher performance is to use 18 dual inline memory modules (DIMMs) of registered 1333
MHz DDR3 error correction code (ECC) memory with Chipkill1 protection (optional). The
second way to improve performance is to obtain a memory capacity of up to 288 GB or 48 GB
DDR3 unregistered DIMMs (UDIMMs) through 12 DIMM slots.
4
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
Both the System x3550 M3 and System x3650 M3 support the use of IBM USB Memory Key
for VMware ESXi 5.0 through an internal USB port. This key, installed in a USB socket
contained inside each server, allows the server to run the embedded hypervisor.
1.3.2 IBM DS3524 Storage System
The IBM DS3524 Express Storage™ System, shown in Figure 1-4, represents a carefully
thought-out and well-tailored fit that provides high availability, scalability, and performance.
The DS3524 comes with optional EXP3524 24 x 6.35 cm (2.5 in.) hard disk drive (HDD)) and
EXP2512 12 x 8.89 cm (3.5 in.) HDD expansion trays that take it beyond its base number of
24 HDDs, for a total of 192 drives. This configuration fills up the base unit with 24 2.5-inch 300
GB 10K rpm, hot-swap SAS hard disk drives for a total of 7.2 TB of raw unstructured storage.
Figure 1-4 IBM DS3524 Express Storage System
1.3.3 Networking element
The following devices are networking elements.
Juniper Networks EX2200 ToR switches for IBM System x
The configuration uses two Juniper Networks EX2200 ToR 1 GbE switches, with 24 fixed
ports and four modular ports, each as shown in Figure 1-5.
Figure 1-5 Juniper EX2200 ToR switches for IBM System x
The EX2200 occupies a single rack unit and features complete Layer 2 and basic Layer 3
switching capabilities. It delivers a compact solution where space and power are at a
premium. Each EX2200 switch supports four fixed front panel GbE uplink ports with optional
pluggable optics. The switch allows for high-speed backbone or link aggregation connections
between wiring closets and upstream aggregation switches.
Broadcom NetXtreme II 1000 Express Quad Port Ethernet Adapter
The Broadcom NetXtreme II 1000 Express Quad Port Ethernet Adapter, coupled with the
two-port Broadcom card in the server, provides the six ports for each required server for this
configuration. The quad-port card includes an iSCSI hardware offload engine within the
adapter.
Chapter 1. Overview
5
1.3.4 VMware Essentials Plus
VMware vSphere Essentials includes vCenter Server Essentials and ESXi for three hosts,
vCenter agents, eight-way virtual symmetrical multiprocessor system (vSMP), and the update
manager. vSphere Essentials can be used on up to three hosts and on servers with up to two
processors with 192 GB total vRAM entitlement.
1.3.5 IBM SmartCloud Entry v2.3
IBM Starter Kit for SmartCloud on System x includes IBM SmartCloud Entry, an entry private
cloud offering that is simple to deploy and easy to use. IBM SmartCloud Entry works with an
existing systems infrastructure. IBM SmartCloud Entry allows managers to quickly deploy
self-service provisioning of virtualized workloads with a simple interface. This interface
provides oversight; at the same time, it increases IT efficiency and lowers administration
costs. IBM SmartCloud Entry offers these features:
򐂰 Self-service portal for workload provisioning, that is, create/replicate assets, manage
deployments, and monitor activity
򐂰 Virtualized image management with library for standardized images
򐂰 Administrative controls for secure operation of a persistent cloud
򐂰 Basic metering, or automated collection of resource usage metrics, authentication, and
authorization
Another SmartCloud Entry feature is the simplification of virtualization management. This
feature provides these components:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Deployed virtual machines (VMs)
VMware configuration considerations
IBM System Storage DS® Storage Manager
IBM System Storage DS3500 plug-in for VMware VCenter
Deploying virtual machines
Dramatically reduce time-to-value for new workloads, from months to a few days, by providing
the following benefits:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Deploy application images across compute and storage resources
Improve responsiveness with user self-service
Ensure security through VM isolation, project-level user access controls
Simplify use because there is no need to know all the details of the infrastructure
Protect your investment with full support of existing virtualized environments
Optimize performance on IBM systems with dynamic scaling, expansive capacity, and
continuous operation
For more details, use the link:
http://www.ibm.com/systems/bladecenter/solutions/cloud/starterkit/index.html
Prerequisite software components
IBM SmartCloud Entry has additional software prerequisites that vary depending on the type
of cloud provider you use. IBM SmartCloud Entry depends on IBM Systems Director
VMControl™ or VMware vSphere with vCenter for platform management and virtualization
services. Ensure that you download and apply the latest fix packs for SmartCloud Entry.
6
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
Server and concurrent user maximums
Depending on your cloud manager, IBM SmartCloud Entry supports 30 concurrent users on
the interface or application programming interfaces (APIs), and 450 maximum virtual servers
(for VMware).
Configuration considerations for VMware
Consider these suggestions for VMware configurations:
򐂰 Use system pools for advanced placement: We suggest that you enable IBM SmartCloud
Entry to allow vCenter to place the user workload on the best host machine. Configure by
using a DRS-enabled cluster within vCenter and setting the appliance target to use the
FIXcluster or a resource pool defined in the cluster. This configuration allows vCenter to
manage the available host resources. Otherwise, the appliance target is an individual host
machine or a resource pool on a host machine.
򐂰 To obtain the best performance, we suggest that the vCenter server and the IBM
SmartCloud Entry server reside on the same network.
Self-service portal
The self-service portal, a key capability of SmartCloud Entry, enables you to perform
administrative and user tasks in an intuitive and simple-to-use graphical interface, as shown
in Figure 1-6. Use the appliance option to create templates for images that you want to
deploy.
Welcome to IBM Starter Kit for Cloud
Get started by taking a look below at some of the actions that you can take with your
available appliances and workloads. Once you are ready, click an action to get going.
Browse Deployable Appliances
Work with the available appliances you
can use to create a workload.
Manage Workloads
Work with your workloads grouped as
projects on the cloud.
Duplicate Workload
Copy the configuration of a workload to
create a new one.
Monitor Activity
Get updates about changes to your
workloads, captured appliances, and
other events.
Create Appliance
Create a new appliance from a running
workload.
Resize Workload
Dynamically adjust the CPU and
memory allocations of your running
workload.
Figure 1-6 IBM SmartCloud Entry self-service portal
IBM DS Storage Manager
With IBM DS Storage Manager software, perform administrative tasks such as creating arrays
and logical drives, assigning logical drives to host servers, setting up IBM FlashCopy® and
Volume Copy, capturing logs for troubleshooting, and management tasks.
Chapter 1. Overview
7
The IBM DS Storage Manager offers these features:
򐂰 Intuitive and powerful management:
– Robust functionality with easy-to-understand graphical user interface (GUI) and
wizards
– Unparalleled configuration flexibility that enables superior utilization
– Tunable attributes to meet any server or application need
򐂰 Protected and available data:
– Online configuration, reconfiguration, expansion, and maintenance
– Automated I/O path failover, drive rebuild, and cache destage
– Integrated disk encryption, Redundant Array of Independent Disks 6 (RAID 6), and
proactive drive monitoring
򐂰 Fully integrated advanced functionality (premium features)
Partitioning, FlashCopy, and Volume Copy
IBM DS3500 System Storage Plug-In for VMware vCenter
The System Storage 3500 Plug-In for VMware vCenter provides VMware administrators with
powerful capabilities that are designed to increase their productivity and simplify their jobs.
The plug-in is designed to monitor and manage System Storage DS3500 storage arrays used
in conjunction with VMware virtualization software. The plug-in also allows administrators to
monitor and provision the storage subsystems that they employ. The ultimate goal is to
ensure the performance and availability of the virtual infrastructure that they manage.
The plug-in enables administrators to monitor and manage their storage subsystem from a
single point and to perform a common set of storage provisioning tasks without switching
between multiple user interfaces. The vCenter plug-in helps VMware administrators in many
ways:
򐂰 Quickly provisioning additional storage for virtual machines
򐂰 Enabling an end-to-end view for VMware to storage from a virtual machine, host, storage
subsystem, or volume perspective
򐂰 Describing current conditions in easy-to-understand terms
򐂰 Responding better to service level agreement (SLA) and quality of service (QoS) issues
򐂰 Employing RAID protection
򐂰 Ensuring availability of sufficient disk space
򐂰 Troubleshooting and conducting root cause analysis for virtual machines and their storage
򐂰 Setting up the remote mirror for VMware Site Recovery Manager
򐂰 Taking a FlashCopy of a data store for validation or before changing the environment
8
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
2
Chapter 2.
Infrastructure and planning
This cloud solution is designed as a versatile platform that can fit into several environments,
such as retail, departmental computing, or branch offices. In each scenario, the solution can
coexist with installed equipment or the solution can be part of the data center. Planning well
for the installation can help to ensure early success and create a pathway for future growth
and scaling with this product.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2012. All rights reserved.
9
2.1 Rack, power, and cabling
Optimized infrastructure equipment is critical to drive improved IT efficiency and availability
for data centers of today and tomorrow. The IBM rack and power infrastructure offerings are
custom designed for IBM System x servers. You can realize the following benefits with this
infrastructure:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Improved data center efficiency
Increased power efficiency
Increased space efficiency
Lowered cost through better data center utilization
Improved IT availability
Improved uptime
Action before downtime affects business
Matched utilization, power resources, and capacity planning
In addition, IT availability and efficiency are primary drivers to data center spending:
򐂰 Servers for each rack show a 50% increase since 2000.
򐂰 Energy consumption shows an increase of 20% due to more memory and improved
utilization from virtualization.
򐂰 Power densities are higher at the server and rack levels.
Today, in the online environment, even minutes of downtime can significantly affect the
operations of an organization, client satisfaction, and financial results, making high availability
an essential feature. Data center technology fundamentals require a solid foundation of rack
and power infrastructure that delivers the ability to securely manage and control power
resources, servers, and appliances in the data center and across the network. This solid
foundation is imperative to maintain the highest levels of IT availability and drive operational
efficiencies.
IBM has over 40 new products, refreshing the offerings across the entire rack and power
options portfolio. Figure 2-1 on page 11 shows several of the new products:
򐂰 Three new racks that are 1,200 mm (47.24 in.) deep. This new lineup includes a new 47U
tall rack and new 42U versions that include a dynamic rack that is ship loadable.
򐂰 A lineup of optional uninterruptible power supplies that includes new rack-mounted and
tower units, supporting voltages and configurations not previously available. These
uninterruptible power supplies include new 1,500, 2,200, 3,000, and 6,000 volt ampere
(VA) units.
򐂰 A new line of 0U strip power distribution units (PDUs) designed for tool-less installation in
the new racks. These PDUs have 24 outlets for the server-dense rack installation of today.
򐂰 IBM also offers new Local and Global Console Managers that support unique cabling
options, conversion options, to enable chaining up to 1,024 managed devices that can be
managed from a single console.
10
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
Racks
UPSs
42U and 47U deep racks
Optional Network
Management Card
PDUs
KVM/consoles
0U 24 C13
PDUs
1754D1X IBM Global
2x2x16 Console
Manager (GCM16)
1754-A1X
IBM Local 1x8
Console Manager
(LCM8)
Optional Environmental
Monitoring Probe
46M5382 IBM Serial
Conversion Option (SCO)
1000VA LCD Tower UPS
1500VA LCD Tower UPS
1500VA LCD 2U Rack UPS
2200VA LCD 2U Rack UPS
3000VA LCD 3U Rack UPS
6000VA LCD 4U Rack UPS
46M5383 IBM Virtual Media
Conversion Option Gen2
(VCO2)
1754-A2X
IBM Local 2x16 Console
Manager (LCM16)
1754D2X IBM Global
4z2x32 Console
Manager (GCM32)
0U 12
C13/12 C19
PDUs
Figure 2-1 New System x rack and power offerings
You can use these additional components to complement the solution with consoles, KVM
switches, rack enclosures, and additional elements for a more efficient data center.
2.2 Components
These infrastructure components reflect preferred practices and the preferred elements for
the reliable operation of the solution. You can also deploy the solution within existing racks
and connect it to existing infrastructure, if you follow the overall guidelines and principles
described here.
Components include rack and power elements, compute and management cluster
components, storage and network elements, and software components.
Table 2-1 describes the rack and power elements.
Table 2-1 Rack and power elements
Part number
Description
Quantity
93072PX
IBM S2 25U Static Standard Rack Cabinet
1
NetBAY S2 25U Standard Rack Cabinet
1
Alternative
93072RX
Table 2-2 on page 12 shows the compute and management cluster components.
Chapter 2. Infrastructure and planning
11
Table 2-2 Compute and management cluster components
Part number
Description
Quantity
x3650 M3, Xeon 6C X5675 95W
3.06GHz/1333MHz/12MB, 1x4GB, O/Bay HS 2.5in
SAS/SATA, 675W p/s, Rack
3
81Y6544
Intel Xeon 6C Processor Model X5675 95W
3.06GHz/1333MHz/12MB
3
49Y1397
8GB (1x8GB, 2Rx4, 1.35V) PC3L-10600 CL9 ECC
DDR3 1333MHz LP RDIMM
18
49Y1407
4GB (1x4GB, 2Rx8, 1.35V) PC3L-10600 CL9 ECC
DDR3 1333MHz LP RDIMM
18
41Y8300
IBM USB Memory Key for VMware ESXi 5.0
3
Servers
794572U
CPU and memory
Table 2-3 describes the storage elements.
Table 2-3 Storage elements
Part number
Description
Quantity
Storage system
Additional 300 GB drives
1746A4D
IBM System Storage DS3524 Express Dual Controller
Storage System
1
49Y1836
300GB 2.5in 10K 6Gb SAS HDD
24
68Y8433
1Gb iSCSI 4 Port Daughter Card
2
Table 2-4 describes the network elements.
Table 2-4 Network elements
Part number
Description
Quantity
6630010
Juniper 24 Port 1Gb EX2200 Ethernet Switch for IBM
System x
2
In server
NIC PCIe adapters
49Y4220
NetXtreme II 1000 Express Quad Port Ethernet adapter
Top-of-rack switch
3
Table 2-5 on page 13 describes the planning actions of the software components.
12
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
Table 2-5 Software components planning actions
Part number
Description
Quantity
Cloud
IBM SmartCloud Entry (one year)
00D4658
IBM Starter Kit for Cloud x86 Ed V2, Per Managed Srvr
w/1 Yr S&S
Alternative
IBM SmartCloud Entry (three year)
00D4659
IBM Starter Kit for Cloud x86 Ed V2, Per Managed Srvr
w/3 Yr S&S
Hypervisor-OS
VMware Essentials Plus (one year)
4817SF9
VMware vSph5 Ess Plus Bundle for 3 hosts Lic and 1
Year Subs
Alternative
VMware Essentials Plus (three year)
4817TF9
VMware vSph5 Ess Plus Bundle for 3 hosts Lic and 3
Year Subs
3
3
1
1
A key element of the installation steps is to ensure that power to the system is provided
reliably, thus minimizing the possibility of inadvertent power loss. This section describes
choices and preferred practices that can prevent power-related issues and problems.
2.2.1 Rack and power distribution
You need to install the PDUs and their cabling before placing any of the systems or storage in
the rack. Provide enough PDUs to allow redundant power supplies to be fed from separate
electrical circuits. As you cable the PDUs, consider the following suggestions:
򐂰 Ensure that sufficient separate electrical circuits and receptacles are available to support
the necessary PDUs.
򐂰 Minimize the chance that a single electrical circuit failure might disable a device by
ensuring PDUs feeding redundant power supplies are supplied from separate electrical
circuits.
򐂰 Plan for one electrical cord from separate PDUs for devices that have redundant power
supplies.
򐂰 Power each EX2200 Ethernet switch from a separate PDU.
򐂰 Locate Ethernet switches to allow the easiest cable runs possible.
򐂰 Locate storage in lower portions of rack for added stability.
2.2.2 Network
The network topology and architecture play an important role in streamlining flow. You need to
carefully plan the following steps:
򐂰 Network naming conventions
򐂰 Network cabling plan and port assignment
򐂰 IP addresses, subnets, and virtual local area networks (VLANs)
Chapter 2. Infrastructure and planning
13
2.2.3 Storage
Implementing the storage usage model can be part of a standard. The approach used in this
configuration balances performance and redundancy; however, you can choose the
configuration that best fits your specific environments.
2.2.4 Virtualization
Defining a virtualization strategy is key to maximizing the benefits of a centralized
administration of tasks and resources. This strategy helps with scalability issues and overall
hardware resource allocation, including power management. You must consider the following
areas:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
14
VMware vSphere cluster and management servers
vSphere to application development (AD) domain integration
VM naming conventions
VM network connectivity
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
3
Chapter 3.
Designing the solution
In this section, we describe the two major subsystems, networking and storage, in detail.
Networking and storage, along with the servers, create the foundation for the solution. The
networking section describes the virtual local area network (VLAN) configuration and
topology. The storage section includes suggested structure for performance and redundancy.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2012. All rights reserved.
15
3.1 Networking
Each server offers six 1 Gb Ethernet ports to the hypervisor, vSphere ESXi. Two ports are
LAN ports on motherboard (LoM) and four ports are on additional network interface cards
(NICs). Each server has additional ports for integrated management modules (IMMs), which
are not used by the hypervisor or virtual machines (VMs), as shown in Figure 3-1.
2x 1 Gb
2x 1 Gb
Existing Network – Core Network
EX2200 sw1
2x 1 Gb
EX2200 sw2
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
System x3650 M3
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
15
System x3650 M3
3x 1 Gb
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
3x 1 Gb
15
System x3650 M3
Figure 3-1 Network topology
16
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
3.1.1 Ethernet switching
Network traffic is organized in eight networks that are placed in separate VLANs. Several
Ethernet ports are used for more than one network, as outlined in Table 3-1.
Table 3-1 Network VLANs
Network
Name
Description
VLAN 11
iSCSI-1
iSCSI storage network 1 that is used for iSCSI storage traffic
VLAN 12
iSCSI-2
iSCSI storage network 2 that is used for iSCSI storage traffic
VLAN 31
VM31
Production VM communication network 1, used as
communication network for production VMs
VLAN 32
VM32
Production VM communication network 2, used as
communication network for production VMs
VLAN 33
VM33
Production VM communication network 3, used as
communication network for production VMs
VLAN 40
LM
Live migration, private network for ESXi hosts, used for vMotion
VLAN 50
MGMT
Management network, which is the network that is used for
managing ESXi hosts, DS3500, and Active Directory
connections
VLAN 51
IMM-MGMT
Management network, which is the network that is used for
managing IMMs on servers
There are three production VM networks here, though, in some cases, only one network can
be used for this purpose. By creating multiple networks, you can isolate workload (VMs) for
security purposes.
Two IP-based Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI) networks, which are shown in
Table 3-1, enable multipath design by using redundant gigabit Ethernet ports on servers and
storage controllers. This design helps to achieve high availability and more bandwidth.
Figure 3-2 on page 18 illustrates this configuration.
Chapter 3. Designing the solution
17
IBM DS3524 Storage
LNK
OK
Gb/s 1
4
2
1
4
OK
2 Gb/s
FC1
A
OUT
FC2
B
Gb/s 1
4
1
4
LNK
2 Gb/s
FC2
OUT
FC HOST
AC
OK
2
FC1
FC HOST
DC
DC
OK
AC
2x Juniper EX2200
24 port switch
VLANs for iSCSI (11 and 12)
VLANs for Management (40, 50, and 51)
VLANs for Production VMs (31, 32, and 33)
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Systemx3650 M3
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
15
Systemx3650 M3
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Systemx3650 M3
3x IBM x3650 M3 servers
Figure 3-2 VLAN assignment
Table 3-2 describes the VLAN assignments.
Table 3-2 VLAN assignments
Server port
VLAN
Purpose
LAN1
MGMT (50) and live
migration (40)
Management and live migration to Switch 1
LAN2
MGMT (50) and live
migration (40)
Management and live migration to Switch 2
Card 1 port 1
iSCSI-1 (11)
iSCSI storage to Switch 1, no VLAN tagging
Card 1 port 2
iSCSI-2 (12)
iSCSI storage to Switch 2, no VLAN tagging
Card 1 port 3
VM31, VM32, VM33
Production VM traffic to Switch 1
Card 1 port 4
VM31, VM32, VM33
Production VM traffic to Switch 2
This configuration uses two Juniper Networks EX2200 switches. The switches have 24 fixed
ports, 10/100/1000Base-T (gigabit Ethernet) ports with RJ45 connectors, and four uplink slots
for optional gigabit small form factor pluggables (SFPs). Figure 3-3 on page 19 shows this
configuration.
18
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
EX2200 sw1
2x 1 Gb
for Production VMs
2x 1 Gb
for iSCSI
2x 1 Gb
for Management VLANs
and vMotion
connected to LoM
1
PCI
2
3
PCI
4
ATTENTION
Power supply filler is
required for system cooling
Remove only when
installing 2nd power supply
AC
DC
IBM x3650 M3 Server
EX2200 sw2
Figure 3-3 Switch connectivity
Table 3-3 outlines the suggested VLAN mapping for EX2200 switches.
Table 3-3 Suggested VLAN mapping for EX2200 switches
Ports
VLANs and purpose
0-3
MGMT and LM - management and live migration (vMotion), VLAN tagged, connected
to LAN1/LAN2 on the server
4-7
iSCSI-1 (Switch 1) or iSCSI-2 (Switch 2) - storage iSCSI traffic, untagged
8 - 11
VM31, VM32, VM33 - Production VM traffic
12 - 13
Available
14 - 15
IMM-MGMT - IMM network management connection on the servers, two ports on
each switch
16 - 17
iSCSI-1 or iSCSI-2 - storage iSCSI traffic for DS3500, untagged
18 - 19
MGMT - management for DS3500 and optional local management workstation
20 - 21
All VLANs - Trunk link aggregation (LAG) to other switch
22 - 23
All VLANs - Trunk LAG to existing corporate network
Chapter 3. Designing the solution
19
Figure 3-4 illustrates the networking configuration in vSphere ESXi virtual Ethernet switches
and ports.
Two physical ports
Port group for
each VLAN
Only one physical
port for switch for
iSCSI traffic
Figure 3-4 Network configuration in vSphere ESXi virtual Ethernet switches and ports
Link aggregation (LAG) or bonding is not used between servers and EX2200 switches. A LAG
link has two ends. If all LAG member links on one end are terminated on the server, all
member links on the other end need to be terminated on one physical or logical switch.
EX2200 switches work independently; therefore, they cannot work as one logical switch
(virtual chassis).
If two physical ports on the host are connected to the same virtual switch in ESXi (IBM
Versatile Storage Server (VSS)), load balancing is configured for each virtual port
identification. Management VLANs (LoM port) and production VM VLANs, use this
configuration, as shown in Figure 3-4.
Use Auto Negotiate for links between server NICs and the EX2200 switch. You do not need to
fix speed or duplex on modern gigabit Ethernet NICs.
Preventing network bridge loops: Server Time Protocol
A loop might occur in the network when two switches are connected to the existing network.
Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) is enabled by default on EX2200 loop prevention
protocol. To optimize data paths in the network, configure RSTP to keep a link between the
two EX2200 switches in a forwarding state, and link between the first EX2200 and corporate
20
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
network in a forwarding state. Then, link between the second EX2200 switch and corporate
network in a blocked state. Create this linkage by configuring bridge priorities and port cost on
EX2200 switches. Alternatively, you can configure EX2200 to use Multiple Spanning Tree
Protocol (MSTP) for loop prevention. The choice between RSTP and MSTP depends on
which protocol that you use in the existing network.
3.1.2 IP routing
EX2200 is configured as a managed level 2 (L2) switch. EX2200 also has level 3 (L3)
capabilities, but those levels are not used in this setup. We assume that you are using existing
corporate network equipment to route traffic between VLANs and to the Internet.
3.1.3 Prioritizing network traffic (class of service)
Consider configuring quality of service settings (QoS) (class of service) for ports that are
used for more than one VLAN. Live migration (vMotion) traffic might have lower priority than
management traffic for ESXi hypervisors or integrated management modules (IMMs).
Configure class of service on EX2200 switches to correctly prioritize traffic.
To configure class of service on an EX2200 switch, consider these methods:
򐂰 Classify inbound traffic in forwarding classes based on VLANs.
򐂰 Configure schedulers by specifying a transmit rate for forwarding classes, and applying
sets of these schedulers on egress ports.
For detailed information about the Juniper class of service, see this link:
http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/en_US/junos/information-products/pathway-pages/cos
/index.html
You can configure networking on ESXi hosts to limit the amount of traffic for every port group.
For example, host vMotion outgoing traffic can be limited to reserve bandwidth on shared
ports for ESXi management traffic. Another example is to limit outgoing traffic for port groups
for VM production traffic. ESXi implements hard limits for the traffic; if traffic reaches the
configured limit, it is not used even if unused bandwidth exists on the port.
3.1.4 Managing EX2200
An EX2200 switch has a console port on the back for out-of-band management that uses the
command-line interface (CLI). For more information, see Juniper Networks EX2200 Switch
Quick Start paper for instructions about initial configuration:
http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/en_US/release-independent/junos/information-produc
ts/pathway-pages/ex-series/ex2200/ex2200.html
You can manage the EX2200 switch by using the following methods:
򐂰 Out-of-band management port on the back of the device
򐂰 In-band management that applies an L3-interface to one of the VLANs, for example,
management VLAN
In the sample configuration shown in Appendix B, “Sample Juniper Networks EX2200
Ethernet Switch configuration” on page 35, out-of-band management is used to configure the
IP address on the Management Ethernet, me.
Chapter 3. Designing the solution
21
3.2 Storage area network (iSCSI network)
EX2200 switches provide function for storage area networks (SANs), connecting hosts with
storage. This configuration is a converged network design because the same infrastructure is
used for SAN traffic and data traffic.
Converged networks provide significant savings:
򐂰 Infrastructure cost: Fewer devices to purchase
򐂰 Operational cost: Fewer devices to manage, and less energy for power and cooling
The network is designed to avoid the adverse effects other types of traffic might have on SAN
traffic:
򐂰 EX2200 switches are non-blocking with wire-rate forwarding speed. After the frame is in
the switch, it is forwarded to the destination port independently of other types of traffic.
򐂰 SAN traffic uses dedicated ports on EX2200, servers, and DS3524, so that it does not
compete for bandwidth on the same physical port with other types of traffic.
The only exception is the placement of SAN traffic on trunk interfaces between switches to
provide an optional feature of iSCSI access to DS3524 from the core network. For this feature
to work, iSCSI VLANs must be enabled on all three trunk ports, the switch-to-switch links, and
the two uplink trunks from switches to the core network. Configure the class of service on
EX2200 switches to correctly prioritize traffic on trunk ports if you want to use this feature.
Storage network traffic in EX2200 switches is isolated from other types of traffic by using two
VLANs, iSCSI-1 (VLAN-ID 11) and iSCSI-2 (VLAN-ID 12). For iSCSI traffic servers, use two
of the six ports for storage traffic. DS3524 controllers use a total of four ports dedicated for
storage traffic. All access ports for VLAN iSCSI-1 are on Switch 1, and all access ports for
VLAN iSCSI-2 are on Switch 2. This configuration effectively avoids the need for iSCSI traffic
to go over trunk links.
Both storage VLANs are available at the same time for servers and DS3524, making
multipathing possible. Multipathing allows high availability (HA) and increased bandwidth,
which is doubled in this case, by using independent network ports and switches. If a failure
occurs on one port or the entire switch, the server can continue to send and receive SAN
traffic over the storage VLAN by using another path.
Multipathing is configured both on the ESXi hosts and the DS3524 controller. The server can
transfer data to and from storage at a speed of 2 Gbps (4 Gbps full duplex). The DS3524 can
use both controllers to send and receive data to servers, with a total available bandwidth of 4
Gbps or 8 Gbps, full duplex.
3.2.1 Jumbo frames
You can also configure server NICs and DS3524 controllers to allow jumbo frames with sizes
up to 9,000 bytes. Jumbo frames are not enabled by default, but they are supported as a
feature on all elements of this configuration, that is, servers, storage, and switches. Therefore,
you need to configure all devices on the Ethernet frame data path and server switch storage
for support of jumbo frames. To configure jumbo frame support, set the appropriate maximum
transmission units (MTUs) to 9,000 (typically) on server and storage NICs. Set to 9,216 MTUs
on EX2200 switches.
22
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
Follow these steps to set 9,216 MTUs on the ESXi 2200 switches:
1. In the ESXi configuration, under Networking, select switch Properties. For the vSwitch
and the port group, set MTU; repeat for all iSCSI interfaces.
2. On the EX2200 switch, under physical port, that is, ge-0/0/; or LAG interface, that is, ae0;
set MTU to 9216. This configuration is sufficient for L2 operations on the switch.
3. On the DS3524, under Configure iSCSI Host Ports, select Advanced Host Port Settings,
and set MTU to 9000 for all controller interfaces.
The Broadcom iSCSI Adapter (iSCSI HW offload) does not support jumbo frames. In this
case, use the vSphere iSCSI Software Adapter.
3.3 Storage system
The IBM System Storage DS3500 Express Storage and the IBM System Storage EXP3500
Express expansion units deliver affordable, entry-level configurations for small and
medium-sized businesses in compact 2U, 48.26 cm (19 in.) rack mount enclosures. These
configurations have the flexibility to scale in capacity, performance, host interfaces, and
advanced functions as your business grows or requirements change.
The IBM DS3524 Storage System offers the following key features:
򐂰 Six Gbps serial-attached SCSI (SAS) system delivers midrange performance and
scalability at entry-level prices
򐂰 Built-in management expertise in intuitive and powerful storage management software
򐂰 Support for 6.35 cm (2.5 in.) and 8.89 cm (3.5 in.) hard disk drives (HDDs), scalable to a
total of 192 HDDs
򐂰 Data security with full disk encryption is provided and supports high-performance
solid-state drives (SSDs)
򐂰 Drive and expansion enclosure intermix that cost-effectively meets client requirements
򐂰 Four interface options:
– Four or eight 6 Gbps SAS ports
– Eight 8 Gbps Fibre Channel ports and four 6 Gbps SAS ports
– Eight 1 Gbps iSCSI ports and four 6 Gbps SAS ports
– Four 10 Gbps iSCSI ports and four 6 Gbps SAS ports
The DS3524 that is used in this reference configuration has the following hardware
specifications:
򐂰 Dual-active, hot-swappable controllers
򐂰 One GB cache for each controller, with a 2 GB upgrade available
Mirrored, battery-backed, and destaged to flash
򐂰 Eight 1 Gbps iSCSI ports and four 6 Gbps SAS ports
򐂰 24 x 300 GB 10K rpm SAS HDDs, for a total of 7.2 TB of raw storage
򐂰 Two 6 Gbps SAS drive expansion ports
򐂰 Redundant power and cooling
򐂰 IBM Storage Manager running on a management console
Chapter 3. Designing the solution
23
3.4 IBM System Storage DS3500
The IBM System Storage DS3500 provides RAID controllers, plus tools for expanding storage
and for configuration.
3.4.1 RAID controller
Redundant Array of Independent Disk (RAID) controllers support RAID levels 0, 1, 3, 5, 6,
and 10. Each controller has 1 GB, which is upgradeable to 2 GB of user data cache with
battery backup.
In dual controller configurations, the controller on the left is A, and on the right is B, when
viewed from the rear of the subsystem. Dual controller configurations offer redundant access
to disk storage. If the controller or I/O path fails, the other controller continues to provide
access to disk drives.
All DS3500 RAID controllers have built-in connectors for the following ports:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Two 6 Gbps SAS host server attachment ports
Drive-side 6 Gbps SAS expansion port
Ethernet management port
Serial management port
3.4.2 Expansion for more storage
The DS3524 Storage System represents a carefully thought-out and well-tailored fit,
providing scalability and performance. Perform the following steps to scale with more storage:
򐂰 Select larger (600 GB or larger) drives
򐂰 Use one or more expansion trays to increase scalability up to 192 drives: IBM System
Storage EXP3512 Express Storage Expansion Unit (EXP3512), a 8.89 cm (3.5 in.) HDD;
or IBM System Storage EXP3524 Express Storage Expansion Unit (EXP3524), a 6.35 cm
(2.5 in.) HDD.
3.4.3 Configuration
The following RAID settings are used in this reference configuration:
򐂰 Array0: 3x300 GB HDD in RAID 5, which provides 558 GB
򐂰 Array1: 10x300 GB HDD in RAID 5, which provides 2,513 GB
򐂰 Array2: 10x300 GB HDD in RAID 10, which provides 1,396 GB
The following configurations support 45 VMs:
򐂰 55 GB/VM on Array1/RAID 5
򐂰 31 GB/VM on Array2/RAID 10
24
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
These numbers maximize allocations, leaving no space for future growth. You must balance
the choice of additional reliability, availability, and data security, versus additional raw storage
according to the needs of your business. The RAID configuration that is described balances
performance, data security, and reliability.
vSphere Version 4.1 and earlier do not see logical unit number (LUN) sizes of 2 TB and
larger. If you need a data store that is larger than 2 TB, use this workaround:
򐂰 On the DS3524, create a disk array of the size and characteristics (RAID type and number
of drives) that you want.
򐂰 On the disk array, create logical drives that are smaller than 2 TB and assign LUNs to
them.
򐂰 On the ESXi host, create a data store by selecting one LUN and building virtual machine
file systems (VMFS) on it.
򐂰 Increase the size of the data store by adding more LUNs; they appear in the list of extents.
Chapter 3. Designing the solution
25
26
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
A
Configuration steps
Appendix A.
This appendix describes the configuration process. First, install the equipment in the rack,
connect to the cables, and power on.
This configuration process includes the following steps:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
“Configuring EX2200 switch” on page 28
“Configuring DS3524 System Storage network access” on page 28
“Configuring DS3524 System Storage storage subsystem” on page 29
“Configuring server hardware” on page 29
“Installing vSphere ESXi hypervisor on server” on page 29
“Configuring networking on vSphere ESXi hypervisor” on page 30
“Configuring storage adapter on vSphere ESXi hypervisor” on page 30
“Configuring IBM DS3524 System Storage host to LUN mapping” on page 31
“Configuring storage on vSphere ESXi hypervisor” on page 31
“Installing and configuring vCenter server” on page 31
“Creating VM template with Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2” on page 32
“Installing vSphere Management Assistant” on page 32.
“Installing IBM System Storage Plug-In for VMware vCenter” on page 33
“Installing IBM SmartCloud Entry” on page 33
“Installing IBM SmartCloud Entry fix pack” on page 34
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2012. All rights reserved.
27
Configuring EX2200 switch
Use the following steps to configure the EX200 switch. The commands in parentheses are
examples.
1. Use a console cable to connect EX2200 to a computer with terminal emulator software.
2. Follow the instructions for creating the initial configuration by using command-line
interface (CLI) command ezsetup on the shell prompt.
3. Enter CLI mode by issuing command cli on the shell prompt.
4. Change the configuration by using CLI commands in configuration mode (config):
a. Create the virtual local area networks (VLANs) (set vlan MGMT vlan-id 50) and
interfaces to VLANs (set vlan MGMT interface ge-0/0/0).
b. Set the maximum number of Link Aggregation Group (LAG) interfaces for each switch
(set chassis aggregated-devices Ethernet device-count).
c. Create LAG interfaces (set interfaces ae1 unit 0 family Ethernet switching).
d. Remove Ethernet switching from LAG member interfaces (delete interfaces
ge-0/0/20 unit 0).
e. Add the interface as a LAG member (set interfaces ge-0/0/20 ether-options
802.3ad ae0).
f. Set the trunk mode on the interface (set interfaces ge-0/0/11 unit 0 family
ethernet-switching port-mode trunk). This step is mandatory for an interface that
transports two or more VLANs.
g. Change the maximum transmission unit (MTU) on the interface (set interfaces
ge-0/0/4 mtu 9216).
h. Change the bridge priority on the switch for Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) (set
protocols rstp bridge-priority 44k).
i. Commit the configuration changes (commit).
Configuring DS3524 System Storage network access
Follow these steps to configure the DS3523 System Storage network access:
1. Install the System Storage DS3524 in the rack. Power on the DS3524. Connect the
DS3524 controllers to the network: management ports and host (iSCSI) ports.
2. Download the latest DS3524 management software: IBM System Storage DS Storage
Manager from the IBM website (Fix Central) for your management workstation platform
(Microsoft Windows, Linux, or MacOS).
3. Install IBM Tivoli® Storage Manager on your management workstation. This software runs
on a computer that is not part of the cluster.
4. Determine the IP addresses of the Ethernet management ports on the DS3524. For more
details, reference section 10.7, “Set Ethernet management ports”, in IBM System Storage
DS3500 Introduction and Implementation Guide, SG24-7914. Change IP addresses of the
DS3524 controllers to match your IP address plan.
5. Connect the Storage Manager software to DS3524 controllers over the IP network by
specifying IP addresses of both controllers.
28
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
6. Click the Setup tab (initial setup tasks) and configure:
– Storage subsystem password
– iSCSI host ports
– Manage iSCSI settings (authentication, identification, and discovery)
Configuring DS3524 System Storage storage subsystem
Plan carefully before you complete these steps. For example, reference technical
documentation, such as section 3.3, “Planning your storage structure”, in IBM System
Storage DS3500 Introduction and Implementation Guide, SG24-7914.
1. Use Storage Manager to connect to the DS3524.
2. Click the Setup tab (initial setup tasks) and choose Configure Storage Subsystem.
3. Choose automatic configuration or manual (advanced). Follow these steps for manual
configuration:
a. Configure the hot spare drive. Dedicate at least one drive for each shelf.
b. Create arrays by using available drives; choose the Redundant Array of Independent
Disks (RAID) level that you want.
c. Create logical drives by using a space on the existing arrays. Choose the size, name,
segment size, controller ownership, and caching options.
Configuring server hardware
Follow these steps to configure the server hardware:
1. Verify the processor and the memory configuration for the systems.
2. Confirm that a four-port network interface card (NIC) card is installed.
3. Confirm that two ports from the onboard NIC connect to the assigned communications
network ports on each EX2200 switch. These ports are used for connecting to virtual
LANs (VLANs) for management and live migration (vMotion).
4. Confirm that two ports on the add-on NIC card are connected to the assigned network port
on each EX2200 switch for iSCSI storage traffic.
5. Confirm that two ports on the add-on NIC card are connected to the assigned network port
on each EX2200 switch for production VM traffic.
Installing vSphere ESXi hypervisor on server
Follow these steps to install the vSphere ESXi hypervisor on the server:
1. Use a CD-ROM to install ESXi 5.0 on the server. The destination media is a USB key.
2. Verify in unified Extensible Firmware Interface (uEFI) on the server that the default boot
device is the USB key.
3. Configure the management network on the server by using the following steps:
– Use the onboard NIC.
– Set the correct VLAN ID (50 in our example).
Appendix A. Configuration steps
29
– Set the IP address and netmask.
– Set the default gateway.
– Set the host name, domain, and domain name servers (DNS).
4. Connect to the server by using the vSphere client from the computer that is running
Microsoft Windows OS. This step enables you to verify the correct installation and basic
configuration of ESXi.
Configuring networking on vSphere ESXi hypervisor
Follow these steps to configure networking on the vSphere ESXi hypervisor:
1. Use the vSphere client to connect to the ESXi host.
2. Add another onboard NIC port to the first virtual switch for management. Set both ports to
Active, and under NIC Teaming, set the load balance to Route based on the originating
virtual port ID.
3. Add port group for Live Migration (vMotion) on the first virtual switch, and assign the
correct VLAN and IP address.
4. Create a new virtual switch for iSCSI traffic with one physical uplink port from the four-port
NIC to switch 1 (VLAN11). Assign the correct IP addresses for the iSCSI interfaces. Do not
apply any VLAN tags here.
5. Create a new virtual switch for iSCSI traffic with one physical link port from the four-port
NIC to switch 2 (VLAN12). Assign the correct IP addresses for the iSCSI interfaces. Do not
apply any VLAN tags here.
6. Create an additional virtual switch for production VM traffic with two uplink ports from the
four-port NIC. Connect one uplink port to switch 1, and another to switch 2. Set both ports
to Active, and load balancing is based on the virtual port ID.
7. Create port groups on the virtual switch for production VM traffic with the correct VLANs
for connecting virtual machines (VMs).
Configuring storage adapter on vSphere ESXi hypervisor
Configure the ESXi storage adapters. Repeat this process on all servers:
1. Use the vSphere client to connect to the ESXi host.
2. Select the iSCSI software adapter and verify that the Status is Enabled.
3. Under Network Configuration, verify the appropriate VMKernel Port Bindings between the
port groups and the VMKernel adapters. Add pairs as needed.
4. Identify the host iSCSI qualified name (IQN). The storage adapter is going to use this
iSCSI ID to communicate with the DS3524.
5. On the DS3524, define the host by using this ID. For this definition, reference “Configuring
IBM DS3524 System Storage host to LUN mapping”.
6. In vSphere Client, under Dynamic Discovery, add the iSCSI server location IP address of
the iSCSI interface on DS3524.
7. Rescan the storage adapter. All the LUNs on DS3524 that are available to this host must
be shown in the list (Devices).
30
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
Configuring IBM DS3524 System Storage host to LUN mapping
Configure the IBM DS3524 System Storage host to LUN mapping:
1. Use Storage Manager to connect to the DS3524.
2. Under the Mappings tab, define Hosts and their interfaces by using the iSCSI qualified
names (IQNs).
3. Under the Mappings tab, define Host Groups and assign the hosts to the groups.
4. Under the Mappings tab, define Mappings between Hosts or Host Groups and LUNs.
Configuring storage on vSphere ESXi hypervisor
The assumption is that the DS3524 is already provisioned. Repeat this process on all servers.
Formatting the logical unit number (LUN) must be completed only one time, not from each
server. Follow these steps:
1. Use the vSphere client to connect to the ESXi host.
2. Add the DS3524 Logical Drive as the data store on ESXi host:
a. Click Configuration  Storage.
b. Click Add Storage.
c. Click Disk/LUN.
d. Choose one LUN.
e. Choose the virtual machine file system (VMFS) version (Version VMFS-3 for
compatibility with ESXi 4.1) that you want.
f. Decide on the partitions, block size, and complete formatting. Formatting must be done
only one time on the first server in the cluster.
Repeat these steps for all logical drives created on the DS3524.
Installing and configuring vCenter server
Follow these steps to install and configure the vCenter server:
1. Use the vSphere client to connect to the ESXi host.
2. Create VM for vCenter server.
3. Install Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 in VM for vCenter server.
4. Power on the newly created VM and connect to it by using VM Console.
5. Configure networking for this VM by connecting the VM to the management network, and
by assigning a static IP address.
6. Add VM to the Active Directory.
7. Use the network connection to copy the vCenter software installation package to the VM
virtual hard disk drive (HDD).
8. Install VMware vCenter on VM, then restart VM.
Appendix A. Configuration steps
31
9. After this point, configure this setup by connecting the vSphere client to the vCenter VM,
instead of connecting it to the individual ESXi hosts. Use the VM credentials to log in to
vCenter (Windows user, Administrator).
10.Use the vSphere client to create the data center container in vCenter, and the cluster
inside of the data center container.
11.Add all hosts (servers that run vSphere ESXi hypervisor) to the cluster. All VMs on ESXi
hosts are imported into the cluster (including vCenter VM).
Creating VM template with Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2
Follow these steps to create the VM template with Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2:
1. Use the vSphere client to connect to the ESXi host.
2. Create a folder on the data store and upload the ISO file for Windows Server 2008 R2.
3. Create VM for Microsoft Windows 2008 R2 with resources (that is, two virtual processors,
4 GB RAM, 40 GB virtual HDD, and one NIC - VMXNET3) that you prefer.
4. Connect the VM NIC to the correct network, which is the port group for production VMs.
5. Map the VM CD/DVD drive to the ISO file with Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2.
6. Boot VM from the mapped ISO file and complete the installation of the OS.
7. Install VMware tools to the VM.
8. Run the OS software update inside of VM to apply all the software patches that you want.
9. Complete the configuration and tuning of VM (that is, enable remote desktop, and other
steps).
10.When using vSphere Client, click VM, and choose to create a template from this VM
(Clone to Template).
Installing vSphere Management Assistant
Follow these steps to install the vSphere Management Assistant:
1. Use the vSphere client to connect to the vCenter.
2. vSphere Management Assistant (vMA) provides CLI for configuring vSphere ESXi on
hosts.
3. vMA is available, at no cost, on the VMware website download in Open Virtual Machine
Format (OVF) format, in the compressed file archive.
4. Download the vMA archive from the VMware website, and extract it on the file system
where the vSphere client is running.
5. Use the vSphere client and run the installation wizard. Click File  Deploy OVF
Template.
32
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
Installing IBM System Storage Plug-In for VMware vCenter
Follow these steps to install IBM System Storage Plug-In for VMware vCenter:
1. Download the plug-in from the IBM website:
http://ibmdsstorage.com/software/vcenter-plug-in.html
2. Install the downloaded application on VM, running vCenter.
3. Download the documentation for the plug-in from the prior website.
Installing IBM SmartCloud Entry
Follow these steps to install IBM SmartCloud Entry, previously known as Starter Kit for Cloud:
1. SmartCloud Entry 2.2 can be installed on VM as a software package for Microsoft
Windows, or Linux OS. Or, it can be deployed by using the OVF package as a pre-built
Linux VM.
2. Download documentation for SmartCloud Entry from the IBM website:
https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/wiki/smart-cloud-entry
3. Check the website for “Installation and Prerequisite Instructions”. For example, a system
that runs IBM Starter Kit for Cloud (SKC) needs to have at least two processors (or two
vCPUs in the case of VM).
4. Obtain an SKC software package for your management platform of choice.
5. If using Microsoft Windows OS, install the following components:
– IBM SmartCloud Entry X86 Edition V2.2 Multiplatform English eAssembly (CRG6CEN)
– IBM Upward Integration for VMware vSphere V1.0 for Multiplatform Multilingual
(CI22 AML)
Ensure that you document installation points for later reference, including your answers to the
installation procedure questions. Follow these steps:
1. Find the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) certificate file on vCenter, and copy the file (rui.crt)
to a folder on the SmartCloud Entry server. Typically, the file rui.crt is in the folder,
C:\ProgramData\VMware\VMware VirtualCenter\SSL.
2. Install the SSL certificate file on the SmartCloud Entry server:
a. Run the following command: keytool -import -file rui.crt -alias SKC -keystore
vmware.keystore
b. The command prompt asks for a password for the keystore.
c. The file vmware.keystore is created in the current directory. Move that file to
C:\Users\Administrator\.skc (configuration folder).
d. Restart SKC.
3. By default, the SmartCloud Entry configuration files are in the following folders:
– C:\Program Files (x86)\IBM\Starter Kit for Cloud
– C:\Users\Administrator\.skc
4. Before starting SKC, verify the following configuration settings:
– C:\Program Files (x86)\IBM\Starter Kit for Cloud\skc.ini
And add the line: -XX:MaxPermSize=128m
Appendix A. Configuration steps
33
– C:\Users\Administrator\.skc\email.properties
Change email relay host
– C:\Users\Administrator\.skc\email.properties\approvals.properties
Change request.lifecycle  true
5. Start SKC by clicking the desktop icon, which is the shortcut for C:\Program Files
(x86)\IBM\Starter Kit for Cloud\skc.exe. This command opens the SmartCloud Entry
console window. This window needs to be open for the SmartCloud Entry 2.2 web service
to work.
6. Install the latest fix packs for SKC. The details are in “Installing IBM SmartCloud Entry fix
pack”.
7. Connect to the SmartCloud Entry web interface at address (replace localhost with correct
address) http://localhost:8080/cloud/web/index.htm
8. Define projects on the Projects tab. Workloads and Appliances (VM templates) are
associated to projects. In the SmartCloud Entry web interface, only one project is selected
at any time (drop-down list is in the upper-right corner). Only the workload for that
particular project shows.
9. Define user accounts in the SmartCloud Entry on the Users tab.
10.Define Networks, which are templates that are applied to appliances (VM templates).
11.Submit a request for new workloads by selecting Appliance, and selecting action Deploy.
The new request is listed under the Requests tab and is waiting for approval by a user
with administrator privileges.
12.SmartCloud Entry 2.2 offers metering and billing but they are not enabled by default.
Enable these functions by editing the configuration files.
Installing IBM SmartCloud Entry fix pack
Follow these steps to install the IBM SmartCloud Entry fix pack:
1. Download the SmartCloud Entry fix pack, the fix pack readme file, and the HTML file with
extension readme file.
2. Extract the fix pack in a local folder on the SmartCloud Entry server.
3. Go to the application console and add a folder path as a repository (use a forward slash in
the PATH):
a. addrepo file:PATH_TO_DIRECTORY
b. Type the command installupdates
4. Restart the SmartCloud Entry application.
34
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
B
Appendix B.
Sample Juniper Networks
EX2200 Ethernet Switch
configuration
This appendix outlines a high-level script of the parameters that are used to configure Juniper
Networks EX2200 Ethernet Switches.
system {
host-name sw1;
time-zone America/New_York;
root-authentication {
encrypted-password bJlDKIKtpnDMk; ## SECRET-DATA
}
login {
user admin {
uid 2000;
class super-user;
authentication {
encrypted-password "$1$rv1Pt8/9$s/jPJ.C0R3aGzUIk9C/3e."; ##
SECRET-DATA
}
}
}
services {
ssh {
protocol-version v2;
}
telnet;
netconf {
ssh;
}
web-management {
http;
}
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2012. All rights reserved.
35
}
syslog {
user * {
any emergency;
}
file messages {
any notice;
authorization info;
}
file interactive-commands {
interactive-commands any;
}
}
}
chassis {
aggregated-devices {
ethernet {
device-count 4;
}
}
}
interfaces {
ge-0/0/0 {
description "Node-1 Port_LAN1";
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching {
port-mode trunk;
}
}
}
ge-0/0/1 {
description "Node-2 Port_LAN1";
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching {
port-mode trunk;
}
}
}
ge-0/0/2 {
description "Node-3 Port_LAN1";
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching {
port-mode trunk;
}
}
}
ge-0/0/3 {
description "Node-4 Port_LAN1";
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching {
port-mode trunk;
}
}
}
ge-0/0/4 {
36
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
description "Node-1 Port_1/1";
mtu 9216;
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching;
}
}
ge-0/0/5 {
description "Node-2 Port_1/1";
mtu 9216;
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching;
}
}
ge-0/0/6 {
description "Node-3 Port_1/1";
mtu 9216;
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching;
}
}
ge-0/0/7 {
description "Node-4 Port_1/1";
mtu 9216;
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching;
}
}
ge-0/0/8 {
description "Node-1 Port_1/3";
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching {
port-mode trunk;
}
}
}
ge-0/0/9 {
description "Node-2 Port_1/3";
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching {
port-mode trunk;
}
}
}
ge-0/0/10 {
description "Node-3 Port_1/3";
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching {
port-mode trunk;
}
}
}
ge-0/0/11 {
description "Node-4 Port_1/3";
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching {
Appendix B. Sample Juniper Networks EX2200 Ethernet Switch configuration
37
port-mode trunk;
}
}
}
ge-0/0/12 {
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching;
}
}
ge-0/0/13 {
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching;
}
}
ge-0/0/14 {
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching;
}
}
ge-0/0/15 {
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching;
}
}
ge-0/0/16 {
mtu 9216;
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching;
}
}
ge-0/0/17 {
mtu 9216;
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching;
}
}
ge-0/0/18 {
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching;
}
}
ge-0/0/19 {
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching;
}
}
ge-0/0/20 {
ether-options {
802.3ad ae0;
}
}
ge-0/0/21 {
ether-options {
802.3ad ae0;
}
38
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
}
ge-0/0/22 {
ether-options {
802.3ad ae1;
}
}
ge-0/0/23 {
ether-options {
802.3ad ae1;
}
}
ge-0/1/0 {
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching;
}
}
ge-0/1/1 {
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching;
}
}
ge-0/1/2 {
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching;
}
}
ge-0/1/3 {
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching;
}
}
ae0 {
description "Link to sw2";
mtu 9216;
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching {
port-mode trunk;
}
}
}
ae1 {
description "Upink to corporate net";
mtu 9216;
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching {
port-mode trunk;
}
}
}
me0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 10.13.97.31/24;
}
}
Appendix B. Sample Juniper Networks EX2200 Ethernet Switch configuration
39
}
}
snmp {
location rack1;
contact Admin-contact-info;
community eLite {
authorization read-only;
}
}
routing-options {
static {
route 0.0.0.0/0 next-hop 10.13.97.1;
}
}
protocols {
igmp-snooping {
vlan all;
}
rstp {
bridge-priority 44k;
}
lldp {
interface all;
}
lldp-med {
interface all;
}
}
ethernet-switching-options {
storm-control {
interface all;
}
}
vlans {
IMM-MGMT {
vlan-id 51;
interface {
ae0.0;
ae1.0;
ge-0/0/14.0;
ge-0/0/15.0;
}
}
LM {
vlan-id 40;
interface {
ae0.0;
ae1.0;
ge-0/0/0.0;
ge-0/0/1.0;
ge-0/0/2.0;
ge-0/0/3.0;
}
}
MGMT {
40
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
vlan-id 50;
interface {
ae0.0;
ae1.0;
ge-0/0/0.0;
ge-0/0/1.0;
ge-0/0/2.0;
ge-0/0/3.0;
ge-0/0/18.0;
ge-0/0/19.0;
}
}
VM31 {
vlan-id 31;
interface {
ae0.0;
ae1.0;
ge-0/0/8.0;
ge-0/0/9.0;
ge-0/0/10.0;
ge-0/0/11.0;
}
}
VM32 {
vlan-id 32;
interface {
ae0.0;
ae1.0;
ge-0/0/8.0;
ge-0/0/9.0;
ge-0/0/10.0;
ge-0/0/11.0;
}
}
VM33 {
vlan-id 33;
interface {
ae0.0;
ae1.0;
ge-0/0/8.0;
ge-0/0/9.0;
ge-0/0/10.0;
ge-0/0/11.0;
}
}
iSCSI-1 {
vlan-id 11;
interface {
ae0.0;
ae1.0;
ge-0/0/4.0;
ge-0/0/5.0;
ge-0/0/6.0;
ge-0/0/7.0;
ge-0/0/16.0;
Appendix B. Sample Juniper Networks EX2200 Ethernet Switch configuration
41
ge-0/0/17.0;
}
}
iSCSI-2 {
vlan-id 12;
interface {
ae0.0;
ae1.0;
}
}
}
42
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
Related publications
The publications listed in this section are considered suitable for a more detailed discussion of
the topics covered in this paper.
IBM Redbooks
The following IBM Redbooks publications provide additional information about the topic in this
document. Some publications referenced in this list might be available in softcopy only.
򐂰 “IBM System Storage DS3500”
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/tips0836.html
򐂰 IBM System Storage DS3500 Introduction and Implementation Guide
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg247914.html
򐂰 “Juniper EX2200 Ethernet Switch”
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/tips0816.html
Online resources
These websites are also relevant as further information sources:
IBM System x resources
򐂰 IBM System x3650 M3 product page
http://www.ibm.com/systems/x/hardware/rack/x3650m3/
IBM DS3524 resources
򐂰 IBM System Storage DS3500 Express product page
http://www.ibm.com/systems/storage/disk/ds3500/
򐂰 IBM System Storage DS3500 Express specifications
http://www.ibm.com/systems/storage/disk/ds3500/specifications.html
Juniper EX2200 resources
򐂰 IBM product page for the Juniper Networks EX2200 Ethernet Switch
http://www.ibm.com/systems/x/options/networking/juniperex2200/
򐂰 Juniper EX2200 product page
http://www.juniper.net/us/en/products-services/switching/ex-series/ex2200/
򐂰 Juniper EX2200 support page
http://www.juniper.net/customers/support/?ex2200
򐂰 Juniper EX2200 Switch Quick Start
http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/en_US/release-independent/junos/information-pro
ducts/topic-collections/hardware/ex-series/ex2200/quick-start-ex2200.pdf
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2012. All rights reserved.
43
򐂰 Day One: Configuring EX Series Ethernet Switches
http://www.juniper.net/us/en/community/junos/training-certification/day-one/fab
ric-switching-tech-series/config-ex-series/
򐂰 Junos as a Switching Language: An Introduction to Using Junos Software on EX Series
Switches
http://www.juniper.net/us/en/training/elearning/junos_switching/course_start.ht
ml
SmartCloud Entry resources
򐂰 IBM SmartCloud Entry on IBM DeveloperWorks
https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/wiki/smart-cloud-entry
vSphere ESXi resources
򐂰 IBM x86 solutions for VMware vSphere Hypervisor
http://www.ibm.com/systems/x/os/vmware/esxi/
򐂰 Download VMware vSphere 5.0
http://downloads.vmware.com/d/info/datacenter_cloud_infrastructure/vmware_vsphe
re/5_0
򐂰 VMware vCenter Server product page
http://www.vmware.com/products/vcenter-server/overview.html
򐂰 vSphere Management Assistant Documentation
http://www.vmware.com/support/developer/vima/
򐂰 VMware vSphere 5 Documentation
http://pubs.vmware.com/vsphere-50/index.jsp
How to get IBM Redbooks publications
You can search for, view, or download IBM Redbooks publications, Redpapers, Web Docs,
draft publications and Additional materials, as well as order hardcopy Redbooks publications,
at this Web site:
ibm.com/redbooks
Help from IBM
IBM Support and downloads
ibm.com/support
IBM Global Services
ibm.com/services
44
IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on System x with SmartCloud Entry
Back cover
IBM Reference Configuration
for VMware on System x with
SmartCloud Entry
Understand
components of the
IBM Reference
Configuration
IBM SmartCloud Entry provides a fully integrated software stack for
transforming a virtualized environment to a cloud environment. The
intuitive self-service portal allows users to get up and running quickly.
Built-in workload metering and additional tools enable tight controls
and planning.
Learn about
infrastructure and
planning steps
The IBM Reference Configuration for VMware on IBM System x with
SmartCloud Entry provides an affordable, easy to deploy, private cloud
architecture with configurations based on leading-edge technology
from IBM, VMware, and Juniper Networks. The reference configuration
is for midsized companies who need simpler and affordable IT
solutions, without compromising on functionality. IBM and VMware,
world leaders in enterprise-class IT solutions, are now bringing IT
solutions tailored to the midmarket.
Follow preferred
practices to create
the solution
This IBM Redpaper provides setup, configuration, and deployment
details for the reference configuration, and is intended for IT
professionals who are familiar with software and hardware setup, and
configuration.
®
Redpaper
INTERNATIONAL
TECHNICAL
SUPPORT
ORGANIZATION
BUILDING TECHNICAL
INFORMATION BASED ON
PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE
IBM Redbooks are developed
by the IBM International
Technical Support
Organization. Experts from
IBM, Customers and Partners
from around the world create
timely technical information
based on realistic scenarios.
Specific recommendations
are provided to help you
implement IT solutions more
effectively in your
environment.
For more information:
ibm.com/redbooks
REDP-4853-00
™
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