Broadcast Warehouse TX150 Manual
TX150/300 FM Broadcast Transmitter
Technical Manual
v2.1
No part of this manual may be re-produced in any form without prior written permission from BW Broadcast.
The information and specifications contained in this document is subject to change at any time without notice.
Copyright 2012 BW Broadcast
www.bwbroadcast.com
WARNING
This transmitter should never be operated without a suitable antenna or test dummy
load! Failure to observe this requirement may result in damage to the transmitter
that is not covered by the warranty.
IMPORTANT
This transmitter has been shipped with the internal stereo generator enabled. The
internal jumper J5 (MPX loop-through) is set to ON.
If you intend to connect a MPX signal to the MPX input
BNC connector you will need to move J5 (MPX loopthrough) to the OFF position.
Examples of configurations requiring setting J5 to OFF
include:
MPX Loopthrough Jumper
in off position
●● Routing the internal MPX signal through an external RDS encoder.
●● Connecting an external audio processor or stereo generator to the
transmitter.
●● Connecting a re-broadcast or STL receiver to the transmitter.
Consult the manual for further information on the transmitter’s jumpers and connections.
CONTENTS
1.Introduction
1.1
TX FM Transmitter
1.2Warranty
1.3Safety
1.4
Quick setups
1.5
Front And Rear Panels
1.6
Control And Monitor LCD
2.
Installation And Setup
2.1
Frequency Setup
2.2
R.F. Power Setup
2.3Alarms
2.4
RS232 Control & Monitoring
2.41 Windows remote control application
2.42 Terminal control of the transmitter
2.5
Modes Of Operation
2.51 A guide to the jumpers
2.52 Multiplex / Broadband Input
2.53 Stereo
2.54
Mono
2.6
Other Setup Considerations
3.
Technical data
3.1Specifications
3.2
Circuit Description
3.21
Combo board
3.22 LCD control board
3.23 Power amplifier board
3.3
Block Diagram
3.4
Internal Wiring / Case Overview
3.5Schematics
3.51
Combo section
3.511
DSP Limiter section
3.512 Stereo Encoder section
3.513
Exciter section
3.514
Digital Input Section
3.52 LCD control section
3.53 Power amplifier section
3.6
Parts List
3.61 Combo board parts list
3.62 LCD control board parts list
3.63 Power amplifier board parts list
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 3
Introduction
1.1 TX150/300 FM TRANSMITTER
The BW Broadcast TX150/300 is a high specification FM broadcast transmitter. Its broadband “no-tune” design allows 87.5108 MHz operation from internal direct reading rotary switches or the front panel LCD frequency control system if enabled.
Digital PWM techniques provide an easily adjustable and accurate automatic level controlled R.F. output of the MOS-FET
power amplifier stage. With integrated multi-band DSP technology the TX150/300 ideal for creating a loud, punchy, on-air
presence.
A metering system offering accuracy normally found on specialist test equipment is available at a glance on the LCD graphics display. Partnered with the simple controls and clear menus a new level of ease of setup and installation is achieved.
Local and remote personal computer control and metering are achievable via RS232 interface and there's an alarm I/O and
trigger I/O connectors for full system flexibility.
The four band digital signal processor features automatic gain control, multiband leveling, and distortion cancelling clippers
to limit audio level; keeping your signal to a maximum in both level and quality.
The FM modulator section employs a dual speed “virtual VFO” system for extremely low audio distortion and excellent stereo performance. A built in high specification stereo encoder provides crystal clear stereo sound and combined with the internal limiter a fully compliant “plug and play” all in one low power broadcast transmitter.
For future compatibility all settings are switchable with on board jumpers and dip switches. The stereo and processing settings can be switched in and out to suit the requirements of any external broadcast equipment you may have now and in the
future.
The lightweight mains input design ensures a high reliability efficient design compatible with any mains system in the world.
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 4
Introduction
1.2WARRANTY
BW Broadcast warrants the mechanical and electronic components of this product to be free of defects in
material and workmanship for a period of two (2) years from the original date of purchase, in accordance with
the warranty regulations described below. If the product shows any defects within the specified warranty period
that are not due to normal wear and tear and/or improper handling by the user, BW Broadcast shall, at its sole
discretion, either repair or replace the product. If the unit has a manufacturers fault within twenty eight (28)
days then BW Broadcast will pay the freight at their discretion. If the warranty claim proves to be justified,
the product will be returned to the user freight prepaid. Warranty claims other than those indicated above are
expressly excluded.
Return authorisation number
To obtain warranty service, the buyer (or his authorized dealer) must call BW Broadcast during normal business
hours BEFORE returning the product. All inquiries must be accompanied by a description of the problem. BW
Broadcast will then issue a return authorization number.
Subsequently, the product must be returned in its original shipping carton, together with the return authorization
number to the address indicated by BW Broadcast. Shipments without freight prepaid will not be accepted.
Warranty regulations
Warranty services will be furnished only if the product is accompanied by a copy of the original retail dealer’s
invoice. Any product deemed eligible for repair or replacement by BW Broadcast under the terms of this
warranty will be repaired or replaced within 30 days of receipt of the product at BW Broadcast.
If the product needs to be modified or adapted in order to comply with applicable technical or safety standards
on a national or local level, in any country which is not the country for which the product was originally
developed and manufactured, this modification/adaptation shall not be considered a defect in materials or
workmanship. The warranty does not cover any such modification/adaptation, irrespective of whether it was
carried out properly or not. Under the terms of this warranty, BW Broadcast shall not be held responsible for any
cost resulting from such a modification/adaptation.
Free inspections and maintenance/repair work are expressly excluded from this warranty, in particular, if caused
by improper handling of the product by the user. This also applies to defects caused by normal wear and tear, in
particular, of faders, potentiometers, keys/buttons and similar parts.
Damages/defects caused by the following conditions are not covered by this warranty:
Misuse, neglect or failure to operate the unit in compliance with the instructions given in BW Broadcast user
or service manuals. Connection or operation of the unit in any way that does not comply with the technical
or safety regulations applicable in the country where the product is used. Damages/defects caused by force
majeure or any other condition that is beyond the control of BW Broadcast. Any repair or opening of the unit
carried out by unauthorized personnel (user included) will void the warranty.
If an inspection of the product by BW Broadcast shows that the defect in question is not covered by the
warranty, the inspection costs are payable by the customer.
Products which do not meet the terms of this warranty will be repaired exclusively at the buyer’s expense. BW
Broadcast will inform the buyer of any such circumstance. If the buyer fails to submit a written repair order
within 6 weeks after notification, BW Broadcast will return the unit C.O.D. with a separate invoice for freight and
packing. Such costs will also be invoiced separately when the buyer has sent in a written repair order.
Warranty transferability
This warranty is extended exclusively to the original buyer (customer of retail dealer) and is not transferable to
anyone who may subsequently purchase this product. No other person (retail dealer, etc.) shall be entitled to
give any warranty promise on behalf of BW Broadcast.
Claims for damages
Failure of BW Broadcast to provide proper warranty service shall not entitle the buyer to claim (consequential)
damages. In no event shall the liability of BW Broadcast exceed the invoiced value of the product.
Other warranty rights and national law
This warranty does not exclude or limit the buyer’s statutory rights provided by national law, in particular, any
such rights against the seller that arise from a legally effective purchase contract. The warranty regulations
mentioned herein are applicable unless they constitute an infringement of national warranty law.
BW Broadcast Technical Manual
Page 5
Introduction
1.3SAFETY
MAINS VOLTAGE
This equipment operates from an AC power source of between 90 and 265 volts. There are hazardous
voltages present internally. PLEASE OBSERVE CAUTION WITH THE COVER REMOVED.
SWITCHED MODE POWER SUPPLY HAZARD
Please note that the power supply units in this equipment is of the switched mode variety and have lethal
voltages present internally. The switched mode supplies are universal input fully approved type. They are
non serviceable modules and should be fully replaced should they fail.
FUSES
Only use fuses with the specified voltage and current ratings as stated on the back panel. Failure to do so
may increase the risk of equipment failure, shock and fire hazard.
R.F.
The N type R.F. power output socket contains R.F. voltages which may burn or present a shock. Please
make sure that the equipment is connected to an adequately rated load or antenna system while in operation.
TOXIC HAZARD
This equipment includes R.F. components that may contain Beryllium oxide which is a highly toxic substance that could be hazardous to health if inhaled or ingested. Care should be taken when replacing or
discarding such devices. Seek expert advice from the manufacturer should you physically damage a device
that contains Berillyium Oxide. The main R.F. output power transistor contains Beryllium oxide.
OTHER SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS
Do not operate this equipment in the presence of flammable gases, fumes or liquids
Do not expose this equipment to rain or water.
CE CONFORMANCE
This device complies with the requirements of the 1995/5/EC Radio and Telecommunications Terminal Equipment (R&TTE). The equipment will meet or exceed the following
standards: EN 60215:1996 (Safety Requirements for Radio Transmitting Equipment),
EN 301 489-11 (ERM/EMC for Radio Equipment, Part 11 Specific Conditions for FM
Transmitters), EN 302 018-2 ERM (Transmitting Equipment for FM Radio Broadcasting
service)
The operating frequencies of this transmitter may not be harmonised in the intended
countries of use. The user must obtain a license before using the product in the intended country of use. Ensure respective country licensing requirements are complied with.
Limitations of use can apply in respect of operating frequency, transmitter power and/or
channel spacing.
WEEE COMPLIANCE
BW Broadcast Ltd is registered with Northern Compliance PCS number WEE/P3438PR/
SCH and has been issued with WEE/FA0268RX as its unique producer ID by the appropriate environment agency. BW Broadcast Ltd full comply with it explicit responsibilities,
subject to WEEE Collections Policy outlined in their General Terms and conditions of
Sale, when it sells Electrical and Electronic Equipment (EEE) to B2B customers in the
UK and EU.
This appliance has been designed and manufactured with high quality materials and components that can
be recycled and reused. Electronic appliances are liable to contain parts that are necessary in order for the
system to work properly but which can become a health and environmental hazard if they are not handled
and disposed of in the proper way. Consequently, please do not throw your inoperative appliance with the
household waste. Having purchased this appliance it is your responsibility to dispose of this equipment
appropriately.
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 6
Introduction
1.4 Quick set-up guide
Using a transmitter stand-alone (without RDS encoder)
This set-up uses the built-in audio limiter and stereo generator. The transmitter as shipped from factory is already
configured for this set-up, so there are no internal changes to be made.
1. Place a transmitter in a well ventilated space. If it's rack-mounted, leave at least 1U free above and below it for adequate cooling.
2. Connect the antenna to the RF output 7/16" connector on the back of the transmitter.
3. Connect the left and right program audio signals to the XLR input connectors on the back of the transmitter.
4. Plug the power cord into the power supply module on the rear panel of the transmitter.
5. Once the transmitter is operating, set the correct carrier frequency from the front panel (this can also be
locked and set internally).
6. Adjust the desired power output level using front panel. Check reflected power is OK.
That finishes the set-up. A much more detailed explanation is available in the appropriate sections of this manual as
well as additional options. You should read through it!
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 7
Introduction
1.4 Quick set-up guide
Using a transmitter stand-alone with RDS encoder
This set-up uses the built-in audio limiter and stereo generator.
1. Remove the screws holding the smaller section of lid (above the power supply module) and place to one
side.
2. Locate the main board on the right side of the transmitter. Locate jumper
J5 right behind the BNC connectors. Move it to left position (Loopthrough off).
3. Reassemble the lid back on.
4. Place a transmitter in a well ventilated space. If it's rack-mounted,
MPX Loopthrough Jumper
in off position
leave at least 1U free above and below it for adequate cooling.
5. Connect the antenna to the RF output 7/16" connector on the back of the transmitter.
6. Connect the left and right program audio signals to the XLR input connectors on the back of the transmitter.
7. Connect the Baseband/MPX output on the back of the transmitter to
RDS encoder
MPX
OUT IN
Aud
the MPX input of the RDS encoder.
8. Connect the MPX output of the RDS encoder to the MPX input on the
back of the transmitter.
RF OUT
9. Plug the power cord into the power supply module on the rear panel of
the transmitter.
10.Once the transmitter is operating, set the correct carrier frequency
IN OUT
MPX
BW Broadcast
Transmitter
BW
T
from the front panel (this can also be locked and set internally).
11. Adjust the desired power output level using front panel. Check reflected power is OK.
MPX connections
tion level.
RDS encoder
Audio processor
12.Check the documentation that came with your RDS encoder on how to set/check
the proper RDS injecMPX
OUT IN
MPX
IN OUT
That finishes the set-up. A much more detailed explanation is available in the appropriate sections of this manual
as well as additional options. You should read through it!
RF OUT
IN OUT
MPX
BW Broadcast
Transmitter
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 8
Introduction
1.4 Quick set-up guide
Using a transmitter with external audio processor/stereo generator
but without RDS encoder
1. Remove the screws holding the smaller section of lid (above the power supply module) and place to one
side.
2. Locate the main board on the right side of the transmitter. Locate jumper
J5 right behind the BNC connectors. Move it to left position (Loopthrough off).
3. Reassemble the lid back on.
MPX Loopthrough Jumper
in off position
4. Place a transmitter in a well ventilated space. If it's rack-mounted,
leave at least 1U free above and below it for adequate cooling.
5. Connect the antenna to the RF output 7/16" connector on the back of the transmitter.
6. Connect the MPX output of your audio processor (or stereo generator) to the MPX input on the back of
the transmitter.
RDS encoder
7. Plug the power cord into the power supply module on the rear panel of
MPX
OUT IN
Audio processor
the transmitter.
MPX
OUT IN
8. Once the transmitter is operating, set the correct carrier frequency
from the front panel (this can also be locked and set internally).
RF OUT
IN OUT
MPX
RF OUT
9. Adjust the desired power output level using front panel. Check reflected power is OK.
BW Broadcast
Transmitter
BW Broadcast
Transmitter
10.Check the modulation level - if the modulation level is low, adjust the
MPX output level on your audio processor (or stereo generator) and/
or the MPX input level on the back of the transmitter. The maximum
modulation should not exceed 75kHz.
MPX connections
11. Check the documentation that came with your audio processor on how to
Audio processor
MPX
OUT IN
RDS encoder
set/check the proper pilot injection level.
IN OUT
MPX
Audio processor
MPX
OUT
That finishes the set-up. A much more detailed explanation is available in the appropriate sections of this manual
as well as additional options. You should read through it!
SCA PILOT
IN
OUT
MPX
IN OUT
RF OUT
IN OUT
MPX
BW Broadcast
Transmitter
BW Broadcast technical manual
RF OUT
IN OUT
MPX
BW Broadcast
Transmitter
Page 9
Introduction
1.4 Quick set-up guide
Using a transmitter with external audio processor/stereo generator
and with RDS encoder (in-line connection)
1. Remove the screws holding the smaller section of lid (above the power supply module) and place to one
side.
2. Locate the main board on the right side of the transmitter. Locate jumper
RDS encoder
MPX
OUT IN
Audio
J5 right behind the BNC connectors. Move it to left position (Loopthrough off).
3. Reassemble the lid back on.
4. Place a transmitter in a well ventilated space. If it's rack-mounted,
leave at least 1U free above and below it for adequate cooling.
MPX Loopthrough Jumper
IN OUT
RF OUT
in off position
MPX
BW Broadcast
Transmitter
BW
Tra
5. Connect the antenna to the RF output 7/16" connector on the back of the transmitter.
6. Connect the MPX output of your audio processor (or stereo generator) to the MPX input of your RDS encoder.
7. Connect the MPX output of your RDS encoder to the MPX input
Audio processor
RDS encoder
on the back of the transmitter.
MPX
OUT IN
8. Plug the power cord into the power supply module on the rear
panel of the transmitter.
MPX
IN OUT
9. Once the transmitter is operating, set the correct carrier fre-
quency from the front panel (this can also be locked and set internally).
10.Adjust the desired power output level using front panel. Check
reflected power is OK.
RF OUT
IN OUT
MPX
BW Broadcast
Transmitter
11. Check the modulation level - if the modulation level is low, adjust
the MPX output level on your audio processor (or stereo generator), RDS encoder and/or the MPX input level on the back of the
transmitter. The maximum modulation should not exceed 75kHz.
MPX connections
12.Check the documentation that came with your audio processor on how to set/check the proper pilot
injection level.
13.Check the documentation that came with your RDS encoder on how to set/check the proper RDS injection level.
That finishes the set-up. A much more detailed explanation is available in the appropriate sections of this manual
as well as additional options. You should read through it!
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 10
Introduction
1.4 Quick set-up guide
Using a transmitter with external audio processor/stereo generator
and with RDS encoder (sidechain connection)
This is the best connection in terms of pilot and RDS subcarrier phase syncronization and MPX spectrum cleanliness.
1. Remove the screws holding the smaller section of lid (above the power supply module) and place to one
side.
RDS encoder
MPX
OUT IN
Audio processor
2. Locate the main board on the right side of the transmitter. Locate jumper
MPX
OUT IN
J5 right behind the BNC connectors. Move it to left position (Loopthrough off).
3. Reassemble the lid back on.
RF OUT
IN OUT
MPX
RF OUT
MPX Loopthrough Jumper
IN OUT
MPX
in off position
BWspace.
Broadcast
4. Place a transmitter in a well ventilated
If it's rack-mounted,BW Broadcast
Transmitter
leave at least 1U free above and below
it for adequate cooling.
Transmitter
5. Connect the antenna to the RF output 7/16" connector on the back of the transmitter.
6. Connect the MPX output of your audio processor (or stereo
generator) to the MPX input on the back of the transmitter.
Audio processor
generator) to the Reference input on your RDS encoder.
MPX
OUT IN
MPX
OUT
RDS encoder
RDS encoder
Audio processor
7. Connect the Pilot output of your
audio processor (or stereo
SCA PILOT
IN
OUT
MPX
IN OUT
input on your audio processor.
PILOT RDS
IN
OUT
8. Connect the MPX output of your RDS encoder to the SCA
9. Plug the power cord into the power supply module on the rear
panel of the transmitter.
RF OUT
IN OUT
MPX
10.Once the transmitter is operating,
set the correct carrier freBW Broadcast
Transmitter
quency from the front panel (this
can also be locked and set
internally).
11. Adjust the desired power output level using front panel.
Check reflected power is OK.
RF OUT
IN OUT
MPX
BW Broadcast
Transmitter
MPX connections
12.Check the modulation level - if the modulation level is low, adjust the MPX output level on your audio
processor (or stereo generator) and/or the MPX input level on the back of the transmitter. The maximum
modulation should not exceed 75kHz.
13.Check the documentation that came with your audio processor on how to set/check the proper pilot
injection level.
14.Check the documentation that came with your RDS encoder on how to set/check the proper RDS injection level.
That finishes the set-up. A much more detailed explanation is available in the appropriate sections of this manual
as well as additional options. You should read through it!
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 11
BW Broadcast technical manual
2
ANALOGUE
RIGHT
3
4
6
OUT
LEVEL
IN
BASEBAND/MPX
FSK INPUT
5
7
RS232
I/O - ALARMS
LAN
8
9
1.
Left audio input/Digital audio input
2.
Analoge/Digital input selector
3.
Right audio input
4.
MPX output
5.
FSK input (optional)
6.
MPX level control
7.
MPX input
8.
LAN Socket (optional)
9.
I/O + Alarms
T X 3 0 0
10.RS232
11.
R.F. output
12.
Power socket
13.
Chassis ground post
14.
RF monitor output -50dBc (not suitable for
DIGITAL
LEFT/MONO
/DIGITAL
1
T X 3 0 0
14
15.
16.
17.
18.
10
VSWR
FAULT
16
TEMP
Page 12
DIGITAL
3
1
ANALOGUE
RIGHT
2
LAN
OUT
LEVEL
BASEBAND/MPX
RS232
PIN1GND
IN
I/O - ALARMS
PIN2 Hot (+)
PIN3 Cold (-)
FSK INPUT
VSWR
ANALOGUE
XLR Audio input connectors
DIGITAL
FAULT
TEMP
harmonic measurements)
Modulation monitor output (buffered multiplex,
nominally 3V peak-to-peak for 75kHz)
VSWR and temperature fault LEDs
LCD display
LEFT/MONO
RIGHT
/DIGITAL
Up / Down frequency buttons
RF OUTPUT
11
LEFT/MONO
/DIGITAL
15
IN
9
4
8
3
7
2
6
1
I/O - ALARMS
5
LAN
18
12
RF OUTPUT
13
Pin 1
Pin 2
Pin 3
Pin 4
RF OUTPUT
Pin 5
Pin 6
Pin 7
Pin 8
Pin 9
LEVEL
MOD failure alarm (TTL
PLL failure alarm (TTL)
RF failure alarm (TTL)
RF Mute
+18V DC 200mA
MOD failure alarm (OC)
PLL failure alarm (OC)
RF failure alarm (OC)
GND
RS232
I/O - Alarms D-type connector pinout:
OUT
BASEBAND/MPX
FSK INPUT
17
Introduction
1.5 FRONT AND REAR PANELS
Introduction
1.6 CONTROL AND MONITOR LCD
The front panel LCD graphics display has seven screens (shown below). These allow monitoring of the transmitter’s R.F, audio and other parameters and the adjustment (if internally allowed) of the transmitter’s frequency. You
can move through the screens by pressing the NEXT button, which will display them in the following order.
Main parameter screen.
This shows together the three most important transmitter
parameters. Frequency, R.F. output power and the peak
deviation.
Frequency display and control
This screen will display the frequency and PLL locked condition. The up and down buttons will allow 100 kHz frequency
steps from 87.5 to 108Mhz if the internal switches are set
to 4440. If the frequency is set internally with the rotary
switches then the up / down buttons will give a ‘not allowed’
message
Peak deviation
This display indicates the peak and average deviation. Peak
deviation is shown both numerically and as a moving single
pixel wide bar. Average deviation is shown with the solid
black bar. Over-deviation will display an exclamation ( ! )
Power supply
Power amplifier voltage is shown together with the transmitters secondary supply that feeds the exciter section. The
power amplifier voltage will vary depending on set output
power and the presence of any fault conditions which also
cut the voltage back and with it the R.F. output.
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 13
Installation and setup
2.1 FREQUENCY SETUP
The Frequency can be set on the transmitter in one of two ways:
1. From internal direct reading decimal switches on the main board
2. From the front panel LCD display and front panel buttons.
Many radio regulatory bodies stipulate that the transmitters parameters including the frequency must not be easily
changed from the front panel. To meet this requirement you will need to set the frequency internally with the dial
switches.
The switches have a silkscreen diagram next to them on the board (see diagram below) clearly indicating what
each switch represents.
The top dial switch represents the value selected x 10 Mhz with the exception of ‘0’ which represents 10 so when
selected would equal 100 Mhz.
The second dial switch represents the value selected x 1 Mhz.
The third dial switch represent the value selected x .1 Mhz (100 kHz)
The bottom switch represents the value selected x .0125 Mhz (12.5 kHz)
Frequency selection switches on main board
For example:
FREQ
SWITCHES (MHz)
X10
X1
X.1
X.0125
87.90
98.75
100.00
104.225
108.00
‘8’
‘9’
‘0’
‘0’
‘0’
‘7’
‘8’
‘0’
‘4’
‘8’
‘9’
‘7’
‘0’
‘2’
‘0’
‘0’
‘4’
‘0’
‘2’
‘0’
As you can see, the switches directly read the frequency with the
exception of frequencies above 100 Mhz, where the top switch being set at ‘0’ represents ‘10’. The X0.125 ‘offset’
switch is only used when you want to provide a shift to the carrier of between 12.5 kHz and 112.5 kHz. Note that
setting the switch on 8 or 9 will have the same effect as setting the previous switch (100 kHz) 1 position higher,
as 8 represents 100 kHz on the 12.5 kHz switch. 8 x 0.125MHz = 0.1MHz = 100kHz
The LCD display on the front panel will display the frequency that you have set on the internal switches. If you try
to adjust the frequency with the front panel up / down buttons you will get a ‘ NOT ALLOWED ‘ message appearing on the LCD display. This protects against unauthorized front panel frequency changes when the frequency
has been set internally with the dial switches.
The TX will load the switch values at power up. You will need to remove the mains power to the transmitter
and then reapply it if you want to change the frequency by using the direct reading switches
LCD front panel frequency selection.
If you want to control the frequency from the front panel LCD control system you will need to set the internal switches to 4440. The
transmitter will pass frequency control to the LCD control system
and the frequency can be moved up and down by pressing the
NEXT button until the frequency menu is displayed. The other two
buttons control the UP and DOWN frequency selection. PLL lock
status is also displayed on this screen.
The LCD readout will only display frequencies in 100Khz steps. Any frequency offsets derived from the
internal 12.5kHz offset switch will not show on the LCD. Consult a frequency counter if using offsets.
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 14
Installation and setup
2.2 R.F. POWER SETUP
The R.F. power output from the transmitter can be controlled by an analogue potentiometer (POT) or from the
front panel LCD screen or a combination of both.
ANALOGUE POWER CONTROL
If the frequency is set internally with the dial switches you will not be able to adjust the power from the LCD
screen. This is to comply with regulatory body’s that stipulate that the transmitter is not to have it’s parameters
adjustable from the front panel. In this case you must use the maximum power set control to set the transmitters
power. This control will give the full power range adjustment.
If the transmitter has been internally set to 4440 with the dial switches then you can also control the power from
the LCD screen’s R.F. power menu’s up and down buttons. A “not allowed” message will be displayed to the user
if the dial switches are not set to 4440
FUSE
RS232 power control will over-ride the power control restrictions caused by having the frequency set
internally (not set to 4440).
DIGITAL POWER CONTROL
4
When the power is to be controlled from the front panel the max power set POT takes on a new role of setting the
maximum power of the transmitter. If you want the LCD screen to have full power range control of the transmitter
you
that the max
power set control is at maximum power. Otherwise your control
range 12
may 13
5
6will 7need to ensure
8
9
10
11
be limited. This feature enables you to limit the transmitters maximum power to a fixed level but to still allow the
LCD screen to provide adjustment of the R.F. power down from that maximum power set point. This can be desirable in transmitter hire situations where you wish to govern the maximum
output to a fixed level but to allow the customer (hirer of the transmitter)
to run the power of the transmitter at a lower level if they so decide.
150/300 FM TRANSMITTER
The maximum power set is positioned to the lower left of the LCD screen
on some models, other models may not have the hole in the front panel
B W - T X 6 0 0
and you will need to remove the lid of the transmitter to access the adjustment which will be in the same position but on the other side of the PCB. You will need a small ‘tweaker style’ flathead screwdriver to adjust the pot. This control is quite delicate so try to not be too heavy handed in it’s adjustment.
FUSE
Please note that the VSWR and temperature protection circuitry will turn back the R.F. power if a fault condition exists. Make sure that you have a good VSWR (low reverse power reading) before setting the R.F.
power as the removal of a fault condition may cause the R.F. power to increase.
4
5
6 7
8
9
11
10
12
13
12
13
RF POWER MUTE (analogue)
There is a pin (2) on the back panel I/O D-type that can be pulled low to mute the transmitters RF power.
25/50 FM TRANSMITTER
1
2
6
3
7
4
8
5
9
RF POWER MUTE (digital/RS232)
4
1 FM TRANSMITTER
The windows application has a button that can toggle the RF output of the trans5
6 7
8
9
mitter.
FUSE
The transmitters RF power output can be muted via the RS232 control system.
Terminal software can mute/unmute the RF power with the ‘o’ and ‘f’ commands
respectively.
10
11
Please consult the RS232 section of this manual for more information on
controlling the transmitter remotely.
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 15
Installation and setup
2.3ALARMS
The transmitter has three alarms that can alert the broadcaster if one of the following fails:
R.F. POWER, PLL LOCK, MODULATION
The alarms when set are available on the back panel 9-pin D-type. Each alarm has an open collector (OC) and
a TTL level contact on the D-type. The alarm induced active open collectors can pull down any external signals
and the TTL outputs will provide a 5 Volt indication. The alarm is also visible if any RS232 monitoring (through
Windows Remote Control application or terminal software) is employed.
For the alarms to function correctly the transmitter must be left on the default menu screen. This is the screen that
displays frequency, R.F. power and peak deviation. To ensure that the alarm system functions correctly the transmitter will return to the default menu screen if the LCD is left on another menu screen for more than 5 minutes.
R.F. POWER.
The R.F. power alarm will be set if the R.F. power falls below a threshold level during normal operation.
This threshold is set below the normal operating lowest wattage available from the transmitter. If you
require a different setting for the alarm, contact our tech dept. The alarm will only be set if the fault condition exists for sixty seconds or more. You will need to reset the transmitter to clear the alarm/s or you can
do it via RS232 connection.
PLL LOCK.
The PLL lock alarm will be set if the transmitters falls out of frequency lock during normal operation. The
alarm will only be set if the fault condition exists for sixty seconds or more. You will need to reset the transmitter to clear the alarm/s or you can do it via RS232 connection.
MODULATION FAILURE.
The Modulation failure alarm will be set if during normal operation the peak deviation of the transmitter
drops and remains below 16 kHz. The 16 kHz alarm level allows the alarm to be set if the audio feed to
the transmitter fails even if the stereo pilot internal to the transmitter is still modulating the transmitter. The
alarm will only be set if the fault condition exists for sixty seconds or more. You will need to reset the transmitter to clear the alarm/s or you can do it via RS232 connection.
MORE INFO ON ALARMS
The three alarms are available on the back panel D-type connector. The pin-outs are shown on the rear
panel diagram. The three alarms are available as TTL level and as open collector outputs. The TTL level
outputs are active high in the event of an alarm. The open collector outputs are ON in the event of an alarm
and will pull down any external levels. The open collectors can sink 100 mA MAX with an absolute maximum switched voltage of 25 volts.
The D-type connector can also supply 18 volts at 200 mA that can be used for pull-ups on the open collector alarm outputs and for your own external switching circuitry.
The RS232 interface provides the ability to reset the alarms either through Windows Remote Control application or terminal software. More info is found in the following pages of the manual.
BW Broadcast can also customise the alarm / fault software to meet the requirements of major broadcasters and networks or supply N+1 solutions. More information on this and other custom features can be
obtained from our technical department.
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 16
Installation and setup
2.4 RS232 CONTROL AND MONITORING
The TX range of transmitters can be monitored or controlled from a personal computer either locally or remotely.
The Transmitters can “chat” either by a windows application or via a standard serial terminal program. The windows application is the more versatile option and is to be preferred but the ability to use a terminal program can
prove useful in the absence of the windows application or a computer that runs windows. The front panel should
not be used while the remote control is connected.
2.42 Windows application
The latest version of Windows Remote Control application can be downloaded from:
http://www.bwbroadcast.com
Installation
After downloading just click on the .msi file to run the set up program. The set up will place icons in both the
Windows start menu and on your desktop. Simply run the program by clicking on icon from either location.
Running the application
When started the application will resemble the picture to the right.
The application can connect to any COM port currently available on your computer that is running the application. Connect a serial cable between the RS232
connector on the rear of the transmitter and one of your computers COM ports. If
you are using a codec or other STL device then you may be able to connect that
device in line to act as part of the serial link.
Remote Control Applictiona startup screen
Selected the COM port you want to use and then click the Connect button.
If the application is able to connect to the transmitter then you will be presented with a screen similar to the one
above. Once connected you should be able to monitor all the parameters of the transmitter as well as being able
to mute the R.F., change the frequency, change the R.F. power and reset any alarm flags that have been set.
Remote Control Application
2.43 Terminal control of the transmitter
Installation
Please see the instructions for your terminal software package to find out how to connect to a remote serial
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 17
Installation and setup
device. The transmitter is internally set to communicate at 9600 bps, no parity with 1 stop bit and hardware flow control. This is commonly known as
9600 8N1. If your using Windows then you can use the pre-bundled terminal
program “Hyper-terminal”. This is located in the Programs -> Accessories
-> Communications folder accessible from the Start menu. Select direct to
COM port x where x is the com port that the transmitter is connected to. You
will be presented with a dialog box like the one shown to the right. Select
9600, 8, none ,1 with hardware flow control and then click OK.
If you are using another terminal program then you may need to consult the
documentation for that software, but it should be pretty much straight forward.
Operation
The transmitter will respond to certain key presses and each one has a certain function. See the list below for details of what key to press for each function.
Hyper Terminal connection
The most important key press is the ‘Enter’ key. This
will need to be pushed as soon as you connect to the
transmitter so you can get the transmitter to refresh
your terminal window with the transmitters status and
parameters.
FREQUENCY
FWD R.F. PWR
The transmitter won’t respond to any of the other key
presses until it detects the ‘Enter’ key is pressed. Once
the Enter key is pressed the transmitter will listen out
for other key presses for 60 seconds. This Initial ‘Enter’
key validation and time window is a safety feature to
prevent the transmitter from detecting an erroneous
key press such as R.F. mute and causing a service
affecting problem.
After performing a function you may need to press
the ‘Enter’ key to see a response to your function. For
example, If you pressed ‘o’ for R.F. Mute you would
not see the effect of the R.F. power change until you
refreshed the screen again because the terminal window would still be showing the transmitters R.F. power
from the previous ‘Enter’ (screen refresh) command,
prior to you performing the R.F. mute command.
The frequency change key’s will perform an automatic screen
refresh on there execution but the other keys will require a
refresh command to be sent to the transmitter for you to visibly
be able to see the effect of your command. In some circumstances you may need to press the refresh screen key several times in
order to see what’s happening. Take the R.F. mute function again
as an example. You press the R.F. mute key (‘o’) and then press
refresh screen key (‘ENTER’) to get a status update. The transmitters power control circuitry may not have had time to turn the
R.F. power down into full R.F. mute by the time it has sent back
to you the status requested by the refresh screen command. It
does no harm to wait a second or two before asking for a refresh
screen or by asking for several refresh screens by pressing the
'Enter’ key a few times in succession.
BW Broadcast technical manual
REV R.F. PWR
PEAK MOD
LIMITER G.R.
P.A. VOLTS
AUX VOLTS
P.A. TEMP
ALARMS
R.F. FAIL PLL FAIL MOD FAIL
1=alarm, 0=no alarm
Hyper Terminal window
KEY
1 2 3
4 5
6 o f ENTER COMMAND
Frequency up
Frequency down
R.F. power up
R.F. power down
reserved
Reset alarms (all to 0 / off)
Mute R.F.
Unmute R.F.
Refresh screen
Page 18
Installation and setup
2.5 MODES OF OPERATION
The transmitter is fully configurable and can be set up to support various modes of operation. The mode of operation is set by the configuration of the internal jumpers.
This chapter provides a guide to the various jumpers, followed by a brief description of the main modes of operation. The advanced setup procedure pages that follow provide a little more information on each mode as well as
providing some information on setting the equipment up accurately if you have access to some test equipment.
2.51 A guide to the hardware settings
Main combo board
Analog/Digital input selector





































  































DSW4
- DSW8 Factory Presets











 





















































J6
Pilot On/Off (stereo)















   


BW Broadcast technical manual

Pilot level control






















VR4










































 



 


























 










 






























 























DSW1 Pre-emphasis type
DSW2 Pre-emphasis time
constant
DSW3 Stereo/Mono Input









 








 



















































 









  


























































MPX loopthrough




J5




 
































 
Page 19
Installation and setup
The board leaves the factory with default settings which should be suitable for most locations and requirements.
Nevertheless, it is worth familiarizing yourself with all the options available, and checking that the settings are appropriate, as part of the installation process.
Analog/Digital input selector
The default position is analog.
Setting this to digital allows a digital (AES/EBU) input to be fed to the left XLR input.
Jumper 5: MPX loopthrough
The default position is ON (right).
This is where you want the audio left and right XLR sockets on the back of the board to be the signal source,
duly limited and stereo coded internally. Only when you want to use the rear BNC socket for a complete
multiplex (MPX) input for the broadcast should you change the position of this link.
If the link is in the OFF position, only signals from an external encoder or processor will be accepted, unless
the internal coder has been ‘loop-throughed’ (see later).
DIP switch 1: Pre-emphasis on / off
DIP switch 2: Pre-emphasis 50 / 75 µs
The default position is 50 µs (75 µs/Japan).
What is pre-emphasis?
Pre-emphasis is the treble boost that must be applied to all FM broadcasts to compensate for the treble cut
(de-emphasis) present in every receiver. The aim of this process is to reduce noise in the broadcast path
without degrading the audio.
The precise nature of the treble boost is defined by a time-constant in microseconds, which describes the
resistor/capacitor network that will produce the appropriate 6dB per octave treble boost curve.
There are two different standards in use worldwide.
In Europe and Africa, the standard is normally 50 µs. This represents a lift of about 3dB at 3 kHz, and
10dB at 10 kHz. In the Americas, and in Japan, more boost is in use with a network of 75 µs, about 3dB
up at 2 kHz.
The effects of pre-emphasis
The absence of any pre-emphasis will result in a broadcast sounding noticeably lacking in treble. Applying
50 µs pre-emphasis will correct the situation in European receivers (75 µs in Μs/Japan). If you apply 75 µs
pre-emphasis when 50 is called for, the received sound will have some 3dB shelved treble boost above 3kHz.
This is undesirable. Conversely, if you only apply 50 where 75 is required, there will be 3dB treble loss, which
is also undesirable. You should not have to change the pre-emphasis setting from 50 to 75 or back unless
you are relocating the installation abroad where the standard is different.
However, whenever pre-emphasis is deliberately applied to your audio at some point before it enters the XLR
sockets on the back of the board, by an external processor for example, then you must set the pre-emphasis
to off, because pre-emphasis must only be applied once. Double pre-emphasis must be avoided because it
will make a signal sound far too bright and toppy.
DIP switch 3: Stereo / Mono
The default position is stereo.
When the board is operating in mono, this should be set to mono. This ensures that when the board is
operating in mono, no stereo information is broadcast, and that a mono drive to either left or right inputs, or
a stereo input applied simultaneously to L and R inputs, will produce proper summed mono operation and no
spurious 38kHz signals.
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Installation and setup
DIP switches 4-8: Factory Presets
DSW4 - 8 off
Preset Bypass
All presets bypassed. For use with an external processor.
DSW4
AC (Factory Default)
A nice balance for lighter formats where loudness is not everything. A good all-rounder and ideal starting
point.
DSW5
HOT
Nice balance of bass and treble give the preset punch without sacrificing clarity.
DSW5
LOUD
A more competitive preset for crowded markets where loudness is important.
DSW5
SMOOTH
Controlled bass and highs with this preset will make your sound roll. Suits a variety of formats
DSW7
TALK
Higher gating thresholds and slower decays help to prevent ambience noise swelling. Perfect for talk format
stations.
It’s important to listen to and compare the options while passing a representative selection of typical programme material through the board. This will help you establish which sound you prefer.
Jumper 6: Pilot On/Off (stereo)
The default position is STEREO, pilot tone on.
This option allows you to remove or restore the stereo pilot tone, at a frequency of 19 kHz, normally sitting at
a level between 8 and 10% of total deviation.
It is this tone which alerts stereo FM receivers to the need to switch on their stereo decoders. The presence
of a pilot tone is all that is required for the ‘stereo’ beacon to light on a receiver. If no 19kHz tone is received,
the receiver will operate in mono. It will not decode any L-R information modulated on the 38 kHz subcarrier,
even when it is still present.
To make sure that no 38 kHz energy is generated during mono operation even from stereo inputs, set DIP
switch 3 to mono. This jumper does not affect the mono/stereo status of externally-coded MPX inputs.
Modes of operation
Multiplex / broadband input.
The Internal stereo encoder and audio limiter are not used. Wideband modulation is fed into the rear panel
BNC multiplex input socket. Allows external processors, encoders and rebroadcast receivers to be plugged
straight into the transmitter.
JUMPERS. J5 (OFF), J6 (NA), DSW1-8 (NA)
Stereo with no processing presets.
Left and Right audio are fed to the back panel balanced inputs and are pre-emphasized, peak limited, filtered and then fed to the internal stereo encoder for multiplex generation. This mode can be used when
you are using an external processor to provide the correct sound. The multiplex signal is then fed through
to the exciter module and to the back panel multiplex output BNC socket. See loopthrough mode below *
JUMPERS. J5 (ON), J6 (STEREO), DSW1 (ON / OFF), DSW2 (50 / 75), DSW3 (STEREO), DSW4-8 (OFF)
BW Broadcast technical manual
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Installation and setup
Stereo with processing preset. (Factory Setting)
As the above stereo with no processing mode except the internal processor is used. See loopthrough
below *
AC
(Default)
JUMPERS. J5 (ON), J6 (STEREO), DSW1 (ON / OFF), DSW2 (50 / 75), DSW3
(STEREO), DSW4 (ON), DSW5-8 (OFF)
HOT
JUMPERS. J5 (ON), J6 (STEREO), DSW1 (ON / OFF), DSW2 (50 / 75), DSW3
(STEREO), DSW4 (OFF), DSW5 (ON), DSW5-8 (OFF)
LOUD
JUMPERS. J5 (ON), J6 (STEREO), DSW1 (ON / OFF), DSW2 (50 / 75), DSW3
(STEREO), DSW4-5 (OFF), DSW6 (ON), DSW7-8 (OFF)
JUMPERS. J5 (ON), J6 (STEREO), DSW1 (ON / OFF), DSW2 (50 / 75), DSW3
SMOOTH (STEREO), DSW4-6 (OFF), DSW7 (ON), DSW8 (OFF)
TALK
JUMPERS. J5 (ON), J6 (STEREO), DSW1 (ON / OFF), DSW2 (50 / 75), DSW3
(STEREO), DSW4-7 (OFF), DSW8 (ON)
Mono from two independent channels.
Essentially the same as the stereo mode except the stereo pilot is disabled which will enable receivers to
receive you in mono. See loopthrough mode below *
JUMPERS. J5 (ON), J6 (MONO), DSW1 (ON / OFF), DSW2 (50 / 75), DSW3 (MONO), DSW4-8 (OFF /
ON)
Mono from one channel input.
Essentially the same as the stereo mode except the stereo pilot is disabled which will enable receivers to
receive you in mono. You can provide one audio feed to the transmitter via the left balanced input. See
loopthrough mode below *
JUMPERS. J5 (ON), J6 (MONO), DSW1 (ON / OFF), DSW2 (50 / 75), DSW3 (MONO), DSW4-8 (OFF / ON
* Loopthrough mode
The transmitter has been provided with a multiplex output socket to present the output of the internal
audio stages to the outside world. This allows you to connect the signal from the internal limiter and stereo
encoder to an external piece of equipment before being injected back into the transmitter via the multiplex
input socket.
The most common application is for RDS encoders which nearly always have a loopthrough connection for
this purpose. Other applications include SCA generators and composite clippers. You will need to set the
internal jumper to off for external loopthrough. This is to stop the internal stereo encoder’s multiplex output
signal from being fed to the exciter section internally.
More information on loopthrough setup is provided at the end of the advanced setup procedure section.
BW Broadcast technical manual
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Installation and setup
ADVANCED SETUP PROCEDURE
The front panel LCD metering is accurate enough to set up the transmitter in the absence of external test equipment. If you have access to a modulation meter and RF power meter then substitute those for references to the
relevant LCD display menu.
You will most likely need the following pieces of test equipment:
Audio signal generator capable of -10dbu to +10dbu
Voltmeter
2.52 Multiplex input only.
Open the lid of the transmitter and make sure that jumper J5 on the main board
is configured so that MPX Loopthrough is OFF. This makes sure that the internal
stereo encoder is not connected through to the modulator. Connect your wideband audio source (processor, coder or rebroadcast receiver) to the multiplex
input on the back panel. Setup your external equipment for its correct output
level making sure that it falls into the range of -6 to +10 dbu. Adjust the multiMPX Loopthrough Jumper
in off position
plex input level control on the back panel for a peak deviation of +/- 75kHz. The
peak deviation can be shown on the LCD system.
The factory setting for the multiplex input level is +6dBu. This corresponds to the
output level of our internal stereo encoder module. We recommend feeding this level input to the multiplex input
socket if it is available from the external equipment.
2.53Stereo.
The limiter can be disabled internally if you do not require it. This effectively allows any audio input signals
straight through to the stereo encoder unaltered. You may wish to disable the limiter when you have an external
processor or limiter that may be of a higher performance than the internal limiter in this transmitter. You can still
have the limiter active even with external limiters in operation. We leave that up to you. For safety purposes you
may wish to leave the clippers on the limiter and the 15 kHz filters in to provide extra protection when you are
unsure of the peak output characteristics of the external piece of equipment. When you know that the piece of
audio processing equipment is band-limited to 15 kHz and peak limited you can leave out the clippers safe in the
assumption that the external processor will be able to handle the level control completely.
Advanced setup procedure.
1. Firstly make sure that the exciter is set to your chosen operating frequency. If you have not already done so
then remove the top cover from the transmitter.
2. Connect the transmitter to a dummy load.
3. Turn on the transmitter and within 10 seconds it should lock to frequency.
4. If your audio feed has gone through an external processor prior to this transmitter then check to see if that unit
has pre-emphasis capability and if it is switched on. If it has pre-emphasis and it is enabled then you should set
the transmittor pre-emphasis DIP switch, set to off to ensure that only one set of pre-emphasis has been applied
throughout the broadcast chain. Otherwise, switch it to on and set DIP switch 2 to the correct setting for your
region, 75µs for the Americas and Japan and 50µs for the rest of the world. Turn the pre-emphasis off for now by
setting DIP switch 1 to the right. Make sure the loopthrough jumper J5 is switched to loopthrough and DIP switch
3 is set to stereo. Disable the stereo pilot by setting jumper J6 to mono.
These settings will allow any audio straight through the limiter and into the stereo encoder without any form of
level control apart from the peak level clippers, so we can set the system internal levels correctly.
5. Connect an audio source to both channels and apply a 400Hz tone with a level of +6dBu.
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 23
Installation and setup
6. Work out the the pilot level you intend to use. It is usually between 8 and 10 percent of the modulation with 9
percent being standard in most countries. 9 percent corresponds to 6.75 kHz deviation so for a total peak deviation of 75 kHz (the industry standard for 100 percent modulation) we need to adjust the multiplex level for a peak
deviation of 68.25 kHz (91 percent modulation). This corresponds to the total minus the intended pilot level that
we will re-introduce in a moment. We recommend further backing off the deviation by 4 % which equates to 3
kHz deviation. This 4 % acts as a guard-band for any small overshoots that may occur in the limiter and the stereo encoder filters. You should at this point with your tones applied have a peak deviation of 75 kHz - 6.75kHz (or
intended pilot level) - 3 kHz = 65.25kHz. If you have not already done so, adjust the multiplex input level on the
back panel to this level. If you are using the LCD display metering then 65 kHz would be an acceptable setting.
8. Re-instate the pilot by setting jumper J6 to STEREO. Now adjust the pilot level control VR4 for a peak deviation of 75kHz peak deviation (100 percent modulation)
The transmitter should now have the total multiplex and the pilot setup at the correct level.
9. Connect your studio feed to the transmitter. Turn the power off to the transmitter, connect your external antenna, reconnect the power and your on the air!
10. Monitor your total peak deviation with your real world audio material and check with the deviation display that
your peak deviation does not exceed 75 kHz. If you have set up the transmitter as per the instructions in this section then you should be within 1 kHz or so of this figure. If your deviation does exceed 75 kHz then adjust the
back panel multiplex control to keep your maximum deviation at 75 kHz.
2.54Mono.
Mono from one channel input: You can provide one audio feed to the transmitter via the left balanced input. This
has the advantage of supplying two exact audio signals to the stereo encoder section that will in turn cancel the
stereo subcarrier leaving only a pure mono signal with content falling to zero above 15 kHz.
Mono from two independent channels: A stereo feed can be supplied to the transmitter’s left and right inputs. If
DIP switch 3 is set to mono these will be summer to mono, ensuring the subcarrier contect is kept to a minimum.
The absence of the pilot will force tuners to decode the broadcast in mono.
Advanced setup procedure.
1. Firstly make sure that the exciter is set to your chosen operating frequency. If you have not already done so
then remove the top cover from the transmitter.
2. Connect the transmitter to a dummy load.
3. Turn on the transmitter and within 10 seconds it should lock to frequency.
4. Turn the pre-emphasis off for now by setting DIP switch 1 to the right. Make sure the loopthrough jumper J5 is
switched to loopthrough. Set DIP switch 3 to mono and disable the stereo pilot by setting jumper J6 to mono.
5. Connect an audio source to both channels and apply a 400Hz tone with a level of +6 dbu
6. Adjust the multiplex gain control on the back panel for a peak deviation of 72 kHz. This allows a 3 kHz guardband for slight overshoots that may occur in limiter and filters inside the system.
7. If your audio feed has gone through an external processor prior to this transmitter then check to see if that unit
has pre-emphasis capability and if it is switched on. If it has pre-emphasis and it is enabled then you should leave
the pre-emphasis DIP switch, set to off to ensure that only one set of pre-emphasis has been applied throughout
the broadcast chain. Otherwise, switch it back to on and set DIP switch 2 to the correct setting for your region,
75µs for the Americas and Japan and 50µs for the rest of the world.
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 24
Installation and setup
8. Connect as before. Turn the power off to the transmitter, connect your external antenna , reconnect your power
and your on the air!
10. Monitor your total peak deviation with your real world audio material and check with the deviation display that
your peak deviation does not exceed 75 kHz. If you have set up the transmitter as per the instructions in this section then you should be within 1 kHz or so of this figure. If your deviation does exceed 75 kHz then adjust the
back panel multiplex control to keep your maximum deviation at 75 kHz.
2.6 OTHER SETUP CONSIDERATIONS
LOOPTHROUGH
The rear panel BNC sockets provide an easy interface to the multiplex path. You can insert an external piece of
equipment between the multiplex output of the internal stereo encoder and the modulator section.
To connect an external piece of equipment consult the external equipments documentation. It should be as easy
as configuring the transmitter as per normal and then simply setting the internal Loopthrough jumper to OFF and
taking the multiplex output to the input of the external equipment and the output of the external equipment back
into the multiplex input socket. If the external equipment is not unity gain you may have to readjust the multiplex
input gain slightly to take account for any gain differences. Most loopthrough designed equipment is unity gain to
make setup and use as simple as possible.
FREQUENCY FINE TUNE ( WARNING, ADVANCED TECHNICIANS ONLY)
While the frequency is controlled by the phase locked loop system, the stability is governed by the stability of the
reference. A quartz crystal is used for the reference for its high stability however component ageing can affect the
frequency slightly over time. The frequency can be finely adjusted via VC1. This provides a small adjustment of
the VCO frequency when locked. This will have been adjusted at factory to the correct setting and the transmitter should remain within 1kHz of the channel required. If however the frequency does move off slightly due to
component ageing then you can adjust VC1 to trim the unmodulated carrier back onto channel. You will need a
frequency counter to monitor the output frequency of the un modulated transmitter when adjusting VC1.
LCD SYSTEM METERING ACCURACY
DISPLAYMeasurementAccuracy
POWER SUPPLYVolts+/-1 Volt
TEMPERATUREDegrees Centigrade+/-1 Degree
PEAK DEVIATIONkHz+/-1 kHz
RF POWERWatts5 %
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 25
Technical data
3.1SPECIFICATIONS
RF
Power
Connector
Harmonics
Spurious
Frequency range
Frequency steps
Frequency selection
Frequency control type
Frequency stability
MPX input
MPX input level
MPX input response
Modulation
Synchronous AM Noise
Asynchronouse AM Noise
STEREO
Subcarrier generation
Pilot
Pilot generation
Output level (BNC)
15 kHz filtering
Spurious
> 80 kHz
>160 kHz
Stereo separation
DSP LIMITER
Audio input levels
15W - 150W (TX150) 15W - 300W (TX300)
N-type 50 Ohm
better than 82 dBc
< -90 dBc
87.5 - 108 MHz
100 kHz from LCD or 12.5 kHz from internal switches
Internal switches or LCD system
Dual speed phase locked loop
< +/- 500 Hz (fine adjustment available)
BNC
MPX input level -10 dB to +10 dB (adjustable)
MPX input response +/- 0.3 dB, 5 Hz to 100 kHz
Direct frequency modulation
0.31% (at normal deviation)
0.18% (at centre frequency of 97.7MHz)
Microprocessor generated 8x over-sampled
19 kHz +/- 1 Hz (adjustable)
Microprocessor generated 16x over-sampled
(BNC) 0dB
> 40dB at 19 kHz
> -60dBr
> -80dBr
> 55dB (20Hz-15kHz)
Analogue input connectors
Digital input connectors
Digital sampling rate
Input CMRR
Frequency response
Input impedance
Pre-emphasis
Process modes
-10 to +24dBu (AGC)
+8dBu (Bypass)
XLR balanced (RF shielded)
XLR balanced (RF shielded)
32-96 kHz
> 60dB
20 Hz to 15 kHz +/- 0.5dB
10 kOhm
50 µs,75 µs and 0 µs (off)
Bypass, AC, Hot, Loud, Smooth, Talk
OTHER
Control system
External control/monitor
Size
Weight
Voltage input
Current input
Power connector
Switched mode approvals
3 buttons, 122x32 graphics display
I/O Alarms D9-type Male; RS232 D9-Type Female
482mm x89mm x 422mm
6.9 kg
110 - 260 VAC
110VAC - 4A / 220VAC - 2A
IEC, FUSED and switchable
UL / TUV / CE
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 26
Technical data
3.2 CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
The transmitter consists of three main circuit boards, two power supply modules and the associated wiring and
connectors. The power supplies are fully approved modules and won’t be discussed electrically except for the
connections to the other boards where appropriate.
The three PCB’s previously mentioned are the combo board, the power amplifier board and the control / LCD
board. The wiring and connection between the boards can be seen in the internal case diagram.
The combo board contains
1. DSP Audio limiter with pre-emphasis capability
2. High spec over-sampled digital stereo encoder
3. High spec low distortion PLL exciter
4. Power supply circuitry to supply various voltages to the different sections
5. A logic / control section to interface to external equipment
6. Control connections to the LCD control board
The Power amplifier board contains
1. A 2 stage 150/300 Watt FM amplifier
2. Low pass harmonic filter
3. VSWR bridge / coupler and power sniff circuitry
4. Temperature sensing circuitry
The Control / LCD board contains
1. A 122x32 LCD graphics display
2. Three front panel buttons for LCD control
3. Power control adjustment and transmitter fault / protection circuitry
4. An 8 bit microcontroller to control all the LCD functions, metering and alarm monitoring
We will describe the electrical workings of the transmitter from the audio input through to the RF output and will
attempt to explain how the three boards tie together and form the complete unit.
We will start at the audio input sockets on the back panel which are part of the combo board.
3.21 COMBO BOARD
Audio limiter description
Left and right audio signals are applied to balanced input XLR sockets on the back panel. The balanced audio
signals are fed to IC14 and IC13 which are configured as differential amplifiers to convert the balanced inputs to
unbalanced for the rest of the limiters circuitry. The output from the differential op-amps feed an oversampled ADC
(IC15). The digital input feeds into an AES/EBU decoder chip (IC12) with built-in SRC via an isolating transformer (TR1). The backpanel input source switch selects which input is fed into the four DSPs (IC8-IC11). Following
the digital signal processing the DAC (IC15) returns the signal to the analog domain in preparation for the stereo
encoding.
Stereo encoder description
The stereo encoder section is based around a high speed switch which is used to generate the multiplex at 38
kHz. The switch is controlled by microcontroller IC5 which supplies the timing signals to the switch at 304 kHz.
The high speed enables an over-sampled 38kHz subcarrier to be generated that is rock steady and spectrally
clean. As the signal is generated digitally no adjustments or setups are required for the encoder. The only adjustments on the encoder section are the stereo/mono control and the level of the stereo subcarrier. The 19kHz pilot
tone is also generated by the microcontroller and because of this the stereo separation is excellent due to the perfect timing between the pilot and the subcarrier. The 19 kHz pilot is also generated by over-sampling techniques
to produce a very low distortion pilot tone.
The audio from the DAC is buffered through IC2 and IC7. These buffer op-amps drive into the analogue switches
(IC6). The switches are controlled by the microcontroller IC5 and the output from the switches feed into three
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 27
Technical data
resistors R82,83,84 to provide a D/A type function producing the multiplex signal. The resistors are carefully
chosen to provide sine weighting for the reconstruction, which keeps the lower order harmonic content down to
almost zero. These three resistors are combined in virtual earth mixer op-amp IC4. The stereo pilot tone emerges
from the microcontroller as a 4 bit word which has sine weighting applied to it by resistors R87 to R94. At this
point, apart from 19 kHz, the pilot has no significant energy below 304 kHz. The pilot is fed through VR4 for
adjustment of the pilot level before being combined with the subcarrier at the virtual earth mixer op-amp IC4.
The complete stereo multiplex signal emerges from IC4 and is fed into a low-pass filter formed by L11,L12 and
C7-C11. This filter removes any high frequency products due to the sample rate. The filter is buffered by output
op-amp IC3 which also provides a fixed output level of +6dBu, which is fed to the multiplex output BNC socket on
the back panel, as well as to one side of the loopthrough jumper J5.
Exciter description
The principal frequency determining elements are inductor L1 and varicap diode VD1. These components,
together with transistors T4 and T5, form a cascade oscillator whose output is then buffered and amplified by RF
transistor T3. The RF output from T3 is impedance matched to the base of P.A. transistor T6 by RFT1, a 4 to 1
matching transformer. The nominal 5W power output from P.A. transistor T6 is impedance matched by coils L7
and L8 and associated capacitors C87, C92, C93 and C95 to the 50 ohm output socket CON4. A coaxial cable
carries the RF output from this socket to the RF input connector on the main power amplifier PCB.
The PLL circuit is primarily U3 which is a serially programmable PLL chip. The microcontroller U1 reads the dial
switches at power up and outputs a serial code to the PLL chip in a format that determines the output frequency
that the PLL will lock the transmitter to. If the microcontroller detects that the switches are set to 4440 then the
microcontroller will talk to the microcontroller on the control / LCD board to request the LCD display control system stored frequency. The PLL chip delivers raw control pulses to the loop filter built around op-amp U2. The
loop filter is a low-pass filter that takes the raw rectangular differential outputs from the PLL chip and creates a DC
voltage to apply to the frequency determining component, varicap diode VD1. The main time constant in the loop
filter is formed by resistor R4 driving C67 and R5 driving C129. The high resistance of R4 and R5 allows slow
charging of C67 and C129 from the PLL chip. The DC voltage derived from the output of the op-amp will be slow
to change in response to the raw PLL pulses due to the slow charging of those capacitors. This slow DC voltage
change is converted to slow frequency change by the varicap diode. U3 is an analogue switch that shorts out the
two high resistance resistors in the loop filter to allow faster charging of C67 and C129, and so, a faster change
of the output DC voltage from the filter. This faster changing voltage can allow the transmitter to get on frequency
faster. When the transmitter is on frequency the analogue switch stops shorting out the high resistance resistors
and the slow loop takes control, which greatly improves the audio response of the transmitter. The microcontroller U1 determines when to switch the analogue switch in and out by reading the lock detect signals from the PLL
chip. The microcontroller can also use this information to switch off transistor T3 with open collector configured T2
which mutes the RF output when the transmitter is out of lock. LED9 provides visual indication of the PLL locked
condition. The front panel control system will also display the locked condition when in the frequency display
screen.
Audio is fed into the modulation input of the exciter from external multiplex input connector CON7 which is a BNC
type or from the internal stereo encoder section by having jumper J5 set to loopthrough. The modulation level can
be adjusted from the back panel by the adjustment of variable resistor VR3 which is in the feedback loop of opamp IC18. The output of the op-amp feeds the modulation element, varicap diode VD1, via potential divider R22
and R23.
CON2 provides an interface to the control / LCD board. This ribbon cable interface provides connections for the
alarm signals to the back panel D-type from the microcontroller on the LCD board together with connections for
the modulation level and a serial interface which provides frequency and status information between the PLL
microcontroller on the combo board and the main system microcontroller on the LCD board.
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 28
Technical data
3.22 LCD CONTROL BOARD
The LCD control board is the heart of the transmitter. The board contains an eight bit microcontroller, LCD display,
a voltage regulator and a dual op-amp together with a few passive components.
CON1 provides a 10 way interface to the power amplifier board and its sensors. Some of the connections of
CON1 are routed around to the power supply modules. CON2 provides a 16 way interface to the combo board
providing power to the combo board as well as routing signals to the back panel D-type sockets for alarms/RS232
and returning modulation to the main microcontroller.
The voltage regulator REG1 and decoupling capacitors C1 and C2 takes the 18 volt auxillary supply from CON1
and regulate it down to 5 volts for the microcontroller and LCD circuitry. The microcontroller is a 40 pin 8 bit type
running at 8 MHz. The microcontroller has several ports that have various functions and connect to external components.
PORTA (6 bits) is primarily used for the analogue voltage inputs. Bit 1 the modulation, Bit 2 the AUX volts and Bit
3 the Fwd RF power. Bit 4 is not used and bit 5 of PORTA has a control connection to the LCD display.
PORTB (8 bits) has a few different functions. Bits 7,6 and 3 of the port are the alarm signal outputs and are routed off via CON2 to the D-type on the back of the combo board. Bit's 5,4 and 2 are connected to the front panel
buttons to allow navigation of the LCD functions. Bits 1 and 0 provide a 2 wire interface to the PLL microcontroller
on the combo board.
PORTC (8 bits) bits 0 and 1 are used to write information to the LCD display. Bit 2 is the pulse width modulator
output (PWM) and connects into unity gain DC amplifier op-amp IC2A. The voltage generated by the PWM is set
by the software in the microcontroller. This PWM level is then fed through potentiometer VR2 and smoothed by
C13 before being buffered by the aforementioned op-amp. PORTC bits 3-5 are not used. Bit’s 6 and 7 of PORTC
are used by the UART inside the microcontroller. These pins are RXD and TXD for the RS232 interface. They are
routed via CON2 to the back panel D-type.
PORTD's 8 bit's are interfaced to the 8 bit data bus of the LCD display. The data byte on PORTD can be latched
into the LCD display by the LCD control bits on PORTC.
PORTE (3 bits) has the remaining A/D inputs. Bit 0 is the PA volts, Bit 1 is the Rev RF power and bit 2 is for the
PA temperature.
The microcontrollers software reads all the analogue voltages, converts and displays them where neccessary and
outputs alarm signals in the event of a transmitter error. There are various passive components associated with
IC1. Each A/D port has input current limiting resistors R1-11 and decoupling capacitors C5-11. X1, C3 and C4
provide the 8 MHz signal for the clock of the microcontroller. R12 and R13 provide pull downs for correct operation of the internal processor communications channel. C12 provides supply decoupling for the microcontroller
and VR1 sets the contrast of the LCD display.
IC2 is a dual op-amp whose purpose is to control the output power of the transmitter. Side A of the op-amp is configured as a unity gain buffer for the PWM and was described previously. VR2 provides an adjustable DC level to
side B of the op-amp. Side B is configured as a DC amplifier with the gain set by R17, R18, R19, R20 and R25.
The larger the DC signal provided by side A and the larger the DC signal at the output of Side B. This DC signal
is used to turn down the output of the Power amplifiers power supply and with it the RF power output level.
LED3 and R20 provide a connection from the reverse RF power sensor into the input the non inverting input of
side B of the op-amp. LED3 only allows DC through above a certain level. Any DC above this level will increase
the output voltage from the op-amp and the RF power level will decrease. This forms the VSWR protection for
the transmitter. LED1 and LED2 also provide the same function but with the DC level this time being supplied
by the temperature sensor on the PA board. Too high a temperature will cause the DC level to exceed the turn
on point of the two diodes and voltage will once again turn up the op-amps voltage and turn down the RF power
level which should lower the temperature of the transmitter. The output from side B is fed to the switched mode
power supply of the power amplifier via R21 and CON1. R22 and C15 provide supply decoupling for the op-amp.
C14,15,16,17,18 provide further decoupling and feedback for the power control feedback loop formed around side
B of the op-amp.
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 29
Technical data
3.23 POWER AMPLIFIER BOARD
The RF signal from the exciter section of the combo board arrives at the MCX RF input connector CON1 via a
coaxial cable. From here the 50 ohm input impedance is matched to the gate of the FET transistor T1 by the
impedance matching network formed by C1, C2, C34, L1 and L9. R1, R2, VR2 and C3 provide bias control to the
gate of T1 from the output of REG1 which is a 18 volt regulator derived from the 24 Volt line of the AUX power
supply module. C6 and C7 provide decoupling for the regulator. L4, C5, R3 and L3 provide 24 volts to T1’s drain
from the 24 volt AUX line as well as providing some impedance matching to the output of T1. Further impedance
matching from T1’s drain is composed of C4, L2 and VC1 and RFT1. RFT1 is a four to one balun that provides an
unbalanced to balanced connection to the two Gates of gemini packaged FET transistor T2. Both gates of T2 are
each biased with 2 parralled 12 Ohm resistors.
The drain outputs of T2 are connected to another balun transformer RFT2 which provides four to one impedance
step up as well as proving a DC feed to the transistors drains via a center tapped winding. The DC power applied
to the center of RFT2 comes from the main adjustable power supply module which can control the RF power output by having it’s output voltage adjusted over a 12 to 35 volt range. C8-14, L5, and R9 provide filtering and RF
decoupling to the power feed into the center tap RFT2.
The RF output side of the balun is fed into a low pass filter composed of C15-21 and inductors L6 to L8. These
components reduce the level of any harmonic products generated by the power amplifier. The output of the low
pass filter feeds into the VSWR sensor which generates our forward and reverse RF power measurements for
metering and for VSWR fault protection and alarms. The RF line passes through ferrite ring RFT3. This ring also
has 14 turns of wire as a secondary winding. IC1 and associated resistors R13-R26 buffer the sensors outputs
and provide a level suitable for the control/LCD boards microcontroller and protection circuitry.
The RF output sniff for the front panel is realized by R34 which is placed very close to the RF output line. A coaxial cable connects this picked up RF output to the front panel.
A temperature sensor circuit is located close to the main RF transistor T2. This temperature sensor is mounted
into the heatsink and consists of the sensor itself TS1 which is located under the board and an op-amp circuit
for level adjustment. The op-amp IC2 and associated components R10 and R27-R32 convert the output signal
from the sensor itself to a level more suitable for the microcontroller and protection circuitry on the Control / LCD
board.
CON2 connection block provides an interface to the board for the power connections from the two power supply
modules. CON5 provides an interface to the LCD control board. This connector carrys readings for the forward
and reverse power, temperature, PA voltage, 18 volts from the regulator off the AUX power line to power the
LCD control board and the combo board, and last but not least the PA power modules control line which controls
it’s output voltage. This control signal is derived from the LCD / control board and is wired through the power
amplifier PCB and out through CON2 to the power supply module.
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 30
Technical data
3.3 BLOCK DIAGRAM
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 31
EARTH
48V 800W
POWER SUPPLY
Fan
RF & MOD
MON BNC’s
RED
BLACK
PA BOARD
Fan
RG316
RG316
CONTROL / POWER / EXCITER SECTION
Filtered IEC
mains socket
9-pin D-Types
(Alarms & RS232)
BNC
BNC
XLR
AUDIO INPUT / LIMITER SECTION
COMBO BOARD
16 WY RIBBON
BW Broadcast technical manual
XLR
LCD board
STEREO ENCODER SECTION
10 WY RIBBON
N-type socket
Technical data
3.4 WIRING AND INTERNAL OVERVIEW
Page 32
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
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

BW Broadcast technical manual


Technical data
3.51 COMBO BOARD SCHEMATICS
3.511DSP Limiter section
Page 33
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BW Broadcast technical manual


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

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
Technical data
3.512 Stereo encoder section
Page 34
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







































































































































































































































 



 








 


















 
 
 
 
 














 













































BW Broadcast technical manual



Technical data
3.513 PLL exciter section
Page 35







 


 





























 




















































BW Broadcast technical manual
















Technical data
3.514 Digital Input section
Page 36
Technical data
3.52 LCD CONTROL BOARD
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 37
1
CON1
1
C2
C1
CON4
FAN
CON2
GND PCB and Assembly Components
PCB1
RF IN
CON5 / 7 PA V Sense
CON5 / 6 FWD
2
L9
1/4
2/3
1
2
3
4
5
5
4
3
2
1
C34
C22
L1
R8
C31
C30
CON2 / 1 PA V
CON5 / 3
CON5 / 2
CON5 / 1 REV
CON5 / 5&10
C3
C29
C32
VR1
VR2
R2
C5
C7
R33
R3
MIN PWR SET
D3
T1
R37
C4
L4
L3
C38
IN
VOLT
REG
REG1
L2
COM
R1
CON5 / 3
CON5
+18V
VC1
CON5 / 5&10
C35
OUT
C6
+18
R31
R6
RFT1
R4
+18
R30
6
5
R7
4
3
R5
3
V-
U1
T2
2
ADJ
1
V+
5
C13
IC2:B
7
R32
C33
1
2
2
1
P2
P1
R29
C9
C10
RFT2
C12
C11
S2
R28
4
Center
2
3
C28
C8
R9
3
S1
8
4
IC2:A
R10
5
1
R27
+18V
C14
C18
L6
C19
L7
R12
CON5 / 2
C15
C27
R11
L5
C20
CON5 / 6 FWD
C16
L8
C21
7
R34
R24
6
5
R19
R13
C37
IC1:B
RF SNIFF
FWD PWR METER SET
C17
CON5 / 7 PA V Sense
CON2 / 1 PA V
C23
R36
R25
C24
R21
R35
R17
R16
Roger Howe
10th April 2008
Drafts Person
Date
C36
2
3
R18
R14
R22
1
C26
IC1:A
R23
+18
1
1
CON3
RF OUT
CON6
RF Sniff
CON5 / 1 REV
FM 300/150 PA MK III RF Board CCT.
D4
C25
R20
D1
Copyright (C) BW Broadcast Ltd 2000-2006
All Rights Reserved.
VR3
D5
R26
D2
R15
RFT3
8
2
2
BW Broadcast technical manual
4
10
9
8
7
6
Technical data
3.53 POWER AMPLIFIER BOARD
Page 38
FM150PA_3.DSN
Technical data
3.6 PARTS LIST
3.61 Combo board
Quantity Reference
Description
4
R1,R44,R72,R73
10K 0.25W 1206 Thick Film 4Way Resistor Array 5%
1
R2
10K 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
4
R3,R8,R116,R117
1K 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
3
R4,R5,R57
680R 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
2
R6,R120
330K 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
9
R7,R23,R50,R51,R53,R54,R82,R121,R133
10K 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
R9
1M 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
2
R10,R146
220R 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
7
R11,R35,R59,R79,R92,R95,R128
1K 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
6
R12,R33,R41,R46,R61,R119
10R 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
R13
3K 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
R14
33K 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
3
R15,R30,R58
470R 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
4
R16,R27,R31,R69
51R 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
9
R17,R18,R62-R67,R118
1K2 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
5
R19,R81,R88,R90,R101
12K 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
12
R20,R28,R68,R74,R77,R103,R104,R107,
R108,R112-R114
4K7 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
R21
34K8 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
6
R22,R25,R43,R45,R48,R97
100R 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
3
R24,R36,R38
220R 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
R26
330R 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
2
R29,R37
22R 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
R32
68R 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
2
R34,R83
1M 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
R39
470R 1W 2512 Thick Film Resistor 5%
1
R40
100R 1W 2512 Thick Film Resistor 5%
1
R42
100R 0.25W 1206 Thick Film 4Way Resistor Array 5%
4
R47,R93,R132,R134
47K 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
4
R49,R52,R55,R56
820R 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
4
R60,R129,R135,R136
1K8 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
4
R75,R76,R105,R106
200R 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
3
R78,R126,R127
75R 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
R80
220R 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
R84
24K 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
R85
5K1 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
R86
6K8 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
R87
5K6 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
2
1
R89
R91,R96
R94
4K3 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
3K3 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
120K 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 47
Technical data
1
R98
220uH Axial Inductor Ferrite 5% Tolerance
1
R99
3K6 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
2
R100,R111
6R8 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
R102
430R 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
R109
1K3 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
R110
820R 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
2
R130,R131
0R 0805 Thick Film Resistors 0.125W 1%
4
R137-R140
10R 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
5
R147,R153-R155,R158
1K 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
4
R148,R156,R157,R164
10K 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
R149
4K7 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
R150
1K6 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
R151
10R 0.25W 1206 Thick Film 4Way Resistor Array 5%
1
R159
2K2 0.1W 0805 Thick Film Resistor 1%
1
R160
12R 1W 2512 Thick Film Resistor 5%
1
C1
220pF 0805 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V C0G / NP0 Capacitor
22
C2,C18,C19,C22,C23,C27,C28,C39,C40,C42,C9
6,C99-C101,C103,C104,C111,C113,C116,C119,C
160,C165
10uF 4mm Diameter SMD Elec Can 16V Capacitor
4
C3,C4,C67,C129
470uF 8mm Diameter SMD Elec Can 16V Capacitor
4
C5,C8,C9,C11
330pF 0805 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V X7R Capacitor
58
C6,C12,C13,C15,C17,C20,C26,C29,C31,C32,C44
,C53,C56,C60,C61,C63,C66,C68-C71,C73,C74,C
79,C85,C88,C90,C97,C98,C102,C107,C108,C110,
C114,C115,C118,C122,C124-C128,C138-C147,C1
49,C150,C153,C155,C157,C163
100nF 0805 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V X7R Capacitor
2
C7,C46
100pF 0805 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V C0G / NP0 Capacitor
2
C14,C154
12pF 0805 Multi-Layer Ceramic 50V C0G / NP0 Capacitor
5
C33,C34,C92,C112,C117
22pF 0805 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V C0G / NP0 Capacitor
8
C35-C37,C130-C133,C137
100nF 0603 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V X7R Capacitor
4
C38,C148,C156,C159
47uF 6.3mm Diameter SMD Elec Can 16V Capacitor
7
C43,C62,C64,C65,C75,C83,C158
2.2uF 4mm Diameter SMD Elec Can 50V Capacitor
1
C45
47pF 0805 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V C0G / NP0 Capacitor
3
C47,C59,C93
27pF 0805 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V C0G / NP0 Capacitor
1
C48
82pF 0805 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V C0G / NP0 Capacitor
11
C49,C51,C52,C54,C55,C77,C80,C81,C86,C89
,C91
2n2 0805 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V X7R Capacitor
2
C50,C57
10uF 4mm Diameter SMD Elec Can 25V Capacitor
1
C58
15pF 0805 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V C0G / NP0 Capacitor
1
C72
1uF 0805 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V X7R Capacitor
2
C76,C84
100uF 6.3mm Diameter SMD Elec Can 16V Capacitor
1
C78
10nF 0805 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V X7R Capacitor
1
C82
4p7 0805 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V C0G / NP0 Capacitor
1
C87
18pF 0805 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V C0G / NP0 Capacitor
1
C94
4.7uF 0805 Multi-layer Ceramic 25V X5R / X7R Capacitor
1
C95
39pF 0805 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V Capacitor 1%
1
C105
470nF 0805 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V X7R Capacitor
1
C106
8200pF 0805 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V Capacitor 5%
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 48
Technical data
3
C134-C136
10nF 0603 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V X7R Capacitor
2
C151,C152
33pF 0805 Multi-layer Ceramic 50V Capacitor 1%
1
IC1
B3-153R3SS 2W SIL Single Output DC To DC Converter 3.3V Out
2
IC2,IC7
NE5534D Low Noise Op-Amp SOP8.225
4
IC3,IC4,IC13,IC14
TL071 Single Op-Amp 3MHz SOP8.225
1
IC5
PIC16F627A-I/SO 8Bit Flash Micro-Controller SOIC18
1
IC6
HI3-0201HS-5Z High Speed Quad SPST
4
IC8-IC11
AL3101CG Dual Volt DSP SOIC-28
1
IC12
CS8420-CSZ Digital Audio Sample Rate Converter SOP28.375
1
IC15
AK4620B 24-Bit 192kHz Audio CODEC with IPGA
1
IC16
XC9572XL-10VQG44C In-System Programmable CPLD
1
IC17
PIC18F87K22-I/PT 8 bit Micro-Controller TQFP80
1
IC18
TL072CD Dual FET Op Amp SOIC8
1
IC19
MAX232 RS232 Dual Tranceiver SOJ16
1
IC20
12-15 2W DIL Dual Output DC To DC Converter
1
U1
LM3S608 Luminary Microcontroller LQFP48 Package
1
U2
NE5534D Low Noise Op-Amp SOP8.225
1
U3
HEF4066BT Quad Bilateral Analogue Switch SOIC14
1
U4
MC145170P2 SOP16.225 PLL Freq Synthesizer Serial Interface
1
U5
74HCT245 Quad Buffer Line Driver SOIC20
1
U7
LM317 1.5A Adjustable Linear Regulator
17
D3-D18,D20
1N4148 100V High Speed Switching Diode SOD-323 Package
1
D21
1N4001 SSot-6 1A 50V Miniature Plastic Diode
1
D22
Generic Zener Diode 3.3V 400mW SOD323 Package
1
J1
8 Pin 2.54mm Pitch SIL Straight PCB Mount Header
2
J2,J7
5 Pin 2.54mm Pitch SIL Straight PCB Mount Header
6
J3,J5,J6,J8-J10
3 Pin 2.54mm Pitch SIL Straight PCB Mount Header
1
J4
6 Pin 2.54mm Pitch SIL Straight PCB Mount Header
2
J11,J12
4 Pin 2.54mm Pitch SIL Straight PCB Mount Header
2
J13,J14
3 Pin 2.54mm Pitch SIL Straight PCB Mount Header
3
CON1,CON4,CON11
MCX Jack Straight PCB Mount Receptacle 50Ohm
1
CON2
16 Way 2.54mm Pitch Straight PCB Mount Boxed Header
1
CON5
2 Way Screwless 45 degree PCB Mount Terminal Block
1
CON6
Filtered Dual 9 Way Right Angle PCB Mount D-Type Connector
2
CON7,CON8
BNC Right Angle PCB-Mount Non-insulated Connector 50Ohm
2
CON9,CON10
3Pin XLR Female R/A PCB Mount Non-Insulated Chassis Socket
1
CON12
10 Way 2.54mm Pitch Straight PCB Mount Boxed Header
1
DSW1
8 Way SPST 2.54 Pitch SO-16 Slide Switch
12
FIL3-FIL12,FIL15,FIL16
1nF 2606 Package Suppression T-Filter
10
LED1-LED10
0805 Green LED
1
OSC1
12.288Mhz 14 Pin Oscilator 100ppm DIL14
1
REG1
L7805CV +5V 1A, Linear Fixed Voltage Regulators
1
REG2
L7815CV +15V 1A, Linear Fixed Voltage Regulator TO220
1
RFT1
28SWG (0.355mm) Blue/Green Bonded Bifilar Enamelled Wire
4
SW1-SW4
10 Step Decimal Rotary PCB Switch Hole Through
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 49
Technical data
1
SW6
Miniture Right Angle SMTAllOne Switch
2
T1,T4
MMBTH10LT1G NPN SOT23 Bipolar Transistor
1
T2
N-Channel Enhancement-Mode MOSFET Transistor
2
T3,T5
BFR93A NPN 6 GHz wideband transistor
1
T6
PD85004 RF Power Transistor ( LdmoS Family)
3
T7-T9
BC817 SOT-23 NPN Transistor
1
TR1
AES 1:1 Transformer S5612LF
1
VC1
8-30pF 4mm Surface Mount Variable Capacitor
1
VD1
BB809 VHF variable capacitance diode (obselete)
1
VR1
20K 4mm SMT 3314J Closed Frame Cermet Trimmer
1
VR2
200R 4mm SMT Bournes 3314J Closed Frame Cermet Trimmer
1
VR3
10k 3/4IN Bourns 3006P Horizontal Cermet Trmmer
1
VR4
10K 4mm SMT Bournes 3314J Closed Frame Cermet Trimmer-
1
X1
10.000MHz HC-49/S SMT Crystal
1
X2
4.9152MHZ HC49S SMD Crystal 30/50/-10 60/30 ESR=30
1
X3
4.864MHz HC-49/S Surface Mount Crystal
1
L1
114 (MC120)Toko Radial Inductor Space Wound with Can
1
L2
110 (MC141)Toko Radial Inductor Close Wound with Can
1
L3
1mH 5% SMD 0805 Inductor
3
L4,L9,L10
200mA Bead Inductor 10% 0805 600R at 100MHZ
1
L5
330nH 10% SMD 1008 Ferrite Inductor
1
L6
Bead Inductor 10% 0805 600R 100MHZ
1
L7
47nH MidiSpring Inductor
1
L8
68nH MidiSpring Inductor
1
L11
4.7mH 10RB Toko Radial Inductor #181LY-472J
1
L12
3.9mH 10RB Toko Radial Inductor #181LY-392J
2
L13,L14
220uH Axial Inductor Ferrite 5% Tolerance
BW Broadcast technical manual
Page 50
Technical data
3.62 LCD control board
Qty
4
2
2
10
1
1
1
3
3
4
1
1
6
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
3
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
Reference
C1, C2, C13, C18
C12, C15
C3, C4
C5, C6, C7, C8, C9, C10, C11, C14, C16, C17
D1
LED1
LED2
R1, R2, R16
R12, R13, R14
R15, R18, R20, R22
R17
R19
R3, R7, R8, R9, R10, R11
R4, R5
R6
R21
R23, R24
R25
VR3
VR1
VR2
Reg1
IC1
IC2
IC3
SW1-3
X1
Connector
LCD Screen
IC1
IC2,IC3
Panel Buttons
Con1
Con2
BW Broadcast technical manual
Value
2.2uF
100n
33pF
560pF
1N4148
3mm
3mm
33k
1k8
100R
560R
100k
820R
390R
10k
4k7
4R7
1K
200R
500R
100k
7805
40 Pin
CA3240EZ
TBA
9.5mm
8MHz
20-Way
LCD
40-Pin
8-Pin
n/a
10-Way
16-Way
Description
63V Electrolytic Cap
2.5mm Pitch Radial Multilayer Ceramic ( Y5V )
33pF Ceramic 2.5mm Pitch
560pF Ceramic
1N4148
Mini 3mm Green LED - L-7104GD
Mini 3mm Red LED - L-7104GD
1/8 W Metal Film 1% - CR12
1/8 W Metal Film 1% - CR12
1/8 W Metal Film 1% - CR12
1/8 W Metal Film 1% - CR12
1/8 W Metal Film 1% - CR12
1/8 W Metal Film 1% - CR12
1/8 W Metal Film 1% - CR12
1/8 W Metal Film 1% - CR12
1/8 W Metal Film 1% - CR12
1/8 W Metal Film 1% - CR12
1/8 W Metal Film 1% - CR12
Bourns 3296 W 3/8in
Bourns Minipot
Minipot Spectrol 63M
7805CV 1A VOLTAGE REGULATOR
40 Pin PIC16F877-20P (NOT FITTED)
CA3240 Op Amp
NOT FITTED
9mm Tactile Switch
8MHz Crystal
Header Strip (20-Way)
Blue LCD Display
40 Pin IC Socket
8-Pin IC Socket
Molded Cap for Switch (NOT FITTED)
10 Way Boxed Header
16 Way Boxed Header
Page 51
Technical data
3.63 Power amplifier board
Qty
2
2
5
2
6
1
3
1
1
2
1
2
4
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
15
2
1
3
4
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
Reference
R1,R31
R1,R31
R2,R18,R19,R21,R25
R3,R8
R4-R7,R15,R16
R9
R10,R23,R33
R11
R12
R13,R14
R17
R20,R26
R22,R24,R27,R29
R28,R32
R30
R34
R35,R36
R37
VR1
VR2,VR3
C1
C2
C3,C8-C11,C24-C28,C30-C33,C35
C4,C34
C5
C6,C7,C38
C12,C13,C22,C29
C14
C15
C16
C17
C18-C20
C21
C23
C36,C37
VC1
L1
L2
L3,L5
L4
L6
L7
L8
L9
D1,D2
D3
D4,D5
T1
T2
IC1,IC2
IC3,IC4
CON1,CON3
BW Broadcast technical manual
Value
3k3
3k3
470R
12R
12R
N.F.
75R
6k8
560R
22K
330R
1K5
10k
18k
13k
47R
1k3
??
10k
1K
47pF
27pF
10nF
150pF
330pF
2.2uF
100uF
1uF
12pF
10pF
8pF
33pF
15pF
8p2
N.F.
5-65pF
IND-AIR
IND-AIR
IND-IRON
IND-AIR
IND-AIR
IND-AIR
IND-AIR
IND-AIR
DIODE2
LED
DIODE2
FET
DUALFET
TL072
8-Pin
COAXSOCKET
Description
1/4W Metal film resistor
1/4W Metal film resistor
1/4W Metal film resistor
1/4W Metal film resistor
SMT Chip resistor 120
NOT FITTED
1/4W Metal film resistor
1/4W Metal film resistor
1/4W Metal film resistor
SMT Chip resistor 223
SMT Chip resistor 331
1/4W Metal film resistor
1/4W Metal film resistor
1/4W Metal film resistor
1/4W Metal film resistor
1/4W Metal film resistor
1/4W Metal film resistor
OPTIONAL 1/4W Metal film resistor
63M series - top screw adjustment
Top screw adjustment
5mm Pitch Ceramic Cap
2.5mm Pitch Ceramic Cap
2.5mm Pitch Ceramic Cap
2.5mm Pitch Ceramic Cap
5mm Pitch Ceramic Cap 683 series
1.5mm Pitch Mini Radial Electrolytic
Electrolytic 105deg
5mm Miniture Polyester Cap
SEMCO Metal Clad Cap - MIN02-002
SEMCO Metal Clad Cap - MIN02-002
SEMCO Metal Clad Cap - MIN02-002
SEMCO Metal Clad Cap - MCM01-001
SEMCO Metal Clad Cap - MCM01-001
2.5mm Pitch Ceramic Cap 680 series
OPTIONAL
Miniature trimmer capacitor
AgCu - 0.9mm half loop link
3.5T S18 Inductor
Radial Ferrite Bead Inductor- 6A Murata
8 Turn coil, (self fluxing wire)
14 Gauge - SC2.0X7.8X2.5T-3
14 Gauge - SC2.0X7.8X3.5T-3
14 Gauge - SC2.0X7.2X3.5T-4
2.5T S18 Inductor
Single Diode Silicon schottky BAT42
5mm Pitch Green LED-L-53 series
OPTIONAL
N Channel Power MOSFET IRL510 5.6A
BLF278 Power Transistor
CA3240EZ 8-pin Op-Amp
8-Pin IC Holder
MCX PCB Connector
Page 43
Technical data
1
2
2
2
CON2
CON4
CON5
CON6
BW Broadcast technical manual
CONN-H5
CONN-H2
CONN-DIL10-IDC
COAXSOCKET
OPTIONAL 5-Way 45deg Terminal
2-Way 45deg Terminal
RA IDC Ribbon Connector
NOT FITTED
Page 44
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