IP Office Manager 3.0

IP Office Manager 3.0
IP Office
Manager 3.0
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Table of Contents
IP Office System Design Guide............................................................................................... 12
Scope of Manual ...................................................................................................................... 21
Overview of Manager ............................................................................................................... 22
Manager .................................................................................................................................... 23
Installing Manager .................................................................................................................................... 23
Daily Backup............................................................................................................................................. 24
Default LAN Settings ................................................................................................................................ 24
Default Telephony Settings ...................................................................................................................... 24
How the System Receives Time............................................................................................................... 25
Upgrading Manager and IP Office ............................................................................................................ 26
Introduction - Upgrading IP Office........................................................................................................ 26
Pre-Upgrade Checks ........................................................................................................................... 26
Validated Upgrade ............................................................................................................................... 28
Upgrading IP Office Application Software............................................................................................ 29
Upgrading Control and Expansion Unit Software ................................................................................ 30
.bin Files for Control and Expansion Units........................................................................................... 31
Troubleshooting........................................................................................................................................ 32
Manager Commands................................................................................................................ 33
Toolbar ..................................................................................................................................................... 33
File Menu.................................................................................................................................................. 33
Open .................................................................................................................................................... 33
Close.................................................................................................................................................... 33
Save..................................................................................................................................................... 33
Save As................................................................................................................................................ 33
Change Working Directory................................................................................................................... 34
Change Password................................................................................................................................ 34
Preferences.......................................................................................................................................... 35
Open File ............................................................................................................................................. 36
Receive Config..................................................................................................................................... 36
Send Config ......................................................................................................................................... 36
Erase Config ........................................................................................................................................ 37
Reboot ................................................................................................................................................. 37
Upgrade ............................................................................................................................................... 37
Backup ................................................................................................................................................. 38
Restore ................................................................................................................................................ 38
Import Directory ................................................................................................................................... 38
Export Directory ................................................................................................................................... 38
Import Configuration Entities................................................................................................................ 38
Export Configuration Entities ............................................................................................................... 39
Export as Text...................................................................................................................................... 39
Import as Text ...................................................................................................................................... 39
Logoff ................................................................................................................................................... 39
Exit ....................................................................................................................................................... 39
Tools Menu............................................................................................................................................... 40
MSN Configuration............................................................................................................................... 40
Renumber Lines................................................................................................................................... 40
Busy on Held Validation....................................................................................................................... 40
Edit Menu ................................................................................................................................................. 41
View Menu................................................................................................................................................ 41
Window Menu........................................................................................................................................... 41
Using Manager ......................................................................................................................... 42
Operators.................................................................................................................................................. 42
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Table Of Contents
Default Operators................................................................................................................................. 42
Creating Operators .............................................................................................................................. 42
Receiving a Configuration ........................................................................................................................ 43
To Receive and Open a Configuration................................................................................................. 43
To Receive, Name and Open a Configuration ..................................................................................... 43
Configuration Sizes .................................................................................................................................. 44
Editing a Configuration ............................................................................................................................. 45
Sending/Saving a Configuration ............................................................................................................... 45
Instructions for Sending a Configuration .................................................................................................. 46
Reboot/Merge Configuration List.............................................................................................................. 47
Supported Country and Locale Settings................................................................................................... 48
Offline Files............................................................................................................................................... 50
Working with Offline Files .................................................................................................................... 50
Saving an Offline File to a Live System ............................................................................................... 50
Sample Step-by-Step Configuration....................................................................................... 51
Step-by-Step Overview............................................................................................................................. 51
Update Manager Account Information...................................................................................................... 52
Change System Password ....................................................................................................................... 53
Check System Locale Setting................................................................................................................... 54
Server Status of the Control Unit.............................................................................................................. 56
Setting up Analog Trunks/Lines................................................................................................................ 57
Assign Extension Numbers ...................................................................................................................... 59
Setting Up Users ...................................................................................................................................... 60
Create Hunt Groups ................................................................................................................................. 62
Overflow Hunt Group................................................................................................................................ 64
Create an Incoming Call Route ................................................................................................................ 65
Create Short Codes.................................................................................................................................. 66
Installing and Configuring Ports ............................................................................................ 67
Port Types ................................................................................................................................................ 67
Installing and Configuring DS Ports.......................................................................................................... 68
Installing and Configuring DS Ports ..................................................................................................... 68
Configuring Softkeys............................................................................................................................ 68
Assigning Functions to DSS Keys ....................................................................................................... 69
Using DisplayMsg ................................................................................................................................ 70
Call Coverage ...................................................................................................................................... 70
Installing and Configuring So8 Ports ........................................................................................................ 71
Installing and Configuring So8 Ports.................................................................................................... 71
Example Configurations....................................................................................................................... 72
Installing and Configuring WAN Ports ...................................................................................................... 73
Installing and Configuring WAN Ports.................................................................................................. 73
Installing a WAN3 Module.................................................................................................................... 73
Configuring a WAN Link....................................................................................................................... 74
PBX Features and Functions .................................................................................................. 75
Notes ........................................................................................................................................................ 75
Extension versus User.............................................................................................................................. 75
Account Codes ......................................................................................................................................... 76
Account Codes..................................................................................................................................... 76
Force Account Code ............................................................................................................................ 77
Account Codes and Phone Manager ................................................................................................... 78
Call Restriction ......................................................................................................................................... 78
Conferencing ............................................................................................................................................ 79
Conferencing Overview........................................................................................................................ 79
Default Conference Handling............................................................................................................... 79
Using Conference Meet Me ................................................................................................................. 80
Conferencing with 4606, 4612, 4624, 4400 Series and 6400 Series Display Phones ......................... 81
Conferencing with 2402, 2410, 4610, 5400 Series and 5600 Series Display Phones ......................... 81
Conferencing with Phone Manager...................................................................................................... 82
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Table Of Contents
Conferencing with Conferencing Center .............................................................................................. 82
Conference Recording ......................................................................................................................... 83
Conferencing and Voicemail Pro ......................................................................................................... 84
Caller Display ........................................................................................................................................... 86
Call Forwarding ........................................................................................................................................ 87
Call Intrusion............................................................................................................................................. 88
Call Pickup................................................................................................................................................ 88
Acquire Call/Steal Call.............................................................................................................................. 89
Call Waiting .............................................................................................................................................. 89
Do Not Disturb .......................................................................................................................................... 90
Follow Me ................................................................................................................................................. 90
Holding a Call ........................................................................................................................................... 91
Music on Hold........................................................................................................................................... 92
Music on Hold (MOH) .......................................................................................................................... 92
Internal Music on Hold ......................................................................................................................... 93
External Music on Hold ........................................................................................................................ 94
Internal MOH and Remote Maintenance ............................................................................................. 94
Incoming Call Routing .............................................................................................................................. 95
Incoming Call Routing.......................................................................................................................... 95
Night Service Destinations................................................................................................................... 95
Fallback Extension............................................................................................................................... 95
Incoming Call Priority ........................................................................................................................... 95
Parking a Call ........................................................................................................................................... 96
Configuring Personal Fax Numbers ......................................................................................................... 97
Ring Back When Free .............................................................................................................................. 97
Transferring a Call .................................................................................................................................... 98
Hot Transfer ......................................................................................................................................... 98
Queuing a Call to a Busy extension..................................................................................................... 98
Ring Tones ............................................................................................................................................... 99
Ring Tones........................................................................................................................................... 99
Selectable Ring Tones......................................................................................................................... 99
Flash Hook Pulse Width..................................................................................................................... 100
Trusted Locations ................................................................................................................................... 101
External Output Port ............................................................................................................................... 102
Introduction - Using the External Output (Door) Port ......................................................................... 102
Wiring Connection.............................................................................................................................. 102
Short Code Controls .......................................................................................................................... 103
Phone Manager Pro........................................................................................................................... 104
Voicemail Pro..................................................................................................................................... 105
Hot Desking ............................................................................................................................................ 106
Hot Desking ....................................................................................................................................... 106
Force Login ........................................................................................................................................ 108
Login Idle Period ................................................................................................................................ 109
Hunt Groups ........................................................................................................................... 110
Overview of Hunt Groups ....................................................................................................................... 110
Examples................................................................................................................................................ 111
Basic Hunt Group............................................................................................................................... 111
Using Voicemail ................................................................................................................................. 111
Using the Queuing Facility ................................................................................................................. 111
Using an Overflow Group................................................................................................................... 112
Overflow Group List - Select Required Items..................................................................................... 112
Using a Night Service Fallback Group ............................................................................................... 112
Using a Time Profile........................................................................................................................... 112
Enable/Disable Membership................................................................................................................... 113
Hunt Group Call Waiting......................................................................................................................... 113
Hunt Group Voicemail ............................................................................................................................ 113
Forwarding Hunt Group calls.................................................................................................................. 113
How to Monitor Calls .............................................................................................................................. 114
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Table Of Contents
Using Queuing........................................................................................................................................ 114
Short Codes............................................................................................................................ 115
Understanding Short Codes ................................................................................................................... 115
Matching Order....................................................................................................................................... 116
Getting the Dialed Number ..................................................................................................................... 116
Example: Dial Delay Time.................................................................................................................. 116
Example: Short Dialing ...................................................................................................................... 117
Example: Overlap Dialing .................................................................................................................. 117
Example: Single Digit Short Codes.................................................................................................... 117
Short Code Parameters .......................................................................................................................... 118
Telephone Number Characters .............................................................................................................. 119
Short Code Characters........................................................................................................................... 120
Using Special Characters ....................................................................................................................... 121
Secondary Dial Tone and [n] Characters........................................................................................... 121
'N' and 'X' ........................................................................................................................................... 121
Dialed Digits and Outgoing Digits ...................................................................................................... 122
Using the Y Character........................................................................................................................ 122
Default System Short Code List ............................................................................................................. 123
Short Code Features .............................................................................................................................. 125
Short Code Feature Overview ........................................................................................................... 125
Busy ................................................................................................................................................... 128
Busy On Held..................................................................................................................................... 128
Call Intrude......................................................................................................................................... 129
Call Listen .......................................................................................................................................... 129
Call Pickup Any.................................................................................................................................. 129
Call Pickup Extn................................................................................................................................. 130
Call Pickup Group .............................................................................................................................. 130
Call Pickup Members ......................................................................................................................... 131
Call Queue ......................................................................................................................................... 131
Call Record ........................................................................................................................................ 132
Acquire Call/Call Steal ....................................................................................................................... 133
Call Waiting On .................................................................................................................................. 134
Call Waiting Off .................................................................................................................................. 134
Call Waiting Suspend......................................................................................................................... 135
Cancel All Forwarding........................................................................................................................ 135
Cancel Ring Back When Free............................................................................................................ 136
Channel Monitor................................................................................................................................. 136
Cancel or Deny/Clear Call ................................................................................................................. 136
Clear CW ........................................................................................................................................... 137
Clear Hunt Group Night Service ........................................................................................................ 137
Clear Hunt Group Out Of Service ...................................................................................................... 138
Clear Quota........................................................................................................................................ 138
Conference Add ................................................................................................................................. 138
Conference Meet Me ......................................................................................................................... 139
CW ..................................................................................................................................................... 139
Dial..................................................................................................................................................... 139
Dial 3K1 ............................................................................................................................................. 141
Dial 56K ............................................................................................................................................. 141
Dial 64K ............................................................................................................................................. 141
Dial CW.............................................................................................................................................. 142
Dial Direct .......................................................................................................................................... 142
Dial Direct Hot Line ............................................................................................................................ 142
Dial Emergency.................................................................................................................................. 143
Dial Extn............................................................................................................................................. 143
Dial Inclusion...................................................................................................................................... 144
Dial Paging......................................................................................................................................... 144
DialPhysicalExtensionByNumber....................................................................................................... 144
DialPhysicalNumberByID................................................................................................................... 145
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Table Of Contents
Dial Speech........................................................................................................................................ 145
Dial V110 ........................................................................................................................................... 146
Dial V120 ........................................................................................................................................... 146
Dial Video........................................................................................................................................... 147
Display Msg ....................................................................................................................................... 147
Do Not Disturb Exception Add ........................................................................................................... 148
Do Not Disturb Exception Delete ....................................................................................................... 148
Do Not Disturb On.............................................................................................................................. 149
Do Not Disturb Off.............................................................................................................................. 149
Extn Login .......................................................................................................................................... 150
Extn Logout........................................................................................................................................ 150
Flash Hook......................................................................................................................................... 151
Follow Me Here.................................................................................................................................. 151
Follow Me Here Cancel...................................................................................................................... 152
Follow Me To ..................................................................................................................................... 152
Forward Hunt Group Calls On ........................................................................................................... 153
Forward Hunt Group Calls Off ........................................................................................................... 153
Forward Number ................................................................................................................................ 154
Forward On Busy Number ................................................................................................................. 154
Forward On Busy On ......................................................................................................................... 155
Forward On Busy Off ......................................................................................................................... 155
Forward On No Answer On................................................................................................................ 156
Forward On No Answer Off................................................................................................................ 156
Forward Unconditional On ................................................................................................................. 157
Forward Unconditional Off ................................................................................................................. 157
Headset Toggle.................................................................................................................................. 158
Hold Call ............................................................................................................................................ 158
Hold CW............................................................................................................................................. 159
Hold Music ......................................................................................................................................... 159
Hunt Group Disable ........................................................................................................................... 159
Hunt Group Enable ............................................................................................................................ 160
Off Hook Station................................................................................................................................. 160
Park Call ............................................................................................................................................ 161
Priority Call......................................................................................................................................... 161
Record Greeting................................................................................................................................. 162
Relay On ............................................................................................................................................ 162
Relay Off ............................................................................................................................................ 162
Relay Pulse........................................................................................................................................ 163
Resume Call ...................................................................................................................................... 163
Retrieve Call ...................................................................................................................................... 164
Ride Call ............................................................................................................................................ 164
Ring Back When Free........................................................................................................................ 165
Secondary Dial Tone ......................................................................................................................... 165
Set Absent Text ................................................................................................................................. 166
Set Account Code .............................................................................................................................. 167
Set Hunt Group Night Service............................................................................................................ 167
Set Hunt Group Out Of Service ......................................................................................................... 168
Set Inside Call Seq ............................................................................................................................ 168
Set Allocated Answer Interval/No Answer Time ................................................................................ 169
Set Outside Call Seq.......................................................................................................................... 169
Set Ringback Seq .............................................................................................................................. 170
Set Wrap Up Time ............................................................................................................................. 170
Suspend Call...................................................................................................................................... 171
Suspend CW...................................................................................................................................... 171
Toggle Calls ....................................................................................................................................... 171
Voicemail Collect ............................................................................................................................... 172
Voicemail Node.................................................................................................................................. 173
Voicemail On...................................................................................................................................... 174
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Voicemail Off...................................................................................................................................... 174
Voicemail Ringback On...................................................................................................................... 175
Voicemail Ringback Off...................................................................................................................... 175
Creating User Short Codes .................................................................................................................... 176
Creating System Short Codes ................................................................................................................ 177
Creating User Restriction Short Codes .................................................................................................. 177
Routing Features and Functions .......................................................................................... 178
Overview of Routing ............................................................................................................................... 178
Internal Data Channels........................................................................................................................... 178
Connecting to the Internet ...................................................................................................................... 179
Connecting to the LAN ........................................................................................................................... 180
Connecting to the LAN....................................................................................................................... 180
IP Addressing..................................................................................................................................... 180
Sending Traffic to the Router: Subnet Masks .................................................................................... 181
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) .................................................................................. 181
Getting it Working! ............................................................................................................................. 182
Address ranges.................................................................................................................................. 182
Viewing Your PCs IP configuration .................................................................................................... 182
Domain Name System............................................................................................................................ 182
Firewalls ................................................................................................................................................. 183
Firewalls............................................................................................................................................. 183
Example Firewall Filters..................................................................................................................... 183
Understanding IP Routing via ISDN ....................................................................................................... 185
Configuration Example....................................................................................................................... 185
Network Address Translation (NAT)....................................................................................................... 186
Configuring NAT ................................................................................................................................ 186
Point to Point Protocol (PPP) ................................................................................................................. 186
Quotas and Timebands .......................................................................................................................... 187
Using a Fallback Service ........................................................................................................................ 187
Using a Service ...................................................................................................................................... 188
Bandwidth on Demand ........................................................................................................................... 188
Gatekeeper............................................................................................................................................. 188
RIP.......................................................................................................................................................... 189
Viewing the Routing Table ................................................................................................................. 190
Voice over IP .......................................................................................................................... 191
Overview of VoIP.................................................................................................................................... 191
VoIP Protocols........................................................................................................................................ 192
Performance ........................................................................................................................................... 192
Implementation ....................................................................................................................................... 193
Creating a VoIP Link via the LAN ........................................................................................................... 194
Creating a VoIP Link via the WAN Port Using PPP................................................................................ 195
Creating a VoIP Link via the WAN Port Using Frame Relay .................................................................. 196
Dedicated T1 Service ............................................................................................................................. 197
Using a Dedicated T1/PRI ISP Link....................................................................................... 199
Using a Dedicated T1/PRI ISP Link........................................................................................................ 199
1. Create a Firewall ................................................................................................................................ 200
1a. Block NetBIOS/DNS Access........................................................................................................ 201
1b. Allow Ping for Testing .................................................................................................................. 201
2. Create a WAN Service ....................................................................................................................... 202
2a. Create a New WAN Service......................................................................................................... 202
2b. Configure the WAN Service – Service Tab.................................................................................. 202
2c. Configure the WAN Service Bandwidth Tab ................................................................................ 202
2d. Configure the WAN Service – IP Tab .......................................................................................... 202
2e. Configure the WAN Service – PPP Tab....................................................................................... 202
3. Create the Virtual WAN Port............................................................................................................... 203
4. Create an IP Route............................................................................................................................. 203
5. Configure the Line Channels .............................................................................................................. 204
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5a. T1 Line ......................................................................................................................................... 204
5b. T1 PRI Line .................................................................................................................................. 204
SNMP....................................................................................................................................... 205
SNMP Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 205
Installing the IP Office MIB Files............................................................................................................. 205
CastleRock SNMPc ........................................................................................................................... 206
HP Open View Network Node Manager ............................................................................................ 206
Avaya 4600 & 5600 Series IP Phones ................................................................................................... 207
Enabling SNMP and Polling Support...................................................................................................... 207
Enabling SNMP Trap Sending................................................................................................................ 208
Configuration Forms.............................................................................................................. 209
The Configuration Tree........................................................................................................................... 209
BOOTP Form.......................................................................................................................................... 210
Operator Form ........................................................................................................................................ 211
System Form .......................................................................................................................................... 212
System Form Overview...................................................................................................................... 212
System ............................................................................................................................................... 212
LAN1 .................................................................................................................................................. 214
LAN2 .................................................................................................................................................. 215
DNS ................................................................................................................................................... 215
Voicemail ........................................................................................................................................... 216
System Telephony ............................................................................................................................. 217
Gatekeeper ........................................................................................................................................ 219
LDAP Overview.................................................................................................................................. 220
LDAP.................................................................................................................................................. 221
SNMP................................................................................................................................................. 223
Line Form ............................................................................................................................................... 224
Line Form Overview........................................................................................................................... 224
Line Form (E1 PRI, BRI) .................................................................................................................... 225
Line Form (E1-R2) ............................................................................................................................. 228
Line Form (US T1) ............................................................................................................................. 231
Line Form (US PRI) ........................................................................................................................... 234
Line Form (Analog) ............................................................................................................................ 238
Line Form (S0) ................................................................................................................................... 241
Line Form (IP) .................................................................................................................................... 243
Control Unit Form ................................................................................................................................... 246
Control Unit Form............................................................................................................................... 246
Extension Form ...................................................................................................................................... 247
Extension Form Overview.................................................................................................................. 247
Extn.................................................................................................................................................... 248
VoIP ................................................................................................................................................... 249
User Form............................................................................................................................................... 250
User Form Overview .......................................................................................................................... 250
User ................................................................................................................................................... 252
Voicemail ........................................................................................................................................... 253
DND ................................................................................................................................................... 254
Short Codes ....................................................................................................................................... 254
Source Numbers ................................................................................................................................ 255
User Telephony.................................................................................................................................. 256
Forwarding ......................................................................................................................................... 258
Dial In................................................................................................................................................. 258
Voice Recording................................................................................................................................. 259
Button Programming/Digital Telephony ............................................................................................. 260
Appearance Functions ....................................................................................................................... 261
Button Numbering Layout .................................................................................................................. 261
Emulation Functions .......................................................................................................................... 262
Hunt Group Form.................................................................................................................................... 270
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Hunt Group Overview ........................................................................................................................ 270
Hunt Group ........................................................................................................................................ 271
Voicemail ........................................................................................................................................... 272
Fallback.............................................................................................................................................. 273
Queuing ............................................................................................................................................. 274
Voice Recording................................................................................................................................. 274
Short Code Form .................................................................................................................................... 275
Short Code Form ............................................................................................................................... 275
Service Form .......................................................................................................................................... 276
Service Form Overview...................................................................................................................... 276
Service ............................................................................................................................................... 277
Bandwidth .......................................................................................................................................... 278
DialIn.................................................................................................................................................. 279
IP........................................................................................................................................................ 280
Autoconnect ....................................................................................................................................... 281
Quota ................................................................................................................................................. 281
Fallback.............................................................................................................................................. 282
PPP.................................................................................................................................................... 282
RAS Form............................................................................................................................................... 284
RAS Form Overview .......................................................................................................................... 284
RAS.................................................................................................................................................... 284
PPP.................................................................................................................................................... 285
Incoming Call Route Form ...................................................................................................................... 286
Incoming Call Route Form ................................................................................................................. 286
Incoming Call Route Examples.......................................................................................................... 288
WAN Port Form ...................................................................................................................................... 289
WAN Port ........................................................................................................................................... 289
Frame Relay ...................................................................................................................................... 289
Advanced ........................................................................................................................................... 290
DLCIs ................................................................................................................................................. 291
Directory Form........................................................................................................................................ 292
Directory Entry Form.......................................................................................................................... 292
Time Profile Form ................................................................................................................................... 293
Time Profile Form .............................................................................................................................. 293
Time Entry.......................................................................................................................................... 293
Firewall Profile Form............................................................................................................................... 294
Firewall Profile Form Overview .......................................................................................................... 294
Standard ............................................................................................................................................ 294
Custom............................................................................................................................................... 295
IP Route Form ........................................................................................................................................ 296
IP Route Form.................................................................................................................................... 296
Least Cost Route Form .......................................................................................................................... 297
Least Cost Route Form Overview...................................................................................................... 297
LCR.................................................................................................................................................... 298
Main Route......................................................................................................................................... 299
Alternate Route 1 ............................................................................................................................... 299
Alternate Route 2 ............................................................................................................................... 299
Examples ........................................................................................................................................... 300
LCR Using T1/PRI Lines or Secondary Dial Tone ............................................................................. 304
License Form.......................................................................................................................................... 309
License Form ..................................................................................................................................... 309
Account Code Form................................................................................................................................ 310
Account Code .................................................................................................................................... 310
Voice Recording................................................................................................................................. 310
E911 System .......................................................................................................................................... 311
E911 System Configuration ............................................................................................................... 311
System Parameters ........................................................................................................................... 312
E911 Zone Configuration ................................................................................................................... 312
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E911 Warning Screen........................................................................................................................ 313
E911 Configuration Steps .................................................................................................................. 314
Wireless 802.11b.................................................................................................................................... 315
SSID................................................................................................................................................... 315
Security .............................................................................................................................................. 316
User Restrictions .................................................................................................................................... 317
User Restrictions Overview................................................................................................................ 317
Using User Restrictions ..................................................................................................................... 317
Restrictions ........................................................................................................................................ 318
Short Codes ....................................................................................................................................... 318
Logical LAN ............................................................................................................................................ 319
Tunnel..................................................................................................................................................... 320
Tunnel ................................................................................................................................................ 320
L2TP Tunnel ...................................................................................................................................... 321
IP Security Tunnel.............................................................................................................................. 323
Auto Attendant........................................................................................................................................ 325
Auto Attendant ................................................................................................................................... 325
Actions ............................................................................................................................................... 325
DTE Port Maintenance ........................................................................................................... 326
DTE Port Overview ................................................................................................................................. 326
DTE Port Settings................................................................................................................................... 326
Loader Version ....................................................................................................................................... 327
Erasing the Flash Configuration ............................................................................................................. 327
Erasing the Operational Software........................................................................................................... 328
DTE Port Trace of Defaulted Unit Reboot .............................................................................................. 329
Port Trace of Normal Reboot.................................................................................................................. 331
Transactional Pad .................................................................................................................. 332
Connecting a Transactional Pad ............................................................................................................ 332
Configuration Parameters....................................................................................................................... 332
Configuration Auto-Load......................................................................................................................... 333
Tracing.................................................................................................................................................... 333
VCM & Data Channels............................................................................................................ 334
Overview of Channels ............................................................................................................................ 334
VCM Examples....................................................................................................................................... 335
Data Channel Examples ......................................................................................................................... 335
VCM & Data Channels Supported.......................................................................................................... 336
Detecting the VCM Module Fitted........................................................................................................... 337
Voicemail ................................................................................................................................................ 338
Paging ..................................................................................................................................... 339
Paging from IP Office ............................................................................................................................. 339
Universal Paging Access Module ........................................................................................................... 339
Paging via an Analog Extension Port (POT Port) ................................................................................... 340
Paging via an Analog Trunk Port............................................................................................................ 342
Making Page Calls.................................................................................................................................. 344
Making Page Calls ............................................................................................................................. 344
Paging via a DSS Key........................................................................................................................ 344
Paging from Phone Manager ............................................................................................................. 344
Group Paging..................................................................................................................................... 344
Voicemail Pro..................................................................................................................................... 345
Remote Access ...................................................................................................................... 347
Remote Access ...................................................................................................................................... 347
IP Office Remote Access Setup ............................................................................................................. 348
Remote Access Using Analog Lines ...................................................................................................... 348
Additional User Controls......................................................................................................................... 349
Remote Dial-Up PC Setup...................................................................................................................... 349
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Remote Domain Browsing and LMHOSTS ............................................................................................ 349
Small Community Networking .............................................................................................. 350
Small Community Networking ................................................................................................................ 350
Requirements ......................................................................................................................................... 351
Enabling Small Community Networking ................................................................................................. 352
SCN Programming Tip ........................................................................................................................... 353
Short Code Programming for Small Community Networks..................................................................... 354
Dial Name................................................................................................................................ 355
Dial Name............................................................................................................................................... 355
Configuration in Manager ....................................................................................................................... 356
Dial Name in Small Community Networks .............................................................................................. 356
Use Dial Name with DS Phones ............................................................................................................. 357
Accessing the Dir Function via a DSS Key............................................................................................. 358
Editing the DS User's Full Name ............................................................................................................ 358
Appendix A ............................................................................................................................. 359
Locale Specific Tone Settings ................................................................................................................ 359
Argentina ................................................................................................................................................ 359
Australia.................................................................................................................................................. 360
Belgium (frb) ........................................................................................................................................... 361
Belgium (nlb) .......................................................................................................................................... 362
Brazil....................................................................................................................................................... 363
Canada ................................................................................................................................................... 364
Chile ....................................................................................................................................................... 365
Columbia ................................................................................................................................................ 366
Denmark ................................................................................................................................................. 367
Finland.................................................................................................................................................... 368
France .................................................................................................................................................... 369
Germany................................................................................................................................................. 370
Holland ................................................................................................................................................... 371
Italy ......................................................................................................................................................... 372
Japan...................................................................................................................................................... 373
Mexico .................................................................................................................................................... 374
Norway ................................................................................................................................................... 375
Peru ........................................................................................................................................................ 376
Poland .................................................................................................................................................... 377
Portugal .................................................................................................................................................. 378
Russia..................................................................................................................................................... 379
Sweden................................................................................................................................................... 380
UK........................................................................................................................................................... 381
USA ........................................................................................................................................................ 382
Venezuela............................................................................................................................................... 383
Index........................................................................................................................................ 384
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IP Office System Design Guide
This form is designed to help you gather the necessary information in preparation for the configuration of
your new IP Office system. Information on this form is critical for the smooth installation and
configuration of the IP Office system. The form needs to be completed by the Installation Engineer and
the person overseeing the telephone system at the site in which IP Office is being installed. All
information should be provided and reviewed prior to the Installation Engineer's arrival at the site.
Section I: General Site Information
1. Company Name:
2. Point of contact/Project Manager:
3. Phone Number:
4. Email Address:
5. Fax Number:
6. Is there access restrictions to your building/visitor passes?
7. If yes, please provide instructions and contact names and phone numbers if different from the
person above.
Section II: Hardware Setup
1. Please list the IP Office equipments to be installed and specify the quantity of each.
Quantity
Equipment (including expansion modules, daughter cards
and applications)
2. Where do you want the IP Office hardwares to reside?
If on a rack, is there enough rack space? Distance to be taken into account of is 1 meter between
control units.
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IP Office System Design Guide
Section III: IP Addresses
1. Will the IP Office system be part of a data network or will it be a stand alone phone system?
2. If it will be part of a data network, place a check mark next to the statement that specifies the
server status of the IP Office Control Unit within your network configuration.
IP Office Control Unit is the DHCP Server on the network.
If yes, how many IP addresses will the Control Unit assign? This defines the number of
sequential IP addresses, including the Control Unit IP address, that is allocated via DHCP.
The IP Office Control Unit can assign IP addresses to Dial In users only.
If yes, how many IP addresses will the Control Unit assign? This defines the number of
sequential IP addresses, including the Control Unit IP address, that is allocated via DHCP.
The IP Office Control Unit has a static IP address. This is the recommended option if the control
unit is part of a data network.
If yes, please provide the following information:
•
Control Unit IP address:
•
Subnet mask:
The IP Office Control Unit is a DHCP Client. (Not recommended)
3. What is the IP address of the PC running the Feature Key Server? This is the server PC
providing license key validation for the Control Unit. For a serial licence key plugged directly into
a Avaya IP Office - Small Office Edition control unit, the field should be left blank. Note that each
IP Office Control Unit requires a separate server PC for license validation.
4. Do you have a server that receives reliable time settings? If you do, please provide the IP
Address of that server here.
If you do not, the Voicemail Server, Voicemail Pro Server or Manager programs can all act as
Time servers, giving the time as set on their host PC's. If this is the case, please provide the IP
Address of the PC that will act as the time server here.
5. If you are using IP phones, please provide the IP Address of a TFTP server. The TFTP server
should be the PC on which the IP phone software has been loaded.
Manager 3.0
IP Office
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Section IV: System-wide Configuration
1. Will your system use IP Office Voicemail?
If yes, is it Voicemail Lite or Voicemail Pro?
If using Voicemail Pro, what is the IP address of the PC running Voicemail?
2. Do you want calls to be automatically placed on hold when another button is selected?
3. Place a check mark next to the phone numbers you want to block users from dialing. These
restrictions can be removed for individual users.
900 numbers
Directory assistance number (411)
Long distance numbers
International numbers
4. Are there specific numbers that users will be prohibited from dialing?
If yes, please list them below.
Restricted Phone Numbers
5. How long (minutes or seconds) do you want a call to remain on hold before the system re-alerts
the station/extension?
6. How long (minutes or seconds) do you want a call to remain on park?
7. Do you currently dial "9" to get an outside line?
8. Does your company use account codes for billing purposes?
If yes, provide the information below.
Account Code
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Associated Caller ID
(optional)
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
IP Office System Design Guide
Section V: Users Specific Configuration
1. List existing extension numbers and the first and last name of each employee who has or will
have a phone. Include the telephones in the kitchens, conference rooms, break room, etc.
Name
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Old
Extn.
Number
New
Extn.
Number
Direct Dial Number
(optional)
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
2. Consider the following functional settings for each user or those users who require special
consideration. Do you want some users to have certain capabilities while others do not? Can you
group these users into categories? This will help to quickly assign functions for each user. For
example, decide which functions you want assigned to all contractors working for your company
and tag those contractors
•
Voicemail: Does this user/extension need voicemail?
•
Outgoing Calls: Does this user/extension need to make outgoing calls?
•
Busy Tone: Do you want callers to get a busy tone when they call this extension and it
has a call on hold?
•
Message Ringback: Does this extension want a ring alert when there is a voicemail
message left on its extension?
•
Call Monitor: Does this extension need to be able to monitor another extension's call?
•
Privacy/Cannot be Intruded: Do you want to prevent others from intruding on this user's
calls?
•
Force Account Code: Must this user enter a valid account code to make ANY external
call?
•
Trusted Voicemail Access: Does this user need to access her/his voicemail from an
extension/phone other than the original phone extension? If yes, please provide the
phone numbers.
•
Override Restricted Numbers: Can this user override any of the restricted numbers? If
yes, list those numbers.
•
Redirect Time: When a call comes in for this extension, how many rings will the caller
hear before the call is redirected?
Extn/Name
John
Smith
Voicemail
yes
Outgoing
Calls
yes
Busy Tone
no
Message
Ringback
no
Call
Monitor
yes
Privacy
yes
Force Acct
Code
no
Trusted
VM
yes
(ext.204)
Over-ride
Number
no
Redirect
Time
5
Manager 3.0
IP Office
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
IP Office System Design Guide
3. Do you want any “Hotdesk" users (people who share handsets or need to access their phone and
voicemail settings from various phones throughout the day)? If yes, please list them.
Hotdesk Users
Manager 3.0
IP Office
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Section VI: Hunt Groups
A Hunt Group is a collection of users, eg. Sales - a group to handle all sales related calls. An incoming
caller wishing to speak to Sales can ring one number but the call can be answered by any number of
extensions that are members of the Sales Hunt Group.
1. If you want hunt groups created, please provide the following information for each hunt group in
the table below:
•
Group Name
•
Extension number and the direct dial number for the hunt group.
•
Members in each group
•
Hunt type (how calls will be routed for the group):
•
Linear/Hunt: Incoming calls will always ring the first member of the group before
moving to the next member.
•
Most Idle/Idle: Incoming calls will always start with the member who has been idle
the longest.
•
Circular/Rotary: Incoming calls will start with the next available member in the
hunt group based on the last extension used.
•
Group: Incoming calls will be alerted to all members at the same time.
Group Name
Sample Hunt
Group
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Extn. # & DDI
Extn: 203
DDI: 408 555 1234
Users
Hunt
Type
John Smith, Mary Roberts, Ron
Jones
Idle
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
IP Office System Design Guide
2. For each hunt group listed above, provide the following additional information:
•
Queuing: Would you like calls to be queued for this group?
•
Voicemail: Would you like calls to go to voicemail if hunt group members do not answer a
call?
•
No Answer Time: The number of seconds an extension rings before the call is passed to
another extension on the list.
Group Name
Sample Hunt Group
Queuing
Voicemail
No Answer Time
(sec)
Yes
No
15
3. For each hunt group listed above, please provide the following fallback related information
(Optional):
•
Out of Service Fallback Group: When the hunt group is Out of Service, which group
should answer the call?
•
Night service fallback: When the hunt group is in Night Service mode, which group
should answer the call?
•
Overflow Fallback Group: When all agents in the hunt group are unavailable to take a
call, which group should that call be overflowed to?
•
Overflow Time: How many seconds should a call wait (while it is being rung around the
Extension List) before being passed to the Overflow Group?
Group Name
Sample Hunt
Group
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Out of
Service
Fallback
Group
Reception
Night
Service
Fallback
Group
Voicemail
Overflow
Fallback
Group
Reception
Overflow
Time
(sec)
60
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
4. For each of the hunt groups, please answer the following questions relating to Night Service. If
Night Service is used, do you want to activate night service manually via short codes or would
you like it to be activated automatically by a schedule? If you want it activated automatically,
please provide a time profile with days of the week and specific times in which the hunt group will
be in Night Service mode.
Group Name
Sample Hunt Group
Manual or
Auto
Activation
Auto
Time Profile
M - F 6pm to 8am
All day Sat. and Sun.
Section VII: Trunk Configuration
1. How many trunks do you need?
2. Please list your trunks (analogue, digital PRI/BRI, etc.) below and the number of channels
available on each?
Trunk Type
Number of available
channels
3. Do you need certain calls or types of calls routed over specific trunks? This is rare, but if you
need this feature, please specify the DDI's/DID's or types of calls and the line number you want
these calls routed over.
DDI's/DID'sCall Types
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Trunk Number
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Scope of Manual
The IP Office Manager 3.0 manual is designed to guide you through configuring the IP Office Control
Unit after all the necessary hardware has been installed. It contains in-depth discussion on setting up
both telephony and data specifications such as VCM & Data Channels, Remote Access, Small
Community Networking, etc. The Configuration Forms section contains explanations for all configuration
options within Manager's Configuration Tree window. A set of instructions to guide you through getting
the IP Office system up and running with just the basic configuration is available in the Sample Step-byStep Configuration section.
Manager 3.0
IP Office
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Overview of Manager
Manager is a Windows application for viewing and editing the configuration file of IP Office Control Units.
The Control Unit holds the configuration as files in the Control Unit's flash memory. Thus the files are not
lost when power is removed from the system. Whenever the system is rebooted, the file is loaded from
flash memory into the systems RAM memory.
Using Manager, you can extract and then view and alter the configuration file in the system's RAM
memory. Having received a configuration file, you can archive it on the PC or modify it using Manager.
When you are finished with the new configuration, you can use Manager to send the configuration back
to the Control Unit's flash memory and then reboot the Control Unit to activate the changes.
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IP Office
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager
Installing Manager
Manager is installed as one of the applications from the IP Office Administrator Applications CD. It is
highly recommended that Manager is kept on the same version number as the IP Office Control Unit
software.
•
•
•
Operating System:
Manager is supported on the following Windows platforms:
•
Windows 2003
•
Windows XP Professional & XP Professional Server,
•
Windows 2000 Professional (SP2) & Server (SP2),
•
Windows NT4 Workstation (SP6) & NT4 Server (SP6),
•
Windows 98 (2nd Edition)
Network Settings:
•
The PC should be in the same IP domain as the IP Office Control Unit, ie. it should have
the same subnet mask.
•
A fixed IP address is strongly recommended.
WARNING:
If the Manager PC is to be used for software upgrades or to support Avaya 4600 and 5600 Series
IP telephones, then a fixed IP address is required. Note also that software upgrades through
Manager are not supported over WAN or RAS links.
•
Installation with Other Applications:
If IP Office Feature Key Server and/or IP Office Voicemail (Lite or Pro) are being installed,
it is recommended that they are installed onto the same PC and that Manager is installed
onto that PC. The required PC specifications for those applications exceed those required
by Manager.
•
Security:
Though Manager and the IP Office Control Units both require passwords for access, it is
recommended that Manager is not installed on a PC in a public/general use area. The
Manager PC will hold copies of the IP Office configuration and other important files.
•
Regional Settings:
The regional settings (Start | Settings | Control Panel | Regional Options or Regional
Settings) should be set correctly. These control the options shown with the Manager
application. For a new IP Office installation, the regional setting of the Manager PC is
used to set the Locale within the IP Office configuration when first loaded.
•
Time & Date Settings:
Initially the IP Office takes its time and date from whichever PC it finds running Manager.
Therefore the time and date on the Manager PC should be set correctly (Start | Settings |
Control Panel | Date/Time). See How the System Receives Time .
Manager 3.0
IP Office
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Daily Backup
Using short codes, applications such as Phone Manager and the menus on digital telephones, users can
make changes to the configuration running in the system's RAM.
In order to ensure that such changes are saved, the system copies the RAM configuration into the Flash
memory once each day. This occurs at between 12:00 AM and 12:30 AM (it only occurs if user changes
to the RAM have been made).
Default LAN Settings
When an un-configured Control Unit is switched on, it requests IP information from a DHCP Server on
the network.
•
Note: This means that the Control Unit must be physically connected to the LAN before
being switched on. If connecting to the LAN via another hub, then connect via LAN port 8
with the UPLINK button out.
•
If there is a DHCP server on the LAN, the control unit defaults to being a DHCP client and uses
the IP address information that the DHCP server supplies.
•
If no DHCP Server replies, then the Control Unit defaults to being the DHCP server for the LAN.
It then does the following:
•
It allocates itself the IP address 192.168.42.1 and IP Mask 255.255.255.0.
•
By default, the Control Unit supports 200 DHCP clients. Any PC that connects to the LAN
as a DHCP client is given an address between 192.168.42.2 and 192.168.42.201 plus
255.255.255.0 as its IP mask and 192.168.42.1 (the Control Unit's address) as its default
gateway settings.
•
Note: Address for device on the LAN are allocated from the bottom of the DHCP range
upwards. Addresses for dial-in connections are allocated from the top of the DHCP range
down.
•
Any PC or device that needs to connect to the Control unit and have a fixed IP address
should use IP addresses between 192.168.42.202 and 192.168.42.254.
•
The address 192.168.42.255 is a broadcast address.
Any of these LAN settings can be altered using Manager. For more information see Connecting to the
LAN .
Default Telephony Settings
The Control Unit comes with a default configuration.
•
No prefix is required for dialing external telephone numbers.
•
Various default short codes are available to enable user's to utilize system features via their
telephone, see Default System Short Code List .
•
Each extension is associated with a User and the user name defaults to "Extn201", "Extn202"
etc. The user name appears in the Caller Display so you may want to change these to real
names. These are configured using the User configuration form.
•
All incoming voice calls are routed to a group called Main (200), which contains the first 16
extensions. Use the Incoming Call Route Form to create incoming call routes to other
destinations (extension, fax machines, etc.).
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IP Office
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager
How the System Receives Time
Whenever the Control Unit reboots, it requests the time using the standard Internet Time protocol
(RFC868).
Time servers may give the time in local format or in UTC (Universal Time Coordinates) format. If the
Control Unit receives the time in local time format it uses that time. Otherwise if it receives the time in
UTC format, it uses that time plus the Time Offset configured through Manager in the System Form.
The Voicemail Server, Voicemail Pro Server or Manager programs can all act as Time servers, giving
the time as set on their host PC's. They all give the time in both local time format and UTC format.
Following a reboot the Control Unit repeats its request every hour. It first makes the request using the
Voicemail Server IP address in its configuration and if it receives no reply it then does a broadcast
request.
If you are running Manager when the Voicemail Server starts, then Voicemail does not start as a time
server. It is therefore highly recommended that you have no copy of Manager running when you start or
restart the Voicemail Server.
You can check the time held by the Control Unit on any phone with a suitable display. Alternatively you
can run the Monitor application and enable the option System | System Resource Status Prints to
see the Control Unit's time.
Manager 3.0
IP Office
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Upgrading Manager and IP Office
Introduction - Upgrading IP Office
Because Manager is an application used for managing the IP Office control unit, upgrading the Manager
application does not update the control unit's core software. It is highly recommended that when the IP
Office control unit software is upgraded, the Manager application is upgraded as well.
Before attempting an upgrade, ensure that you have performed all the necessary Pre-Upgrade Checks.
Certain IP Office control units require additional steps and procedures.
Note: The processes in this document are generic upgrade processes only. When upgrading it is your
responsibility to check for and refer to any relevant Avaya Technical Bulletins and other instructions
relating to the particular upgrade being performed.
Pre-Upgrade Checks
Before proceeding with the upgrade, check the following:
1. Are your Manager PC and the IP Office on the same LAN segment?
If you are running Manager 2.1 or later and IP Office 2.1 or later, then a validated upgrade will be
available. If you are running Manager 2.0 or earlier or if you are running Manager 2.1 but the
control unit is still running IP Office 2.0, a validated upgrade will not be performed. If the latter
situation applies, make sure your Manager PC and the IP Office are on the same LAN segment
and the upgrade is not being performed across WAN or RAS links.
•
Ensure that the Manager PC has a fixed (static) IP address.
•
In Manager, select File | Preferences. The current setting (shown in bold) should be
255.255.255.255 in order to test broadcast routing between the Manager PC and IP Office.
If not, select that setting and then check that Manager can see and receive the
configuration from the IP Office being upgraded.
•
Check the Manager program's Binary Directory is the folder containing the bin files. The
directory is shown in the Manager's title bar and can be set using File | Change Working
Directory.
2. Upgrade the IP Office Admin & User Software Suites if necessary.
If upgrading between software levels, for example from 1.1 to 1.3, you should also upgrade the IP
Office Administration suite of software to match. The new level of .bin software is likely to need
the matching level of Manager software to allow access to new configuration fields. See
Upgrading IP Office Application Software.
3. Manager PC IP Address.
The PC running IP Office Manager should be given a fixed (static) IP address. This address
should be on the same subnet as the IP Office Control Unit with the subnet mask set correctly.
4. Multiple IP Office Networks.
Where several IP Offices are connected in a voice and/or data network they should all be running
the same level of software.
5. Copy the Latest IP Office Configuration.
Always ensure that you have received and made a copy of the latest configuration from the IP
Office system before attempting any upgrade.
6. Obtain the Bin files.
If you have upgraded the IP Office Manager application, then the appropriate .bin files are copied
to the Manager's working directory (in default c:\program files\avaya\ip office\manager). A set
of .bin files can also be found in the \bin folder on the IP Office Administration CD.
•
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Upgrading IP403 Systems to 2.0 or newer
Page 26
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager
IP403 control units must be upgraded to 2.0 or newer in a two stage process. The first stage
involves using the ip403.bin file found in the Manager IP403V1_99 sub-folder. Copy this file
to the Manager folder and then perform the upgrade. The second stage involves using the
ip403.bin file found in the Manager IP403V2_0 sub-folder. Copy this file to the Manager
folder and repeat the upgrade.
•
If you have obtained .bin files from another source check that you have a copy of any
instructions provided with those bin files and check that the system complies with those
instructions. Backup the existing .bin files and then copy the new files into the Manager's
Working Directory.
7. Check the Manager BOOTP Entries.
BOOTP is part of the process by which the IP Office restarts and requests new software. The
Manager PC acts as the IP Office's BOOTP server and must have a BOOTP entry for the IP
Office.
a. In Manager, receive the IP Office's configuration file. Click
of units in the system.
Control Unit to display a list
b. Device Number 1 is the Control Unit (ie. IP403, IP406, IP412 or IP Office Small Office
Edition). Note its type, software version, IP address and the serial number. The Serial
Number is the Control Unit's MAC address.
BOOTP to display a list of BOOTP entries. There should be one for every IP Office
c. Click
ever configured from the Manager PC. Check that the list includes the MAC and IP address
of the Control Unit you want to upgrade and that the .bin file listed matches the Control
Unit's type.
d. If an entry does not exist right-click the displayed list and select New. Enter the required
details and click OK. You do not need to send the configuration back to the IP Office as
BOOTP entries are stored on the Manager PC.
e. Double-check the entry as this is a critical setting for the upgrade process.
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IP Office
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Validated Upgrade
With a Validated upgrade, the IP Office box waits until it has received the new software before erasing
the old version and starting the upgrade. A validated upgrade is only available with IP Office 2.1 or
newer as detailed below.
If you are running Manager 2.1 or later and IP Office 2.1 or later, a validated upgrade is available
through the Upgrade Wizard within the Manager interface. To invoke a validated upgrade, the Validate
box on the Upgrade Wizard must be ticked (default) before performing the upgrade. With the Validate
box ticked, the system will check that it has received the new .bin files and then give you the option to
upgrade. If you untick the Validate box, a validated upgrade will not be performed. The validated
upgrade function can be performed on both a remote and local upgrade.
If you are running Manager 2.0 or earlier, the Validate box and hence the remote upgrade functionality is
not available. If you are running Manager 2.1 but the control unit is still running IP Office 2.0, a validated
upgrade will not be available and the Validate box will be grayed out on Manager.
Manager 3.0
IP Office
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager
Upgrading IP Office Application Software
When upgrading an IP Office system from one core software level to another, the recommended process
is to upgrade all existing IP Office application software as well. This is done by uninstalling and then
reinstalling the software.
The uninstall process below only removes those files installed during each applications original
installation. Any other files added since (user files, system configurations files, voicemail messages, etc.)
are not removed.
1. Open the Windows Control Panel (Start | Settings | Control Panel).
2. Select Add/Remove Programs.
3. Select the IP Office application suite to be removed, eg. IP Office Admin Suite, IP Office User
Suite, Voicemail Pro.
•
If removing Voicemail Pro, ensure that you have backed up the existing call flow database
first, see the "Voicemail Pro Installation" manual for further details.
4. Click Add/Remove.
5. From the options offered select Remove. This process only removes those files installed during
the application suites original installation. Any other files added since (user files, system
configurations files, voicemail messages, etc.) are not removed.
6. Follow any prompts given during the removal process.
Note: The removal of some applications (for example TAPI, Feature Key Server, etc) will require
the PC to be rebooted.
7. When the process has completed, select another IP Office suite to remove if necessary.
8. Click OK to finish and close the Control Panel.
9. The new versions of the application suites can now be installed.
Manager 3.0
IP Office
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Upgrading Control and Expansion Unit Software
Upgrading IP Office Systems 2.1 or Later
To upgrade an IP Office control and/or expansion unit software:
1. Ensure that you have followed the Pre-Upgrade Checks.
2. Ensure that you have received and made a copy of the IP Office's configuration. If the upgrade
fails the current configuration may be erased so a backup copy is an essential precaution.
3. In Manager, select File | Advanced | Upgrade. This starts the UpgradeWiz application.
4. The wizard lists the Control Units and Expansion Modules found.
•
No Units Listed
If this occurs using the Broadcast Address of 255.255.255.255 it implies that the Manager
PC is not connected to any local IP Office units. At this point, you should enter the specific
IP address of the unit you wish to upgrade or check the network settings.
5. The list shows the current software level of the units and the level of the appropriate bin file it has
available for each unit from those in the Manager's working folder.
6. Tick the boxes for those control units that you want to upgrade.
7. If you are running Manager 2.1 or later, a Validate box will be available and ticked by default.
Leave the box ticked if the control unit you are updating is currently running IP Office 2.1 or later
because this will perform a validated upgrade. If the control unit you are updating is currently
running IP Office 2.0 or earlier, the Validate box will be grayed out.
8. In Manager select View | TFTP Log. This will allow you to see the file transfer processes.
Arrange the windows so that you can see both the TFTP Log and the UpgradeWiz.
9. In the UpgradeWiz click Upgrade.
10. You will be asked to enter the System Password.
11. After the system has received and validated the new .bin files, you will be given the option to
continue with the upgrade, where the process of erasing, downloading and installing will begin. If
you want the to continue, click OK. Clicking Cancel will erase all the new .bin files from the RAM
of the control unit. The unit will continue operating as if an upgrade was never attempted.
12. An example TFTP log for a successful upgrade is shown below. Refer to Troubleshooting if any
other messages are shown.
13. Following the upgrade the IP Office Control Unit should return to normal operation.
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IP Office
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager
.bin Files for Control and Expansion Units
The software for IP Office Control Units and Expansion Units is provided in the form of .bin files. These
are normally copied to the Manager application's working directory during installation of Manager.
This table describes the different .bin files. Additional .bin files are available for relevant Avaya phones.
File
Description
ip401.bin
Core software for IP401 Control Units.
ip403.bin
Core software for IP403 Control Units.
ip406.bin
Core software for IP406 V1 Control Units.
ip406u.bin
Core software for IP406 V2 Control Units.
ip412.bin
Core software for IP412 Control Units.
naatm16.bin
Software for Analog Trunk Expansion Modules.
nadcp-16.bin
Software for Digital Station Expansion Modules.
nas0-16.bin
Software for S0 Expansion Modules.
avpots16.bin
Software for Phones Expansion Module (analog
extensions).
ip9000.bin
Software for the INDeX Media Gateway expansion
module.
ipwan3.bin
Software for 10/100Mbps WAN3 modules supported
from IP Office 1.4 onwards.
Note: As of IP Office version 3.0, DT ports and telephone sets are no longer supported.
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IP Office
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Troubleshooting
If the IP Office does not reboot after the upgrade or goes into a reboot loop, then the upgrade has not
been successful.
Some clues as to the cause may be given by the entries in the TFTP Log that was running during the
upgrade process.
1. Unable to Send
The following or similar in the TFTPLog indicates that the required .bin file was not in the
Manager’s Working Directory:
: Received BOOTP request for 00e007000123 192.168.42.1 ip403.bin
: Sending BOOTP response for 00e007000123 192.168.42.1 ip403.bin
: Unable to send ip403.bin length 0 bytes
•
If this occurs check the setting for Manager's Working Directory (File |Change Working
Directory). Then check that the file detailed by the BOOTP entry is in that folder. A set of
.bin files is also available in the \bin folder on the IP Office Administration CD. Then remove
and reapply power from the IP Office to force a reboot attempt.
2. Unable to Process
The following or similar in the TFTPLog indicates that a matching BOOTP entry was not found.
: Received BOOTP request for 00e007000123 192.168.42.1 ip403.bin, unable to
process
•
If this occurs use Manager to add or edit the required BOOTP entry. Then remove and
reapply power from the IP Office to force a reboot attempt.
If these actions do not resolve the issue, the IP Office will have to be reset via the DTE port. For details
refer to the DTE Port Maintenance section of this manual.
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IP Office
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager Commands
Toolbar
Clicking one of the Toolbar buttons is a quick alternative to choosing a command from the menu. Buttons
on the toolbar activate and deactivate according to the state of the application. The toolbar itself may be
moved with the mouse and left as a floating palette, or docked to any edge of the main window.
Button
Action
Menu Equivalent
Locate and open a file.
File / Open
Save the file in the active window.
File / Save
File Menu
Open
The File | Open command reads and opens the current configuration from the Control Unit selected.
You are prompted for the System Password (if you are using the default password this does not need to
be entered)
A copy of the configuration file is also saved in the Manager's Working Directory. The System name is
used for the file name if available, otherwise it is named as nabranch.cfg.
See Receiving a Configuration .
Close
This command closes the configuration currently open.
Save
The File | Save command saves the amended configuration.
If the configuration has been opened "online", the Sending Config To dialog box appears in order to
select the Reboot mode required. If you choose to Cancel the file is only saved to disk.
If the configuration file has been opened "offline", the file is saved to disk only.
See Sending a Configuration .
Save As
The File | Save As command allows you to save a configuration file under an new name, or in a new
location. The command displays the Save File As dialog box. You can enter the new file name, including
the drive and directory.
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Manager 3.0
Change Working Directory
The File | Change Working Directory option allows you to set where Manager should save and look for
different files.
The normal default in all cases is the Manager application folder (C:\Program Files\Avaya\IP
Office\Manager). This ensure that whenever Manager is upgraded by deinstalling the existing copy and
installing the new Manager, all associated admin files are also upgraded.
If any of the directories is changed, you must ensure that the correct files are present in the new
directory and that these files are manually updated whenever Manager is upgraded.
•
Working Directory (.cfg files):
The location to which copies of control unit configuration files should be saved.
•
Binary Directory (.bin files):
The directory that contains the .bin files for IP Office modules and control units. Also the directory
that contains any .bin and other files for 4600 and 5600 Series IP telephones. This directory is
used as the root directory for Manager's BOOTP/TFTP services.
•
Upgrade Directory (UpgradeWiz.exe):
The directory that contains the Upgrade Wizard application. This directory should include the files
UgradeWiz.exe and bin.cfg (which details which units use which bin files).
Change Password
See Operators .
The File | Change Password command allows the Operator that is currently logged on to change their
password. This setting is held on the Manager PC and so does not require a send to the Control Unit or
reboot.
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Manager Commands
Preferences
This command allows you to specify the IP address of the Control Unit you wish to manage. By default,
the broadcast address (255.255.255.255) is used and all Control Units found are then shown. Specifying
individual addresses (maximum 10) allows quicker selection of the Control Unit required.
To create a new entry, from the Preferences menu, select Edit
•
Enter broadcast IP address:
The IP address for the Control Unit you wish to manage or a more general broadcast address. If
you wish to manage a remote Control Unit then you must enter its IP address here. If it is set as
255.255.255.255 (default) then the Manager will be able to talk to all Control Units on the local
LAN. If the PC has two LAN connections then it is necessary to set this for the broadcast address
of the LAN, eg. 192.168.42.255 you have connected your Control Unit to.
•
Enable port for serial communication: Default = Off
When off, the Manager application does not check for a serial port when started.
•
Enter port number to be used for serial communication:
Not used. This is a legacy feature for older units that were managed via the serial rather than
LAN port. Setting this to 0 the Manager does not use the serial port, leaving it free for use by
programs such as Hyper Terminal.
•
Load Last File:
If this option is selected, the last configuration file you were working on will automatically open
when launching the Manager application.
•
Close Configuration after send: Default = On
Automatically closes the configuration file open in Manager when it has been sent to the control
unit. This helps ensure that configuration being edited is a recent copy received from the control
unit and thus contains any user changes. The setting does not apply if the configuration is
opened offline.
•
Save configuration file before send: Default = On
Save a copy of the configuration file on the Manager PC whenever the configuration is sent to the
control unit.
•
Backup files on save: Default = On
If on, whenever a copy of a configuration is saved on the Manager PC, any existing saved copy is
renamed with the backup file extension name (see below).
•
Backup file extension:Default = .BAK
The file extension used for backup configuration files.
I Cannot Send/Read an Existing Config?
You need to make sure that the manager's preferences are pointing at the correct IP address, which
should be either a broadcast address of 255.255.255.255 or the specific address of a Control Unit. You
should also check that you are using the correct password.
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Manager 3.0
Open File
The File | Offline | Open command displays the Open dialog box so you can select a configuration file
to edit from those stored on the PC.
Receive Config
This enables you to receive a copy of the current operational configuration from a system. This is saved
in the Manager's Working Directory as a file, which can be modified without being connected to the
system and then sent back to the Control Unit to become operational when the system is rebooted.
By default, the name given is the System Name as set in the System Form .
Note: The suggested file name is the same for each download from the Control Unit, make sure you
have a backup of the file before downloading over an existing file.
Note: Failing to supply the correct password results in an empty file.
See Receiving a Configuration .
Send Config
The SendConfig function instructs Manager to save the amended configuration to the Working Directory
and send it to the Flash memory. To activate the new configuration the system must be rebooted to pass
the configuration from Flash to the RAM. See Sending a Configuration .
Select the type of reboot required as follows:
Reboot Mode:
•
Immediately: When selected the reboot occurs immediately regardless of the number of calls on
the system.
•
When Free: When this option is selected the Control Unit waits until all calls have cleared before
rebooting.
•
Merge Config: When this option is selected the amendments are merged with the configuration
currently stored in the RAM. This means that new features can be active without rebooting the
system. See Merging a Configuration .
•
None: When selected the configuration is sent to the Flash only.
•
Bar Incoming Calls: When selected this option is checked with the When Free option above the
System will bar all new incoming calls until after the reboot
•
Bar Outgoing Calls: When selected this option is checked with the When Free option above the
System prevents all new outgoing calls until after the reboot
•
Reboot Time (hh:mm): The system waits until this time before attempting to reboot. This option
is only available when When Free is selected under Reboot Mode. The instruction is stored in
the Control Unit, not in Manager.
•
Please Enter Password: Enter the System Password, this is required to authorize a reboot. If
you entered the password when you received the configuration this box does not appear.
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Manager Commands
Erase Config
The Erase Config command removes the active configuration from the Control Unit and restores it to
the factory default.
Select Advanced from the File menu and then Erase Config (factory default).
In order to complete this operation you must enter the System Password.
Reboot
This command instructs the System to reboot. This sends the configuration currently stored in the Flash
memory to the RAM.
Select File | Advanced | Reboot and select the type of reboot required as follows:
•
Reboot Mode:
•
Immediately: When selected the reboot occurs immediately regardless of the number of
calls on the system.
•
When Free: When this option is selected, the Control Unit waits until all calls have
cleared before rebooting. The following options are only available with When Free
selection:
•
•
•
Bar Incoming Calls: When selected, this option is checked with the When Free
option and the System will bar all new incoming calls until after the reboot
•
Bar Outgoing Calls: When selected, this option is checked with the When Free
option and the System prevents all new outgoing calls until after the reboot
•
Reboot Time (hh:mm): The system waits until this time before attempting to
reboot. The instruction is stored in the Control Unit not in the Manager.
Merge Config: When this option is selected, the amendments are merged with the
configuration currently stored in the RAM. This means that new features can be active
without rebooting the system. See Merging a Configuration .
Please Enter Password: Enter the System Password, this is required to authorize a reboot.
Upgrade
This command starts the Upgrade Wizard. This application is installed with the Manager application from
the Administration CD and allows you to follow the progress of upgrading your system.
•
WARNING: Upgrading from IP Office 1.4 and earlier
If upgrading from a previous version of Manager please refer to Pre-Upgrade Checks
section of this manual. This is especially important for IP403 systems which require a twostage upgrade process.
•
WARNING:
Incorrect use of the Upgrade command can halt Control Unit operation. If an upgrade is
performed from a Manager PC that is not on the same LAN segment as the IP Office
Control Unit, the Validate box on the Upgrade Wizard screen must be ticked (default) to
invoke a remote upgrade. ONLY untick the Validate box if the Manager PC is on the same
LAN segment as the IP Office and running on a PC with a fixed IP address. For full details,
refer to the "Upgrading Manager and IP Office" section of this manual.
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Manager 3.0
Backup
The Backup feature creates a copy of all configuration files (.cfg) and software files (.bin) stored in the
Manager's Working Directory to a folder of your choice.
Use this dialogue box to select the folder where you wish the files to be copied. Double-click to expand
or collapse a folder.
Restore
The Restore feature copies all configuration files (.cfg) and software files (.bin) stored in the selected
folder to the Working Directory.
Use this dialogue box to select the folder the files are to be retrieved from. Double-click to expand or
collapse a folder.
Import Directory
This command allows you to import a .cvs or .tab file into the Directory stored in the configuration.
Directory Format
Use this dialogue box to select the format in which the Directory Entries are to be saved or imported.
•
Export To/Import From: The box displays the path selected in the previous dialogue box. This is
the location and file name that is used to save or retrieve the directory entries.
•
Format: Select the format in which the directory entries are retrieved or saved
•
Comma Separated: Each field is separated by a comma
•
Tab Separated: Each field is separated by a tab
•
Name/Number or Number/Name: Select the order of the fields
•
Add Entries: Select if the current Directory Entries are to be added to existing entries
•
Replace Entries: Select if the current Directory Entries are to replace existing entries
•
Maximum Directory Name Length: Specify the length of the name field
Export Directory
This option allows you to export the contents of the Directory stored in the configuration into a .csv or
.tab file.
Import Configuration Entities
You may wish to copy entries, eg. Short Codes, services, from another configuration file into the current
configuration. To do this you must first export the entries from the other configuration - see Export
Configuration Entities .
Once you have exported the relevant entries, select Import Configuration Entities from the File | Import |
Export menu. From the Open dialog box, select the export file and choose Open. The entries are
imported into the current configuration file.
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Manager Commands
Export Configuration Entities
You may wish to copy entries, eg. Short Codes, Services, to another configuration file to save you time
recreating them again.
To do this select the Export Configuration Entities option in the File | Import | Export menu.
Select the entries you wish to export and enter the path for the new file. This will default to config.exp in
the Working Directory.
See Import Configuration Entities .
Export as Text
This command creates a .csv text file from the open configuration. The name of the file defaults to the
system name but this can be changed.
Import as Text
Overwrite the configuration in Manager with an imported .csv file.
Logoff
Once an Operator has logged on, this menu option becomes available to allow the current Operator to
log off and the Manager application waits for another Operator to log on.
Exit
The File | Exit command exits the Manager application. If you have modified a configuration without
saving, you'll be prompted to save before exiting.
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Manager 3.0
Tools Menu
MSN Configuration
This form can be used to populate the Incoming Call Route table.
•
MSN:
The first number in the set of MSN numbers for which you have subscribed.
Note: If you require to find an exact match between the MSN numbers and the destination
numbers, enter a minus (-) sign before the first MSN number.
•
Destination:
Where incoming calls with matching digits should be routed. The drop-down list contains the
extensions and groups on the system.
•
Presentation Digits:
Set to match the number of digits from the MSN number that the PSTN will actually present to the
system.
•
Range:
How many MSN numbers were subscribed for. This assumes that all the numbers are in series
from the MSN entry above.
•
Add:
Adds the appropriate entries to the Incoming Call Route table using the value entered above.
•
Delete:
Removes a specific entry.
Renumber Lines
The Renumber Lines option within the Tools menu bar allows you to number or renumber all trunk
lines. The number of trunk lines is useful for Line Appearance configuration. Before the system
associates a particular Line Appearance ID with a channel, a check is made to determine that the ID is
not already used as an extension number for a user or hunt group. If the number is currently in use, the
ID number is incremented until an unused number is found. Each channel is then numbered
sequentially. If any channel has a Line Appearance ID configured, it will automatically be updated to use
the new number.
To number or renumber all trunk lines:
1. From the Tools menu bar, select Renumber Lines.
2. Enter the desired number.
3. Select OK.
Busy on Held Validation
With Line Appearances configured, the expected behaviour is that all incoming calls are presented on
available line appearances to give the user the option to take the incoming call or not. If Busy on Held is
enabled for users with line appearances, incoming calls after the user already has a call on hold are
given busy tones and not presented on available line appearances. To make full use of line
appearances, the ability to disable Busy on Held for all users with line appearances is provided. The
Busy on Held Validation option checks for all users with Line Appearances configured and Busy on
Held activated. Once detected, the administrator is given the option to disable Busy on Held for all
those users.
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Manager Commands
Edit Menu
This menu allows objects in the configuration to be cut, copied, pasted and deleted.
View Menu
•
TFTP Log:
Open a log of all file transfers - this can be used to follow the process of an upgrade or when
receiving or sending a configuration.
Window Menu
The Window menu provides commands to control the position and layout of application windows.
•
Tile:
Resize and position all windows side-by-side in an non overlapping pattern.
•
Cascade:
Resize and position all windows in an overlapping pattern from the top-left hand corner of the
application's main window so that the title bar of each is visible.
•
Close All:
Close all windows.
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Using Manager
Operators
Operators are people who use Manager to configure the system. Operators can be created with different
levels of access to the configuration file.
A configuration form represents each entry in the system's configuration. Each operator can be given the
rights to View different types of forms, Edit those forms, create New entries and Delete entries. Some
forms consist of a number of tabs and operators can be restricted to which of those tabs they can
access. All the configuration forms are discussed in more detail in their respective sections.
Each Operator has a user name and a password. Once an Operator has logged on to Manager, they can
open configuration files held on the PC or received from the Control Unit. Access to the configuration
forms within the configuration file will be dependent on the Operator's rights.
Each Operator can change their password by doing the following:
1. Select Change Password from the File menu and enter your new password.
2. Click OK.
3. Select Logoff from the File menu and the "Enter Operator Name and Password" dialogue box
returns.
4. Log on using your new password.
Default Operators
When Manager is installed, it creates several default operators, whose user name and passwords
match. The default operators can access the following configuration forms:
•
Administrator:
The Administrator has full access to all configuration forms and can create, edit and delete
Operators.
•
Manager:
Line (View, Edit and Delete only), Extension (View and Edit only), Service (IP, AutoConnect,
Quota and PPP tabs only), Firewall Profile (Standard tab only), System, User, Hunt Group, Short
Code, Incoming Call Route, Directory, Time Profile, Least Cost Route and Account Code.
•
Operator:
User (view and edit the Voicemail, DND, Telephony and Forwarding tabs only), Hunt Group (view
and edit the Hunt Group tab only), Time Profile (view and edit only), Directory and Account Code.
Creating Operators
The top-level operator, called "Administrator" has rights to create new operators, change operator
settings and delete operators. This is done by accessing the Operator form after logging onto Manager
as the Administrator. See Operator Form.
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Using Manager
Receiving a Configuration
With each start-up or reboot of Manager, it needs to get the current configuration from the Control Unit.
The configuration is copied from the system's RAM and includes any user changes made since the last
reboot of the system. The system's current configuration can be received from the Control Unit using
either of the methods below.
To Receive and Open a Configuration
1. Click on the
icon or select File and then Open.
2. Manager scans the LAN for Control Units.
3. If only one Control Unit is detected, the Receiving Config From dialogue box appears - go to
step 5; otherwise, the Select unit to read configuration from dialogue box will appear.
4. The Control Units found are listed in the box. Select the Control Unit required and then select
OK.
5. Enter the system password. The configuration is then read and opened in Manager. The
following message appears in the Manager status bar - "filename.cfg Received OK Size xxxx".
•
If no configuration file is loaded, the most likely cause is an incorrect system password.
6. A copy of the configuration file is also saved in the Manager's Working Directory as a .cfg file.
The System name is used for the file name.
To Receive, Name and Open a Configuration
This method of opening a configuration allows you to rename the configuration file if so desired before
opening it. It also allows you to see the file being received and then you can open it by clicking the
icon.
1. Select File and then Offline.
2. Select RecvConfig. Manager scans the LAN for Control Units.
3. If only one Control Unit is detected the Default File Name dialogue box appears - go to step 5,
otherwise the "Who Is" dialogue box appears.
4. The Control Units found are listed in the box. Select the Control Unit required and then select
OK.
5. Enter the name you wish to give the configuration file in the Default File Name dialogue box (by
default the System name is used).
6. Select Yes in the "About to Receive filename.cfg from..." dialogue box
7. Enter the system password. The configuration is then received by Manager (the configuration file
is received into the Manager program file). The follow message appears in the Manager status
bar - "filename.cfg Received OK Size xxxx".
8. Click the
icon or select File and then Open.
9. Enter the system password.
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Manager 3.0
Configuration Sizes
There are maximum size limits to the configuration that can be loaded into the different IP Office Control
Units. These are:
•
IP401: 64KB.
•
IP403: 192KB.
•
IP406 V1: 192KB.
•
IP406 V2: 256KB
•
IP412: 1.0MB.
•
IP Office Small Office Edition: 192KB.
Attempting to load a configuration that exceeds the limits above will cause the system to lock and require
resetting via the DTE port.
Figures for all individual entries in the configuration cannot be given as they vary between software
releases. The list below gives typical values, in bytes, for common entries:
•
Extension: 70.
•
User: 170.
•
Short code: 40.
•
DSS button: 20.
•
RAS: 110.
•
Intranet Service: 240.
•
WAN Service: 400.
•
IP Route: 30.
•
Account Code: 40.
•
Directory Entry: 70.
•
Internet Service: 220.
•
Hunt Group: 100 (+ 10 per member).
•
Firewall: 40 (+ 80 per custom entry).
•
Time Profile: 40 (+ 20 per entry).
•
Licence: 40.
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Using Manager
Editing a Configuration
Manager displays the Control Unit's configuration as a series of icons in two panels.
The left-hand panel contains a configuration tree, with icons used to group different types of
configuration entries. Double-click on a top-level icon within the configuration tree to expand or collapse
the display of matching entries under each icon. Click on the top-level icon to display the matching
entries in the right-hand panel.
Double-click on an entry in either the left or right-hand panel to display the configuration form for that
entry. Each form contains a range of settings appropriate to the type of entry. Each form may consist of a
number of tabbed pages (referred to as 'tabs'). For details of the various forms, see The Configuration
Tree.
In the right-hand panel you can select an entry in the right-hand panel and then right-click to View, Edit,
Copy or Delete the entry. Additionally, you can right-click to Add a new entry.
This is a brief overview of the commands that can be used to view and alter the configuration. For details
of additional commands, see Toolbar .
•
Right Mouse Button
The right mouse button can be used within the right hand side pane of the configuration tree and
you are given a menu with options for View, Edit, New and Delete. These allow you to view, edit
or delete an existing entry or create a new entry.
•
Sorting
Each branch of the Configuration Tree lists its entries under column headings (Users are listed by
Name, Extension, Options and Forwarding etc.) To change the entry order, either ascending or
descending, click on the column heading, eg. to view your Users in descending order click on the
Name column.
•
Drag and Drop
Entries can be copied between configuration forms using drag and drop. For example, a short
code created for a user can be copied to another User by dragging the short code between the
two open forms.
•
Direct Access
In most cases where a list box is used to select a Hunt Group, Time Profile, Firewall Profile etc., it
is possible to double-click on this entry to enable you to view or edit the relevant form.
Sending/Saving a Configuration
After making any configuration changes, the new configuration needs to be saved before the changes
are reflected. There are two ways to save a configuration, via a system merge or a full reboot of the
Control Unit. When a merge is performed, the updated configuration is saved in both the RAM and Flash
memory. When a reboot is performed, Manager matches the configuration from RAM to that in the Flash
memory and then does a reboot. Hence, the terms "saving" and "sending" a configuration are used
interchangeably within Manager. Manager 3.0 tracks the changes made to the configuration so that if all
the changes made can be merged, then the option for merging (Merge Config) will automatically be
selected and if a reboot is required, When Free will be selected.
A daily backup is performed by the system to capture configuration updates performed via the user's
phone or Phone Manager.
Instructions for sending a configuration back to the system apply to both the merge and reboot method.
Each time a live configuration is sent back to the system, you can choose between a merge and a
reboot.
Configuration Sizes can effect the sending of configuration forms back to the different IP Office Control Units.
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Instructions for Sending a Configuration
Manager 3.0 tracks the changes made to the configuration so that if all the changes made can be
merged, then the option for merging (Merge Config) will automatically be selected and if a reboot is
required, When Free will be selected. Although a reboot only takes a few seconds, it cuts off any calls in
progress. To avoid upsetting users, select the Reboot When Free option.
If you are working with a configuration received from the Control Unit, do the following to save the
configuration:
icon or choose File | Save.
1. Click the
2. The save action required is automatically selected based on changes made to the configuration.
If a reboot option is selected by the system, then you MUST perform a reboot for the
configuration changes to be reflected. If Merge Config is selected by the system, you can
override this selection and perform a reboot if you desire. The options available are:
•
Immediately - Reboots the Control Unit immediately and will cut off any calls in progress.
•
When Free - Reboots the Control Unit when the system is free (no calls in progress). The
following options are only available with When Free selection:
•
Bar Incoming Calls: When selected, this option is checked with the When Free
option and the System will bar all new incoming calls until after the reboot
•
Bar Outgoing Calls: When selected, this option is checked with the When Free
option and the System prevents all new outgoing calls until after the reboot
•
Reboot Time (hh:mm): The system waits until this time before attempting to
reboot. The instruction is stored in the Control Unit not in the Manager.
•
Merge Config - This option allows new features to be made active without rebooting the
Control Unit, but only certain configuration changes can be merged.
•
None - Does not send any configuration to the Control Unit.
3. If you did not enter a system password when you received the configuration, then a password
MUST be entered at this point to send the configuration to the Control Unit.
4. Select OK.
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Using Manager
Reboot/Merge Configuration List
Certain configuration changes can be merged and become active without a reboot and others require a
full reboot. Merged changes are copied to both the system's RAM and Flash memory.
Manager tracks the changes made to the configuration so that if all changes made can be merged, then
the option for sending the configuration will automatically be selected to Merge Config. If a reboot is
selected, DO NOT override this option because your updated configuration will not be saved.
The table below shows which configuration form can be merged and which requires a system reboot:
: Configuration changes can be merged.
: Configuration changes require a system reboot.
BootP
Operator
System
Line
Unit
Extension
User
Merge
N/A
N/A
Reboot
N/A
N/A
Hunt Group
Short Code
Service
RAS
Incoming Call
Route
WAN Port
Directory
Time Profile
Firewall Profile
IP Route
Least Cost Route
License
Account Code
User Restriction
E911
Wireless
Logical LAN
Tunnel
Auto Attendant
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Manager 3.0
Supported Country and Locale Settings
When a new or defaulted system's configuration is first opened in Manager, the system's Locale is set to
match that of the PC running Manager. This Locale can be changed through the System form if required.
The system's Locale sets the default ringing patterns and caller display settings.
The locale also controls the language that a voicemail server will use for prompts. Note however that the
range of languages installed and supported on the voicemail server may differ from those supported by
the Control Unit. For details refer to the Voicemail Installation & Administration Manual.
This list indicates locale settings supported within the Control Unit software for the functions listed. Note:
This does not necessarily indicate support, availability or approval for IP Office within that country.
Table header explanation
•
Default Caller Display: The display types for analog extension ports.
•
Telephony: Indicates that telephony related functions are effected by the locale setting.
•
Manager Application: Indicates that text on the Manager application will reflect the language
locale setting. If Manager does not support the specific locale language, it will use the most
similar language available. For example, if the locale is set to ESR (which is not supported in
Manager), Manager will use Mexico Spanish for its text display.
•
Handset Display: On handsets with a display window, it indicates the availability of the text
content in the corresponding language.
•
Embedded Voicemail Audio Clips: Indicates the availability of the Embedded Voicemail audio
clips in the corresponding language.
•
Voicemail Lite Audio Clips: Indicates the availability of the Voicemail Lite audio clips in the
corresponding language.
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Using Manager
Country
Argentina
Locale(s) Default Telephony Manager Handset Embedded Voicemail
Caller
Application Display Voicemail Lite
Display
Audio
Audio
Clips
Clips
ess
FSK-D
x
x
x
x
Australia
ena
UK20
Belgium
frb, nlb
FSK-D
Brazil
ptb
DTMF-D
x
Canada
enc, frc
FSK-D
Chile
esl
FSK-D
China
chs
FSK-A
Columbia
eso
UK20
x
x
Denmark
dan
DTMF-C
x
x
x
x
Finland
fin
DTMF-A
x
x
x
x
France
fra
FSK-D
x
x
x
x
Germany
deu
FSK-D
x
x
x
x
Greece
ell
FSK-D
x
Holland
nld
DTMF-D
x
Hungary
hun
FSK-D
Iceland
isl
Italy
ita
Japan
jpn
Korea
kor
Mexico
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
FSK-D
x
x
x
esm
FSK-D
x
x
x
New
Zealand
enz
UK20
x
x
Norway
non, nor UK
x
x
Peru
esr
FSK-D
x
x
Poland
plk
FSK-D
x
Portugal
ptg
UK20
x
x
x
x
Russia
rus
x
x
x
x
South
Africa
ens
x
x
Spain
esp, esn FSK-D
x
x
x
x
Sweden
sve
DTMF-A
x
x
x
x
Switzerland frs
FSK-D
x
x
UK
eng
UK20
x
x
x
x
x
USA
enu
FSK-D
x
x
x
x
x
Venezuela esv
FSK-D
x
Manager 3.0
IP Office
FSK-D
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Offline Files
Working with Offline Files
Offline files are useful for making changes and updates without actually affecting the live system. This
means you can save your IP Office configuration file offline, then open it within Manager but still offline,
make any necessary changes and when ready, send the configuration to the live system.
Another use for offline files is if for any reason, your live configuration gets erased, you can open an
offline configuration file (if you have saved a version offline) and send it to your live system without
needing to re-configure your system from scratch.
Saving an Offline File to a Live System
Sending an offline configuration file to the live system will replace your existing live configuration with the
new configuration. Make sure that this is what you want to do because you will not be able to revert back
to your old configuration unless you have saved a copy offline.
If you are working with an offline configuration and are now ready to merge it with the live system:
1. Click on the
icon or choose File | Save
2. Go to File menu, select Offline | Send Config
3. Manager program scans the LAN for all Control Units (The LAN can be defined in Preferences)
4. If only one Control Unit is detected the Sending Config To dialogue box appears - go to step 6
otherwise Manager then offers a list of the Control Units found
5. Select the Control Unit you wish to send the configuration to
6. Enter the System password in the Sending Config To dialogue box and select the Reboot mode
- See Reboot.
7. Select OK. This sends the configuration to the flash memory and reboots the Control Unit to
transfer the configuration from the Flash memory to the RAM.
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Page 50
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Sample Step-by-Step Configuration
Step-by-Step Overview
The complexity of an IP Office configuration is dependent upon a company's needs. The greater the
need, the more complex the configuration is most likely to be. This sample configuration is intended to
help you get the IP Office system functional with just the essential features configured. For additional
feature configuration, see the relevant sections.
Our sample Manager configuration is based on an IP Office 403 control unit for a make-believe North
America company of 35 employees. With an IP 403, there are two slots in the back of the box for Analog,
BRI or PRI Trunk Cards. For this sample configuration, we will imagine the following hardware setup:
•
•
•
1 Analog Trunk Card (4 analog trunks)
1 Analog Trunk Expansion Module (16 analog trunks)
1 Digital Station Expansion Module (30 DS extensions)
This will provide a total of 20 analog trunks with 38 DS extensions. Most likely, not all 20 trunks will be
used. With this hardware set up, we can now configure the lines. A graphical representation of the
hardware setup is displayed below.
These set of instructions assume hardware setup and wiring are complete. We recommend the
configurations are performed in the order listed below. The last step of each set of configuration
instructions directs you to save the changes. You can follow those instructions and save after each
configuration or wait until after you have made all the necessary changes and then save.
1. Update Manager Account Information
2. Change System Password
3. Check System Locale Setting
4. Server Status of the Control Unit
5. Setting up Analog Trunks/Lines
6. Assign Extension Numbers
7. Setting Up Users
8. Create Hunt Groups
9. Overflow Hunt Group
10. Create an Incoming Call Route
11. Create Short Codes
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Page 51
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Update Manager Account Information
Upon install of the Manager application, several default operator accounts are created with different
levels of access to the configuration file. The account you will need to log on to perform these
configurations is Administrator. The default Administrator password is Administrator. Once logged on
as an Administrator, you can update the Administrator's account information by changing only the
password or changing both the user name and password. For more information on Manager operators,
see Operators.
To update the Administrator's account information:
1. Open Manager and log on as an Administrator with the default Administrator account
information.
2. Click Operator from the Configuration Tree.
3. Double-click the Administrator account.
4. Two options are available:
•
Enter a new password in the Password and Confirm Password fields and keep the
Administrator user name. This only changes the password of the Administrator account.
The system password still remains to be changed.
•
Enter a new user name in the Name field and a new password in the Password and
Confirm Password fields. This creates a new administrator account with all the
administrative rights. Once this new account is created, log off and log back onto
Manager with the new account and delete the old Administrator account by right-clicking
on it and selecting Delete.
These account information are held on the Manager PC, so does not require a send to the Control Unit
or reboot.
Next recommended configuration: Change System Password
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Page 52
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Sample Step-by-Step Configuration
Change System Password
Upon install of the IP Office unit, the default system password is password. This password controls
access to the operation of the Control Unit and is required to upgrade, reboot and send to or receive
configurations from the Control Unit. This is a required option and a prompt is given if left blank.
To change the password:
to receive a configuration form. The Receiving Config from dialog box appears
1. Click
displaying the IP address of the IP Office control unit. Enter the IP Office unit's default password
of password.
2. Click System from the Configuration Tree.
3. From the System tab, delete the current password in the Password and Confirm Password
fields. Enter the new password in to both fields. Password must be at least 4 characters long.
4. Click OK.
5. Click
OK.
Save. In the Sending Config To dialog box, accept the selected save option and click
Next recommended configuration: Check System Locale Setting
Manager 3.0
IP Office
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Check System Locale Setting
When a new or defaulted system's configuration is first opened in Manager, the system's country Locale
is set to match that of the PC running Manager. The system's Locale defines certain configuration fields,
the default ringing patterns and caller display settings.
The locale also controls the language that a voicemail server will use for prompts. Note however that the
range of languages installed and supported on the voicemail server may differ from those supported by
the Control Unit. For details refer to the Voicemail Installation & Administration Manual.
Because of the effect the locale setting has on certain configuration, it is good practice to check the
system's locale setting before starting any configuration. To confirm the country locale setting:
to receive a configuration form. The Receiving Config from dialog box appears
1. Click
displaying the IP address of the IP Office control unit. Enter the IP Office system password.
2. Click System from the Configuration Tree and double click the IP403 configuration on the right
hand side of the display window.
3. From the System tab, check the entry in the Locale field. Check that the field contains the
abbreviation (based on the table below) that corresponds to the country in which you are
configuring the IP Office. For our sample configuration, the Locale field should read enu.
4. Click OK.
5. Click
OK.
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Save. In the Sending Config To dialog box, accept the selected save option and click
Page 54
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Sample Step-by-Step Configuration
Country Locale Table
Country
Argentina
Australia
Belgium
Brazil
Canada
Chile
China
Columbia
Denmark
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Holland
Hungary
Iceland
Italy
Korea
Mexico
New Zealand
Norway
Peru
Poland
Portugal
Russia
South Africa
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
UK
USA
Venezuela
Locale(s)
ess
ena
frb, nlb
ptb
enc, frc
esl
chs
eso
dan
fin
fra
deu
ell
nld
hun
isl
ita
kor
esm
enz
non, nor
esr
plk
ptg
rus
ens
esp, esn
sve
frs
eng
enu
esv
Default Caller Display
FSK-D
UK20
FSK-D
DTMF-D
FSK-D
FSK-D
UK20
DTMF-C
DTMF-A
FSK-D
FSK-D
FSK-D
DTMF-D
FSK-D
FSK-D
FSK-D
FSK-D
UK20
UK
FSK-D
FSK-D
UK20
FSK-D
DTMF-A
FSK-D
UK20
FSK-D
FSK-D
Next recommended configuration: Server Status of the Control Unit.
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IP Office
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Server Status of the Control Unit
The role of the IP Office Control Unit within the data network is important to its overall
functioning. This option needs to have been decided by the network administrator prior to
the installation of IP Office. Do the following to make the selection:
to receive a configuration form. The Receiving Config from dialog box appears
1. Click
displaying the IP address of the IP Office control unit. Enter the IP Office system password.
2. Click System from the Configuration Tree and double click the IP403 configuration on the right
hand side of the display window.
3. Click the LAN1 tab and make the following selections within the DHCP Mode area:
•
Server: (default selection) When selected the Control Unit is acting as the DHCP Server
on LAN1, allocating addresses to other devices on the network and to PPP Dial in users.
If this configuration is selected, please provide the following additional information:
• IP Address: Default = 192.168.42.1
This is the IP address of the Control Unit on LAN1. If the Control Unit is also acting
as a DHCP server on LAN1 then this address will be the DHCP Starting address.
A static IP Address is recommended.
• IP Mask: Default = 255.255.255.0
This is the Subnet mask used on LAN1.
• Number of DHCP IP Addresses: Default = 200; Recommended Maximum = 200
This defines the number of sequential IP addresses, including the Control Unit IP
address, that is allocated via DHCP on LAN1 and/or to Dial in users. Addresses
are only allocated if the DHCP mode is set to Server or DialIn.
• Note: If the Control Unit is acting as a DHCP Server (DHCP mode set to
Server or DialIn) on both the LAN1 and LAN2, Dial in users are allocated
their address from the LAN1 pool of addresses first.
• Disabled: When selected the Control Unit will not use DHCP, therefore it will not act as a
DHCP server or obtain an IP address from a DHCP server on this LAN. If this
configuration is selected, please provide the following additional information:
• IP Address: Default = 192.168.42.1
This is the IP address of the Control Unit on LAN1. If the Control Unit is also acting
as a DHCP server on LAN1 then this address will be the DHCP Starting address.
A static IP Address is recommended.
• IP Mask: Default = 255.255.255.0
This is the Subnet mask used on LAN1.
• Dial In: This option allows the Control Unit to allocate IP addresses to PPP Dial In users
only. It will not allocate IP addresses to local devices on this LAN. If this configuration is
selected, please provide the following additional information:
• IP Address: Default = 192.168.42.1
This is the IP address of the Control Unit on LAN1. If the Control Unit is also acting
as a DHCP server on LAN1 then this address will be the DHCP Starting address.
A static IP Address is recommended.
• IP Mask: Default = 255.255.255.0
This is the Subnet mask used on LAN1.
• Client: (Not recommended) The Control Unit obtains its IP Address and IP Mask from a
DHCP server on the LAN. Do not enter IP Address and IP Mask values if running in this
mode. The fields will be filled automatically with the values received from the DHCP
server.
4. Once all the necessary information has been provided, click
Save. In the Sending Config To
dialog box, accept the selected save option and click OK.
Next recommended configuration: Setting up Analog Trunks/Lines.
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Page 56
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Sample Step-by-Step Configuration
Setting up Analog Trunks/Lines
Once all the hardware is connected, IP Office recognizes the connected analog trunks and lists them
within the Line configuration form in Manager. If all the appropriate trunks are not listed, make sure the
connection between the IP Office 403 Control Unit and the Analog Trunk Expansion Module is tight. Our
sample configuration will display a line configuration similar to the following:
For our example, there is not much configuration needed to get calls coming in and routed out. The one
configuration needed is within the Analog tab for each of the analog trunks displayed. Check with your
service provider for the Trunk Type (Ground Start, Loop Start, Loop Start Caller ID). With this known
information, do the following:
1. Click the Line configuration.
2. Double click the first of the lines. An Analog Trunk configuration window displays.
3. Click the Analog tab.
4. Click the drop down box that corresponds to the Trunk Type field. The following options are
listed: Ground Start, Loop Start, Loop Start Caller ID and Out of Service. The default is Loop
Start. Select the trunk type based on the information provided by the service provider.
5. Click OK.
6. Click
Manager 3.0
IP Office
to send the updated configuration to the IP Office 403 Control Unit.
Page 57
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
The following configuration settings should be pointed out:
•
Keep all the incoming and outgoing group IDs at the default setting of "0". This is a typical
configuration because unless there are special reasons for wanting certain incoming or outgoing
calls to go through specific trunks, the group IDs should be left as the default.
•
Default system short codes are available for dialing out. The specific short codes are dependent
upon the This short code is:
•
Short Code: ?
•
Telephone Number: .
•
Feature: Dial
•
Line Group: 0
This short code enables all lines on the Outgoing Group ID of 0 to dial out. The other default
system short code is:
•
Short Code: 9
•
Telephone Number: .
•
Feature: SecondaryDialTone
•
Line Group: 0
This short code defines all calls going out through line group 0 that are preceded by 9 to receive a
secondary dial tone. Additional default short codes relating to dialing 9 to get the secondary dial
tone are also available for long distance and international numbers. Dialing 9 is common to the
North American market. See Default System Short Code List for the list of default short codes.
Next recommended configuration: Assign Extension Numbers
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Page 58
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Sample Step-by-Step Configuration
Assign Extension Numbers
With all the internal telephones hooked up to the IP Office system, extension numbers are automatically
assigned to the physical telephones. By default, the extension numbers begin with 200 and increase by
1 digit accordingly. If you wish to use a different range of extension numbers, we highly recommend
making the changes now, prior to making any other configuration changes, because several
configurations rely on extension numbers. Extension numbers can be viewed by clicking Extension from
the Configuration Tree.
To assign a different range of extension numbers to the physical phone extensions:
1. Open Manager and log on as an Administrator.
to receive a configuration form. The Receiving Config from dialog box appears
2. Click
displaying the IP address of the IP Office control unit. Enter the IP Office password.
3. Select File from the tool bar, then select Advanced|Rebase.
•
If Rebase is not available (which it will not be for this scenario because the locale setting
is for North America), click System from the Configuration Tree and double click your IP
Office unit. From the System tab, change the Locale temporarily to eng. Click OK. The
Rebase option should now be available.
4. To increase the range of extension numbers, enter the number you want to increase it by. To
decrease the range of extension numbers, enter the number preceded by a minus sign.
5. Click OK.
6. If the system locale was changed to eng, change it back to the previous setting by clicking
System from the Configuration Tree and double click your IP Office unit. Make the necessary
change from the System tab.
7. Click
OK.
Save. In the Sending Config To dialog box, accept the selected save option and click
8. Check that the updates have been made by clicking Extension from the Configuration Tree.
Next recommended configuration: Setting Up Users
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Page 59
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Setting Up Users
With the range of extension numbers configured, these extensions can now be matched to actual users.
To do this, you need to know which users are associated with which extension. You may need to walk
from desk to desk and physically match a user to an extension before making the configuration changes
on Manager.
Once you have the necessary information, do the following to match an extension to a user:
1. Open Manager and log on as an Administrator.
to receive a configuration form. The Receiving Config from dialog box appears
2. Click
displaying the IP address of the IP Office control unit. Enter the IP Office password.
3. Click User from the Configuration Tree. A list of users are displayed in the right hand panel of
Manager. For those extensions that have not been configured, the Name column has an
extension number that corresponds to an extension number. For more information on all the
fields within the User form, see User Form Overview.
4. Double-click the extension number you want assigned to a user.
5. In the User tab, make the following configurations:
•
Name:
This is the user's account name, eg. "JohnB" and the one that will be used for
RAS Dial In, Caller Display and voicemail mailbox. As the display on Caller
Display telephones is normally only 16 digits long it is useful to keep the name
short. Only alphanumeric characters and space are supported in this field. Do
not use punctuation characters such as #, ?, /, -, _ and ,. This field is case
sensitive and must be unique.
•
Voicemail uses the name to match a user to their mailbox. Changing a user's
name will route their voicemail calls to a new mailbox.
•
Full Name: Default = Blank
Use this field to enter the entire user's name. The Phone Manager Directory uses this
information when the Show Users option is checked and also appears in the title bar of
Phone Manager.
•
To understand the other configuration fields, see User Form.
6. Click OK.
7. Repeat steps 4-6 until all users are defined.
8. Click
OK.
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Save. In the Sending Config To dialog box, accept the selected save option and click
Page 60
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Sample Step-by-Step Configuration
Below are the users we have created for this sample configuration:
Name
Extension
Number
Full Name
Steve J
201
Steve Jones
Pat F
202
Patricia Franks
Jane M
203
Jane Marker
Dawn S
204
Dawn Smith
Brian R
205
Brian Rogers
Peter Y
206
Peter Young
Rose H
207
Rose Haynes
Pam G
208
Pamela Green
Next recommended configuration: Create Hunt Groups
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Page 61
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Create Hunt Groups
A Hunt Group is a collection of users, eg. Sales - a group to handle all sales related calls.
An incoming caller wishing to speak to Sales can ring one number, but the call can be answered by any
number of extensions that are members of the Sales Hunt Group.
By default all incoming voice calls are sent to a Hunt Group called Main (extension 200), which is
configured in Group mode, and contains the first 16 extensions. Therefore all incoming calls ring each
extension simultaneously. This is set up as an initial starting point for the telephone system while
individual user extensions are configured.
To create a Hunt Group:
1. Open Manager and log on as an Administrator.
to receive a configuration form. The Receiving Config from dialog box appears
2. Click
displaying the IP address of the IP Office control unit. Enter the IP Office password.
3. Select Hunt Group in the Configuration Tree.
4. Right click within the panel on the right hand side of the window and select New.
5. In the Name text box, enter the name of the group you want to create. For our example, we will
create a Sales Hunt Group.
6. In the Extension text box, enter an extension number (must be a number outside the range of the
existing extension numbers). For our example, we will use extension number 500.
7. In the Extension List box, right click and select Add. The list of users are displayed.
8. Hold down the CTRL key and select the users you want included in this Hunt Group. In our
sample configuration, Dawn Smith, Brian Rogers and Pam Green are included in the Sales Hunt
Group.
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Page 62
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Sample Step-by-Step Configuration
9. In the Ring Mode box, make sure that Hunt (the default) is selected. The Hunt mode means
each extension is rung in order, one after the other, starting from the first extension in the list
each time. The other ring mode options are:
•
Group: All telephones in the Extension List ring simultaneously.
•
Rotary: Each extension is rung in order, one after the other. However, the last extension
used is remembered. The next call received rings the next extension in the list.
•
Idle: The extension that has been unused for the longest period rings first, then the
extension that has been idle second longest rings, etc.
10. Optional - If you want to configure the number of seconds an extension rings before the call is
passed to another extension in the list, enter that information into the No Answer Time field. The
number of seconds entered applies to all telephones in this group and the Overflow Groups (if
used). If left blank the System Default No Answer Time (15 seconds) will be used.
11. Click OK.
12. Click
OK.
Save. In the Sending Config To dialog box, accept the selected save option and click
Next recommended configuration: Overflow Hunt Group
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Page 63
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Overflow Hunt Group
If all extensions in a Hunt Group are busy (ie. on a call, logged out or membership is disabled) or not
answered, another Hunt Group, called an Overflow Group, can be used to take the calls. The Overflow
Time can be used to stipulate how long a call will ring round the members of the Hunt Group before
being passed to the Overflow Group.
In this part of the exercise, we will create another Hunt Group called Reception and use this group as
the Overflow Hunt Group for Sales.
To setup an Overflow Hunt Group:
1. Create a new Hunt Group by following the instructions in Create Hunt Groups. For our sample
configuration, this new group has the following parameters:
Name = Reception
Extension = 501
Extension List = Pat F (202)
2. Select Hunt Group from the Configuration Tree.
3. Right click on the Sales Hunt Group and select Edit.
4. Right click in the Overflow Group List and select Add.
5. From the pop up dialog box, select Reception then click OK.
6. In the Overflow Time (secs) field, enter the number of seconds callers will wait before being
transferred to the Overflow Hunt Group (Reception). In our sample configuration, we have
entered 60 seconds.
7. Click OK.
8. Click
OK.
Save. In the Sending Config To dialog box, accept the selected save option and click
Next recommended configuration: Create an Incoming Call Route
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Page 64
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Sample Step-by-Step Configuration
Create an Incoming Call Route
Users and Hunt Groups currently only have extension numbers; they do not have direct dialing numbers
(DDI/DID). Before creating incoming call routes for individuals and groups, you must have a list of ISDN
numbers.
With the list of ISDN numbers in hand, use the Incoming Call Route form to route incoming calls to
different groups, extensions/users, RAS services or voicemail. In our sample configuration, we will use it
to create incoming call routes to the Sales Hunt Groups and various users. While creating this incoming
call route, a DDI/DID number is also set for the Sales hunt group.
To create an incoming call route:
1. Open Manager and log on as an Administrator.
to receive a configuration form. The Receiving Config from dialog box appears
2. Click
displaying the IP address of the IP Office control unit. Enter the IP Office password.
3. Select Incoming Call Route in the Configuration Tree.
4. Right click and select New.
5. In the Incoming Number field, enter one of your ISDN numbers.
6. In the Destination field, click the corresponding drop-down box and select the destination that
the specified ISDN number will be directed to. In our sample configuration, we will select the
Sales Hunt Group. For information on the other configuration fields on this dialog window, see
Incoming Call Route Form.
7. Select OK.
8. Repeat steps 3-7 to configure additional incoming call routes.
9. Click
OK.
Save. In the Sending Config To dialog box, accept the selected save option and click
10. Use an external telephone to test the incoming call routes. The ISDN numbers you assigned to
specific users and/or groups should ring those users/groups accordingly.
Next recommended configuration: Create Short Codes
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IP Office
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Create Short Codes
Short Codes allow an administrator to configure features that can be accessed on a system-wide or user
basis. A list of these features are available under Short Code Features. IP Office comes with a list of
default system short codes, but additional short codes can also be created. To understand more about
short codes, see Understanding Short Codes.
For our sample configuration, we will create 2 additional short codes, one to disable a Hunt Group
member and one to enable a Hunt Group member. These two short codes are useful for Hunt Group
members to manage their own participation/non-participation in a group, for example, when a hunt group
member is on vacation.
To create a short code:
1. Open Manager and log on as an Administrator.
to receive a configuration form. The Receiving Config from dialog box appears
2. Click
displaying the IP address of the IP Office control unit. Enter the IP Office password.
3. Select Short Code in the Configuration Tree.
4. Right click in the right hand side of the window and select New.
5. Enter the following information:
Short Code = *90*N#
Telephone Number = N
Feature = HuntGroupDisable
(N represents the Hunt Group the user wishes to disable or enable her/himself from.)
6. Click OK to save the new short code.
7. Create another short code with the following information:
Short Code = *91*N#
Telephone Number = N
Feature = HuntGroupEnable
(N represents the Hunt Group the user wishes to disable or enable her/himself from.)
8. Click OK to save the new short code.
9. Click
OK.
Save. In the Sending Config To dialog box, accept the selected save option and click
10. Test the new short codes (based on this sample's Sales Hunt Group - extn. #500):
•
From the extension of a hunt group member (Brian Rogers' extension), dial *90*500#.
Brian Rogers is now disabled from the Sales Hunt Group. Test this configuration by using
an extension that is not a member of the Sales Hunt Group and dialing extension 500.
The call should ring on the other extensions and miss out Brian Rogers' extension.
•
From the extension of a hunt group member (Brian Rogers' extension), dial *91*500#.
Brian Rogers is once again enabled on the Sales Hunt Group. Test this configuration by
using an extension that is not a member of the Sales Hunt Group and dialing extension
500. The call should ring Brian Rogers' extension in the order that his extension was
added to the Extension List when the Hunt Group was created.
Manager 3.0
IP Office
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Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Installing and Configuring Ports
Port Types
The IP Office supports a wide range of ports. The types of port supported vary from country to country.
For details of the IP Office ports supported in a particular country, contact Avaya in that country.
Note: As of IP Office version 3.0, DT ports and telephone sets (20 series) are no longer supported.
•
BRI: Basic Rate Interface
These are provided for BRI line connection or via the S0 Expansion module for BRI device
connection.
•
DS: Digital Station
Provides support for Avaya 4400 and 6400 Series telephones.
•
Expansion:
These are used for connection to IP Office Expansion Modules.
•
LAN: Local Area Network
These are 10/100MBps auto-detect Ethernet LAN ports.
•
POT: Plain Ordinary Telephone
Provide support for analog telephones.
•
WAN: Wide Area Network
See Installing and Configuring WAN Ports and Voice over IP - Overview.
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IP Office
Page 67
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Installing and Configuring DS Ports
Installing and Configuring DS Ports
Some Control Units are equipped with DS ports. These can also be added to a system by installing a DS
Expansion Module.
DS ports are used to support Avaya 2400, 3810, 4400, 5400 and 6400 Series telephones. Further details
on the use of these phones are given in the User Guide for each phone.
Note: 4400/6400 Ringing Tones
The 4400 and 6400 telephones store ringer cadences internally and so cannot be altered by settings
within Manager.
The following are instructions for installing a DS Expansion Module to any IP Office Control Unit.
1. Using the blue expansion cable supplied, connect the DS Module to the Control Unit via the next
available Expansion port.
2. Power up the DS Module via the power supply provided.
3. Reboot the Control Unit, the Control Unit will not see the DS module until after a reboot.
4. Via IP Office Manager, receive the configuration from the Control Unit.
5. From the Configuration Tree within Manager, click Unit to ensure that the DS module is now
listed. Check that the additional Extensions and Users are listed. These can be renumbered and
renamed as per normal extensions.
6. Connect the DS handsets to the extension ports required.
Configuring Softkeys
The 4412D+, 4424D+ and 6400 series phones display a number of softkey functions. The default softkey
menu is:
•
Dir, Drop, HfAns, Timer, DpkUp, AutCB, Prog, CFrwd, Cpark, SAC, TmDay, Admin.
Other functions may be substituted for the default function. See Installing and Configuring DS Ports for a
list of functions. Alternatively an Abbreviated Dial may be configured for the SoftKey. The softkey menu
is changed either through the phone (using Menu | Admin) or by adding entries in the User's Short Code
table.
•
•
Changing a Softkeys Function:
The example below configures softkey 1 to be "GrpPg" (function number 138) for hunt group
200. This replaces the default softkey 1 function "Dir".
•
Short Code: *SK1 (Softkey 1)
•
Telephone Number: 138/200 (function number 138 with parameter 200)
•
Feature: CW
Using a Softkey for Abbreviated Dialing:
The softkey menu may include Abbreviated Dial elements. Again this can be done via an entry in
the User's Short Code table. For example:
•
Short Code: *SK2 (Softkey 2)
•
Telephone Number: Lewis/217 (the text to display above the softkey (max 5 characters)
and the number to dial)
•
Feature: Dial
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Installing and Configuring Ports
Assigning Functions to DSS Keys
Functions can also be made available via the DSS keys. This is done through the User's Button
Programming tab. This allows you to select an action for the DSS key and to enter the telephone
number or parameters for that action.
•
Note that for each DSS key setup, a short code of the form *DSS appears in the User's Short
Codes tab. Changes made these short codes are ignored and overwritten by the settings in the
Button Programming tab.
The actions supported are Dial, Group, Park, User, Emulation and Advanced.
•
Dial:
This is an abbreviated dial where the LED illuminates for the duration of the call, giving the user
some feedback as to what was pressed. Abbreviated Dial may be partial dialing strings. For
example it may contain "732" and be labeled "NJ", with the user being required to complete the
dialing.
•
Group:
Monitor the status of a Hunt-group queue. Flashes green if a call is incoming to the group,
flashes red if calls for the group are being queued. Put the name of the group, surrounded by
quotes, in the Telephone Number field.
•
Park:
Monitor a park slot. The red LED is lit if the park slot is occupied by a call parked by another
station, or green if the park slot is occupied by a call parked by the station with the programmed
PARK BLF button. If you are the user who parked the call, pressing this button reconnects you to
the call. If another party parked the call, pressing this button once provides call information and
pressing it a second time connects you to the call. Select Answer from this menu to pickup call.
•
User:
Monitor a user. This is a Busy-Lamp-Field. Put the name of the person, surrounded by quotes, in
the Telephone Number field.
•
Emulation:
Gives access to number of functions that emulate operation on other telephone systems. See
Emulation Functions .
•
Advanced:
Gives access to a range of short code functions which can be assigned to DSS keys. See Short
Code Features.
Users can setup the Dial, Group, Park and User actions through their telephone using Menu | Menu |
ProgA | DSS.
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Using DisplayMsg
There is an additional method for starting DS functions. This is via a specially formatted "DisplayMsg".
Other users may send the DisplayMsg, CTI applications may send it, or a user may send a message to
themselves. The format of the display message is as follows: [0)nnn/ppppppp
To set a short code up:
•
Short Code:
•
Telephone Number: xxxx;[0)nnn/ppppppp
•
•
xxxx is the destination. If empty, DisplayMsg is self-directed.
•
nnn is the function number
•
ppppppp is the parameter data (if required)
Feature: DisplayMsg
Call Coverage
Call coverage allows calls ringing at one extension (the 'Covered User') to also be presented and
answered at other extensions (called the 'Covering Users'). This is configured on the Covering User's
user setting via the Button Programming/Digital Telephony tab. See the "IP Office Key and Lamp
Operation" manual for more information on setting up and using call coverage.
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Installing and Configuring Ports
Installing and Configuring So8 Ports
Installing and Configuring So8 Ports
The So8 module provides ISDN BRI outputs so you can share out ISDN access from, for example, your
PRI line to devices like Video Conferencing Control Units or ISDN PC Cards. The So8 module
encompasses 8 S-Bus interfaces for Basic Rate ISDN devices. The So8 module only supports the ETSI
signaling protocol.
An So8 module appears as So8 lines in the system configuration. DID numbers on the main line can be
routed out to devices attached to the So8. To add So8 lines, the configuration should be received from a
Control Unit, which will then update the configuration file with the correct hardware detail.
Do the following to connect a So8 module to any IP Office Control Unit:
1. Attach the So8 module to one of the Control Unit's expansion ports and power up the module.
2. Reboot the Control Unit.
3. Open the configuration from the Control Unit. Check that the extra lines have been added to the
configuration.
4. The default line configuration is probably totally usable/acceptable apart from changing the line
group IDs.
5. Any call from the ISDN device attached to the So8 should be able to make external calls. The
outgoing rules are the same as apply to any extension.
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Example Configurations
To route incoming calls on, eg. DID 123456 to the first port, eg. Line Group ID 701:
1. Configure an Incoming Call Routing:
The destination (type this in) represents the short code to be used to direct the call to the correct
line group ID. Note that the Bearer Capability has been set to Any, to allow data and voice via
this route.
•
Line Group ID: 0
•
Incoming Number: 123456
•
Destination: 123456
•
Bearer Capability: Any
2. Create a System Short Code:
This matches the destination in the Incoming Call Route.
•
Short Code: 123456
•
Telephone Number: 123456
•
Line Group ID: 701
•
Feature: Dial
3. Send the configuration to the Control Unit.
Any call coming into the main system on DID 123456 will now be passed directly to the first port.
If you wish to assign DID's from your main pool to individual ports and avoid network charges
when dialing between them, try variations on the following:
1. You have DID ranges, eg. 7325551000 to 7325551099. You wish to assign 7325551000-19 to
port 1 and 7325551020-20 to port 2 etc.
2. Configure Incoming Call Route:
The # is used here instead of "n" to avoid problems with, eg. "Main". The minus sign means the
number is processed from the left and so will wait for the whole number.
•
Line Group ID: 701
•
Incoming Number: -100x
•
Destination: #
3. Repeat for Line Group ID 702 etc.
4. Create Short codes, eg.
•
Short Code: 100x
•
Telephone Number: .
•
Line Group ID: 701
•
Feature: Dial
S0 calls dialed without the area code are handled locally without network charges. Calls with area calls
will go via the network.
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Installing and Configuring Ports
Installing and Configuring WAN Ports
Installing and Configuring WAN Ports
The Control Unit has a Wide Area Network (WAN) port that can be connected to a digital leased line
service using either V.11 or V.24 or V.35 interface at speeds up to 2048kbps.
Point-to-Point protocol (PPP) is used over this link. ISDN links can also be used in the event of failure of
the WAN link to provide alternate or top up bandwidth on demand.
The link can use CHAP (encrypted passwords) to verify the end users (preferred) or PAP, giving no
authentication. If the link is to provide no authentication, use identical names for the RAS, Service and
User and do not enable the Encrypted Password option. If the link is to provide authentication, the RAS
name must match the User name at the remote end and enable Encrypted Password in the Service and
RAS.
Installing a WAN3 Module
The WAN3 module provides an additional 3 WAN ports. The interface of these ports is identical to the
WAN port on the Control Unit.
•
Note:
Installation of a WAN3 module requires allocation of an IP address to the WAN3 unit via DHCP,
ie. a DHCP server must be present on the LAN. Following installation the allocated IP address
can be changed if required.
1. Switch off power to the IP Office Control Unit.
2. Connect the WAN3 module to the Control Unit using the LAN cable supplied with the unit. This
connects to a LAN port on the front of the Control Unit.
3. Apply power to the WAN3 module.
4. Switch on power to the IP Office Control Unit.
5. Run Manager and check under File | Preferences that the broadcast address being used is
255.255.255.255.
6. Click on the Manager folder icon or select Open from the File menu. The list of available units
should include both the Control Unit and the WAN3 module.
•
If the WAN3 module icon appears indented from the Control Unit icon then it is associated
with the Control Unit. Go to Step 13.
•
If the WAN3 module icon appears in-line with the Control Unit icon then the WAN3
module is not associated with the Control Unit. Go to Step 7.
7. Select and load the configuration from the Control Unit.
8. Double-click on the Unit icon to display the installed units.
9. Right-click on the right-hand panel and select New.
10. Click on the WAN3 unit to be added.
11. Send the new configuration to the Control Unit and reboot (do not use Merge).
12. Click on the Manager folder icon or select Open from the File menu. The list of available units
should include both the Control Unit and the WAN3 module.
•
The WAN3 module icon should now appear indented to the right of the Control Unit icon.
If this is not the case then repeat Steps 7 to 12.
13. You can now proceed with configuring the ports on the WAN3 module by selecting and loading
the configuration from the Control Unit.
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Configuring a WAN Link
To create a data link from Site A to Site B via the WAN port configure the Control Unit as per the
following example:
At Site A on IP address 192.168.43.1.
1. Create a Normal Service:
The Service name can be any text and is used to identify this particular Service. The Account
Name and password are presented to the remote end, therefore must match the User name and
password configured at Site B. The Encrypted Password option can only be used if the remote
end also supports CHAP.
2. Create a User:
Under the Dial In tab tick Dial In On. This User account is used to authenticate the connection
from the Site B. Note that if the Service and User have the same name these two configuration
forms are automatically linked and become an Intranet Service. The User password is displayed
at the bottom of the Service tab as the Incoming Password.
3. Setup RAS:
If CHAP is to be used on this link then the Encrypted Password option must be checked in the
Service and in the RAS service. The name of the RAS service must match the name of the
Service at Site B. Note that if the RAS settings are given the same name as the Service and User
they are automatically linked and become a WAN Service. Ensure that the Encrypted Password
option is not checked when using a WAN Service.
4. Edit the WANPort:
Note: Do not create a new WANPort, this is automatically detected. If a WANPort is not
displayed, connect the WAN cable, reboot the Control Unit and receive the configuration. The
WANPort configuration form should now be added.
5. Create an IP Route:
In the IP Address field enter the network address of the remote end, not the IP address of the
Control Unit. Under Destination select the Service created above.
At Site B on IP address 192.168.45.1
1. Repeat the above process but altering the details to create a route from Site B to Site A
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PBX Features and Functions
Notes
This section covers many of the system features of the Control Unit.
•
Digital Telephones.
Note that this section chiefly covers the use of short codes dialed by the user from
any type of phone. The Control Unit's DS ports support digital phones, which may
access these functions through special keys and display menus. Refer to the
separate User Guide for these types of phone.
•
RECALL Button.
Many sections make reference to the RECALL button on telephones. On some
phones this may be marked as R or HOLD.
•
Calls without CLI.
Many features of the PBX utilize the ICLID that accompanies the call. These features
(such as external call auto-answer and trusted source mailbox access) will not work
if the incoming line provides no ICLID.
Extension versus User
Within Manager, there are configuration forms for both extensions and users. The following paragraphs
discuss the relationship between the two within Manager and the IP Office control units.
Extensions refer to physical telephone ports, their characteristics and connection. The Manager
configuration tree displays the list of physical extensions available on the system.
Users are the people who use the system and Dial In users for data access. A system user does not
have to have an extension number that physically exists - this can be useful if the user does not require
their own extension but does require to use other system features such as voicemail, call forwarding, etc.
By default, each Extension is associated with a User. The User Name is used to identify the caller in the
display of suitable phones and PC programs. These User Names can be changed via the User
configuration form.
Physical extensions are associated with an extension number through their Extension form. A user is
associated to that extension, by setting that extension number in their User form.
Note that changing a user's extension number affects the user's ability to collect Voicemail messages
from their own extension. Each user's extension is set up as a "trusted location" under the Source
Numbers tab of the User configuration form. This "trusted location" allows the user to dial *17 to collect
Voicemail from his own extension. Therefore if the extension number is changed so must the "trusted
location".
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Account Codes
Account Codes
Account codes are commonly used to control cost allocation and out-going call restriction. Once a
successful call has been completed using a certain account code, that account code information will be
removed from the internal call information. This means that using the redial button will not re-activate the
account code; the user must re-enter the account code each time the restricted number is dialed.
The method for entering account codes depends on the type of phone used. Refer to the relevant
telephone User's Guide for details.
Account codes can also be made mandatory for users via Force Account Code.
The account code used on a call is included in the call information output by the system's call log.
Incoming calls can also trigger account codes automatically by matching the Caller ID stored with the
account code.
•
To create an account code:
1. Click
Account Code to display a list of existing account codes.
2. Double-click on an existing account code to edit it or right-click on the
displayed list and select New.
3. In the Account Code field, enter the code to be used to track specific calls.
•
Alphabetic characters can be used in account codes for users dialing from Phone
Manager.
•
Wildcards can be used within the account code. The wildcard ? matches a single
character, for example 123??? matches any 6 digit account code starting 123. The
wildcard * matches any digits, for example 456* matches any account code
beginning with 456.
4. In the CLI field (optional), entering a Caller ID means that the account code is
automatically assigned to incoming or outgoing calls with the same Caller ID.
5. Send the configuration changes to the Control Unit via Merge.
An account code can be entered before the number is dialed if the user knows the number to be dialed is
restricted. If the account code is entered before the number is dialed, a dial tone is supplied to indicate
the line is ready to accept the phone number. If the phone number is dialed first, a re-occurring beep will
sound to indicate the request for an account code. There are two ways users can enter an account code
prior to dialing the phone number:
•
Creating a short code
•
Via Phone Manager - See the Phone Manager User Guide
Once the account code is created, it can be used in the following ways:
•
To force the use of account codes for individual users
•
To force the use of account codes at the system level
•
To allow Plain Ordinary Telephone (POT) users to enter account codes
If you have IP Office Phone Manager, the list of account codes can be made available to Phone
Manager users. See Account Codes and Phone Manager.
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Force Account Code
A user can be forced to enter an account code when making ANY external call. This setting is useful
when tracking calls for costing purposes or simply for restricting the use of certain numbers. When used
for billing purposes different accounts will be billed depending on the account code entered by the user.
The Force Account Code field is available for individual users as well as on a system wide basis.
Warning: Users with POT (Plain Ordinary Telephones) can only enter account codes prior to
entering the restricted telephone number and if the Set Account Code short code is created. POT users
can not enter account codes at the system prompt.
•
To force the use of account codes for individual users:
1. Receive the system configuration if one is not opened.
2. Click User located in the Configuration Tree panel.
3. In the list of users, double-click the user name or extension for whom you want to force
the use of account codes.
4. Click the Telephony tab.
5. Tick the Force Account Code option.
6. Click OK.
7. Merge the configuration.
8. If the user is using Phone Manager and does not enter an account code, they see an
error message. 4400 series and 6400 series handset users see a request to enter an
account code on the phone's display.
Account codes can also be used as PIN codes to restrict outgoing calls. At the short code level, account
codes can be set as a mandatory use in association with outgoing dialed numbers. Once set up, users
are required to enter an account/PIN code when the number being dialed is matched to a defined
restricted number. These restricted numbers are defined using a short code. Any valid account code can
be used as a PIN code.
•
To force the use of account codes at the system level:
1. Click the Short code form.
2. In the list of short codes, right-click one of the short code and select New.
3. Create a short code for a number you want to restrict. For example:
•
Short Code: 00xxxxxxxxxxx
•
Telephone Number: 00N
•
Feature: Dial
•
Force Account Code: Ticked
This example forces the use of account codes when dialing an international number. In this
example, wildcards are used in defining the restricted number so that PIN codes are not
requested in the middle of dialing a number. In this example, a matching number of 00x
xxx xxx xxxx will request the PIN code after the entire number has been dialed. If we had
entered a matching number of 00, the system would request the PIN code in the middle of
dialing the number, as it would be matched after just 2 digits.
4. Click OK.
5. Merge the configuration.
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Account Codes and Phone Manager
If you have IP Office Phone Manager, the list of account codes can be made available to Phone
Manager users. To make the list of account codes available, set up the following within Manager:
1. Open the System form for your IP Office Control Unit.
2. Click the Telephony tab.
3. Tick the Show Account Code field.
4. Click OK.
5. Send the configuration changes to the Control Unit via Reboot.
If the Show Account Code field is enabled/ticked, Phone Manager and display phones display asterisks
in the account code field (when account codes are used) to signify that account code digits are being
withheld from view.
Call Restriction
Simple call barring can be applied using short codes. This uses the fact that the IP Office checks dialed
numbers for short code matches in a specific order, see Matching Order.
Example:
We want to allow only selected users to dial numbers starting 91900. To do this, we must set up 2 short
codes. The first one is a system short code that stops all general users from dialing numbers starting
with 91900:
System short code: Short code | Right-click | New
•
Short Code: 91900N
•
Telephone: blank
•
Feature: Busy
To allow a specific user to override the above system short code and dial 91900 numbers, we should
add the following to their user short codes:
User specific short code: User | Double-click a specific user | ShortCodes tab | Right-click |
Add
•
Short Code: 91900N
•
Telephone: 1900N
•
Feature: Dial
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PBX Features and Functions
Conferencing
Conferencing Overview
IP Office systems support the following conference capabilities:
Control Unit Conference Capabilities
Note: The term conference party refers to both internal and external callers.
•
IP401 & IP Office- Small Office Edition:
Supports a single 3-way conference.
•
IP403 & IP406:
Supports multiple conferences totaling up to 63 parties. For example:
•
•
21 x 3-way conferences.
•
1 x 10-way conference (10 parties) plus 11 x 3-way conferences (33 parties) and free
capacity for 20 more conference parties to join new or existing conferences.
IP412:
Supports multiple conferences totaling up to 126 parties but with no more than 63 parties in any
one conference.
•
•
The IP412 supports two 63 party conference banks. When a new conference is started,
the bank with the most free capacity is used for that conference. However once a
conference is started on one conference bank, that conference cannot use any free
capacity from the other conference bank.
Analog Trunk Restriction:
In conferences that include external calls coming in from analog trunks, only a maximum of two
analog trunk calls are supported.
Note: System features such as call intrusion, call recording and silent monitoring all use conference
resources. This includes automatic recording if enabled.
When any of these features is active, the number of slots available for conference parties is reduced.
Default Conference Handling
The methods below use the IP Office's default system short codes.
To start/add to a conference:
1. Place your first call or the existing conference on hold. Existing conference parties will still be
able to talk to each other.
2. Call the new party.
•
If not answered, or diverted to voicemail, or answered but the party does not want to join
the conference; put them on hold and dial *52 to clear the call.
3. If answered and the other party wants to join the conference, put them on hold and dial *47.
4. All held calls are now in conference.
•
Digital display extensions will see CONF followed by the conference number.
To exit a conference:
1. Any party wanting to leave a conference can simply hang-up.
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Using Conference Meet Me
Each conference on the IP Office is assigned a conference number. This number is displayed on
suitable display phone extensions (eg. Avaya 2400, 4400, 4600, 5400, 5600 and 6400 series display
phones).
Note: As of IP Office version 3.0, DT ports and telephone sets (20 series) are no longer supported.
Conference Meet Me allows users to join or start a specific numbered conference. This method of
operation allows you to advertise a conference number and then let the individual parties join the
conference themselves.
Through the Button Programming tab (also called Digital Telephony) within IP Office Manager, the
Conference Meet Me function can be assigned to a DSS key (select Advanced | Call | Conference
Meet Me). This allows simple one key access by internal users to specific conferences.
•
Note: Conference Meet Me can create conferences that include only one or two parties. These
are still conferences using slots from the IP Office's conference capacity.
Example 1: Meet Me to a user specified conference
The following example system short code allows any extension to dial *67* and then the number of the
conference which they want to join followed by #. For example dialing *67*600# will put the user into
conference 600.
•
Short Code: *67*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: Conference Meet Me
Example 2: Meet Me to a system specified conference number
The following example system short code allows the dialing extension to join a specific conference, in
this case 500.
•
Short Code: *500
•
Telephone Number: 500
•
Feature: Conference Meet Me
If you are asked to add a party to a conference, having a conference meet me short code is very useful.
With the conference in progress, call the new party. When they answer, hold the call, dial the conference
meet me short code and then hang-up.
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PBX Features and Functions
Conferencing with 4606, 4612, 4624, 4400 Series and 6400 Series
Display Phones
These phones support the following features for conference calls on IP Office.
To add another caller to a call or conference:
1. During the existing call or conference, press Conf.
2. Dial the other party.
•
If not answered, end the call either by pressing the Drop or Hold button, then press Conf.
•
When answered, press Conf again. Any call that was put on Hold is now conferenced in.
To drop a caller from a conference:.
Note: If the conference only contains four parties (including yourself), using Drop to remove the last
caller added to the conference will end the whole conference.
1. During the conference, press Menu
. The 4610 does not have a
2. Using the
and
keys, display and then select Drop.
To display calls in a conference:
1. CONF on your display indicates that you are in a conference call.
2. Press Menu
twice.
3. Select HC&P (held, conference and parked).
4. The
above Confs indicates a conference call. Select Confs.
5. Use the
•
and
keys to see the details of the different callers in the conference.
To remove a caller from the conference: Select Drop.
Note: 4606, 4612 and 4624 telephones cannot add callers to a conference when working handsfree.
They can return to handsfree once they have completed adding a call to the conference.
Conferencing with 2402, 2410, 4610, 5400 Series and 5600 Series
Display Phones
These phones support the following features for conference calls on IP Office.
To add another caller to a call or conference:
1. During the existing call or conference, press Conf
.
2. Dial the other party.
•
If not answered, end the call either by pressing the Drop or Hold button, then press Conf.
•
When answered, press Conf again. Any call that was put on Hold is now conferenced in.
To drop yourself from the conference:
Pressing the Drop button will remove yourself from the conference while leaving existing conferenced
parties in the conference.
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Conferencing with Phone Manager
The IP Office Phone Manager application can be used to setup and control a conference. Even if the
conference is started by other methods, the conference parties will appear in the Phone Manager's
Conference tab.
1. Make an outgoing call or answer an incoming call.
2. Place the call on hold (click on
).
3. Make a call to the required third party (click on
4. Place that call on hold also (click on
).
).
5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 until all parties required for the conference are on hold.
6. Click on
.
7. The Conference tab will appear in Phone Manager. This shows you all the conference parties.
8. To remove a caller from the conference, right-click on their entry in the Conference tab and select
Hang Up.
Conferencing with Conferencing Center
IP Office Conferencing Center is a licensed application that is comprised of two web-based graphic user
interfaces (GUI), the Scheduler and the Web Client. The Conferencing Center Scheduler allows users to
schedule and manage conferences; the Web Client allows participants to join web conferences that act
as supplements to scheduled audio conferences. A conference can be booked as a stand-alone audio
conference or booked in conjunction with a web conference where real-time voting, presentation display
and mute all can be initiated by the conference host.
If you are interested in IP Office Conferencing Center, please contact Avaya's sales department.
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Conference Recording
WARNING
The use of call recording is normally subject to local laws and regulations. Before using call
recording, you must ensure that you have complied with all applicable local laws and
regulations. Failure to do so may result in severe penalties.
If your IP Office also has Voicemail Pro installed, then it can support call recording. Call recording can be
applied to conference calls and is not controlled by the intrude settings of the internal conference parties.
The Voicemail Pro has an "Advice of Call Recording" setting. If this is enabled, then all parties in the
conference will hear a message that the call is being recorded. Note: Once recording has been started, if
a further participant is added to the conference the recording will stop, the new party having not heard
the advice of call recording message.
Remember that the Voicemail Pro counts as an additional conference party so recording will not work if
all conference slots are in use.
To start recording:
•
4606, 4612, 4624, 4400 series, and 6400 series display phone users can press Menu
then Func and Recor.
•
2402, 2410, 4602, 4610, 4620, 4620SW, 5400 series and 5600 series display phone users must
have a Record key programmed onto their phones or use a short code (CallRecord feature) to
enable recording.
•
Users running IP Office Phone Manager can select Functions and then Start Recording.
•
For other users, a call record short code must first be setup via Manager. They can then put the
conference on hold, dial the short code and when recording begins they are returned to the
conference.
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Conferencing and Voicemail Pro
The Voicemail Pro can be used to route callers into a conference.
Example 1
In this example callers are routed into conference 500.
1. Using IP Office Manager, a new short code was created. This code allows callers to indicate the
conference they want to join.
•
Short Code: *92
•
Telephone Number: 500
•
Feature: Conference Meet Me
2. In Voicemail Pro, a new module called Conf500 was created.
3. The following actions were then added to the module.
•
The Check Digits action forces callers to match a PIN code.
•
The Assisted Transfer action contains the short code created above. This will place the
caller into conference 500 in this example.
4. External callers can be routed to the module by entering its name in an Incoming Call Route or
making the module an option in an existing auto attendant call flow.
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PBX Features and Functions
Example 2
In this example, callers are able to specify the conference they want to join.
1. Using IP Office Manager, a new short code was created. This short code allows callers to
indicate the conference they want to join. In this example conference 500.
•
Short Code: *91*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: Conference Meet Me
2. In Voicemail Pro, a new module called Conference was created.
3. The following actions were then added to the module.
•
The Check Digits action forces callers to match a PIN code.
•
The Menu action has been configured to expect 3 digits, indicated by the ???.
•
The Assisted Transfer action uses the short code created above. $KEY part uses the
digits the caller entered in the Menu action.
4. External callers can be routed to the module by entering its name in an Incoming Call Route or
making the module an option in an existing auto attendant call flow.
5. Adding another short code to the IP Office system lets internal callers also access the call flow.
•
Short Code: *90
•
Telephone Number: "Conference"
•
Feature: Voicemail Collect
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Caller Display
Caller Display uses Incoming Caller Line Identification (ICLID) passed by the Telephone Company via
the line. It shows up on phones with display windows and is also passed to your PC programs, and the
PC TAPI interface.
Extensions can be configured to enable or disable Caller Display via their Extension Form. Note that the
presentation of Caller Display information can delay the ringing of the phone. Also if used on some nonCaller Display phones, it can cause a slight ringing at the start and end of calls. If this is not desired then
disable the caller display on the extension.
The Control Unit's Directory allows you to associate names to numbers that you may receive on the
system.
•
Note: Caller ID can not be forwarded
If an extension is forwarded to another extension the Caller ID of the forwarded extension is
received, not the Caller ID of the original call.
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PBX Features and Functions
Call Forwarding
This is the ability to forward a User's calls to another extension or external number. Calls can be
forwarded when there is no answer, when the extension is busy or for all calls. This can be
enabled/disabled by dialing short codes, configuring the User | Forwarding form or via the Phone
Manager application.
The following default Short Codes are available to make use of Forwarding:
•
To set the number for forward all calls and forward on no answer
•
•
To set the number for forward on busy
•
•
•
•
*07*N# - The user should enter the number in place of the N, eg. *07*208# or
*07*5551234#. For a detailed example of this short code set up, see Forward Number.
*57*N# - The user should enter the number in place of N, eg. *57*208#. For a detailed
example of this short code set up, see Forward On Busy Number.
To set forwarding for all direct station (ie. not Hunt Group) calls
•
*01 enables forwarding. For a detailed example of this short code set up, see Forward
Unconditional On.
•
*02 disables forwarding. For a detailed example of this short code set up, see Forward
Unconditional Off.
To set forwarding when the user's extension is not answered
•
*05 enable. For a detailed example of this short code set up, see Forward On No Answer
On.
•
*06 disable. For a detailed example of this short code set up, see Forward On No Answer
Off.
To set forwarding when the user's extension is busy
•
*03 enable. For a detailed example of this code set up, see Forward On Busy On.
•
*04 disable. For a detailed example of this short code set up, see Forward On Busy Off.
A forwarded call cannot, by default, be transferred back to the original destination. To allow this facility,
set Do Not Disturb and enter the Forward Number as a Do Not Disturb Exception.
A forwarded call is processed through all extensions' forwarding path. For example, if extension 201
forwards to 202 and 202 forwards to 203 a call to 201 rings at 203.
When forwarding all is enabled, a user can also forward their Hunt Group calls via Phone Manager or by
using the default short codes as follows:
•
*50 - Enable Forward Hunt Group calls. For a detailed example of this short code set up, see
Forward Hunt Group Calls On.
•
*51 - Disable Forward Hunt Group calls. For a detailed example of this short code set up, see
Forward Hunt Group Calls Off.
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Call Intrusion
The Call Intrude short code feature allows a user to join an existing conversation, whether this is an
internal or external call.
To set up this facility, a System or User short code such as the example below must be created:
•
Short Code: *90*N#
•
Telephone No: N
•
Feature: CallIntrude
Based on the above example where N = extn. 201, a user can intrude into a call at extension 201 by
dialing *90*201#.
For a user to intrude, Can Intrude must be selected on their Telephony tab. By default this is not
selected. In addition, the users that they are trying to intrude on must not have their Cannot be Intruded
option checked.
If a user wants to prevent anyone intruding on their calls, the Cannot be Intruded option on the user's
Telephony tab should be checked, which is the default.
The Dial Inclusion short code feature is similar to Call Intrude but allows the intruding party and the
intrusion target to talk without the other party hearing them. During this type of intrusion, all parties hear
a repeated intrusion tone. When the intruder hangs-up the original call parties are reconnected.
Call Pickup
Call pickup allows one user to answer another user's ringing phone.
The following default short codes can be used:
•
*30 - Call Pickup Any:
To allow a user to pick up any (the first available) call ringing on another extension.
•
*31 - Call Pickup Group:
This allows a user to pick up a Hunt Group call ringing on another extension. The user must be a
member of that Hunt Group.
•
*32*N# - Call Pickup Extn:
Pick up a ringing call from the specified Extension. N representing the specific Extension.
•
*53*N# - Call Pickup Members:
Pick up any call ringing on another extension that is a member of the Hunt group specified. The
incoming call can be as a result of a DID call to that extension, an internal call to that extension,
an internal or external call to the Hunt Group, a call to a phone from another Hunt Group etc. N
represents the extension number of the Hunt Group.
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PBX Features and Functions
Acquire Call/Steal Call
If your PC is set to US English, the feature is labeled "Acquire Call"; if it is set to UK English, it is labeled
"Call Steal". This feature takes over the call currently on the specified extension number or reclaim the
user's last transferred call. The Acquire Call facility allows a user to take over the call currently on the
Extension Number specified.
Using the default short codes a call can be acquired by dialing •
*45*N#
N representing the extension number from which the call is to be acquired, eg. *45*205#
•
*46
This short code takes over the last call from your Extension. This function is useful when you
want to catch a call you have just missed that has gone off to Voicemail. The RECLAIM function
in the Phone Manager application also performs this function.
For information on how these two short codes are set up, see Call Steal.
Call Waiting
Enabling Call Waiting allows a user who is already on a call to be made aware of another call to their
extension. An intermittent call waiting tone is played (the tone varies according to locale) and depending
on the phone type, information about the new caller may be displayed.
Note: If the user has call appearance buttons programmed, call waiting will not get activated. The next
incoming call will appear on an available call appearance button. When there are no available call
appearance buttons, the next incoming call will receive busy tone.
To answer a call waiting, either end the current call or put the current call on hold, and then answer the
new call. Hold can then be used to move between calls.
On phones with multiple call appearance buttons, pressing the appropriate button allows you to move
between calls. This can also be done through IP Office applications such as Phone Manager.
Call waiting can also be provided for hunt group calls if the hunt group Ring Mode must be Group. The
group members personal call waiting must also be enabled.
The following default short codes are available when using Call Waiting. The short code features they
use can also be assigned to DSS buttons.
•
*15 - Call Waiting On:
Enables call waiting for the user. An intermittent beep indicates a waiting incoming call. See Call
Waiting On for short code set up information.
•
*16 - Call Waiting Off:
Disables call waiting for the user. See Call Waiting Off for short code set up information.
•
*26 - Clear CW: (Clear & Pickup Call Waiting)
Clear the current call and pick up the waiting call. See Clear CW for short code set up
information.
•
*27*N# - Hold CW: (Hold & Pickup Call Waiting)
Place the current call on hold and pick up the waiting call. See Hold CW for short code set up
information
•
*28*N# - Suspend CW: (Suspend & Pickup Call Waiting)
Suspend the current call into the specified slot and pick up the waiting call. See Suspend CW for
short code set up information.
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Do Not Disturb
This is the ability to temporarily stop incoming calls to a user's telephone. It prevents the user from
receiving Hunt Group calls and give direct callers either busy or Voicemail if available (Note that if Call
Forwarding and Do Not Disturb are active, the call is not forwarded, but does receive Voicemail). This
can be enabled/disabled by dialing short codes or via the Phone Manager application.
If, however, specific numbers are required to override Do Not Disturb, internal and external phone
numbers can be added to an exception list.
Do Not Disturb and an exception list can be configured via the User | DND form or short codes as shown
below.
The following default Short Codes are available to make use of Do Not Disturb:
•
•
To turn Do Not Disturb on
•
*08 enable.
•
*09 disable.
To add an internal or external number to the Exception List
•
•
*10*N# - The user should enter the number in place of the N, eg. *10*5551234#
To delete a number from the Exception List
•
*11*N# - The user should enter the number in place of the N, eg. *11*5551234#
Follow Me
When Follow Me is configured, calls are redirected to the Follow Me destination. Follow Me has two
variances: Follow Me To and Follow Me Here. Follow Me Here is set at the destination location (where
you want the call redirected to). Follow Me To is set a the user's original extension. Both features can be
set via Short Codes.
If the call is not answered or the terminal is busy, forwarding or voicemail behaviour is processed as if
the call is at the targeted extension.
The following default Short Codes are available to make use of Follow Me:
•
To set Follow Me To from the user's extension
*14*N# - The user should enter the destination number in place of the N, eg. *14*208#. For
sample short code set up, see Follow Me To.
•
To cancel Follow Me To from the user's extension
*14*#
•
To set Follow Me Here at the destination extension
*12*N# - The user should enter his extension number in place of the N, eg. *12*204#. For sample
short code set up, see Follow Me Here.
•
To cancel Follow Me Here at the destination extension
*13*N# - The user should enter his extension number in place of the N, eg. *13*204# or dial
*14*# at the user's extension. For sample short code set up, see Follow Me Here Cancel.
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PBX Features and Functions
Holding a Call
While connected to a call, pressing the Hold button on a telephone places the current call on hold. Music
On Hold is played if this facility is available. Reconnect to the call by pressing Hold again, or if the
handset has been replaced, the system will call the extension back after approximately 2 minutes. If your
ISDN supports it, a call can also be placed on hold to a specific exchange slot via a Hold short code. The
Hold Timout is defaulted to 90 seconds and is programmable from the Telephony tab within the System
configuration form. The Busy on Held setting stops any additional incoming call arriving while the user
has a call on hold and is programmable from the User's Telephony tab.
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Music on Hold
Music on Hold (MOH)
The IP Office can provide music on hold (MOH) in one of two ways:
•
Internal MOH:
During a reboot, the IP Office downloads a .wav file called holdmusic.wav from Manager; this
file is not permanently stored in the Control Unit. If the main Control Unit receives a
holdmusic.wav file on reboot, the Audio port is ignored. Note: Internal music on hold is not
supported by the IP401.
•
External MOH:
Connect an audio source to the 3.5mm audio port on the back of the IP Office control unit.
•
If an internal MOH file has been downloaded, the IP Office will not recognize any external
MOH input until it is rebooted without the internal MOH file.
If the message "Unable to send Hold Music" appears in the TFTP Log or on the status bar of Manager,
this means that a "holdmusic.wav" file could not be found in the Working Directory. Ignore this message
if you are using the Audio Port. This message can also be an indication that communication between the
main Control Unit and LAN has been lost since reboot.
Checking Music on Hold
The IP Office has a default system short code that allows you to listen to a system’s current music on
hold.
1. At an idle extension, dial *34.
2. You will hear the system’s music on hold.
Note: You must ensure that any MOH source you use complies with copyright, performing rights and
other local and national legal requirements.
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Internal Music on Hold
The IP Office supports internal music on hold by using a .wav audio file that it downloads during a
reboot. Note: Internal music on hold is not supported by the IP401.
The preferred .wav file properties are:
•
PCM, 8kHz 16-bit, mono.
•
Maximum length 30 seconds.
Music on Hold FAQ
•
? How do I get a suitable .wav file
There are many suppliers of music on hold files. Though many of these require a single payment,
they are then free of copyright and public performance issues. Do an internet search on MOH
and ‘wav’.
•
? How do I check and change my .wav files
Use Windows Sound Recorder to check and change the .wav files properties. Select Start |
Programs | Accessories | Entertainment | Sound Recorder.
•
•
•
Open your .wav file and then select File | Properties to view its properties. Use Convert
Now to change the properties to those required by IP Office.
•
If the file is too long, you can use the slider and the Edit | Delete After Current Position
option to shorten the file.
•
Use Save as and rename the file as holdmusic.wav.
? How do I download the file to the IP Office
Use the following process:
•
Copy the .wav file to the IP Office Manager folder (c:\Program Files\Avaya\IP
Office\Manager) and name it holdmusic.wav.
•
Select View | TFTP Log and arrange the windows so that you can see it and Manager at
the same time.
•
Use File | Advanced | Reboot to send a reboot command to the IP Office. You will be
asked for the system password.
•
During the reboot, in the TFTP Log you should see a request for holdmusic.wav and the
file then being downloaded.
•
Following the reboot you should be able to test the music on hold by dialing *34 at an
extension.
! I do all the above but the file is not downloaded
If running Manager over a WAN link, a RAS connection or from different LAN domain, then the
default TFTP request for the music on hold file during reboot won’t work. See “Internal MOH and
Remote Maintenance”.
Notes:
1. The IP Office will accept .wav files in other formats and then attempt a suitable conversion.
However the results and range of formats that it will convert cannot be guaranteed. Additionally,
higher quality audio .wav files will have larger files sizes that lengthen the reboot time whilst
losing the extra quality after conversion.
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External Music on Hold
The Audio port of the IP Office control unit is a standard 3.5mm audio jack socket. It accepts input using
standard 3.5mm audio stereo or mono jack plugs.
•
? Can I connect a personal music player
Yes, if it has an auto-repeat mode. Simply connect the headphone sockets to the IP Office audio
port. Note however that these devices are not normally designed for continuous 24/7 operation.
•
? What device should I use
We recommend that you use a dedicated hold music device. These are available from most
telecommunications installers and distributors.
•
? Can I Use Internal Music on Hold as well
No, the IP Office only allows one music on hold source. If it downloads an internal music on hold
file it will ignore any input from the Audio port. To remove the internal music on hold file, you must
delete 'holdmusic.wav' found in the Manager program folder and reboot the IP Office.
The IP Office audio port accepts a maximum 200mV RMS input and provides an impedance of 10kΩ per
channel.
Internal MOH and Remote Maintenance
During its reboot, the IP Office sends out a broadcast TFTP request for the holdmusic.wav file.
Since it is a broadcast request, it typically will not be forwarded by any network routers. Also because the
IP Office is rebooting, any existing WAN or RAS connection are broken until the reboot is complete.
These are the possible resolutions (apart from using external music on hold):
•
If the Manager PC is on a LAN connection to the IP Office:
In the IP Office configuration, set the TFTP Server Address on the System form to the IP Address
of the PC running Manager.
•
Run a Second TFTP Server on the Same LAN as the IP Office:
Using a second TFTP server with a copy of holdmusic.wav file in its file directory and on the
same LAN as the IP Office ensures that the file is available to the IP Office during its reboot.
•
Use Manager:
Install a second copy of Manager on the IP Office’s local LAN and set this copy of Manager to run
permanently. Whilst remote maintainers may frown upon this, we always recommend that
Manager is installed somewhere on the IP Office local LAN to support local maintenance when
remote connection is not working.
•
Use another TFTP Server Program:
Any TFTP server can be used to provide the holdmusic.wav file. We have tested operation with
TFTP32 (http://tftp32.jounin.net - disable its DHCP after install) and TFTP Server 2000
(http://support.avaya.com).
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PBX Features and Functions
Incoming Call Routing
Incoming Call Routing
By default, all incoming voice calls are sent to the hunt group Main (extension 200), which contains the
first 16 extensions. All incoming data calls are sent to a RAS service called DialIn, see IP Route Form .
The Incoming Call Route form allows entries to be created to route incoming calls to different groups,
extensions, RAS services or voicemail. These routes can be based on the incoming line group, the type
of call, incoming digits or the caller's CLI.
Each call route has a Destination. The Destination field allows selection of any existing user, hunt group
and RAS service in the configuration. Voicemail can also be selected to prompt the caller for their
mailbox number and mailbox code.
In addition short codes can be manually entered into the Destination field. If Voicemail Pro is installed,
VM: followed by a Voicemail Pro module name can be entered to route calls directly to that Voicemail
Pro module. On Avaya IP Office - Small Office Edition systems with integral voicemail, AA: followed by
an auto-attendant name can be used to route callers directly to a Avaya IP Office - Small Office Edition
Auto-Attendant service. Note: VM: and AA: entries are restricted to a maximum of 15 characters length
in total.
Night Service Destinations
From IP Office 2.1 onwards, a time profile can be used to define when an incoming call route should use
an alternate Night Service Destination field rather than the normal Destination field.
The time profile must already exist in the configuration before it can be selected as the Night Service
Profile for an incoming call route. The time profile defines when the night service destination should be
used.
The Night Service Destination field is used the same as the normal Destination field in the Incoming
Call Route form.
Fallback Extension
Defines an alternate destination that should be used when the current primary destination (set in the
Destination or Night Service Destination field) cannot be obtained. For example, if the primary
destination is a hunt group that is returning busy and does not have queuing or voicemail setup, the
caller would be routed to the Fallback destination.
Fallback extensions are set within the Incoming Call Route form.
Incoming Call Priority
Incoming calls can be assigned a priority level between 1 (lowest) and 3 (highest). When calls to the
same destination are queued, those calls with the highest priority will go before those with a lower
priority. Internal calls are treated as having no priority over external calls. Call priorities are set within the
Incoming Call Route form.
Note: The routing of calls with different priority levels into a queue supported by a Voicemail Pro using a
Speak Position action is not recommended. Having spoken a queue position to a caller, the Voicemail
Pro will not speak a higher queue position to that caller after higher priority callers have gone ahead in
the queue.
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Parking a Call
Parking a call is an alternative to holding a call. The call is parked on the telephone system, then
retrieved by another extension. When the call is retrieved, the action is known as Ride Call.
Each parked call requires a park slot number. Attempting to park a call into a park slot that is already
occupied cause an intercept tone to be played.
Calls left parked for too long will recall to the original extension that parked the call. The Park Timeout is
set through the System | Telephony tab. Its normal default is 5 minutes.
There are several different methods by which calls can be parked and unparked. These are:
Using Short codes
The short code features, ParkCall and RideCall, can be used to create short codes to park and unpark
calls respectively. The default short codes that use these features are:
•
*37*N# - Parks a call in park slot N, eg. *37*300#. For a sample short code set up, see Park Call.
•
*38*N# - Unparks a call from park slot N, eg. *38*300#. For a sample short code set up, see Ride
Call.
Using the Phone Manager and SoftConsole Applications
The Phone Manager and SoftConsole applications all support park buttons. Clicking on these allows the
user to park or unpark calls in the park slot associated with each button.
In addition, when a call is parked in one of those slots by another extension, the application user can see
details of the call and can unpark it at their extension.
By default the application park buttons are associated with park slots 1 upwards. However these park
buttons can be reconfigured to match different park slot numbers.
Using DSS Keys
The ParkCall feature can be used to associate a DSS button on a telephone with a particular park slot
number. The DSS button can then be used to park and unpark calls from that park slot. The DSS buttons
BLF lamps will indicate when a call is parked in the associated park slot.
Phone Defaults
Some telephones support facilities to park and unpark calls through their display menu options (refer to
the appropriate telephone user guide). In this case parked calls are automatically put into park slots
matching the extension number. For example, the first call parked by extension 201 would go into park
slot 2010, the next into park slot 2011 and so on.
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PBX Features and Functions
Configuring Personal Fax Numbers
Individuals and departments can have their own fax numbers.
In the following example, when someone dials 5551234, the system dials 501, which is then rerouted to
the fax server:
1. Attach the fax modem to extension 216
2. Configure extension 216 with Caller Display Type = DTMFF
3. Create a Hunt Group set to extension number 500, with extension 216 as a member.
4. Create a User, eg. Fax501 with an extension of 501 and set Forwarding Unconditional to 500
5. Create an Incoming Call Route to extension 501 where the Incoming Number is the user's
required personal fax number. Repeat for each user's personal fax number.
•
Incoming Number: 5551234
•
Destination: 501 Fax 501
Ring Back When Free
If an extension is busy and you want to be informed when the extension becomes free, you can dial any
digit while listening to the busy tone and put the telephone down to set Ring Back When Free.
When the busy extension becomes free, the system rings your telephone and gives the appropriate
Caller Display information (if your phone has a display) to advise that the destination is free. When you
pick up your phone, a call is automatically made to the extension.
This feature can also be set via the followings methods:
•
Short Code
•
Button Programming (Advanced|Miscellaneous|RingBackWhenFree)
•
Phone display (depending on the phone model)
•
IP Office Phone Manager
Related Topics:
Ringback when free short code set up
Ringback ring tone selection
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Manager 3.0
Transferring a Call
Two types of transfer is available, a blind/unsupervised transfer and an announce/supervised transfer.
When calls are transferred, the original Caller ID is passed onto the destination. By default, a forwarded
call cannot be transferred back to the original destination.
To perform a blind/unsupervised transfer:
1. Place the caller on hold.
2. Dial the target transfer's extension number.
3. While the target transfer line is ringing, hang up your phone. If the line is busy, press hold to
retrieve the original call. If you want to queue the call to the busy extension, see Queuing a Call
to a Busy extension.
4. When the target transfer picks up the phone, the transfer is complete. If the target transfer does
not pick up the phone
The User | Telephony | Transfer Return time can be used to set how long a transferred call
should ring unanswered before returning to the extension performing the transfer. If set, it will only
work if set shorter than the any divert to voicemail settings at the transfer destination.
To perform an announce/supervised transfer:
1. Place the caller on hold.
2. Dial the target transfer extension number.
3. When the target transfer phone is answered, you can confirm the acceptance of the call to be
transferred. If the answer is "Yes", then hangup and the transfer is complete. If the answer is "No"
or if the line is not answered or goes to voicemail, then dial *52 (a default short code) to clear the
call and use hold again to retrieve the original call. If the line is busy, press hold to retrieve the
original call. If you want to queue the call to the busy extension, see Queuing a Call to a Busy
extension.
Hot Transfer
Hot transfer is the ability to transfer a call without personally answering the call. A user can perform a
Hot Transfer via a PC application, for example, Phone Manager. This displays information regarding the
caller, which may assist the user to decide who to pass the call to. Select the Transfer function on the
PC application and enter the destination number. The extension receiving the transferred call is informed
via Caller Display where the call was transferred from and passes any available information regarding
the original caller.
Queuing a Call to a Busy extension
If an extension is busy and a caller wants to hold for that person, the call can be queued for that
extension. The caller is put on hold until the extension is free.
To place a call in a queue until the target transfer extension is available:
1. Place the original call on hold and dial *33* followed by the extension number of the target
transfer and # (pound/hash). *33*N# is the default short code for call queuing.
For example, if the caller wants to queue for extension 201, then you will dial the following:
*33*201#.
2. Once the call queuing short code is activated, the caller is queued indefinitely (until the extension
is free) as there is no time parameter associated with the call queuing feature.
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Ring Tones
Ring Tones
Ring tones can be defined in the following terms:
•
Distinctive Ringing - Inside, Outside and Ringback
A distinctive ring tone can be set for each of the different call types: an internal call, an external
call and all ringback calls (voicemail and ringback when free). Distinctive ringing for the call types
are predefined on the 2400, 4400, 4600, 5400 and 5600 series phones. The distinctive ringing can
only be configured on Manager for analog phones.
•
Personalized ringing - Different types of phones may support their own methods of setting the
ring tone.
Note: As of IP Office version 3.0, DT ports and telephone sets (20 series) are no longer supported.
Selectable Ring Tones
From the System | Telephony tab, the default ring tone for each call type (distinctive ringing) can be
configured. The setting for an individual user can be altered from the system default through each user's
User | Telephony tab. These ring tone settings only apply to analog phones. For the Avaya 2400, 4400,
4600, 5400 and 5600 series phones, the ring tone for each call type are predefined within the phones
themselves.
The selectable ringing tones are:
•
RingNormal
This pattern varies to match the Locale set in the System | System tab, see "Other Ring
Patterns". This is the default for external calls.
•
RingType1: 1s ring, 2s off, etc. This is the default for internal calls.
•
RingType2: 0.25s ring, 0.25s off, 0.25s ring, 0.25s off, 0.25s ring, 1.75s off, etc. This is the
default for ringback calls.
•
RingType3: 0.4s ring, 0.8s off, …
•
RingType4: 2s ring, 4s off, …
•
RingType5: 2s ring, 2s off, …
•
RingType6: 0.945s ring, 4.5s off, …
•
RingType7: 0.25s ring, 0.24 off, 0.25 ring, 2.25 off, …
•
RingType8: 1s ring, 3s off, …
•
RingType9: 1s ring, 4s off, …
•
RingType0: Same as RingNormal for the locale "eng".
•
Default Ring: Shown on the User | Telephony tab. Indicates follow the settings on the System |
Telephony tab.
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Flash Hook Pulse Width
The system Locale defines the default setting for extension flash hook pulse width, see "Other Ring
Patterns".
If necessary, the flash hook pulse width for individual extensions can be altered. This is done through
each extension's Extension form.
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PBX Features and Functions
Trusted Locations
A "trusted location" can be set via the Source Numbers tab in the User's configuration form. Note that
external numbers used as trusted locations must provide ICLID.
These are locations that the System allows either data access, eg. a user dialing in from home, or
access to Voicemail without a Voicemail Code, eg. a user collecting his Voicemail messages from a cell
phone, or the location the Voicemail Server calls to inform the user of a new message.
Allow Direct Voicemail Access
To allow a User to collect Voicemail without being prompted for their Voicemail Code (only supported by
Voicemail Lite and Voicemail Pro using IP Office mode). Prefix the number with a "V".
•
V202 - When set against the user with extension 202, this example allows the user to collect
her/his VoiceMail from extension 202 without being prompted for a Voicemail Code. This is set by
default for all users.
•
V7325551234 - When set against the user with extension 202, this example allows the user to
collect her/his VoiceMail from an external number (7325551234), without being prompted for a
Voicemail Code.
By default, each user is configured with their extension as a "trusted location", which enables them to
dial *17 (default short code) from their own extension to collect Voicemail messages.
Allow RAS/Data Access from a Specified number
To allow RAS/data access only from a specified number, prefix the number (defined in the Source
Numbers tab) with a "R".
•
R7325551234 - Based on this example, the user for whom this setting is defined can now have
RAS/data access from the specified number (7325551234).
Instruct Voicemail to Call the User
To have the Voicemail Server call the user when a new message has arrived for a Hunt Group, prefix the
Hunt Group name with a "H".
When the hunt group receives a new message, the Voicemail Server rings the extension and informs the
user.
•
Hsales - If user 202 is a member of the Sales Hunt Group, then defining Hsales within the user's
Source Numbers tab will allow user 202 to receive notification when a message is left for the
Sales Hunt Group.
Instruct Voicemail to Call the User at Another Location
To have the Voicemail Server call the user at a location other than their own extension when a new
message is received, prefix the number (defined in the Source Numbers tab) with a "P". The telephone
number must include any necessary external dialing prefix.
This facility is only available if using Voicemail Pro and through which the user has a Callback start point
set.
•
P917325559876 - Based on this example, the user for whom this setting is defined will receive
notification at the external number (7325559876) when a message is left on the user's extension.
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External Output Port
Introduction - Using the External Output (Door) Port
All the IP Office control units are equipped with a external output port. This port, also called the "door
relay port", can be used to control up to two external devices.
The port is marked as EXT O/P and is located on the back of the control unit adjacent to the power
supply input socket. It provides two relay connections.
Through the IP Office, the two relays can be switched on, off or pulsed (on for 5 seconds). This can be
done using short codes, through the Door tab in Phone Manager Pro or via the Open Door action in
Voicemail Pro.
As the alternate name for the port suggests, the usual application for these relays is to activate door
release systems. However, as long as the criteria for maximum current and voltage are met, the relays
can be used for other applications.
Wiring Connection
The pin numbers used in the diagram below relate to those used in the IP Office Installation Manual.
3.5mm stereo audio jack plugs are frequently sold as pre-wired sealed units. It may be necessary to use
a multi-meter to determine the wiring connections from an available plug. Typically 3 (common to both
relays) is the cable screen.
•
Switching capacity: 0.7A
•
Maximum voltage: 55V dc.
•
On state resistance: 0.7Ω.
•
Short circuit current: 1.0A
•
Reverse circuit current capacity: 1.4A
•
Ensure that 1 and 2 are always at a positive voltage with respect to 3.
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PBX Features and Functions
Short Code Controls
The IP Office is installed with a number of default short codes for external output operation. These are:
Relay State
Relay 1
Relay 2
- On
*39
*42
- Off
*40
*43
- Pulse
*41
*44
If necessary these short codes can be deleted and a new system or user short code added. The short
code will be similar to the form shown below
•
Short Code: Replace with whatever dialing should trigger the relay action.
•
Telephone Number: Enter either 1 for relay 1 or 2 for relay 2.
•
Feature: Select Relay On, Relay Off or Relay Pulse.
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Manager 3.0
Phone Manager Pro
IP Office Phone Manager Pro can be used to pulse either of the external relays. This is done through the
Door tab on the Phone Manager application. This tab is only shown when a door entry button is
configured.
Note: The Phone Manager Pro user can trigger the door relays through this tab even when they are on a
call.
Configuration
1. Within Phone Manager Pro, click on the Configure Preferences icon.
2. Select the Door Release tab.
3. For Door1 Name and Door2 Name, enter the text to display on buttons in the Phone Manager
Pro's Door tab.
4. In the Door1 Code and Door2 Code, enter the relay number that each button on the Door tab
should pulse. If no number is entered the button is not shown.
5. Select OK.
6. The Door tab can now be selected to display the door buttons and activate the appropriate relay.
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PBX Features and Functions
Voicemail Pro
The Open Door action can be used to pulse either relay 1 or relay 2. It can be incorporated into call flows
where required.
An example scenario could be a lobby phone which, when picked up immediately, either calls the
receptionist (who can manually activate the door release) or allows the caller to enter a code to release
the door themselves.
Do the following to incorporate the Open Door action into a call flow:
1. In Manager, open the configuration for the User associated with the lobby phone. Add a short
code similar to the following:
2. Whenever the user extension goes off hook, this short code will call a Voicemail Pro module, in
this example one called Lobby.
3. In Voicemail Pro, add a module of the matching name.
4. In the Menu action's properties:
•
In the Entry Prompts tab record a prompt such as "Please hold for reception" and tick
Allow prompts to be interrupted by Tone.
•
In the Touch Tones tab set a short timeout since callers who know the door access code
can interrupt the entry prompt. Select a key for door access, in this example we used 1.
•
Link the Timeout result to a Transfer to the reception number.
•
Link the 1 key press result to the Open Door action.
5. In the Open Door action's properties:
•
In the General tab enter a Pin for the action. Callers who press 1 for entry will hear
"Please enter your access code".
•
In the Specific tab select the door relay that should be triggered by successful pin entry.
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Manager 3.0
Hot Desking
Hot Desking
Hot Desking allows several users to use the same extension, but each user logs in to access their user
settings and VoiceMail. Any phone can be used to hot desk. Hot desking is useful for people who are not
at their desks throughout long periods of the day.
•
To create a Hot Desk user:
This will enable the user you are configuring to be able to hot desk.
1. Receive the system configuration.
2. Click User located in the Configuration Tree panel.
3. In the list of users, double-click the user name or extension for whom you want to
create/enable Hot Desking.
4. Click the Telephony tab.
5. In the Login Code field, enter at least 4 digits. Inform the user of this Login Code
because it must be used by the User for Hot Desking.
6. Click OK.
7. Merge the configuration.
•
To use Hot Desking as a user:
1. After the system administrator has set you up as a Hot Desk user, you can
log onto any phone that is on the system by:
•
•
If the phone has display buttons/keys:
i.
Dial the button that corresponds to Login.
ii.
Dial the extension number you want to log onto (usually it is
your own extension).
iii.
Dial the button that corresponds to Next.
iv.
Dial the Login Code (ask your system administrator if you
do not know it).
v.
You are now logged onto your extension.
If the phone does not support display buttons/keys, default system
short codes can be used:
i.
Dial *35*N*C#, where N represents the extension number
you want to log onto and C represents the Login Code (ask
your system administrator if you do not know it).
2. When you are ready to log off the phone:
Manager 3.0
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•
On a phone with display buttons/keys, dial the button that
corresponds Logoff.
•
On a phone without display buttons, dial *36.
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PBX Features and Functions
•
Hot Desking Example:
Example: Extension 201 is to be used for Hot Desking.
1. Create the number of users required and give each a Login Code.
•
User 1: Extension 401, Login Code 123.
•
User 2: Extension 402, Login Code 456.
•
User 3: Extension 403, Login Code 789.
2. At extension 201, each user can now log in to use the extension with their own
user settings. They can do this using the default system short codes.
•
For User 1 to log in: *35*401*123#
•
For User 2 to log in: *35*402*456#
•
For the current user to log out: *36
The user associated with extension 201 (through their User form) does not normally need
to log on. They are automatically re-associated with extn. 201 whenever *36 is dialed at
the extension or following a reboot of the Control Unit. If you want that person to also
have to log on, then in their User tab you should enter a Login Code and select Forced
Login.
When using 4412, 4424 or 6400 series display telephones, you can set the extension to have no
extension number. It then displays NOT LOGGED ON between log on's.
For each log in user, you can configure how long an extension can remain idle before they are
automatically logged out. This is done using the Login Idle Period in their User | Telephony tab. This
option should only be used in conjunction with Force Login.
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Force Login
Force Login forces the user to log back onto his phone after any logoff, including a system reboot. For
example, when a Hot Desking user logs off a phone, the system (by default) attempts to re-associate the
phone with the default user; if that user is set to Force Login, then they must enter their Login Code to
complete the re-association. By default Force Login is not enabled for users.
To set up Force Login:
1. Receive the system configuration.
2. Click User located in the Configuration Tree panel.
3. In the list of users, double-click the user name or extension for whom you want to create a Force
Login.
4. Click the Telephony tab.
5. Tick Force Login.
6. A Login Code must be set when Force Login is enabled. In the Login Code field, enter at least
4 digits. Inform the user of this Login Code.
7. Click OK.
8. Merge the configuration.
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PBX Features and Functions
Login Idle Period
Login Idle Period sets the length (in seconds) in which a user can be logged onto an idle phone. If the
telephone is not used within this time frame, the user currently logged on is automatically logged off.
Because of the potential for an automatic logoff, Login Idle Period must be used in conjunction with
Force Login.
Login Idle Period is useful for call centers where tracking of time spent on the phone is important.
To set a login idle length in seconds:
1. Receive the system configuration.
2. Click User located in the Configuration Tree panel.
3. In the list of users, double-click the user name or extension for whom you want to set a Login Idle
Period.
4. Click the Telephony tab.
5. Enter the seconds you want to set the idle period for.
6. Tick the Force Login field.
7. A Login Code must be set when Force Login is enabled. In the Login Code field, enter at least
4 digits. Inform the user of this Login Code.
8. Click OK.
9. Merge the configuration.
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Hunt Groups
Overview of Hunt Groups
A Hunt Group is a collection of users, eg. Sales - a group to handle all sales related calls. An incoming
caller wishing to speak to Sales can ring one number but the call can be answered by any number of
extensions that are members of the Sales Hunt Group.
By default all incoming voice calls are sent to a Hunt Group called Main (extension 200), which is
configured in Group mode, and contains the first 16 extensions. Therefore all incoming calls ring each
extension simultaneously. This is set up as an initial starting point for the telephone system while
individual user extensions are configured. Hunt group configuration is done through the Hunt Group
configuration form.
The Hunt Group can be given an extension number. This extension number can be used internally or
linked to an Incoming Call Route. All the calls received by this extension number can be answered using
either:
•
Group Mode: All telephones in the Extension List ring simultaneously.
•
Linear/Hunt Mode: Each extension is rung in order, one after the other, starting from the first
extension in the list each time.
•
Circular/Rotary Mode: Each extension is rung in order, one after the other. However, the last
extension used is remembered. The next call received rings the next extension in the list.
•
Idle/Most Idle Mode: The extension that has been unused for the longest period rings first, then
the extension that has been idle second longest rings, etc.
If all extensions in the Hunt Group are busy (ie. on a call, logged out or membership is disabled) or not
answered, another Hunt Group, called an Overflow Group, can be used to take the calls. The Overflow
Time can be used to stipulate how long a call will ring round the members of the Hunt Group before
being passed to the Overflow Group.
If preferred, calls can be held in a queue and passed to the first available extension in the group. If an
Overflow Group is used, a call is sent to the Overflow Group after it has been held in the queue for the
time specified by the Overflow Time.
A Time Profile can be used to indicate when a Hunt Group is operational, (9:00 to 5:00), and another
hunt group called a Night Service Fallback Group can be used to provide cover outside of these hours.
If you wish a Night Service Fallback Group to provide cover at irregular times, a Short Code can be
used. Once this is done, the status of Night Service can only be changed back via a Short Code (and not
Time Profile).
During a holiday period, the Hunt Group can be put into Out of Service mode and another Hunt Group
called the Out of Service Fallback Group can be used to provide cover.
Voicemail can also be used in conjunction with Hunt Groups to take all group related messages, play an
announcement when the Hunt Group is in Night Service or Out of Service mode and give
announcements while a call is held in a queue. Hunt Groups also support Voicemail Email - to pass
messages to an email account, and a Voicemail Code that can be used to verify a user when messages
are retrieved remotely.
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Hunt Groups
Examples
These examples explain how to use a basic Hunt Group and how Voicemail and Queuing act with the
Hunt Group when a Voicemail
Server is operational. There is also an example of how to use an Overflow Group, a Night Service
Fallback Group and a Time Profile.
Basic Hunt Group
Scenario - all sales related calls must be answered by staff in the Sales department, first by Jane, then
by Peter, and finally, if necessary, by Anne.
1. Create a hunt group called "Sales"
2. Assign the extension no, eg. 300
3. Add extensions, ie. Jane (201), Peter (204) and Anne (205)
4. Set the Ring Mode to Linear/Hunt
Result - all calls received by the Sales Hunt Group first go to Jane's phone. If Jane is busy or does not
answer her extension within 15 seconds (default) the call moves to Peter's phone. If Peter is also unable
to answer the call, it goes to Anne's phone. If Anne does not answer the call it passes back to Jane's
phone. The call continues in this manner until the call is answered or the caller hangs up. (This example
assumes that a Voicemail Server is not available, see below).
Using Voicemail
Scenario - if the Sales department is unable to answer a call, the caller is given the option to leave a
message. (An IP Office Voicemail Server must be operational for this facility to be available).
•
Ensure the Voicemail On option in the Sales hunt group created above is checked (default).
Result - when the Sales Hunt Group receives a call and cannot be answered by any member, the caller
is sent to the Voicemail for the Sales Hunt Group.
Using the Queuing Facility
Scenario - if the Sales department is all busy on calls, further calls are held in a queue until one of the
Sales team become free. (In order for a caller to receive the Hunt Group queue messages an IP Office
Voicemail Server must be operational).
1. Ensure the Queuing On option in the Sales Hunt Group created above is checked (default).
2. The Queuing Ring Time is set to 10 seconds by default.
Result – when the Sales Hunt Group receives a call and all members are on calls, the call remains in
queue. If, for example, Peter's extension becomes free the first call in the queue is passed to Peter's
extension.
When the call is placed in the queue, the caller first hears 10 seconds of ringing tone and then is given
the first "Queue" message. Music On Hold (if this facility is available) is then played for 20 seconds
followed by the second "Queue" message. Music On Hold is then played for a further 20 seconds and
followed by the second "Queue" message again. This sequence is repeated until the call is answered.
Please note - the Voicemail On, Queuing On and Queuing Ring Time of 10 seconds options are all set
by default when creating a Hunt Group but these facilities are not available unless a Voicemail Server is
operational.
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Using an Overflow Group
Scenario - When the Sales department is attending their weekly sales meeting the receptionists must
answer calls.
1. Create a new Hunt Group called "Reception".
2. Assign an extension, ie. 301.
3. Add extensions, ie. Katie (202) and Richard (206).
4. Set the Ring Mode to Group.
5. In the Sales Hunt Group created above, add the Reception Hunt Group to the Overflow Group
list.
Result - when the Sales Hunt Group receives a call and the members are unable to answer the call, the
call is sent to the Reception Hunt Group. Katie's and Richard's extensions will ring simultaneously.
If both Katie and Richard are unable to answer the call within 15 seconds (default) the caller is sent to
Voicemail for Sales.
Overflow Group List - Select Required Items
Select the Hunt Group to act as the Overflow Group
CTRL or SHIFT can be used to select multiple entries. A Hunt Group may be added more than once, eg.
Main, Sales, Main, etc.
Using a Night Service Fallback Group
When the Sales department is attending their weekly sales meeting, the receptionist who will take
messages must answer calls.
•
In the Sales Hunt Group created above, set the Reception Hunt Group as the Night Service
Fallback Group.
Result - either Jane, Peter or Anne can dial the relevant short code on their phones to put the Sales Hunt
Group into Night Service. If the default short codes are being used, the short code dialed will be
*20*300#. All calls received by the Sales Hunt Group are sent to the Reception Hunt Group and can be
answered by either Katie or Richard.
When the Sales team has finished their meeting, either Jane, Peter or Anne can dial the relevant short
code to return the Sales Hunt Group to In Service. If the default short codes are being used, the short
code dialed will be *21*300#. Jane, Peter or Anne can now answer All Sales Hunt Group calls.
Using a Time Profile
Office hours are 9.00 am to 5.00 pm, Monday to Friday. Outside of these hours sales related calls must
be passed to Voicemail to give the caller the option to leave a message. (A Voicemail Server must be
operational for this facility to be available).
1. Create a Time Profile for 9.00 am to 5.00 pm, Monday to Friday called "Office Hours".
2. In the Sales Hunt Group created above, enter the "Office Hours" time profile.
3. Ensure that a Night Service Fallback Group has not been entered.
Result - all calls received by the Sales Hunt Group between 9 am and 5 pm on Monday through Friday
are answered by the group. When calls are received before 9 am or after 5 pm Monday to Friday or all
day Saturday or Sunday the call is sent to Voicemail and played the Out of Hours Greeting.
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Hunt Groups
Enable/Disable Membership
A User's membership to a Hunt Group can be disabled temporarily.
•
Right-click on the required User and select Disable. An asterisk appears to the left of the User's
name. Right-click on the User and select Enable to reverse this option.
This facility can also be activated via Short Codes using the features HuntGroupDisable and
HuntGroupEnable. This allows users to disable and enable their membership to a Hunt Group from their
own phones.
For example, the following short codes could be created. N represents the Hunt Group the user wishes
to disable or enable themselves from.
•
•
To Disable Group Membership:
•
Short Code: *90*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Line Group ID: 0
•
Feature: HuntGroupDisable
To Enable Group Membership:
•
Short Code: *91*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Line Group ID: 0
•
Feature: HuntGroupEnable
Hunt Group Call Waiting
Call waiting indication is normally provided to users for hunt group calls. Instead the call should ring at
and be answered by another free group member.
For hunt groups using the Ring Mode of Group, call waiting indication can be enabled. This is done by
ticking the Call Waiting option on the Hunt Group | Hunt Group tab.
Note that for the group member to receive call waiting indication, their personal call waiting setting must
also be enabled.
Note: There is no Hunt Group call waiting. If the user has call appearance buttons programmed, call
waiting will not get activated.
Hunt Group Voicemail
Refer to the "Voicemail Installation and Maintenance Manual".
Forwarding Hunt Group calls
A user can forward his Hunt Group calls to an internal or external number. See Call Forwarding .
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How to Monitor Calls
Monitoring allows a user to listen in to the call being handled by another user.
•
WARNING
Monitoring is not enabled by default. The use of monitoring is normally subject to local laws and
regulations. Before enabling monitoring you must ensure that you have complied with all
applicable local laws and regulations. Failure to do so may result in severe penalties.
•
Monitoring can be accompanied by a repeated tone heard by all parties. In some locales it may
be a requirement to provide this tone. Use of the tone is controlled by the Beep on Listen setting
on the System | System tab.
Note that monitoring is separate from call intrusion. It is not affected by the intrusion settings of any of
the users involved.
Monitoring is setup by selecting a Monitor Group for a user. The user can then listen to any calls made
or received by the members of that group. A short code is also required to trigger the monitoring.
Call monitoring is not supported when the extension to be monitored is using an IP phone.
Example:
User 'Extn205' wants to be able to monitor calls received by members of the Hunt Group 'Sales'.
1. In the Telephony tab of the user 'Extn205', select 'Sales' in the Monitor Group list box.
2. Create a User Short Code to allow Extn205 to start monitoring. This could also be done as a
System short code if desired.
•
Short Code: *99*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Line Group ID: 0
•
Feature: CallListen
Now when a member of the 'Sales' hunt group is on a call, Extn205 can replace N in the short code with
the extension number of that member and monitor their call. Note: Monitoring includes calls direct
to/from a user in addition to hunt group calls.
Using Queuing
Queuing allows callers to a Hunt Group to be held in a queue when all extensions in the Extension List
are busy. When an extension becomes free, a queued call is then presented to that extension.
If voicemail is operational, the caller is played queue messages. Refer to the Voicemail Installation &
Administration Manual for full details.
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Short Codes
Understanding Short Codes
Short Codes allow an administrator to configure features that can be accessed on a system-wide or user
basis. A list of these features and sample short code configurations are available under Short Code
Features.
Short Codes can be used for:
•
Speed Dials.
•
Activating and deactivating features for an individual phone (eg. Do Not Disturb) or for the entire
system (eg. Night Service).
•
Call Routing and Restriction.
Short codes can be set within several configuration forms, depending on how a particular short code is to
be used. For example, a Forward on Busy short code that is created directly from the Short code
configuration form applies to all users on the phone system, but the same short code created within the
User configuration form applies only to that user.
Because short codes can be set within several configuration forms, an order of priority is put in place for
situations where short codes settings contradict. For example, if a system short code states that *08 is
for Do Not Disturb On, but if a particular user is programmed to recognize *08 for Voicemail Ringback
On, then the user short code overrides the system short code for that particular user. The priority level
are as follows:
•
User Short Codes
Takes priority over short codes set for user restrictions, the system as a whole, least cost routing
and lines. The individual user short codes are matched against dialing by a particular user.
•
User Restriction Short Codes
Takes priority over short codes set for the system as whole, least cost routing and lines. The user
restriction short codes are matched against dialing by all users linked to the User Restrictions set.
They are overridden by individual user short codes.
•
System Short Codes
Takes priority over short codes set for least cost routing and lines. System short codes are
matched against any dialing by any user. They are overridden by individual user short codes and
user restriction short codes.
•
Least Cost Routing Short Codes
Takes priority over short codes set for lines. Least cost routing short codes are matched against
any dialing that results in a number to be dialed.
•
Line Short Codes
Short codes can also be configured on some line types.
To create a short code, the following parameters need to be understood:
•
How short code matching is performed
•
List of valid short code characters
•
Valid characters that can be used in the Telephone Number field
•
Short code features
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Manager 3.0
Matching Order
The number dialed by a user is treated in the following order:
1. If the number dialed matches an internal extension, go to step 6.
2. If the number matches a User short code, apply the short code. If the result is a number for
dialing proceed to Step 5. Otherwise go to step 3.
3. If a User Restriction has been applied to a user, the dialed number must match a User
restriction short code or else the number will not be routed out. To avoid all outgoing calls
being held up for this user when a match is not achieved, create a User restriction short code that
allows unmatched numbers to be routed out.
4. If the number matches a System short code, apply the short code. If the result is a number for
dialing proceed to Step 5.
5. If the number matches a Least Cost Route short code, dial the number as per the Least Cost
Route rules.
6. Dial the number.
Getting the Dialed Number
This section describes how a dialed number is determined and how short code matching is performed.
Routing of the short code begins based on a couple of parameters set in the System Telephony tab
(see Telephony ).
•
The Dial Delay Count is the number of digits that are dialed by the user before the system
begins to process the dialed string. Matching against the short code table occurs when this
number had been reached.
•
The Dial Delay Time is the interval allowed between dialed digits. It is reset after a new digit is
dialed. It serves two purposes:
•
It sets the time since the last digit dialed, after which dialing is assumed to have ended.
•
It is used to detect short codes that are less than the Dial Delay Count in length.
The Dial Delay Count and Dial Delay Timer work together to get the dialed string that is examined by IP
Office. The Dial Delay Count takes precedence. Once that number of digits in the Dial Delay Count has
been dialed, the system starts to match the digits against Short Codes. The dialed string is considered
complete when there are no more digits dialed within the Dial Delay Time.
Example: Dial Delay Time
An example of the first use of the Dial Delay Count is the following:
•
Dial Delay Count = 0
•
Dial Delay Time = 4000 msec (4 seconds)
A user dials the number "97325551212".
The Dial Delay Count is 0, so the system immediately starts looking for a match against Short Codes
even though dialing has not been completed..
As long as the user dials each digit within 4 second of the previous digit, the Dial Delay Time reset after
each digit. Only after the last "2" is dialed does the Dial Delay Timer expire and the complete number
dialed to evaluate is stored.
User may see the effect of this in the short delay between dialing a neighboring extension and that
extension ringing.
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Short Codes
Example: Short Dialing
An example of the second use is:
•
Dial Delay Count = 4
•
Dial Delay Time = 4000 msec (4 seconds)
A user dials "911". The dial string is less than the Dial Delay Count. However 4 seconds after the final 1,
the Dial Delay Time expires. The switch assumes that dialing is complete and process the number "911".
Example: Overlap Dialing
When the Dial Delay Count is greater than zero, overlap dialing can be supported. Consider the
following:
•
Dial Delay Count =4
•
Dial Delay Time = 4000 msec (4 seconds)
•
Short Code 1 = 01
•
Short Code 2 = 0123
When 1234 is dialed, Short Code 2 is matched because the Dial Delay Count is reached. Short Code 1
is only matched if the Dial Delay Time is met before the Short Code 2 match occurs.
If the Dial Delay Count was set to 0, only Short Code 1 would be used because the matching would
occur immediately.
Example: Single Digit Short Codes
IP Office supports Single Digit Short Codes, but they are treated in a different way than other short
codes and should be used with extreme care. Single Digit Short Codes rules can be summarized by the
following. They are acted on immediately regardless of the Dial Delay Count and Dial Delay Time.
Consider the following short codes:
•
Dial Delay Count =2
•
Dial Delay Time = 2000 msec (2 seconds)
•
Short Code 1 = 1
•
Short Code 2 = 12
•
Short Code 3 = 123
If Single Digit Short Codes did not receive special treatment, a user could dial any one of the three short
codes listed and the switch would translate the dialed short code after the 2 second Dial Delay Time
interval. However, because there is special treatment, the only short code that is recognized is Short
Code 1 (single digit 1). The switch does not wait for the Dial Delay Time interval. As soon as the first digit
is dialed a match is recognized and the switch translates immediately.
An administrator must choose Single digit short codes with digits that are not used as the first digit for
any other short code. They should be defined only after all other short requirements are satisfied.
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Short Code Parameters
Short Codes are made up of a combination the following, depending on what short code you are
creating:
•
Short Code: Default = blank
The dialing digits used to trigger the short code. Maximum length is 33 characters.
See Short Code Characters for a list of valid characters.
•
Telephone Number: Default = blank
The number output by the short code. The number dialed by the short code or parameters
for the short code feature. This field can contain numbers and characters. For
example, it can contain Voicemail Pro start point names, user names, hunt group
names and telephone numbers (including those with special characters). Maximum
length 33 characters. See Telephone Number Characters for a list of valid characters.
•
Line Group ID: Default = 0
For external calls, this is the set of lines that are used when making the call. Which group a line
belongs to is set through the Line form for each line.
•
Feature: Default = Dial
This is what the short code does. See Short Code Features.
•
Locale: Default = blank
Some features can support country specific variations if needed.
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Short Codes
Telephone Number Characters
In relation to short codes, the Telephone Number field can reflect the number dialed by the short code or
parameters for the short code feature. For example, this field can contain Voicemail Pro start point
names, user names, hunt group names and telephone numbers (including those with special
characters).
The Telephone Number field can contain numbers and the following characters:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
C – Place digits following the "C" in the outgoing call's Called Number field rather than Keypad
field (this is the default).
D – Wait for connection, then send the following as DTMF. (See Least Cost Route Overview for
an example). Note: A DTMF tone will not be produced if you are running IP Office Small Office
Edition.
E – Replace with the Extension Number dialing the Short Code.
I - Send data in an Information Packet rather than Set-up Packet (for advance use).
K - Place the digits following the "K" in the outgoing call's Keypad field rather than Called Number
field. Only supported on ISDN/QSIG.
L - Use the last number dialed.
N - Substitute with digits dialed for N or the string of "X"s in the Short Code field. For example use
the Hunt Group extension number entered as part of the short code. (See default short code
*20*N# for an example.)
S - Place the digits following the "S" into the outgoing call's Calling Number field.
SS - Pass through the Calling Party Number on VPN lines. For example, to provide
the incoming ICLID at the far end of a VoIP connection, a short code ? with
telephone number .SS should be added to the line.
t - Set the maximum duration for a call (+/-1 minute). Follow the Telephone Number entry of
short codes using a dial feature with t(x) where x is the number of minutes. See Maximum Call
Length for a sample short code setup using this feature.
U - Replace with the User Name of the User dialing the Short Code. See default short code *17
for an example.
W – Set flag in packet to withhold outgoing Caller ID (operation is PSTN network dependent.
Y – Used to send the digits following the "Y" as DTMF tones. This option differs from the "D"
option in that the digits following the Y in the Short Code are sent as DTMF tones on reception of
either a Progress or Call Proceeding message from the Line Provider, whereas the "D" option
sends the digits as DTMF tones only after a "Connect" message is received. For example, the Y
character would be necessary at a site where they have signed up with their telephone service
provider to withhold international dialing until a DTMF pin/account number is entered that initiates
the call progress/proceeding message. See Using the Y Character for an example.
@ – Enter following digits into sub-address.
. – Replace with current dialed digits, ie. those that have been dialed so far and triggered the
short code match.
, – One second pause in between DTMF digit dialing (See Least Cost Route Overview for an
example).
" " – Any text must be surrounded by quotation marks, eg. User or Hunt Group Names.
? – Indicates collect messages.
* - Sends the * tone to line.
# – When used in conjunction with the Voicemail Collect feature, it indicates leave messages. In
all other situations, it sends the # tone to line. Typically used in the CALA region to send the tone
at the end of a dialed number when the trunk configuration requires it.
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Short Code Characters
When creating a short code, the Short Code field can contain dialed numbers plus * and # and the
following non dialed characters:
•
? – Signifies that this is the default entry and is used in the absence of any other match or partial
match.
•
?D – This character combination will initiate a call to a defined phone number as soon as the
extension goes off-hook. This feature is also known as "hotline" and typically used with a phone
in unattended reception areas or for door entry. See the Dial on Pick up short code for an
example of its use.
•
N - Signifies a sequence of one or more digits dialed and then followed by a * or #. The * or # are
entered separately in Short Code field (ie. N* or N#).
•
X – Match a single digit. When a group of "X"s is used, the short code matches against the total
length of "X"s (for example if there are 10 "X"s, the user would have to dial 10 digits for it to
match the short code).
•
[n] – Expect secondary dial tone, where "n" represents the short code configured to trigger
secondary dial tone.
•
; – Receive sending complete. This must be the last character in the short code string. It indicates
to the system wait for the number to be fully dialed (based on the Dial Delay Time) before acting
on the short code.
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Short Codes
Using Special Characters
Using Special Characters
Throughout this section, the short codes start with "9" to access a second dial tone.
Secondary Dial Tone and [n] Characters
If secondary dial tone is required, the following short code needs to be added.
•
Short Code: 9
•
Telephone: .
•
Feature: SecondaryDialTone
•
Line Group ID: 0
With this additional short code in place, other short codes that would be used for dialing out on lines
would start with "[9]" rather than "9". Thus, the other short code examples in this section would start with:
•
[9]N;
•
[9]xxxxxxxxxx;
•
[9]1800N;
'N' and 'X'
When Short Codes contain only digits, matching is straightforward. When special characters are used,
"N"s and "X"s for example, short code matching becomes a bit more complex. One question is, can
Short Codes that have "X"s in them be used in conjunction with ones that just have "N"? The answer is
yes. The "X"'s in the Short Code field match against a specific string length.
Consider the following two short codes.
•
Short Code: 9N;
•
Telephone: N
•
Feature: Dial
•
Line Group ID: 0
•
Short Code: 9xxxxxxxxxx;
•
Telephone: N
•
Feature: Dial
•
Line Group ID: 0
In the above case, dial strings that are less than 10 digits use the first short code, while strings that are
10 digits or more use the second short code. This scheme can be used to send local versus long
distance calls out over different line, without the user being aware of this.
In the above example, if only the "9xxxxxxxxxx;" short code existed, any number dialed that was less
than 10 digits would not be matched.
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Dialed Digits and Outgoing Digits
Another thing that needs to be understood is what is going to get sent to the Central Office. If you have
separated out digits to match against and you want those digits sent out to the Central Office, you must
add them in the Telephone Number field. Consider the following.
•
Short Code: 91800N;
•
Telephone: 1800N
•
Feature: Dial
•
Line Group ID: 0
The user dials "918005551212". The match is made on the string to the above short code. If the "1800"
did not appear in the Telephone Number field, "5551212" would be what got sent out.
If the line requires "*" codes to access features, or you would like to make use of your line Provider's
features (Call ID Block), simply add the appropriate "*" code as part of the Telephone Number field.
The same holds true for long distance carrier access code numbers. Simply add the access code as part
of the Telephone Number field.
•
In the United States, short codes that use Line Groups that contain PRI lines need to have the
Short Code end with a ";" because the PRI protocol must have certain parameters that require
the entire dialed number. Analog (Loop and Ground Start) lines do not require this, so short
codes associated with only these types of lines can be configured without the ";". If you have a
group that contains either PRI or T1 emulating analog lines, use the ";".
Using the Y Character
The "Y" character, used in the Telephone Number field when creating a short code, is designed to send
the digits following the "Y" as DTMF tones. This option differs from the "D" option in that the digits
following the Y in the Short Code are sent as DTMF tones on reception of either a Progress or Call
Proceeding message from the Line Provider, whereas the "D" option sends the digits as DTMF tones
only after a "Connect" message is received.
For example, the "Y" character would be necessary at a site where they have signed up with their
telephone service provider to withhold long distance dialing until a DTMF pin/account number is entered
that initiates the call progress/proceeding message.
The following example demonstrates how the Y character can be used.
Short Code: 91N;
Telephone: 1NY2345
Feature: Dial
In the above sample short code, 1 represents the long distance access, N represents the telephone
number and 2345 represents the DTMF pin/account number.
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Short Codes
Default System Short Code List
This section lists the default system short codes. It shows the Short Code, the Telephone Number, the
Feature and the Line Group ID. Blank indicates that the field is left blank.
Code
*00
*01
*02
*03
*04
*05
*06
*07*N#
*08
*09
*10*N#
*11*N#
*12*N#
*13*N#
*14*N#
*15
*16
*17
*18
*19
*20*N#
*21*N#
Telephone
Number
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank
N
Blank
Blank
N
N
N
N
N
Blank
Blank
?U
Blank
Blank
N
N
Line
Group
CancelAllForwarding
0
ForwardUnconditionalOn
0
ForwardUnconditionalOff
0
ForwardOnBusyOn
0
ForwardOnBusyOff
0
ForwardOnNoAnswerOn
0
ForwardOnNoAnswerOff
0
ForwardNumber
0
DoNotDisturbOn
0
DoNotDisturbOff
0
DoNotDisturbExceptionAdd 0
DoNotDisturbExceptionDel 0
FollowMeHere
0
FollowMeHereCancel
0
FollowMeTo
0
CallWaitingOn
0
CallWaitingOff
0
VoicemailCollect
0
VoicemailOn
0
VoicemailOff
0
SetHuntGroupNightService 0
ClearHuntGroupNightService 0
*22*N#
*29
*30
*31
*32*N#
*33*N#
*34
*35*N#
*36
*37*N#
*38*N#
*39
*40
*41
*42
*43
*44
*45*N#
*46
*47
*48
N
Blank
Blank
Blank
N
N
Blank
N
Blank
N
N
1
1
1
2
2
2
N
Blank
Blank
Blank
SuspendCall
ToggleCalls
CallPickupAny
CallPickupGroup
CallPickupExtn
CallQueue
HoldMusic
ExtnLogin
ExtnLogout
ParkCall
RideCall
RelayOn
RelayOff
RelayPulse
RelayOn
RelayOff
RelayPulse
AcquireCall
AcquireCall
ConferenceAdd
VoicemailRingbackOn
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Feature
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
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Manager 3.0
*49
*50
*51
*52
*53*N#
*57*N#
*70*N#
*71*N#
*DSSN
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank
N
N
N
";[0]151 –
ERR'-N
";[0]151 –
ERR'-N
";[0]151 –
ERR'-N
0N
1N
N
N
*SDN
*SKN
[9]0N;
[9]1N;
[9]N;
[9]
xxxxxxxxxxx;
9
.
911
911
?
.
VoicemailRingbackOff
ForwardHuntgroupOn
ForwardHuntgroupOff
Cancel or Deny
CallPickupMembers
ForwardOnBusyNumber
DialPhysicalExtnByNumber
DialPhysicalExtnByID
DisplayMsg
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
DisplayMsg
0
DisplayMsg
0
Dial3K1
Dial3K1
Dial3K1
Dial3K1
0
0
0
0
SecondaryDialTone
Dial
Dial
0
0
0
Suggested minimum configuration
•
Code
Telephone
Number
Feature
Line
Group
*17
?U
VoicemailCollect 0
*30
Blank
CallPickupAny
0
?
.
Dial
0
Note: The "Follow Me Here" (*12*N#) and "Follow Me To" (*14*N#) functions can be canceled by
using *14*# on the user's original extension.
With the default short codes, the following will happen:
•
All calls preceded by 9 will receive secondary dial tone.
•
International numbers follow the "[9]0N;" short code.
•
Long Distance numbers use the "[9]1N;" short code.
•
Local (7 digits) numbers use the "[9]N;" short code.
•
Local (10 digit) numbers use the "9xxxxxxxxxx" short code.
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Short Code Features
Short Code Feature Overview
The options within the Feature field represents what the short code does when the user dials it. Every
short code requires a selected feature. In this section, the short code features are presented in
conjunction with button programming for DSS keys. Regardless of how the short code features are
implemented, the actual function of the features are the same. Certain short code features are not
programmable on DSS keys; where this is applicable, it is stated as such.
Information relating to each feature as programmed for display phones takes the following form:
•
Feature name: Busy, Busy on Held, Call Intrude, etc. for example.
•
A short description of the feature's usage.
•
Telephone Number: Data required by the feature. Some features do not require any data
entered in this field.
•
Button Programming: Path to the feature when applied to a DSS key.
•
Toggles: States whether the DSS key and the programmed short code reverses the feature
when activated again or not. A Yes implies that the feature has toggle capability and a No implies
it does not.
•
Label: Name shown next to the display key if set on 2420 or 4620 telephones.
Short codes are a flexible and quick way of setting up certain features. Because of their flexibility, the
procedure for setting up short codes can seem a little vague for people who are unfamiliar with them. To
help you get familiar with them, we have provided sample short codes for each corresponding feature.
Remember that short codes can be set on a system-wide or user basis and many default short codes
have already been created by the system.
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The available features are presented in the table below:
•
Busy
•
Follow Me Here
•
Busy On Held
•
Follow Me Here Cancel
•
Call Intrude
•
Follow Me To
•
Call Listen
•
Forward Hunt Group Calls On
•
Call Pickup Any
•
Forward Hunt Group Calls Off
•
Call Pickup Extn
•
Forward Number
•
Call Pickup Group
•
Forward On Busy Number
•
Call Pickup Members
•
Forward On Busy On
•
Call Queue
•
Forward On Busy Off
•
Call Record
•
Forward On No Answer On
•
Call Steal
•
Forward On No Answer Off
•
Call Waiting On
•
Forward Unconditional On
•
Call Waiting Off
•
Forward Unconditional Off
•
Call Waiting Suspend
•
Headset Toggle
•
Cancel All Forwarding
•
Hold Call
•
Cancel Ring Back When Free
•
Hold CW
•
Channel Monitor
•
Hold Music
•
Clear Call
•
Hunt Group Disable
•
Clear CW
•
Hunt Group Enable
•
Clear Hunt Group Night Service
•
Off Hook Station
•
Clear Hunt Group Out Of Service
•
Park Call
•
Clear Quota
•
Priority Call
•
Conference Add
•
Record Greeting
•
Conference Meet Me
•
Relay On
•
CW
•
Relay Off
•
Dial
•
Relay Pulse
•
Dial 3K1
•
Resume Call
•
Dial 56K
•
Retrieve Call
•
Dial 64K
•
Ride Call
•
Dial CW
•
Ring Back When Free
•
Dial Direct
•
Secondary Dial Tone
•
Dial Emergency
•
Set Absent Text
•
Dial Extn
•
Set Account Code
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Short Codes
•
Dial Inclusion
•
Set Hunt Group Night Service
•
Dial Paging
•
Set Hunt Group Out Of Service
•
DialPhysicalNumberByExtension
•
Set Inside Call Seq
•
DialPhysicalNumberByID
•
Set No Answer Time
•
Dial Speech
•
Set Outside Call Seq
•
Dial V110
•
Set Ringback Seq
•
Dial V120
•
Set Wrap Up Time
•
Dial Video
•
Suspend Call
•
Display Msg
•
Suspend CW
•
Do Not Disturb Exception Add
•
Toggle Calls
•
Do Not Disturb Exception Delete
•
Voicemail Collect
•
Do Not Disturb On
•
Voicemail Node
•
Do Not Disturb Off
•
Voicemail On
•
Extn Login
•
Voicemail Off
•
Extn Logout
•
Voicemail Ringback On
•
Flash Hook
•
Voicemail Ringback Off
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Busy
Provide busy signal to the user. This is useful for barring numbers - it provides a busy tone when the
barred number is dialed. See Call Restriction for a sample short code using the Busy feature.
The following forms apply to the Busy feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Busy | Busy (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Busy (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
Busy On Held
When on, busy on held returns busy to new calls when the user has an existing call on hold. This short
code feature is useful when a user does not want to be distracted by an additional incoming call when
s/he has a call on hold. This feature is also configurable in Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Busy On Held feature:
•
Telephone Number: Y or 1 for on, N or 0 for off.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Busy | Busy on Held (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: BusyH (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Sample short codes using the Busy on Held feature (via Manager):
Turning Busy on Held on
If on, when the user has a call on hold, new calls receive busy tone (ringing if analog) or are diverted to
Voicemail if enabled, rather than ringing the user. Note: this overrides call waiting when the user has a
call on hold.
•
Short Code: *12
•
Telephone Number: Y
•
Feature: BusyOnHeld
Turning Busy on Held off
Another short code must be created to turn the Busy on Held feature off. If off, when the uses has a call
on hold, new calls will still get directed to the user.
•
Short Code: *13
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: BusyOnHeld
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Call Intrude
Intrudes on the existing call of the specified target extension. All call parties are put into a conference
and can talk.
Use of this feature is subject to the Can Intrude status of the intruder and the Cannot be Intruded
status of the other call parties. For a sample short code using the Call Intrude feature, see Call Intrusion.
The following forms apply to the Call Intrude feature:
•
Telephone Number: Target extension number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Call Intrude (specific to the DSS keys).
•
Label: Intru (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Call Listen
This feature will allow a user to listen to another conversation. The extension the user is listening to must
be a member of their Monitor group. This feature can be useful for training purposes. For a sample short
code using the Call Listen feature, see How to Monitor Calls.
The following forms apply to the Call Listen feature:
•
Telephone Number: Target extension number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Call Listen (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Listn (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Call Pickup Any
Pick up any (the first available) ringing call. This short code feature is useful if a user is sitting in close
proximity to a hunt group and all members of that group is busy when another call comes in; instead of
letting it go to Voicemail, the user can use this feature to pick up the call.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Call Pickup Any (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: PickA (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is an example of the short code
setup:
•
Short Code: *30
•
Feature: CallPickupAny
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Call Pickup Extn
Pick up a ringing call from a specific extension. This feature is useful if people at the managerial/director
level want their personal assistants to have the ability to answer their incoming calls.
The following forms apply to the Call Pickup Extn feature:
•
Telephone Number: Target extension number.
•
Button Programming: No (specific to DSS keys).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is an example of the short code
setup:
•
Short Code: *32*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: CallPickupAny
N represents the specific extension. For example, if a user dials *32*201#, s/he will pick up the call
coming into extension 201.
Call Pickup Group
Pick up a call ringing any hunt group of which the user is a member. This feature is useful in situations
where a user is a member of a hunt group that is set to the Linear ring mode (each extension is rung in
order) and the user sees that all other members are on the telephone, this user can use the Call Pickup
Group feature to pick up the call rather than wait for it to get to the right extension.
The following forms apply to the Call Pickup Group feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Call Pickup Group (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: PickG (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is an example of the short code
setup:
•
Short Code: *31
•
Feature: CallPickupGroup
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Short Codes
Call Pickup Members
This feature can be used to pick up any call to an extension that is a member of the Hunt Group
specified. The incoming call can be as a result of a DID call to that extension, an internal call to that
extension or an internal or external call to the Hunt Group. This feature is useful in situations where there
are several hunt groups within close proximity of one another and the user is not a member of any one
group but is tasked with assisting these groups in times of heavy call volumes. This short code gives the
user the ability to choose which hunt group call to pick up, without having to be a member of that group.
The following forms apply to the Call Pickup Group feature:
•
Telephone Number: Group number or "Group name".
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Call Pickup Members (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: PickM (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is an example of the short code
setup:
•
Short Code: *53*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: CallPickupMembers
N represents the extension number of the Hunt Group. For example, if a user dials *53*500#, s/he will
pick up the call coming into extension 500 (a hunt group's extension).
Call Queue
Queue the current call to the destination phone, even when the destination phone is busy. This is the
same as a transfer except it allows you to transfer to a busy phone.
The following forms apply to the Call Queue feature:
•
Telephone Number: Target extension number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Call Queue (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Queue (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is an example of the short code
setup:
•
Short Code: *33*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: CallQueue
N representing the extension the caller wishes to queue for. For example, if a user dials *33*201# while
connected to a caller, this caller will be queued for extension 201.
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Call Record
This feature allows you to record a conversation on the extension specified in the short code. To make
use of this, refer to the Voicemail Pro documentation as VMPro is required to make use of this feature.
Refer to your local regulations in relation to recording calls. For certain markets, this feature can be
useful for training purposes.
The following forms apply to the Call Record feature:
•
Telephone Number: Target extension number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Call Record (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Recor (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Below are sample short codes using the Call Record feature (via Manager).
Record another extension's call
•
Short Code: *54*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: CallRecord
N representing the extension to be recorded. For example, if a user dials *54*201#, s/he will record
extension 201's current call onto the mailbox destination as configured in the Manual Recording
Mailbox field in User | VoiceRecording.
Record your own extension's call
•
Short Code: *55
•
Telephone Number: None
•
Feature: CallRecord
To use this short code, the user should place the call on hold and dial *55. You will automatically be
reconnected to the call when recording begins.
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Short Codes
Acquire Call/Call Steal
If your PC is set to US English, the feature is labeled "Acquire Call"; if it is set to UK English, it is labeled
"Call Steal". Takes over the call currently on the specified extension number or reclaim the user's last
transferred call.
The following forms apply to the Acquire Call feature:
•
Telephone Number: Target extension number or blank for last call transferred.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Call Steal (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Steal (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
The two short codes below are defaults within the Manager configuration. Sample setups are provided
for your reference.
Taking Over a Call
•
Short Code: *45*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: AcquireCall
N representing the extension to be taken over. For example, if a user dials *45*201#, s/he takes over the
current call on extension 201.
Reclaiming a Call
This short code reclaims the last call from your extension. This function is useful when you want to catch
a call you have just missed that has gone off to Voicemail. The RECLAIM function in the Phone
Manager application also performs this function.
•
Short Code: *46
•
Feature: AcquireCall
If a user dials *46 immediately after a call has transferred to Voicemail, s/he can reclaim the call,
provided the caller has not disconnected.
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Call Waiting On
Enables call waiting on the user's extension, which allows a user who is already on a call to be made
aware of another call to her/his extension.
Note: If the user has call appearance buttons programmed, call waiting will not get activated. The next
incoming call will appear on an available call appearance button. When there are no available call
appearance buttons, the next incoming call will receive busy tone.
See Call Waiting for more information on its usage.
The "Call Waiting" feature is also configurable via Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Call Waiting On feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Call Waiting On (specific to DSS keys).
•
Toggles: Yes.
•
Label: CWOn (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup:
•
Short Code: *15
•
Feature: CallWaitingOn
To turn call waiting off, see Call Waiting Off.
Call Waiting Off
Disables Call Waiting on this Extension. The "Call Waiting" feature is also configurable via Phone
Manager.
Note: If the user has call appearance buttons programmed, call waiting will not get activated. The next
incoming call will appear on an available call appearance button. When there are no available call
appearance buttons, the next incoming call will receive busy tone.
The following forms apply to the Call Waiting Off feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Call Waiting Off (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: CWOff (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup:
•
Short Code: *16
•
Feature: CallWaitingOff
To turn call waiting on, see Call Waiting On.
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Short Codes
Call Waiting Suspend
This uses the Q.931 Hold facility and "holds" the incoming call at the ISDN exchange, freeing the ISDN B
channel. The current call is placed in slot 0 at the exchange or the slot specified. Only available if
supported by the ISDN exchange.
The following forms apply to the Call Waiting Suspend feature:
•
Telephone Number: Blank or specific exchange slot number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Call Waiting Suspend (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: CWSus (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *70
•
Feature: CallWaitingSuspend
Cancel All Forwarding
Cancels all forms of forwarding on the user's extension including "Follow Me" and Do Not Disturb".
The following forms apply to the Cancel All Forwarding feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Cancel All Forwarding (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: FwdOf (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *00
•
Feature: CancelCallForwarding
To set up short codes for the following Forwarding features, see:
•
Forward Hunt Group Calls On
•
Forward Hunt Group Calls Off
•
Forward Number
•
Forward On Busy Number
•
Forward On Busy On
•
Forward On Busy Off
•
Forward On No Answer On
•
Forward On No Answer Off
•
Forward Unconditional On
•
Forward Unconditional Off
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Cancel Ring Back When Free
Cancels any existing ring back (also known as callback) set by the user. The following forms apply to the
Cancel Ring Back when Free feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Miscellaneous | Cancel Ring Back When Free (specific to
DSS keys).
•
Label: RBak- (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Cancel Ring Back When Free feature (via Manager):
Cancel Ring Back When Free
This example Short Code will cancel Ring Back When Free on the specified extension.
•
Short Code: *84*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: CancelRingBackWhenFree
N represents the target extension from which you have set the ring back. For example, if Paul has set a
ring back on extension 201, he must dial *84*201# to cancel that ring back request.
To enable the ring back feature, see Ring Back When Free.
Channel Monitor
For Avaya use only.
•
Telephone Number: Channel.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Channel Monitor.
•
Label: ChMon.
Cancel or Deny/Clear Call
If your PC is set to US English, the feature is labeled "Cancel or Deny"; if it is set to UK English, it is
labeled "Clear Call". This feature can be used to end the current call.
The following forms apply to the Cancel or Deny feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Clear Call (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Clear (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *52
•
Feature: Cancel or Deny/ClearCall
The above short code can be used in a situation where you are doing a supervised transfer and the party
to be transferred to does not want to take the call. In this scenario, you can put the call on hold and dial
*52. This will clear the last connected call (the party who has just refused the transfer) and retrieve the
original call.
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Short Codes
Clear CW
This feature is most commonly used to end the user's current call and answer the waiting call.
Note: If the user has call appearance buttons programmed, call waiting will not get activated. The next
incoming call will appear on an available call appearance button. When there are no available call
appearance buttons, the next incoming call will receive busy tone.
The following forms apply to the Clear Call Waiting (CW) feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Clear CW (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: ClrCW (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *26
•
Feature: ClearCW
Clear Hunt Group Night Service
Changes the specified hunt group from 'Night Service' mode to 'In Service' mode. Note: This will not
override a time profile if set.
The following forms apply to the Clear Hunt Group Night Service feature:
•
Telephone Number: Group number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Clear Hunt Group Night Service (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: HGNS- (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *21*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: ClearHuntGroupNightService
N represents the telephone number of the hunt group to be taken out of "Night Service" mode and
placed into "In Service" mode. For example, when *21*201# is dialed, the hunt group associated with
extension 201 will be taken out of "Night Service" mode.
To place a hunt group into "Night Service" mode, see Set Hunt Group Night Service.
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Clear Hunt Group Out Of Service
Changes the specified hunt group from 'Out of Service' mode to 'In Service' mode Note: this will not
override time profile settings.
The following forms apply to the Clear Hunt Group Out Of Service feature:
•
Telephone Number: Group number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Clear Hunt Group Out of Service (specific to DSS
keys).
•
Label: HGOS- (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Clear Hunt Group Out Of Service feature.
•
Short Code: *55*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: ClearHuntGroupOutOfService
N represents the telephone number of the hunt group to be taken out of "Out of Service" mode. For
example, when *55*201# is dialed, the hunt group associated with extension 201 will be placed into "In
Service" mode.
To create a short code for placing a hunt group into "Out Of Service" mode, see Set Hunt Group Out Of
Service.
Clear Quota
Refreshes the quota for all services or a specific service. See Quotas and Timebands for an
understanding of quotas and a short code example using the Clear Quota feature.
The following forms apply to the Clear Quota feature:
•
Telephone Number: "Service name" or "" (all services).
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Clear Quota (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Quota (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
Conference Add
Places all calls the user has on hold into a conference with the user. This feature is useful for impromptu
conferences .
The following forms apply to the Conference Add feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Conference Add (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Conf+ (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *47
•
Feature: ConferenceAdd
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Short Codes
Conference Meet Me
This feature allows a user to join a specific conference. See Using Conference Meet Me for more
information on IP Office's conferencing feature and sample short codes.
The following forms apply to the Conference Meet Me feature:
•
Telephone Number: Conference number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Conference Meet Me (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: CnfRV (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
CW
Pick up the waiting call. Provides same functionality as pressing the Recall or Hold key on the phone. As
opposed to the Clear CW feature, this feature does not disconnect you from the existing call when the
second call is picked up.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: No (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
Dial
This short code feature allows users to dial the number specified to an outside line.
The following forms apply to the Dial feature:
•
Telephone Number: Telephone number
•
Button Programming: Dial (specific to DSS keys)
•
Label: Telephone number (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones)
Sample short codes using the Dial feature (via Manager) are provided below.
Creating a Speed Dial
In this example, user(s) entering 401 on their telephone key pad will dial the New Jersey Office on 212
555 0000.
•
Short Code: 401
•
Telephone Number: 1 212 555 0000
•
Line Group ID: 0
•
Feature: Dial
Replace Outgoing Caller ID
This short code is useful in a "call center" environment where you do not want customers to have access
to the number of your direct line; you want the general office number displayed. The sample short code
below will force the outgoing caller ID to display 123. Note: The usability of this feature is dependent
upon your local service provider.
•
Short Code: ?
•
Telephone Number: .s123
•
Feature: Dial
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External Dial Prefix
This short code is for dialing a prefix for an outside line (for a group that contains PRI lines).
•
Short Code: 9N;
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: Dial
N represents the external number you want to call.
Analog and/or T1 Lines
The short code is for dialing a prefix for an outside line (for analog - Loop or Ground Start - and T1 lines
or a combination of the two).
•
Short Code: 9N
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: Dial
N represents the external number you want to call.
Blocking Caller ID
This is for blocking Caller ID for external calls.
•
Short Code: 9N
•
Telephone Number: NW
•
Feature: Dial
This feature can be applied to specific external numbers or to all out going calls. In most situations, the
company will choose to block the caller ID for all external calls or leave it available for all external calls.
Maximum Call Length
The character t can be used in dialing short codes to set the maximum allowed duration of a call.
For example, the following short code will dial a number but then disconnect the call after 20 minutes
(plus or minus a minute).
•
Short Code: 9N
•
Telephone Number: Nt(20)
•
Line Group ID: 0
•
Feature: Dial
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Dial 3K1
Sets the ISDN bearer capabilities to 3.1Khz audio call.
The following forms apply to the Dial 3K1 feature:
•
Telephone Number: Telephone number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Dial 3K1 (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: D3K1 (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Dial 3K1 feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *97*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: Dial3K1
N represents the phone number to be dialed and charged at the 3K1 rate (if it is supported on your
ISDN). For example, a call that is dialed by entering *97*14085551234# will be charged at the 3k1 rate.
Dial 56K
Sets the ISDN bearer capabilities to 56Kbps data call.
The following forms apply to the Dial 56K feature:
•
Telephone Number: Telephone number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Dial 56K (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: D56K (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Dial 56K feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *97*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: Dial56K
N represents the phone number to be dialed and charged at the 56K rate (if it is supported on your
ISDN). For example, a call that is dialed by entering *97*14085551234# will be charged at the 56K rate.
Dial 64K
Sets the ISDN bearer capabilities to 64Kbps data call.
The following forms apply to the Dial 64K feature:
•
Telephone Number: Telephone number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Dial 64K (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: D64K (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Dial 64K feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *97*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: Dial64K
N represents the phone number to be dialed and charged at the 64K rate (if it is supported on your
ISDN). For example, a call that is dialed by entering *97*14085551234# will be charged at the 64K rate.
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Dial CW
Call the specified extension number and force call waiting indication on if the extension is already on a
call.
Note: If the user has call appearance buttons programmed, call waiting will not get activated. The next
incoming call will appear on an available call appearance button. When there are no available call
appearance buttons, the next incoming call will receive busy tone.
The following forms apply to the Dial CW feature:
•
Telephone Number: Extension number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Dial CW (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: DCW (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Dial CW feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *97*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: DialCW
N represents the extension number to be dialed. For example, a user dialing *97*201# will force call
waiting indication on at extension 201 (if extn. 201 is already on a call).
Dial Direct
Call the extension specified and force automatic answer if supported by the telephone type.
The following forms apply to the Dial Direct feature:
•
Telephone Number: Extension number
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Dial | Dial Direct (specific to DSS keys)
•
Label: Dirct (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones)
Below is a sample short code using the Dial Direct feature (via Manager).
This allows the extension specified to be automatically answered.
•
Short Code: *83*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: DialDirect
N represents the extension that will be forced to automatically answer. For example, when a user dials
*83*201#, extension 201 will be forced to automatically answer the call.
Dial Direct Hot Line
Typically, when a line appearance key is selected, secondary dial tone is generated. When the line
appearance is mapped to a short code using the DialDirectHotLine short code feature, no secondary
dial tone is generated and the number is dialed directly.
Below is a sample short code using the DialDirectHotLine feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *83*
•
Telephone Number: .
•
Feature: DialDirectHotLine
N represents the extension that will be forced to automatically answer. For example, when a user dials
*83*201#, extension 201 will be forced to automatically answer the call.
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Dial Emergency
Dials the number specified regardless of any call barring applicable to the user. The DialEmergency
short code feature can be used to allow any number to override the Outward Restricted option.
The following forms apply to the Dial Emergency feature:
•
Telephone Number: Telephone number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Dial Emergency (specific to DSS keys)
•
Label: Emrgy (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones)
Below is a sample short code using the Dial Emergency feature:
Use Dial Emergency
To allow access to emergency services (eg. 911) even though Call Restriction barring has been set for a
User, a short code should be created for each emergency number.
For example:
•
Short Code: 911
•
Telephone Number: 911
•
Line Group ID: 0
•
Feature: DialEmergency
Dial Extn
This feature can be used to dial an internal extension number.
The following forms apply to the Dial feature:
•
Telephone Number: Extension number.
•
Button Programming: No (specific to DSS keys).
Below are sample short codes using the Dial Extn feature (via Manager).
Internal Extension Speed Dial
When the user dials 100, this short code rings the internal extension 201. This short code can be useful
if the receptionist's extension is an obscure one that is difficult to remember, so a short code can be
created to assign a default, easy to remember number for access to the receptionist.
•
Short Code: 100
•
Telephone Number: 201
•
Feature: DialExtn
Dial on Pick up
The following user short code dials the extension specified the moment the user's handset it is picked
up.
•
Short Code: ?D
•
Telephone Number: 201
•
Line Group ID: 0
•
Feature: DialExtn
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Dial Inclusion
Intrudes on the existing call of the specified target extension. The intruder and the target extension can
then talk but cannot be heard by the other party.
During the intrusion all parties hear a repeated intrusion tone. When the intruder hangs-up the original
call parties are reconnected.
Use of this feature is subject to the Can Intrude status (configured in Manager via the User form's
Telephony tab) of the intruder and the target extension (the extension to be intruded upon).
The following forms apply to the Dial Inclusion feature:
•
Telephone Number: Target extension number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Dial | Dial Inclusion (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Inclu (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Dial Inclusion feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *97*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: DialInclusion
N represents the extension to be intruded upon. For example, if a user dials *97*201# while extension
201 is on a call, then the user is intruding into extn. 201's current call.
Dial Paging
Makes a paging call to an extension or group. The target extension or group members must support
page calls. For a sample of a short code using the Dial Paging feature, see Group Paging.
The following forms apply to the Dial Paging feature:
•
Telephone Number: Extension or group number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Dial | Dial Paging (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Page (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
DialPhysicalExtensionByNumber
Dial a specified extension number regardless of the current user logged on at that extension and any
forwarding, follow me or do not disturb settings applied by the extension user.
This function is currently only available on US based systems as part of E911 requirements.
•
Telephone Number: Extension number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Dial | Dial Physical Extn By Number (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: PhyEx (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Dial Physical Extn By Number feature.
•
Short Code: *97
•
Telephone Number: 911
•
Feature: DialPhysicalExtnByNumber
This short code will allow a user to dial *97 to reach the emergency services department (911)
regardless of the current user logged on at that extension and any forwarding, follow me or do not
disturb settings applied by the extension user.
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Short Codes
DialPhysicalNumberByID
Dial a specific extension using its system ID. This may be necessary in hot desking environments where
some extensions have been created with no default extension number. Without an extension number, a
call can not be made to that extension unless a short code is created.
The following forms apply to the DialPhysicalNumberByID feature:
•
Telephone Number: Extension ID
•
Button Programming: No (specific to DSS keys).
Below is a sample short code using the DialPhysicalNumberByID feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *97
•
Telephone Number: 16
•
Feature: DialPhysicalNumberByID
In the above example, if the telephone at extension ID 16 is not associated with an extension number, a
user can dial *97 to connect to that phone.
Dial Speech
This feature allows a short code to be created to force the outgoing call to use the Speech bearer
capability.
•
Telephone Number: Telephone number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Dial | Dial Speech (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: DSpch (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Dial Speech feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *97*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: DialSpeech
N represents the phone number of the outgoing call using the speech bearer capability. For example, if a
user dials *97*14085551234#, this outgoing call will use the speech bearer capability.
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Dial V110
Sets the ISDN bearer capabilities to V110. The call is presented to local exchange as a "Data Call". It is
ideal for some bulletin boards.
The following forms apply to the Dial V110 feature:
•
Telephone Number: Telephone number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Dial V110 (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: DV110 (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Dial V110 feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *97*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: DialV110
N represents the phone number of the outgoing call that will have the V110 ISDN bearer capability
applied to it. For example, if a user dials *97*14085551234#, this outgoing call will have the V110 ISDN
bearer capability applied to it.
Dial V120
Sets the ISDN bear capabilities using V.120. The call is presented to local exchange as a "Data Call".
This will run at speeds up to 64K per channel but has a slightly higher Protocol overhead than pure 64K
operation. Useful for some bulletin board systems as it allows the destination to run at a different
asynchronous speed to the calling end.
•
Telephone Number: Telephone number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Dial V120 (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: DV120 (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Dial V120 feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *97*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: DialV120
N represents the phone number of the outgoing call that will have the ISDN bearer capabilities using
V.120 applied to it. For example, if a user dials *97*14085551234#, this outgoing call will have the V.120
ISDN bearer capabilities applied to it.
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Dial Video
Sets the call protocol to Sync PPP, ISDN rate is set to 64000 bps. The call is presented to the local
exchange as a "Video Call".
The following forms apply to the Dial Video feature:
•
Telephone Number: Telephone number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Dial Video (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Dvide (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Dial Video feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *97*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: DialVideo
N represents the phone number of the outgoing call that will use the Sync PPP protocol. For example, if
a user dials *97*14085551234#, this outgoing call will have the Sync PPP protocol applied to it.
Display Msg
Allows the sending of special functions to DS port display phone extensions. The telephone number
takes the format xxxx;[0)nnn/ppppppp where:
•
xxx is the target extension.
•
nnn is the Definity feature number.
•
ppppppp is the parameter data (if required).
•
Telephone Number: See above.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Dial | Display Msg.
•
Label: Displ.
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Do Not Disturb Exception Add
Adds a number to the user's "Do Not Disturb Exception List". This can be an internal extension number
or external CLI. This feature is also available on Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Do Not Disturb Exception Add feature:
•
Telephone Number: Telephone number or CLI.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Do Not Disturb | Do Not Disturb Exception Add (specific to
DSS keys).
•
Label: DNDX+ (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *10*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: DoNotDisturbExceptionAdd
N represents the extension or telephone number to be added to the user's "Do Not Disturb Exception
List". For example, when a user has "Do Not Disturb" turned on and dials *10*4085551234#, incoming
calls from telephone number (408) 555-1234 will be allowed through because it has been added to the
"Do Not Disturb Exception List". All other calls, except those numbers on the exception list, either hear
busy tones or are re-directed to voicemail.
To program a short code for deleting a number from the "Do Not Disturb Exception List", see Do Not
Disturb Exception Delete.
Do Not Disturb Exception Delete
Removes a number from the user's "Do Not Disturb Exception List". This feature is also available on
Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Do Not Disturb Exception Delete feature:
•
Telephone Number: Telephone number or CLI.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Do Not Disturb | Do Not Disturb Exception Delete (specific to
DSS keys).
•
Label: DNDX- (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *11*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: DoNotDisturbExceptionDel
N represents the extension or telephone number to be deleted from the user's "Do Not Disturb Exception
List". For example, when a user has "Do Not Disturb" turned on and the telephone number (408) 5551234 on her/his "Do Not Disturb Exception List", dialing *10*4085551234# will remove this phone
number from the list. Incoming calls from (408) 555-1234 will no longer be allowed through; they will
either hear a busy tone or are re-directed to voicemail.
To program a short code for adding a number to the "Do Not Disturb Exception List", see Do Not Disturb
Exception Add.
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Do Not Disturb On
Places the users into 'do not disturb' mode. For an overview of the Do Not Disturb related features, see
Do Not Disturb.
This feature is also available on Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Do Not Disturb On feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Do Not Disturb | Do Not Disturb On (specific to DSS keys).
•
Toggles: Yes.
•
Label: DNDOn (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *08
•
Feature: DoNotDisturbOn
To program a short code for turning "Do Not Disturb" off, see Do Not Disturb Off.
Do Not Disturb Off
Cancels the user's 'do not disturb' mode if set. This feature is also available on Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Do Not Disturb Off feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Do Not Disturb | Do Not Disturb On (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: DNDOf (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *09
•
Feature: DoNotDisturbOff
To program a short code for turning "Do Not Disturb" on, see Do Not Disturb On.
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Extn Login
This feature allows a user to take over ownership of an Extension. The Telephone Number entered is the
"Extension*Login Code" of the required User. Users' login codes are set within the User | Telephony tab.
The following forms apply to the Extn Login feature:
•
Telephone Number: Extension Number*Login Code of agent or hot desk user.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Extn | Extn Login (specific to DSS keys)
•
Toggles: Yes.
•
Label: Login (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones)
Below is are sample short codes using the Extn Login feature (via Manager).
Individual Hot Desking
This short code allows a user to log onto another user's extension with her/his own extension settings.
•
Short Code: 299
•
Telephone Number: 204*1234
•
Feature: Extnlogin
Based on the above sample short code, Paul (extension 204) can go to another phone (even if it is
already logged on by another user) and log on as extension 204 by simply dialing 299. Once Paul has
logged onto this phone, extension 204 is logged out at Paul's original phone. For Paul to make use of
this short code, his login code set within User | Telephony must match that configured in the above short
code. When Paul logs out of the phone he has "borrowed", his original extension will automatically be
logged back on.
Log In
The default short code for logging into a phone is configured as shown below. N represents the users
extension number followed by a * and then their login code, eg. *35*401*123#.
•
Short Code: *35*N#
•
Telephone: N
•
Feature: ExtnLogin
For the default short code for logging off, see Extn Logout.
Extn Logout
Logs out a User from a telephone to which they had previously logged on. The following forms apply to
the Extn Logout feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Extn | Extn Logout (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Logof (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Extn Logout feature (via Manager).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration.
•
Short Code: *36
•
Feature: ExtnLogout
For the default short code for logging onto a phone, see Extn Login.
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Flash Hook
Sends a hook flash signal to the currently connected analog line.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Miscellaneous | Flash Hook (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Flash (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Flash Hook feature.
•
Short Code: *96
•
Feature: FlashHook
Follow Me Here
Causes calls to the extension number specified to be redirected to the extension initiating the 'Follow Me
Here'. If the redirected call receives a busy tone or is not answered, then the call behaves as though the
User's extension had failed to answer, eg. Forward settings take effect.
The following forms apply to the Follow Me Here feature:
•
Telephone Number: Extension to redirect.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Follow Me | Follow Me Here (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Here+ (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *12*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: FollowMeHere
This feature is set at the end destination extension, so N represents the extension number of the user
dialing the short code. For example, if Paul (whose extension is 224) wants his calls redirected to
extension 201, Paul needs to be at extn. 201 when he uses this short code by dialing the following:
*12*201#.
To program a short code for canceling the follow me here feature, see Follow Me Here Cancel.
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Follow Me Here Cancel
Cancels any 'Follow Me Here' set on the specified extension. Only works if entered at the extension from
which the original "Follow Me Here" was initiated.
The following forms apply to the Follow Me Here Cancel feature:
•
Telephone Number: Extension being redirected.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Follow Me | Follow Me Here Cancel (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Here- (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *13*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: FollowMeHereCancel
This feature is set at the end destination extension, so N represents the extension number of the user
dialing the short code. For example, if Paul (whose extension is 224) wants to cancel the redirect of his
calls to extension 201, Paul needs to be at extn. 201 when he uses this short code by dialing the
following: *13*201#.
To program a short code for activating the follow me here feature, see Follow Me Here.
Follow Me To
Causes calls to the extension initiating the 'Follow Me To' to be redirected to the extension specified. The
'Follow Me To' feature is also available in Phone Manager.
For an overview of the follow me feature, see Follow Me.
The following forms apply to the Follow Me To feature:
•
Telephone Number: Target extension number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Follow Me | Follow Me To (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: FolTo (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Once programmed, the button can be used to toggle this feature on/off.
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *14*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: FollowMeTo
This feature is set at the user's extension, so N represents the extension number the call will be
redirected to. For example, if Paul (whose extension is 224) wants his calls redirected to extension 201,
Paul needs to be at his phone (ext. 224) when he uses this short code by dialing *14*201#. The Follow
Me To feature can be canceled at the originating extension by using the same shortcode, but leaving the
target extension number blank. For example, if Paul wants to cancel the Follow Me To function, he
needs to be at his extension and then dial *14*#.
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Forward Hunt Group Calls On
Forward the user's hunt group calls to their forward number. Only works when a forward number is set
and forward unconditional is also on for the user being forwarded (functions configured via the
User|Forwarding tab or the respective short codes).
This feature is also available on Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Forward Hunt Group Calls On feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Forward | Forward Hunt Group Calls On (specific to DSS
keys).
•
Toggles: Yes.
•
Label: FwdH+ (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *50
•
Feature: ForwardHuntgroupCallsOn
This short code is useful if the hunt group member temporarily uses another workstation and so does not
require a permanent extension change.
To cancel the forwarding of the user's hunt group calls, see Forward Hunt Group Calls Off.
Forward Hunt Group Calls Off
Cancels the forwarding of the user's hunt group calls. This feature is also available on Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Forward Hunt Group Calls Off feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Forward | Forward Hunt Group Calls Off (specific to DSS
keys).
•
Label: FwdH- (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *51
•
Feature: ForwardHuntgroupCallsOff
To enable the forwarding of hunt group calls, see Forward Hunt Group Calls On.
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Forward Number
Sets the extension number to which calls are forwarded when using 'Forward Unconditional' and
'Forward Hunt Group'. This feature does NOT activate the forwarding, it only sets the number to be
forwarded to.
The forwarding number setup is also available on Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Forward Number feature:
•
Telephone Number: Telephone number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Forward | Forward Number (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: FwdNo (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *07N*#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: ForwardNumber
N represents the extension number to be forwarded to. For example, if Paul (whose extension is 224)
wants to set the forwarding number for his 'Forward Unconditional' or 'Forward Hunt Group' feature to
extension 201, Paul can dial *07*201# followed by the short code for the forwarding function.
Forward On Busy Number
Sets the extension number to which calls are forwarded when using 'Forward on Busy' and/or 'Forward
on No Answer'. This feature does NOT activate the forwarding, it only sets the number to be forwarded
to.
Note: If the user has call appearance buttons programmed, 'Forward on Busy' will not be activated until
all the call appearance buttons are in use.
The forward on busy number can also be set up on Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Forward On Busy Number feature:
•
Telephone Number: Telephone number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Forward | Forward on Busy Number (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: FwBNo (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *57N*#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: ForwardOnBusyNumber
N represents the extension number to be forwarded to. For example, if Paul (whose extension is 224)
wants to set the forwarding number for his 'Forward on Busy' and/or 'Forward on No Answer' feature to
extension 201, Paul can dial *57*201# followed by the short code for the forwarding function.
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Forward On Busy On
Enables forwarding to the 'Forward on Busy Number' when the user's extension is busy. Only works
when a forward on busy number is set for the user being forwarded (functions configured via the
User|Forwarding tab or the respective short code). If the user has call appearance buttons programmed,
the system will not treat the line as busy until all the call appearance buttons are in use.
This feature is also available on Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Forward on Busy On feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Forward | Forward on Busy On (specific to DSS keys).
•
Toggles: Yes.
•
Label: FwBOn (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. This short code can be used to toggle the
feature on/off. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *03
•
Feature: ForwardOnBusyOn
Remember that this short code is dependent upon having a 'Forward On Busy Number' configured.
To cancel the forward on busy feature, see Forward On Busy Off.
Forward On Busy Off
Disables forwarding when the user's extension is busy. This feature is also available on Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Forward On Busy Off feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Forward | Forward on Busy Off (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: FwBOf (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *04
•
Feature: ForwardOnBusyOff
To enable the forwarding when the user's extension is busy, see Forward On Busy On. If the user has
call appearance buttons programmed, 'Forward on Busy' will not be activated until all the call
appearance buttons are in use.
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Forward On No Answer On
Enables forwarding to the 'Forward on Busy Number' (configured via the User|Forwarding tab or the
corresponding short code) when the user's extension is not answered within the period defined by their
'No Answer Time' (configured via the User|Telephony tab).
This feature is also available on Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Forward On No Answer On feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Forward | Forward on No Answer On (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: FwNOn (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *05
•
Feature: ForwardOnNoAnswerOn
Remember that the forwarding number for this feature uses the 'Forward on Busy Number'.
To cancel the forward on no answer feature, see Forward On No Answer Off.
Forward On No Answer Off
Disables forwarding when the user's extension is not answered. This feature is also available on Phone
Manager.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Forward | Forward on No Answer Off (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: FwNOff (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *06
•
Feature: ForwardOnNoAnswerOff
To start forwarding calls when there is no answer, see Forward On No Answer On.
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Forward Unconditional On
Enables forwarding of all calls, except group calls, to the 'Forward Number' set for the user's extension.
To also forward hunt group calls to the same number 'Forward Hunt Group Call On' must also be used.
This feature requires having a forward number set and forward unconditional enabled for the user being
forwarded (functions configured via the User|Forwarding tab or the respective short codes).
This feature is also available on Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Forward Unconditional On feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Forward | Forward Unconditional On (specific to DSS keys).
•
Toggles: Yes.
•
Label: FwUOn (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. This short code can be used to toggle the
feature on/off. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *01
•
Feature: ForwardUnconditionalOn
Remember that this feature requires having a forward number configured.
To cancel the forward unconditional feature, see Forward Unconditional Off.
Forward Unconditional Off
Disables forwarding of all calls from the user's extension. Note: This does not disable 'Forward on No
Answer' and/or 'Forward on Busy' if also on.
This feature is also available on Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Forward Unconditional Off feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Forward | Forward Unconditional Off (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: FwUOf (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *02
•
Feature: ForwardUnconditionalOff
To activate the forward unconditional feature, see Forward Unconditional On.
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Headset Toggle
Toggles between the use of a headset and the telephone handset.
The following forms apply to the Headset Toggle feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Miscellaneous | Headset Toggle (specific to DSS keys).
•
Toggles: Yes.
•
Label: HdSet (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Headset Toggle feature (via Manager). This short code can be
used to toggle the feature on/off.
•
Short Code: *55
•
Feature: HeadsetToggle
If an Avaya supported headset is connected to your telephone, this short code can be used to toggle
between using the headset and the telephone handset.
Hold Call
This uses the Q.931 Hold facility, and "holds" the incoming call at the ISDN exchange, freeing up the
ISDN B channel. The Hold Call feature "holds" the current call to a slot. The current call is always
automatically placed into slot 0 if it has not been placed in a specified slot. Only available if supported by
the ISDN exchange. See also Retrieve Call .
•
Telephone Number: Exchange hold slot number or blank (slot 0).
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Hold | Hold Call (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Hold (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample short code using the
Hold Call feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *24*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: HoldCall
N represents the exchange hold slot number you want to hold the call on. For example, while connected
to a call, dialing *24*3# will hold the call onto slot 3 on the ISDN.
To retrieve the held call, see Retrieve Call.
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Hold CW
Place the user's current call on hold and answers the waiting call.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Hold | Hold CW (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: HoldCW (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample short code using the
Hold CW feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *27
•
Feature: HoldCW
Hold Music
Allows the user to listen to the system's music on hold. See Music On Hold for more information relating
to MOH.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Hold | Hold Music (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Music (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample short code using the
Hold Music feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *34
•
Feature: HoldMusic
Hunt Group Disable
Disables the user's membership of the specified hunt group. They will no longer receive call to that hunt
group until their membership is enabled again. To use this feature, you must already belong to the hunt
group.
The following forms apply to the Hunt Group Disable form:
•
Telephone Number: Group number (specific to DSS keys).
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Hunt Group | Hunt Group Disable (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: HGDis (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Hunt Group Disable feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *90*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: HuntGroupDisable
N represents the hunt group number from which the user wants to be disabled from. For example, if Paul
wants to be disabled from the Sales hunt group (extn. 500), he needs to dial *90*500#.
To enable a hunt group member's ability to receive calls to that hunt group, see Hunt Group Enable.
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Hunt Group Enable
Enables the user's membership of a hunt group so s/he can begin to receive calls to the specified hunt
group. To use this feature, the user must already belong to the hunt group. This short code can not be
used to add someone to a hunt group. This must be done within Manager's Hunt Group form.
The following forms apply to the Hunt Group Enable form:
•
Telephone Number: Group number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Hunt Group | Hunt Group Enable (specific to DSS keys).
•
Toggles: Yes.
•
Label: HGEna (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code can be used to toggle the feature on/off. Below is a sample short code using the Hunt
Group Enable feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *91*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: HuntGroupEnable
N represents the hunt group number for which the user wants to start receiving calls. For example, if
Paul is already a member of the sales hunt group (extn. 500) but has changed his availability status for
that hunt group, he can make himself available for receiving calls to the Sales hunt group again by
dialing *91*500#.
To disable a hunt group member's ability to receive calls to that hunt group, see Hunt Group Disable.
Off Hook Station
Enables or disables whether the user's extension acts as a fully hands free unit. Typically this is used
when the answering and clearing of calls is done through an application such as Phone Manager. This
feature is also configurable via Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Off Hook Station feature:
•
Telephone Number: "Y" for on or "N" for off.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Miscellaneous | Off Hook Station (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: OHStn (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Below are sample shorts code using the Off Hook Station feature.
Turning the off hook station off
•
Short Code: *99
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: OffHookStation
Turning the off hook station on
•
Short Code: *98
•
Telephone Number: Y
•
Feature: OffHookStation
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Park Call
Parks the user's current call into the specified park slot number. The call can then be retrieved by other
extensions (refer to the appropriate telephone user guide). The 'Ride Call' feature can be used to retrieve
calls from specific park slots.
Note: When programmed to a DSS key, the key's BLG lamp indicates when a call is parked in that park
slot. The key can also be used to retrieve the parked call.
The following forms apply to the Park Call feature:
•
Telephone Number: Park slot number.
•
Button Programming: Park (specific to DSS keys).
•
Toggles: Yes.
•
Label: Park (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. This short code can be used to toggle the
feature on/off. Below is a sample short code setup.
Parking a call is similar to holding and then transferring a call. It can be used in situations where you
need to prioritize calls for others to pick up.
•
Short Code: *37*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: ParkCall
N represents the park slot number in which the call will be parked. For example, if a user wants to park a
call to slot number 9, the user would dial *37*9#. The call will be parked there until retrieved by another
extension or the original extension.
Priority Call
Allows the user to call an extension that is set to 'do not disturb'.
The following forms apply to the Priority Call feature:
•
Telephone Number: Target extension number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Priority Call (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: PCall (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Priority Call feature.
•
Short Code: *71*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: PriorityCall
N represents the extension number to be called, despite the extension being set to 'do not disturb'. For
example, if extension 201 has 'do not disturb' enabled, a user can dial *71*201# and still get through.
This short code is useful for companies that frequently use the 'do not disturb' feature and can be given
to Managing Directors or people who may need to get through to people regardless of their 'do not
disturb' status.
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Record Greeting
For use with integrated Voicemail on Avaya IP Office - Small Office Edition systems. Allows the
recording of the greetings used by auto-attendant services.
•
Telephone Number: AA:Name.x where Name is the auto-attendant service name and x is the
greeting (1 = morning, 2 = afternoon, 3 = evening and 4 = options menu).
Relay On
Closes the specified switch in the system's external output (EXT O/P) port.
•
Telephone Number: Switch number (1 or 2).
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Relay | Relay On (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Rely+ (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is sample short code using the
Relay On feature (via Manager).
This short code is useful for companies that have external devices, such as door controls, connected to
the IP Office switch.
•
Short Code: *42
•
Telephone Number: 2
•
Feature: RelayOn
Based on this sample short code, a user dialing *42 is closing switch number 2 to activate an external
device.
To open a specific switch, see Relay Off.
Relay Off
Opens the specified switch in the system's external output (EXT O/P) port.
•
Telephone Number: Switch number (1 or 2).
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Relay | Relay Off (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Rely- (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is sample short code using the
Relay Off feature (via Manager).
This short code is useful for companies that have external devices, such as door controls, connected to
the IP Office switch.
•
Short Code: *43
•
Telephone Number: 2
•
Feature: RelayOff
Based on this sample short code, a user dialing *43 is opening switch number 2 to activate an external
device.
To close a specific switch, see Relay On.
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Relay Pulse
Closes the specified switch in the system's external output (EXT O/P) port for 5 seconds and then opens
the switch.
•
Telephone Number: Switch number (1 or 2).
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Relay | Relay Pulse (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Relay (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is sample short code using the
Relay Off feature (via Manager).
This short code is useful for companies that have external devices, such as door controls, connected to
the IP Office switch.
•
Short Code: *44
•
Telephone Number: 2
•
Feature: RelayPulse
Based on this sample short code, a user dialing *44 is opening switch number 2 to activate an external
device.
Resume Call
Resume a call previously suspended to the specified ISDN exchange slot. The suspended call may be
resumed from another phone/ISDN Control Unit on the same line. See also Suspend Call and Suspend
CW for information about suspended a call.
•
Telephone Number: Exchange suspend slot number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Resume Call (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Resum (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is sample short code using the
Resume Call feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *23*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: ResumeCall
N represents the exchange slot number from which the call has been suspended. For example, if a user
has suspended a call on slot number 4, this user can resume that call by dialing *23*4#.
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Retrieve Call
Retrieves a call previously held to a specific ISDN exchange slot. Only available when supported by the
ISDN exchange.
The following forms apply to the Retrieve Call feature:
•
Telephone Number: Exchange hold slot number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Retrieve Cal (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Retriv (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is sample short code using the
Retrieve Call feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *25*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: RetrieveCall
N represents the exchange slot number from which the call has been placed on hold. For example, if a
user has placed a call hold on slot number 4, the user can resume that call by dialing *25*4#.
To place a call on hold to a specific exchange slot, see Hold Call.
Ride Call
Retrieve a parked call from a specified system park slot.
The following forms apply to the Ride Call feature:
•
Telephone Number: System park slot number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Ride Call (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Ride (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample short code using the
Ride Call feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *38*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: RideCall
N represents the park slot number in which the call you want to retrieve was parked. For example, if a
user parked a call to slot number 9, you can retrieve that call by dialing *38*9#.
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Ring Back When Free
Sets a ringback on the specified extension. This sets a 'ringback when free' on an extension currently on
a call or a 'ringback when next used' for an extension that is free but does not answer.
When the target extension is next used or ends its current call, the users is rung and when they answer
a call is made to the target extension.
•
Telephone Number: Target extension number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Miscellaneous | Ring Back When Free (specific to DSS
keys).
•
Label: RBak+ (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Ring Back When Free feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *71*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: RingBackWhenFree
N represents the target extension from which you want to receive the callback. For example, if you call
extension 201 but the line is busy, hang up and then dial *71*201#. When extension 201 disconnects
from its current call, your phone will ring. Once you pick up the phone, extension 201's line will start
ringing to indicate an incoming call.
To cancel a Ring Back When Free request, see Cancel Ring Back When Free.
Secondary Dial Tone
Secondary dial tone is a system feature to generate a second dial tone after the user has hit a trunk
access digit. This feature can be used to provide secondary dial tone to a user before dialing. For
sample short codes, see Secondary Dial Tone and [n] Characters.
The following forms apply to the Secondary Dial Tone feature:
•
Telephone Number: Digit which triggers secondary dial tone.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Dial | Secondary Dial Tone (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: DTone (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
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Set Absent Text
This feature can be used to select the user's current absence text. Note: The user still has to select Set
or Clear on their phone to display or hide the text. This text is then displayed to internal callers who have
suitable display phones or applications.
The following forms apply to the Set Absent Text feature:
•
Telephone Number: The telephone number should take the format "y,n,text" where:
•
y = 0 or 1 to turn this feature on or off.
•
n = the number of the absent statement to use, see the list below:
•
•
0 = None.
•
1 = On vacation until.
•
2 = Will be back.
•
3 = At lunch until.
•
4 = Meeting until.
•
5 = Please call.
•
6 = Dont disturb until.
•
7 = With visitors until.
•
8 = With cust. til.
•
9 = Back soon.
•
10 = Back tomorrow.
•
11 = Custom.
text = any text to follow the absent statement.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Set | Set Absent Text (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: Absnt (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones)
Sample short codes using the Set Absent Text feature (via Manager) are provided below.
Using the Set Absent Text Short Code Feature
The following short code can be used to turn an absent text message on:
•
Short Code: *88
•
Telephone Number: "1,5,my assistant on 208"
•
Line Group ID: 0
•
Feature: SetAbsentText
The following short code could be used to turn this facility off. In the Telephone Number the first 0 is
used to turn this facility off and the second 0 is used to select the absent statement "None".
•
Short Code: *89
•
Telephone Number: "0,0"
•
Line Group ID: 0
•
Feature: SetAbsentText
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Set Account Code
This short code feature is used to allow system users to enter a valid account code prior to making a
phone call. This short code feature is essential for allowing POT users to enter account codes. The
example below demonstrates a short code that makes use of the SetAccountCode feature. Once this
short code is set up, any account code can be used in conjunction with it.
The following forms apply to the Set Account Code feature:
•
Telephone Number: A valid account code.
•
Button Programming: User | Digital Telephony | Emulation | Account Code Entry (specific to
DSS keys).
•
Label: Acct (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Example
•
Short code: 11*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: SetAccountCode
In the example above, N (within the short code field) = any valid account code, N (within the Telephone
Number field) = any telephone number. For the purpose of this example, we will imagine the account
code to be 1234. Once this short code is created, a user can dial 11*1234# to get a dial tone for dialing
the restricted telephone number or the phone number needing to be tracked for billing purposes.
Set Hunt Group Night Service
Puts the specified hunt group into 'Night Service' mode.
The following forms apply to the Set Hunt Group Night Service feature:
•
Telephone Number: Hunt group extension number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Set | Set Hunt Group Night Service (specific to DSS keys).
•
DSS Toggles: Yes (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: HGNS+ (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. This short code can be used to toggle the
feature on/off. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *20*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: SetHuntGroupNightService
N represents the telephone number of the hunt group to be placed into "Night Service" mode. For
example, when *20*201# is dialed, the hunt group associated with extension 201 will be placed into
"Night Service" mode.
To create a short code for clearing a hunt group from "Night Service" mode and placed into "In Service"
mode, see Clear Hunt Group Night Service.
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Set Hunt Group Out Of Service
Puts the specified hunt group into 'Out of Service' mode.
The following forms apply to the Set Hunt Group Out of Service feature:
•
Telephone Number: Hunt group extension number.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Set | Set Hunt Group Out of Service (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: HGOS+ (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones).
This short code can be used to toggle the feature on/off. Below is a sample short code using the Set
Hunt Group Out Of Service feature.
•
Short Code: *56*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: SetHuntGroupOutOfService
N represents the telephone number of the hunt group to be placed into "Out of Service" mode. For
example, when *56*201# is dialed, the hunt group associated with extension 201 will be placed into "Out
of Service" mode.
To create a short code for clearing a hunt group from "Out of Service" mode, see Clear Hunt Group Out
Of Service.
Set Inside Call Seq
Allows the user to select the ringing used on their extension for internal calls. The number entered
corresponds to the ring pattern required. This is 0 for Default Ring, 1 for RingNormal, 2 for RingType1,
etc. For more information on selectable ringing patterns, see Ring Tones. Note: The 4400 and 4600
series telephones only support the Default Ring type.
The following forms apply to the Set Inside Call Sequence feature:
•
Telephone Number: Number corresponding to the desired ring pattern.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Set | Set Inside Call Sequence (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: ICSeq (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Set Inside Call Sequence feature (via Manager).
User Selected Internal Ringing Type
This Short Code allows a User to change their inside call pattern.
•
Short Code: *80*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: SetInsideCallSeq
N represents the number corresponding to the Call Sequence the user wishes to choose, the numbering
starts at 0 selecting Default Ring, 1 selects RingNormal, 2 selects RingType1, etc. For example, if a user
wants to set her/his internal ring pattern to RingType1, the user would dial *80*2# because 2
corresponds to RingType1. This short code is useful for distinguishing an external call from an internal
one simply by the ring tone.
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Set Allocated Answer Interval/No Answer Time
If your PC is set to US English, the feature is labeled "Acquire Call"; if it is set to UK English, it is labeled
"Call Steal". This short code feature allows the user to change her/his Allocated Answer Interval setting.
The default setting is configured on the User | Telephony tab within Manager.
The following forms apply to this feature:
•
Telephone Number: Time in seconds.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Set | Allocated Answer Interval (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: NATim (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Set Allocated Answer Interval feature (via Manager).
Set Allocated Answer Interval
This short code allows a user to change the length of time s/he has to answer the phone before it goes
to divert or voicemail.
•
Short Code: *81*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: SetAllocatedAnswerInterval
N represents the number of seconds. For example, if a user wants to set the allocated answer interval to
15 seconds, the following information needs to be entered: *81*15#.
Set Outside Call Seq
Allows the user to select the ringing used on their extension for external calls. The number entered
corresponds to the ring pattern required. This is 0 for Default Ring, 1 for RingNormal, 2 for RingType1,
etc. For more information on selectable ringing patterns, see Ring Tones. Note: The 4400 and 4600
series only support the Default Ring type.
The following forms apply to the Set Outside Call Sequence feature:
•
Telephone Number: Number corresponding to the desired ring pattern.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Set | Set Outside Call Sequence (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: OCSeq (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Set Outside Call Sequence feature (via Manager).
User Selected External Ringing Type
This short code allows a user to change the ringing tone for an external call.
•
Short Code: *81*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: SetOutsideCallSeq
N represents the number corresponding to the Call Sequence the user wishes to choose, the numbering
starts at 0 selecting Default Ring, 1 selects RingNormal, 2 selects RingType1, etc. For example, if a user
wants to set her/his ring pattern for external calls to RingType1, the user would dial *81*2# because 2
corresponds to RingType1. This short code is useful for distinguishing an external call from an internal
one simply by the ring tone.
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Set Ringback Seq
Allows the user to select the ringing used on their extension for ringback calls. The number entered
corresponds to the ring pattern required. This is 0 for Default Ring, 1 for RingNormal, 2 for RingType1,
etc. For more information on selectable ringing patterns, see Ring Tones. Note: The 4400 and 4600
series only support the Default Ring type.
The following forms apply to the Set Ringback Sequence feature:
•
Telephone Number: Number corresponding to the desired ring pattern.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Set | Set Ringback Call Sequence (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: RBSeq (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Set Ringback Sequence feature (via Manager).
User Selected Ringback Ringing Type
This short code allows a user to change the ringing tone for a ringback call.
•
Short Code: *81*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: SetRingbackSeq
N represents the number corresponding to the ring tone the user wishes to choose, the numbering starts
at 0 selecting Default Ring, 1 selects RingNormal, 2 selects RingType1, etc. For example, if a user wants
to set her/his ring pattern for ringback calls to RingType1, the user would dial *81*2# because 2
corresponds to RingType1. This short code is useful for distinguishing a ringback call from any other call
simply by the ring tone.
Set Wrap Up Time
Allows users to change their Wrap-up Time setting, which specifies the amount of time (after
disconnecting from a call) before the user can take another call. The default is set on the User |
Telephony tab.
The following forms apply to the Set Wrap Up Time feature:
•
Telephone Number: Time in seconds.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Set | Set Wrap Up Time (specific to DSS keys)
•
Label: WUTim (specific to the 2420 and 4620 telephones)
Below is a sample short code using the Set Wrap Up Time feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *82*N#
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Feature: SetWrapUpTime
N represents the number of seconds. For example, if a user wants to set her/his wrap up time to 8
seconds, this user would dial *82*5#. This short code is useful in a "call center" environment where users
may need time to log call details before taking the next call. If set to 0 the user does not receive any
calls. It is recommended that this option is not set to less than the default of 2 seconds.
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Suspend Call
Uses the Q.931 Suspend facility. Suspends the incoming call at the ISDN exchange, freeing up the ISDN
B channel. The call is placed in exchange slot 0 if a slot number is not specified. Only available when
supported by the ISDN exchange. To resume a call that has been suspended, see Resume Call.
•
Telephone Number: Exchange slot number or blank (slot 0).
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Suspend | Suspend.
•
Label: Suspe
Suspend CW
Uses the Q.931 Suspend facility. Suspends the incoming call at the ISDN exchange and answer the call
waiting. The call is placed in exchange slot 0 if a slot number is not specified. Only available when
supported by the ISDN exchange. To resume the call after it has been suspended, see Resume Call.
The following forms apply to the Suspend CW feature:
•
Telephone Number: Exchange slot number or blank (slot 0).
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Suspend | Suspend CW.
•
Label: SusCW.
Sample short code using the Suspend CW feature (via Manager):
•
Short Code: *93
•
Feature: Suspend CW
Toggle Calls
Cycle through each call that the user has on hold on the IP Office. This feature is useful when a user
with a single-line telephone has several calls on hold and needs to respond to each one in turn.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Call | Toggle Calls.
•
Label: Toggl.
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is sample short code using the
Toggle Calls feature (via Manager).
•
Short Code: *29
•
Feature: ToggleCalls
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Voicemail Collect
Connects to the voicemail server. The telephone number must indicate the name of the Voicemail box to
be accessed, eg. "?Extn201" or "#Extn201". The ? indicates "collect Voicemail" and the # indicates
"deposit Voicemail".
When using Voicemail Pro, names of specific callflow start points can also be used to directly access
those start points via a short code. In these cases, ? is not used and # is only used if ringing is required
before the start points callflow begins.
•
Note: Short codes using the Voicemail Collect feature, with either "Short Codes.name"
and "#Short Codes.name" entries in the Telephone Number field, will be automatically
converted to the Voicemail Node feature and name.
The following forms apply to the Voicemail Collect feature:
•
Telephone Number: See above.
•
Digital Telephony: Advanced | Voicemail | Voicemail Collect (specific to DSS keys)
•
Label: VMCol (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones)
Below are sample short codes using the Voicemail Collect feature (via Manager):
Retrieve Messages from Specific Mailbox
This short code allows a user to retrieve messages from the specified Voicemail box, eg. the Sales Hunt
Group.
•
Short Code: *99
•
Telephone Number: ?Sales
•
Feature: VoicemailCollect
Record Message to Specific Mailbox
To allow users to deposit a message directly to Extn201's Voicemail box. This short code is useful when
you know the person is not at her/his desk and you want to immediately leave a message rather than call
the person and wait to be redirected to voicemail.
•
Short Code: *201
•
Telephone Number: "#Extn201"
•
Feature: VoicemailCollect
Accessing a Specific VoiceMail Pro Module
This short code can be used in instances where you have a conference bridge set up on the IP Office
and a module has been created via VoiceMail Pro to access this conference bridge. A short code can be
created for internal access to the module. In the sample short code below, the telephone number field
contains the name of the module.
•
Short Code: *100
•
Telephone Number: "conferenc"
•
Feature: VoicemailCollect
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Voicemail Node
Similar to Voicemail Collect but used for calls being directed to a Voicemail Pro Short Codes start point.
If ringing is required before the start point callflow begins then a # should be included before the name.
Useful if you have set up a short code start point with VoiceMail Pro and want to give direct internal
access to it.
•
Telephone Number: Voicemail Pro Short Code start point name.
•
Digital Telephony: Not applicable.
•
Label: – (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
Below is a sample short code using the Voicemail Node feature:
Directing Incoming Calls to Voicemail Pro
The destination field of an Incoming Route form can be used to direct calls to a specific Voicemail Pro
start point. An instance of this need is if a company wants all calls coming into the Sales department to
first be directed to an auto attendant for information gathering purposes. The following configurations
need to be set up on both Voicemail Pro and Manager:
a) Module Start Point
In the Incoming Call Route form, enter the destination as the name of the module start point preceded by
VM: and enclosed in quotes, eg. "VM:AutoAttend". Note that there is a maximum of 15 characters
allowed in this entry.
A hunt group should also be created that has the same name as the module start point. In case where
Voicemail Pro is not available, incoming calls will be directed to that hunt group as an alternate
destination. eg. For the example above create a group called AutoAttend.
b) Short Code Start Point
Once a short code start point has been created in Voicemail Pro, a matching short code should be
created on the IP Office, eg:
•
Short Code: *96
•
Telephone Number: "#Short Codes.Sales" (include quote marks)
•
Feature: VoiceMailNode
The above short code will allow internal users to access a Voicemail Pro short code start point named
Main. To route external incoming calls to the same start point, enter the short code *96 as the
Destination in the Incoming Call Route form.
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Voicemail On
Enables the user's voicemail mailbox to answer calls which ring unanswered or arrive when the user is
busy.
This feature is also available on Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Voicemail On feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Voicemail | Voicemail On (specific to DSS keys).
•
DSS Toggles: Yes
•
Label: VMOn (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. This short code can be used to toggle the
feature on/off. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *18
•
Feature: VoicemailOn
To prevent calls from going to voicemail, see Voicemail Off.
Voicemail Off
Disables the user's voicemail box from answering calls. This feature is also available on Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Voicemail Off feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Voicemail | Voicemail Off (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: VMOff (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *19
•
Feature: VoicemailOff
To enable calls to go through to voicemail, see Voicemail On.
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Voicemail Ringback On
Enables voicemail ringback to the user's extension. Voicemail ringback is used to call the user when they
have new voicemail messages. The ringback takes place each time the extension is used. This feature is
useful for users who do not have voicemail light/button indicators on their telephone.
This feature is also available on Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Voicemail Ringback On feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Voicemail | Voicemail Ringback On (specific to DSS keys).
•
DSS Toggles: Yes (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: VMRB+ (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. This short code can be used to toggle the
feature on/off. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *48
•
Feature: VoicemailRingbackOn
To turn voicemail ring back off, see Voicemail Ringback Off.
Voicemail Ringback Off
Disables voicemail ringback to the user's extension. This feature is also available on Phone Manager.
The following forms apply to the Voicemail Ringback Off feature:
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Advanced | Voicemail | Voicemail Ringback Off (specific to DSS keys).
•
Label: VMRB- (specific to the 2420 or 4620 telephones).
This short code is a default within the Manager configuration. Below is a sample of the short code setup.
•
Short Code: *49
•
Feature: VoicemailRingbackOff
To disable voicemail ring back, see Voicemail Ringback On.
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Creating User Short Codes
User short codes are created within a specific user's settings and apply only to that user. All the rules
relating to telephone number characters, short code characters and special characters still apply.
To create a user short code:
1. Click the User form within the Configuration Tree.
2. Double-click the user for whom you want to create the short code.
3. Click the ShortCodes tab.
4. Double-click or right-click within the panel.
5. Enter information in the necessary fields:
•
Short Code: Default = blank
The dialing digits used to trigger the short code. Maximum length is 33 characters. See
Short Code Characters for a list of valid characters.
•
Telephone Number: Default = blank
The number output by the short code. The number dialed by the short code or parameters
for the short code feature. This field can contain numbers and characters. For example, it
can contain Voicemail Pro start point names, user names, hunt group names and
telephone numbers (including those with special characters). Maximum length 33
characters. See Telephone Number Characters for a list of valid characters.
•
Line Group ID: Default = 0
For external calls, this is the set of lines that are used when making the call. Which group
a line belongs to is set through the Line form for each line.
•
Feature: Default = Dial
This is what the short code does. See Short Code Features.
•
Locale: Default = blank
Some features can support country specific variations if needed.
6. Merge the configuration.
Short codes created within the User Restriction configuration form can also be applied to individual
users.
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Creating System Short Codes
System short codes apply to and can be used by all users on the system. A list of default system short
codes have been created for your convenience.
To create a new system short code:
1. Click the Short code form within the Configuration Tree.
2. Double-click within the short code panel or right-click and select New.
3. Enter information in the necessary fields:
•
Short Code: Default = blank
The dialing digits used to trigger the short code. Maximum length is 33 characters. See
Short Code Characters for a list of valid characters.
•
Telephone Number: Default = blank
The number output by the short code. The number dialed by the short code or parameters
for the short code feature. This field can contain numbers and characters. For example, it
can contain Voicemail Pro start point names, user names, hunt group names and
telephone numbers (including those with special characters). Maximum length 33
characters. See Telephone Number Characters for a list of valid characters.
•
Line Group ID: Default = 0
For external calls, this is the set of lines that are used when making the call. Which group
a line belongs to is set through the Line form for each line.
•
Feature: Default = Dial
This is what the short code does. See Short Code Features.
•
Locale: Default = blank
Some features can support country specific variations if needed.
6. Merge the configuration.
Creating User Restriction Short Codes
User Restriction short codes are useful when applied to the Restriction field for each user. When
applied to a user, these short codes can be used by those specific users and eliminate the need to
recreate the short codes for each user. These short codes have the same properties and parameters as
the other short codes, with the exception that you can assign specific names to them for re-use.
To set up a restriction within the User Restriction form:
1. Click User Restriction form within the Configuration Tree.
2. Enter a name for the restriction.
3. Click the Short Code List tab and create a short code.
4. Merge the configuration.
For a description of all the fields within this form, see User Restrictions Overview.
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Overview of Routing
The Control Unit is a network router. In this role it can extend a local area network by using WAN links
and PSTN connections, so that users on the LAN can access remote addresses.
Additionally it allows users to dial-in and then act as if they were using a PC on the LAN.
Internal Data Channels
As well as being a network router, the Control Unit is a telephone system. These dual roles allow it to
support a range of functions that involve traffic between the network and telephony interfaces. These
functions use internal data channels.
The number of internal data channels that can be connected from the system's LAN interface to its
telephony interface at any time is restricted.
•
An internal data channel is a B-channel connected between the system's telephony and LAN
interfaces. For example a Voicemail connection, an internet connection or a RAS user.
•
The number of data channels in use does not necessarily match the number of users:
•
Several network users, browsing the internet using the same ISP connection would be a single
data channel.
•
Several dial-in network users would each have a separate data channel.
•
An additional restriction is in place to limit the number of data channels that can be
simultaneously in use for Voicemail at any time.
The restriction depends on the type of Control Unit being used.
•
Control Unit
Maximum
Number of
Internal Data
Channels
Maximum
Number of
Internal Data
Channels for
Voicemail
IP 401
2
2
Avaya IP Office - Small Office Edition
18
10
IP 403
18
10
IP 406
24
20
IP 412
100
30
Note: Calls using a VCM channel (eg. VoIP calls and Avaya 4600 and 5600 Series phones) do
not use a data channel.
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Connecting to the Internet
You require an account with an Internet Service Provider (ISP). By using the Network Address
Translation feature, a simple single address ISDN dial up account provides all your users access to the
Internet. The ISP provides you with an account name, password, address of a DNS service (this is not
required if the Request DNS option is selected), and ISDN number to call. You can use the Installation
Wizard to enter these details, or configure a Service and an IP route (this is not required if the Default
Route option is checked).
Example Configuration
This example shows how to set up a connection to an ISP:
1. Create a service via the Services configuration form. Double click on Services, select Normal
Service and click OK. The following fields within the configuration form needs to be:
•
Name: Internet (any name to identify the Service).
•
Account Name: As provided by the ISP.
•
Password: As provided by the ISP.
•
Telephone Number: As provided by the ISP.
•
Only select the Encrypted Password option if the ISP also supports CHAP.
2. Create an IP Route. This is not required if the Default Route option is selected, as shown above.
•
Enter only the Destination as "Internet" (this is the Service created above). This becomes
the default route, in other words, if a packet is received for a network where a route has
not been configured it is sent via this Service.
3. Under DNS tab of the System configuration form enter the DNS Server IP Address as provided
by the ISP. Note that this is not required if the Request DNS option is selected under the
Service's IP tab.
•
If the Request DNS option is enabled a PC sends DNS requests to the Control Unit. The
Control Unit then forwards these requests to the correct DNS server. This is useful if your
system is using different ISPs at different times of the day or for backup.
4. The Quota time (default 240 minutes) limits the amount of call time allowed for this Service per
day, week or month. This time can be refreshed via a short code using the ClearQuota feature.
5. Each PC that is used to access the Internet requires the IP address of the DNS Server whether
this is the Control Unit or the ISP's DNS server. If DHCP is being used the Windows 95/98 utility,
winipcfg, can be used to release and renew the IP configuration of a PC.
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Connecting to the LAN
Connecting to the LAN
Computers in an office communicate via a LAN (Local Area Network), which may at its simplest be a
length of coaxial cable connecting all the computers or by twisted pair cables going into a central hub. In
our case the Control Unit is a LAN hub with a number of LAN ports for computer connection. The Control
Unit communicates with the LAN via TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol / Internet Protocol).
The computers communicate by putting data into packets marked with the source and destination IP
address. The sending computer does not care where the destination is, it simply places the packet onto
its LAN. It is the destination computer's task to see the packets and collect them.
Separate LANs are connected together using routers. Routers use WAN (Wide Area Network) links on
leased telephone lines or data calls across the public telephone network (PSTN) to route traffic from one
network to another. The Control Unit is a router, which can be setup with information about where to
route traffic to and from other LANs.
IP Addressing
Each computer/host on a TCP/IP network must have a unique IP Address. The address is 32 bits long,
eg. 11000000101010000010101000000001.
As this is impossible for humans to remember, we split it into 4 groups of 8 bits and convert those groups
from binary into decimal numbers, with dots between the groups.
For example:
•
11000000101010000010101000000001 becomes
•
11000000.10101000.00101010.00000001 becomes
•
192.168.42.1.
Note: Occasionally IP addresses may also be seen in hexadecimal format, in this case 192.168.42.1
becomes C0.A8.2A.01.
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Routing Features and Functions
Sending Traffic to the Router: Subnet Masks
Each computer on a TCP/IP LAN requires three values; an IP address, a subnet mask (also called an IP
Mask) and a default gateway address. The first two are used to decide whether a data packet for another
computer is on the same LAN. If it is not then the third, the default gateway address, is the address of
the router, which will forward the packet to its correct destination outside the LAN
To decide this, the computer does a binary AND of its IP address and mask and compares that to the
binary AND of the destination's IP address and mask. If the result is not the same then the destination is
not on the LAN. The packet is sent to the PC's default gateway address, where the original destination
address is looked at to determine how to get the packet to its final destination. Our gateway or router is
the Control Unit, which contains in its IP Route table instructions to get the packet to the destination.
For example:
•
Source PC1:
IP address 192.168.42.201, Subnet mask 255.255.255.0, ANDing gives 192.168.42.0.
•
Destination PC2:
IP address 192.168.42.202, Subnet mask 255.255.255.0, ANDing gives 192.168.42.0, same as
PC1 so on the same LAN as PC1.
•
Destination PC3:
IP address 158.152.1.43, Subnet mask 255.255.255.0, ANDing gives 158.152.1.0, which is
different from PC1 so the packet is sent to the Control Unit which must have a entry for address
of PC2 in its IP Route table.
There are special IP addresses called broadcast addresses, which are seen by all computers on a LAN,
eg. 255.255.255.255 or 192.168.42.255.
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)
Originally IP addresses were allocated manually to each computer/host by network administrators. A
protocol called Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) allowed this to be done automatically.
When a computer is switched on, it sends out a broadcast on the LAN asking for an IP address, subnet
mask and default gateway. A DHCP server replies, thus simplifying the allocation process.
A major benefit of DHCP is that a PC can be set to be a DHCP client. It can then be connected to any
LAN with a DHCP server, switched on and it will automatically be correctly configured. There should only
be one DHCP server on any LAN.
The Control Unit can act as a simple DHCP server. When switched on with a defaulted configuration, the
Control Unit request IP information from a DHCP server. If it gets no response to its request then it
assumes the role of DHCP server for the LAN.
In DHCP Server mode, by default the Control Unit issues itself the address 192.168.42.1. It allocates
200 addresses for DHCP clients, 192.168.42.1 to 19.168.42.200. This leaves 192.168.42.201 to
192.168.42.254 available for any computers that need to be allocated a fixed or static IP address.
192.168.42.255 is not used as this is a broadcast address for the LAN.
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Getting it Working!
A major factor is what IP address range the customer wants the Control Unit to have. If the default of
192.168.42.1 to 254 is acceptable with the Control Unit acting as DHCP server, connect the Control Unit
system to the LAN and switch it on. Then connect the PC's to the LAN and switch them on.
If the Customer wants you to work to a specific address range and has a DHCP server machine on his
LAN that is okay. Connect the Control Unit to the LAN and switch it on. It should see the DHCP server
and configure itself as a client.
Configuration is more complex if the customer wants the Control Unit to have a specific address but
does not have a DHCP server on the LAN. First, establish communications with the Control Unit from a
PC configured with a specified IP address 192.168.42.201, subnet mask 255.255.255.0. Use that to
configure the Control Unit to the IP address, IP mask and DHCP mode required.
Address ranges
The following addresses will never appear on the Internet and are thus free for use within a private
network.
•
10.0.0.0.
•
172.16.0.0 through 172.32.0.0.
•
192.168.0.0 through 192.168.255.0.
If you pick one of these you should have no address problems with the Internet. We picked 192.168.42.0
and 192.168.43.0 out of the hat!
Viewing Your PCs IP configuration
In Windows 95/98 there is a program called WINIPCFG, which displays the IP configuration of the PC.
This is useful when the PC is obtaining the configuration from a DHCP server. To view this information
run winipcfg or winipcfg /all
If DHCP is being used, winipcfg also allows you to change your PC's IP configuration without rebooting
by using Release and Renew.
On Windows NT/2000 and XP the information can be obtained using ipconfig or ipconfig /all via the
command prompt.
Domain Name System
This is the system used on the Internet to match computer names to IP addresses.
Internet users request specific hosts using names such as www.avaya.com. These names are sent to a
Domain Name Server (DNS), which converts the name to the IP address so the computers can pass
data.
Typically your ISP will give you the address of their DNS server and this information can be entered in
the DNS tab of the System configuration form.
If you are using multiple ISPs the Control Unit can pass on DNS requests to the correct DNS Server, tick
Request DNS in the IP tab of the Service configuration form.
Whichever method is used, each PC on the network should renew their IP configuration either using the
Windows 95/98 utility called winipcfg or next time the PC requests an IP address from the DHCP server.
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Routing Features and Functions
Firewalls
Firewalls
The Control Unit can act as a firewall. The firewall access software allows you to control who can access
external resources, while isolating your private networks from the Internet. The firewall also performs
Network Address Translation allowing access to the Internet using a single pre-configured or dynamically
assigned IP address, yet still allows all your PCs and workstations simultaneous access if and when
required.
Different firewall profiles can be created and then assigned to Services and to Dial In users.
To create a firewall, right-click within the Firewall Profile entries and select New. There are 2 levels of
configuration, the Radio buttons on the Standard tab then the additional filters you wish to apply via the
Custom tab.
The firewall works by allowing permitted packets to punch holes in the wall (start a session) and then
allowing the responses through. After a period these holes heal and prevent further packets getting
through.
When a packet comes along and there are no holes on the wall, the following checks take place:
1. Is there an existing hole/session - let it through and also check for end/timeout.
2. Will ANY of the additional filters drop the packet - Yes, then drop it and go onto next packet.
3. Is there an additional filter that allows this packet through - Yes, then let it through and move onto
next packet.
4. Will any of the radio buttons let the packet through - Yes, then let it through and move onto next
packet.
5. If Network Address Translation (NAT) is used with the firewall (which it typically is), then you
must also configure a Primary Incoming Translation Address (see IP tab of the Service
configuration form) if you wish sessions to be started into your site (typically for SMTP) from the
Internet.
Example Firewall Filters
Dropping NetBIOS searches on an ISPs DNS
We suggest that the following filter is always added to the firewall facing the Internet to avoid costly but
otherwise typically pointless requests from Windows machines trying to find friends by making DNS
searches on the DNS server at your ISP.
Add the following in a custom firewall entry.
•
Direction: Drop
•
IP Protocol: 6
•
Match Offset: 20
•
Match Length: 4
•
Match Data: 00890035
•
Match Mask: FFFFFFFF
Browsing Non-Standard Port Numbers
The radio button for HTTP permits ports 80 and 443 through the firewall. Some hosts use non-standard
ports for HTTP traffic eg. 8080, 8000, 8001,8002, etc. You can add individual filters for these ports as
you find them. (The Monitor program can identify which packets are being blocked by the Firewall. Using
the Firewall Fail information obtained from the trace and the data in RFC1700 - Assigned Numbers,
firewall entries can then be created.)
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You wish to access a Web page but you cannot because it uses TCP port 8000 instead of the more
usual port 80, use the entry below.
•
Direction: Out
•
IP Protocol: 6
•
Match Offset: 22
•
Match Length: 2
•
Match Data: 1F40
•
Match Mask: FFFF
A more general additional entry given below allows all TCP ports out.
•
Direction: Out
•
IP Protocol: 6
•
Match Offset: 0
•
Match Length: 0
•
Match Data: 00000000000000000000000000000000
•
Match Mask: 00000000000000000000000000000000
Routing All Internet Traffic Through a WinProxy
If you wish to put WinProxy in front of all Internet traffic via the Control Unit. The following firewall allows
only the WinProxy server to contact the Internet : 1. Create a new Firewall profile and select Drop for all protocols
2. Under Custom create a new Firewall Entry
3. In Notes enter the name of the server allowed. Then use the default settings except in Local IP
Address enter the IP address of the WinProxy Server, in Local IP Mask enter 255.255.255.255
and in Direction select Bothway
4. Stopping PINGs
You wish to stop pings - this is ICMP Filtering. Using the data below can create a firewall filter
that performs the following; Trap Pings; Trap Ping Replies; Trap Both.
•
Trap Pings: Protocol = 1, offset = 20, data = 08, mask = FF
•
Trap Ping Replies: Protocol = 1, offset = 20, data = 00, mask = FF
•
Trap Both: Protocol = 1, offset = 20, data = 00, mask = F7, Traps Both.
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Routing Features and Functions
Understanding IP Routing via ISDN
This is a mechanism for taking IP packets from one LAN transporting them across an ISDN data call and
depositing the packets on a distant LAN. The data call is made automatically when packets require
transporting and is cleared when the flow of packets stops. The user is not aware of the individual
"Bandwidth on demand" calls happening. The data within the ISDN call uses the Point-to-Point Protocol
(PPP) which is used by the vast majority of manufacturers for linking routers, particularly if it is not the
same router manufacturer at each end of the link.
•
For outbound calls, eg. to the Internet, configure a Service and IP Route - for further information
refer to Connecting to the Internet .
•
For inbound calls, eg. a user dialing in from home to the office, configure an Incoming Call Route,
a RAS service, a User, and an IP route for the return data.
•
For calls both ways between two sites, configure a Service, a User, a RAS, an Incoming Call
Route and an IP Route at both ends - see the example below.
It is possible to have several different routing destinations active at any time. The Control Unit can
handle simultaneous active data routes dependent on the number of data calls supported by the system.
The basic decision on how to route a packet is set by the IP routing table (see IP Route Form ) which
looks for the best route in its tables and selects the appropriate destination. The Default Route is
typically to the Internet where the vast majority of IP addresses exist. These are static routes.
Configuration Example
To create a data link between two sites via ISDN configure the Control Unit as per the following example:
At Site A on IP address 192.168.43.1
1. Create a Normal Service:
The Service name can be any text and is used to identify this particular Service. The Account
Name and password are presented to the remote end, therefore must match the User name and
password configured at Site B. The Telephone Number is the number of the remote end.
2. Create a User:
Under the Dial In tab tick Dial In On. This User account is used to authenticate the connection
from the Site B. Note that as the Service and User have the same names, these two
configuration forms are automatically linked and become an Intranet Service. The User password
is displayed at the bottom of the Service tab as the Incoming Password.
3. Setup RAS:
Check the default RAS settings "DialIn" are available, otherwise create a new one. If the RAS
settings are given the same name as the Service and User they are automatically linked and
become a WAN Service. Ensure that the Encrypted Password option is not checked when using
a WAN Service.
4. Setup an Incoming Call Route:
Check the default Incoming Call Route is available, otherwise create a new one. If the Incoming
Number is left blank, the Incoming Call Route accepts data calls on any number. Under
Destination select the RAS service created above. The Bearer Capability should be AnyData.
5. Create an IP Route:
In the IP Address field enter the network address of the remote end, not the IP address of the
Control Unit. Under Destination select the Service created above.
At Site B on IP address 192.168.45.1
1. Repeat the above process but altering the details to create an route from Site B to Site A
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Network Address Translation (NAT)
NAT is a mechanism that allows you to pretend to have a different IP address than you actually have.
You may have an established network using your own numbering scheme, and would like to access the
Internet. There are many cost effective Internet Service Providers (ISP) but they want you to use a
different IP address. By using NAT between your machine and their network everyone is satisfied, and
no need to renumber your network. An additional benefit is that all your machines can use the NAT
facility and access the Internet via the one address.
NAT is the translation of an IP address within one network to a different IP address known within another
network. One network is designated the inside network and the other is the outside. Typically, a
company maps its local inside network addresses to one (or more) global outside IP address and
unmaps the global IP address on incoming packets back into local IP addresses. This helps ensure
security since each outgoing or incoming request must go through a translation process that also offers
the opportunity to qualify or authenticate the request or match it to a previous request. NAT also
conserves on the number of global IP addresses that a company needs and it lets the company use a
single IP address in its communication with the world.
Configuring NAT
The use of NAT is automatically enabled if the Service being used includes an IP address that is not in
the same domain as the Control Unit's IP address. See IP .
An exception to the above applies for the IP412 Control Unit. This unit displays an Enable
NAT check box on its System LAN1 and LAN2 forms.
Point to Point Protocol (PPP)
This is an industrial standard protocol for data links, particularly useful when connecting equipment from
differing vendors. Options within the protocol, eg. data compression can be negotiated, thus avoiding the
need for a manager to set these independently for each destination.
PPP (Point-to-Point Protocol) is a Protocol for communication between two computers using a Serial
interface, typically a personal computer connected by phone line to a server. For example, your Internet
server provider may provide you with a PPP connection so that the provider's server can respond to your
requests, pass them on to the Internet, and forward your requested Internet responses back to you. PPP
uses the Internet protocol (IP) and is designed to handle others. It is sometimes considered a member of
the TCP/IP suite of protocols. Relative to the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) reference model, PPP
provides layer 2 (data-link layer) service. Essentially, it packages your computer's TCP/IP packets and
forwards them to the server where they can actually be put on the Internet.
PPP is a Full Duplex protocol that can be used on various physical media, including twisted pair or fiber
optic lines or satellite transmission. It uses a variation of High Speed Data Link Control (HDLC) for
packet encapsulation.
PPP is usually preferred over the earlier de facto standard Serial Line Internet Protocol (SLIP) because it
can handle Synchronous as well as Asynchronous communication. PPP can share a line with other
users and it has error detection that SLIP lacks. Where a choice is possible, PPP is preferred.
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Routing Features and Functions
Quotas and Timebands
Quotas place a time limit on outgoing calls to a particular IP Service. This avoids excessive ISDN call
charges when perhaps something changes on your network and call frequency increases unintentionally.
See the Quota tab of the Service configuration form
To refresh the Quota time, create a short code using the ClearQuota feature as per the following
example or use "" to represent all Services.
•
Short Code: *75
•
Telephone Number: "Internet"
•
Line Group: 0
•
Feature: ClearQuota
Timebands apply to incoming calls. You can specify what hours you are open for external users. See the
Dial In tab of the User configuration form.
Using a Fallback Service
A Fallback Service provides an alternative route while a Service is In Fallback. For example, you may
wish to connect to your ISP during working hours and at other times take advantage of varying call
charges from an alternative ISP. You could therefore set up one Service to connect during peak times
and another to act as fallback during the cheaper period.
You need to create an additional Service to be used during the cheaper period and select this service
from the Fallback Service list box (open the Service form and select the Fallback tab).
If the original Service is to be used during specific hours and the Fallback Service to be used outside of
these hours, a Time Profile can be created. Select this Time Profile from the Time Profile list box. At the
set time the original Service goes into Fallback and the Fallback Service is used.
A Service can also be put into Fallback manually using short codes, eg:
•
•
Put the service "Internet" into fallback
•
Short Code: *85
•
Telephone Number: "Internet"
•
Line Group ID: 0
•
Feature: SetHuntGroupNightService
Take the service "Internet" out of fallback
•
Short Code: *86
•
Telephone Number: "Internet"
•
Line Group ID: 0
•
Feature: ClearHuntGroupNightService
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Using a Service
A Service is configured to provide remote data access for local users. A Service is needed when
configuring, for example, connection to an ISP for Internet access, connection to a remote Control Unit
via ISDN or via a WAN link. See Service Form to configure services.
When creating a new Service, you are given several options:
•
A Normal Service should be selected when configuring, for example, a connection to an ISP.
•
A WAN Service can be selected when creating a WAN link. A User and RAS Service will also be
created with the same name. These three entries are automatically linked and each open the
same form. Note however, that this type of Service cannot be used if the Encrypted Password
option is checked. In this case the RAS Service name must match the Account Name. Therefore
either create each entry manually or create an Intranet Service.
•
An Intranet Service can be selected to automatically create a User with the same name at the
same time. These two entries are linked and will each open the same form. Note that the Dial In
tab is now added to the Service configuration form and the Dial In On option is assumed. The
User's password is entered in the Incoming Password field at the bottom on the Service tab.
Bandwidth on Demand
This is the ability to make data calls between sites only when there is data to be sent or sufficient data to
warrant an additional call. The calls are made automatically without the users being aware of when calls
begin or end. Using ISDN it is possible to establish a data call and be passing data in less that a second.
The rules for making calls, how long to keep calls up, etc. are configurable via the Bandwidth of the
Service configuration form.
Gatekeeper
Gatekeepers provide network services to H.323 terminals, MCUs, and gateways. H.323 devices register
with gatekeepers to send and receive H.323 calls. Gatekeepers give permission to make or accept a call
based on a variety of factors.
Note: H.323 gatekeeper (Call Servers) is supported on the LAN1 address only.
Gatekeepers can provide network services such as:
•
Controlling the number and type of connections allowed across the network.
•
Helping to route a call to the correct destination.
•
Determining and maintaining the network address for incoming calls.
The Gatekeeper tab in the System configuration form can be used to configure Gatekeeper support.
[break]
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Routing Features and Functions
RIP
Routing Information Protocol (RIP) is a protocol which allows routers within a network to exchange
routes of which they are aware approximately every 30 seconds. Through this process, each router
becomes adds routes in the network to its routing table.
Each router to router link is called a 'hop' and routes of up to 15 hops are created in the routing tables.
When more than one route to a destination exists, the route with the lowest metric (number of hops) is
added to the routing table.
When an existing route becomes unavailable, it is marked as requiring 'infinite' (16 hops). It is then
advertised as such to other routers for the next few updates before being removed from the routing table.
The IP Office also uses 'split horizon' and 'poison reverse'.
RIP is a simple method for automatic route sharing and updating within small homogeneous networks. It
allows alternate routes to be advertised when an existing route fails. Within a large network the
exchange of routing information every 30 seconds can create excessive traffic. In addition the routing
table held by each IP Office is limited to 100 routes (including static and internal routes).
RIP is supported with IP Office system's from Level 2.0 upwards. The normal default is for RIP to be
disabled. It can be enabled on LAN1, LAN2 and individual services. The supported RIP options are:
•
Listen Only (Passive):
The IP Office listens to RIP1 and RIP2 messages and uses these to update its routing table.
However the IP Office does not respond.
•
RIP1:
The IP Office listens to RIP1 and RIP2 messages. It advertises its own routes in a RIP1 subnetwork broadcast.
•
RIP2 Broadcast (RIP1 Compatibility):
The IP Office listens to RIP1 and RIP2 messages. It advertises its own routes in a RIP2 subnetwork broadcast. This method is compatible with RIP1 routers.
•
RIP2 Multicast:
The IP Office listens to RIP1 and RIP2 messages. It advertises its own routes to the RIP2
mulitcast address (249.0.0.0). This method is not compatible with RIP1 routers.
Broadcast and multicast routes (those with addresses such as 255.255.255.255 and 224.0.0.0) are not
included in RIP broadcasts.
Static routes (those in the IP Route table) take precedence over a RIP route when the two routes have
the same metric.
The full routing table currently held by an IP Office system can be viewed using the IP Office Monitor
application, see Viewing the Routing Table.
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Viewing the Routing Table
An IP Office's routing table can be viewed using the IP Office Monitor application. This application can be
installed from the IP Office Admin CD. Full details of using Monitor are not covered here.
Note: This method can be used to view the IP Office's routing table regardless of whether RIP is being
used.
1. Start Monitor and select the IP Office system whose routing table you want to view.
2. Select Filters | Trace Options.
3. Select the Routing tab.
4. Tick Routing Table.
5. If required you can also select to view Routing Table Changes plus RIP In and RIP Out
messages.
6. The routing table is sent to the monitor trace once every minute.
Destination
0.0.0.0
255.255.255.255
192.168.44.0
192.168.99.0
192.168.42.0
Netmask
0.0.0.0
255.255.255.255
255.255.255.0
255.255.255.0
255.255.255.0
Gateway
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
192.168.44.1
Interface
Metric Type
LAN1
0
S
LAN1
0
I
LAN1
0
I
RemoteManager 0
S
LAN1
0
S
The Type indicates:
•
I = Internal routes.
•
S = Static route set in the IP Route table.
•
R = RIP route resolved from RIP messages.
•
T = Temporary route to a specific IP address accessed via a service.
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Voice over IP
Overview of VoIP
The Control Unit supports a maximum of 30 VoIP channels, which can be compressed using voice
compression channels. These are pre-installed in Avaya IP Office - Small Office Edition controls units.
On other units they are added by installing 5, 10, 20 or 30 channel Voice Compression Modules. Note:
The type and number of VCM modules supported by each control unit type varies.
The voice compression channel improves call quality and can be used to compress voice down to either
6k3 (G723) or 8k (G729/Netcoder) and provides echo cancellation (required for high latency circuits).
The bandwidth required for a VoIP call is made up of two parts, one of which is due to the actual
digitization of the analog voice the other is required by the protocol which is used to wrap the digitized
voice up and transport it to the remote site. VoIP calls require an overhead of 40 bytes per packet
(RTP/UDP/IP Header overhead) this overhead is increased on a LAN by a further 12 bytes Ethernet or
by 7 bytes over a PPP WAN link.
When transporting voice over low speed links (WANs) it is possible that normal data packets (eg. 1500
byte IP packets) can prevent or delay the voice data from getting across the link. This can cause a very
unacceptable speech quality. Thus it is vital that the routers in the network that carry voice have some
form of Quality of service mechanism (QoS).
The Control Unit supports the DiffServ (RFC 2474) Quality of Service mechanisms (QoS) which is based
upon a Type of Service (ToS) field in the IP header. The software will prioritize voice, fragment large
packets and provide VoIP header compression to minimize the WAN overhead.
Typically the VoIP WAN overhead is 47 bytes on 20 byte payload this is 235% overhead. On the WAN
protocol this is reduced to 11 bytes (8 bytes data, 2 bytes CRC and 1 byte HDLC flag) on the same 20byte packet this is only 55%, and 180% saving. This overhead must be included when calculating the
actual link speeds required to support voice traffic, eg. an 8Kbps compression voice path actually
required 12.4Kbps of WAN bandwidth when using QoS or 26.8Kbps if using standard non QoS routers.
QoS routers are also required to ensure low speech latency and to maintain sufficient audible quality. At
present our header compression is based upon the latest standards (RFC 2507/2508/2509). For
efficiency we operate below PPP (non-standard) - reducing the overheads further and allow data
fragmentation to be performed more effectively (keeping latency low). It is therefore required to place our
equipment at both ends to operate at full efficiency.
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Manager 3.0
VoIP Protocols
The H.323 Stack within the core software supports the following protocols:•
H.323 (V2)(1998), Packet-based multimedia communications systems
•
Q.931, ISDN user-network interface layer 3 specification for basic call control
•
H.225.0 (1998), Call signaling protocols and media stream packetization for packet-based
multimedia communication systems
•
RTP/RTCP
•
H.245 (1998), Control protocol for multimedia communication
•
Audio CODECs:
•
G.711 A-law/U-law
•
G.723.1 MP-MLQ
•
G.729 Annex A - CS-ACELP (Not supported by NetMeeting)
•
Silence Suppression
•
Fax Relay
•
Local End Echo Cancellation 25ms (except transparent - no cancellation)
•
Out of band DTMF
•
Internet Standards/Specification (in addition to TCP/UDP/IP)
•
RFC 1889 - RTP/RTCP
•
RFC 2507,2508,2509 - Header Compression
•
RFC 2474 - DiffServ
Performance
The following table is the absolute maximum ratings tested in the lab. For deployment we recommend
that more bandwidth be made available for normal data.
56K
64K
128K
256K
2M
LAN
G729.1 (8k)
4
5*
6
18
20!
20
NetCoder (8k)
4
5*
9*
18!
20
20
G.723 (6.4k)
5
5*
9
18
20
20
ADPCM (32k)
1
1
6
5
20!
20
G.711 (64k)
X
X
1
3
16!
20
Transparent (64k)
X
X
1
3
14!
20
•
* - data transfer is affected at higher channel connectivity
•
! - channel connectivity at higher levels is affected by data transfer
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Voice over IP
Implementation
A Control Unit plays the part of a Gateway between H.323 terminals and phones connected to the
Control Unit (and also external lines). H.323 is configured on a Control Unit as a VPN line, specifying the
IP address of a remote gateway and the audio compression to be used.
IP phones can be configured as extensions. An example is NetMeeting, which is configured to use the
Control Unit as a Gatekeeper, with an account name that should match the name of a user configured on
the Control Unit.
IP extensions are automatically created when an IP phone registers with the Gatekeeper (depending on
a configuration option). If the user is not found a new user and extension are created, allowing the phone
to be used immediately.
Basic call setup (without a Gatekeeper)
•
Call setup using H.225.0 encapsulated in Q.931 messages
•
Capability exchange using H.245
•
Establishment of audio communication using H.245 OpenLogicalChannel
•
Audio using RTP/RTCP
Fast connect procedure
•
Call setup using H.225.0 in Q.931 messages, with H.245 OpenLogicalChannel messages
embedded in the H.225.0 messages
•
Audio using RTP/RTCP
Overlap sending
•
Support for overlap sending, where a SetupAck is sent in response to the Setup message
Gatekeeper
•
Gatekeeper support allows IP extensions to be automatically configured when they register with
the gatekeeper.
Jitter buffer
•
5 frames of jitter buffer
Q
uality of Service
•
Layer3 - DiffServ TOS Field set to DSCP 6 on generated packets. WAN links optimize for this
traffic when set to "PPPSyncVoice". At present normal LAN and normal ISDN traffic is not
prioritized.
•
Layer4 - UDP Port Marking - all RTP/UDP traffic is sent within UDP port range of C000-CFFF
(hex) (49152-53247)
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Manager 3.0
Voice Packet Payload Sizing/Latency (Default)
Codec
Payload
Latency
Transparent 64K G711
80bytes
10ms
ADPCM 32K
40bytes
10ms
ADPCM 16K
20bytes
10ms
G.711 ALAW
160bytes
20ms
G.729A
20bytes
20ms
G.723 (6K3)
24bytes
30ms
Netcoder 8K
20bytes
20ms
G.726-32K
80bytes
20ms
G.726-16K
40bytes
20ms
Creating a VoIP Link via the LAN
At Site A on IP address 192.168.43.1
1. Create a new line:
The Line Number and Line Group ID must be unique, in other words, not used by any other line.
The Gateway IP Address is the IP Address of the Control Unit at the remote end.
2. Create an IP Route:
The IP Address is the network address of the remote end. The Destination will either be LAN1 or
LAN2.
3. Create a Short Code:
This routes all calls where the number dialed starts with 8 via Line Group ID 1, therefore via the
VPN Line created above.
•
Short Code: 8N
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Line Group ID: 1
•
Feature: Dial
At Site B on IP address 192.168.45.1
1. Repeat the above steps for VoIP traffic from Site B to Site A.
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Voice over IP
Creating a VoIP Link via the WAN Port Using PPP
A VoIP link across a leased line requires the Control Unit at both ends to have a Voice Compression
Module installed. These provide for a fixed number of channels to use VoIP at any time. They are used
to compress voice down to either 6k3 (G723) or 8k (G729) and provide echo cancellation.
Both ends must using the same version of software and configured to use the same speed and
compression.
At Site A on IP address 192.168.42.1.
1. Create a Normal Service:
The Account Name and password is presented to the remote end, therefore must match the User
name and password configured at Site B. The Encrypted Password option can only be used if the
remote end also supports CHAP.
2. Create a User:
Under the Dial In tab tick Dial In On. This User account is used to authenticate the connection
from the Site B. As the Service and User have the same name these two configuration forms are
automatically linked and become an Intranet Service. The User password is displayed at the
bottom of the Service tab as the Incoming Password.
•
Name: SiteB
•
Dial In | Dial In On: Enabled.
3. Create a RAS service:
If CHAP is to be used on this link, then the Encrypted Password option must be checked in the
Service and in the RAS service. The name of the RAS service must match the name of the
Service at Site B. If the RAS service is given the same name as the Service and User, they are
automatically linked and become a WAN Service. Ensure that the Encrypted Password option is
not checked when using a WAN Service.
4. Edit the WANPort:
Note - do not create a new WANPort, this is automatically detected. If a WANPort is not
displayed, connect the WAN cable, reboot the Control Unit and receive the configuration. The
WANPort configuration form should now be added.
•
RAS Name: SiteA
5. Create an IP Route:
The IP Address is the network address of the remote end. Under Destination select the Service
created above.
6. Create a new Line:
The Line Number and Line Group ID must be unique, in other words, not used by any other line.
The Gateway IP Address is the IP Address of the Control Unit at the remote end. The
Compression Mode used is dependent on the Voice Compression Card the Control Unit is
running and the speed of the link.
7. Create a Short Code:
To route all calls where the number dialed starts with 8 via Line Group ID 1, therefore via the
VPN Line created above.
•
•
•
•
Short Code: 8N
Telephone Number: N
Line Group ID: 1
Feature: Dial
At Site B on IP address 192.168.45.1
1. Repeat the above steps for VoIP traffic from Site B to Site A.
•
Note: For the IP Office Small Office Edition Control Unit, enabling Local Tones under the Line
and Extension VoIP tabs is recommended.
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Manager 3.0
Creating a VoIP Link via the WAN Port Using Frame Relay
To create a VoIP link via the WAN port using frame relay, the first step is to attach a WAN cable and
reboot the Control Unit. After this, receive a copy of the configuration.
Both ends must using the same version of software and configured to use the same speed and
compression.
At Site A
1. Create a WAN Service:
•
On the Service Tab:
The Name is "FR_link". The Account Name should be "FR_Link" and all password fields
(both Password and Incoming Password) should be left blank.
•
On the PPP Tab:
Check the MultiLink/QoS box.
Set the Header Compression Mode to IPHC.
•
On the Dial In Tab:
If you are using a WAN 3 module, you must add "WAN" as the Dial In Service number.
2. On the Wan Port Form:
•
In the WanPort Tab
Set the speed to match the link. Set the RAS Name to DialIn. Set the Mode as
SyncFrameRelay.
•
In the FrameRelay Tab
Set the appropriate Frame Relay Management Type. The other default settings are
appropriate for a basic Frame Relay Connection.
•
In the DCLI tab
Set the RAS Name to "FR_link".
Frame Link Type = PPP
DLCI set to the network setting
3. Create a RAS service:
Encrypted Password option is not checked when using a WAN Service. Have the Name =
"FR_Link"
4. Create an IP Route:
The IP Address is the network address of the remote end. Under Destination select the "FR_link"
that was created above.
5. Create a new Line:
The Line Number and Line Group ID must be unique, in other words, not used by any other line.
The Gateway IP Address is the IP Address of the Control Unit at the remote end.
6. Create a Short Code:
To route all calls where the number dialed starts with 8 via Line Group ID 1, therefore via the
VPN Line created above.
•
Short Code: 8N
•
Telephone Number: N
•
Line Group ID: 1
•
Feature: Dial
At Site B
1. Repeat the above steps for VoIP traffic from Site B to Site A.
•
Note: For the IP Office Small Office Edition Control Unit, enabling Local Tones under the Line
and Extension VoIP tabs is recommended.
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Voice over IP
Dedicated T1 Service
At the IP Office
1. Create a Service:
• On the Service Table:
Add an entry and click on the radio button for WAN. The Name value is "isp_service".
• On the Bandwidth Tab:
Set the Minimum Number of Channels value to 1 and set the Maximum Number of Channels to
the number to be used in Step 2.
• In the IP Tab
Set the IP Address field to the IP address of the subscriber's end of the T1 cable (this is assigned
by the ISP at subscription time).
• On the PPP Tab:
Check the MultiLink box.
Disable Compression Mode.
Disable Callback Mode.
• Click OK at the bottom
This action automatically adds an entry to the RAS table with the name "isp_service" and
automatically adds a User with the name "isp_service".
2. On the WAN Port Form
• Create a WAN Service:
Add an entry with a Name value like LINE5.0 with no spaces where LINE in capital letters is
mandatory. The digit 5 indicates that the PRI/T1 card is in slot B. If the PRI/T1 card were in slot
A, the digit 1 would be used. The dot is mandatory. The digit(s) after the dot is (are) determined
by the formula: the lowest numbered channel used for dedicated service minus one. If the PRI/T1
card is in slot B and channels 1 through 12 are used for dedicated service, the Name value must
be LINE5.0 with no spaces. If the PRI/T1 card is in slot A and channels 21 through 24 are used
for dedicated service, the Name value must be LINE1.20 with no spaces.
• Set the Speed value, e.g. 768000 (depending on the channels used, in multiples of 64000, e.g.
12 channel used).
• Set the Mode value to SyncPPP.
• Set the RAS Name value to "isp_service".
• Click OK to save the changes.
3. Create an IP Route
• In IP Route Table:
Add an entry with a blank IP Address value, a blank IP Mask value a blank Gateway value and a
Destination value of "isp_service".
• Click OK to save the changes.
4. Line Changes
• In the Line Table:
Edit the Line 01 or Line 05 entry, depending on the value entered in step 2, such that each
channel from the lowest numbered of the of the dedicated channels, e.g. 1, to the highest
numbered dedicated channel, eg. 12.
• Set the Type value to Clear Channel 64K.
• Click OK to save the changes.
5. System Changes
• In the LAN1 Tab on the System Form:
Change the IP address to the IP address of the IP Office.
• Set the IP Mask to the that required by the network configuration.
• In the DNS Tab on the System Form:
Set the DNS Server IP Address to the value in the network.
• Set the Type value to Clear Channel 64K.
• Click OK to save the changes.
6. Save the configuration file to the Control Unit, choose to reboot immediately.
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Manager 3.0
At the PC
1. Use Start | Settings | Control Panel | Network | Protocols Tab | TCP/IP entry | Properties.
Set the IP address to the IP address of the IP Office the IP Mask to that required by the network
configuration and the Gateway IP Address to the IP Address of the IP Office as Specified in Step
5 of the previous list and the DNS Server IP Address to the value in the network.
2. In Internet Explorer, under Tools->Internet Options, set the home page as required.
3. Open the configuration file from the Control Unit.
4. Connect the span to the slot in the back of the Control Unit as determined by the value assigned
in Step 2 of the previous list.
5. In the Browser, click on the Home button.
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Using a Dedicated T1/PRI ISP Link
Using a Dedicated T1/PRI ISP Link
This document shows by example the configuration to create a dedicated WAN PPP link to an Internet
Service Provider (ISP) over a set of T1 or PRI line channels.
•
Note: The ISP must support this mode of connection and will need to provide details of the
required settings. If multiple channels are to be used, then the ISP must support Multilink PPP.
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Manager 3.0
1. Create a Firewall
•
WARNING: WAN connections can be used without a firewall. However, for any WAN
connection to or through the Internet, Avaya strongly recommends that a firewall is setup
and used to control the types of traffic allowed.
The normal installation process for IP Office creates a default firewall for internet access. We are
repeating the process here in case a firewall was not setup during original installation or if you want to
apply different firewall settings to the T1 PPP link.
1. Start Manager and load the IP Office configuration.
2. In the left-hand panel, click
Firewall Profile to display the list of the existing profiles.
3. Right-click on the displayed list and select New.
•
Double-click on a existing profile if you want to edit and use it.
4. Enter an appropriate name, such as “Internet01”, in the Name field.
5. Set the protocols settings as required by the customer. The defaults, are shown above.
6. Proceed to step 1a following.
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Using a Dedicated T1/PRI ISP Link
1a. Block NetBIOS/DNS Access
NetBIOS and DNS traffic from your network to the internet is normally not needed and causes
unnecessary line usage and costs. You can block it by adding a custom filter to the internet firewall
profile.
1. With the firewall profile open, click on the Custom tab.
2. Right-click the Notes area and select Add.
3. In the Notes field, enter an appropriate name such as Drop NetBIOS/DNS.
4. Set the Direction to Drop.
5. In the IP Protocol field, enter 6 (TCP).
6. In the Match Offset field, enter 20.
7. In the Match Length field, enter 4.
8. In the Match Data field, enter 00890035 (the IP Office will insert the remaining zeros).
9. In the Match Mask field, enter ffffffff.
10. Click OK.
1b. Allow Ping for Testing
Sending pings through the firewall may be useful for testing the internet connection. Remember to
remove this custom entry afterwards unless the customer also want to be able to send pings.
1. With the firewall profile open, click on the Custom tab.
2. Right-click on the Notes area and select Add.
3. In the Notes field, enter an appropriate name such as Allow ICMP (PING).
4. Set the Direction to Bothway.
5. Set the IP Protocol to 1 (ICMP).
6. Set the Match Offset to 20.
7. Set the Match Length to 0.
8. Set the Match Mask to F7.
9. Click OK to save the custom setting and OK to save the profile.
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Manager 3.0
2. Create a WAN Service
The service defines features such as the ISP assigned IP address, the bandwidth required and the
firewall to use.
2a. Create a New WAN Service
1. In the left-hand panel, click on
Service to display the list of existing services.
2. Right-click on the list and select New.
3. Select WAN Service and then click on OK.
4. The configuration form for a service should appear.
2b. Configure the WAN Service – Service Tab
1. Select the Service tab.
2. In the Name field enter an appropriate name, such as “Internet”.
•
Note: This will also automatically create a RAS entry with the same name.
3. Enter the Account Name, Password and Telephone Number details provided by the ISP.
4. For the Firewall Profile select the firewall created previously.
2c. Configure the WAN Service Bandwidth Tab
1. Click the Bandwidth tab.
2. Set the Maximum No. of Channels to the maximum number of channels that the service should
use. In this example, 12 channels were used.
•
Note: The maximum number of channels that can be used will be limited by the number
of data channels supported by the IP Office Control Unit and not already in use.
3. Leave all the other entries at their default values.
2d. Configure the WAN Service – IP Tab
If the ISP has allocated IP address details then enter them through this tab. If the IP Address and IP
Mask define a different domain from the IP Office's own LAN settings (those in the System | LAN1 or
LAN2 tab), then NAT is automatically applied.
1. Click the IP tab.
2. In the IP Address field, enter the IP address specified by the ISP.
3. In the IP Mask field, enter the IP Mask specified by the ISP.
2e. Configure the WAN Service – PPP Tab
The settings shown are typical. The actual settings must match those required by the ISP. For example,
if Cisco routers are being used then IPHC needs to be ticked.
1. Click the PPP tab.
2. Ensure that the following options are selected. Leave all other options at their default settings.
•
•
•
•
Multilink.
Compression Mode: Disable.
Callback Mode: Disable.
Access Mode: Digital64
3. Click OK.
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Using a Dedicated T1/PRI ISP Link
3. Create the Virtual WAN Port
1. In the left-hand panel, click
WAN Port to display a list of existing ports.
2. Right-click on the displayed list and select New.
3. In the Name field, enter either LINEx.y where:
•
LINE must be in uppercase.
•
x is the line number. For a PRI/T1 module in Slot A, this will be 1. For a PRI/T1 module in
Slot B, this will be 5.
•
y is the lowest numbered channel number to be used by the WAN link minus 1. For
example, if the lowest channel to be used is channel 1 then y = 1 - 1 = 0.
4. In the Speed field, enter the total combined speed of the maximum number of channels sets in
the Service. In this example, 12 channels x 64000 bits = 76800.
•
Note: The maximum number of channels that can be used will be limited by the number of
data channels supported by the IP Office Control Unit and not already in use.
5. Set the Mode to SyncPPP.
6. In the RAS Name field, select the RAS name created when the new Service of that name was
created.
7. Click OK.
4. Create an IP Route
Note: By leaving the IP address details blank, this becomes the default route for any IP traffic not for the
IP Office's LAN. To route IP traffic via other WAN routes, specific IP address details need to be entered
in the IP Route form for those routes.
1. In the left-hand panel, click on
IP Route to display the list of existing routes.
2. Right-click on the list area and select New.
3. In the Destination field, select the name given to the WAN Service created previously.
4. Leave the Metric at default value of 1.
5. Click OK.
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Manager 3.0
5. Configure the Line Channels
This stage of the process differs according to the type of line being used.
5a. T1 Line
1. In the left-hand panel, click
Line to display the list of existing lines.
2. Double-click on the line previously entered in the WAN Port settings.
3. Check that the Channel Allocation order matches that required by the ISP. Cisco routers
typically use 1->24.
4. Select the channels to be used in the WAN PPP link and change their Channel Type to “Clear
Channel 64k”. Use the Shift key to select and edit the appropriate channels all at the same time.
5. Click OK.
6. Click OK again.
7. Send the configuration to the IP Office and reboot.
5b. T1 PRI Line
1. In the left-hand panel, click on
Line to display the list of existing lines.
2. Double-click on the line previously entered in the WAN Port settings.
3. Check that the Channel Allocation order matches that required by the ISP. Cisco routers
typically use 1->23.
4. Select the channels to be used in the WAN PPP link and change their Admin to “Out of
Service”. Use the Shift key to select and edit the appropriate channels all at the same time.
5. Click OK.
6. Click OK again.
7. Send the configuration to the IP Office and reboot.
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SNMP
SNMP Introduction
SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) is a standard network protocol that allows the monitoring
and management of data devices across a network.
An SNMP agent can be built into network devices such as routers and hubs. An SNMP manager
application (for example CastleRock or HP OpenView) can then communicate with those devices.
This communication can be:
•
Polling: Supported by IP Office 2.0 and above
Some SNMP manager applications send out polling messages to the network. They then record
the responds of any SNMP enabled devices (agents). This allows the manager to create a
network map and to raise an alarm when devices previously present do not respond.
•
Most SNMP manager applications can also do simple IP address polling to locate nonSNMP enabled devices. However this method of polling does not identify the device type
or other information.
•
SNMP polling including details about the responding device. For example an IP Office
control unit's response includes the control unit type, level of software, routing table
information, up time, etc.
•
Traps: Supported by IP Office 2.0 and above
When certain events occur, a devices SNMP agent can send details of the event to the SNMP
manager. This is called an SNMP 'trap'. These appear in the event log of the SNMP manager.
Most SMNP manager's can be configured to give additional alerts in response to particular traps.
•
Management: Not supported by IP Office 2.0 and above
Some SNMP agents support device management and configuration changes through the SNMP
manager interface.
IP Office 2.0 and above allows IP Office Control Units to act as read-only SNMP v1 agents. It can
include the sending of events traps to up to two different SNMP manager addresses.
IP Office SNMP operation has been tested against Castle Rock SNMPc-EE 5.1.6c and HP OpenView
Network Node Manager 6.41.
Installing the IP Office MIB Files
To allow full communication between an SNMP agent and an SNMP manager, the SNMP manager must
load MIB files (Management Information Base) specific to the SNMP agent device and the features it
supports. These MIB files contain details of the information the agent can provide and the traps that it
can send. Full details of the structure of the IP Office MIB files, MIB groups within those files and event
traps can be found in the "IP Office Installation Manual".
The MIB files for IP Office operation are included on the IP Office Admin CD in the folder
C:\smnp_mibs. The actual files required and the method of loading depend on the SNMP manager
application being used. The details below cover the two SNMP manager applications tested.
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Manager 3.0
CastleRock SNMPc
1. Copy the following MIB files from C:\smnp_mibs to the applications MIBs folder. Note: The order
matches the order in which the MIBs should be added in step 4 below.
MIB File
Source
a. entity-mib.mib
snmp_mibs\Standard folder on IP Office Admin CD.
b. avayagen-mib.mib
snmp_mibs\IPOffice folder on IP Office Admin CD.
c.
snmp_mibs\IPOffice folder on IP Office Admin CD.
ipo-prod-mib.mib
d. ipo-mib.mib
snmp_mibs\IPOffice folder on IP Office Admin CD.
e. inet-address-mib.mib
snmp_mibs\Standard folder on IP Office Admin CD.
f.
snmp_mibs\Standard folder on IP Office Admin CD.
integrated-services-mib.mib
g. diffserv-dscp-tc.mib
snmp_mibs\Standard folder on IP Office Admin CD.
h. diffserv-mib.mib
snmp_mibs\Standard folder on IP Office Admin CD.
i.
snmp_mibs\IPOffice folder on IP Office Admin CD.
ipo-phones-mib.mib
2. Start the CastleRock SNMP console.
3. Select Config | MIB Database.
4. Select Add. Select and add each MIB in the shown above.
5. Select Compile.
HP Open View Network Node Manager
1. Copy the following MIB files from C:\smnp_mibs to the applications MIBs folder.
MIB File
Source
a. rfc2737-entity-mib.mib
snmp_mibs\standard folder on OpenView Install CD.
b. avayagen-mib.mib
snmp_mibs\IPOffice folder on IP Office Admin CD.
c.
snmp_mibs\IPOffice folder on IP Office Admin CD.
ipo-prod-mib.mib
d. ipo-mib.mib
snmp_mibs\IPOffice folder on IP Office Admin CD.
e. inet-address-mib.mib
snmp_mibs\Standard folder on IP Office Admin CD.
f.
snmp_mibs\standard folder on OpenView Install CD.
rfc2213-integrated-servicesmib.mib
g. diffserv-dscp-tc.mib
snmp_mibs\Standard folder on IP Office Admin CD.
h. diffserv-mib-hpov.mib
snmp_mibs\Standard folder on IP Office Admin CD.
i.
snmp_mibs\IPOffice folder on IP Office Admin CD.
ipo-phones-mib.mib
2. Start the OpenView Network Node Manager console.
3. Select Options and then Load/Unload MIBs: SNMP.
4. Select Load and select all the MIB files listed above.
5. Select Compile.
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SNMP
Avaya 4600 & 5600 Series IP Phones
A MIB file exists for the SNMP monitoring of Avaya 4600 and 5600 Series IP phones. The MIB file can
be obtained from the Avaya support website (http://support.avaya.com).
Enabling SNMP and Polling Support
In order for the IP Office control unit to be discovered and polled by an SNMP manager, its SNMP agent
must be enabled and placed in the same read community as the SNMP manager.
To enable the SNMP agent:
1. In Manager, receive the control unit's configuration.
2. Double-click System from the Configuration Tree panel and select the SNMP tab.
3. Tick SNMP Enabled.
4. In SNMP Port, enter the UDP port number used by the IP Office SNMP agent to listen for and
respond to SNMP traffic. The normal default is 161.
5. In Community (Read-only), enter the community to which the device belongs for read access.
This community name must match that used by the SNMP manager application when sending
requests to the device. The community public is frequently used to establish communication and
then changed (at both the SNMP agent and manager ends) for security.
6. Click OK.
7. Send the configuration back to the IP Office and select reboot.
8. Following the IP Office reboot, the SNMP manager should be able to discover the control unit.
9. The control unit's response will include details of the control unit type and the current level of core
software.
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Enabling SNMP Trap Sending
In Manager, receive the control unit's configuration.
1. Double-click System from the Configuration Tree panel and select the SNMP tab.
2. Ensure that SNMP Enabled is ticked.
3. Using either Trap Destination 1 or Trap Destination 2, enter the following information:
•
Enter the IP Address of the PC running the SNMP manager application.
•
Enter the Port on which the traps messages should be sent. This is the UDP port on
which the IP Office sends SNMP trap messages. The default is 162.
•
Set the Community that will be used by the agent and the SNMP manager. The
community public is frequently used to establish communication and then changed (at
both the SNMP agent and manager ends) for security.
•
Select the Events which should be sent:
•
Generic:
Events such as soft reboot (warm start), hard reboot (cold start), links up/down
(transition in the status of a PPP or frame relay interface) or SNMP community
mismatch.
•
Entity:
Failures, errors and changes of state in IP Office modules and trunk interfaces.
Note: Does not include WAN3, Modem2 and ATM4.
•
Licence:
Changes of state in the communication with the Feature Key Server.
•
Phone Change:
Changes to the type of DS or IP phone connected to a port.
8. Click on OK.
9. Send the configuration back to the IP Office and select reboot.
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Configuration Forms
The Configuration Tree
When you receive a configuration, the majority of that information encompasses details that were set-up
within each configuration form.
The left-hand panel of the Manager screen shows each configuration form arranged in a configuration
tree format. Appropriately, this panel is called the Configuration Tree panel. The Configuration Tree
panel can be navigated in the following ways:
•
To open or display related information on each configuration form, click on the corresponding
icon.
•
Double-clicking on each icon will expand/contract the configuration tree.
•
With each added entry, the number of entries is reflected in the parenthesis () following the
respective configuration form.
Once the configuration form is opened, right-click in the right-hand panel to select various options
(typically View, Edit, New and/or Delete). If there is an existing entry for the configuration form, you can
double-click the displayed entry name to view its configuration.
Following are a list of all the available configuration forms:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Configure a BootP entry.
Configure an Operator.
Configure the System.
Configure a Line. This form varies according to the type of line.
Configure a Control Unit.
Configure an Extension.
Configure a User.
Configure a Hunt Group.
Configure a Short Code.
Configure a Service.
Configure a Remote Access Service (RAS).
Configure an Incoming Call Route.
Configure a WAN Port.
Configure a Directory Entry.
Configure a Time Profile.
Configure a Firewall Profile.
Configure an IP Route.
Configure a Least Cost Route.
Enter License keys.
Configure an Account Code.
Configure an E911 System. This configuration form is only available when the system locale is
set to enu - U.S.
Configure Wireless 802.11b. This configuration form is only available if you are running IP
Office - Small Office Edition.
Configure User Restrictions.
Configure a Logical LAN.
Configure Tunnels.
Configure an Auto Attendant. This configuration is only available if you are running IP Office Small Office Edition and IP Office 406v2 (systems that supported Embedded Voicemail.
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Manager 3.0
BOOTP Form
BOOTP is used to upgrade the operational software on the Control Unit. BOOTP entries are generated
automatically and stored in the registry of the local PC. You may need to create a BOOTP entry
manually if you have a Control Unit that has not previously been upgraded from the local PC.
•
Note: The BOOTP entry for a system is used for software upgrades. It is also used for
emergency recovery. Therefore it is important to check that an entry has been created for the
system you are managing.
•
Note: The BOOTP information is not saved as part of the system configuration. It is saved on the
Manager PC and may contain information for several systems if managed through the same PC.
•
Enabled : Default = Enabled
If unticked, disables BOOTP support of the IP Office system from this Manager PC. This may be
necessary when managing multiple IP Office systems on different networks.
•
MAC :
The hardware MAC address of the Control Unit. This is the same as the Serial Number displayed
in the Unit form. Alternatively this information is available during the upgrade process via the
TFTP log (see View Menu ) or in the status bar of Manager.
•
IP Address :
Enter the IP address of the Control Unit.
•
File Name :
Enter the name of the .bin software file to be sent to the Control Unit during upgrades. This file
must exist in the Working Directory.
•
Time Offset (hours) : Default = 0.
Use if the Manager application is being used as the time server for the IP Office system. Sets the
offset between the PC time and the time sent to the IP Office system in response to a time
request. Do not use if an alternate time server has been set in the System form.
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Operator Form
Operators are people who configure the system. Rather than allowing full access to the configuration,
Operators can be created with different levels of access to the configuration file. Each Operator should
be given a name and a password.
•
Name :
The name of the Operator
•
Password :
The password to be used by the Operator
•
Confirm Password :
Type the password entered above to ensure the correct password has been used.
Define what access you are going to give to the Operator on this configuration form, the following four
rights define this access:
•
View: This allows the Operator to view existing entries.
•
Edit: This allows an Operator to make changes to entries in a form.
•
New: This allows an Operator to create new entries.
•
Delete: This allows an Operator to delete existing entries.
The other tabs represent the various configuration forms. Use the check boxes to select what access the
operator should have to which parts of each form.
The operator settings are stored on the Manager PC in .ops files in the Manager directory. As this is not
part of the Control Units configuration no send or reboot is necessary following operator changes.
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System Form
System Form Overview
This form enables the configuration of system settings and the system's main features such as DHCP
and the Voicemail Server PC.
The following tabs correspond to the System Form:
•
System
•
LAN1
•
LAN2 - Applies only to the IP412 and Avaya IP Office - Small Office Edition.
•
DNS
•
Voicemail
•
Telephony
•
Gatekeeper
•
LDAP
•
SNMP
System
Fields within this tab allow you to configure settings related to the Control Unit. The following fields are
configurable:
•
Name:
A name to identify this system. This is typically used to identify the configuration by the location
or customer's company name.Some features such as Gatekeeper require the system to have a
name. This field is case sensitive and within any network of IP Offices must be unique. Do not
use punctuation characters such as #, ?, /, -,. and ,.
•
Locale:
This option sets country and language variations based on a three letter value. The main purpose
is to set the default ringing and caller display types for the system. See Supported Country and
Locale Settings.
•
Password: Default = password
A password for controlling access to the operation of the Control Unit. This is
required to upgrade and reboot and to send or receive configurations from the
Control Unit. This is a required option and a prompt is given if left blank.
•
•
Monitor Password: Default = blank
This password is used by the Monitor and Call Status applications to allow communication with
the main unit. If left blank these applications will use the System Password above.
•
•
Confirm Password:
This is used to check that the password entered in the Password field has been entered
correctly. A warning message appears requesting you to re-confirm the password if the
fields differ.
Confirm Monitor Password:
This is used to check that the password entered in the Monitor Password field has been
entered correctly. A warning message appears requesting you to re-confirm the password
if the fields differ.
Time Server IP Address: Default = Blank
Sets a specific address for the Control Unit's time server requests. Blank or 0.0.0.0 means default
operation as above. 0.0.0.1 disables time server updates.
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Configuration Forms
•
Time Offset (Hours): Default = Blank
If the IP Office resides in a time zone that is different from that of the time server, this field needs
to be configured to compensate for the time difference. For example, if the time server is 5 hours
ahead of the IP Office, then this field must be configured with -5 to make the adjustment.
•
TFTP Server IP Address: Default = Blank
When Manager is running, it acts as a TFTP server for the IP Office Control Unit. An entry is only
required here if you want to force the Control Unit to use a particular device as its TFTP server.
This field must be filled in with the IP address of the PC running Manager on systems using 4600
Series IP phones. On Avaya IP Office - Small Office Edition systems, this can be the IP Address
of the control unit if fitted with a local memory storage card.
•
License Server IP Address: Default = 255.255.255.255
The IP address of the server PC providing license key validation for the Control Unit. For a serial
licence key plugged directly into a Avaya IP Office - Small Office Edition control unit, the field
should be left blank. Note that each IP Office Control Unit requires a separate server PC for
license validation. See License Form .
•
AVPP IP Address : Only necessary if using the 3600 series wireless handsets.
The address of the Avaya Voice Priority Processor (AVPP) used to support 3600 series wireless
handsets (SpectraLink).
•
File Writer IP Address :
The address of the TFTP server able to send files to any writable media card installed on Avaya
IP Office - Small Office Edition systems.
•
Conferencing Center IP Address :
The IP address of the Conferencing Center server PC. This address is used by the IP Office and
by Voicemail Pro server.
•
Conferencing Center URL :
The root URL of the web server being used to support Conferencing Center. This address is then
used by Conferencing Center links within Phone Manager and SoftConsole.
•
DSS Status: Default = Off
Affects phones with a display and DSS keys. Controls whether pressing a DSS key set to another
user, who is on a call, display details of their calling/called party. When not selected, off, no
called/calling party information is displayed.
•
Beep on Listen: Default = On (USA)/On (ROW)
Controls whether call parties hear a repeating tone when their call is monitored by another party
using the Call Listen feature. See How to Monitor Calls .
•
Hide auto record: Default = On (USA)/Off (ROW)
During call recording by Voicemail Pro, some Avaya terminals display REC to show that the call
is being recorded. When on, Hide auto record suppresses this recording indication.
•
Favour RIP Routes, over static routes: Default = Off
If enabled and a static route is configured for a specific destination and a RIP route is received for
that same destination, the RIP route will be added to the routing table and used, regardless of the
metric it has. If this field is not enabled, then a RIP route that is received at the same destination
to a configured static route will be discarded.
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LAN1
This configuration form is used to configure IP addressing for the LAN. Note: The IP412 and Avaya IP
Office - Small Office Edition control units support two LANs, appearing as LAN1 and LAN2. On the IP412
each LAN is represented by a separate physical LAN port. On the Avaya IP Office - Small Office Edition,
the LAN ports are switched as appropriate.
The following fields are configurable:
•
IP Address: Default = 192.168.42.1
This is the IP address of the Control Unit on LAN1. If the Control Unit is also acting as a DHCP
server on LAN1 then this address will be the DHCP Starting address.
•
IP Mask: Default = 255.255.255.0
This is the Subnet mask used on LAN1.
•
Do not enter IP Address and IP Mask values if running in DHCP Client mode. The fields
will be filled automatically with the values received from the DHCP server.
•
Primary Trans. IP Address: Default = blank [IP412 and IP Office - Small Office Edition only]
This address acts as the primary address for the LAN. Any incoming IP packets without a session
are translated to this address.
•
Number of DHCP IP Addresses: Default = 200
This defines the number of sequential IP addresses, including the Control Unit IP address, that is
allocated via DHCP on LAN1 and/or to Dial in users. Addresses are only allocated if the DHCP
mode is set to Server or DialIn.
•
•
Note: If the Control Unit is acting as a DHCP Server (DHCP mode set to Server or DialIn)
on both the LAN1 and LAN2, Dial in users are allocated their address from the LAN1 pool
of addresses first.
DHCP Mode:
This controls the Control Unit's DHCP state on the LAN1.
•
Server: When selected the Control Unit is acting as the DHCP Server on LAN1, allocating
address to other devices on the network and to PPP Dial in users.
•
Disabled: When selected the Control Unit will not use DHCP, therefore it will not act as a
DHCP server or obtain an IP address from a DHCP server on this LAN.
•
Dial In: This option allows the Control Unit to allocate IP addresses to PPP Dial In users
only. It will not allocate IP addresses to local devices on this LAN.
•
Client: The Control Unit obtains its IP Address and IP Mask from a DHCP server on the
LAN.
•
Enable NAT: Default = Off
This option is only shown on the LAN1 and LAN2 tabs of IP412 and Avaya IP Office - Small
Office Edition Control Units. It controls whether NAT should be used for IP traffic from LAN1 to
LAN2. Note: Not supported on the same LAN interface as WAN3.
•
RIP Mode : Default = None
Routing Information Protocol (RIP) is a method by which network routers can exchange
information about device locations and routes. RIP can be used within small networks to allow
dynamic route configuration as opposed to static configuration.
•
•
•
•
•
Manager 3.0
IP Office
None: The LAN does not listen to or send RIP messages.
Listen Only (Passive): Listen to RIP-1 and RIP-2 messages in order to learn RIP routes
on the network.
RIP1: As above plus send RIP-1 responses as a sub-network broadcast.
RIP2 Broadcast (RIP1 Compatibility): As above but send RIP-2 responses as a subnetwork broadcast.
RIP2 Multicast: As above but send RIP-2 responses to the RIP-2 multicast address.
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Configuration Forms
LAN2
This configuration form is similar to LAN1 . It appears on the IP412 and Avaya IP Office - Small Office
Edition which support two separate LAN's.
Note: For Manager 2.1, DHCP will always give the LAN1 address, even if you have a LAN2 configured.
The following additional field is shown on the LAN2 tab:
•
Firewall:
Allows the application of an IP Office firewall to traffic between LAN2 and LAN1.
DNS
DNS is the system used on the Internet to match computer names to IP addresses. Internet users
request specific hosts using names such as www.avaya.com. These names are sent to a Domain Name
Server, which converts the name to the IP address, which the computers can pass data.
Within the context of Manager, this tab is used to enter the DNS and WINS information that is given to
each host on LAN1 and LAN2 when the main unit is acting as the DHCP server on either or both LANs.
See Domain Name System .
•
DNS Service IP Address: Default = Blank
This is the IP address of an DNS Server. Your Internet service provider or network administrator
provides this information. Alternatively leave this field blank and the main unit will offer itself as a
DNS server and will then forward DNS requests to the ISP's DNS server. With the second
method, tick Request DNS in the IP tab of the Service Form. The form includes fields for primary
(1) and secondary (2) address entries.
•
DNS Domain: Default = Blank
This is the domain name for your IP address. Your Internet service provider or network
administrator provides this. Typically this field is left blank.
•
WINS Server IP Address: Default = Blank
This is the IP address of your local WINS server. This is only used by Windows PCs, and
normally points to an NT server nominated by your network administrator as your WINS server.
Setting a value will result in also sending a mode of "hybrid". The form includes fields for primary
(1) and secondary (2) address entries.
•
WINS Scope: Default = Blank
This is provided by your network administrator or left blank.
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Voicemail
If Voicemail or VoiceMail Pro applications are being used with your system, the system must know
where the Voicemail Server is located. Fields in this tab allow you to define the Voicemail Server.
The following fields are configurable:
•
Voicemail Type: Default = PC
Sets the type of voicemail system being used.
•
None : No voicemail operation.
•
PC : The Voicemail server is being run on a networked PC.
•
Line : Used for centralized voicemail.
•
Integral : Voicemail running on an integral card in the Control Unit.
•
Group : Not currently supported.
•
Audix: Communicate with an Avaya Intuity Audix voicemail system.
•
Voicemail Destination : Default = blank
Only used if the Voicemail type is set to Line, Group or Audix. The drop-down selector displays
the available options.
•
Audix UDP :
Available if the voicemail type Audix is selected. Needs to be completed with a four digit number
from the Universal Dial Plan.
•
Voicemail IP Address : Default = 255.255.255.255
This is the IP address of the PC that is running the Voicemail Server or Voicemail Pro application.
•
•
Voicemail Password : Default = blank
The Voicemail Password is used by the main unit to confirm connection has been made to the
correct Voicemail Pro Server. The password entered must correspond to the password set via
the Voicemail Pro software. This entry must be left blank when using the standard Voicemail
application supplied on the Admin CD.
•
•
If set as 255.255.255.255, Control Unit broadcasts on the LAN to see if it can discover the
Voicemail Server. If set to a specific IP address, the system connects to the Voicemail
Server running on that specific IP address only.
Confirm Password :
The password must be retyped to ensure it has been correctly entered.
Maximum Record Time: Default = 120 seconds; Range = 5 to 180 seconds
This field is only available when the Integral voicemail type is selected. The value sets the
maximum record time (in seconds) for messages and prompts to the value required by the
customer.
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Configuration Forms
System Telephony
Information within this tab allows you to set the system defaults for telephony operation. These can also
be set per user in the Telephony tab of the User configuration form.
For details of the ringing tones see Ring Tones.
The following fields are configurable within this tab:
•
Default Outside Call Sequence: Default = RingNormal
Default Ringing sequence for outside calls. These ring tone settings only apply to analog phones.
•
Default Inside Call Sequence: Default = RingType1
Default Ringing sequence for internal (extension to extension) calls. These ring tone settings only
apply to analog phones.
•
Default Ring Back Sequence: Default = RingType2
Default Ringing sequence for calls that are ringing back an extension, eg. CTI calls, VoiceMail
and Ring Back when free. These ring tone settings only apply to analog phones.
•
Dial Delay Time (ms): Default = 4000ms (USA/Japan), 1000ms (ROW)
The time the system waits following a dialed digit before it interprets all the digits dialed as a
unique number. This allows Short Codes and Extensions to have overlapping numbers, eg.
Extension "555" and the telephone number "5551234".)
•
Dial Delay Count: Default = 0 digits (USA/Japan), 4 digits (ROW)
The number of digits to wait for before interpreting the dialed digits - this acts earlier than the dial
delay time if this number of digits has been entered.
•
Default No Answer Time (secs): Default = 15 seconds
The amount of time allowed after the start of ringing to when the phone has been considered
unanswered. This determines the amount of time a call rings at the extension before going to
Voicemail and also the amount of time a call rings at the extension when auto callback has been
invoked.
•
Hold Timeout (secs): Default = 90 seconds
The time calls remain on hold before recalling to the user who held the call. Entering 0 disables
this feature.
•
Park Timeout (secs): Default = 300 seconds
The time calls remain parked before recalling to the user who parked the call. Entering 0 disables
this feature.
•
Show Account Code: Default = Off
If enabled, the list of account codes will display in Phone Manager. If disabled, the request for
account codes will be blocked.
•
Auto Hold: Default = On
If you have more than one line configured for your phone, having Auto Hold enabled will place the
first line on hold when the user picks up the second line. If not enabled, the first line will be
dropped.
•
Local Dial Tone: Default = On
For all normal operation this should be left enabled as it allows the system to provide dial tone to
users (essential for MSN working).
•
Local Busy Tone: Default = Off
Used when local exchange gives busy signal (via Q.931) but provides no Busy Tone. For all
normal operation this should be left off.
•
Companding:
Used to select the method of audio compression for voice calls between ALAW and ULAW (also
called MU-LAW or -Law).
•
Conferencing Tone: Default = Off
When off, gives a single tone when a new party joins a conference and double-tone when a party
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leave a conference. When on, repeats the conference tone every 10 seconds to all conference
parties.
•
Inhibit Off-Switch Calls: Default = Off (Italy = On)
When on, bars any calls (internal or external) from being diverted or forwarded off switch.
•
Dial By Name: Default = On
When on, allows the directory features on various phones to match the dialing of full names.
When off, the directory features use the pre-IP Office 1.4 method of first character match only.
•
Busy Tone Detection: Default = System
Allows configuration of the IP Office's busy tone detection settings. The busy tone detection
options (frequency mode and width) are defined by the system locale. They should not be
adjusted unless advised by the Avaya Technical Support.
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Configuration Forms
Gatekeeper
Gatekeepers provide network services to H.323 terminals, MCUs, and gateways. H.323 devices register
with gatekeepers to send and receive H.323 calls. Gatekeepers give permission to make or accept a call
based on a variety of factors.
Note: H.323 gatekeeper (Call Servers) is supported on the LAN1 address only.
Gatekeepers can provide network services such as:
•
Controlling the number and type of connections allowed across the network.
•
Helping to route a call to the correct destination.
•
Determining and maintaining the network address for incoming calls.
Within the Gatekeeper tab, the following fields are configurable:
•
Gatekeeper Enable: Default = On
This option enables Gatekeeper support.
•
Direct Routed Signaling Enable: (currently not supported)
H.323 terminals send audio data directly rather than via the Control Unit, when this feature is
enabled.
•
Auto-create Extn Enable: Default = On
When selected, H.323 terminals automatically register themselves with the Gatekeeper, thus
creating an Extension in the configuration.
•
Enable RSVP: (currently not supported)
Use this option to turn RSVP support on or off. Note that the default firewall profile settings, if
applied, drop RSVP.
•
DSCP (Hex): Default = 0xB8
The Quality of Service (DiffServe) setting applied to VoIP calls. For correct operation, especially
over WAN links, the same value should be set at both ends.
•
•
DSCP Mask (Hex): Default = 0xFC
Allows a mask to be applied to packets for the DSCP value.
•
•
DSCP Mask: Default = 63.
Decimal value equivalent of DSCP Mask (Hex). These two fields are linked, allowing
DSCP Mask entry in either Hex or Decimal.
SIG DSCP (Hex): Default = 0x00
The Quality of Service setting applied to VoIP call signaling.
•
•
DSCP: Default = 46
Decimal value equivalent of DSCP (Hex). These two fields are linked, allowing DSCP
entry in either Hex or Decimal.
SIG DSCP: Default = 0.
Decimal value equivalent of SIG DSCP (Hex). These two fields are linked, allowing SIG
DSCP entry in either Hex or Decimal.
SSON: Default = 176
Sets the site specific option number (SSON) used by the IP Office's internal DHCP. This should
match the SSON used by 4600 & 5600 Series IP phones to request installation settings (the
default being 176). Acceptable values are between 128 and 255.
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LDAP Overview
LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) is a software protocol for enabling anyone to locate
organizations, individuals, and other resources such as files and devices in a network, whether on the
Internet or on a corporate intranet. LDAP is a "lightweight" (smaller amount of code) version of DAP
(Directory Access Protocol), which is part of X.500, a standard for directory services in a network. LDAP
is lighter because in its initial version, it did not include security features. LDAP originated at the
University of Michigan and has been endorsed by at least 40 companies. Netscape includes it in its
latest Communicator suite of products. Microsoft includes it as part of what it calls Active Directory in a
number of products including Outlook Express. Novell's NetWare Directory Services interoperates with
LDAP.
In a network, a directory tells you where in the network something is located. On TCP/IP networks
(including the Internet), the Domain Name System (DNS) is the directory system used to relate the
domain name to a specific network address (a unique location on the network). However, you may not
know the domain name. LDAP allows you to search for an individual without knowing where they're
located (although additional information will help with the search).
An LDAP directory is organized in a simple "tree" hierarchy consisting of the following levels:
•
The "root" directory (the starting place or the source of the tree), which branches out to
•
Countries, each of which branches out to
•
Organizations, which branch out to
•
Organizational units (divisions, departments, and so forth), which branches out to (includes an
entry for)
•
Individuals (which includes people, files, and shared resources such as printers)
An LDAP directory can be distributed among many servers. Each server can have a replicated version of
the total directory that is synchronized periodically. An LDAP server is called a Directory System Agent
(DSA). An LDAP server that receives a request from a user takes responsibility for the request, passing
it to other DSAs as necessary, but ensuring a single coordinated response for the user.
LDAP Directory Synchronization allows the telephone number Directory held in the Control Unit to be
synchronized with the information on an LDAP server. Although targeted for interoperation with Windows
2000 Server Active Directory, the feature is sufficiently configurable to interoperate with any server that
supports LDAP version 2 or higher.
Telephone numbers obtained via the LDAP mechanism are held dynamically in the Directory. Each
record retrieved creates a Directory Entry for use with Phone Manager. Please note that the entries are
not stored in the configuration and therefore will not be visible via Manager. A maximum of 500 records
can be retrieved due to size restraints. Records with exactly the same data in the Name and Number
fields will not be duplicated.
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LDAP
This form is used to configure LDAP operation.
The following fields are configurable within the LDAP tab:
•
User Name: Default = blank
Enter the user name to be used to authenticate connection with the LDAP database.
For a Windows 2000 Active Directory server, the user name is of email format (ie. with a domain
suffix). To determine the domain-name of a particular Windows 2000 user look on the "Account"
tab of the user's properties under "Active Directory Users and Computers". Note that this means
that the user name required is not necessarily the same as the name of the Active Directory entry.
There should be a built-in account in Active Directory for anonymous Internet access, with prefix
"IUSR_" and suffix server_name (whatever was chosen at the Windows 2000 installation). Thus,
for example, the user name entered is this field might be: IUSR_CORPSERV@acme.com
•
Password: Default = blank
Enter the password to be used to authenticate connection with the LDAP database.
Enter the password that has been configured under Active Directory for the above user.
Alternatively an Active Directory object (eg the User container) may be made available for
anonymous read access. This is configured on the server as follows:
In "Active Directory Users and Computers" enable "Advanced Features" under the "View" menu.
Open the properties of the object to be published and select the "Security" tab. Click "Add" and
select "ANONYMOUS LOGON", click "Add", click "OK", click "Advanced" and select
"ANONYMOUS LOGON", click "View/Edit", change "Apply onto" to "This object and all child
objects", click "OK", "OK", "OK".
Once this has been done on the server, any entry can be made in the User Name field in the
System configuration form (however this field cannot be left blank) and the Password field left
blank. Other non-Active Directory LDAP servers may allow totally anonymous access, in which
case neither User Name nor Password need be configured.
•
Confirm Password:
Reenter the password to ensure this has been entered correctly.
•
Server IP Address: Default = blank
Enter the IP address of the server storing the database
•
Authentication Method: Default = Simple
Select the authentication method to be used.
•
Simple: clear text authentication
•
Kerberos: Kerberos 4 LDAP and Kerberos 4 DSA encrypted authentication (for future
use).
•
Resync Interval (secs): Default = 3600 seconds
The period, expressed in seconds, at which the Control Unit will resynchronize the directory with
the server.
This value also affects some aspects of the internal operation. The LDAP search inquiry contains
a field specifying a time limit for the search operation and this is set to 1/16th of the resync
interval. So a server should terminate a search request if it has not completed within 225 secs
(default). The client end will terminate the LDAP operation if the TCP connection has been up for
more than 1/8th of the resync interval (default 450 secs). This time is also the interval at which a
change in state of the "LDAP Enabled" configuration item is checked.
•
Search Base / Search Filter: Default = blank
These 2 fields are used together to refine the extraction of directory entries. Basically the Base
specifies the point in the tree to start searching and the Filter specifies which objects under the
base are of interest. The search base is a distinguished name in string form (as defined in
RFC1779).
The Filter deals with the attributes of the objects found under the Base and has its format defined
in RFC2254 (except that extensible matching is not supported).
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If the Search Filter field is left blank the filter defaults to "(objectClass=*)", this will match all
objects under the Search Base.
The following are some examples applicable to an Active Directory database:
•
•
•
To get all the user phone numbers in a domain:
Search Base: cn=users,dc=acme,dc=com
Search Filter: (telephonenumber=*)
•
To restrict the search to a particular Organizational Unit (eg office) and get cell phone
numbers also:
Search Base: ou=holmdel,ou=nj,DC=acme,DC=com
Search Filter: (|(telephonenumber=*)(mobile=*))
•
To get the members of distribution list "group1":
Search Base: cn=users,dc=acme,dc=com
Search Filter:
(&(memberof=cn=group1,cn=users,dc=acme,dc=com)(telephonenumber=*))
Number Attributes: Default = see below
Enter the number attributes the server should return for each entry that matches the Search Base
and Search Filter. Other entries could be ipPhone, otherIpPhone, facsimileTelephoneNumber,
otherfacsimileTelephone Number, pager or otherPager. The attribute names are not case
sensitive. Other LDAP servers may use different attributes.
•
By default the entry is
"telephoneNumber,otherTelephone,homePhone=H,otherHomePhone=H,mobile=M,other
Mobile=M", as used by Windows 2000 Server Active Directory for Contacts.
•
The optional "=string" sub-fields define how that type of number is tagged in the directory.
Thus, for example, a cell phone number would appear in the directory as: John Birbeck M
7325551234
LDAP Enabled: Default = Off
This option will turn LDAP support on or off.
Notes:
•
A maximum of 500 records can be retrieved due to size restraints.
•
Each record retrieved creates a Directory entry for use with Phone Manager. Please note that the
entries will not be stored in the configuration and therefore are not visible via Manager.
•
All records are merged so that no duplicate entries are created.
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SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) allows network devices (SNMP clients and SNMP
servers) to exchange information. SNMP clients are built into devices such as network routers, server
PC, etc. SNMP servers are typically PC application which receive and/or request SNMP information.
The IP Office SNMP client allows the IP Office control unit to respond to SNMP polling and to send
information about error conditions to SNMP servers.
Note: In order for an SNMP server application to interact with an IP Office, the IP Office MIB files,
provided on the IP Office Admin CD, must be compiled into the SNMP server applications database. For
details on compiling the MIB files, see Installing the IP Office MIB Files.
The following fields are configurable:
•
SNMP Enabled: Default = Off
Enables support for SNMP by the IP Office control unit.
•
SNMP Port: Default = 161
The port on which the control listens and responds to SNMP polling traffic.
•
Community (Read-only): Default = Blank
The SNMP community, eg. public.
•
Trap Destination 1/2:
The control unit supports two SNMP traps, to which it can send specified IP Office events.
•
IP Address: Default = Blank
The IP address of the SNMP server to which trap information is sent.
•
Port: Default = 162
The SNMP transmit port
•
Community: Default = Blank
The SNMP community for the transmitted traps. Must be matched by the receiving SNMP server.
•
Events: Default = None
Sets which types of IP Office events should be collected and sent by the trap:
•
Generic: Report on cold starts, warm starts and SNMP authentication failure.
•
Entity: Report on link up/down changes between IP Office modules (except WAN3),
trunks and VCM.
•
Licence: Report failure to connect with the Licence Key Server.
•
CSU Loop-Back: Only displays when the system locale is set to enu. Ticking this field
enables the sending of CSU loop-back events, which may then be monitored by an SNMP
manager application.
•
Phone Change: Send a trap whenever a phone is removed or moved.
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Line Form
Line Form Overview
Depending on the types of line installed in the Control Unit, the tabs and options that appear for this form
will vary. Manager will recognize the type of line card installed in the Control Unit and make only those
corresponding configuration settings available.
Note: The types of lines supported will vary in different countries. For confirmation of the line types
supported in a particular country, contact your Avaya representative in that country.
These are the possible line types and their respective symbols within Manager:
•
Analog Line:
Indicates that the line is on an Analog card installed in the Control Unit or that analog
expansion module(s) are in use. When configuring an analog line on Manager, the Line
and Analog tabs will be available for set up. When configuring the line settings, make sure
your line settings match those of the exchange line settings.
•
•
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Digital Line:
Indicates that the line is a digital line. Each line consists of a single physical connection
but may carry a number of channels. To recognize the type of digital line, look at its Line
SubType setting. Digital line types available are:
•
T1: The line is provided by a PRI T1 card installed in the Control Unit and set the T1
operation.
•
US PRI: The line is provided by a PRI T1 card installed in the Control Unit and set to
PRI operation.
•
E1 PRI: The line is provided by a PRI E1 or BRI card installed in the Control Unit.
•
E1-R2: The line is provided by an E1-R2 card installed in the Control Unit.
•
Blank: The line is a BRI line provided by an S0 expansion port.
IP Line:
The line is an IP line added manually rather than by the installation of a physical line card
in the Control Unit.
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Line Form (E1 PRI, BRI)
Line Form (E1 PRI, BRI) Overview
This configuration form is used to configure the E1 PRI and BRI lines installed in the Control Unit.
The following tabs contain configurable information for this line form:
•
Line
•
Short Codes
BRI Line Settings
BRI lines can be used in either Point-to-Point or Point-to-MultiPoint mode. Point-to-Point lines are used
when only one device terminates a line in a customer's office. Point-to-MultiPoint lines are used when
more than one device may be used on the line at the customer's premises.
There are major benefits in using Point-to-Point lines: 1. The exchange knows when the line/terminal equipment is down/dead, thus it will not offer calls
down that line. If the lines are Point-to-MultiPoint calls are always offered down the line and fail if
no response from the terminal equipment. So if you have two Point-to-MultiPoint lines and one is
faulty 50% of incoming calls fail.
2. You get a Green LED on the Control Unit when the line is connected. With Point-to-MultiPoint
lines some exchanges will drop level/layer 1/2 signals when the line is idle for a period.
3. The timing clock is locked to the exchange. If level/layer 1/2 signals disappear on a line then the
Control Unit will switch to another line, however this may result in some audible click when the
switchover occurs.
The system will typically work when defaulted on either Point-to-Point or Point-to-MultiPoint lines. This is
because our Terminal Equipment Identifier (TEI), which is used by the exchange to chat to the
equipment, is set to 0 (TEI = 0). If you intend to connect multiple devices (simultaneously) to an ISDN
line, then the TEI should be set to 127. With a TEI = 127 the Control Unit will ask the exchange to
allocate a TEI for operation.
•
Note: When connected to some manufactures equipment, which provides an S0 interface (BRI),
a defaulted Control Unit will not bring up the ISDN line. Configuring the Control Unit to a TEI =
127 for that line will usually resolve this.
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Line
Within the Line tab, the following fields are available for configuration:
•
Line Number
This parameter is not configurable, it is allocated by the system.
•
Line Sub Type:
Select to match the particular line provided by the PSTN.
•
E1 PRI supports ETSI, QSIG A and QSIG B.
•
BRI supports ETSI and AusTS013.
•
Telephone Number:
Used to remember the external telephone number of this line to assist with loop-back testing. For
information only.
•
Number Of Channels:
Defines the number of operational channels that are available on this line. 2 for BRI and up to 30
for PRI - depending upon the number of channels subscribed.
•
Outgoing Channels:
This defines the number of channels available, on this line, for outgoing calls. This should
normally be the same as Number of Channels field, but can be reduced to ensure incoming calls
cannot be blocked by outgoing calls.
•
Data Channels:
The number of channels available for data use. If left blank, the value is 0.
•
Voice Channels:
The number of channels available for voice use.
•
TEI: Default = 0
The Terminal Equipment Identifier. Used to identify each Control Unit connected to a particular
ISDN line. For Point to Point lines this is typically (always) 0. It can also be 0 on a Point to MultiPoint line, however if multiple devices are sharing a Point to Multi-Point line it should be set to
127 which results in the exchange deciding on the TEI's to be used.
•
International Prefix: Default = 00
This indicates the digits to be prefixed to an incoming international call. When a number is
presented from ISDN as an "international number" this prefix is added, eg. 441923000000 is
converted to 00441923000000.
•
National Prefix: Default = 0
This indicates the digits to be prefixed to a incoming national call. When a number is presented
from ISDN as a "national number" this prefix is added, eg. "1923000000 is converted to
01923000000.
•
Prefix: Default = Blank.
On Incoming Calls the ISDN messaging tags the incoming call source location as either National
or International (see their respective prefixes above). This determines the addition of the relevant
0 or 00 respectively (0 is default for National and 00 is default for International). If the ISDN
message flags the call source as unknown, then the number in the Prefix field is added to the
CLI.
In Outgoing Calls when a number is presented to the Line whose programming includes a Prefix
number and the prefix number is present in the dialled digits, it is stripped prior to being sent out
on the line.
•
Channels: BRI = 2, PRI = 30 (or the number of channels purchased from your service provider)
The settings for each channel can be edited double clicking on a channel. This will display the Edit
Channel dialog box for that particular channel. Users have the option of editing individual channels
by double-clicking on the channel, or editing multiple channels by doing the following:
1. Use the standard Window Key to select a continuous group (Shift Key) or Individual
Channels (Control Key).
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2. After selecting the last item (via either of the above methods, press the right mouse button
while still holding down the Control or Shift Key). Select the Edit option.
3. A form comes up with the Channel parameters. The first and last channels that you have
selected are listed in the Channel box (ie. 1-8).
4. Make all appropriate changes and then select OK. The changes are applied to all the
selected channels.
Note: The Line Appearance ID cannot be updated when editing multiple channels.
Edit Channel
The following fields are configurable for each channel:
•
Incoming Group & Outgoing Group: Default = 0
A group can contain multiple lines and channels. Short codes and Incoming Call Routes can
indicate which group they should use.
•
Line Appearance ID: Default = Blank
Used for configuring Line Appearances with button programming. The following rules apply when
setting up Line Appearance IDs:
•
The Line Appearance ID must NOT already be assigned to another channel or be the
extension number of a user or hunt group.
•
If an existing Line Appearance ID that is configured for a specific user's line appearance
is deleted, a warning message stating that if this ID is deleted, then all related
appearances will also be deleted. You can then confirm or cancel the action.
•
If the Line Appearance ID is changed but not removed, then all appearances configured
for the old ID are updated to contain the new ID.
Short Codes
A Line Short Code is similar to a User Short Code in that it performs the function on that line only. A Line
Short Code is performed once the specific Line has been accessed. See Understanding Short Codes .
•
To add a Short Code:
Place the cursor over the Short Code List Box and double-click or right-click and select Add.
Advanced
Clock Quality: Default = Network
Sets whether the Control Unit takes it clock source from the network, use the network as a fallback
source or not as a clock source.
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Line Form (E1-R2)
Line Form (E1-R2) Overview
This form is used to configure E1-R2 lines provided by an E1-R2 card installed in the Control Unit.
The following tabs contain configurable information for this line form:
•
Line
•
Advanced
•
MFC Group
Line (E1-R2)
Within the Line tab, the following fields are available for configuration:
•
Line Number:
Allocated by the system.
•
Line SubType: Default = E1-R2
Supported options are E1-R2, ETSI, QSIGA or QSIGB.
•
Channel Allocation: Default = 30>1
The order (30>1 or 1>30) in which channels are used.
•
Country (Locale): Default = Mexico.
Select the locale that matches the area of usage. Note that changing the locale will return MFC
Group settings to their defaults for the selected locale. Currently supported locales are Mexico,
Brazil, Argentina, Korea, China and None.
The table at the base of the form displays the settings for the individual channels provided by the line.
For details of the channel settings see Edit Channel (E1-R2).
To edit a channel, either double-click on it or right-click and select Edit. This will display the Edit Channel
dialog box. To edit multiple channels at the same time select the channels whilst pressing the Shift or
Ctrl key. Then right-click and select Edit.
Note: The Line Appearance ID cannot be updated when editing multiple channels.
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Edit Channel (E1-R2)
Within the Edit Channel section, the following fields are available for configuration:
•
Channel:
The channel or channels being edited.
•
Incoming Group & Outgoing Group: Default = 0
A group can contain multiple lines and channels. Short codes and Incoming Call Routes can
indicate which group they should use.
•
Direction: Default = Bothway
The direction of calls on the channel (Incoming, Outgoing or Bothway).
•
Bearer: Default = Any
The type of traffic carried by the channel (Voice, Data or Any).
•
Line Signaling Type: Default = R2 Loop Start
The signaling type used by the channel. Current supported options are:
•
R2 Loop Start, R2 DID, R2 DOD, R2 DIOD, Tie Immediate Start, Tie Wink Start, Tie Delay
Dial, Tie Automatic, WAN Service and Out of Service.
•
Dial Type: Default = MFC Dialing
The type of dialing supported by the channel (MFC Dialing, Pulse Dialing or DTMF Dialing).
•
Line Appearance ID: Default = Blank
Used for configuring Line Appearances with button programming. The following rules apply when
setting up Line Appearance IDs:
•
The Line Appearance ID must NOT already be assigned to another channel or be the
extension number of a user or hunt group.
•
If an existing Line Appearance ID that is configured for a specific user's line appearance
is deleted, you will receive a warning to confirm that if this ID is deleted, then all related
appearances will also be deleted. You can then confirm or cancel the action.
•
If the Line Appearance ID is changed but not removed, then all appearances configured
for the old ID are updated to contain the new ID.
Timers
This form display the various timers provided for E1-R2 channels. To change a value either double-click
on it or right-click and select Edit.
By right-clicking you can also select options to set to default, set to maximum or set to minimum the
selected timer or all timers.
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Advanced (E1-R2)
•
Line Signaling Timers:
To edit one of these timers, either double-click on the timer or right-click on a timer and select the
action required.
•
Zero Suppression: Default = HDB3
Selects the method of zero suppression used (HDB3 or AMI).
•
Clock Quality: Default = Network
Sets whether the Control Unit takes it clock source from the network, use the network as a
fallback source or not as a clock source.
•
Pulse Metering Bit: Default = A Bit
Sets which bit should be used to indicate the pulse metering signal (A Bit, B Bit or C Bit).
•
Line Signaling: Default = CPE
Select either CPE or CO. The CO feature is intended to be used primarily as a testing aid. It
allows T1 and E1 lines to be tested in a back-to-back configuration, using crossover (Qsig)
cables.
Note: The CO feature operates on this line type by modifying the way in which incoming calls are
disconnected for IP Office configuration in Brazil and Argentina. In these locales, the CO setting
uses Forced-Release instead of Clear-Back to disconnect incoming calls. The Brazilian DoubleSeizure mechanism, used to police Collect calls, is also disabled in CO mode.
•
Incoming Routing Digits: Default = 4
Sets the number of incoming digits used for incoming call routing.
•
CRC Checking: Default = Ticked (On)
Switches CRC on or off.
•
Default All
Default the MFC Group tab settings.
MFC Group (E1-R2)
These tabs show the parameter assigned to each signal in an MFC group. The defaults are set
according to the Country (Locale) on the Line tab. All the values can be returned to default by the
Default All button on the Advanced tab.
To change a setting either double-click on it or right-click and select Edit.
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Line Form (US T1)
T1 Line Overview
T1 is a standard for digital transmission in the United States and Canada.
This form is used to configure T1 lines provided by T1 PRI card installed in the Control Unit.
The following tabs contain configurable information for your T1 line:
•
Line
•
Advanced
Line
Within the Line tab, the following fields are available for configuration:
•
Line Number:
Allocated by the system.
•
Line SubType: Default = PRI
Set to T1 for a T1 line. For PRI see Line Form (US PRI) .
•
Channel Allocation: Default = 24 -> 1
The order, 24 to 1 or 1 to 24, in which channels are used.
•
Prefix: Default = Blank
Enter the number to prefix to all incoming numbers for callback. This is useful if all users must
dial a prefix to access an outside line. The prefix is automatically placed in front of all incoming
numbers so that users can dial the number back.
The settings for each channel can be edited. Users have the option of editing individual channels (for
both the T1 Edit Channel and Timer forms) by double-clicking on the channel, or editing multiple
channels by the following:
1. Use the standard Window Key to select a continuous group (Shift Key) or Individual Channels
(Control Key).
2. After selecting the last item (via either of the above methods, press the right mouse button while
still holding down the Control or Shift Key). Select the Edit option.
3. A form comes up with the Channel parameters. The first and last channels that you have
selected are listed in the Channel box (ie. 1-8).
4. Make all appropriate changes and then select OK. The changes are applied to all the selected
channels.
Note: The Line Appearance ID cannot be updated when editing multiple channels.
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T1 Edit Channel
•
Channel:
Allocated by the system.
•
Incoming Group and Outgoing Group: Default = 0
One group can contain multiple lines. Short Codes and Incoming Call Routes use this number to
indicate which line they use.
•
Line Appearance ID: Default = Blank
Used for configuring Line Appearances with button programming. The following rules apply when
setting up Line Appearance IDs:
•
The Line Appearance ID must NOT already be assigned to another channel or be the
extension number of a user or hunt group.
•
If an existing Line Appearance ID that is configured for a specific user's line appearance
is deleted, you will receive a warning to confirm that if this ID is deleted, then all related
appearances will also be deleted. You can then confirm or cancel the this action.
•
If the Line Appearance ID is changed but not removed, then all appearances configured
for the old ID are updated to contain the new ID.
•
Direction: Default = Bothway
The direction of calls on the channel (Incoming, Outgoing or Bothway).
•
Bearer: Default = Voice
The type of traffic carried by the channel.
•
Type: Default = Ground-Start
The T1 emulates the following connections (Ground-Start, Loop-Start, E&M - TIE, E&M - DID,
E&M Switched 56K, Direct Inward Dial, Clear Channel 64K or Out of Service). When a
channel is Out Of Service, set the Incoming Group and Outgoing Group to 0 (the default).
•
If E&M-TIE is selected and the Outgoing Trunk Type is set to Automatic, no secondary
dial tone is provided for outgoing calls on this line/trunk.
•
Dial Type: Default = DTMF Dial
Select the dialing method required (DTMF Dial or Pulse Dial).
•
Incoming Trunk Type: Default = Wink-Start
Used for E&M types only. The handshake method for incoming calls (Automatic, Immediate,
Delay Dial or Wink-Start).
•
Outgoing Trunk Type: Default = Wink-Start
Used for E&M types only. The handshake method for outgoing calls (Automatic, Immediate,
Delay Dial or Wink-Start).
•
If the line Type is set to E&M-TIE and the Outgoing Trunk Type is set to Automatic, no
secondary dial tone is provided for outgoing calls on this line/trunk.
•
Tx Gain: Default = 0dB
The transmit gain in dB.
•
Rx Gain: Default = 0dB
The receive gain in dB.
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Timers
This form displays the various timer provided for T1 lines. The Timers can be changed for one timer or
multiple timers.
Timers can either be changed manually or by clicking the right mouse button. The options are listed
below:
•
Edit Value
Calls up the edit box to manually enter a value.
•
Default Value
Applies a default value, which is hard coded within the box.
•
Default All Values
Applies the default value to all parameters listed.
•
Apply Maximum
Applies Maximum allowable value to the selected parameter.
•
Apply All Maximum
As above but for all timer parameters.
•
Apply Minimum
Applies Minimum allowable value to the selected parameter.
•
Apply All Minimum
As above but for all timer parameters.
Advanced
•
Framing: Default = ESF
Selects the type of signal framing used (ESF or D4).
•
Zero Suppression: Default = B8ZS
Selects the method of zero suppression used (B8ZS or AMI ZCS).
•
Clock Quality: Default = Network
Sets whether the Control Unit takes its clock source from the network, uses the network as a
fallback clock source only or not as a clock source (Network, Fallback or Un-suitable).
•
Line Compensation: Default = 0-115 feet
Sets the line length to a specific distance.
•
Channel Unit: Default = Foreign Exchange
The channel signaling equipment provided by the Central Office (Foreign Exchange, Special
Access or Normal).
•
CRC Checking: Default = On
Turns CRC on or off.
•
Line Signaling: Default = CPE
Note: This field is only available when logged into Manager with the Administrator password. It
affects T1 channels set to Loop-Start or Ground-Start. The field can be set to either CPE
(Customer Premises Equipment) or CO (Central Office). This field should normally be left at its
default of CPE. The setting CO is normally only used in lab back-to-back testing.
•
Incoming Routing Digits: Default=0 (present call immediately)
Sets the number of routing digits expected on incoming calls. This allows the line to present the
call to the system once the expected digits have been received rather than waiting for the digits
timeout to expire. This field only affects T1 line channels set to E&M Tie, E&M DID,E&M
Switched 56K and Direct Inward Dial.
•
CSU Operation: Tick this field to enable theT1 line to respond to loop-back requests from the
line.
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Manager 3.0
Line Form (US PRI)
Line Form (US PRI) Overview
This form is used to configure PRI lines provided by T1 PRI card installed in the Control Unit.
In PRI operation two information elements, TNS (Transit Network Selector) and NSF (Network Specific
Facility) are sent in the call setup to the service provider. On IP Office, the values for TNS, NSF and the
actual phone number presented to the line are determined by parsing the number dialed through, in
sequence, the TNS, Special and Call by Call tabs.
Note also that B-channels within the same line can be brought from different service provides.
Additionally some B-channels can be used 'call by call', that is, use a different service provider for each
call.
More:
•
Line
•
Network Selection
•
Special
•
Call By Call
•
Advanced
Line
•
Line Number:
Allocated by the system.
•
Line SubType: Default = PRI
Set to PRI. If set to T1 see Line Form (US T1) .
•
Channel Allocation: Default = 23 -> 1
The order, 23 to 1 or 1 to 23, in which channels are used.
•
Switch Type: Default = NI2
Options 4ESS, 5ESS, DMS100 and NI2.
•
Provider: Default = Local Telco
Select the PSTN service provider (AT&T, Sprint, WorldCom or Local Telco).
•
Prefix: Default = Blank
Enter the number to prefix to all incoming numbers for callback. This is useful if all users must
dial a prefix to access an outside line. The prefix is automatically placed in front of all incoming
numbers so that users can dial the number back.
The settings for each channel can be edited via the Edit Channel dialog box. Users have the option of
editing individual channels by double-clicking on the channel, or editing multiple channels by the
following:
1. Use the standard Window Key to select a continuous group (Shift Key) or Individual Channels
(Control Key).
2. After selecting the last item (via either of the above methods, press the right mouse button while
still holding down the Control or Shift Key). Select the Edit option.
3. A form comes up with the Channel parameters. The first and last channels that you have
selected are listed in the Channel box (ie. 1-8).
4. Make all appropriate changes and then select OK. The changes are applied to all the selected
channels.
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Configuration Forms
Edit Channel
•
Channel:
Allocated by the system.
•
Incoming Group and Outgoing Group: Default = 0
One group can contain multiple lines. Short Codes and Incoming Call Routes use this number to
indicate which line they use.
•
Line Appearance ID: Default = Blank
•
Used for configuring Line Appearances with button programming.
•
Direction:Default = Bothway
The direction of calls on the channel (Incoming, Outgoing or Bothway).
•
Bearer: Default = Any
The type of traffic carried by the channel (Voice, Data or Any).
•
Service: Default = No Service or None.
If the line provider is set to AT&T, selects the type of service provided by the channel from Call
by Call, SDN (inc GSDN), MegaCom800, MegaComWats, Accunet, NLDS, I800, ETN, Private
Line, AT&T Multiquest. For other providers the service options are None or No Service.
•
Admin: Default = In Service
Used to indicate the channel status (In Service, Out of Service or Maintenance).
•
Tx Gain: Default = 0dB
The transmit gain in dB.
•
Rx Gain:Default = 0dB
The receive gain in dB.
Network Selection
This tab is shown when the line Provider is set to AT&T.It allows the entry of the Network Selection
settings. These are prefixes for alternative long distance carriers (for example 10XXX). When a number
dialed matches an entry in the table, that pattern is stripped from the number before being sent out. This
table is used to set field in the TNS information element for 4ESS and 5ESS exchanges. It is also used
to set fields in the NSF information element.
•
Network Selection Code:
The pattern for the alternate long distance carrier. Right-click the mouse to Add, Delete or Edit
entries.
•
Example:
Pattern 10xxx is in the Network Selection tab. If 10288 is dialed, 10 is removed, 288 is
placed in the TNS and NSF information.
•
Altering Entries:
Right-click the mouse to Add, Delete or Edit entries.
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Special
This tab is shown when the line Provider is set to AT&T.This table is used to set additional fields in the
NSF information element after initial number parsing by the TNS tab. These are used to indicate the
services required by the call. If the channel is set to Call by Call, then further parsing is done using the
entries in the Call by Call tab.
Double-click on an existing entry to edit it or on a blank space to add a new entry.
•
Short code:
The number which results from the application of the rules specified in the User or System Short
code tables and the Network Selection table and the Call-by-call table to the number dialed by
the user.
•
Number:
The number to be dialed to line.
•
Special: Default = No Operator
(No Operator, Local Operator or Presubscribed Carrier).
•
Plan: Default = National
(National or International).
Typical values would be:
Short code
Number
Service
011N
N
No Operator, International
010N
N
Local Operator, International
01N
N
Local Operator, National
00N
N
Presubscribed Carrier, National
0N
N
Presubscribed Carrier, National
1N
1N
No operator, National
Call By Call
This tab is shown when the line Provider is set to AT&T.Settings in this tab are only used when calls are
routed via a channel which has its Service set to Call by Call.
It allows short codes to be created to route calls to a different services according to the number dialed.
Call By Call reduces the costs and maximizes the use of facilities. Call By Call chooses the optimal
service for a particular call by including the Bearer capability in the routing decision. This is particularly
useful when there are limited resources.
Double-click on an existing entry to edit it or on a blank space to add a new entry.
•
Short Code:
The number which results from the application of the rules specified in the User or System Short
code tables and the Network Selection table to the number dialed by the user.
•
Number:
The number to be dialed to line.
•
Bearer: Default = Any
The type of channel required for the call (Voice, Data or Any).
•
Service:Default = AT&T.99
The service required by the call (SDN (inc GSDN), MegaCom800, MegaCom, Inwats, Wats,
Accunet, NLDS, I800, ETN, Private Line, AT&T Multiquest).
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Configuration Forms
Advanced
These configuration fields control the basic PRI 24 line functions during sub-tending and survivable
mode.
•
Test Number:
Used to remember the external telephone number of this line to assist with loopback testing. For information only.
•
Framing: Default = ESF
Selects the type of signal framing used (ESF or D4).
•
Zero Suppression: Default = B8ZS
Selects the method of zero suppression used (B8ZS or AMI ZCS).
•
Clock Quality: Default = Network
Sets whether the Control Unit takes it clock source from the network, uses the network as a
fallback clock source only or not as a clock source (Network, Fallback or Un-suitable).
•
CSU Operation: Tick this field to enable theT1 line to respond to loop-back requests from the
line.
•
Line Compensation: Default = 0-115 feet
Sets the line length to a specific distance.
•
Channel Unit: Default = Foreign Exchange
The channel signaling equipment provided by the Central Office (Foreign Exchange, Special
Access or Normal.
•
CRC Checking: Default = On
Turns CRC on or off.
•
Line Signaling:
Note: This field is only available when logged into Manager with the Administrator password. Not
used for PRI, only used for T1.
•
Incoming Routing Digits:
Not used for PRI, only used for T1.
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Manager 3.0
Line Form (Analog)
Analog Line Overview
This form is used to configure analog lines installed in the Control Unit or those on expansion modules.
When configuring the line settings, make sure your line settings match those of the exchange line
settings.
The following tabs contain configurable information for this line form:
•
Line
•
Analog
Line
Within the Line tab, the following fields are available for configuration:
•
Line Number
This parameter is not configurable, it is allocated by the system.
•
Telephone Number:
Used to remember the external telephone number of this line to assist with loop-back testing. For
information only.
•
Outgoing Channels: Default = 1 (not changeable)
This defines the number of channels available, on this line, for outgoing calls. This should
normally be the same as Number of Channels field, but can be reduced to ensure incoming calls
cannot be blocked by outgoing calls.
•
Voice Channels: Default = 1 (not changeable)
The number of channels available for voice use.
•
Incoming Group ID and Outgoing Group ID: Default = 0
One group can contain multiple lines. Short Codes and Incoming Call Routes use this number to
indicate which line they use.
•
National Prefix: Default = 0 (not changeable)
This indicates the digits to be prefixed to a national call.
•
Prefix: Default = Blank.
Enter the number to prefix to all incoming numbers for callback. This is useful if all users must
dial a prefix to access an outside line. The prefix is automatically placed in front of all incoming
numbers so that users can dial the number back.
In Outgoing Calls when a number is presented to the Line whose programming includes a Prefix
number and the prefix number is present in the dialled digits, it is stripped prior to being sent out
on the line.
•
Line Appearance ID: Default = Blank
Used for configuring Line Appearances with button programming. The following rules apply when
setting up Line Appearance IDs:
•
The Line Appearance ID must NOT already be assigned to another channel or be the
extension number of a user or hunt group.
•
If an existing Line Appearance ID that is configured for a specific user's line appearance
is deleted, you will receive a warning to confirm that if this ID is deleted, then all related
appearances will also be deleted. You can then confirm or cancel the this action.
•
If the Line Appearance ID is changed but not removed, then all appearances configured
for the old ID are updated to contain the new ID.
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Configuration Forms
Analog
Within the Analog tab, the following fields are available for configuration:
•
Channel:
Set by the system. Shown for information only.
•
Trunk Type: Default = Loop Start
Sets the analog line type (Ground Start, Loop Start, Loop Start Caller ID, Out of Service).
•
Note: Ground Start Trunks.
Ground Start is only supported on trunks provided by the Analog Trunk 16 expansion
module.
•
Note: Delay Waiting for Caller ID Information.
Selecting Loop Start Caller ID on trunks where CLI is not being provided causes a delay
in call connection.
•
Signaling Type: Default = DTMF Dialing
Sets the signaling method used on the line (DTMF Dialing or Pulse Dialing).
•
Direction: Default = Bothway
Sets the allowed direction of operation of the line (Incoming, Outgoing or Bothway).
•
Bearer: Default = Any
Sets the type of traffic carried by the line (Voice, Data or Any).
•
Bearer: Default = Any
Sets the type of traffic carried by the line (Voice, Data or Any).
•
Impedance: [PTB locale only] Default = 900R
•
Allow Forwarding: Default = Not selected (Off).
When off, external calls on other trunks cannot be transferred back off-switch via this trunk. This
prevents transfers to trunks that do not support disconnect clear. See also Inhibit Off-Switch
Calls on the System | Telephony tab.
•
BCC: [PTB locale only] Default = Not selected
•
Ring Persistency: Default = Set according to system locale
The minimum duration of signal required to be recognized.
•
Ring Off Maximum: Default = Set according to system locale
The time required before signaling is regarded as ended.
•
Flash Pulse Width: Default = 50 (500ms)
•
DTMF Mark: Default = 80 (80ms)
•
DTMF Space: Default = 80 (80ms)
•
Intermediate Digit Pause: Default = 50 (500ms)
•
Voicemail Recording Level: Default = Low
Used to adjust the volume level of calls recorded by voicemail. Options are Low, Medium and
High.
•
Disconnect Clear:
A technique used to signal to the IP Office from the carrier/exchange that the call should clear.
We recommend leaving this ticked to make use of the disconnect clear function.
•
Enable: Enables use of disconnect clear.
•
Units: Default = 50 (500ms)
If this default value needs to be changed, the detection time must be less than the actual
disconnect time period and the value entered must be the desired time minus the internally
defined 150ms de-glitch time period.
•
Pulse On Width: Default = 40 (40ms)
•
Pulse Off Width: Default = 60 (60ms)
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•
Await Dial Tone: Default = 15 (1.5second)
Sets how long the system should wait before dialing out.
•
BCC Flash Pulse Width: [PTB locale only] Default = 100 (1000ms)
•
Gains:
•
•
Tx (A-D): Default = 0dB
Set the transmit gain between -4.0 to +3.5dB in 0.5dB steps.
•
Rx (D-A): Default = 0dB
Set the receive gain between -4.0 to +3.5dB in 0.5dB steps.
Secondary Dial Tone: Default = Off
Configures the use of secondary dial tone on analog lines. When selected the following options
are accessible:
•
Await time: Default = 10 (x 100ms = 1 second)
Used when secondary dial tone (above) is selected. Sets the delay.
•
After n Digits: Default = 1
Sets where in the dialing string, the delay for secondary dial tone, should occur.
•
Matching Digit: Default =0
The digit which, when first matched in the dialing string, will cause secondary dial tone
delay.
•
Long CLI Line: Default = Off
The CLI signal on some long analog lines can become degraded and is not then correctly
detected. If you are sure that CLI is being provided but not detected, selecting this option may
resolve the problem.
•
Modem Enabled: Default = Off
The first analog channel on Avaya IP Office - Small Office Edition controls units and on ATM4
trunk modules can be set to modem operation (V.32 with V42 error correction). This allow the
receipt of incoming modem calls for system maintenance operation. In addition in systems
without a Modem 2 card the channel can also be used for outgoing modem operation.
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Configuration Forms
Line Form (S0)
Line Form (S0) Overview
This configuration form is used for lines added by the installation of an S0 expansion module.
The S0 module provides ISDN BRI outputs so you can share out ISDN access from say your PRI line to
ISDN2 devices like Video Conferencing Control Units or ISDN PC Cards.
For details on installation and sample configurations of S0 modules, see Installing and Configuring S0
Ports.
The following tabs contain configurable information for this line form:
•
Line
•
Short Codes
Line
•
Line Number
This parameter is not configurable. It is allocated by the system.
•
Line Sub Type: Default = Blank
Not used.
•
Telephone Number:
Used to remember the telephone number of this line. For information only.
•
Number Of Channels: Default = 2
Defines the number of operational channels that are available on this line. 2 for BRI and up to 30
for PRI - depending upon the number of channels subscribed.
•
Outgoing Channels: Default = 2
This defines the number of channels available, on this line, for outgoing calls. This should
normally be the same as Number of Channels field, but can be reduced to ensure incoming calls
cannot be blocked by outgoing calls.
•
Clock Quality:
Sets whether the Control Unit takes it clock source from the network, uses the network as a
fallback clock source only or not as a clock source (Network, Fallback or Un-suitable).
•
Voice Channels: Default = 2
The number of channels available for voice use.
•
Data Channels: Default = 2
The number of channels available for data use. If left blank the value is 0.
•
TEI: Default = 0
Not used. The Control Unit will ignore any entry.
•
Incoming Group ID and Outgoing Group ID: Default = 0
One group can contain multiple lines. Short Codes and Incoming Call Routes use this number to
indicate which line they use.
•
International Prefix: Default = 00
This indicates the digits to be prefixed to an incoming international call. When a number is
presented from ISDN as an "international number" this prefix is added, eg. 441923000000 is
converted to 001441923000000.
•
National Prefix: Default = 0
This indicates the digits to be prefixed to a incoming national call. When a number is presented
from ISDN as a "national number" this prefix is added, eg. "7325551234 is converted to
17325551234.
•
Prefix: Default = Blank.
On Incoming Calls the ISDN messaging tags the incoming call source location as either National
or International (see their respective prefixes above). This determines the addition of the relevant
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0 or 00 respectively (0 is default for National and 00 is default for International). If the ISDN
message flags the call source as unknown, then the number in the Prefix field is added to the
CLI.
In Outgoing Calls when a number is presented to the Line whose programming includes a Prefix
number and the prefix number is present in the dialled digits, it is stripped prior to being sent out
on the line.
Short Codes
A Line Short Code is similar to a User Short Code in that it performs the function on that line only. A Line
Short Code is performed once the specific Line has been accessed. See Understanding Short Codes.
•
To add a Short Code:
Place the cursor over the Short Code List Box and double-click or right-click and select Add.
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Configuration Forms
Line Form (IP)
Line Form (IP) Overview
This configuration form is used for lines added manually, ie. IP lines. These are typically used for VoIP
operation.
Line (IP)
Within the Line tab, the following fields are available for configuration:
•
Line Number
Enter the line number that you wish. Note that this must be unique.
•
Telephone Number:
Used to remember the telephone number of this line. For information only.
•
Number Of Channels: Default = 20
Defines the number of operational channels that are available on this line. 2 for BRI and up to 30
for PRI - depending upon the number of channels subscribed.
•
Outgoing Channels: Default = 20
This defines the number of channels available, on this line, for outgoing calls. This should
normally be the same as Number of Channels field, but can be reduced to ensure incoming calls
cannot be blocked by outgoing calls.
•
Data Channels: Default = 20
The number of channels available for data use. If left blank the value is 0.
•
Voice Channels: Default = 20
The number of channels available for voice use.
•
TEI: Default = 0
The Terminal Equipment Identifier. Used to identify each Control Unit connected to a particular
ISDN line. For Point to Point lines this is typically (always) 0. It can also be 0 on a Point to MultiPoint line, however if multiple devices are actually sharing a Point to Multi-Point line it should be
set to 127 which will result in the exchange deciding on the TEI's to be used by this Control Unit.
•
Incoming Group ID and Outgoing Group ID: Default = 0
One group can contain multiple lines. Short Codes and Incoming Call Routes use this number to
indicate which line they use.
•
International Prefix: Default = 00
This indicates the digits to be prefixed to an incoming international call. When a number is
presented from ISDN as an "international number" this prefix is added, eg. 441923000000 is
converted to 001441923000000.
•
National Prefix: Default = 0
This indicates the digits to be prefixed to a incoming national call. When a number is presented
from ISDN as a "national number" this prefix is added, eg. "7325551234" is converted to
"17325551234".
•
Prefix: Default = Blank.
On Incoming Calls the ISDN messaging tags the incoming call source location as either National
or International (see their respective prefixes above). This determines the addition of the relevant
0 or 00 respectively (0 is default for National and 00 is default for International). If the ISDN
message flags the call source as unknown, then the number in the Prefix field is added to the
CLI.
In Outgoing Calls when a number is presented to the Line whose programming includes a Prefix
number and the prefix number is present in the dialled digits, it is stripped prior to being sent out
on the line.
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Short Codes (IP)
A Line Short Code is similar to a User Short Code in that it performs the function on that line only. A Line
Short Code is performed once the specific Line has been accessed. See Understanding Short Codes .
•
To add a Short Code:
Place the cursor over the Short Code List Box and double-click or right-click and select Add.
VoIP (IP)
This tab is used for configuring the VoIP operation of an IP line. The following fields are available for
configuration:
•
Gateway IP Address: Default = Blank
Enter the IP address of the remote Control Unit.
•
Voice Pkt. Size:
This is the number of data bytes contained in a Voice Packet. This is automatically defaulted to
match the Compression Mode selected.
•
Compression Mode: Default = Automatic Selection
This defines the type of compression which is to be used on any Voice call on this Line.
•
Automatic Selection - During call setup the IP Office negotiates the compression mode
using the following order of preference: G729a, G.723.1, G711 ALAW, G711 ULAW.
•
Other available options are: Transparent 64K, G.711 ALAW 64K, G.711 ULAW 64K,
G.729(a) 8K CS-ACELP, G.729 Simple, G.723.1 6K3 MP-MLQ, NetCoder 8K, G726
ADPCM 32K, G.726 ADPCM 16K.
•
H450 Support: Default = H450
Selects the supplementary service signaling method for use across H.323 connections. Options
are None, QSig and H450. Note that the selected method must be supported by the remote end.
For IP Office to IP Office connections H450 is preferred.
•
Silence Suppression: Default = Off
When selected H.323 terminals will not send data if they are silent, this is useful when optimizing
data traffic.
•
Enable FastStart: Default = Off
A fast connection procedure. Reduces the number of messages that need to be exchanged
before an audio channel is created.
•
Fax Transport Support: Default = Off
When selected, this option will provide support for faxing over a H.323 connection to another IP
Office with the same setting.
•
Local Hold Music: Default = Off
When selected, the hold music used is that on the local IP Office system where the phone is
directly registered to/connected. This can help in saving bandwidth where the available
bandwidth is low/in high usage.
•
Local Tones: Default = Off
When selected, the tones are generated by the local IP Office system to which the phone is
registered. For the IP Office 401 and IP Office Small Office Edition control units, this field should
to be enabled.
•
Enable RSVP: Default = Disabled (Greyed out)
Use this option to turn RSVP support on or off. Note that the default firewall profile settings if
applied drop RSVP.
•
Out of Band DTMF: Default = On
When on, DTMF is sent as a separate signal rather than as part of the encoded voice stream ("In
Band"). This is recommended for low bit-rate compression modes such as G.729 and G.723
where DTMF in the voice stream can become distorted.
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Configuration Forms
•
Allow Direct Media Path: Default = On
When disabled the media (voice) path always passes through the Control Unit. When enabled
the remote end may be told of a new IP address for the media path if for example the call is
transferred to a H.323 extension. Enabling this option may cause some vendors problems with
changing the media path in mid call.
•
Voice Networking: Default = Off
Also known as "Small Community Networking". This option enables extension number sharing
with the remote IP Office system. Extensions on the remote system can then be dialed from the
local system.
•
Note: This requires that extension numbers and names on the two systems are unique.
Line and group extension numbers are not shared. Remote extension numbers cannot be
included in local groups.
•
Full operation requires H450 Support to be enabled over the links used.
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Manager 3.0
Control Unit Form
Control Unit Form
The Control Unit configuration form gives the specifications for each device connected to the system.
This includes modules installed in the Control Unit as well as external expansion modules.
For most units, this information is allocated by the system and is not configurable. The fields displayed
are:
•
Device Number:
This is automatically allocated by the system.
•
Unit Type:
The name of the device, eg. IP403, ANALOGUE POTS2, DIGITAL DS 8.
•
Version:
The version of software running on each unit.
•
Serial Number:
This is the number the system uses to tie a physical Control Unit to a device configuration (device
number). For the Control Unit and WAN3 modules this is the MAC address. For a device
connected to an Expansion port it is the Expansion port number plus 1.
•
Unit IP Address:
This field should be blank except for the Control Unit and any WAN3 modules installed. Do not
change the Control Unit entry (if this is necessary, it should be done via the System form). If the
WAN3 module has not obtained an IP address by DHCP, then an entry can be made here for the
WAN3.
•
Interconnect Number:
The Expansion port used to connect to this device.
•
Interconnect Class:
The type of interconnection used between this device and the Control Unit, eg. CPU (itself),
TDMInterconnect (Expansion Bus), etc.
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Configuration Forms
Extension Form
Extension Form Overview
Extensions refer to physical telephone ports, their characteristics and connection. The Manager
configuration tree displays the list of physical extensions available on the system. Only an IP extension
can be manually created.
Users are the people who use the system and Dial In users for data access. A system User does not
have to have an Extension Number that physically exists - this can be useful if the user does not require
their own extension but does require to use other system features such as Voicemail, call forwarding,
etc.
By default, each Extension is associated with a User. The User Name is used to identify the caller in the
display of suitable phones and PC programs. These User Names can be changed via the User Form.
Physical extensions are associated with an extension number through their Extension Form . A User is
associated to that extension, by setting that extension number in their User form.
Note that changing a user's extension number affects the user's ability to collect Voicemail messages
from their own extension. Each user's extension is set up as a "trusted location" under the Source
Numbers tab of the User configuration form. This "trusted location" allows the user to dial *17 to collect
Voicemail from his own extension. Therefore if the extension number is changed so must the "trusted
location".
The Extension configuration form allows you to configure the operation of each physical telephone
extension.
The following tabs contain configurable information for this form:
•
Extn
•
VoIP - Only available when a new extension is created.
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Extn
Within this tab, the following fields are configurable:
•
Extension ID:
The physical ID of the extension port. This parameter is only configurable with an IP extension.
With all other extensions, it is allocated by the system and therefore not configurable.
•
Extension:
This is the logical extension number and can be up to 9 digits long.
•
Caller Display Type: Default = CallerDisplayOn
Controls the presentation of caller display information. See Caller Display.
•
•
•
Off: Disables caller display.
•
On: Enables caller display using the caller display type appropriate to the System Locale,
see Supported Country and Locale Settings. If a different setting is required it can be
selected from the list of supported options.
•
For an analog extension connected to a fax server or other device that requires the pass
through of DTMF tones, select DTMFB. See Configuring Personal Fax Numbers.
Equipment Classification: Default = Standard Telephone
Select the type of terminal that is connected to the extension port.
•
Standard Telephone:
•
Paging Speaker: When enabled this Extension can be used for connection to a paging
amplifier. When the Extension is called, no ringing is generated and the call is answered
immediately. (When returning this extension back to a standard analog extension the
Phone module must also be rebooted.)
•
Quiet Headset:
•
IVR Port:
Provides a disconnect clear signal to the attached device at the end of calls.
This is required by some third party devices. When selected the Disconnect Pulse Width
is displayed and can be adjusted if necessary. Note: This feature is only configurable
when the locale setting is configured for enu (United States).
Use for normal telephone extensions.
Hook Persistency: Default = 100ms
Defines the time frame (in milliseconds) in which the system will wait before determining that the
phone is off-hook.
•
•
Flash Hook Pulse Width:
•
Use System Defaults: Default = Selected (On)
Use the values set as appropriate to the system's Locale.
•
Minimum Width:
Minimum hook flash length sent if Use System Defaults is not selected.
•
Maximum Width:
Maximum hook flash length sent if Use System Defaults is not selected.
Message Waiting Lamp Indication Type: Default = None
This option is grayed out except for analog extensions. When set to On allows the sending of
message waiting lamp indication to an analog extension. Due to the number of methods of
message waiting indication (mwi) used by different manufacturers, this operation cannot be
guaranteed with all analog phones.
•
•
The IP Office currently only supports lamps using 81V dc signaling. Some analog phones
use 90V dc signaling.
Reset Volume after Calls: Default = None
Reset the phone volume after each call.
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VoIP
This tab is available when a new IP Extension is created manually. See Voice over IP - Overview.
The following fields are available for configuration:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
IP Address: Enter the IP address of the H.323 terminal. The default entry accepts connection to
any address.
Voice Pkt. Size: Default = 80
This is the number of data bytes contained in a Voice Packet. This is automatically defaulted to
match the Compression mode selected.
Compression Mode: Default = Automatic Selection
This defines the type of compression which is to be used on any Voice call on this Line.
• Automatic Selection - During call setup the IP Office negotiates the compression mode
using the following order of preference: G729a, G.723.1, G711 ALAW, G711 ULAW.
• Other available options are: Transparent 64K, G.711 ALAW 64K, G.711 ULAW 64K,
G.729(a) 8K CS-ACELP, G.729 Simple, G.723.1 6K3 MP-MLQ, NetCoder 8K, G726
ADPCM 32K, G.726 ADPCM 16K.
MAC Address: Default = 000000000000
Enter the hardware address of the H.323 terminal. The default entry accepts connection to any
terminal.
Gain: Default = Default
Sets the volume received on an IP phone. The gain is selectable from -31dB to +31dB in 1 dB
increments.
Silence Suppression: Default = Off
When selected H.323 terminals will not send data if they are silent, this is useful when optimizing
data traffic.
Enable Faststart: Default = Off
A fast connection procedure. Reduces the number of messages that need to be exchanged
before an audio channel is created. However, the Faststart feature is not required and SHOULD
NOT be enabled for inter-working with Avaya IP phones (Avaya 4600 and 5600 series IP
phones).
Fax Transport Support: Default = Off
When selected this option will provide support for faxing over a H.323 connection to another IP
Office with the same setting.
Local Hold Music: Default = Off
When selected H.323 terminals use their own hold music.
Local Tones: Default = Off
When selected, the tones are generated by the local IP Office system to which the phone is
registered. For the IP Office 401 and IP Office Small Office Edition control units, this field should
to be enabled.
Enable RSVP: Default = Disabled (Greyed out)
Use this option to turn RSVP support on or off. Note that the default firewall profile settings if
applied drop RSVP.
Out of Band DTMF: Default = On
When on, DTMF is sent as a separate signal rather than as part of the encoded voice stream ("In
Band"). This is recommended for low bit-rate compression modes such as G.729 and G.723
where DTMF in the voice stream can become distorted.
Allow Direct Media Path: Default = On
When disabled the media (voice) path always passes through the Control Unit. When enabled
the remote end may be told of a new IP address for the media path if for example the call is
transferred to a H.323 extension. Enabling this option may cause some vendors problems with
changing the media path in mid call.
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User Form
User Form Overview
Users are the people who use the system and Dial In users are for data access. To be recognized as a
system User, one does not need to have an Extension Number that physically exists; this can be useful if
the user does not require a physical phone associated with that extension, but does require the use of
other system features such as Voicemail, call forwarding, etc.
By default, each Extension is associated with a User. The User Name is used to identify the caller in the
display of suitable phones and PC programs. These User Names can be changed via the User tab within
the User Form.
Physical extensions are associated with an extension number through the Extension Form. A User is
associated to that extension by setting that extension number in the User form.
Aside from the
standard user, the system also recognizes the following user set up:
•
No User: Used to apply settings to extensions which have no associated user.
•
Remote Manager: Used as the default settings for dial in connections.
•
Hot Desking User: Users with a Login Code set within this User form's Telephony tab. This
user can use this login code to log onto the associated extension (and all its associated settings)
from any telephone - Hot Desking.
When a new user is created:
•
Newly created users are automatically logged into their handsets, provided that the Forced
Login user configuration parameter is disabled.
•
Any calls in progress when the handset is repossessed on completion of the merge now belong
to the new user.
•
If this is not the behaviour required, then the Forced Login parameters should be enabled, and
the new user must log into their phone manually.
When a user is deleted:
When a user is deleted, any calls in progress with this user continue without interruption. The owner if
the call is transferred to the NoUser system user. When the call drops, the call is reported in the call log
event stream as originating/terminating at NoUser. The handset reports Not Logged In when the user is
deleted.
Merging the deletion of a user causes all references to that deleted user to be removed from the system.
This includes:
•
DSS keys set to User.
•
Presence on a coverage list.
•
Diverts to this user.
•
Incoming call routes to this target.
•
Hunt group membership.
•
Internal auto-attendant transfers.
Note that if the user is logged onto IP Office Phone Manager and/or SoftConsole, the deleted user must
terminate and then restart these applications manually utilizing the new user configuration.
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Changing a user's extension:
Changing a user's extension automatically logs the user out of their current extension and into their new
extension provided that this new extension exists and Forced Login is not enabled. If Forced Login is
enabled, then the user remains on the current extension being used until the user logs out.
Note that changing a user's extension number affects the user's ability to collect Voicemail messages
from their own extension. Each user's extension is set up as a "trusted location" under the Source
Numbers tab of the User configuration form. This "trusted location" allows the user to dial *17 to collect
Voicemail from his own extension. Therefore if the extension number is changed so must the "trusted
location".
The following related configuration items are automatically updated when a user extension is changed:
•
Hunt group membership (disabled membership state is maintained).
•
Coverage lists containing this user.
•
Diverts to this user.
•
Incoming call routes to this destination.
•
Internal auto-attendant transfer-targets.
•
Dial in source numbers for access to user's own voicemail.
The following tabs contain configurable information for the User form:
•
User
•
Voicemail
•
DND
•
ShortCodes
•
SourceNumbers
•
Telephony
•
Forwarding
•
DialIn
•
VoiceRecording
•
Digital Telephony/Button Programming
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User
Users are the people who use the system or are Dial In users for data access. A system User may or
may not have an Extension Number that physical exists - this is useful if users do not require a physical
extension but wish to use system features, eg. Voicemail, forwarding etc. See Extension versus User .
•
No User is used to apply settings to extensions which have no associated user.
•
Remote Manager is used as the default settings for dial in connections.
The following fields are configurable within the User tab:
•
Name:
This is the user's account name, eg. "JohnB" and the one that will be used for RAS Dial In, Caller
Display and voicemail mailbox. As the display on Caller Display telephones is normally only 16
digits long it is useful to keep the name short. Only alphanumeric characters and space are
supported in this field. Do not use punctuation characters such as #, ?, /, -, _ and ,. This field is
case sensitive and must be unique.
•
Voicemail uses the name to match a user to their mailbox. Changing a user's name
will route their voicemail calls to a new mailbox.
•
Password: Default = Blank
This password is required when the User has Dial In access, or wishes to monitor/control their
Extension with Phone Manager and TAPI applications.
•
Confirm Password:
This is used to check that the password entered in the Password field has been entered correctly.
A warning message requesting you to re-confirm the password is generated if the Password and
the Confirm Password fields differ.
•
Full Name: Default = Blank
Use this field to enter the entire user's name. The Phone Manager Directory uses this information
when the Show Users option is checked and also appears in the title bar of Phone Manager.
•
Extension:
Any number up to 9 digits. In general all extensions should have the same number of digits. If left
blank then this User has no Extension and is just a Dial In user.
•
Locale: Default = Blank
On an analog extension this option configures the language used by voicemail prompts to the
user (assuming that language is available on the voicemail server). On a digital extension it also
controls the display language used on the telephone. See Supported Country and Locale
Settings.
•
Priority: Default = 5, Range 0 (Lowest) to 5 (Highest)
This setting is used by Least Cost Routing to determine which routes the user can use.
•
Restrictions: Default = None
Sets which set of User Restrictions applies to the user. See User Restrictions.
•
Ex (exclude) Directory: Default = Off
If checked, the user does not appear in the directory list in Phone Manager and suitable
telephones.
•
Phone Manager Type: Default = Lite
Determines the mode in which the user's copy of the Phone Manager application will operate.
Modes are Lite, Pro and VoIP. Note that the number of users able to simultaneously use Pro and
VoIP modes is controlled by licenses.
•
Book a Conferencing Center in Phone Manager: Default = Off
When enabled, displays links in the user's Phone Manager application for access to
Conferencing Center. Note that to book a conference requires the user to have a Conferencing
Center user ID and password.
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Voicemail
If a Voicemail Server application is being used on your system, each user has use of a Voicemail box.
You can use this form to enable this facility and various user voicemail settings.
The following fields are configurable within the Voicemail tab.
•
Voicemail Code: Default = Blank
A code (1-15 digits) used by the Voicemail Server to validate access to this User's Voicemail box.
This is required when users retrieve Voicemail messages remotely, ie. from another user's
extension or from an external telephone, eg. a mobile. If remote access is attempted and a
Voicemail Code has not been configured the message "Remote access is not configured on this
mailbox" is played.
•
Confirm Voicemail Code:
The Voicemail Code must be retyped to ensure it has been correctly entered.
•
Voicemail Email: Default = Blank
When a new Voicemail message is received by the user, the WAV file created can be sent to an
email account. Enter the email address to be used by the Voicemail Server, eg.
jbloggs@bloggs.com. This address is passed to the MAPI interface on the Voicemail Server.
•
Refer to the "Voicemail Installation & Administration Manual" for further details. This
setting is not required for IMS operation.
•
Voicemail Reception: Default = Blank
When connected to a User's Voicemail the caller can press 0 to be transferred to either an
internal number, eg. Reception or to an external number, eg. a mobile. Enter here the telephone
number to be used. The User should announce this facility in their greeting message, eg. "John
Smith is not available today, you may leave a message or press 0 for Reception".
•
Voicemail On: Default = On
Controls if Voicemail is available for this extension.
•
Voicemail Help: Default = Off
For voicemail systems running IP Office mailbox mode, this option controls whether users
retrieving messages are given an additional prompt, "For help at any time press 8." For voicemail
systems running in Intuity Emulation mode, this option does not have the same effect, where the
prompt is: "For help at any time, press *H." This prompt is played automatically for Intuity
Emulation mode systems.
•
Voicemail Ringback: Default = Off
When enabled and a new message has been received, the Voicemail server calls the User's
extension to attempt to deliver the message each time the telephone is put down. Voicemail will
not ring the extension more than once every 30 seconds.
•
Voicemail Email Reading: Default = Off
When you log into you voicemail box, it will detect your email messages and read them to you.
This email text to speech feature is set-up through Voicemail Pro. Refer to the "Voicemail
Installation & Administration Manual" for further details.
•
Voicemail Email Mode: Default = Off
Controls the method of operation of Voicemail Email above. These settings are not used by IMS.
•
Off: Do not automatically send a new message to the email account
•
Copy: Copy all messages to the email account
•
Forward: Forward all messages to the email account and delete from the Voicemail
Server.
•
Alert: Send an email message without attaching the Voicemail file. This may be used with
Email gateways to Pagers or Mobile telephone Short Message Services. Includes the
caller's Caller ID if available.
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DND
This is the ability to temporarily stop incoming calls to a user's telephone. It prevents the user from
receiving Hunt Group calls and give direct callers either busy or Voicemail if available. (Note that if Call
Forwarding and Do Not Disturb are active, the call is not forwarded, but does receive Voicemail). This
can be enabled/disabled by dialing short codes or via the Phone Manager application.
Note: With a call already connected and another call already alerting, activating DND will not effect the
alerting call.
If, however, specific numbers are required to override Do Not Disturb, internal and external phone
numbers can be added to an exception list.
See Do Not Disturb for default short codes relating to DND.
The following fields are configurable within the DND tab:
•
Do Not Disturb: Default = Off
When checked the Extension is considered busy, except for calls coming from sources listed in
the Exception List.
•
Do Not Disturb Exception List: Default = Blank
This is the list of telephone numbers that are still allowed through when Do Not Disturb is set, eg.
this could be an assistant or an expected phone call. Internal extension numbers or external
telephone numbers can be entered.
To add a telephone number to the Do Not Disturb Exception List, do the following:
1. Right-click within the Telephone Number box and select Add.
2. Enter the telephone number to be exempt from the Do Not Disturb feature.
3. Click OK.
If you wish to add a range of numbers, you can either enter each number separately or make use of the
variables "N" or "x" in the number, eg. to allow all numbers from 7325551000 to 7325551099, the DND
Exception number can be entered as either 73255510xx or 73255510N.
Short Codes
When a Short Code is entered into this list, it operates on behalf of the User's extension only. See
Understanding Short Codes for full discussion of short codes and Creating User Short Codes for
extended instructions on creating user short codes.
•
To add a Short Code:
Place the cursor within the Short Code List Box, then double-click or right-click and select Add.
Note: Short codes of the form *DSS relate to entries in the Button Programming tab and should be
altered from that tab.
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Source Numbers
Use this tab to create "trusted locations" for data and/or voicemail access. For example, a user dialing in
from home or accessing to Voicemail without a Voicemail code is making use of trusted locations. to
These are locations that the System allows either data access, eg. a user dialing in from home, or
access to Voicemail without a Voicemail Code, eg. a user collecting his Voicemail messages from a cell
phone, or the location the Voicemail Server calls to inform the user of a new message. See Trusted
Locations for more information. Note that external numbers used as source numbers must provide CLI.
The Telephone Number field is available for configuration within the Source Numbers tab:
•
Telephone Number: Default = V plus own extension number
Right-click within the Telephone Number box and select Add to enter a telephone number. The
following letter-based codes are available to create source numbers:
•
V<Callers CLI> = Voicemail Trusted Source access
Allows access to the user's mailbox for a specified CLI number, eg. V201 or
V7325551237. The default is the user's own extension number but additional numbers
may be added. Note: Only supported by Voicemail Lite and Voicemail Pro using IP Office
mode.
•
R<Caller's CLI> = Dial in access
To allow data access only from a specified number prefix the number with a "R", eg.
R7325551234
•
H<Group Name> = Hunt Group Voicemail Indication
Allows the user to receive message waiting indication of new group messages. Enter H
followed by the group name, eg. HMain.
•
•
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•
On suitable display extensions, the hunt group name and number of new
messages is displayed (refer to the appropriate telephone user guide).
•
If the user is using Phone Manager, the Messages tab shows the hunt group
name and number of new messages.
•
If the user is not a member of the group, a voicemail code must be set for the
group's mailbox (see Voicemail Code on the Hunt Group | Voicemail tab). Refer
to the Voicemail Installation & Administration Manual.
P<Telephone Number> = Voicemail Ringback Number
For user's with voicemail ringback enabled, this entry sets the ringback destination to a
number other than the user's own extension. The voicemail server will ring that number
when the user has a new voicemail message. Enter P followed by the telephone number
including any necessary external dialing prefix, eg. P917325559876. This facility is only
available when using VoiceMail Pro through which one of the following is configured:
•
Default Callback Start Point is set up and connected to a Get Mail action.
•
User Specific Callback Start Point is set up and connected to a Get Mail action.
eConsole = eConsole User Return Calls
This option has been replaced by Transfer Return Time in the User | Telephony
settings.
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User Telephony
This form allows you to set telephony related features per user. These override the settings in the
Telephony tab of the System configuration form.
For details of the ringing tones, see Ring Tones. DefaultRing uses the system default setting set
through the System | Telephony tab.
The following fields are configurable within this Telephony tab:
•
Outside Call Sequence: Default = Default Ring
Sets the Outside call pattern for the User. These ring tone settings only apply to analog phones.
•
Inside Call Sequence: Default = Default Ring
Sets the Inside call pattern for the User. These ring tone settings only apply to analog phones.
•
Ring Back Sequence : Default = Default Ring
Sets the Ring Back call pattern for the User. These ring tone settings only apply to analog
phones.
•
Allocated/No Answer Interval (secs): Default = Blank
Leave blank to use the System Default Allocated/No Answer Interval (default 15 seconds). This
determines the amount of time a call rings at the extension before going to Voicemail and the
amount of time a call rings at the extension when auto callback has been invoked.
•
Wrap-up Time (secs): Default = 2 seconds
Specifies the amount of time before the user can take another call. You may wish to increase this
in a "call center" environment where users may need time to log call details before taking the next
call. If set to 0 the user does not receive any calls. It is recommended that this option is not set to
less than the default of 2 seconds. See Set Wrap Up Time.
•
Transfer return Time (secs): Default = Blank
Sets the delay after which any call transferred by the user, which remains unanswered, should
return to the user. Configurable up to 180 seconds.
•
Individual Coverage Time (secs): Default = 10 seconds
Specifies the length of time before the Coverage Appearance function is activated. This function
sets how long the phone will ring at your extension before going to any covering users. This time
setting should not be equal to or larger than the Allocated/No Answer Interval time.
•
Login Code: Default = Blank
The code that has to be entered, as part of the Extension Login sequence, to allow a User to
make use of any telephone as if it was theirs. This Login Code can be used for Hot Desking as
well as loging back onto your phone after it has been used by a hot desker. See Hot Desking.
This entry must be at least 4 digits for DT or DS users.
•
Login Idle Period (secs): Default = Blank (Off)
If the telephone is not used for this period, the user currently logged in is automatically logged off.
This option should be used only in conjunction with Force Login (see below).
•
Monitor Group: Default = Blank
Sets the Hunt Group the User can monitor. See How to Monitor Calls.
•
Call Waiting On: Default = Off
Call waiting attempts to give the user a tone to indicate other calls are waiting. Note: If the user
has call appearance buttons programmed, call waiting will not get activated. The next incoming
call will appear on an available call appearance button. When there are no available call
appearance buttons, the next incoming call will receive busy tone. See Call Waiting.
•
Answer Call Waiting on Hold (Analog): Default = On
Applies to analog extension users only. If the user has a call waiting and places their current call
on hold, the call waiting is automatically connected.
•
Busy on Held: Default = On
If on, when the user has a call on hold, new calls receive busy tone (ringing for incoming analog
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call) or are diverted to voicemail if enabled, rather than ringing the user. Note this overrides call
waiting when the user has a call on hold.
•
Outgoing Call Bar: Default = Off
Stops external calls from this User's extension. See Call Restriction.
•
Offhook Station: Default = Off
Indicates whether this extension is used with a hands free or standard handset.
•
Can Intrude: Default = Off
Check this option if the User can interrupt other user's calls. See Call Intrusion.
•
Cannot be Intruded: Default = On
If checked, this user's calls cannot be interrupted or acquired.
•
Force Login: Default = Off
If checked, the user must login to an extension using the Login Code created within this tab. For
example, if Force Login is ticked for User A and after User B has logged off (having used User
A's phone for Hot Desking), then User A must log back onto his extension to make use of the
phone. If Force Login is not ticked, then after User B logs off, User A's extension will
automatically be logged back on.
•
Force Account Code: Default = Off
If checked, the User must enter an Account Code to make an external call. See Account Codes.
•
System Phone: Default = Off
Allows the user (on 4400/4600/5600/6400 series phones with a Menu key) to alter the date and
time displayed on thel phones. On other phones it is accessed by pressing Menu | Menu | Func |
Setup. Also allows SoftConsole users to use the SoftConsole Send Message function.
•
Remote Homeworker/Agent: (Only available in locales where Index is supported) Default = Off
Select if the user has been configured as a remote extension on an Avaya INDeX telephone
system. Refer to INDeX Level 10 documentation for full details. Only available in Locales where
INDeX may also be supported.
•
Can Accept Collect Calls: Default = Off [PTB Only]
Determines whether the user is able to receive and accept collect calls.
•
Multi Line Options: Used to configure Key & Lamp functions.
See the Key & Lamp manual for details on these configuration fields.
o
Pre-Select: Default = Off
o
Ringing Line Preference: Default = On
o
Idle Line Preference: Default = On
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Forwarding
This is the ability to forward a user's calls to another extension or external number. Calls can be
forwarded when there is no answer, when the extension is busy or for all calls. This can be
enabled/disabled by dialing short codes or via the Phone Manager application. See Call Forwarding for
call forwarding related short codes.
The following fields are configurable within the Forwarding tab:
•
Follow Me Number: Default = Blank
All calls are redirected to the extension number entered. If the redirected call fails or is not
answered then the call behaves as though this User's extension had failed to answer, eg. the
Forward settings take effect or voicemail is used.
•
Forward Unconditional: Default = Off
All calls, except group calls, are forwarded to the Forward Number set below.
•
Forward Number: Default = Blank
The telephone number to which calls are to be forwarded when Forward Unconditional is on.
This may be an internal or external number, eg. a cell phone.
•
Forward On Busy: Default = Off
Calls are forwarded to the number set below if the user's extension is busy. If the user has call
appearance buttons programmed, the system will not treat the line as busy until all the call
appearance buttons are in use.
•
Forward On No Answer: Default = Off
Calls are forwarded to the number set below when the user's extension is does not answer within
their set No Answer time.
•
Forward Number: Default = Blank
The number to which calls are forwarded when Forward On Busy and/or Forward On No
Answer are on.
•
Forward HuntGroup Calls: Default = Off
If the user is a member of a hunt group, the hunt group call can also be forwarded if required.
The group's Ring Type must be Hunt or Rotary (not Group or Idle). This option only forwards
hunt group calls when Forward Unconditional is also on and use the same Forward Number
as Forward Unconditional. The call is only forwarded to this number for the period defined by
the hunt group's No Answer Time after which it returns to the hunt group.
Dial In
Use this dialogue box to enable dial in access for a remote user. An Incoming Call Route and RAS
service must also be configured.
The following fields are configurable within the Dial In tab:
•
Dial In On: Default = Off
When enabled, dial in access into the system is available via this User account.
•
Dial In Time Profile: Default = Blank
Select the Time Profile applicable to this User account. A Time Profile (configured via the Time
Profile configuration form) can be used to set time restrictions on dial in access via this User
account. Dial In is allowed during the times set in the Time Profile form. If left blank, then there
are no restrictions.
•
Dial In Firewall Profile: Default = Blank
Select the Firewall Profile to restrict access to the system via this User account. If blank, there
are no Dial In restrictions. Firewall profiles are created in the Firewall Profile configuration form.
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Voice Recording
This tab is used to activate the automatic recording of user's external calls. The recordings are placed in
the user's mailbox. This requires Voicemail Pro to be installed and running.
The following fields are configurable within the Voice Recording tab:
•
Record Outbound: Default = None
Select whether outgoing calls are recorded. Options for recording are:
•
On: Record the call if possible.
•
Mandatory: If not possible to record, return busy tone to the caller.
•
Percentages of calls: Various percentages of calls made by the user will be recorded.
•
Record Inbound: Default = None
The same as Record Outbound but applied to inbound calls to the user.
•
Record Time Profile: Default = Blank
Used to select a time profile during which calls are recorded.
•
Auto Recording Mailbox: Default = <user's own mailbox>
Sets the mailbox into which automatically triggered recordings are placed.
•
Voice Recording Library (Auto): Default = Not Enabled
When checked, voice recording to ContactStore via Voicemail Pro is enabled for the
corresponding user. If this function is enabled and the call connects to voicemail to leave a
mailbox message, automatic call recording will not occur.
•
Manual Recording Mailbox: Default = <user's own mailbox>
Sets the mailbox into which recordings triggered by the user are placed.
•
Voice Recording Library (Manual): Default = Not Enabled
When checked, the corresponding user can manually trigger voice recordings via Voicemail Pro.
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Button Programming/Digital Telephony
If the system locale for Manager is set to enu, then the tab is labeled as Button Programming. If the
system locale is set to eng, then the tab is labeled as Digital Telephony. Regardless of the label,the
feature has the same functionality.
This tab is currently used to assign functions to the DSS keys of DS and IP telephones. See Installing
and Configuring DS Ports
•
Note: Though set through this tab, short codes of the form *DSS1 appear in the User's Short
Codes tab. Any changes to those short codes are ignored and overwritten by the contents of the
Button Programming tab.
The following settings are available within the Button Programming/Digital Telephony tab:
• Button:
The number of the DSS key against which the function is being set. See Button Numbering
Layout. To set a function against a button/key, click the corresponding Action box and select
from the drop down list.
• Menu1 to Menu12 can be used to override the default display softkey features accessed
by pressing Menu
on suitable telephones.
• Action:
Defines the action taken by the buttons once they are programmed. Provides the following:
• Dial:
This is effectively an Abbreviated Dial. The only difference is that the LED illuminates for
the duration of the call, giving the User some feedback as to what was pressed. The dial
string administered for this button may be a partial dial string.
• Group:
Monitor the status of a Hunt-group queue. Flashes Green if a call is incoming to the
group, flashes Red if the queue is backing up. Press to show call information, press again
to pickup call. Put the name of the group, surrounded by quotes, in the Telephone
Number field. This feature only works for groups with queuing enabled.
• Park:
Monitor a park slot. Monitor a park slot. The green LED is lit if the park slot is occupied by
a call parked by the station with the programmed PARK BLF button. The red LED is lit if
the park slot is occupied by a call parked by another station. If you are the user who
parked the call, or have a 4406D+ or 4606D+ station, pressing this button reconnects you
to the call. If another party parked the call and you do not have a 4406D+ or 4606D+
station type, pressing this button once provides call information and a menu, and pressing
the button a second time connects you to the call. Selecting Answr from this menu will
also pickup the call.
• User:
Monitor a user. This is a Busy-Lamp-Field. Put the name of the person, surrounded by
quotes, in the Telephone Number field. Note: When the other party is busy on a call, DSS
Status (on the System | System tab) control whether you see details of the user's call.
• Emulation:
See Emulation Functions .
• Advanced:
These are short code features that can be assigned to DSS keys. For details of the
individual functions, see Short Code Features. TransTalk 9040 MDW sets must access
these features through normal dialed short codes.
• Appearance:
Defines Key & Lamp functions. See Appearance Functions for more information.
• Telephone Number
Information required for this field and the controls available will vary depending on the action
displayed in the Action column. For information on what controls are available, please see
Appearance Functions.
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Appearance Functions
The Appearance functions can be assigned to all Avaya multi-line digital phones. Before programming
any other functions, at least one Call Appearance button must be setup.
Within the Action column, the following functions are available for the Appearance function:
•
Call - Assigns the Appearance function to the corresponding button. Call Appearance enables
the corresponding button on your phone to signal when there is an incoming call. At least one
Call Appearance button must be created before any other appearance buttons can be
programmed. No information is required for the corresponding Telephone Number cell.
•
Bridge - Assigns the Bridge Appearance function to the corresponding button. Bridge
Appearance enables an incoming call to be displayed on both the destination extension as well
as the extension of the bridged user. The corresponding Telephone Number cell must be
defined with a system username and a button number for that user.
•
Coverage - Assigns the Coverage Appearance function to the corresponding button. This
function enables the user for whom it is being programmed to cover for calls coming into a
defined user destination when that user's extension is unanswered after a defined time period. A
username must be defined in the corresponding Telephone Number cell.
•
Line - Assigns the Line Appearance function to the corresponding button. This function assigns
specific lines to specific buttons on a user's phone. Lines need to be defined and then selected
for the corresponding Telephone Number cell.
•
Typically, when a line appearance key is selected, secondary dial tone is generated.
When the line appearance is mapped to a short code using the DialDirectHotLine short
code feature, no secondary dial tone is generated and the number is dialed directly.
For information on programming appearance functions in relation to key and lamp, please see the "IP
Office Key and Lamp Operations" manual.
Button Numbering Layout
For information on the button layout for individual Avaya phones, please refer to the "IP Office Key and
Lamp Operations" manual.
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Emulation Functions
These functions can be assigned to DSS keys. Where supported, they emulate the action of the same
feature when selected on other non-IP Office Avaya telephone systems.
•
Supported Functions:
Those features listed as Not supported can be assigned to a DSS key but have no equivalent
function on the IP Office. However they can be configured and a CTI application can then
override the display. For example, "Stats" could be configured as a soft key and a CTI application
run to override it and display suitable agent statistics.
For each emulation function, various features can apply. Depending on the function, the following
features will be available, where some will require information to be entered:
•
Telephone Number:
Data required by the feature when setup.
•
Button Programming:
Path to feature when applying to a DSS button.
•
DSS Toggles:
The DSS key reverses the feature when pressed again.
•
Label:
Name shown against DSS keys on suitable telephones.
•
User Program:
Indicates whether the feature can be programmed against keys by the user if their phone has
been programmed with access to the Admin (Self-Administer) function.
•
Function Number:
Definity feature number.
•
Default Softkey:
Indicates that the feature is a default softkey display feature accessed by pressing Menu on
phones with a Menu key.
•
9040:
Is the feature supported on the TransTalk MDR 9040.
Abbreviated Dial
This allows one touch dialing of a stored number.
•
Telephone Number: Telephone number or partial telephone number.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Abbreviated Dial.
•
Label: AD User Program: Yes.
•
Function Number: 129. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
Abbreviated Dial Pause
Not supported. Allows a user to enter a pause character when programming an abbreviated dial.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Abbreviated Dial Pause.
•
Label: Pause. User Program: No.
•
Function Number: 130. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
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Abbreviated Dial Program
Allows a user to program abbreviated dialing numbers against other DSS keys.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Abbreviated Dial Program.
•
Label: Prog. User Program: Yes.
•
Function Number: 7. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
Abbreviated Dial Stop
Not supported. Allows a user to enter a stop character when programming an abbreviated dial.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Abbreviated Dial Stop.
•
Label: Stop. User Program: No.
•
Function Number: 148. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
Account Code Entry
Enter an account code for a call.
•
Telephone Number: A code is required and it must match an account code set in the account
codes list.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Account Code Entry.
•
Label: Acct. User Program: Yes.
•
Function Number: 128. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
ACD Agent Statistics
Not supported.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | ACD Agent Statistics.
•
Label: Stats. User Program: No.
•
Function Number: 147. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
ACD Stroke Count
Not supported.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | ACD Stroke Count.
•
Label: Count. User Program: No.
•
Function Number: 135. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
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AD Special Function Mark
Not supported. Allows a user to enter a mark character when programming abbreviated dial.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | AD Special Function Mark.
•
Label: Mark. User Program: No.
•
Function Number: 142. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
AD Special Function Wait
Not supported. Allows a user to enter a Wait for Dial Tone character when programming an abbreviated
dial.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | AD Special Function Wait.
•
Label: Wait. User Program: No.
•
Function Number: 149. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
AD Special Functions
Not supported. Allows a user to enter a special character (mark, pause suppress, wait) when entering an
abbreviated dial.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | AD Special Functions.
•
Label: Sfunc. User Program: No.
•
Function Number: 145. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
AD Suppress
Suppresses the display of dialed digits on the telephone display. Dialed digits are replaced with an s
character.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | AD Suppress.
•
Label: Spres. User Program: Yes. Toggles: Yes.
•
Function Number: 146. Default Softkey: No. 9040: Yes.
Appearance
Allows a user to have a visual appearance of calls that are made and received.
•
Telephone Number: Text entered appears on the call appearance display line of 2420 and 4620
when idle.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Appearance.
•
Label: Appear. User Program: Yes.
•
Function Number: –. Default Softkey: No. 9040: Yes.
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Automatic Callback
Initiates a call to an extension automatically when that extension becomes free.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Automatic Callback.
•
Label: AutCB. User Program: Yes. Toggles: Yes.
•
Function Number: 6. Default Softkey: Yes. 9040: No.
Automatic Intercom
Call an extension and have the call answered on speakerphone. Handsfree auto-answer must be
supported by the called extension.
•
Telephone Number: Extension number.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Automatic Intercom.
•
Label: Iauto. User Program: No.
•
Function Number: 139. Default Softkey: No. 9040: Yes.
Call Forwarding All
Forward all calls to a number entered. Alters the users forward unconditional number and forward on
busy number.
•
Telephone Number: Telephone number.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Call Forwarding All.
•
Label: CFrwd. User Program:
•
Toggles: Yes.
•
Function Number: 8. Default Softkey: Yes. 9040: No.
Call Park
Allows the user to park their current call.
•
Telephone Number: Park slot number (assigned based on parking extension number).
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Call Park.
•
Label: CPark. User Program: Yes. Toggles: Yes.
•
Function Number: 9. Default Softkey: Yes. 9040: Yes.
Call Park To Other Extension
Allows the user to place their current call against another extension. The parked call indication on that
extension is then activated (this varies according to the telephone. The park slot number assigned to the
parked call is based on the number of the extension parking the call.
•
Telephone Number: Extension number.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Call Park to Other Extension.
•
Label: Park. User Program: Yes.
•
Function Number: 143. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
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Cancel Leave Word Calling
Not supported. Cancels the last Leave Word Calling message originated by the user.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Cancel Leave Word Calling.
•
Label: CnLWC. User Program: No.
•
Function Number: 133. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
Call Pickup
Answer an alerting call in the system.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Call Pickup.
•
Label: CpkUp. User Program: Yes.
•
Function Number: 132. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
Directory
Provides access to the system directories of telephone numbers.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Directory.
•
Label: Dir. User Program: Yes.
•
Function Number: 1. Default Softkey: Yes. 9040: No.
Group Paging
Allows a user to make announcements to a group of extensions. The extensions must support handsfree
auto-answer.
•
Telephone Number: Group number.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Group Paging.
•
Label: GrpPg. User Program: Yes.
•
Function Number: 138. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
Consult
Not supported.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Consult.
•
Label: Cnslt. User Program: No.
•
Function Number: 134. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
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Dial Intercom
Call an extension and have the call answered on speakerphone. Handsfree auto-answer must be
supported by the called extension.
•
Telephone Number: Extension number.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Dial Intercom.
•
Label: Idial. User Program: No.
•
Function Number: 140. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
Directed Call Pickup
Pickup a call ringing at a specific extension or hunt group.
•
Telephone Number: Ringing extension or group number.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Directed Pickup.
•
Label: DpkUp. User Program: Yes.
•
Function Number: 136. Default Softkey: Yes. 9040: No.
Drop
For alerting calls, pressing the Drop button sends the ringing call to Voicemail (if voicemail is enabled).
On Avaya DS terminals, not having voicemail enabled will allow the call to keep ringing. For active calls,
pressing this button disconnects and clears the call.
When Drop is used, silence is returned to the user rather than a dial tone. This is an intended operation,
reflecting that Drop is mainly used by call center headset users.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Drop.
•
Label: Drop. User Program: Yes.
•
Function Number: 2. Default Softkey: Yes. 9040: No.
Inspect
Not supported. Allows users on display phones to determine the identification of held calls. Allows users
on an active call to display the identification of incoming calls.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Inspect.
•
Label: Inspt. User Program: No.
•
Function Number: 141. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
Internal Auto-Answer
Sets the user's extension to automatically connect internal calls after a single ring.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Internal Auto-Answer.
•
Label: HfAns. User Program: Yes. Toggles: Yes.
•
Function Number: 3. Default Softkey: Yes. 9040: No.
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Leave Word Calling
Not supported. Leaves a message for the user associated with the last number dialed to call the
originator.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Leave Word Calling.
•
Label: LWC. User Program: No.
•
Function Number: 131. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
Manual Exclusion
Not supported.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Manual Exclusion.
•
Label: Excl. User Program: No.
•
Function Number: 137. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
Priority Calling
Not supported.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Priority Calling.
•
Label: Pcall. User Program: No.
•
Function Number: 5. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
Ringer Off
Switches the call alerting ring on/off at the user's extension.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Ringer Off.
•
Label: RngOf. User Program: Yes. Toggles: Yes.
•
Function Number: 144. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
Self-Administer
Allows a user to program features against the DSS buttons on their phone.
•
Telephone Number: None or 1.
•
If no value is set for the telephone number, allows user programming of those
Emulation functions marked as User Program: Yes.
•
If 1 is entered as the telephone number, allows user programming of Dial,
Group, Park, User and Hook Flash functions against DSS keys.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Self-Administer.
•
Label: Admin. User Program: Yes.
•
Function Number: 12. Default Softkey: Yes. 9040: No.
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Send All Calls
Sets the user's extension into 'Do Not Disturb' mode.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Send All Call.
•
Label: SAC. User Program: Yes. Toggles: Yes.
•
Function Number: 10. Default Softkey: Yes. 9040: Yes.
Stored Number View
Not supported. Allows a user to view on the phone's display the contents of any programmed feature
button.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Stored Number View.
•
Label: BtnVu. User Program: No.
•
Function Number: 150. Default Softkey: No. 9040: No.
Time of Day
Displays the time and date on the user's telephone.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Time of Day.
•
Label: TmDay. User Program: Yes. Toggles: Yes.
•
Function Number: 11. Default Softkey: Yes. 9040: Yes.
Timer
Starts a timer running on the display of the user's extension. Note: The timer disappears when the user
end a call.
•
Telephone Number: None.
•
Button Programming: Emulation | Timer.
•
Label: Timer. User Program: yes. Toggles: Yes.
•
Function Number: 4. Default Softkey: Yes. 9040: No.
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Hunt Group Form
Hunt Group Overview
A Hunt Group is a collection of users, eg. Sales - a group to handle all sales related calls
An incoming caller wishing to speak to Sales can ring one number but the call can be answered by any
number of extensions that are members of the Sales Hunt Group.
Changing the name of a hunt group has the following effects:
•
A new empty mailbox is created on voicemail with the new hunt group name.
•
Entries in other groups' Overflow lists will be updated.
•
Out-of-Service and Night-Service fallback references are updated.
Modifying the extension number of a hunt group updates the following:
•
DSS queue monitoring configurations.
•
Incoming call routing entries.
•
Transfer-target in auto-attendant.
When a hunt group is deleted, all references to the deleted group will be removed including:
•
Entry in Incoming call routing table.
•
Transfer target in internal auto-attendant.
•
Overflow, Night-Service or Fallback-Service on other groups.
•
DSS keys monitoring group status.
Note that a group will not be deleted until all calls that were established through calling the hunt group
are cleared. In the meanwhile, the group is set to Out of Service and any new calls to that group will not
be processed. The group is now set in a Deleting state. While in this state, updating any setting on the
group using Manager or the Installation Wizard will reinstate the group, that is, the Deleting state is lost
and the group will not be deleted.
For a full overview of hunt groups, see Overview of Hunt Groups.
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Hunt Group
The following fields are available for configuration within the Hunt Group tab:
•
Name:
The name to identify this Hunt Group. It is recommended that only alphanumeric characters with
no spaces be used. This field is case sensitive and must be unique.
•
Voicemail uses the name to match a group and its mailbox. Changing a group's
name will route its voicemail calls to a new mailbox.
•
Extension:
The extension number to be used by the Hunt Group. This can be left blank, however, many
useful features will not be available, for example, it will not be possible to transfer a call to the
Hunt Group or collect Voicemail messages remotely.
•
No Answer Time (secs): Default = Blank
The number of seconds an extension rings before the call is passed to another extension in the
list. This applies to all telephones in this group and the Overflow Groups (if used). If left blank the
System Default No Answer Time (15 seconds) will be used.
•
Overflow Time: Default = Blank
The Overflow Time is the amount of time (in seconds) a call will ring round the Extension List
before being passed to the Overflow Group. If all the members in the extension list are busy, this
is the amount of time the caller is held in the group queue before being passed to the Overflow
Group. See Using Queuing .
•
Call Waiting On: Default = Off
Only supported by group's set to the Ring Type of Group. When on, user's in the group already
on a call, receive call waiting indication when a new call rings the group. The users must also
have their own Call Waiting setting set to On. Note: If the user has call appearance buttons
programmed, call waiting will not get activated.
•
Hunt Type: Default = Hunt/Linear
Sets the order in which each extension in a Hunt Group is rung.
•
•
Group: All telephones in the Extension List ring simultaneously.
•
Linear/Hunt: Each extension is rung in order, one after the other, starting from the first
extension in the list each time.
•
Circular/Rotary: Each extension is rung in order, one after the other. However, the last
extension used is remembered. The next call received rings the next extension in the list.
•
Idle/Most Idle: The extension that has been unused for the longest period rings first, then
the extension that has been idle second longest rings, etc.
Extension List:
An ordered list of telephone extensions that form the Hunt Group. These telephones ring when
the Group is In Service (See the Fallback tab). Repeated numbers can be used, eg. 201, 202,
201, 203 etc. Each extension will ring for the number of seconds defined by the No Answer Time
before moving to the next extension in the list, dependent on the Ring Mode chosen.
•
To alter entries:
Right-click in the Extension List box and select Add from the menu and select the User to
be a member of the Hunt Group. CTRL or SHIFT can be used to select multiple entries.
Repeated users can be added, eg. 201, 202, 201, 203 etc.
•
To change the order of the Extensions, drag and drop the extension to the required
position.
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•
To delete an entry, right-click on the required User and select Delete.
•
It is also possible to disable a User's membership to a Hunt Group temporarily.
Right-click on the User and select Disable. An asterisk appears to the left of the
User's name. To reverse this option right-click on the User and select Enable.
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•
•
This facility can also be activated via short codes - see Enable/Disable
Membership .
Overflow Group List:
If a call cannot be answered by the extensions shown in the Extension List, the call can be
passed to another Hunt Group called an Overflow Group. The Overflow Group acts as a single
extension in the Hunt Group. Overflow/Fallback settings relevant to the Hunt Group acting as an
Overflow Group will be ignored. Multiple Overflow Groups can be used and a Hunt Group may be
added more than once to the Overflow Groups list. To alter entries right-click on the list.
Voicemail
If a Voicemail Server is being used on your system, each Hunt Group can have its own voicemail box.
You can use this form to enable this facility (default) and control various hunt group voicemail settings.
•
Voicemail Code: Default = Blank
A security code (1-15 digits) used by the Voicemail Server. This is required when users retrieve
Voicemail messages for this Hunt Group remotely, ie. from an extension not a member of the
Hunt Group or from an external telephone, eg. a cell phone.
•
Confirm Password:
The Voicemail Code must be retyped to ensure it has been correctly entered.
•
Voicemail Email: Default = Blank
Messages for this Hunt Group can be sent to an email account. Enter the email address, eg.
jbloggs@bloggs.com. Select the required Voicemail Email mode below. The Voicemail message
is received by the email application as a .wav file and played through the speakers of the PC.
Refer to the Voicemail Installation & Administration Manual for full details. This entry is not used
by IMS.
•
Voicemail On: Default = On
Each Hunt Group can use Voicemail to collect group related messages. Use this option to turn
this feature on or off.
•
Voicemail Help: Default = Off
When retrieving Voicemail messages users can be given a recorded message helping them to
use the Voicemail facility - "For help at any time press 8." This option turns this facility on or off.
•
Broadcast: Default = Off
If a Voicemail message is left for a hunt group and Broadcast is enabled, a copy of the message
is forwarded to the mailbox of all the group members. The original message on the hunt group
mailbox will then be automatically deleted. This option turns the Broadcast facility on or off.
•
Voicemail Email mode: Default = Off
If a Voicemail Email address has been entered above, select one of the following modes:
•
Off: Voicemail messages or notifications are not sent to the email account automatically.
•
Copy: A copy of the Voicemail message is sent to the email account.
•
Forward: Voicemail messages are sent to the email account and deleted from the
Voicemail server.
•
Alert: Notification that a new Voicemail message has been received is sent to the email
account.
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Fallback
The Fallback Tab allows you to configure what happens to group calls at times when the extensions in
the Extension List are not manned, for example, outside of office hours or during a holiday period.
See Using the Fallback Tab .
The following fields are configurable within the Fallback tab:
•
Time Profile: Default = Blank
This field allows selection of a previously created Time Profile. (See Time Profile Form for
information on creating a time profile) That time profile specifies the time period within which the
Hunt Group behaves as defined by the Service Mode. If no time profile is specified, the Hunt
Group will behave as defined by the Service Mode 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. For example,
if In Service Mode is selected and a Time Profile is defined, then the system will be in service
within that time profile. Outside these hours, the group follows the Night Service mode settings.
Please note:
•
The Time Profile does not change the groups Service Mode setting.
•
Short codes cannot be used to override the time profile action.
•
Out of Service Fallback Group: Default = Blank
Select from the list box a Hunt Group previously created. The Out of Service Fallback Group is
used to provide cover when the Hunt Group is in Out of Service mode.
•
Night Service Fallback Group: Default = Blank
Select from the list box a Hunt Group previously created. The Night Service Fallback group is
used to provide cover when the Hunt Group is in Night Service mode.
•
Service Mode: Default = In Service
Indicates the service mode that the group is currently providing:
•
Out of Service
When selected, callers to the group hear busy tone or are passed to voicemail if
operational and played the Out of Hours greeting. Alternatively, an Out of Service
Fallback Group can be set to provide cover. Alternatively the short code features
SetHuntGroupOutOfService and ClearHuntGroupOutofService could be used to create
short codes for this action.
•
In Service
When selected the Hunt Group is enabled. This is the default mode.
•
Night Service
When selected, callers to the group hear busy tone or are passed to voicemail if
operational and played the Out of Hours greeting. Alternatively, a Night Service Fallback
Group can be set to provide cover.
Using Short Codes to Change Group Service Mode
Short Codes can also be created using the SetHuntGroupNightService and
ClearHuntGroupNightService features to enable and disable Night Service. Note that if the group is
also using a time profile, the short codes cannot be used to override the night service when the time
profile sets the group into night service mode. They are meant for putting a group in or out of night
service mode at times outside its time profile.
The default short codes include two short codes that already use those features:
•
*20*N# - Puts group N into Night Service mode.
•
*21*N# - Takes group N out of Night Service mode.
Once you have used Short Codes to change the status, it can only be changed back via a Short Code
(and not Time Profile).
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Queuing
The Queuing feature allows calls to the Hunt Group to be held in a queue when all extensions in the
Extension List are busy. When an extension becomes free a queued call is then presented to that
extension.
If the system has voicemail operational then queued callers are played queue messages at set intervals.
See Using Queuing .
•
Queuing On
: Default = On
If selected (default) queuing is available for this Hunt Group.
•
Queue Limit: Default = Blank
This features sets the number of calls that is held in the queue at any one time. If this number is
exceeded the caller will hear busy tone or be passed to Voicemail (if operational).
•
Queue Ring Time (secs): Default = 10 seconds
This facility defines the time (in seconds) before the caller is placed in the queue.
Voice Recording
This tab is used to activate the automatic recording of external hunt group calls. The recordings are
placed in the hunt group mailbox. This requires Voicemail Pro to be installed and running.
•
•
Record Inbound:Default = None
Select whether inbound calls by group members should be recorded. Options are On,
Mandatory and then various percentages of calls made by the group.
•
On: Record the call if possible.
•
Mandatory: If not possible to record, return busy tone to the caller.
Record Time Profile: Default = Blank
Used to select a time profile during which calls are recorded.
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Short Code Form
Short Code Form
This form is used to create System Short Codes. System short codes allow access to certain phone
features by all users on the system. A list of default short codes are provided, but they can be amended
and new ones added by the system administrator. Because short codes are very involved and their
rules/restrictions apply across several configuration forms, please see Understanding Short Codes and
its related topics before creating a short code.
In the panel to the right of the Configuration Tree panel, right-click to add a new short code or select a
existing short code and right-click to view, edit, delete or copy one. For each short code, the following
fields are available for configuration:
•
Short Code: The dialing digits used to trigger the short code. Maximum length is 33
characters. See Short Code Characters for a list of valid characters.
•
Telephone Number: The number dialed by the short code or parameters for the short code
feature. This field can contain numbers and characters. For example, it can contain Voicemail
Pro start point names, user names, hunt group names and telephone numbers (including those
with special characters). Maximum length 33 characters. See Telephone Number Characters for
a list of valid characters.
•
Line Group ID: Default = 0
Enter the identity of the Line that this Short Code will use to make a call.
•
Feature:
Select the feature used by the Short Code.
•
Locale: Default = Blank
This option sets country variations if applicable, eg. Voicemail server prompts. For a
list of the locales supported, see Supported Country and Locale Settings.
•
Force Account Code: When creating a short code that specifies how an outgoing call will be
handled, having Force Account Code ticked will assert that the dialed number requires an
account code before the call is put through. Any existing account code can be used by the user to
put the call through. See Force Account Code for more information.
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Service Form
Service Form Overview
A Service is configured to provide remote data access for local users. A Service is needed when
configuring, for example, connection to an ISP for Internet access or connection to a remote Control Unit
via ISDN or via a WAN link.
When creating a new Service, you are given several options:
•
A Normal Service should be selected when configuring, for example, a connection to an ISP.
For an example of setting up a connection to an ISP, see Connecting to the Internet. If this type
of service is selected, the following tabs are available:
•
Service
•
Bandwidth
•
IP
•
AutoConnect
•
Quota
•
Fallback
•
PPP
•
A WAN Service can be selected when creating a WAN link. A User and RAS Service will also be
created with the same name. These three entries are automatically linked and each open the
same form. Note however, that this type of Service cannot be used if the Encrypted Password
option is checked. In this case the RAS Service name must match the Account Name. Therefore
either create each entry manually or create an Intranet Service. If a Wan Service is selected, the
DialIn configuration tab is available along with the Normal Service's configuration tabs above.
•
An Intranet Service can be selected to automatically create a User with the same name at the
same time. These two entries are linked and will each open the same form. Note that the Dial In
tab is now added to the Service configuration form and the Dial In On option is assumed. The
User's password is entered in the Incoming Password field at the bottom on the Service tab. An
Intranet Services shares the same configuration tabs as those available to the WAN Service.
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Service
Fields within this tab enable you to create a service. the following field are available for configuration:
•
Name:
The name of the service, eg. Holmdel, Internet etc. It is recommended that only alphanumeric
characters be used.
•
Account Name:
The User Name that is used to authenticate the connection. This is provided by the ISP or remote
system.
•
Password: Default = Blank
Enter the password that is used to authenticate the connection. This is provided by the ISP or
remote system.
•
Confirm Password:
Reenter the password to ensure it has been entered correctly.
•
Telephone Number: Default = Blank
If the connection is to be made via ISDN enter the telephone number to be dialed. This is
provided by the ISP or remote system.
•
Firewall Profile: Default = Blank
From the list box select the Firewall Profile that is used to allow/disallow protocols through this
Service.
•
Encrypted Password: Default = Off
When enabled the password is authenticated via CHAP (this must also be supported at the
remote end). If disabled, PAP is used as the authentication method.
•
Default Route: Default = Off
When enabled this Service is the default route for data packets (unless a specific route has been
created under IP Route). A green arrow appears to the left of the Service in the Configuration
Tree. Only one Service can be the default route. If disabled, a route must be created under IP
Route.
If you have created a WAN or Intranet Service, the following fields are available:
•
Incoming Password: Default = Blank
Enter the password that will be used to authenticate the connection from the remote Control Unit.
(If this field has appeared because you have created a Service and User of the same name, this
is the password you entered in the User's Password field).
•
Confirm Password:
Reenter the password to ensure it has been entered correctly.
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Bandwidth
These options give the ability to make ISDN calls between sites only when there is data to be sent or
sufficient data to warrant an additional call. The calls are made automatically without the users being
aware of when calls begin or end. Using ISDN it is possible to establish a data call and be passing data
in less that a second. Note: the system will check Minimum Call Time first, then Idle Period then Active
Idle Period.
The following bandwidth related configuration fields are available:
•
Minimum No of Channels: Default = Blank (1 channel)
Defines the number of channels used to connect for an outgoing connection. The initial channel
must be established and stable, before further calls are made.
•
Maximum No of Channels: Default = Blank
Defines the maximum number of channels to can be used. If blank then the number is the same
as set in the Minimum Channels field. This field should be blank or contain a value greater than
the Minimum Channels field.
•
Extra BW Threshold: Default = 50%
Defines the utilization threshold at which extra channels are connected. The value entered is a
%. The % utilization is calculated over the total number of channels in use at any time, which may
be one, two etc.
•
•
For example, if Minimum Channels set to 1, Maximum Channels set to 2 and Extra
Bandwidth set to 50 - once 50% of first channel has been used the second channel are
connected.
Reduce BW Threshold: Default = 10%
Defines the utilization threshold at which additional channels are disconnected. The value
entered is a %. Additional calls are only dropped when the % utilization, calculated over the total
number of channels in use at the time, falls below the % value set, for a time period defined by
the Service-Idle Time. The last call (calls - if Minimum Calls is greater than 1) to the Service is
only dropped if the % utilization falls to 0, for a time period defined by the Service-Idle Time. Only
used when 2 or more channels are set above.
•
For example, if Minimum Channels set to 1, Maximum Channels set to 2 and Reduce
Bandwidth is set to 10 - once the usage of the 2 channels drops to 10% the number of
channels used is 1.
•
Callback Telephone Number: Default = Blank
The number that is given to the remote service, via BAP, which the remote Control Unit then dials
to allow the bandwidth to be increased. Incoming Call routing and RAS Services must be
appropriately configured.
•
Idle Period (secs): Default = 10 seconds
The time period, in seconds, required to expire after the line has gone idle (ie. no real data has
passed during this time period). At this point the call is considered inactive and is completely
closed.
•
•
For example, the 'Idle Period' is set to X seconds. X seconds before the 'Active Idle
Period' timeouts the Control Unit checks the packets being transmitted/received, if there is
nothing then at the end of the 'Active Idle Period' the session is closed & the line is
dropped. If there are some packets being transmitted/received then the line stays up.
After the 'Active Idle Period' has timed out the system performs the same check every X
seconds, until there are no packets being transferred and the session is closed and the
line dropped.
Active Idle Period (secs): Default = 180 seconds
Sets the time period during which time the line has gone idle (ie. no real data has passed) but
there are still active sessions in progress (eg an FTP is in process, but not actually passing data
at the moment). Only after this timeout will call be dropped.
•
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For example, you are downloading a file from your PC and for some reason the other end
has stopped responding, (the remote site may have a problem etc.) the line is idle, not
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down, no data is being transmitted/ received but the file download session is still active.
After the set time period of being in this state the line will drop and the sessions close.
You may receive a remote server timeout error on your PC in the Browser/FTP client you
were using.
•
Min Call Time (secs): Default = 60 seconds
Sets the minimum time that a call is held up after initial connection. This is useful if you pay a
minimum call charge every time a call is made, no matter the actual length of the call. The
minimum call time should be set to match that provided by the line provider.
•
Extra BW Mode: Default = Incoming Outgoing
Defines the mode of operation used to increases bandwidth to the initial call(s) to the remote
Service.
•
Outgoing Only: Bandwidth is added by making outgoing calls.
•
Incoming Only: Bandwidth is added by the remote service calling back on the BACP
number (assuming that BACP is successfully negotiated).
•
Outgoing Incoming: Uses both methods but bandwidth is first added using outgoing
calls.
•
Incoming Outgoing: Uses both methods but bandwidth is first added using incoming
BACP calls.
DialIn
Only available for WAN and Intranet Services. This tab is used to define a WAN connection.
To define a WAN connection:
1. Right-click within the DialIn window and select Add.
2. Enter WAN if the service is being routed via a WAN port on a WAN3 expansion module.
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IP
The fields in this tab are used to configure network addressing for the services you are running.
Depending on how your network is configured, the use of Network Address Translation (NAT) may be
required.
The following fields are configurable within the IP tab:
•
IP Address: Default = Blank (address assigned by ISP)
A value should only be entered here if a specific IP Address (and appropriate mask as below) is
required. Note that if the address is in a different domain from the Control Units IP address then
NAT is automatically enabled.
•
Note: IP412 Control Units include an Enable NAT checkbox on their System LAN1 and
LAN2 tabs.
•
IP Mask: Default = Blank (use NAT)
Enter the IP Mask associated with the required IP Address if an address is entered.
•
Primary Trans IP Address: Default = Blank
This address acts as a primary address for incoming IP traffic. All incoming IP packets without a
session are translated to this address. This would normally be set to the local Mail/Web Server's
IP Address.
•
On systems using an IP412 Control Unit, primary transfer IP addresses for each LAN can
also be set through the System | LAN1 and System | LAN2 tabs. See LAN1 .
•
Request DNS: Default = Off
By selecting this option DNS information is automatically obtained - typically from your ISP. You
should also leave the DNS Server IP Address box in the DNS tab of the System configuration
form blank. The PC making the DNS request should point to the Control Unit as the DNS Server,
this happens automatically if you are using DHCP. Use winipcfg or ipconfig to check the PC's
DNS Server setting.
•
Forward Multicast Messages: Default = On
By default this option is on. Multicasting allows WAN bandwidth to be maximized through the
reduction of traffic that needs to be passed between sites.
•
RIP Mode : Default = None
Routing Information Protocol (RIP) is a method by which network routers can exchange
information about device locations and routes. RIP can be used within small networks to allow
dynamic route configuration as opposed to static configuration using.
•
None: The LAN does not listen to or send RIP messages.
•
Listen Only (Passive): Listen to RIP-1 and RIP-2 messages in order to learn RIP routes
on the network.
•
RIP1: As above plus send RIP-1 responses as a sub-network broadcast.
•
RIP2 Broadcast (RIP1 Compatibility): As above but send RIP-2 responses as a subnetwork broadcast.
•
RIP2 Multicast: As above but send RIP-2 responses to the RIP-2 multicast address.
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Autoconnect
Fields in this tab enable you to set up automatic connections to the specified Service.
•
Auto Connect Interval (mins): Default = Blank (AutoConnect is disabled)
This field defines how often this Service will automatically be called ("polled"), eg. 60 means the
system will call this Service every hour in the absence of any normally generated call (this timer
is reset for every call; therefore if the service is already connected, then no additional calls are
made). This is ideal for SMTP Mail polling from Internet Service Providers.
•
Auto Connect Time Profile: Default = Blank
Allows the selection of any configured Time Profiles. (The Time Profile must first be configured
within the Time Profile Form configuration form.) The selected profile controls the time period
during which automatic connections to the service are made. It does NOT mean that connection
to that service is barred outside of these hours. For example, if a time profile called "Working
Hours" is selected, where the profile is defined to be 9:00AM to 6:00PM Monday to Friday, then
automatic connection to the service will not be made unless its within the defined profile. If there
is an existing connection to the service at 9:00AM, then the connection will continue. If there is no
connection, then an automatic connection will be made at 9:00AM.
Quota
Quotas are associated with outgoing calls, they place a time limit on calls to a particular IP Service. This
avoids excessive call charges when perhaps something changes on your network and call frequency
increases unintentionally.
The following fields are configurable:
•
Quota Time (mins): Default = 240 minutes
Defines the number of minutes used in the Quota. When the Quota Time is used up no further
data can be passed to this Service. This feature is useful to catch/stop things like an Internet
game keeping a call to your ISP open for 3 months.
•
•
Warning: Setting a value here without selecting Daily/Weekly/Monthly refresh will stop all
further calls after this period has expired.
Quota: Default = Daily
Sets the period of quota operation (None, Daily, Weekly or Monthly). For example, if the Quota
Time is 60 and Quota is set to Daily then the maximum allowed total connect time during any one
calendar day is 60 minutes. Any time beyond this will cause the system to close the Service and
prevent any further calls to this Service. To disable quotas select none AND set a quota time of
zero/blank.
•
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Note: The ClearQuota feature can be used to create Short Codes to refresh the quota
time.
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Fallback
These options allow you to set up a fallback for the Service. For example, you may wish to connect to
your ISP during working hours and at other times take advantage of varying call charges from an
alternative carrier. You could therefore set up one Service to connect during peak times and another to
act as fallback during the cheaper period.
See Using a Fallback Service .
The following fields are configurable within the Fallback tab:
•
In Fallback: Default = Off
This option indicates whether the Service is in Fallback or not. This can be set manually, via a
Time Profile or via a Short Code.
•
Time profile:
Select the Time Profile you wish to use for this Service. The time profile should be set up for the
hours that you wish this service to be operational, out of these hours the Fallback Service is
used.
•
Fallback Service:
Select the Service that is used when this Service is in fallback.
PPP
Fields in this tab enable you to configure Point to Point Protocol (PPP) in relation to this particular
service. PPP is a protocol for communication between two computers using a Serial interface. For an
overview of PPP, see Point to Point Protocol (PPP) .
The following fields are configurable within the PPP tab:
•
Chap Challenge Interval (secs): Default = Blank
The period between CHAP challenges. Blank or 0 disables repeated challenges. Some software
such as Windows 95 DUN does not support repeated CHAP challenges.
•
Header Compression Mode: Default = None selected
Enables the negotiation and use of IP Header Compression. Supported modes are IPHC and VJ.
IPHC should be used on WAN links.
•
BACP: Default = Off
Enables the negotiation and use of BACP/BCP protocols. These are used to control the addition
of B channels to increase bandwidth.
•
Incoming traffic does not keep link up: Default = On
When enabled, the link is not kept up for incoming traffic only.
•
Multilink/QoS: Default = Off
Enables the negotiate and use of the Multilink protocol (MPPC) on the link(s) into this Service.
Multilink must be enabled if there is more than one channel that is allowed to be
Bundled/Multilinked to this RAS Service.
•
Compression Mode: Default = MPPC
Enables the negotiate and use of compression. Do not use on VoIP WAN links.
•
•
Disable: Do not use or attempt to use compression.
•
StacLZS: Attempt to use STAC compression (Mode 3, sequence check mode).
•
MPPC: Attempt to use MPPC compression. Useful for NT Servers.
Callback Mode: Default = Disable
•
Disable: Callback is not enabled
•
LCP: (Link Control Protocol) After authentication the incoming call is dropped and an
outgoing call to the number configured in the Service is made to re-establish the link.
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•
•
•
Callback CP: (Microsoft's Callback Control Protocol) After acceptance from both ends the
incoming call is dropped and an outgoing call to the number configured in the Service is
made to re-establish the link.
•
Extended CBCP: (Extended Callback Control Protocol) Similar to Callback CP except the
Microsoft application at the remote end prompts for a telephone number. An outgoing call
is then made to that number to re-establish the link.
Access Mode: Default = Digital64
Sets the protocol, line speed and connection request type used when making outgoing calls.
Incoming calls are automatically handled (see RAS services).
•
Digital64: Protocol set to Sync PPP, rate 64000 bps, call presented to local exchange as
a "Data Call".
•
Digital56: As above but rate 56000 bps.
•
Voice56: As above but call is presented to local exchange as a "Voice Call".
•
V120: Protocol set to Async PPP, rate V.120, call presented to local exchange as a "Data
Call". This mode runs at up to 64K per channel but has a higher Protocol overhead than
pure 64K operation. Used for some bulletin board systems as it allows the destination end
to run at a different asynchronous speed to the calling end.
•
V110: Protocol is set to Async PPP, rate V.110. This runs at 9600 bps, call is presented
to local exchange as a "Data Call". It is ideal for some bulletin boards.
•
Modem: Allows Asynchronous PPP to run over an auto-adapting Modem to a service
provider (requires a Modem2 card in the main unit)
Data Pkt. Size: Default = 0
Sets the size limit for the Maximum Transmissible Unit.
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RAS Form
RAS Form Overview
Remote Access Server (RAS) is a piece of computer hardware which sits on a corporate LAN and into
which employees dial on the public switched telephone network to get access to their email and to
software and data on the corporate LAN.
This form is used to create a RAS service that the system offers Dial In users. A RAS service is needed
when configuring modem dial in access, digital (ISDN) dial in access and a WAN link. Some systems
may only require one RAS service since the incoming call type can be automatically sensed.
The following tabs contain configurable information for this form:
•
RAS
•
PPP
RAS
Remote Access Server (RAS) is a piece of computer hardware which sits on a corporate LAN and into
which employees dial on the public switched telephone network to get access to their email and to
software and data on the corporate LAN.
•
Name:
A textual name for this service, eg. DialIn. If Encrypted Password (see below) is used this name
must match the Account Name entered in the Service Form.
•
Extension:
Enter an Extension Number if this service is to be accessed internally, eg. via a modem.
•
COM Port:
For future use.
•
TA Enable: Default = Off
Select to enable or disable - if enabled RAS will pass the call onto a TA port for external handling,
eg. HyperTerminal, NT RAS etc.
•
Encrypted Password: Default = Off
This option is used to define whether Dial In users are asked to use PAP or CHAP during their
initial logon to the RAS Service. If the Encrypted Password box is checked then Dial In users are
sent a CHAP challenge, if the box is unchecked PAP is used as the Dial In Authorization method.
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PPP
PPP (Point-to-Point Protocol) is a Protocol for communication between two computers using a Serial
interface, typically a personal computer connected by phone line to a server. See Point to Point Protocol
(PPP) for a more detailed overview of PPP.
•
CHAP Challenge Interval (secs): Default = Blank
The period between successive CHAP challenges. Blank/0 disables repeated challenges. Some
software, eg. Windows 95 DUN does not support repeated CHAP challenges.
•
IP Header Compression: Default = Off
Enables the negotiation and use of IP Header Compression as per RFC2507, RFC2508 and
RFC2509.
•
Multilink: Default = Off
Enable/Disable – When enabled the system attempts to negotiate the use of the Multilink protocol
(MPPC) on the link(s) into this Service. Multilink must be enabled if the more than one channel is
allowed to be Bundled/Multilinked to this RAS Service.
•
BACP: Default = Off
Enable/Disable - Allows negotiation of the BACP/BCP protocols. These are used to control the
addition of additional B channels to simultaneously improve data throughput.
•
Incoming traffic does not keep link up: Default = On
When enabled, the link is not kept up for incoming traffic only.
•
Compression Mode: Default = MPPC
This option is used to negotiate compression (or not) using CCP. If set to MPPC or StacLZS the
system will try to negotiate this mode with the remote Control Unit. If set to Disable CCP is not
negotiated.
•
•
•
Disable: Do not use or attempt to use compression.
•
StacLZS: Attempt to use and negotiate STAC compression (the standard, Mode 3)
•
MPPC: Attempt to use and negotiate MPPC (Microsoft) compression. Useful for dialing
into NT Servers.
Callback Mode: Default = Disable
•
Disable: Callback is not enabled
•
LCP: (Link Control Protocol) After authentication the incoming call is dropped and an
outgoing call to the number configured in the Service will be made to reestablish the link.
•
Callback CP: (Microsoft's Callback Control Protocol) After acceptance from both ends the
incoming call is dropped and an outgoing call to the number configured in the Service is
made to reestablish the link.
•
Extended CBCP: (Extended Callback Control Protocol) Similar to Callback CP however
the Microsoft application at the remote end will prompt for a telephone number. An
outgoing call will then be made to that number to reestablish the link.
Data Pkt. Size: Default = 0
This is the number of data bytes contained in a Data Packet.
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Incoming Call Route Form
Incoming Call Route Form
The Incoming Call Route form allows entries to be created to route incoming calls to different groups,
extensions, RAS services or voicemail. These routes can be based on the incoming line group, the type
of call, incoming digits or the caller's CLI. See Incoming Call Routing . If a range of MSN numbers has
been issued, this form can be populated using the MSN Configuration tool (see MSN Configuration ).
The following fields are available for configuration:
•
Line Group ID: Default = 0
The identity of the Line Group. Only calls received on this Line Group use this route. This entry
only applies to Lines with the same Line Group ID.
•
Incoming Number:
This is the number presented by the ISDN provider. A blank entry collects all calls that do not
match other entries. For PRI, the administrator must add to the Incoming Call Route table one
entry for each subscribed digit-string the service provider will send to IP Office, and must add one
entry for unassigned numbers. Entries that are intended to match the subscribed digit-strings
must specify the digit-strings as the rightmost digits in the Incoming Number field, because, with
PRI, IP Office matches from right to left. See Incoming Call Route Examples.
•
Using a - in front of the number forces a left-to-right match (the default is right-to-left).
•
Use a * to match any number for which a specific matching route does not exist.
•
Use X's to enter a single digit wildcard character.
•
Incoming Sub Address: Default = Blank
The sub address component of the incoming call request. If this field is left blank it means all calls
with the sub addresses field set is routed to the entry specified in the Destination field.
•
Incoming Caller ID:
Enter the number to match the caller's incoming telephone number. This can be: -
•
•
full telephone number, eg. 7325551234
•
partial telephone number area code, eg. 7321 for New Jersey calls.
•
! for number withheld.
•
? for number unavailable.
•
blank for all.
•
Note: Calls are matched on the Incoming Number field before they are matched on the
Incoming Caller ID, thus if you want to send all callers who withhold their number to
Voicemail you may need several entries.
Destination:
Select the destination for the call from the list box which contains all available extensions, users,
groups, RAS services and voicemail. System short codes and dialing numbers can be entered
manually. Once the incoming call is matched (to the appropriate Line Group ID, Incoming
Number, Incoming Caller ID etc.) the call is passed to that destination. For additional methods for
routing calls directly to a specific Voicemail Pro module or short code start point see Directing
Incoming Calls to Voicemail Pro.
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Drop-Down List Options
The following options appear in the Destination drop-down
•
Hunt Group and User Names.
•
Voicemail: Allows remote mailbox access (Voicemail Lite and Voicemail Pro).
Callers are asked to enter the extension ID of the mailbox required and then the
mailbox access code.
•
AA:Name Directs calls to an Embedded Voicemail auto-attendant service (Small
Office Edition systems only). See Auto Attendant.
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•
Manually Entered Options
The following options can be entered manually into the Destination field.
•
VM:Name Directs calls to the matching start point in Voicemail Pro.
•
A . matches the incoming number field. This can be used even when a * (match
all) or X wildcards are being used in the Incoming Number field.
•
A # matches all X wildcards in the Incoming Number field.
•
Text and number strings entered here are passed through the System Short Code
table.
•
Locale:
This option sets country variations.
•
Priority: Default = 1
Allows calls to be assigned a priority between 1 (lowest) and 3 (highest). In situations where calls
are queued, high priority calls are placed before calls of a lower priority. Internal calls are always
assigned priority 1. Note also that using priority is not recommended for destinations where
queue ETA and position messages are being provided by Voicemail Pro.
•
Fallback Extension: Default = Blank
Defines an alternate destination which should be used when the current primary destination (set
in the Destination or Night Service Destination field) cannot be obtained. For example if the
primary destination is a hunt group returning busy and without queuing or voicemail.
•
Night Service Profile: Default = Blank
A time profile during which the Night Service Destination should be used rather than the
Destination.
•
Night Service Destination: Default = Blank
Set the destination to be used during periods defined by the Night Service Profile.
•
Bearer Capability:
The type of call selected from the list of standard bearer capabilities.
•
AnyVoice - all calls designated as being used for Speech services - a Speech or
Audio3K1 call will meet these criteria.
•
Speech - normal speech call.
•
Audio3K1 - speech call requesting a guaranteed bandwidth of 3,100 Hz.
•
AnyData - all calls designated as containing data - a Data64K, Data56K, DataV110,
DataV120 or Video call will meet this classification.
•
Data64K - data call with 64000 bps throughput capability.
•
Data56K - data call with 56000 bps throughput capability.
•
DataV110 - data call that supports the V.110 sub-rate multiplexing scheme.
•
DataV120 - data call that supports the V.120 sub-rate multiplexing scheme.
•
Video - calls from equipment, which support Video conferencing.
•
Any - any call type is accepted and route (this may be useful for the S0 module).
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Incoming Call Route Examples
For PRI, the administrator must add to the Incoming Call Route table one entry for each subscribed digitstring the service provider will send to IP Office, and must add one entry for unassigned numbers.
The entries that are intended to match the subscribed digit-strings must specify the digit-strings as the
rightmost digits in the Incoming Number field, because, with PRI, IP Office matches from right to left.
Example 1
For example, if the customer subscribes to two DID numbers for Sales and Service, the administrator
must add an entry for Sales and an entry for Service:
Line Group
Incoming Number
Destination
1
77
SalesHuntGrp
1
88
ServiceHuntGrp
1
Extn201
1. Note that the Incoming number could be the full dialed number (7325551177 and 7325551188
respectively) and produce the same results.
Example 2
The right-to-left matching gets complicated when the number of incoming digits is greater than the
number of digits specified in the Incoming Number field. Consider a PRI circuit that delivers the digits 77
to the customer. The following tables will route the call to the MatchGrp hunt group.
Line Group
Incoming Number
Destination
1
677
NoMatchGrp1
1
77
MatchGrp
1
7
NoMatchGrp2
1
Extn201
•
The first and second entries have the same number of matching digit places and no nonmatching places, but the second entry has a shorter Incoming Number, so the second entry is
chosen.
Line Group
Incoming Number
Destination
1
677
MatchGrp
1
7
NoMatchGrp2
1
Extn201
•
The first entry had more matching digit places, 2 versus 1, and no non-matching digit places.
Example 3
If the PRI circuit delivers the digits 777 to the customer, the following table routes the call to the
MatchGrp.
Line Group
Incoming Number
Destination
1
677
NoMatchGrp1
1
7
MatchGrp
1
•
Extn201
The first entry had a non-matching digit place, so there was no match. The second had one
matching digit place and no non-matching digit places.
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Configuration Forms
WAN Port Form
WAN Port
Use this form to configure the leased line connected to the WAN port on the Control Unit. Important - this
connection is automatically detected by the Control Unit, therefore please ensure you are editing the
correct form. If a WAN Port is not displayed, connect the WAN cable, reboot the Control Unit and receive
the configuration. The WANPort configuration form should now be added.
The following fields are available for configuration:
•
Name
The physical ID of the Extension port, eg. WAN01. This parameter is not
configurable, it is allocated by the system.
•
Speed
The operational speed of this port, eg. for a 128K connection enter 128000. This should be set to
the actual speed of the leased line as this value is used in the calculation of bandwidth utilization.
If set incorrectly, additional calls may be made to increase Bandwidth erroneously.
•
Mode: Default = SyncPPP
Select the protocol required:
•
•
SyncPPP: For a data link.
•
SyncFrameRelay: For a link supporting Frame Relay.
RAS Name
If the Mode is SyncPPP, selects the RAS service to associate with the port. If the Mode is
SyncFrameRelay, the RAS Name is set through the DCLIs tab.
Note: If using Frame Relay; temporarily set the Mode to SyncPPP and in the RAS Name field select the
default RAS service DialIn. Then set the Mode back to SynchFrameRelay. This is necessary even
though the RAS service actually used for Frame Relay is set through the DCLIs tab.
Frame Relay
This tab is only available when SyncFrameRelay is selected in the Mode field of the WANPort
configuration form.
•
Frame Management Type:
This must match the management type expected by the network provider. Selecting AutoLearn
option allows the Control Unit to automatically determine the management type based on the first
few management frames received. If a fixed option is required the following are supported: Q933
AnnexA 0393, Ansi AnnexD and FRFLMI.
•
Frame Learn Mode:
This parameter allows the DLCIs that exist on the given WAN port to be provisioned in a number
of different ways.
•
•
None: No automatic learning of DLCIs. DLCIs must be entered and configured manually.
•
Mgmt: Use LMI to learn what DLCIs are available on this WAN.
•
Network: Listen for DLCIs arriving at the network. This presumes that a network provider
will only send DLCIs that are configured for this particular WAN port.
•
NetworkMgmt: Do both management and network listening to perform DLCI learning and
creation.
Max Frame Length: Maximum frame size that is allowed to traverse the frame relay network.
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Advanced
The following are used for frame relay:
•
Address Length:
The address length used by the frame relay network. The network provider will indicate if lengths
other than two bytes are to be used.
•
N391: Full Status Polling Counter
Polling cycles count used by the CPE and the network provider equipment when bi-directional
procedures are in operation. This is a count of the number of link integrity verification polls (T391)
that are performed (ie. Status Inquiry messages) prior to a Full Status Inquiry message being
issued.
•
N393: Monitored Events Counter
Events counter measure used by both the CPE and network provider equipment. This counter is
used to count the total number of management events that have occurred in order to measure
error thresholds and clearing thresholds.
•
T392: Polling Verification Timer
The polling verification timer only applies to the user equipment when bi-directional procedures
are in operation. It is the timeout value within which to receive a Status Inquiry message from the
network in response to transmitting a Status message. If the timeout lapses an error is recorded
(N392 incremented).
•
T391: Link Integrity Verification Polling Timer
The link integrity verification polling timer normally applies to the user equipment and to the
network equipment when bi-directional procedures are in operation. It is the time between
transmissions of Status Inquiry messages.
•
N392: Error Threshold Counter
Error counter used by both the CPE and network provider equipment. This value is incremented
for every LMI error that occurs on the given WAN interface. The DLCIs attached to the given
WAN interface are disabled if the number of LMI errors exceed this value when N393 events
have occurred. If the given WAN interface is in an error condition then that error condition is
cleared when N392 consecutive clear events occur.
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Configuration Forms
DLCIs
Only available if SyncFrameRelay is selected in the Mode box of the WANPort configuration form. To
add an entry, right-click and select Add.
•
Frame Link Type: Default = PPP
Data transfer encapsulation method. Set to the same value at both ends of the PVC.
•
None:
•
PPP: Using PPP offers features such as out of sequence traffic reception, compression
and link level connection management.
•
RFC 1490: RFC 1490 encapsulation offers performance and ease of configuration and
more inter-working with third party CPE.
•
RFC1490 + FRF12: Alternate encapsulation to PPP for VoIP over Frame Relay. When
selected all parameters on the Service | PPP tab being used are overridden.
•
DLCI: (Data Link Connection Identifier) Default = 100
Unique number assigned to a PVC end point that has local significance only. Identifies a
particular PVC endpoint within a user's physical access channel in a frame relay.
•
RAS Name:
Select the RAS Service you wish to use.
•
Tc: (Time Constant [ms]) Default = 10
The time interval used for measurement of data traffic rates (CIR and EIR). General a shorter Tc
should be used when carrying VoIP traffic. The Tc used by the IP Office can be shorter than that
used by the network provider.
•
CIR: (Committed Information Rate) Default = 64000 bps
The maximum amount of data that the network agrees to transfer during the given time interval
(Tc). The number of committted bits can be calculated as Bc = CIR x Tc. When carrying VoIP
traffic the Bc figure should be sufficient to carry a fully VoIP packet
•
EIR: (Excess Information Rate) Default = 0 bps
The maximum amount of data in excess of the CIR that a frame relay network may attempt to
transfer during the given time interval (Tc). This traffic is normally marked as DE (discard
eligabal). The number of excess bits can be calculated as Be = EIR x Tc. The probability of Be
data arriving is lower than the probability of Bc data arriving.
Example:
G.729 VoIP creates 20 byte packets every 20ms. Adding typical WAN PPP overheads results in a 33
byte packet every 20ms.
For a CIR of 14Kbps and a Tc of 10ms, Bc = CIR x Tc = 14,000 x 0.01 = 140 bits = 17.5 bytes. Clearly a
full VoIP packets cannot be sent within the Tc without exceeding the Bc. The most likely result is lost
packets and jitter.
If the Tc is increased to 20ms, Bc = 14,000x0.02 = 280 bits = 35 bytes. The Bc is now sufficient to carry
a VoIP packet within the Bc threshold every 20ms.
Note:
1. Backup over Frame Relay is not supported when the Frame Link Type is set to RFC1490.
2. When multiple DLCIs are configured, the WAN link LED will be switched off in any one of those
DLCIs is made inactive, regardless of the state of the other DLCIs. Note also that the WAN link
LED is switched on following a reboot even if one of the DLCIs is inactive. Therefore when
multiple DLCIs are used the WAN link LED cannot be used to determine the current state of all
DLCIs.
3. When the Frame Link Type is set to RFC1490, the WAN link LED is switched on when the WAN
cable is attached regardless other whether being connected to a frame relay network. Therefore
the WAN link LED cannot be used to determine the state of RFC1490 links.
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Directory Form
Directory Entry Form
This configuration form can be used to create an entry in the Directory. The Directory is a list of numbers
and associated names stored centrally in the configuration. A Directory Entry can be used to identify a
incoming call on a caller display telephone or via a PC application, or give a system wide list of
frequently used numbers for speed dialing via Phone Manager or 6400 series, 4412 and 4424 handset. If
IP Office Conferencing Center is available, information entered in this configuration form will be
displayed in the Address Book for conference scheduling.
An example entry would display "HeadOffice" in a user's caller display when a call from 5551234 is
received. Users will see "HeadOffice" in the Directory List in Phone Manager or via INDeX function on a
6400 series, 4412 and 4424 handsets and can speed dial that number.
The following fields are required to create a directory entry:
•
Name:
Enter the text, without spaces, to be used to identify the number.
•
Number:
Enter the number, without spaces, to be matched with the above name.
If this Directory Entry is to be used to identify an incoming call, enter the part of the incoming telephone
number that is to be used as a match as follows:
1. The number is matched against the right hand side of the Calling Line ID number, therefore
specifying a Directory Number of 1234 will successfully match all the following incoming
numbers: •
1234
•
5551234
•
7325551234 etc.
2. Partial matches can be used to allow area codes or company location matches to be made, eg
•
Name = Holmdel
•
Number = 732555????
These area numbers must be padded with question marks to the correct length, ie.
Holmdel local numbers are 10 digits long so 4 question marks are required.
•
This entry displays "Holmdel:1234" for a call from 5551234.
3. Brackets can be used around the area code, eg. (732) 5551234, so that if a call is received from
both 5551234 and 7325551234 the directory entry is displayed.
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Configuration Forms
Time Profile Form
Time Profile Form
Time Profiles are used by different IP Office services to define when their settings are used. For
example, a time profile can be used to define where hunt group calls are routed outside of office hours.
To create a time profile:
1. Select the Time Profile form from the Configuration Tree.
2. Right-click within the Time Profile window and select New.
3. Enter a Name to identify the Time Profile.
•
Name:
Enter the Name to identify this Time Profile.
•
Time Entry List:
Place the cursor within the Time Entry List. Right-click and select Add. Multiple Time Entries can
be created so that a Time Profile can be used to stipulate specific hours in the day, eg. 09:0012:00 and 1:00-5:00.
Outside of a Time Profile, voice calls are re-routed according to the configuration but any currently
connected calls at the time the Time Profile changes are not affected.
Data calls are cut off when a time profile goes out of service, then the new service is started immediately
if specified.
Time Entry
A Time Entry is used to stipulate the specific hours you wish the time profile to be active, eg. 9 - 12,
Monday to Friday.
•
Start Time:
The time during the day at which this profile becomes active (useable). Use a colon to separate
the hours from the minutes.
•
End Time:
The time during the day at which the profile becomes inactive (un-useable). Use a colon to
separate the hours from the minutes.
•
Days of Week:
The days of the week that the above start and end time applies to.
Note:
A Time Entry cannot span over two days eg. you cannot have a time profile starting at 6:00 PM and
ending 8:00 AM. If this time period is required two Time Entries should be created - one starting at 6:00
PM and ending 11:59 PM and the other starting at 12:00 AM and ending 8:00 AM.
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Firewall Profile Form
Firewall Profile Form Overview
You can apply firewall settings to each service that you setup. The system allows you to have a number
of firewall profiles, which can be shared between different services. See Firewall for more information on
firewalls.
If during the initial configuration from the Administration CD an ISP connection was specified, a default
firewall profile called 'internet' is created unless the installer selected otherwise. The 'internet' firewall
profile has the standard default firewall settings.
The following tabs contain configurable information for this form:
•
Standard
•
Custom
Standard
By default, any protocol not listed in the standard firewall list is dropped unless a custom firewall entry is
configured for that protocol.
The following fields are available for configuration within the Standard tab:
•
Name:
Enter the name to identify this profile, eg. "InternetFirewall".
•
Select one the following options for each protocol.
•
•
Drop: No sessions via this protocol are allowed through the wall
•
In: An incoming session can "punch a hole" in the wall to allow traffic in both directions
•
Out: An outgoing session can "punch a hole" in the wall to allow traffic in both directions
•
In/Out: Both incoming or outgoing sessions can "punch a hole" in the wall to allow traffic
in both directions
Protocols:
•
TELNET: Remote terminal login. Default = Out.
•
FTP: File Transfer Protocol. Default = Out.
•
SMTP: Simple Mail Transfer Protocol. Default = Out.
•
TIME: Time update protocol. Default = Out.
•
DNS: Domain Name System. Default = Out.
•
GOPHER: Internet menu system. Default = Drop.
•
FINGER: Remote user information protocol. Default = Drop.
•
RSVP: Resource Reservation Protocol. Default = Drop.
•
HTTP: Hypertext Transfer Protocol. Default = Out.
•
POP3: Post Office Protocol. Default = Out.
•
NNTP: Network News Transfer Protocol. Default = Out.
•
SNMP: Simple Network Management Protocol. Default = Drop.
•
IRC: Internet Relay Chat. Default = Out.
•
PPTP: Point to Point Tunneling Protocol. Default = Drop.
•
IGMP: Internet Group Membership Protocol. Default = Drop.
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Configuration Forms
Custom
The Custom form gives a list of the filters created for this Firewall. To create a custom entry, right-click
within the Firewall Entry List and select Add.
The following fields are available for configuration:
•
Notes:
For information only - enter text to remind you what this entry is for. When left blank you are
prompted.
•
Remote IP Address:
The IP address of the system at the far end of the link. Blank allows all IP addresses.
•
Remote IP Mask:
The mask to use when checking the Remote IP Address. When left blank then no mask is set, ie.
255.255.255.255 - allows all.
•
Local IP Address:
The address of devices local to this network (pre-translated). Blank allows all IP addresses.
•
Local IP Mask:
The mask to use when checking the Local IP Address. When left blank then no mask is set, ie.
255.255.255.255 - allows all.
•
IP Protocol:
The value entered here corresponds to the IP Protocol which is to be processed by this Firewall
profile: 1 for ICMP, 6 for TCP, 17 for UDP or 47 for GRE. This information can be obtained from
the "pcol" parameter in a Monitor trace.
•
Match Offset:
The offset into the packet (0 = first byte of IP packet) where checking commences for either a
specific port number, a range of port numbers, or data.
•
Match Length:
The number of bytes to check in the packet, from the Match Offset point, that are checked
against the Match Data and Match Mask settings.
•
Match Data:
The values the data must equal once masked with the Match Mask. This information can be
obtained from "TCP Dst" parameter in a Monitor trace (the firewall uses hex so a port number of
80 is 50 in hex)
•
Match Mask:
This is the byte pattern, which is logically ANDed with the data in the packet from the offset point.
The result of this process is then compared against the contents of the "Match Data" field.
•
Direction:
The direction that data may take if matching this filter.
•
Drop: No packets matching this may pass.
•
In: Allow new sessions into the private network.
•
Out: Allow sessions out to the Internet.
•
Bothway: Do both "In" and "Out".
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IP Route Form
IP Route Form
Use this configuration form to specify where packets destined for a specific network are to be sent.
These are static routes. See Understanding IP Routing via ISDN .
The following fields are available for configuration:
•
IP Address:
The IP address to match for ongoing routing, eg. 192.168.131.0. Any packets meeting the IP
Address and IP Mask settings are routed to the entry configured in the Destination field. When
left blank then an IP Address of 255.255.255.255 (all) is used.
•
IP Mask:
The Subnet Mask used to mask the IP Address for ongoing route matching, eg. 255.255.255.0. If
blank the mask used is 255.255.255.255 (all).
•
Note: A blank entry in the IP Address and IP Mask fields means route all packets where
the destination IP address is not on the local LAN or where a specific IP Route is not
available. The Default Route option in the Service Form achieves the same goal.
•
Gateway IP Address: Default = Blank
The address of the gateway where packets for the above address are to be sent. If this field is set
to 0.0.0.0 or is left blank then all packets are just sent down to the Destination specified, not to a
specific IP Address. This is normally only used to forward packets onto another Router on the
local LAN.
•
Destination:
The name of the Service to send these packets to. Note: Only those Services configured are
shown and can be selected.
•
Metric: Default = 1
The number of "hops" this route counts as.
•
ProxyARP: Default = Off
This allows the Control Unit to respond on behalf of this IP address when receiving an ARP
request.
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Configuration Forms
Least Cost Route Form
Least Cost Route Form Overview
By configuring a Least Cost Route, you are able to route calls via an alternative carrier. Time profiles can
also be used to allow you to take advantage of cheaper rates at specific times.
Note: The LCR menu is not compatible with short codes using the ; (semi-colon) character (used for
T1/PRi line) and secondary dial tone features. To achieve least cost routing on those lines, refer to
Alternate LCR.
Least cost routing uses the following standard elements of IP Office Configuration:
•
•
Short Codes:
Short codes are used to match the dialed number. When a match occurs, the matching short
code indicates the number that should be output and which line group to use.
•
Short Codes can be configured in the Least Cost Route form. The following are the only
kind of features allowed in the feature field: Dial, Dial3K1, Dial56K, Dial64K,
DialEmergency, Dial Speech, DialV110, DialV120, DialVideo, Busy.
•
Short codes in a Least Cost Route form are applied after any User or System short code
but before Line Short codes.
Outgoing Group IDs:
Outgoing Group IDs within the Line Form are used to group lines. Typically a separate group ID
will be used for lines from different PSTN service providers. Once these lines are grouped, they
can be used by Short codes to match which lines can be used to route an outgoing call.
In addition the following elements can also optionally be used:
•
Time Profiles:
Time Profiles can be used to set when a particular set of Least Cost Route settings are used.
•
Alternate Routes:
If a call is routed by Least Cost Routing to a Outgoing Group ID in which all the lines are busy,
then after an adjustable timeout, the IP Office can look for a another short code match in a further
set of Short codes.
•
Priority:
Each user has an assigned priority between. High priority users can bypass route settings with a
lower priority. Low priority user must wait for a busy period to expire before they can try a higher
priority route setting. Priority settings for individual users are located in the User form on the User
tab.
To Route Calls via an Alternative Carrier During Specific Hours
1. Create a Time Profile for the required hours.
2. Create a Least Cost Route that uses that Time Profile and with a short code that will route all
calls via the required carrier, eg.
•
Short Code: ?
•
Telephone Number: 1234. (1234 being the carriers required prefix)
•
Feature: Dial
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To Use Multiple Carriers
If you wish to use multiple carriers, for example, local calls and international calls are to go through one
carrier between specific hours, all calls to UK through an alternative carrier and all other calls via a third
carrier.
1. Create a Least Cost Route and create short codes for all local dial codes and international calls,
eg. short codes for 732n, 609n, etc.
2. All other calls will use the system short code used for dialing out.
2-Stage LCR Set-up (In-band DTMF)
To take advantage of the Least Cost Routing services offered by second-tier carriers/PTOs/Telcos/etc.
who utilize older Central Office switches, a second string of digits needs to be presented, in-band to
them after the call is initially set-up. To set this up, use the following Short Code features:
•
D = wait for the connection then send the following DTMF
•
, = one second pause in between DTMF digit dialing, eg. 18005551234D12345,N
This represents the carrier's telephone number, then D, then the digits required by the carrier, eg.
an account number, then comma and N representing the number dialed.
Note: A DTMF tone will not be produced if you are running IP Office 401 control unit.
Right-click on the list area or an existing route to select View, Edit, Delete or New. The following tabs
within the LCR form contain fields for configuration:
•
LCR
•
Main Route
•
Alternate Route 1
•
Alternate Route 2
LCR
•
Name:
The name to identify the Route set.
•
Time Profile:
Select the Time Profile to be used with this Least Cost Route. If no profile is selected the route
settings apply at all times.
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Configuration Forms
Main Route
The three routing tabs; Main Route, Alternate Route 1 and Alternate Route 2, all contain the same
settings.
•
Timeout (secs): Default = 30 seconds
When a call goes to a line group where all lines are busy, this timeout sets how long the system
waits before trying short code options in the next tab.
•
Note: When a user is routed to a short code with the Busy feature, then they remain at
busy and do not try any other options.
•
Priority: Default = 5, Range 0(lowest) to 5(highest).
If the user's priority is higher than that of the tab, routing is applied using the Short codes in the
tab and those in the next tab simultaneously. When a short code exists in both tabs, the short
code from the next tab is used.
•
Allow Bump: Default = Off
When the lines indicated by a route are being used by a multilink PPP data call, if this option is
selected, the user's call is able to seize a line from the data call.
•
Short Code List:
These perform dialed number matching. When a match occurs, the matching short code
indicates the telephone number to outdial and the line group in which a line should be seized. To
add a short code, right-click on the list and select Add.
•
The only short code features that should be used in a Least Cost Route short code are:
Dial, Dial3K1, Dial56K, DialEmergency, DialSpeech, DialV110, DialV120, DialVideo and
Busy.
•
The ; character and [n] syntax cannot be used.
Alternate Route 1
Operates similarly to the Main Route tab.
Alternate Route 2
Operates similarly to the Main Route tab.
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Examples
Example: Fallback Carrier Routing
In this example, the customer has lines from two separate providers.
•
•
The required routing is:
•
Local and national calls should go via the standard provider's lines.
•
International calls should go via the alternate provider's lines.
•
If all lines to the alternate provider are busy, users should be able to use the standard
providers lines
To achieve this the following configuration changes were made:
•
Lines to the standard provider were given the Outgoing Group ID 0.
•
Lines to the alternate provider were given the Outgoing Group ID 10.
•
In Least Cost Route, a new route called "Fallback" was added.
•
The Main Route tab is programmed as follows:
•
•
9011N: This short code matches any dialing beginning with 9011, ie. an
international call. It strips the 9 and then tries to seize a line in group 10 to dial the
number.
•
The timeout is 5 seconds. This means that if after 5 seconds the system is still
unable to seize a line from Line Group 10, it should look for an alternate short
code match (against the original dialed digits) in the Alternate Route 1 tab.
The Alternate Route 1 tab is programmed as follows:
•
Manager 3.0
IP Office
9011: The short code again matches any international dialing. This time however,
it tries to seize a line in Line Group 0.
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Configuration Forms
Example: Using an Alternate Carrier
In this example, the customer's lines are all from the same provider. However,the customer wants any
calls other than local calls to go via an alternate carrier.
The required routing is:
•
All calls go via the same set of lines.
•
Any national or international calls should be prefixed with the alternate carrier's access code
(123), a short pause and a customer ID number (123456).
•
The alternate carrier also provides billing by extension number, so insertion of the dialing
extension number is desired.
•
Local numbers dialed in full (ie. with the local area code) should not go via the alternate carrier.
•
Toll free numbers provided by the line provide should not go via the alternate carrier.
To achieve this routing, the following configuration changes were made:
•
All the PSTN providers’ lines have been left in Outgoing Group ID 0.
•
In Least Cost Route, a new route called "Alternate" was added. The following settings were
added to the Main Route tab:
•
9011N: This short code matches anyone dialing an international number. Before trying to
seize a line, it inserts the information required by the alternate call carrier. The , (comma)
adds a pause, the E sends the dialing extension number.
•
91N: This short code matches anyone dialing an national number and again inserts the
information required to route the call via the alternate call carrier.
•
91800N, 91866N, 91877N, 91888N: These short codes match national numbers that are
toll free and so do not need to be routed via the alternate call carrier.
•
9xxxxxxxxxx: This short code matches any local dialing. These calls are not routed via
the alternate call carrier.
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Example: International Call Restriction
In this example, we want to restrict who makes international calls.
The required routing is:
•
Users with a priority of 3 or lower should not make international calls.
•
Users with a higher priority can make international calls.
•
The customer has an overseas office to which all users should be able to make calls.
To achieve this routing, the following configuration changes were made:
•
Those extension users cannot to make international calls had their Priority set to 3. This is done
through the User tab of the User form.
•
In Least Cost Route, a new route called "International" was added.
•
In the Main Route tab the required priority was left as 5.
•
•
901141555364N: This short code matches DID numbers at the overseas office and allows
any user to dial those numbers.
•
9011N: This short code matches the dialing of any other international numbers and
returns busy tone to the dialer.
For users with Priority higher than 3, the IP Office immediately looks for a short code match in the
Alternate Route 1 tab as well as the Main Route tab. When identical short codes exist, the one in
the Alternate Route tab takes precedence.
•
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9011N: Again this short code matches international number dialing but this time it allows
such calls rather than returning busy tone.
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Configuration Forms
Example: Small Community Network VoIP Routing
In this example, the customer has two IP Office systems. In addition to their own external lines, the two
sites are linked by a data link. The data link has to be configure as a VoIP VPN link and use IP Office
Small Community Networking.
•
System A has extensions and groups numbered from 200 upwards.
•
System B has its extensions and groups numbered from 500 upwards.
•
The customer wants anyone at Site A dialing the external number of Site B or a DID at Site B to
have the call re-routed via the VoIP link.
To achieve this, the following changes were made on System A.
•
The VoIP lines from System A to System B were put into Outgoing Group ID 5.
•
In Least Cost Route a new route called "SiteB" was added.
•
In the Main Route tab the following Short codes were added:
•
91555392200: This short code matches the main reception number at Site B. The short
code changes the number to the main group at Site B and re-routes the call to the VoIP
Link.
•
91555364N: This short code matches the dialing of DID numbers of extensions and
groups on System B. It removes everything apart from the extension /group number and
route the call to the VoIP link.
Similar changes would also be implemented on System B to reroute return calls.
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LCR Using T1/PRI Lines or Secondary Dial Tone
Alternate LCR Overview
Least Cost Routing allows calls to be routed making the best use of system resources. The examples in
this section demonstrate how to achieve Least Cost Routing when using T1/PRI lines or secondary dial
tone.
•
If using T1/PRI lines, you must include the ; (semi-colon) at the end of the Short code entry.
•
If you want to provide a secondary dial tone to users, the dial access number must be
surrounded by [ ] (brackets).
These characters are not supported in the short codes entered in IP Office Least Cost Route forms.
Least cost routing functionality instead is achieved through system short codes. This section gives
various examples. In all the examples, the number “9” is used to get access to outside lines.
•
Note: When not using the ; or [ ] in short codes, least cost routing can be done through the Least
Cost Route form in the IP Office configuration.
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Configuration Forms
Example: Fallback Carrier Routing
In this example, the customer has lines from two separate providers.
The required routing is:
•
Local and national calls should go via the standard provider's lines.
•
International calls should go via the alternate provider's lines.
•
“900” calls should be blocked
•
The dial access code must be the same for both national and international lines
The first thing to do is to change the Outgoing Line Group ID (on the Line Form). Put all the lines that
will be used for local and national calls in one group (10 for this example). The lines that are going to be
used for international dialing should be in a second group (20 for this example).
Configure the following Short codes on the Short code Form.
T1 or PRI Short code
Secondary Dialtone Short
code
Explanation
Short code: 9
Telephone Number: .
Line Group ID: 0
Feature: SecondaryDialTone
Secondary Dial Tone
Short code: 9001N;
TelephoneNumber: 001N
Line Group ID: 10
Feature: Dial
Short code: [9]001N
Telephone Number: 001N
Line Group ID: 10
Feature: Dial
Matches international
number
Short code: 91N;
Telephone Number: N
Line Group ID: 20
Feature: Dial
Short code: [9]1N
Telephone Number: N
Line Group ID: 20
Feature: Dial
Matches Long Distance
(national) number
Short code:9xxxxxxxxxx;
Telephone Number: N
Line Group ID: 20
Feature: Dial
Short code: [9]xxxxxxxxxx
Telephone Number: N
Line Group ID: 20
Feature: Dial
Matches local number
Short code: 91900N;
Telephone Number:
Line Group ID:
Feature: Busy
Manager 3.0
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Short code: [9]1900N
Telephone Number:
Line Group ID:
Feature: Busy
Matches 900 numbers
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Example: Using an Alternate Carrier
In this example, the customer's lines are all from the same provider. However, they want calls other than
local calls to go via an alternate carrier.
The required routing is:
•
•
All calls go via the same set of lines.
Any national or international calls should be prefixed with the alternate carrier's access code
(123), a pause and a customer ID number (123456).
• The alternate carrier also provides billing by extension number, so insertion of the dialing
extension number is desired.
• Local numbers dialed in full (ie. with the local area code) should not go via the alternate carrier.
• Toll free numbers provided by the line provide should not go via the alternate carrier.
Configure the following Short codes on the Short code Form.
T1 or PRI Short code
Secondary Dialtone Short code
Explanation
Provides
Short code: 9
secondary dial
Telephone Number: .
tone after dialing
Line Group ID: 0
9.
Feature: SecondaryDialTone
Matches national
Short code: [9]1N
Short code: 91N;
number
Telephone Number:
Telephone Number:
123,123456E1N
123,123456E1N
Line Group ID: 10
Line Group ID: 10
Feature: Dial
Feature: Dial
Matches
Short code: [9]001N
Short code: 9001N;
International
Telephone Number:
Telephone Number:
number
123,123456E1N
123,123456E1N
Line Group ID: 10
Line Group ID: 10
Feature: Dial
Feature: Dial
Short code: 91800N;
Short code: [9]1800N
Matches toll free
Telephone Number: 1800N
Telephone Number: 1800N
number
Line Group ID: 10
Line Group ID: 10
Feature: Dial
Feature: Dial
Matches toll free
Short code: [9]1888N
Short code: 91888N;
number
Telephone Number: 1888N
Telephone Number: 1888N
Line Group ID: 10
Line Group ID: 10
Feature: Dial
Feature: Dial
Matches toll free
Short code: [9]1866N
Short code: 91866N;
number
Telephone Number: 1866N
Telephone Number: 1866N
Line Group ID: 10
Line Group ID: 10
Feature: Dial
Feature: Dial
Short code: 91877N;
Short code: [9]1877N
Matches toll free
Telephone Number: 1877N
Telephone Number: 1877N
number
Line Group ID: 10
Line Group ID: 10
Feature: Dial
Feature: Dial
Matches local
Short code:[9]xxxxxxxxxx
Short code: 9xxxxxxxxxx;
number
Telephone Number: N
Telephone Number: N
Line Group ID: 10
Line Group ID: 1
Feature: Dial
Feature: Dial
Short code: 91900N;
Short code: [9]1900N;
Matches 900
numbers
Telephone Number:
Telephone Number:
Line Group ID:
Line Group ID:
Feature: Busy
Feature: Busy
In the above table, the short codes 9001N and 91N match long distance and international dialing. The
alternate carrier’s access code (123), a pause (“,”) and the customer’s identification number (123456)
followed by the user dialing (E), followed by the dialed number (1N) are sent out to the line.
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Configuration Forms
Example: International Call Restriction
In this example, the customer wants to restrict who can make international calls.
The required routing is:
•
The customer has an overseas office to which all users should be able to make calls.
•
Certain users can make international calls.
To achieve this the following configuration changes are done in the System Short code form:
T1 or PRI Short code
Secondary Dialtone Short code
Explanation
Short code: 9
Telephone Number: .
Line Group ID: 0
Feature: SecondaryDialTone
Provides secondary
dial tone after
dialing 9.
Short code: 9011441707364N;
Telephone Number:
0014417017369N
Line Group ID: 10
Feature: Dial
Short code: [9]011441707364N
Telephone Number:
011441707364N
Line Group ID: 10
Feature: Dial
Matches DID
numbers to the
overseas office
Short code: 9011N;
Telephone Number:
Line Group ID:
Feature: Busy
Short code: [9]011N
Telephone Number:
Line Group ID:
Feature: Busy
Matches
international calls
and returns busy to
the user.
Short code: *80
Telephone Number:
00144392200
Line Group ID: 10
Feature: Dial
Short code: *80
Telephone Number:
00144392200
Line Group ID: 10
Feature: Dial
Allows users to call
main overseas
number
To achieve this the following configuration changes are done in the Short code Tab of the User Form.
This needs to be done for each user that can override the international call restriction.
T1 or PRI Short code
Secondary Dialtone Short code
Explanation
Short code: 9011N;
Telephone Number: 01N
Line Group ID: 10
Feature: Dial
Short code: [9]011N
Telephone Number: 01N
Line Group ID: 10
Feature: Dial
Matches
international calls
and allows the call.
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Example: Small Community Network Routing
In this example, the customer has two IP Office systems. These are linked by a VoIP connection and use
IP Office Small Community Networking.
System A has extensions and groups numbered from 200 upwards. System B has its extensions and
groups numbered from 500 upwards.
•
The customer wants anyone dialing the external DID of an extension on the remote system to
have the call routed via the VoIP connection.
To achieve this, the following configuration changes were made on System A. Similar changes would
also be implemented on System B.
•
The VoIP VPN lines from System A to System B were put into Outgoing Group ID 5.
The following System Short codes are added:
Short code
Explanation
Short code:
9011441707392200
Telephone Number: 500
Line Group ID: 5
Feature: Dial
Routes the call via VoIP to Site B's
reception group (500).
Short code: 9011441707364N;
Telephone Number: N
Line Group ID: 5
Feature: Dial
Matches users dialing the DID of a Site
B user. It routes the call via VoIP
directly to the remote extension.
Short code: 5N
Telephone Number: 5N
Line Group ID: 5
Feature: Dial
Matches any user dialing a Site B
extension or group number.
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Configuration Forms
License Form
License Form
This form is used to display the function, value and status of License keys entered into the system.
License keys are unique and are tied to the serial number of the Feature Key plugged into a Feature Key
Server PC on the network. The address of the Feature Key Server PC (also known as License Key
Server) is set through the System form.
New and altered license keys are not validated against the Server PC's Feature Key until after a Control
Unit reboot. Note also that following a Feature Key Server PC reboot, it will only communication with the
first Control Unit that contacts it.
Refer to the Feature & License Key Manual for full details.
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Account Code Form
Account Code
•
Account Code:
Enter the account code required. The code can include alphabetic characters for users dialing via
Phone Manager. It can also include wildcards; ? matches a single digit and * matches any digits.
•
Caller ID:
Enter the number to be matched to incoming or outgoing Caller ID to automatically assign an
Account Code.
Voice Recording
This tab is used to activate the automatic recording of external calls to or from a recognized Account
Code. The recordings are placed in the IP Office user's mailbox. This requires Voicemail Pro to be
installed and running.
The following field are configurable:
•
Record Outbound:Default = None
Select whether outbound calls are recorded. Options are On, Mandatory and then various
percentages of calls made by the user.
•
On: Record the call if possible.
•
Mandatory: If not possible to record, return busy tone to the caller.
•
Record Inbound: Default = None
The same as Record Outbound but applied to call to the user.
•
Record Time Profile: Default = Blank
Used to select a time profile during which calls are recorded.
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Configuration Forms
E911 System
IP Office supports Enhanced 911 (E911) service that allows the recipient of 911 calls to accurately
identify the telephone number and physical location of the calling party. Emergency personnel crosscheck the incoming Automatic Number Identification (ANI) with the Automatic Line Identification (ALI) or
billing information (in other words, the billing address) associated with the telephone number. If the caller
is in a multi-floor office or multi-billing campus, emergency operators have little idea of the exact location
of the caller since the information presented is often just the main billing address of the company. You
can use the E911 zones in combination with E911 adjuncts to provide more specific ALI about the
caller's location.
As a building can be partitioned into different floors or different areas on one floor, the extensions in IP
Office can be grouped ("zoned") according to their locations. For example you can place all the
extensions in the Northeast Corner of the building in one zone and the extensions in the Northwest
Corner in another zone. You can then assign some trunks with ALI of the Northeast Corner to the first
zone and trunks with ALI of the Northwest Corner to the second zone. When a caller dials "911", the ALI
information shows the emergency response team exactly where the caller is located.
If your states requires that dialing the access code (ie. "9") in front of "911" also allow the call to go out,
add the following System Short Code:
•
Short Code: 9911
•
Telephone Number: 911
•
Line Group ID: 0
•
Feature: Dial
The following options are only available in regions where E911 is supported (it is available in the United
icon) and ten E911
States). The configuration consists of an E911 System entry (shown by the
partitions (shown by
icons). The IP Office E911 solution requires that Analog Loop Start lines be used
for all trunks that are used for Adjuncts (see System Parameters) and Zones (see E911 Zone
Configuration ).
More:
•
E911 System Configuration
•
E911 Zone Configuration
•
E911 Warning Screen
•
E911 Configuration Steps
E911 System Configuration
Clicking on the
icon in the configuration tree and then double-clicking on the entry in the right-hand
panel displays the E911 System Configuration form.
The form contains two tabs.
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System Parameters
•
Enable E911 System:Default = Off (Not Selected)
This is the parameter that indicates whether Enhanced 911 service will be used on the system.
By default this is off. If your state requires E911 service, check this. When selected, the
functionality provided by the other administration items in the E911 System form are used when
"911" calls are dialed.
•
Alarm Station: Default = Blank
When the E911 Adjunct detects an error condition (such as the disconnection of the trunk cable
between the adjunct and the PSTN) the alarm station (which is a connection from the adjunct to a
Tip/Ring port) is notified. A station in the system should be configured for a User DSS button
(See Button Programming section for more details). When the alarm station is notified, the DSS
button is lit. This indicates that there is a problem with the lines or the adjunct device. When this
situation occurs, the lines for the adjunct are NOT used and all "911" calls are routed over local
lines. That means that they go out a non-adjunct line without the extra information. Once the lines
are back in service, the alarm extension is notified and the User LED is extinguished and normal
adjunct E911 operation resumes.
•
Adjuncts:
If your State requires detailed information about a caller (i.e. office number), an adjunct can be
used to provide that information. The adjunct box sits between the IP Office and Central Office
and is connected via Loop Start lines to the IP Office and Centralized Automatic Message
Accounting (CAMA) trunks to the Central Office. When this is administered, "911 calls" that are
routed over these lines send out additional information about the caller (Extension ID). This
information is used by the adjunct to provide detailed caller location. Right-click the mouse to add
or remove entries. Use the standard Window Key to select a continuous group (Shift Key) or
Individual Channels (Control Key). There can be five Analog Loop Start trunks (either on the
Control Unit or those on the ATM 16 module) administered to an E911 adjunct.
E911 Zone Configuration
Zones allow stations to be grouped together that have a similar physical location. Lines are then
assigned to the partition. This billing address associated with the lines can be used to locate the caller.
For E911, what needs to get out is the actual phone that a person is calling from. In the case of IP Office,
Hot Desking allows multiple users to use a single phone (at different times – See Extension versus User
). For that reason, it is important to understand that it is the default User ID that gets sent out, no matter
what user is currently "logged in" to that extension. This allows the physical extension number to be
associated (via an external database) to a specific address (i.e. room number). The Extension form will
provide the information about default users for each extension. In an IP403, the following is the default
for the extensions on the Control Unit:
Manager 3.0
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Extension ID
User
74
201
78
202
67
203
71
204
75
205
79
206
83
207
87
208
91
209
95
210
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With the above numbering, when a person was using the phone connected to Extension ID 67, "203"
would be sent out regardless of the extension number associated with the user currently logged into that
station. A person would be able to dial the phone by using either of the following short codes (these are
the defaults).
•
DialPhysicalExtnByNumber (default short code *70*N# – where "N" is the default User ID for
the extension). This allows the user to call the default user id no matter who is currently using
that station. Using the numbers from the table above, if a user with an extension number 505 was
currently logged into physical extension 67, they could always be called by dialing "*70*203#".
•
DialPhysicalExtnByID (default short code *71*N# – where "N" is the default extension ID for the
extension). This allows the user to call the default user id no matter who is currently using that
station. Using the numbers from the table above, if a user with an extension number 505 was
currently logged into physical extension 67, they could always be called by dialing "*71*67#".
It is expected that the first short code will be used more often due to the fact that the number that gets
sent out will be the extension number not the physical ID.
icon expands and collapses the display of E911 zones (
Double-clicking on the
icon to display details of the partitions in the right-hand panel.
icons). Click on any
Double-click on the
icon to edit the zone settings. Alternatively, in the right-hand panel, right-click and
select the option required (View, Edit, New or Delete).
•
Name: Default = Default
Allows a unique name to be assigned to each zone.
•
Stations: Default = Contains all Extension ID's
Lists the extensions id's within the partition. Right-click on the list to add or delete entries. An
extension can only be in one zone, so when you add an extension it is automatically removed
from it previous assignment. When adding stations, the Selecting E911 Stations form appears
listing available stations and the partition to which they are currently assigned.
•
Trunks: Default = Blank
List the Analog Loop Start trunks within the partition. Right-click on the list to add or delete
entries. When adding trunks, the Selecting E911 Trunks form appears listing all available trunks
and the partition to which they are currently assigned. Only reliable Analog Loop Start trunks
should be used.
E911 Warning Screen
The following warning screen appears when new extensions (eg. IP Phones) or expansion modules
have been added to the system. This message indicates that the zones may not contain all the
extensions in the system.
When this appears, hit the "OK" button. Verify that the new extensions are in a zone (Note that they may
belong in the default, or one that you have created).
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E911 Configuration Steps
If you are using E911 without an adjunct box, the following needs to be administered:
1. Set up zones that you require. Make sure that you add both lines and extensions.
If you are using E911 with an adjunct box:
1. Administer an alarm extension.
2. Program a "User" button for that alarm extension.
3. Administer Analog Loop Start Lines as Adjunct lines.
4. Set up zones.
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Configuration Forms
Wireless 802.11b
The Avaya IP Office - Small Office Edition can act as an 802.11b wireless access point. To do this
requires the insertion of an Agere wireless card into one of the Avaya IP Office - Small Office Edition's
PCMCIA slots and entry of a Avaya IP Office - Small Office Edition WiFi licence.
This allow 802.11b wireless devices to connect to the Avaya IP Office - Small Office Edition LAN
including VoIP devices.
In order to connect to the wireless LAN, the wireless device must be configure for the same wireless
network name and encryption key as the Avaya IP Office - Small Office Edition. Additionally the wireless
device must match the Avaya IP Office - Small Office Edition's LAN1 or LAN2 network settings unless
using DHCP.
More:
•
SSID
•
Security
SSID
The Service Set Identifier (SSID) tab.
•
Network Name: Default = IP Office Wireless.Net
A unique name used to identify and distinguish the Avaya IP Office - Small Office Edition wireless
LAN from other wireless LANs.
•
Wireless Mac Address:
Displays a list of the MAC addresses of the devices currently connected to the wireless LAN.
•
Frequency/Channel: Default = 6
The 802.11b wireless frequency band is sub-divided into a number of channels. In locations
where there are multiple wireless LANs or multiple access points to the same wireless LAN, each
access point should use a separate channel. Devices connecting to a wireless LAN will
automatically connect to the channel providing the strongest signal.
•
•
The number of channels available is country specific. In the US channels 1 to 11 are
available. In most of Europe, channels 1 to 13 are available. In Japan only channel 14 is
available.
•
The channel frequencies overlap. For instance, channel 2 shares part of the same
frequency band as channels 1 and 3. In areas with mulitple access points, use widely
spaced channels, for example 1, 6 and 11, on the different access point.
Accept Any: Default = Off
If on, allows any wireless device to connect to the wireless LAN without having to have a
matching wireless network name (SSID) set. When off, only devices configured with a matching
wireless network name can connect to the wireless LAN.
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Security
This tab allows for additional security through the use of wireless encryption keys. If enabled, in addition
to encrypting the wireless traffic, only devices using a matching encryption key can connect to the
wireless LAN.
•
Encryption:Default = Disabled
Allows selection of 50/64 bit or 128 bit security. Note: 50/64 bit encryption is also know as 40/64
encryption.
•
Alpha/Hex: Default = Hex
Switch key entry between hexadecimal and alphabetic entry modes.
•
Key 1/4:
Allows entry of the security key and selection of which key is the current key to use.
•
Manager 3.0
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Key entries are only viewable by Manager users using an Operator with the Wireless
form Advanced setting ticked.
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Configuration Forms
User Restrictions
User Restrictions Overview
User restrictions can be used to apply the same set of dialing rules to multiple users. The restrictions are
applied to individual users through the Restrictions field in each individual user's User settings.
The following tabs contain configurable information for this form:
•
Restrictions
•
Short Codes
Using User Restrictions
Within Manager, users can be grouped by the types of numbers they are allowed to dial or not allowed to
dial. For example, those who are allowed to dial 1900 or international numbers.
The User Restriction form allows named groups of dialing short codes/restrictions to be created. These
short codes can then be applied to a user by associating them with the User Restriction name rather
than having to recreate the short codes for each user.
To set up a restriction within the User Restriction form:
1. Click User Restriction form within the Configuration Tree.
2. Enter a name for the restriction.
3. Click the Short Code List tab and create a short code.
4. Merge the configuration.
For a description of all the fields within this form, see User Restrictions Overview.
To apply a User Restriction to a specific user:
1. Click the User form within the Configuration Tree.
2. Double-click the user for whom you want this restriction applied.
3. Within the User tab, click the Restriction drop down box and select the User Restriction you
want applied to this user.
4. Merge the configuration.
Example:
Through User Restrictions, we can create a new Group called Standard. To this group, we would add
the short code for barring 91900 numbers:
•
Short Code: 91900N
•
Telephone: 1900N
•
Feature: Busy
To apply this short code to a specific user, select the User formand in the Restrictions drop-down list
for that user, select Standard.
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Restrictions
•
Name: Default = Blank
A name used to identify the set of user restrictions and allow its selection through the
Restrictions field in each individual user's User settings.
•
Priority: Default = 5 (highest), Range 0 to 5
The priority that should be applied to user calls if routed via a Least Cost Route. This overrides
the priority of the individual user.
•
Outgoing Call Bar: Default = Off.
When on, bars users making external calls.
Short Codes
Allows entry of short codes for dialing by associated users. These short codes override any match
system short codes but not individual user short codes.
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Configuration Forms
Logical LAN
A logical LAN carries traffic between two IP Office LANs via an intermediate network such as an ADSL
network.
•
Name: Default = Blank.
A unique name for the logical LAN. This name will then be selectable as a destination in the IP
Route table.
•
IP Address: Default = Blank
The IP address provided by the internet service provider.
•
IP Mask: Default = Blank
The IP address mask provided by the internet service provider.
•
Gateway IP Address: Default = Blank
The IP address of the router.
•
Gateway Mac Address: Default = Blank
The MAC address of the router.
•
Firewall Profile: Default = Blank
The firewall profile that should applied to traffic.
•
Enable NAT: Default = Off.
Enable NAT for traffic across the logical LAN.
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Tunnel
Tunnel
Tunneling improves the security of data exchange between sites where that data crosses an unsecure
network such as the public internet. The IP Office supports two methods of tunneling, L2TP and IPSec.
•
L2TP - Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol
PPP authentication using PAP or CHAP normally takes place between directly connected
routers. When connecting to the internet, authentication is between the customer router and the
internet service providers. L2TP allows additional authentication to be performed between the
routers at each end of the connection despite the intermediate network routers.
•
IPsec
IPsec allows data between two locations to be secured using sender authentication and
encryption of the data. The use of IPsec requires entry of an IPsec Tunnelling licence.
To create a tunnel, right-click the cursor on the list of existing tunnels and select New. The Tunnel
Selection window will appear for you to select the type of tunnel (L2TP or IPSec) to create. Depending
which tunnel you choose to create, different configurations will be available to you.
For more information on tunneling, including sample configurations, see the "IP Office Virtual Private
Networking" manual.
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L2TP Tunnel
Tunnel
Within the Tunnel tab for L2TP Tunnel, the following fields are available for configuration:
•
Name: Default = Blank.
A unique name for the tunnel. Once the tunnel is created, the name can be selected as a
destination in the IP Route table.
•
Local Configuration:
The account name and password is used to set the PPP authentication parameters.
•
Local Account Name:
The local user name used in outgoing authentication.
•
Local Account Password/Confirm Password:
The local user password. Used during authentication.
•
Local IP Address:
The source IP address to use when originating an L2TP tunnel. By default (un-configured),
IP Office uses the IP address of the interface on which the tunnel is to be established as the
source address of tunnel.
•
Remote Configuration:
The account name and password is used to set the PPP authentication parameters.
•
Remote Account Name:
The remote user name that is expected for the authentication of the peer.
•
Remote Account Password/Confirm Password:
The password for the remote user. Used during authentication.
•
Remote IP Address:
The IP address of the remote L2TP peer or the local VPN line IP address or the WAN IP
address.
•
Minimum Call Time (Mins): Default = 60
The minimum time that the tunnel will remain active.
•
Forward Multicast Messages: Default = On
Allow the tunnel to carry multicast messages when enabled.
•
Encrypted Password: Default = Off
When enabled, the CHAP protocol is used to authenticate the incoming peer.
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L2TP
Within the L2TP tab for L2TP Tunnel, the following fields are available for configuration:
•
Shared Secret/Confirm Password:
User setting used for authentication. Must be matched at both ends of the tunnel. This password
is separate from the PPP authentication parameters defined on the L2TP|Tunnel tab.
•
Total Control Retransmission Interval: Default = 0
Time delay before retransmission.
•
Receive Window Size: Default = 4
The number of unacknowledged packets allowed.
•
Sequence numbers on Data Channel: Default = On
When on, adds sequence numbers to L2TP packets.
•
Add checksum on UDP packets: Default = On.
When on, uses checksums to verify L2TP packets.
•
Use Hiding: Default = Off
When on, encrypts the tunnel's control channel.
PPP
Within the PPP tab for L2TP Tunnel, the following fields are available for configuration:
•
CHAP Challenge Interval (secs): Default = Blank
Sets the period between CHAP challenges. Blank or 0 disables repeated challenges. Some
software (such as Windows 95 DUN) does not support repeated challenges.
•
Header Compression: Default = None
Select header compression. Options are: IPHC and/or VJ.
•
Compression Mode: Default = MPPC
Select the compression mode for the tunnel connection. Options are: Disable, StacLZS or
MPPC.
•
Multilink / QoS: Default = Off
Enable the use of Multilink protocol (MPPC) on the link.
•
Incoming traffic does not keep link up: Default = On
When enabled, the link is not kept up when the only traffic is incoming traffic.
•
LCP Echo Timeout (secs): Default = 6
When a PPP link is established, it is normal for each end to send echo packets to verify that the
link is still connected. This field defines the time between LCP echo packets. Four missed
responses in a row will cause the link to terminate.
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Configuration Forms
IP Security Tunnel
Main
Within the Main tab for IP Security Tunnel, the following fields are available for configuration:
•
Name: Default = Blank.
A unique name for the tunnel. Once the tunnel is created, the name can be selected as a
destination in the IP Route table.
•
Local Configuration:
The IP Address and IP Mask are used in conjunction with each other to configure and set the
conditions for this Security Association (SA) with regard to inbound and outbound IP packets.
•
IP Address:
The IP address or sub-net for the start of the tunnel.
•
IP Mask:
The IP mask for the above address.
•
Tunnel Endpoint IP Address:
The local IP address to be used to establish the SA to the remote peer. If left un-configured,
IP Office will use the IP address of the local interface on which the tunnel is to be
configured.
•
Remote Configuration:
The IP Address and IP Mask are used in conjunction with each other to configure and set the
conditions for this Security Association (SA) with regard to inbound and outbound IP packets.
•
IP Address:
The IP address or sub-net for the end of the tunnel.
•
IP Mask:
The IP mask for the above address.
•
Tunnel Endpoint IP Address:
The IP address of the peer to which a SA must be established before the specified local
and remote addresses can be forwarded.
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Manager 3.0
IKE Policies
Within the IKE Policies tab for IP Security Tunnel, the following fields are available for configuration:
•
Shared Secret/Confirm Password:
The password used for authentication. This must be matched at both ends of the tunnel.
•
Exchange Type: Default = ID Prot
Aggressive provides faster security setup but does not hide the ID's of the communicating
devices. ID Prot is slower but hides the ID's of the communicating devices.
•
Encryption: Default = DES CBC
Select the encryption method used by the tunnel. The options are: DES CBC, 3DES or Any.
•
Authentication: Default = MD5
The method of password authentication. Options are: MD5, SHA or Any.
•
DH Group: Default = Group 1
•
Life Type: Default = KBytes
Sets whether Life (below) is measured in seconds or kilobytes.
•
Life:
Determines the period of time or the number of bytes after which the SA key is refreshed or recalculated.
IPSec Policies
Within the IPSec Policies tab for IP Security Tunnel, the following fields are available for configuration:
•
Protocol: Default = ESP
ESP (Encapsulated Security Payload) or AH (Authentication Header, ie. no encryption).
•
Encryption: Default = DES
Select the encryption method used by the tunnel. The options are: DES CBC, 3DES or Any.
Note: Use of 3DES requires entry of an IP Office licence.
•
Authentication: Default = HMAC MD5
The method of password authentication. Options are: HMAC MD5, HMAC SHA or Any.
•
Life Type: Default = KBytes
Sets whether Life (below) is measured in seconds or kilobytes.
•
Life:
Determines the period of time or the number of bytes after which the SA key is refreshed or recalculated.
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Configuration Forms
Auto Attendant
Auto Attendant
The IP Office 401 and Avaya IP Office - Small Office Edition control units support voicemail using a
integral memory card. In addition, IP401 systems also require a VCM card.
On the Small Office Edition, the integral voicemail can provide auto-attendant services in addition to
basic user mailbox services. Within the Auto Attendant tab, the following fields are configurable:
•
Name:
A name for the auto-attendant service. Maximum length 12 characters. External calls can be
routed to the service by entering AA:Name in the Incoming Call Route's Destination field.
•
Morning/Afternoon/Evening:
Each auto-attendant can consist of three distinct time periods, defined by associated time
profiles.
•
Time Profile:
The time profile that defines each period of auto-attendant operation. When there is an overlap
between time profiles, precedence is given in the order morning, afternoon and then evening.
•
Short code:
The short code that can be dialed to access the morning greeting for the auto-attendant service.
The short code is generated automatically and added to the short codes table.
•
Menu Options:
The short code that can be dialed to access the menu options prompt for the auto-attendant
service.
•
Maximum Inactivity: Default = 8 seconds; Range = 5 to 20sec
This field sets how long, after playing the prompts, the Auto Attendant should wait for a valid key
press. If exceeded, the caller is transferred to the Fallback Extension (set within the Incoming
Call Route configuration form) or the caller is disconnected.
Actions
The actions tab defines the actions available to callers dependant on which key they press.
•
Key:
The standard telephone dial pad keys, 0 to 9 plus * and #.
•
Action:
The following actions can be assigned to each key.
•
•
Not Defined:
The corresponding key takes no action.
•
Transfer to Operator:
Transfer the caller to the set Destination number. This is a supervised transfer, if the
caller is not answered they will recall to the auto-attendant.
•
Normal Transfer:
Transfer the caller to the set Destination number. This is an unsupervised transfer, if the
caller is not answered they will be handled as per a direct call to that number.
•
Replay Greeting:
Replay the auto-attendant greetings again.
Destination:
For Transfer to Operator and Normal Transfer actions sets the destination extension or group
numbers.
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DTE Port Maintenance
DTE Port Overview
The DTE port on the back of an IP Office Control Unit is not normally used when configuring an IP Office
system. However the DTE port can be used to erase the system's operational software and/or
configuration if necessary.
Due to the drastic nature of these actions, they should only be performed if absolutely necessary to
return a system back to working order.
In either case, you must ensure that you have a backup copy of the system configuration.
DTE Port Settings
Access to the DTE port requires a serial cable wired as shown below using D-type plugs. The DTE port
on the IP Office Control Unit may be either 25-pin or 9-pin.
IP Office
25-pin
IP Office 9- Signal
pin
PC
9-pin
2
3
Receive Data
3
3
2
Transmit Data
2
4
7
RTS
7
5
8
CTS
8
6
6
DSR
6
7
5
Ground
5
8
1
DCD
1
20
4
DTR
4
9
RI
9
22
An asynchronous terminal program such as HyperTerminal is also required. Configure this for operation
via a PC serial port, as follows:
•
Bits per second: 38,400.
•
Data bits: 8.
•
Parity: None.
•
Stop Bits: 1.
•
Flow Control: None.
•
Settings | Emulation: TTY or VT100.
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DTE Port Maintenance
Loader Version
It may sometimes be necessary to find out the version of Loader software on the IP Office Control Unit.
Do the following to view the Loader software version:
1. Switch off power to the IP Office Control Unit.
2. Attach the serial cable between the PC and the DTE port on the IP Office Control Unit.
3. Start the terminal program on your PC. Ensure that it has been setup as listed in DTE Port
Settings above.
•
Within a HyperTerminal session the current settings are summarized across the base of
the screen.
4. Power on the IP Office Control Unit and press the escape key every second until you get a
Loader message. Below is an example.
P2 Loader 0.7 (4MB-2xLV160 Flash-120nS SDRAM-10)
CPU Revision 0x0501
5. To return the IP Office Control Unit to normal operation switch power to it off and then back on.
6. Close the terminal program session.
Erasing the Flash Configuration
This process erases the configuration held in the IP Office Control Unit's Flash memory. Following this
action, all aspects of the configuration will return to their factory defaults.
Ensure that you have a backup copy of the IP Office's configuration before performing this action.
1. Switch off power to the IP Office Control Unit.
2. Attach the serial cable between the PC and the DTE port on the IP Office Control Unit.
3. Start the terminal program on your PC. Ensure that it has been setup as listed in DTE Port
Settings.
•
Within a HyperTerminal session, the current settings are summarized across the base of
the screen.
4. Power on the Control Unit and press the escape key every second until you get a Loader
message. Below is an example.
P2 Loader 0.7 (4MB-2xLV160 Flash-120nS SDRAM-10)
CPU Revision 0x0501
5. Enter AT (note upper case). The Control Unit should respond OK.
6. Enter AT-X2. The Control Unit should respond 0x0200C000H Erase.
7. Enter AT-X3. The Control Unit should respond 0x02001000H Erase.
8. IP Office 403 only: If running an IP Office 403 control unit, enter AT-X4.
9. Switch power to the Control Unit off and then back on. Within the terminal program you should
see various messages as the Control Unit performs various start up tasks. See DTE Port Trace
of Defaulted Unit Reboot for an example.
10. Close the terminal program session.
11. Manager can now be used to alter and then upload an old configuration file or receive and edit
the Control Unit's now defaulted configuration.
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Manager 3.0
Erasing the Operational Software
Do not perform this process unless absolutely necessary. If you want to upgrade the software this can be
done via the Upgrade tool in the Manager application (File | Advanced | Upgrade).
This process erases the operational software and system configuration. Before attempting this process
you must know the MAC and IP addresses of the system, plus have a backup copy of its configuration
and the correct .bin file for the Control Unit type and level of software.
1. Run Manager. In the BOOTP entries check that there is an entry that matches the MAC Address,
IP Address and .bin file used by the system (the first two details can be found in the Unit settings
in the system's configuration file).
2. If an entry isn't present, create a new entry. Then close and restart Manager.
3. Under File | Preferences ensure that Manager is set to 255.255.255.255.
4. Select View | TFTPLog.
5. Check that the required .bin file is present in Manager's working directory.
6. Attach the serial cable between the PC and the DTE port on the IP Office Control Unit.
7. Start the terminal program on your PC. Ensure that it has been setup as listed in "DTE Port
Settings".
8. Arrange the program windows so that the Terminal program and Manager TFTP Log are visible
at the same time.
9. Switch off power to the IP Office Control Unit.
10. Power on the Control Unit and press the escape key every second until you get a Loader
message.
11. Enter AT (note upper case). The Control Unit should respond OK.
12. Enter AT-X. The Control Unit should respond Multi-Sector Erase.
13. The Control Unit will now request the .bin file it requires from Manager. This process appears in
the TFTPLog.
14. When completed the system will reboot.
Sample TFTPLog of a successful transfer:
If you see the following in the TFTPLog, it means the transfer was performed
successfully:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
Received BOOTP request for 00e007000123 192.168.42.1 napremis.bin
Sending BOOTP response for 00e007000123 192.168.42.1 napremis.bin
Sending napremis.bin length 654321 bytes to 192.168.42.1
Sent 10% of napremis.bin
Sent 20% of napremis.bin
Sent 30% of napremis.bin
Sent 40% of napremis.bin
Sent 50% of napremis.bin
Sent 60% of napremis.bin
Sent 70% of napremis.bin
Sent 80% of napremis.bin
Sent 90% of napremis.bin
Sent 100% of napremis.bin
Sent napremis.bin length 654321 bytes
The following in the TFTPLog indicates that the required .bin file is not in Manager’s Working Directory.
A set of .bin files is available on the IP Office Administration Applications CD in the \bin folder.
: Received BOOTP request for 00e007000123 192.168.42.1 napremis.bin
: Sending BOOTP response for 00e007000123 192.168.42.1 napremis.bin
: Unable to send napremis.bin length 0 bytes
The following in the TFTPLog indicates that a matching BOOTP entry was not found. If this occurs use
Manager to add or edit the required BOOTP entry.
: Received BOOTP request for 00e007000123 192.168.42.1 napremis.bin, unable to
process
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DTE Port Maintenance
DTE Port Trace of Defaulted Unit Reboot
This is an example of a defaulted Control Unit booting.
Expanding MPPC image ...
Constructor StaticHeap=56 DynamicHeap=8185688
NoCacheStaticHeap=1442036 NoCacheDynamicHeap=3694348 Overflow=0
Factory Test Status 00000001
Product Variation Status ffffffff
NVConfiguration:: No NV Stored default..
found FLASH file: ..\modem\zmbin004.s37, len=790
found FLASH file: ..\modem\mcode.bin, len=40000
found FLASH file: ..\vcomp\48105ak.123, len=d8
found FLASH file: ..\vcomp\48105ae3.123, len=1c158
found FLASH file: ..\nabranch\onehz.bin, len=3e80
DT interface detected
htl 00010000 hth 20400000
SLOT A: PRI24 Module Added
SLOT B: No ISDN/AT Module fitted
SLICOFI2: chip version: V1.3
Dual-Modem fitted
Voice Compression PCB detected
Found voice compressor 0
No voice compressor 1
No voice compressor 2
No voice compressor 3
USS-820 USB Device Controller: rev 1.3
Route 00000000 00000000 Usurped (NOCHANGE) is LAN1
Route::Attempting DHCP...
USS820: USB bus reset detected
USBDevice: state POWERED --> DEFAULT
1: Reset phone due to SendSABM NACKs
2: Reset phone due to SendSABM NACKs
Route::No DHCP defaulting IP Address c0a82a01 ffffff00
RouteSystem::Starting DHCP Server...
RouteSystem::RouteSystem LAN1 ipaddr=c0a82a01 ipmask=ffffff00
Configuration::Attempting to read from FLASH...
FlashConfigIO::Load(0)
Configuration::Using Default...
No System IPADDR using DISCOVERED Values
No System IPADDR 2 using DISCOVERED Values
Platform::Discover TDM Attached Units...
Platform::Discover Possible LAN Attached Units...
Configuration::WARNING Unit IP 403 is not configured - adding
Configuration::WARNING Unit ANALOGUE POTS2 is not configured - adding
Configuration::WARNING Unit DIGITAL DT 8 is not configured - adding
Checking WAN
Firewall Validating LAN1
Adding RemoteManager route to 192.168.99.0
Configuration::AddDeadRoute 0a000000 ff000000 00000000
Configuration::AddDeadRoute e0000000 ff000000 00000000
Configuration::Complete
0: PCM=2648 ALaw=9f
1: PCM=4452 ALaw=9f
2: PCM=0000 ALaw=9f
3: PCM=1068 ALaw=9f
4: PCM=0000 ALaw=ff
5: PCM=0003 ALaw=73
6: PCM=0000 ALaw=18
7: PCM=0000 ALaw=98
CallSystem::NEW LINE Detected 1
CallSystem::StartExtn No Config for 2.10 Adding
CallSystem::StartExtn No Config for 2.14 Adding
CallSystem::StartExtn No Config for 2.3 Adding
CallSystem::StartExtn No Config for 2.7 Adding
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Manager 3.0
CallSystem::StartExtn No Config for 2.11
CallSystem::StartExtn No Config for 2.15
CallSystem::StartExtn No Config for 2.19
CallSystem::StartExtn No Config for 2.23
RasServer::Starting...
Added ACDQueue to Main
SNMP::Starting SNMP Server...
MIBII::Creating MIBII base...
IGMP::Starting IGMP Module...
Tue 14/8/2001 09:53:47 FreeMem=7646324
Inband Exception Handling Enabled
Initialisation complete starting TA
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Adding
Adding
Adding
Adding
Page 330
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
DTE Port Maintenance
Port Trace of Normal Reboot
This is an example of a Control Unit rebooting and loading an existing configuration.
Expanding MPPC image ...
Constructor StaticHeap=56 DynamicHeap=8185688
NoCacheStaticHeap=1442036 NoCacheDynamicHeap=3694348 Overflow=0
Factory Test Status 00000001
Product Variation Status ffffffff
found FLASH file: ..\modem\zmbin004.s37, len=790
found FLASH file: ..\modem\mcode.bin, len=40000
found FLASH file: ..\vcomp\48105ak.123, len=d8
found FLASH file: ..\vcomp\48105ae3.123, len=1c158
found FLASH file: ..\nabranch\onehz.bin, len=3e80
DT interface detected
htl 00010000 hth 20400000
SLOT A: PRI24 Module Added
SLOT B: No ISDN/AT Module fitted
SLICOFI2: chip version: V1.3
Dual-Modem fitted
Voice Compression PCB detected
Found voice compressor 0
No voice compressor 1
No voice compressor 2
No voice compressor 3
USS-820 USB Device Controller: rev 1.3
Route 00000000 00000000 Usurped (NOCHANGE) is LAN1
RouteSystem::Starting DHCP Server...
RouteSystem::RouteSystem LAN1 ipaddr=c0a82a01 ipmask=ffffff00
Configuration::Attempting to read from FLASH...
FlashConfigIO::Load(0)
No System IPADDR 2 using DISCOVERED Values
Platform::Discover TDM Attached Units...
USS820: USB bus reset detected
USBDevice: state POWERED --> DEFAULT
Platform::Discover Possible LAN Attached Units...
DT5ToneGenerator::UpdateOper
DT5DTMFGenerator::UpdateOper
Checking WAN
Firewall Validating LAN1
Configuration::Complete
0: PCM=2648 ALaw=9f
1: PCM=4452 ALaw=9f
2: PCM=0000 ALaw=9f
3: PCM=1068 ALaw=9f
4: PCM=0000 ALaw=ff
5: PCM=0003 ALaw=73
6: PCM=0000 ALaw=18
7: PCM=0000 ALaw=98
8: PCM=0000 ALaw=00
9: PCM=0012 ALaw=00
RasServer::Starting...
Added ACDQueue to Main
SNMP::Starting SNMP Server...
MIBII::Creating MIBII base...
IGMP::Starting IGMP Module...
Tue 14/8/2001 09:49:54 FreeMem=7646752
Inband Exception Handling Enabled
Initialisation complete starting TA
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Transactional Pad
Connecting a Transactional Pad
A transaction pad (T-PAD, credit card "swipe" terminal) can use the ISDN (B channel) trunks, via the 25pin D-type connector on the rear of the system Control Unit. This allows for faster transactions then
provided by conventional modem connectivity.
The Control Unit supports a single DTE port. This DTE port has an AT command interface. Certain AT
commands may be sent to the serial port so that it runs an X.25 TPAD interface.
The ISDN link between the Control Unit and the transaction pad is digital. The transaction pad does not
require a modem.
Configuration Parameters
In order to connect to a remote server, the DTE port needs:
•
the Phone number of the remote server
•
local_nua
•
nui
•
lower_channel (defaults to 1024)
•
upper_channel (defaults to 1279)
AT commands need to be issued to the DTE port to enable the interface. The following AT commands
are relevant to transaction pad operation:
•
ATB6 - set connection mode as TPAD
•
AT%A - set the local nua.
•
AT%I - set the nui.
•
AT%L - set the lower channel limit (defaults to 1024).
•
AT%U - set the upper channel limit (defaults to 1279).
•
AT&A - set an autodial number.
•
AT&D=1 - dial autodial number whenever DTR is raised (by pad).
Example:
ATB6
AT%A=1234
AT%I=test_host
AT%L=1048
AT%U=1052
AT&A 01923111111
AT&D=1
Additional information of IP Office DTE port AT commands can be found in the "IP Office AT Commands
Manual".
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Transactional Pad
Configuration Auto-Load
Whereas AT commands can be issue to the DTE port through a serial communications program (eg.
Hyperterminal), DTE port settings and parameters are not saved in the IP Office Control Unit's flash
memory. Thus they are lost during any reboot.
In order to 'permanently' set the parameters they need to be added to the configuration through the IP
Office Manager application. This is done through a configured user called DTEDefault.
Create a user called DTEDefault and add the required initial AT commands into the SourceNumbers
table. These commands are then automatically reloaded following any reboot.
Tracing
There are a number of locations where the transaction can be traced using the IP Office Monitor
application.
•
Options/DTE
•
DTE Command Tx/Rx
This trace information is output when the DTE port is in AT mode
•
DTE Filter Tx/Rx
This is trace information of the Serial communication between the DTE port and the pad. Other
trace information will appear from time to time.
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VCM & Data Channels
Overview of Channels
The IP Office can be treated as having a telephony switching interface (its TDM bus) and a data
networking interface (its Packet bus).
•
The TDM bus is used by devices attached to the system's DS and POT ports (analog and digital
telephones) and by any Line Modules installed in the Control Unit. It is also used by several
internal devices, for example the Tone Generator, MOH and Conference Chip.
•
The Packet bus Interface is used by devices attached to the system's LAN and WAN ports.
Calls between the two buses will use up the IP Office Control Unit's available data and VCM channel
resources as follows:
•
When a voice call takes place between a device on the TDM bus and a device on the packet bus,
a VCM channel is used. If no VCM channel is available, then busy is indicated to the caller.
•
VCM channels are provided by installing a Voice Compression Module into the IP Office Control
Unit.
•
When any data call takes place between a device on the TDM bus and a device on the packet
bus, a data channel is used. If no data channel is available, then the call cannot be initiated.
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VCM & Data Channels
VCM Examples
In the examples below, IP Phone means both IP Hard Phones and IP Soft Phones. Non-IP Phones
mean both analog and digital phones.
•
IP Phone to/from Non-IP Phone: 1 channel used for duration of call.
•
IP Phone to/from IP Phone: 1 channel used during call setup.
•
Access to the Tone Generator on the TDM bus is required during call setup. Thus a VCM
channel is used.
•
Once the call is connected, the VCM channel is no longer used (being IP telephony
devices the IP phones perform their own voice compression).
•
Non-IP Phone to/from PSTN: No channel used.
•
IP Phone to/from PSTN Line: 1 channel used for duration of call.
•
Conference Calls: 1 channel per IP phone.
•
Conference calls are managed on the TDM bus. Therefore, a VCM channel is required for
each device on the Packet bus involved in the conference.
Data Channel Examples
The following scenarios all use data channels:
•
Multiple LAN Users dialing the Same ISP: 1 channel total.
The calls are routed via the same digital trunk (assuming sufficient bandwidth) so only one data
channel is used between the Packet bus and the TDM bus.
•
Remote Access Users: 1 channel per user.
Each RAS user dialing into the IP Office will use a separate trunk and thus each RAS user
requires a data channel.
•
Note: The number of Analog RAS users is also limited by the Modem capacity of the IP
Office Control Unit. Currently this is 2 if a Modem 2 module is fitted (not supported on
IP401) or 1 if the first analog trunk port is set to Modem operation.
•
Access to Voicemail: 1 channel per user.
Each call to an IP Office Voicemail Server uses a data channel as its voicemail port.
•
TAPI WAV: 1 channel per user
Each TAPI WAV user uses a data channel. Note that these are taken from the same pool of data
channels as used for voicemail ports. Non-WAV TAPI users do not use a data channel.
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Manager 3.0
VCM & Data Channels Supported
VCM Modules exist in 5, 10, 20 and 30 channel variants. The IP401, IP403 and IP406 Control Units can
each support a single VCM as shown below. The IP412 can support two VCM modules.
•
VCM Channels
IP401
VCM 5
Yes
VCM 10
IP403
IP406
IP412
Yes
Yes
Yes
–
Yes
Yes
Yes
VCM 20
–
Yes
Yes
Yes
VCM 30
–
–
–
Yes
Maximum VCM Channels
2
20
30
60
IP Office Small Office Edition
For these controls units, either 3 or 16 VCM channels are pre-installed within the unit. The
number is shown by the VCx item on the label on the unit's base.
Each IP Office Control Unit supports the following number of data channels. Note that the number of
those data channels that can be used for voicemail and/or TAPI WAV is further restricted.
Data Channels
IP401
Maximum Data Channels
2
IP403/Small IP406
Office
Edition
IP412
18
24
100
Above data channels usable 2
for Voicemail Lite and/or
TAPI WAV
4
4
4
Above data channels usable 2
for Voicemail Pro and/or
TAPI WAV
10
20
30
Note: The Voicemail Pro also requires licenses for the number of data channels it can use as voicemail
ports. TAPI WAV users must also be licensed.
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VCM & Data Channels
Detecting the VCM Module Fitted
The presence of a VCM module is not shown in the IP Office Control Unit's configuration when opened in
the Manager application. However the Monitor application does provide indication of the number of VCM
channels installed in a Control Unit.
1. Start Monitor.
•
If necessary, use File | Select Unit to indicate the IP Office Control Unit which you want
to monitor.
2. Amongst the first lines of monitor output should be two lines similar to the following:
LAW=A, PRI=0, BRI=4, ALOG=4, ADSL=0 VCOMP=5, MDM=2, WAN=1, MODU=0 LANM=1 CkSRC=8
VMAIL=1(VER=2) CALLS=0(TOT=8)
3. This line provide information about various aspect of the control unit, as follows:
•
PRI = Number of PRI channels
•
BRI = Number of BRI channels (4=1 card, 8=2 cards).
•
ALOG = Number of Analog Trunks Channels
•
ADSL = Number of ADSL channels.
•
VCOMP = Number of VCM channels installed.
•
MDM = Size of Modem Card Fitted
•
WAN = Number of WAN Ports configured.
•
MODU = Number of TDM units attached (i.e. POTS units etc.)
•
LANM = Number of LAN Modules attached (i.e. WAN3s)
•
CkSRC = Current Clock Source (ISDN port number - 0 = NO Clock Source)
•
VMAIL = 1 if connected, 0 if not (VER is the s/w version of the Vmail Server)
•
CALLS = Number of current calls (TOT - total number of calls made to date since last
PBX reboot.)
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Voicemail
Access to voicemail and whether this requires VCM or data channels depends upon the type of
voicemail system being used. This section only covers dedicated IP Office Voicemail servers.
•
Integral Voicemail (IP401 and IP Office Small Office Edition only)
Integral Voicemail is implemented using a VCM module plus a PCMCIA Smart Media card for
prompt and memory storage. VCM channels are used for all calls to the Embedded Voicemail.
•
•
•
•
This means that a call from a VoIP extension to Integral Voicemail will use two VCM
channels. A call from a non-IP extension uses just a single VCM channel.
Voicemail Lite & Voicemail Pro
The Voicemail Server PC is physically attached to the IP Office via a LAN port. However all
devices on the system see the Voicemail Server as if it is a device on the TDM bus. This means:
•
For non-IP phones, no VCM channels are used.
•
For each IP phone calling voicemail, a VCM channel is used.
•
Each voicemail user uses a data channel.
•
TAPI WAV users also use a data channel drawn from the same pool used for voicemail
ports, ie. each TAPI WAV user call reduces the number of data channels available for
voicemail.
Centralized Voicemail Pro
In this solution the IP Office systems are connected by VoIP trunks.
•
Calls to voicemail from the remote IP Office require a VCM channel on both the remote
and central IP Office systems.
•
Calls from remote IP Office IP extensions require a VCM channel on the remote system
only during call setup. They require a VCM channel on the central system for the whole
call.
AUDIX INTUITY Centralized Voicemail
This solution can be connected either via a PRI connection or via an H.323 IP connection.
•
If using a PRI connection, the number of available VCM channels limits the number of
calls between IP Office IP extensions and the central PBX.
•
If using an H.323 connection, the number of available VCM channels limits the number of
simultaneous calls between IP Office non-IP extensions and the central PBX. IP Office IP
extensions only require a VCM channel during call setup.
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Paging
Paging from IP Office
Paging to and from IP Office phone's is covered by the appropriate telephone user guides. This section
covers paging to 3rd-party paging equipment (centrally amplified paging systems or self-amplified
speakers).
Typically, 3rd-party paging equipment uses analog connections. The IP Office can provide analog
connections via either analog trunks or analog extensions. In terms of flexibility of operation once
installed, the use of an analog extension port for paging is the preferred solution.
WARNINGS:
•
The Paging Equipment must provide isolation to the IP Office analog port or an additional
interface device must be fitted.
•
The Paging Equipment (and separate interface device if used) must conform to the local and
national telecommunications device regulation:
•
•
USA: FCC approval.
•
European Union: CE marked indicating compliance with the EMC (EN41003) and Low
Voltage (EN60950) directives.
•
All other countries: use equipment that complies with locals and national
telecommunication device regulation.
Failure to observe the notes above could result in damage to the IP Office or the 3rd-party
equipment.
Universal Paging Access Module
For the US, the Universal Paging Access Module (UPAM) is recommended as the interface device
between the IP Office and the Paging Equipment.
The UPAM:
•
Supports analog extension or trunk (loop or ground start) connection.
•
Requires a 24V or 48V power supply if used with trunk connections.
•
Provides a pre-announce tone heard at the paging extension and over the paging speakers.
On/Off selectable.
•
Provides a confirmation tone heard by the pager only (not supported for ground start trunks).
On/Off selectable.
•
Has Paging Time control which sets the maximum page time (6 to 35 seconds) if its other
disconnect controls are disabled.
•
Supports background music input via an RCA-type jack.
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Manager 3.0
Paging via an Analog Extension Port (POT Port)
IP Office analog extension ports are marked as POT. These can be used for the connection of third-party
paging equipment.
The IP Office 401 (not available in North America) and IP Office 403 Control Units have integral POT
ports.
POT ports can also be installed by the addition of an IP Office Phone Module to the system.
•
The Paging Amplifier must provide isolation or an additional isolation device should be fitted.
•
The Paging Amplifier (and separate isolation device if used) must conform to the local and
national telecommunications device regulation.
•
If not done automatically, it may be necessary to set the Paging Amplifier to give priority to the
VOX input.
Do the following to set up a page via an analog extension port:
1. IP Office POT Port Wiring Connection
Connections to POT ports should use a twin-pair cable wired as follows:
POT
RJ45 Socket
•
Pin Number
Description
1 and 3
Do not use.
2
Bell
4
A: Ring
5
B: Tip
6
Bell
7 and 8
Do not use.
Pins 2 and 6 are connect to pin 5 via a ringing capacitor.
The POT ports are rated as follows:
•
Οff-Hook Current = 25mA.
•
Ring Voltage = 40V rms.
•
REN = 2
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Paging
2. Configure the Analog Extension
To configure the analog extension:
1. Start IP Office Manager and receive the configuration from the IP Office.
2. Click the Extension icon to display the list of extensions.
3. Double-click on the extension that will be used for the paging equipment connection.
4. In the Extn tab, set the following:
• Set the Equipment Classification to Paging Speaker.
• Set Caller Display Type to Off.
5. Click on OK.
6. Note that the icon for the extension has changed from
to . In this mode the extension
connects the speech path imeediately without any ringing.
3. Configure the Analog Extension User
1. Click the
User icon to display the list of users.
2. Double-click the user currently associated with the extension above.
3. In the User tab, set the following set the Name to Paging or similar to indicate the
function.
4. In the Voicemail tab untick Voicemail On.
5. Click OK.
4. Create Short code for Paging the Extension
This stage is optional. Since the connection is via a extension with an associated user, page calls
can be made using the appropriate user name or number (see "Making Page Calls"). If you skip
short code creation, send the new configuration to the IP Office and reboot.
Do the following to create a short code:
1. Click on the
ShortCode icon to display the list of short codes.
2. Right-click on the list and select New.
3. Enter the settings for the short code that users should dial when to make a paging call:
•
Short Code: *78
The numbers users should dial to do a page. *78 is just an example.
• Telephone Number:201
The analog extension connected to the paging equipment.
• Feature: DialPaging
Note that DialPaging is used for an analog extension connection. Dial is used for
an analog trunk connection. .
4. Click on OK.
5. Send the new configuration to the IP Office and reboot.
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Manager 3.0
Paging via an Analog Trunk Port
You can use the analog trunk ports provided by the ATM4 or ATM16 modules.
The ATM4 is an internal module installed into the IP Office Control Unit. Note that the ATM4 only
provides Loop Start analog trunk ports.
The ATM16 is an external expansion module. It supports both Loop Start and Ground Start analog
trunks.
•
As previously stated the Paging Amplifier must provide isolation or an additional isolation device
should be fitted.
•
The Paging Amplifier (and separate isolation device if used) must conform to the local and
national telecommunications device regulation.
•
The paging connection must provide power in order to be seen as a real trunk by the IP Office.
Do the following to set up a page via an analog trunk port:
1. Analog Trunk Port Wiring Connection
The analog trunk ports on IP Office modules are RJ45 sockets. Connections to these should use
a single-pair cable wired cable as follows:
RJ45 Socket
Pin Number
Description
1 to 3
Do not use.
4
A: Ring
5
B: Tip
6 to 8
Do not use.
2. Line Configuration
Configure the line via the Line configuration form in Manager:
1. Receive the configuration from the IP Office.
2. Click on the
Line icon to display the list of installed lines.
3. Analog lines appear as shown with
paging.
icons. Double-click on the line that will be used for
4. In the Line tab, set the following:
•
Manager 3.0
IP Office
In the Telephone Number field enter a note indicating that this is the line to the
paging equipment, eg. Line to Paging.
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Paging
•
Set the Outgoing Group ID to a unique value, ie. one not used by any other line.
This number will be used in a short code that routes page calls to this line.
5. In the Analog tab, set the following:
•
Set the Trunk Type to Loop Start. Note: This is the only option with ATM4 trunks.
With ATM16 trunks Ground Start can be used if required by the paging
equipment.
•
Leave the remaining values at their defaults unless the instructions of the paging
equipment manufacturer indicate that other values are required.
6. Click OK.
3. Short Code for Paging the Trunk
1. Click the ShortCode icon to display the list of system short codes.
2. Right-click on the list and select New.
3. Enter the settings for the short code that users should dial when to make a paging call:
•
Short Code: *88
This is the numbers users should dial to do a page. *88 is just an example.
•
Telephone Number: .
•
Line Group ID:20
This must match the Outgoing Group ID set for the analog trunk.
•
Feature: Dial
Note that Dial is used for an analog trunk connection. DialPaging is used for an
analog extension connection.
4. Click OK.
5. Send the new configuration to the IP Office and reboot.
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Making Page Calls
Making Page Calls
Having setup and tested the paging equipment, users can begin to use it.
If the paging device has been connected via an analog extension port, then the page call features
provided for different phones can also be used to page the extension number. Refer to the appropriate
phone user guide. Otherwise users can dial the short code setup for paging.
The following methods can be used to make page calls.
Paging via a DSS Key
For extensions with DSS keys, paging can be assigned to one of those keys. The following method
programs the key via the Manager application.
1. Start Manager and load the IP Office configuration.
Users to display the list of Users. In the list, double-click the user whose DSS keys you
2. Click
want to edit.
3. Select the Button Programming tab (Digital Telephony tab on UK English systems).
4. For the required DSS button, select Dial as the Action. For the Telephone number enter the
paging short code or the extension number or the extension name in quotes.
5. Click OK.
6. Save the new configuration.
Paging from Phone Manager
You can add a speed dial to Phone Manager in order to make paging calls.
1. Within the users Phone Manager, select the Speed Dials tab.
2. Right-click on the tab area.
•
If paging via a analog extension port, select Add User and select the appropriate user.
•
If paging via an analog trunk port, select New. Enter a name and enter the paging short
code as the number.
Group Paging
If the paging connection is via an extension port, that extension can be included in a group with other
pageable extensions. This allows page calls to be heard via the speaker and over pageable telephones.
To set up group paging:
1. Create a Hunt Group with all the users required as members.
2. Set the Hunt Group to "Group" ring mode and to turn off the Voicemail and Queuing facilities.
3. Create a short code to call the Hunt Group using the DialPaging feature:
•
•
Short Code: *81
•
Telephone Number: 305
•
Line Group ID: 0
•
Feature: DialPaging
Note TransTalk 9040 MDW sets do not receive page calls, but may make them.
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Paging
Voicemail Pro
Voicemail Pro can be used to deliver pre-recorded announcements. This can be useful when the same
announcement is repeated frequently. This method requires the paging port to be an analog extension.
This method also removes the feedback loop that can occur on some sites as the page is first recorded
and then played.
Example 1 of a paging method via Voicemail Pro:
1. In Voicemail Pro, a new Module was added and named Page.
2. A Post Dial action was added to the module. The properties of the Specific tab were set as
shown:
•
The Post the following action field was set to the address of the .wav file we want
played. The (-) in front indicates play once. In the to extension field we put the extension
number to which the message should be played, in this case a paging port.
3. We then saved and made live the new Voicemail Pro call flow.
4. In Manager we received the IP Office configuration and created a new short code.
•
The Telephone Number matches the name of the Voicemail Pro module in quote marks.
•
The Feature is VoicemailCollect.
5. The new IP Office configuration was then merged.
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Manager 3.0
Example 2 of a paging method via Voicemail Pro:
This example builds on example 1 by allowing the user to select which message is played from a menu.
In this example the user can press 1, 2 or 3 for different messages. They can also re-record the
message associated with option 3 by pressing #.
A Play List action was added and in this example set to record pagemsg3.wav. Note that just the file
name was specified as this action saves files relative to the Voicemail Server's WAVS folder.
In the Post Dial action that plays back pagemsg3.wav note that the full file path needs to be used.
In IP Office Manager, we then added a short code that triggers the module "Paging" using the
VoicemailCollect feature.
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Remote Access
Remote Access
In some cases, there may be a need for connecting a remote PC to an IP Office system. Once
connected, the remote PC is part of the IP Office network and can run many of the IP Office applications.
•
WARNING: Do Not Run Upgrade Across RAS Links if running IP Office 2.0 or earlier
If you are running Manager 2.0 or earlier, the Upgrade facility within the IP Office Manager
application should not be used over a RAS link of any kind. To do so will result in a
'frozen' Control Unit which will have to be returned to its factory defaults via its DTE port.
If you are running Manager 2.1 or later and IP Office 2.1 or later, see Pre-Upgrade Checks and
Validated Upgrade for upgrading options.
The diagram below is a general schematic of RAS.
The need for an IP Route within the IP Office is dependant on the respective IP address domains of the
remote PC and the IP Office.
Note: If the connection is via analog, modem or line, the IP Office must also have Modem2 module
installed.
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Manager 3.0
IP Office Remote Access Setup
The following process defines a RAS User on the IP Office system.
1. Create a User
Click the User form within the Configuration Tree to display the list of existing users. Right-click
on the list area and select New. The required details are:
• In the User tab:
Enter a Name and Password. IP Office is case sensitive. Remember to take care with
passwords as this is a remote access link into your network.
• In the Dial In tab:
Ensure that Dial In On is ticked.
2. Create a RAS Entry
Click the RAS form within the Configuration Tree to display the list of existing remote access
services. Right-click on the list area and select New.
• In the RAS tab:
You must enter the same name as the user that you created earlier. Again, remember this
is case sensitive.
3. Create an Incoming Call Route
Click the Incoming Call Route icon to display the list of existing routes. Right-click on the list
area and select New.
• If using an analog modem set the Bearer Capability to Any Voice. If using a digital
connection set the Bearer Capability to Any Data. In the Destination drop-down list,
select the RAS entry created above.
• The values that you enter for any of the other fields will depend on whether the remote
user will be calling in on a particular line, number or from a set CLID.
4. Is a Return IP Route Needed ?
The steps above are sufficient for an incoming digital data connection. However, if the remote
user has an IP address that is not in the same domain as the IP Office, then an IP Route is
needed for outgoing return data.
• This is not necessary if the remote user has an IP address on same domain as the IP
Office. Go to Step 6.
• This is not necessary if the remote user's dial-up connection method is set to 'Obtain an
IP Address Automatically' and the IP Office's DHCP mode is set to Server or DialIn. Go to
Step 6.
5. Create a IP Route
Click on the IP Route icon to display the list of existing routes. Right-click on the list area and
select New.
• Enter the IP Address and IP Mask of the remote system.
• In the Destination drop-down list select the RAS entry created above.
6. Send the configuration to the IP Office and reboot.
Remote Access Using Analog Lines
If the remote connection is using an analog line, then the same principles apply except for the following:
•
To determine if your IP Office Control Unit has a Modem2 card installed, start Monitor. One of
the first lines shown includes the item MDM= followed by the number of modem circuits.
•
Using the Incoming Call Route menu, you MUST be able to clearly identify the analog RAS call,
either by its incoming number or by the CLI. Create a route entry for this with the Bearer
Capability set to Any (there is no D-Channel signal from an analog line so the call is not
automatically recognized as data) and the Destination set to the RAS entry previously created.
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Remote Access
Additional User Controls
Other aspects of system programming that can effect remote access:
•
Time Profiles:
A Time Profile can be used to specify when a user can remotely access the system. Once a
profile has been created, it is applied to the user through their User | Dial In tab.
•
Firewall Profiles:
A Firewall Profile can be used to specify what types of traffic can be run across a remote access
connection. Once a profile has been created, it is applied to the user through their User | Dial In
tab.
•
VoIP Extensions:
In theory a VoIP call could be run across the remote access connection. However in practice the
quality would be reliant on the all parts of the call connection route supporting QoS.
•
Note: If a remote access user runs an H.323 IP Softphone, for example an IP Enabled Phone
Manager Pro, the H.323 Gateway on the IP Office would create a new extension and user for that
Softphone (subject to IP Office licensing). For programming neatness, and to give the remote
user a fixed extension number, it may be better to manually create a VoIP Extension and
associate it with the RAS User.
Remote Dial-Up PC Setup
These instructions assume that you are using a PC with a Microsoft Windows operating system.
However the general principles are applicable to any PC capable of dial-up networking.
1. If the IP Office running DHCP is in Server or Dial In mode, then set the PC's Network Properties
for TCP/IP via the Dial-Up Adapter to Obtain an IP Address Automatically. This does not affect
the PC's network card settings, which can be running a separate set of IP address settings.
•
You can also alter the TCP/IP settings of individual dial-up connections to either Server
Assigned Address (DHCP) or to a fixed IP Address (ie. one matching the IP Office's
domain).
2. Create a new dial up networking session.
3. Ensure that the User Name and Password match those created for the RAS User on the IP
Office.
4. The telephone number dialed or the CLI from which dialing occurs must match the incoming call
route created for remote access.
Remote Domain Browsing and LMHOSTS
Over a basic RAS connection, the remote PC is able to route IP traffic into and out of the IP Office
network.
For the remote PC to be able to browse network drives and facilities on the IP Office network requires
further setup. This is done via the use of a LMHOST file on the remote PC and requires information from
the Network Administrator relating to the network's Domain Controllers and other devices.
Full details of this can be found in Microsoft Knowledge Base Article -Q150800.
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Small Community Networking
Small Community Networking
With Small Community Networking (SCN) enabled, the separate IP Office systems 'learn' each others
extension numbers. This allows extension calls between systems and support for a range of internal call
features.
Small Community Networking currently supports a maximum of 500 extensions across 16 IP Office
systems.
When setting up numbering for an SCN with IP Office, one rule MUST be followed: NO DUPLICATE
EXTENSION NUMBERS. Careful management of the network dial plan is required to avoid the auto
numbering that creates duplicate numbers when an extension is added to the system. Scenario 1
demonstrates how unintentional duplicate extension numbers can be created and Scenario 2
demonstrates how to avoid this situation.
Scenario 1 (NOT Recommended)
In this scenario, extension numbers for the two IP Office systems (Site A and B) have been defined as
displayed in the table below. At this point, there are no duplicate numbers and the setup is acceptable.
However, if an extension is added to Site A, IP Office will automatically number that extension with the
next contiguous number, which is 206. There is now a duplicate extension number and this will cause
severe errors within the system. Scenario 2 demonstrates how to avoid creating duplicate extension
numbers.
Assigned Extension Numbers
Site A
201, 203, 205
Site B
202, 204, 206
Scenario 2 (Recommended)
Avoiding the auto numbering that creates duplicate numbers when an extension is added to the system
is most easily achieved by allocating blocks of numbers to individual sites. In this scenario, a block of
extension numbers is allocated to Site A and Site B. When Site A grows and additional extensions need
to be added, another block of extensions should be assigned. For example, extension numbers 280 299 can be allocated to Site A. This type of dial plan structure will help avoid the creation of duplicate
extension numbers and system management confusion.
Assigned Extension Number Range
Site A
200 - 229
Site B
230 - 259
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Small Community Networking
Requirements
To set up a small community network, the following are required:
•
A working LAN or WAN link exists between the IP Office systems and that the link has been
tested for correct data traffic routing.
•
For Small Community Networks of more than two IP Office systems, a star network configuration
is recommended.
•
VCM modules are required in the remote and central systems.
•
The extension and group numbering on both systems must be unique.
•
The extension and group names on both systems must be unique.
•
We also recommend that all names and numbers (groups, line, services, etc) on the separate IP
Office systems are kept unique. This will reduce potential maintenance confusion.
•
All systems should use the same set of Telephony timeouts, especially the Default Allocated
Answer Interval (System | Telephony).
For more information on the role of the VCM module in handling VoIP calls, see VCM & Data Channels.
For details on using a single Voicemail Pro server to provide voicemail services in an IP Office Small
Community Network, see the Voicemail Pro Installation & Maintenance Manual.
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Manager 3.0
Enabling Small Community Networking
Setup the VoIP Line from System A to System B
1. On System A, receive the system configuration.
2. Click the Line configuration form to display a list of existing lines.
3. Right-click on the displayed list and select New.
4. In the Line tab for the VoIP line set the following:
•
Set a unique Line Number. Anything over 30 is recommended to avoid clashing with an
physical lines that may be added to the system. In this example we will use 3000.
•
In the Telephone Number field, enter a description of the link, eg. "System B".
•
Set the Outgoing Group ID to a unique value; ie. one not already used for lines
connecting elsewhere. For this example, we will use 3000 again.
5. In the VoIP tab for the VoIP line, set the following:
•
Ensure that Voice Networking is ticked. This enables the exchange of directory and user
information between the IP Office systems and is the key enabler of Small Community
Networking.
•
For the Gateway IP Address enter the IP address of System B.
•
Select the preferred Compression Mode. The same mode must be used by all VoIP lines
and extensions within the network.
•
Check that the H450 Support option is set to H450. This enables various Supplementary
Signaling Services across the VoIP connection. QSIG can be used if H450 is not
supported across the VoIP connection. However QSIG support fewer supplementary
signaling features.
6. Load the configuration and reboot System A. Note: Configuration changes and additions to VoIP
line settings cannot be merged.
Setup the VoIP Line from System B to System A
7. On the remote system, repeat the previous steps to create a VoIP VPN link to System A.
•
Ensure that the Compression Mode selected in the VoIP tab of the VoIP line is the same
at both the central and remote system.
•
Load the configuration and reboot the remote IP Office.
Test Small Community Networking
8. Test by making calls between extensions on the different systems.
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Small Community Networking
SCN Programming Tip
The simplest example of a Small Community Network setup is a connection between two IP Offices. In a
larger network however, the number of VPN trunk connections on each system may be much larger.
To set up a small community network on a larger network, do the following:
1. In Manager, open the configuration file from one of the systems.
2. Click on
Line to display the existing lines.
3. Delete the physical lines by right-clicking on each and selecting Delete.
4. Add the VoIP VPN line entries, adding one for each IP Office that will be in the Small Community
Network.
•
Remember to enable Voice Networking and H450 on each entry.
5. Select File | Import/Export | Export Configuration Entities.
6. In the range of entries, tick Line and then click OK.
7. All the VPN line entries for the Small Community Network will have now been exported to a
separate file (by default a file called config.exp in the Manager program folder).
8. Close the configuration without saving it (File | Close).
9. Load the configuration one of the IP Office systems in the Small Community Network and use
File | Import/Export | Import Configuration Entities to load the VoIP VPN line settings.
10. Click on
Line to display the lines.
11. Delete the entries not required.
12. Save the new configuration back to the IP Office and reboot.
This technique can also be adapted to ensure consistent account codes, firewall profiles, etc. on
systems in the same network. A common directory can also be shared between systems using File |
Import/Export | Export Directory and Import Directory.
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Page 353
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Short Code Programming for Small Community Networks
With Small Community Networking enabled, the IP Offices 'learn' each others extension numbers and
route extension calls appropriately.
However the same does not apply to dialing group and other numbers meant for the remote IP Office. To
allow these to be routed correctly across the VoIP VPN links, short codes can be used.
•
Scenario
We want a short code on System A which will correctly route any 3000 range number to System
B. This will allow System B group numbers to be dialed from System A.
To achieve the above scenario, we will add a new system short code. By using a system short code it
becomes available to all users.
1. Receive the configuration from System A.
2. Click the Short code configuration form to display a list of existing system short codes.
3. Right-click on the displayed list and select New.
4. Enter the short code settings as follows:
•
Short Code: 3XXX
This will match any four-digit number beginning with 3.
•
Telephone Number: .
The . indicates that the short code should output the digits as dialed.
•
Line Group ID: 3000
This should match the Outgoing Group ID given to the VoIP VPN line connected to
System B.
•
Feature: Dial
5. Click OK.
6. If the only changes made to the configuration was this short code, load the new configuration
using merge, otherwise load the configuration and reboot.
7. A similar system short code can be added to System B's configuration to route 2XXX dialing to
System A.
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Page 354
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Dial Name
Dial Name
IP Office includes a Dial Name feature for making internal and external calls. It allows users to make
calls by dialing the name on their telephone keypad and making a selection from the displayed matches
or dialing further characters to improve the match.
When used to make internal calls, the name matches are based on the User Names and Full Names
programmed into the system. If a user has a Full Name programmed then that takes precedence over
their User Name.
When used to make external calls, the name matches are based on entries in the IP Office Directory.
On supported 4400, 4600 and 6400 series phones Dial Name also supports hunt group names.
Dial Name is supported on the following telephones:
•
Avaya 4400, 4600 and 6400 Series telephones which have Menu
and
keys .
Note: As of IP Office version 3.0, DT ports and telephone sets are no longer supported.
The Dial Name feature uses the ITU key character layout:
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Page 355
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Configuration in Manager
Selecting Dial Name Mode:
If Dial Name is not selected, the INDeX and Dir features on the telephones operate in their pre-Dial
Name capability.
1. In Manager, receive the IP Office's configuration.
2. Double-click
System to display the System form.
3. Select the Telephony tab.
4. The Dial Name checkbox should be ticked to enable Dial Name mode features.
5. Send the IP Office configuration back to the system and reboot.
Setting User Full Names:
The process below details doing this through Manager. User can also do this through their own
telephone (see Editing the DS User's Full Name.
1. In Manager, receive the IP Office's configuration.
2. Click
User to display the list of users.
3. Double-click the required user to display their User form.
4. In the Full Name field enter the name required. Do not use characters other than Aa to Zz and 0
to 9.
5. Click OK.
6. Repeat for all users required.
7. Send the IP Office configuration back to the system. If this is the only change made then you can
use the merge option.
Adding Directory Entries:
Note that Directory entries are also used for other functions such as name matching against received
CLI on incoming calls.
1. In Manager, receive the IP Office's configuration.
2. Click
Directory to display a list of current entries.
3. Either double-click on an entry to change and right-click on the list and select New.
4. Enter the Name and Number and click OK.
5. Repeat for all entries required.
6. Send the IP Office configuration back to the system. If this is the only change made then you can
use the merge option.
Dial Name in Small Community Networks
User Names and Full Names are shared within a Small Community Network and thus are available for
Dial Name features. This also applies to Group Names.
Directories are not shared within a Small Community Network, so only the Directory of the user's local IP
Office is available for Dial Name features.
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Page 356
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Dial Name
Use Dial Name with DS Phones
This feature is only supported on phones with a Menu
and and keys. These phones can display
a directory of group names, extension names or directory names from which you can select and then
dial.
Note: This feature can work in two modes, Classic or Dial Name mode (the default). Contact your
System Administrator if unsure which mode your telephone system uses.
To use the directory:
1. Press Menu
•
and select Dir (this feature can also be set under a DSS key).
Alternatively, press Menu
twice. Press
and then select Dir.
2. Select from INDeX (internal extension), Group (Hunt Groups) or Extrn (numbers in the IP Office
Directory).
3. The next steps depend on which mode of working your system is using:
•
Dial Name Mode
1. Using the letter keys, start dialing the name that you want, eg. for names starting
with John dial 5646. Ignore any spaces in the name.
2. The display will show the first match to the letters entered so far. Either enter
further letters or:
3. Press the and keys on either side of the current name to display the other
matches found so far.
4. If NO MATCH is displayed press
to go back to the previous step.
5. When the name you want is shown select Call.
6. If you cannot find the name you want press Exit
•
twice.
Classic Mode
1. Press the dial pad button that matches the first letter of the name you want. For
example, to select L press the 5 key three times.
2. Use the and keys to move through the matching entries. You can press
another key on the dialing pad to select a different first letter.
3. When the name you want is shown select Call.
4. If you cannot find the name you want press Exit
Manager 3.0
IP Office
twice.
Page 357
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Accessing the Dir Function via a DSS Key
The Dir function can be assigned to a DSS key if required.
Programming a DSS Key from the Terminal:
1. Press Menu
2. Using the
.
and
keys, display and then select Admin.
3. Select Dir.
4. Press the DSS key against which you want the function programmed.
•
If the key is already programmed you will see options to Repla, Keep or Delete. Select
the option required.
5. BUTTON PROGRAMMED! is used to indicate that the DSS key has now been programmed with
the Dir function. Select Cont.
.
6. Press Exit
Programming a DSS Key via Manager:
1. Start Manager and receive the IP Office's configuration.
User to display the list of users.
2. Click on
3. Double-click on the required user to display their User form.
4. Select the Button Programming tab.
5. Locate the DSS button against which you want to program the Dir function.
6. Click on the Action field and select Emulation | Directory.
7. Click on OK.
8. Send the configuration back to the IP Office. If this is the only change made then you can use the
merge option.
Editing the DS User's Full Name
This changes the full name stored by the telephone system. The full name is used within the directory
function and by the PhoneManager application. It does not change the name shown when making and
receiving calls.
To change your extension name:
twice.
1. Press Menu
2. Press
and select ProgA.
3. Press
and select Name.
4. Enter the new name. Use the dialing keys and Rotat to enter characters. For example, to enter
an L press the 5 key and then press Rotat until an L is displayed. You can use the top-left
display key to backspace.
5. When the text is as you require press Done.
6. Press Exit
Manager 3.0
IP Office
.
Page 358
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Appendix A
Locale Specific Tone Settings
The tables in Appendix A display tone settings for each tone type based on specific locale configuration.
Locale settings can be configured via the System | System tab within Manager.
Argentina
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to ess
(Argentina) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash (mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
350+440
Normal
Steady
Broken
.25/.25
Hz
440+480
Normal
1/3
Hz
480+620
Normal
.5/.5
Fast
.25/.25
Intercept
.25/.25
Hz
400
Pattern
.2/1200
Hz
480+620
Pattern
.5/.5
Hz
25
Pattern
1/3
Min.
85
Max.
1000
FSK-D
Page 359
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Australia
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to ena
(Australia) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash (mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
350+450
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
400+450
Normal
.4/.2/.4/2
Hz
425
Normal
.375/.375
Fast
.375/.375
Intercept
Steady
Hz
400
Pattern
.1/30
Hz
425
Pattern
.375/.375
Hz
25
Pattern
.4/.2/.4/2
Min.
25
Max.
350
UK20
Page 360
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Appendix A
Belgium (frb)
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to frb
(French Belgium) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
425
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
425
Normal
1/3
Hz
425
Normal
.5/.5
Fast
.375/.375
Intercept
.375/.375
Hz
400
Pattern
.08/.175/.08/10
Hz
425
Pattern
.5/.5
Hz
25
Pattern
1/3
Min.
40
Max.
350
FSK-D
Page 361
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Belgium (nlb)
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to nlb
(Netherland Belgium) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
425
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
425
Normal
1/3
Hz
425
Normal
.5/.5
Fast
.375/.375
Intercept
.375/.375
Hz
400
Pattern
.08/.175/.08/10
Hz
425
Pattern
.5/.5
Hz
25
Pattern
1/3
Min.
40
Max.
350
DTMF-D
Page 362
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Appendix A
Brazil
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to ptb
(Brazil) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
425
Normal
Steady
Broken
.25/.25
Hz
425
Normal
1/4
Hz
425
Normal
.25/.25
Fast
.25/.25
Intercept
.1/.1
Hz
400
Pattern
.02/1200
Hz
425
Pattern
.25/.25
Hz
25
Pattern
1/4
Min.
100
Max.
1000
DTMF-D
Page 363
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Canada
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to frc
(Canada) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Hz
350+440
Normal
Steady
Broken
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Hz
440+480
Normal
2/4
Hz
480+620
Normal
.5/.5
Fast
Intercept
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
Pattern
Hz
Pattern
Hz
25
Pattern
Min.
25
Max.
350
FSK-D
Page 364
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Appendix A
Chile
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to esl (Chile)
within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
350+450
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
430+480
Normal
1/3
Hz
480+620
Normal
.5/.5
Fast
.25/.25
Intercept
.25/.25
Hz
400
Pattern
.06/.25/.06/5
Hz
480+620
Pattern
1/3
Hz
25
Pattern
2/4
Min.
60
Max.
1000
FSK-D
Page 365
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Columbia
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to eso
(Columbia) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
350+450
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
430+480
Normal
1/3
Hz
480+620
Normal
.5/.5
Fast
.25/.25
Intercept
.25/.25
Hz
400
Pattern
.06/.25/.06/5
Hz
480+620
Pattern
1/3
Hz
25
Pattern
2/4
Min.
60
Max.
1000
FSK-D
Page 366
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Appendix A
Denmark
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to dan
(Denmark) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
425
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
425
Normal
.75/.75
Hz
425
Normal
.25/.25
Fast
.375/.375
Intercept
.375/.375
Hz
400
Pattern
.08/10
Hz
425
Pattern
.25/.25
Hz
25
Pattern
.75/7.5
Min.
40
Max.
350
DTMF-C
Page 367
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Finland
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to fin
(Finland) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
425
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
425
Normal
1/5
Hz
425
Normal
.25/.25
Fast
.375/.375
Intercept
.375/.375
Hz
400
Pattern
.08/120
Hz
425
Pattern
5/.25
Hz
25
Pattern
1/5
Min.
40
Max.
350
DTMF-A
Page 368
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Appendix A
France
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to fra
(France) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
330
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
440
Normal
1.5/3.5
Hz
440
Normal
.5/.5
Fast
.375/.375
Intercept
.375/.375
Hz
440
Pattern
.1/8
Hz
440
Pattern
.5/.5
Hz
50
Pattern
1.5/3.5
Min.
40
Max.
350
FSK-D
Page 369
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Germany
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to deu
(Germany) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
425
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
425
Normal
.945/4.05
Hz
425
Normal
.48/.48
Fast
.48/.48
Intercept
.375/.375
Hz
400
Pattern
.08/.2/.08/10
Hz
425
Pattern
.48/.48
Hz
25
Pattern
0.945/4.5
Min.
40
Max.
350
FSK-D
Page 370
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Appendix A
Holland
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to nld
(Holland) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
425
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
425
Normal
.945/4.5
Hz
425
Normal
.48/.48
Fast
.375/.375
Intercept
.375/.375
Hz
400
Pattern
.08/10
Hz
425
Pattern
.48/.48
Hz
25
Pattern
0.945/4.5
Min.
40
Max.
350
DTMF-D
Page 371
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Italy
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to ita (Italy)
within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
350+425
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
425
Normal
1/4
Hz
425
Normal
.5/.5
Fast
.375/.375
Intercept
.375/.375
Hz
400
Pattern
.1/4.9
Hz
425
Pattern
.5/.5
Hz
25
Pattern
1/4
Min.
40
Max.
350
FSK-D
Page 372
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Appendix A
Japan
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to jpn
(Japan) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
400
Normal
.2/.2
Broken
.2/.2/.2/.2/.2/.5
Hz
432+480
Normal
1/2
Hz
425
Normal
.5/.5
Fast
.375/.375
Intercept
.375/.375
Hz
400
Pattern
.1/.1/.1/4.7
Hz
425
Pattern
1/1
Hz
16.67
Pattern
1/2
Min.
40
Max.
1000
FSK-D
Page 373
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Mexico
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to esm
(Mexico) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
350+450
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
430+480
Normal
1/3
Hz
480+620
Normal
.5/.5
Fast
.25/.25
Intercept
.25/.25
Hz
400
Pattern
.06/.25/.06/5
Hz
480+620
Pattern
1/3
Hz
25
Pattern
2/4
Min.
60
Max.
1000
FSK-D
Page 374
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Appendix A
Norway
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to nor/non
(Norway) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
425
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
425
Normal
1/1.5/1/4*
Hz
425
Normal
.5/.5
Fast
.375/.375
Intercept
.375/.375
Hz
400
Pattern
.08/.6/.08/10
Hz
425
Pattern
.5/.5
Hz
25
Pattern
1/1.5/1/4
Min.
40
Max.
350
UK
Page 375
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Peru
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to es (Peru)
within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
350+450
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
430+480
Normal
1/3
Hz
480+620
Normal
.5/.5
Fast
.25/.25
Intercept
.25/.25
Hz
400
Pattern
.06/.25/.06/5
Hz
480+620
Pattern
1/3
Hz
25
Pattern
2/4
Min.
60
Max.
1000
FSK-D
Page 376
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Appendix A
Poland
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to plk
(Poland) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
425
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
425
Normal
1/4
Hz
425
Normal
.5/.5
Fast
.375/.375
Intercept
.375/.375
Hz
400
Pattern
.15/.15/.15/10
Hz
425
Pattern
.5/.5
Hz
25
Pattern
1/4
Min.
40
Max.
350
FSK-D
Page 377
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Portugal
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to pta
(Portugal) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
350+450
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
400+450
Normal
.4/.2/.4/.2
Hz
400
Normal
.375/.375
Fast
.375/.375
Intercept
Steady
Hz
400
Pattern
.1/30
Hz
400
Pattern
.375/.375
Hz
25
Pattern
.4/.2/.4/2
Min.
40
Max.
350
UK2
Page 378
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Appendix A
Russia
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to rus
(Russia) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
425
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
425
Normal
1/4
Hz
425
Normal
.35/.35
Fast
.2/.2
Intercept
.35/.35
Hz
425
Pattern
.2/5
Hz
425
Pattern
.35/.35
Hz
425
Pattern
1/4
Min.
40
Max.
350
FSK-D
Page 379
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Sweden
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to sve
(Sweden) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
425
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
425
Normal
1/5
Hz
425
Normal
.25/.25
Fast
.375/.375
Intercept
.375/.375
Hz
400
Pattern
.08/120
Hz
425
Pattern
.25/.25
Hz
25
Pattern
1/5
Min.
40
Max.
350
DTMF-A
Page 380
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Appendix A
UK
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to eng
(United Kingdom) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
350+450
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
400+450
Normal
.4/.2/.4/.2
Hz
400
Normal
.375/.375
Fast
.375/.375
Intercept
Steady
Hz
400
Pattern
.1/30
Hz
400
Pattern
.375/.375
Hz
25
Pattern
.4/.2/.4/.2
Min.
40
Max.
350
UK2
Page 381
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
USA
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to enu
(USA) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
350+440
Normal
Steady
Broken
.25/.25
Hz
400+480
Normal
2/4
Hz
480+620
Normal
.5/.5
Fast
.25/.25
Intercept
.25/.25
Hz
400
Pattern
.2/1200
Hz
480+620
Pattern
.5/.5
Hz
25
Pattern
2/4
Min.
300
Max.
1000
FSK-D
Page 382
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Appendix A
Venezuela
The table below displays the tone settings for each tone type when the country locale is set to es
(Venezuela) within Manager.
Dial Tone
Ring Tone
Busy Tone
Call Waiting
Tone
NU Tone
POTs Ring
Hook Flash
(mS)
Caller Display
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Hz
350+450
Normal
Steady
Broken
1/.5
Hz
430+480
Normal
1/3
Hz
480+620
Normal
.5/.5
Fast
.25/.25
Intercept
.25/.25
Hz
400
Pattern
.06/.25/.06/5
Hz
480+620
Pattern
1/3
Hz
25
Pattern
2/4
Min.
60
Max.
1000
FSK-D
Page 383
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Index
4
406D 260
4406D+ 260
4412D 68
4424D 68
4606D 260
4ESS 235
5
5ESS 234, 235
8
802.11b 315
A
Abbreviated Dial
Softkey 68
Abbreviated Dial 68,
69, 260, 262, 263,
264
Abbreviated Dial
Pause 262
Abbreviated Dial
Program 263
Abbreviated Dial Stop
263
About
Receive
filename.cfg 43
About 43
Absnt 166
Accept Any 315
Accept Collect Calls
256
Access
Admin 262
Access 262
Access mode 282
According
Country 230
According 230
Account Code
Voice Recording
310
Account Code 263,
310
Account code
beginning 76
Account Code Entry
263
Account Code Form
310
Account code starting
123 76
Account Codes 42,
44, 76, 256, 310
Account name 74,
179, 185, 188, 193,
195, 196, 252, 277,
284, 321
Acct 263
Accunet 235, 236
Manager 3.0
IP Office
ACD Agent Statistics
263
ACD Stroke Count
263
Acquire Call 89
AcquireCall 123
Actions 45, 69, 95,
197, 230, 260, 262,
273, 325
Actions sets 325
Active Directory 220
Active idle period 278
AD Special Function
Mark 264
AD Special Function
Wait 264
AD Special Functions
264
AD Suppress 264
AD User Program
262
Add
Incoming Call
Route 286
Reception 111
Source 101
Add 45, 101, 111,
183, 227, 235, 242,
244, 254, 255, 286,
291, 293, 295, 299
Add Entries 38
Add extensions, ie
111
Address
255.255.255.255
35
Avaya Voice 212
Control Unit's 35,
212
H.323 249
LAN 35, 181, 214
PC2 181
TFTP 212
Address 35, 181,
212, 214, 249
Address length 289,
290
Address ranges 182
Adjunct lines 314
Adjuncts 311
Admin
access 262
Admin 68, 235, 262,
268
Admin CD 216
Admin files 34
Administration CD 37
Administration
Manual 48, 114, 253,
255, 272
Administrator 22, 23,
42, 115, 117, 181,
215, 233, 237, 286
ADPCM 192
ADPCM 16K 193
ADPCM 32K 193
ADSL 319
Advanced
Default All button
230
Advanced 36, 37,
69, 128, 129, 130,
131, 132, 133, 134,
135, 136, 137, 138,
139, 141, 142, 143,
144, 145, 146, 147,
148, 149, 150, 151,
152, 153, 154, 155,
156, 157, 158, 159,
160, 161, 162, 163,
164, 165, 166, 167,
168, 169, 170, 171,
172, 174, 175, 230,
233, 237, 260, 290,
316
Advanced (E1-R2)
230
Advanced setting 316
After n Digits 239
Agere 315
AH 324
Alarm Station 312
ALAW 217
ALI
Northeast Corner
311
Northwest Corner
311
ALI 311
All
Routing 183
All 183
All Sales 111
Allocated Answer
Interval 256, 271
Allow Bump 299
Allow direct media
path 244, 249
Allow Direct
Voicemail Access
101
Allow RAS/Data
Access 101
Allow/disallow 277
Allows
Control Unit 214,
289, 296
Covering 70
DSCP 219
DSCP Mask 219
SIG DSCP 219
Allows 70, 214, 219,
285, 289, 296
Allows Asynchronous
282
Alpha/Hex 316
Altering
Entries 235
Altering 235
Alternate Call
Pressing 91, 98
Alternate Call 91, 98
Alternate Route 1
299
Alternate Route 2
299
AM 24, 293
AMI 230
AMI ZCS 233, 237
Analog 122, 191,
239, 248, 311, 312,
314
Analog Loop Start
312
Analog Loop Start
lines 311, 314
Analog Trunk 16 239
Analog voice 191
Analogue
Applies 256
except 248
support 67
Analogue 67, 239,
248, 256
Analogue extension
248, 252
Analogue lines 151,
239
ANALOGUE POTS2
246
And/or 154, 157, 223
And/or voicemail 255
ANDed 181, 281
ANI 311
Anne 111
Another Location 101
Answer Call Waiting
on Hold 256
Answr
Selecting 260
Answr 260
ANY
set 72
ANY 183
AnyData 185, 248,
286
AnyVoice 286
Appearance 70, 89,
261, 264
Applies
analogue 256
DSS button 262
Page 384
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Index
IP412 Control Unit
186
Applies 186, 256, 262
Apply All Maximum
233
Apply All Minimum
233
Apply Maximum 233
Apply Minimum 233
Argentina 48, 228
ARP
receiving 296
ARP 296
Assigned
Functions 69
Assigned 69, 183
Assigning Functions
to DSS Keys 69
Associate
DSS button 96
Associate 96
Async
set 282
Async 282
Async PPP 141, 146
Asynchronous 186
AT 179
AT&T
set 235
AT&T 234, 235
AT&T Multiquest 235,
236
AT&T.99 236
AT&T.It
set 235
AT&T.It 235
AT&T.Settings
set 236
AT&T.Settings 236
AT&T.This
set 236
AT&T.This 236
AT*An 179
ATB1 179
ATM 16 312
ATM4 208, 239
Audio 92
Audio CODECs 192
Audio Port 92
Audio3K1 286
Audix 216
Audix UDP 216
Ausi AnnexD 289
Australia 48
AusTS013 226
AutCB 68, 265
Authentication
Header 324
Authentication
method
LDAP 221
Authentication
method 221, 277
Auto Attendant 325
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Auto Connect Interval
281
Auto connect time
281
Auto connect time
profile 281
Auto Recording
Mailbox 259
Auto-adapting
Modem 282
Auto-adapting 282
Autoconnect 42, 281
Auto-create extn
enabled 219
AutoLearn
Selecting 289
AutoLearn 289
Automatic
incoming 311
Automatic 311
Automatic Callback
265
Automatic Calls 281
Automatic Intercom
70, 265
Automatic Line
Identification 311
Automatic Selection
244, 249
Automatic, Immediate
232
Avaya
connect 315
distinguish 315
Avaya 67, 136, 207,
212, 261, 315
Avaya 20 Series
support 67
Avaya 20 Series 67,
88, 144
Avaya 4400
support 67
Avaya 4400 67, 68
Avaya 4600 Series
178
Avaya 4600 Series IP
23, 207
Avaya 4600 Series IP
Phones 207
Avaya INDeX 256
Avaya IP Office 95,
162, 178, 191, 212,
214, 215, 239, 315,
325
Avaya Voice
address 212
Avaya Voice 212
Avayagen-mib.mib
205
AVPP 212
B
B 197, 205, 282, 285
B Bit 230
B8ZS 233, 237
Back
Control Unit's 22,
36, 197
Jane's 111
Back 22, 36, 111,
197
Back Pattern 256
Backup 35, 36, 37,
179, 291
BACP 278, 282, 285
BACP/BCP
use 282
BACP/BCP 282, 285
BAK 35
Band 244, 249
Band DTMF
Out 192, 244, 249
Band DTMF 192,
244, 249
Bandwidth 73, 185,
188, 191, 192, 197,
278, 280, 282, 286,
289
Bandwidth on
Demand 73, 185, 188
Bandwidth tab 197,
278
Bandwidth Utilization
289
BAP 278
Bar incoming calls
Reboot 36, 37
Bar incoming calls
36, 37
Bar outgoing calls
Reboot 36, 37
Bar outgoing calls 36,
37
Barring
91900 317
Barring 317
Basic Hunt Group
111
Basic Rate Interface
67
Bc
exceeding 291
Bc 291
BCC 239
BCC Flash Pulse
Width 239
B-channel 178
B-channels 234
Bearer capability 72,
145, 185, 236, 248,
286
Become
Intranet 74, 185,
195
Become 74, 185, 195
Beep on Listen 114
Belgium 48
Bi-directional 290
Bin.cfg 34
Bit 230
Blank/0 285
BLF 96
BLG 161
Book
Power Conference
256
Book 256
BOOTP 210
BootP Entry 210
BOOTP Form 210
Bothway 183, 229,
232, 235, 239
Bps 146, 282, 286,
291
Brazil 228
BRI 67, 225, 226,
241, 243
BRI Line Settings 225
BRI lines 67, 225
Broadcast IP address
35
Browser 197
Browser/FTP 278
Browsing
Non-Standard
Port 183
Browsing 183
BtnVu 269
Bundled/Multilinked
282, 285
Busy 78, 87, 90, 95,
97, 98, 99, 110, 111,
114, 128, 131, 155,
174, 217, 254, 256,
258, 259, 260, 271,
273, 274, 286, 299,
310, 317
Busy On Held 128,
256
Busy Pattern 99
Busy signal
user 128
Busy signal 128
Busy Tone 99, 217
Busy Tone Detection
217
BusyH 128
Busy-Lamp-Field 69,
260
Button Numbering
Layout 261
Button Programming
69, 260
C
C 34, 205
C Bit 230
C0.A8.2A.01 180
C000-CFFF 193
Cadence 99
Call Appearance 70
Call Appearance
button 70
Page 385
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Call By Call 234, 235,
236
Call By Call chooses
236
Call By Call reduces
236
Call Coverage
Coverage Points
70
Senders 70
Call Coverage 70
Call Forwarding 87,
90
Call Forwarding All
265
Call ID Block 122
Call Intrude 88, 129
Call Intrude
shortcode feature 88
Call Intrusion 88, 114
Call Listen 129, 212
Call Park
Other Extension
265
Call Park 265
Call Park To Other
Extension 265
Call Pickup 88, 129,
130, 131, 266
Call Pickup Any 88,
129
Call Pickup Extn 88,
130
Call Pickup Group
88, 130
Call Pickup Members
88, 131
Call Queue 131
Call Record 132
Call Restriction 78
Call Routing
Incoming 95
Call Routing 95, 115
Call Status 212
Call Steal 133
Call Waiting
Enabling 89
ticking 113
Call Waiting 89, 113,
271
Call Waiting Off 89,
134
Call Waiting On 89,
134, 256, 271
Call waiting on/off
256
Call Waiting Pattern
99
Call Waiting Suspend
135
Callback 101, 255
Callback CP 282, 285
Callback mode 197,
282, 285
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Callback telephone
number 278
Call-by-call 236
Called/calling 212
Caller Display 24, 48,
86, 97, 98, 212, 248,
252
Caller Display Control
Unit
extension 248
Caller Display Control
Unit 248
Caller display type
system 212
Caller display type
97, 212, 248
Caller display type
appropriate 248
Caller ID
Entering 76
Incoming 286
outgoing 310
Caller ID 76, 86, 253,
286, 310
CallerDisplayOn 248
Callflow 172, 173
Calling Line ID
number 292
Calling/called 212
CallIntrude 88
CallListen 114
CallPickupAny 123
CallPickupExtn 123
CallPickupGroup 123
CallPickupMembers
123
CallQueue 123
Calls
201 87
Holding 91, 96
Incoming 278
MatchGrp 286
Overflow Group
110
Parking 96
transfer 70, 98,
271
User 101
Calls 70, 87, 91, 96,
98, 101, 110, 129,
130, 131, 132, 133,
134, 135, 136, 137,
138, 139, 141, 142,
143, 146, 147, 161,
163, 164, 171, 248,
261, 271, 278, 286
CallWaitingOff 123
CallWaitingOn 123
CAMA 312
Can intrude 88, 129,
144, 256
Canada 48
Cancel
choose 33
Cancel 33
Cancel All
Forwarding 135
Cancel Leave Word
Calling 266
Cancel Ring Back
When Free 136
CancelAllForwarding
123
Cannot 88, 129, 144
Cannot be intruded
256
Cannot Send/Read
Existing Config 35
Cannot Send/Read
35
Cascade 41
Castle Rock SNMPcEE 5.1.6c 205
CastleRock
Start 205
CastleRock 205
CastleRock SNMPc
205
Catch/stop 281
Causes
Flash 45
Causes 45
CCP 285
Central Office 122,
233, 237, 312
Centralized
Automatic Message
Accounting 312
Cfg 37
Cfg files 34, 43
CFrwd 68, 265
Change Group
Using Short
Codes 273
Change Group 273
Change Password 42
Change Working
Directory 34
Changes
Control Unit 76,
246
Softkeys Function
68
Changes 68, 76, 246
Channel Allocation
228, 231, 234
Channel Monitor 136
Channel Unit 233,
237
Channels
ISDN BRI 179
Maximum No 278
Minimum No 278
number 197
Outgoing 226,
238, 241, 243
Channels 179, 197,
226, 231, 234, 238,
241, 243, 278
CHAP
Use 321
CHAP 73, 74, 179,
195, 277, 282, 284,
285, 320, 321, 322
Chap challenge
interval 282, 285, 322
Characteristics 75
Check
end/timeout 183
MultiLink 197
MultiLink/QoS 196
Check 183, 196, 197
Checkboxes
Use 211
Checkboxes 211
China 228
ChMon 136
Choose
Cancel 33
Choose 33
CIR
14Kbps 291
CIR 291
Clear 166
Clear Call 136
Clear Channel 64K
197, 232
Clear CW 89, 137
Clear Hunt Group
Night Service 137
Clear Hunt Group
Out
Service 138
Clear Hunt Group
Out 138
Clear Hunt Group
Out Of Service 138
Clear Quota 138
ClearHuntGroupNight
Service 123, 187
ClearQuota 187
ClearQuota feature
179, 187, 281
CLI
Voice Recording
310
CLI 75, 95, 148, 255,
286, 310
Clock Quality 226,
230, 233, 237, 241
Close 33, 35, 41,
162, 163, 278, 281
Close all 41
Close Configuration
35
ClrCW 137
CnfRV 139
CnLWC 266
Cnslt 266
CO
Page 386
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Index
setting 233
CO 230, 233
Codec 193
Columbia 48
COM port 284
Comma Separated
38
Committed
Information Rate 291
Committted 291
Communicator 220
Community
Set 208
Community 207, 208
Companding 217
Compression mode
PPP 282
Compression mode
195, 197, 244, 249,
282, 285, 322
Computer/host
TCP/IP 180
Computer/host 180,
181
Conf 138
Conference Add 138
Conference Meet Me
139
ConferenceAdd 123
Conferencing Tone
217
Config.exp
default 39
Config.exp 39
Configuration
Editing 45
Receive 43
received 22
Send 41, 45
To Receive 43
To Receive and
Name 43
Configuration 22, 41,
43, 45
Configuration
Example 185
Configuration form
enter
DNS Server 179
Configuration form
enter 179
Configuration form
gives 246
Configuration Forms
22, 24, 42, 45, 74,
75, 76, 101, 179,
182, 183, 187, 188,
195, 211, 214, 215,
217, 246, 256, 280,
281, 289, 291, 292,
296
Configuration Sizes
44
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Configuration tree 45,
75
Configuration tree
displays
list 75
Configuration tree
displays 75
Configure Incoming
Call Route 72
Configuring
Control Unit 225
Personal Fax 97
WAN Link 74
Configuring 74, 97,
225
Configuring a WAN
Link 74
Configuring DS Ports
68
Configuring Personal
Fax Numbers 97
Configuring Ports 22
Configuring S0 Ports
71
Configuring Softkeys
68
Configuring WAN
Ports 73
Confirm Password
252
Connect
Avaya 315
Control Unit 182
LAN 73
PC's 182
Connect 73, 182, 315
Connecting to the
Internet 179, 320
Connecting to the
LAN 24, 180
Consider
PRI 286
Consider 286
Consult 266
Contacts 221
Contain
91900N 317
Contain 317
Control
Control Unit's 214
including 214
Control 24, 186, 214,
231, 234, 280
Control Key 231, 234,
312
Control Panel 197
Control Unit
address 35, 212
allows 214, 289,
296
back 22, 36, 197
change 246
changes 76
Configuring 225
connect 182
controls 214
default 181
DNS requests 179
except 246
ISPs 182
line requires 195
local LAN 35
Manager displays
45
part 211
point 280
require 45
right 73
Select 43, 45, 214
selected 36, 37
Sending a
configuration back
45
timeouts 278
transfer 45
type 178
use 193
Voice
Compression
Card 195
wants 182
Control Unit 22, 24,
25, 33, 35, 36, 37,
42, 43, 45, 48, 68,
71, 72, 73, 74, 75,
76, 86, 92, 99, 106,
178, 179, 180, 181,
182, 183, 185, 188,
191, 193, 194, 195,
196, 197, 210, 211,
212, 214, 216, 219,
220, 225, 226, 230,
233, 234, 237, 241,
243, 244, 246, 249,
277, 278, 280, 285,
289, 296, 309, 312
Control Unit Form
246
Control Unit icon 73
Control Unit on LAN1
214
Control Unit reboots
25, 309
Control Unit's DS 75
Control Unit's time 25
Country
according 230
Country 230
Coverage 70
Coverage Points 70
Covering
allow 70
Covering 70
Covering Extensions
70
Cpark 68, 265
CPE
default 233
CPE 230, 233, 290,
291
CpkUp 266
CPU 246
CRC 191
CRC Checking 226,
230, 233, 237
Create
Incoming Call
Route 97
Intranet 188
Normal 74, 185,
195
Create 74, 97, 185,
188, 195
Create Short 72
Creating a VoIP Link
via the LAN 194
Creating a VoIP Link
via the WAN Port
Using Frame Relay
196
Creating a VoIP Link
via the WAN Port
Using PPP 195
Crosses
unsecure 320
Crosses 320
CS-ACELP 192
CTI 70, 99, 217
CTI application 262
CTRL 111
Ctrl key 228
Cust 166
Custom 44, 166, 183,
294, 295
Custom create 183
Custom tab 183, 295
Customer 182
Customer Premises
Equipment 233
Cvs 38
CW 68, 139
CWOff 134
CWOn 134
CWSus 135
D
D 205
D3K1 141
D4 233, 237
D56K 141
D64K 141
D-A 239
Daily
set 281
Daily 281
Daily Backup 24
Daily/Weekly/Monthly
selecting 281
Daily/Weekly/Monthly
281
Dan 48
DAP 220
Page 387
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Data Call 141, 146,
282
Data channels 178,
226, 238, 241, 243,
322
Data link connection
identifier 291
Data Packet 285
Data Pkt 285
Data pkt size 285,
289
Data56K 286
Data64K 286
DataV110 286
DataV120 286
Date Settings 23
Date/Time 23
Day
Time 269
Day 269
DB 232, 235
DCLIs tab 196, 289,
291
DCP module 68
DCW 142
DE 291
Decimal 219
Dedicated T1 Service
197
Default
192.168.42.1 182
config.exp 39
Control Unit 181
CPE 233
detected 43
MFC Group 230
Default 24, 39, 43,
181, 182, 217, 230,
233
Default All 230
Default All button
Advanced 230
Default All button 230
Default All Values
233
Default Allocated
Answer Interval 217,
271
Default configuration
24, 181
Default inside call
sequence 217
Default Inside Ring
Pattern 217
Default LAN Settings
24
Default outside call
sequence 217
Default Outside Ring
Pattern 217
Default Ring
support 168, 169,
170
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Default Ring 168,
169, 170, 217, 256
Default Ring Back
Pattern 217
Default ring back
sequence 217
Default route 179,
185, 277, 296
Default Softkey 262,
263, 264, 265, 266,
267, 268, 269
Default System Short
Code List 123
Default Telephony
Settings 24
Default Value 233
DefaultRing 256
Defined 325
Definity 147, 262
Deinstalling 34
Delay Dial 232
Delete 42, 45, 235,
312
Denmark 48
Deny 123
DES 324
DES CBC 324
Desking 145
Destination 24, 70,
72, 74, 87, 90, 95,
97, 98, 131, 146,
179, 180, 181, 185,
186, 188, 189, 190,
194, 195, 196, 197,
208, 223, 255, 282,
286, 296, 319, 321,
323, 325
Destination exists
189
Destination Netmask
Gateway Interface
Metric Type 190
Destination PC2 181
Destination PC3 181
Destination select
Service 74, 185,
195
Destination select 74,
185, 195, 196
Destination value 197
Detected
Default 43
Detected 43
Deu 48
Device number 246
DH Group 324
DHCP
Number of
addresses 214,
215
DHCP 24, 73, 179,
181, 182, 214, 215,
219, 246, 280, 315
DHCP Client mode
214
DHCP mode 182,
214, 215
DHCP mode set
Server 214
DHCP mode set 214
DHCP Server 24, 214
DHCP Server mode
181
DHCP Server on
LAN1 214
DHCP Starting 214
Dial
named groups
317
user programming
268
Dial 24, 68, 69, 70,
72, 74, 75, 76, 78,
87, 88, 89, 90, 91,
97, 98, 99, 101, 106,
111, 115, 116, 117,
118, 121, 122, 123,
128, 139, 141, 142,
143, 144, 145, 146,
147, 165, 179, 183,
185, 188, 194, 195,
196, 214, 216, 217,
226, 229, 231, 232,
233, 234, 235, 236,
238, 239, 241, 243,
244, 252, 255, 258,
260, 262, 263, 264,
267, 268, 275, 277,
278, 284, 285, 286,
299, 310, 311, 312,
317, 318, 325
Dial 3K1 141
Dial 56K 141
Dial 64K 141
Dial By Name 217
Dial CW 142
Dial delay count 116,
117, 217
Dial delay time 116,
117, 217
Dial Delay Timer 116
Dial Direct 142
Dial Emergency 143
Dial Extn 143
Dial In 74, 75, 101,
183, 185, 188, 195,
196, 214, 252, 255,
258, 284
Dial In access
user 258
Dial In access 252,
258
Dial In Authorization
284
Dial In On 74, 185,
188, 195, 258
Dial in on/off 258
Dial in tab
User form 258
Dial in tab 74, 185,
188, 195, 196, 258
Dial Inclusion 88, 144
Dial Inclusion
shortcode feature 88
Dial Intercom 70, 267
Dial Paging 144
Dial Physical Extn By
Number 144
Dial Speech 145
Dial string 116, 117,
239, 260
Dial Tone 99, 239,
264
Dial Type 229, 232
Dial V110 146
Dial V120 146
Dial Video 147
Dial3K1 123, 299
Dial56K 299
Dialed Digits 122
Dialed Digits and
Outgoing Digits 122
DialEmergency 299
DialIn 95, 185, 196,
214, 279, 284, 289
Dialling proceed
Step 116
Dialling proceed 116
Dialpad 325
DialPhysicalExtnByID
123, 312
DialPhysicalExtnByN
umber 123, 312
DialPhysicalNumberB
yExtension 144
DialPhysicalNumberB
yID 145
DialSpeech 299
DialV110 299
DialV120 299
DialVideo 299
DID
result 88, 131
DID 71, 72, 88, 131,
232, 286
DID 123456 72
DiffServ 191, 192
DiffServ TOS Field
193
Diffserv-dscp-tc.mib
205
Diffserve 219
Diffserv-mib.mib 205
Diffserv-mibhpov.mib 205
DIGITAL DT 246
Digital Station 67
Digital Telephones 75
Digital Terminal 67
Digital56 282
Digital64 282
Page 388
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Index
Dir 68, 266
Dirct 142
Direct Access 45
Direct Inward Dial
232, 233
Direct route signalling
enabled 219
Direct Routed
Signaling Enable 219
Directed Call Pickup
267
Direction 183, 229,
232, 235, 239, 294
Directory 33, 34, 36,
37, 38, 39, 42, 43,
44, 92, 210, 211,
217, 220, 221, 252,
256, 266, 292
Directory Access
Protocol 220
Directory Entries 38,
44, 292
Directory Entry Form
292
Directory Exclude
256
Directory Format 38
Directory Name 38
Directory Name
Length 38
Directory
Synchronization 220
Disable 87, 113
Disable CCP
set 285
Disable CCP 285
Disable Group
Membership 113
Disable, StacLZS 322
Disables Call Waiting
134
Disconnect Clear 239
Disconnect Pulse
Width
selected 248
Disconnect Pulse
Width 248
Displ 147
Display Msg 147
DisplayMsg
send 70
DisplayMsg 70, 123
Distinguish
Avaya 315
Distinguish 315
DLCI 291
DLCI learning 289
DLCI set 196
DLCIs 196, 289, 290,
291
DMS100 234
DND 42, 254
DND Exception
number 254
Manager 3.0
IP Office
DND tab 254
DNDOf 149
DNDOn 149
DNDX 148
DNS 179, 182, 183,
197, 215, 220, 280,
294
DNS domain 215
DNS requests
Control Unit 179
ISP's DNS 215
DNS requests 179,
182, 215
DNS Server
configuration form
enter 179
DNS Server 179,
182, 197, 215, 280
DNS service IP
address 215
DNS tab 197, 215
Do Not Disturb 87,
90, 115, 135, 144,
148, 149, 161, 254,
269
Do Not Disturb
Exception 87
Do Not Disturb
Exception Add 148
Do Not Disturb
Exception Delete 148
Do not disturb
exception list 148,
254
Do Not Disturb Off
149
Do Not Disturb On
90, 149
Domain
DNS 215
Domain 23, 182, 186,
215, 220, 280, 294
Domain Name
System 182, 220,
294
DoNotDisturbExcepti
onAdd 123
DoNotDisturbExcepti
onDel 123
DoNotDisturbOff 123
DoNotDisturbOn 123
Dont 166
Down/dead 225
DpkUp 68, 267
Drop 45, 68, 70, 183,
219, 225, 244, 249,
267, 278, 282, 285,
294
Drop level/layer 1/2
225
Drop RSVP 219, 244,
249
Dropping NetBIOS
183
DS
special functions
147
starting 70
DS 22, 67, 68, 70,
147, 208, 260
DS Expansion
Module
installing 68
DS Expansion
Module 68
DS users 256
DSA 220, 221
DSCP
allowing 219
DSCP 193, 219
DSCP Mask
allowing 219
DSCP Mask 219
DSpch 145
DSS
functions 260
DSS 69, 89, 96, 212,
254, 260, 262, 263,
268
DSS button
applying 262
associate 96
DSS button 44, 96,
262, 312
DSS key reverses
feature 262
DSS key reverses
262
DSS key set 212
DSS Keys 69, 161,
212, 260, 262
DSS Status 212, 260
DSS Toggles 134,
149, 150, 153, 155,
157, 160, 161, 167,
174, 175, 262
DSS1 260
DSSN 123
DT 22, 67, 75, 106,
150, 208, 256, 260
DTE 44
DTMF 97, 244, 248,
249
DTMF Dialing 229,
232, 239
DTMF Mark 239
DTMF Space 239
DTMF-A 48
DTMFB 97, 248
DTMF-C 48
DTMF-D 48
DTone 165
During 244, 249
DV110 146
DV120 146
Dvide 147
Dynamic host
configuartion protocol
181
Dynamic Host
Configuration
Protocol 181
Dynamic Host
Configuration
Protocol (DHCP) 181
E
E 205
E&M 232
E&M DID 233
E&M Switched 56K
232, 233
E&M Tie
set 233
E&M Tie 233
E1 PRI 226
E1-R2 228, 229, 230
E911 144, 145, 311,
312, 313, 314
E911 Adjunct 312
E911 Configuration
Steps 314
E911 System 311,
312
E911 System
Configuration 311
E911 Warning
Screen 313
E911 Zone
Configuration 312
EConsole 255
EConsole User
Return Calls 255
Edit
Configuration 45
Select 231, 234
WANPort 74, 195
Edit 35, 42, 45, 74,
195, 228, 229, 230,
231, 234, 235
Edit Channel 229,
235
Edit Channel (E1-R2)
229
Edit Value 233
Editing a
Configuration 45
Eg
FTP 278
Eg 35, 39, 45, 72, 87,
89, 90, 96, 97, 99,
101, 110, 111, 115,
172, 178, 180, 181,
183, 185, 186, 187,
191, 197, 217, 221,
223, 226, 241, 243,
246, 252, 253, 254,
255, 258, 271, 272,
275, 277, 278, 281,
284, 285, 286, 289,
Page 389
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
292, 293, 294, 296,
313
EIR 291
Eligabal 291
Email
Enter 253, 272
Send 253
Email 110, 253, 272
Email application 272
Emrgy 143
Emulation 69, 268
Emulation | ACD
Agent Statistics 263
Emulation | AD
Special Functions
264
Emulation | Call
Forwarding All 265
Emulation | Cancel
Leave Word Calling
266
Emulation | Directed
Pickup 267
Emulation | Group
Paging 266
Emulation | Leave
Word Calling 268
Emulation Functions
262
Ena 48
Enable
Call Waiting 89
Enable 87, 89, 113
Enable Fast Start 249
Enable faststart 244,
249
Enable Group
Membership 113
Enable NAT 186,
214, 215, 280, 319
Enable NAT
checkbox 280
Enable RSVP 219,
244, 249
Enable/Disable 285
Enable/Disable
Membership 113
Enabled/disabled 87,
90
Enabling SNMP and
Polling Support 207
Enabling SNMP Trap
Sending 208
Enc 48
Encrypted Password
RAS 284
Encrypted Password
73, 74, 179, 185,
188, 195, 196, 277,
284, 321
Encyrption key 315
End/timeout
check 183
End/timeout 183
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Ending
11 293
PVC 291
T1 197
Ending 197, 291, 293
ENG
RingNormal 99
ENG 48, 99
Enhanced 911 311
Enhanced 911
service 312
Ens 48
Enter
AA 325
Caller ID 76
email 253, 272
Port 208
Wait 264
Enter 42, 76, 208,
253, 264, 272, 325
Enter P 255
Entity-mib.mib 205
Entry
Altering 235
Entry 220, 235
Enu 48
Enz 48
Equipment
classification 248
Erase Config 36
ERR'-N 123
Error Threshold
Counter 290
Es 48
ESF 233, 237
Esl 48
Esm 48
Esn 48
Eso 48
ESP 48, 324
Esr 48
Ess 48
Esv 48
Ethernet 191
Ethernet LAN 67
ETN 235, 236
ETSI 226, 228
Europe 315
Events
Select 208
Events 208
Ex directory 256
Example
Dial Delay Time
116
Overlap Dialing
117
Short Dialing 117
Single Digit Short
Codes 117
Example 116
Example 10XXX 235
Example allows
user 101
Example allows 101
Example CastleRock
205
Example
Configurations 72,
179
Example Firewall
Filters 183
Examples 45, 68, 69,
72, 74, 76, 78, 87,
88, 95, 96, 97, 98,
101, 106, 111, 113,
114, 116, 117, 121,
178, 179, 180, 181,
183, 185, 186, 187,
188, 193, 205, 235,
244, 249, 262, 271,
273, 278, 281, 282,
286, 291, 293, 311,
315, 317
Exceeding
Bc 291
Exceeding 291
Except
analogue 248
Control Unit 246
Except 246, 248
Exception list 90, 254
Excess Information
Rate 291
Exchange Type 324
Excl 268
Existing
hole/session 183
Existing 183
Existing Config
Cannot
Send/Read 35
Existing Config 35
Expansion 246
Expansion Bus 246
Export Configuration
Entities
select 39
Export Configuration
Entities 39
Export menu 39
Export To/Import
From 38
EXT O/P 162, 163
Extended Callback
Control Protocol 282,
285
Extended CBCP 282,
285
Extension
Caller Display
Control Unit 248
extension ID 312
Hunt group 271
ID 248, 289
User 212, 252
User ID 312
Extension 24, 35, 42,
44, 45, 70, 71, 75,
86, 87, 88, 89, 90,
91, 95, 96, 97, 98,
101, 106, 110, 111,
114, 116, 123, 129,
130, 131, 132, 133,
134, 135, 142, 143,
144, 145, 147, 148,
150, 151, 152, 154,
155, 156, 157, 160,
161, 165, 167, 168,
169, 170, 175, 193,
195, 196, 212, 217,
219, 244, 248, 249,
252, 253, 254, 255,
256, 258, 265, 266,
267, 268, 269, 271,
272, 273, 274, 284,
286, 289, 311, 312,
313, 314, 325
Extension back 248
Extension Form
Extn tab 248
VoIP tab 249
Extension Form 248,
249, 312
Extension id
extension 312
Extension id 145,
248, 312
Extension ID 67 312
Extension ID's 312
Extension including
135
Extension initiating
151
Extension list
Hunt group 271
Extension list 110,
114, 271, 273, 274
Extension
Number*Login Code
150
Extension parking
265
Extension receiving
transferred 98
Extension receiving
98
Extension ringing 70,
116
Extension versus
User 75
Extension*Login
Code 150
Extensions refer 75
Extn 144, 150, 248
Extn Login 150
Extn Logout 150
Extn tab 248
Extn201 24, 172, 286
Extn202 24
Extn205 114
Page 390
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Index
ExtnLogin 123
ExtnLogout 123
Extra Bandwidth 278
Extra bandwidth
mode 278
Extra bandwidth
threshold 278
Extra BW Mode 278
Extra BW Threshold
278
Extsion
RAS 284
Extsion 284
F
F 205
F7 183
FacsimileTelephoneN
umber 221
Fallabck Extension
95
Fallback 95, 187,
226, 230, 233, 237,
241, 273, 282, 286
Fallback during 187,
282
Fallback service
Using 187
Fallback service 187,
282
Fallback Service
provides 187
Fallback tab
Service form 282
Fallback tab 187,
273, 282
Faststart 244
Fax 501 97
Fax numbers 97
Fax transport support
244, 249
Fax501 97
Faxing
support 244, 249
Faxing 244, 249
Feature allows
user 139, 150
Feature allows 139,
145, 150
Feature creates 37
Feature Key 309
Feature Key Server
208
Feature Key Server
PC 309
Feature takes 262
Features
DSS key reverses
262
Features 22, 23, 24,
35, 36, 37, 68, 69,
70, 72, 75, 78, 88,
89, 90, 96, 113, 114,
115, 118, 121, 122,
123, 129, 131, 132,
Manager 3.0
IP Office
136, 139, 143, 144,
145, 147, 150, 152,
158, 161, 165, 166,
172, 179, 187, 194,
195, 196, 205, 208,
212, 217, 220, 252,
256, 260, 262, 268,
269, 271, 272, 273,
274, 275, 281, 291,
299, 309, 311, 317
Features exist 273
Features
HuntGroupDisable
113
Features sets
number 274
Features sets 274
Features use
pre-IP Office 1.4
217
Features use 217
FF 183
FFFF 183
FFFFFFFF 183
Fi 48
File
Close 33
Open 33
Preferences 35
Save 33
File 22, 23, 33, 34,
35, 36, 37, 38, 39,
41, 42, 43, 45, 71,
73, 92, 197, 205,
207, 210, 211, 212,
220, 223, 253, 272,
278, 294
File Menu 36, 37,
42, 45, 73
File name 33, 36, 38,
43, 210
File Writer 212
Filename.cfg
Received OK Size
xxxx 43
FINGER 294
Finland 48
Firewall 42, 44, 45,
183, 215, 219, 244,
249, 258, 277, 294,
295, 319
Firewall Entries 183,
294, 295
Firewall Entry List
295
Firewall facing
Internet 183
Firewall facing 183
Firewall Fail 183
Firewall filters 183
Firewall profile
Dial in 258
LAN1 214
LAN2 215
Service 277
Firewall profile 42,
45, 183, 214, 215,
219, 244, 249, 258,
277, 319
Firewall profile form
Custom tab 295
Standard tab 294
Firewall profile form
294, 295
FirewallProfile 183
Firewalls 183
Flash
causes 45
RAM 36
Flash 24, 36, 37, 45
Flash Hook 151, 248
Flash Hook Pulse
Width 248
Flash Pulse Width
239
Flashes Green 260
Follow Me 90, 123,
135, 144, 151, 152,
258
Follow Me Here 90,
123, 151, 152
Follow Me Here
Cancel 152
Follow me number
258
Follow Me To 90,
123, 152
Following
Windows 23
Following 23
FollowMeHere 123
FollowMeHereCancel
123
FollowMeTo 123
FolTo 152
Force account code
76, 256
Force login 106, 256
Foreign Exchange
233, 237
Form
Quality 191
Form 191
Forward 42, 45, 75,
86, 87, 90, 97, 113,
135, 144, 153, 154,
155, 156, 157, 179,
181, 186, 215, 217,
239, 252, 253, 258,
265, 272, 280, 296,
321
Forward hunt group
calls 258
Forward Hunt Group
Calls Off 153
Forward Hunt Group
Calls On 153, 157
Forward HuntGroup
Calls 258
Forward multicast
messages 280, 321
Forward Number 87,
153, 154, 157, 258
Forward on busy 87,
154, 155, 156, 157,
258, 265
Forward On Busy
and/or 258
Forward On Busy
Number 154, 155,
156, 265
Forward On Busy Off
155
Forward On Busy On
155
Forward on no
answer 87, 154, 156,
157, 258
Forward On No
Answer Off 156
Forward On No
Answer On 156
Forward tab
User form 258
Forward tab 258
Forward
unconditional 97,
153, 154, 157, 258,
265
Forward
Unconditional Off 157
Forward
Unconditional On 157
Forwarded/diverted
sender 70
Forwarded/diverted
70
ForwardHuntgroupOff
123
ForwardHuntgroupOn
123
Forwarding 258
Forwarding Hunt
Group calls 113, 157
Forwarding/Divert 70
ForwardNumber 123
ForwardOnBusyNum
ber 123
ForwardOnBusyOff
123
ForwardOnBusyOn
123
ForwardOnNoAnswer
Off 123
ForwardOnNoAnswer
On 123
ForwardUnconditiona
lOff 123
ForwardUnconditiona
lOn 123
Fr 48
Page 391
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
FR_link 196
Fra 48
Frame learn mode
289
Frame link type 196,
291
Frame management
type 289
Frame Relay 196,
208, 289, 290, 291
Frame Relay
Connection 196
Frame Relay
Management Type
196
Frame relay tab 289
FrameRelay Tab 196
France 48
Frb 48
Frc 48
Freeing
ISDN B 135
Freeing 135
Frequency/Channel
315
FRF12 291
FRFLMI 289
Friday
Monday 111, 293
Frs 48
FSKD 248
FSK-D 48
FTP
eg 278
FTP 278, 294
Full Duplex 186
Full name 212, 252
Full Status Inquiry
290
Full Status Polling
Counter 290
Func 256
Functions
Assigning 69
DSS 260
Functions 22, 69, 260
FwBNo 154
FwBOf 155
FwBOn 155
FwdH 153
FwdNo 154
FwdOf 135
FwNOff 156
FwNOn 156
FwUOf 157
FwUOn 157
G
G 205
G.711 192
G.711 ALAW 193
G.711 ALAW 64K
244, 249
G.711 A-law/U-law
192
Manager 3.0
IP Office
G.711 ULAW 64K
244, 249
G.723 192, 193, 244,
249
G.723.1 244, 249
G.723.1 6K3 MPMLQ 244, 249
G.723.1 MP-MLQ
192
G.726 ADPCM 16K
244, 249
G.726-16K 193
G.726-32K 193
G.729 244, 249
G.729 Annex 192
G.729 Simple 244,
249
G.729 VoIP 291
G.729A 193
G711 ALAW 244,
249
G711 ULAW 244,
249
G723 191, 195
G726 ADPCM 32K
244, 249
G729.1 192
G729/Netcoder 191,
195
G729a 244, 249
Gatekeeper 188, 193,
212, 219
Gatekeeper enabled
219
Gatekeeper require
system 212
Gatekeeper require
212
Gatekeeper tab 219
Gateway
part 193
Gateway 193, 197
Gateway IP address
IP route 296
Gateway IP address
194, 195, 196, 197,
244, 296, 319
Gateway Mac
Address 319
Germany 48
Get
Green LED 225
Get 225
Getting it Working!
182
Getting the Dialed
Number 116
GOPHER 294
Greece 48
Green LED
get 225
Green LED 225
Greyed 219, 244,
248, 249
Ground Start 122,
239
Ground-Start 232,
233
GROUP
Incoming 229,
232, 235
GROUP 69, 89, 111,
113, 216, 229, 232,
235, 258, 268, 271,
317
Group ID
Incoming 226,
238, 241, 243
Group ID 226, 238,
241, 243
Group ID 702 72
Group mode 110,
271
Group name 131
Group Paging 266
GrpPg 68, 266
H
H 101, 205, 255
H,mobile 221
H,otherHomePhone
221
H.225.0 192, 193
H.245 192, 193
H.245
OpenLogicalChannel
193
H.323
address 249
H.323 188, 192, 193,
219, 244, 249
H.323 extension 244,
249
H.323 Stack 192
H<Group Name 255
H323 188
H450 244
H450 Support 244
Handsfree 265, 266,
267
HDB3 230
HDLC 186, 191
HdSet 158
Header compression
191, 192, 196, 282,
285, 322
Headset Toggle 158
Hex 219
HfAns 68, 267
HGDis 159
HGEna 160
HGNS 137, 167
HGOS 138, 168
Hh 36, 37
Hide
ID's 324
Hide 212, 324
High 239
High Speed Data
Link Control 186
HMAC MD5 324
HMAC SHA 324
HMain 255
HOLD 75, 158, 159
Hold a call 91
Hold Call 158
Hold CW 89, 159
Hold key 139
Hold Music 92, 159,
244, 249
Hold timeout 217
HoldCW 159
Holding
Call 91, 96
Holding 91, 96, 159
Holding a Call 91, 96
HoldMusic 123
Holdmusic.wav 92
Hole/session
existing 183
Hole/session 183
Holland 48
Holmdel 277, 292
Home button 197
Hook Flash 268
Hot Desking 101,
106, 312
Hot Transfer 98
Hours
Working 281
Hours 273, 281
Hours Greeting 111
How the System
Receives Time 25
How to Monitor Calls
114
HP Open View
Network Node
Manager 205
HP OpenView 205
HP OpenView
Network Node
Manager 6.41 205
HTTP 183, 294
Hu 48
Hun 48
Hungary 48
Hunt 258
Hunt Group 271
Hunt Group acting
271
Hunt Group Call
Waiting 113
Hunt group calls
Overflow Group
271
Hunt group calls 110,
113, 153, 157, 271
Hunt Group Calls Off
153
Hunt Group Calls On
153
Page 392
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Index
Hunt Group Disable
159
Hunt Group Enable
160
Hunt Group Form
Fallabck tab 273
Hunt group tab
271
Queuing tab 274
Voicemail tab 272
Hunt Group Form
271, 272, 273, 274
Hunt group receives
101, 111
Hunt group returning
busy 95
Hunt Group
Voicemail 255, 272
Hunt Group
Voicemail Indication
255
Hunt Groups
Overview 110
Hunt Groups 22, 42,
44, 45, 68, 70, 87,
88, 89, 90, 95, 97,
101, 110, 111, 113,
114, 130, 131, 137,
138, 153, 154, 157,
159, 160, 167, 168,
255, 256, 258, 267,
271, 272, 273, 274,
286, 293
Hunt Type 271
Hunt-group 69, 260
HuntGroupDisable
113
HuntGroupEnable
113
Huunt mode 271
Hyper Terminal 35
HyperTerminal 284
Hz 286
I
I800 235, 236
Iauto 265
Iceland 48
ICLID 75, 86, 101
ICMP Filtering 183
Icons 43, 45, 73, 311,
312
ICSeq 168
Id
Extension 248,
289
Id 72, 248, 289, 312
ID Prot 324
Identification 311
Identify
Route 298
Identify 298
Idial 267
Idle 258
Idle mode 110, 271
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Idle period 278
IDs 71
ID's
hide 324
ID's 324
Ie 23, 73, 87, 110,
111, 217, 231, 234,
253, 272, 278, 281,
290, 292, 311, 324
IGMP 294
II 185, 296
IKE Policies 324
Implementation 193
Import 39
Import Directory 38
IMS 253, 272
In fallback 187, 282
In Service 111, 271
In/Out 294
Inc GSDN 235, 236
Inclu 144
Including
Control 214
Outlook Express
220
Including 214, 220
Incoming
Automatic 311
Call 278
Call Routing 95
Caller ID 286
Group 229, 232,
235
Group ID 226,
238, 241, 243
Only 278
Outgoing 278
Routing Digits
230, 233, 237
Trunk Type 232
Incoming 95, 226,
229, 230, 232, 233,
235, 237, 238, 241,
243, 278, 286, 311
Incoming Call Priority
95
Incoming Call Route
add 286
Create 97
Incoming Call Route
42, 72, 97, 110, 185,
226, 229, 232, 235,
238, 241, 243, 258,
286
Incoming Call Route
Form 95, 286
Incoming Call Route's
Destination 325
Incoming Call
Routing 72, 95
Incoming Caller ID
286
Incoming Caller Line
Identification 86
Incoming Calls 36, 37
Incoming CLI 286
Incoming Group 232
Incoming number 72,
97, 185, 286
Incoming password
74, 185, 188, 195,
196, 277
Incoming sub
address 286
INDeX 256
INDeX Level 10
Refer 256
INDeX Level 10 256
Individual Channels
231, 234, 312
Individual Coverage
Time 256
Indual user 115
Inet-address-mib.mib
205
Information Protocol
Routing 189, 214,
280
Information Protocol
189, 214, 280
Inhibit Off-Switch
Calls 217, 239
Inside
Sets 256
Inside 256
Inside call sequence
Default 217
Inside call sequence
168, 217, 256
Inside Ring Pattern
256
Inspect 267
Inspt 267
Installation 48, 114,
253, 255, 272
Installation Wizard
use 179
Installation Wizard
179
Installing
DS Expansion
Module 68
WAN3 Module 73
Installing 68, 73
Installing a WAN3
Module 73
Installing and
Configuring DS Ports
68
Installing and
Configuring S0 Ports
71
Installing and
Configuring WAN
Ports 73
Installing Manager 23
Installing the IP
Office MIB Files 205
Integrated-servicesmib.mib 205
Interconnect class
246
Interconnect number
246
Interconnection
type 246
Interconnection 246
Intergral voicemail 95
Intermediate Digit
Pause 239
Internal Auto-Answer
267
Internal Data
Channels
Voicemail 178
Internal Data
Channels 178
Internal hold music
92
International 236
International prefix
226, 238, 241, 243
Internet
firewall facing 183
ISP 188
PPP uses 186
users access 179
Internet 25, 44, 178,
179, 180, 182, 183,
185, 186, 187, 188,
192, 197, 215, 220,
277, 281, 294, 319,
320
Internet Explorer 197
Internet Group
Membership Protocol
294
Internet Protocol 180,
186
Internet
Standards/Specificati
on 192
InternetFirewall 294
Interoperate 220
Interoperation 220
Intranet
become 74, 185,
195
create 188
Intranet 74, 185, 188,
195, 220, 277
Intranet Service 44,
188, 279
Introduction 205
Intru 129
Intrude 88, 129, 144,
256
Intuity Mailbox mode
101
Inwats 236
IP 22, 23, 24, 25, 34,
35, 37, 42, 44, 48,
Page 393
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
67, 73, 74, 76, 78,
89, 95, 116, 117,
162, 171, 178, 179,
180, 181, 182, 183,
185, 186, 187, 189,
190, 191, 193, 194,
195, 196, 197, 205,
207, 208, 210, 212,
214, 215, 216, 217,
219, 221, 223, 234,
239, 244, 246, 248,
249, 255, 260, 261,
262, 277, 280, 281,
282, 285, 286, 291,
293, 296, 310, 311,
312, 313, 315, 319,
320, 321, 323, 324,
325
IP addess
TFTP Server 214,
215
IP addess 214, 215
IP Address
Address range
182
Broadcast IP
address 35
DNS service 215
Gateway 244
IP route 296
LAN 214
LAN1 214
LAN2 215
LDAP server 221
Local 214
Number of DHCP
addresses 214,
215
Primary trans 214,
215
Service 280
Unit 246
Voicemail 216
VoIP extension
249
WINS server 215
IP Address 23, 24,
25, 35, 73, 74, 179,
180, 181, 182, 183,
185, 186, 190, 193,
194, 195, 196, 197,
205, 208, 210, 212,
214, 215, 216, 221,
223, 244, 246, 249,
280, 296, 319, 321,
323
IP address mask
IP route 296
Service 280
IP address mask 280,
296, 319
IP address polling
205
IP Address value 197
Manager 3.0
IP Office
IP Addressing 180
IP Mask
LAN1 214
LAN2 215
IP Mask 24, 181,
182, 197, 214, 215,
280, 296, 319, 323
IP Mask value 197
IP Office
IP Office 244
IP Office 23, 34, 37,
48, 67, 76, 78, 89,
116, 117, 171, 189,
190, 197, 205, 208,
210, 212, 215, 219,
223, 234, 244, 248,
249, 261, 262, 291,
293, 311, 312, 320,
321, 323, 324
IP Office 1.4 23, 37
IP Office 2.0 95, 205
IP Office 401 325
IP Office Admin CD
190, 205, 223
IP Office
Administrator
Applications CD 23
IP Office Control 44
IP Office Control
Units 22, 23, 205,
212
IP Office E911 311
IP Office Expansion
Modules 67
IP Office Feature Key
Server and/or IP
Office Voicemail 23
IP Office Installation
Manual 205
IP Office LANs 319
IP Office Mailbox
mode 255
IP Office matches
286
IP Office MIB files
223
IP Office Monitor
application 189, 190
IP Office SNMP 205,
207, 223
IP Office Software 37
IP Office system's
189, 210, 244
IP Office user's 310
IP Office
Wireless.Net 315
IP Office's busy 217
IP Phones 313
IP protocol 183
IP Route 44, 181,
185, 189, 190, 277,
296, 319, 321, 323
IP Route Form 296
IP Route Table 197
IP routing 185
IP Tab 197
IP tabe 280
IP401 44
IP401 Control Units
92, 195, 196, 244,
249
IP401 systems 325
IP403 44, 246, 312
IP403 systems 23, 37
IP406 44
IP412 44, 214, 215
IP412 Control Unit
applies 186
IP412 Control Unit
186, 280
Ipconfig 182, 280
IPHC 196, 282
IPHC and/or VJ 322
Ipo-mib.mib 205
Ipo-phones-mib.mib
205
Ipo-prod-mib.mib 205
IpPhone 221
IPSec
use 320
IPSec 320
IPSec Policies 324
IPsec Tunnelling 320
IRC 294
ISDN 71, 73, 135,
141, 147, 158, 163,
164, 171, 179, 185,
187, 188, 192, 193,
226, 241, 243, 277,
278, 286
ISDN B
freeing 135
ISDN B 135, 158,
171
ISDN BRI
channels 179
ISDN BRI 71, 179
ISDN dial 179
ISDN line 225, 226,
243
ISDN PC Cards 71
ISDN2 71
Isl 48
ISP
Control Unit 182
Internet 188
ISP 178, 179, 182,
183, 186, 187, 188,
197, 277, 280, 281,
282
Isp_service 197
ISP's DNS
DNS requests 215
ISP's DNS 179, 183,
215
Ita 48
Italy 48, 217
IVR Port 248
J
Jane
back 111
Jane 111
Japan 315
Jbloggs@bloggs.com
253, 272
Job Aid 046
refer 23, 37
Job Aid 046 23, 37
John Smith 253
JohnB 252
K
Katie 111
KBytes 324
Kerberos 221
Key Server PC 309
Key Server PC
reboot 309
Ko 48
Kor 48
Korea 48, 228
L
L2TP 320, 322
LAN
address 35, 181,
214
connects 73
IP addressing 214
Manager scans 43
PC 178
scans 45
Small Office
Edition 214
LAN 24, 35, 43, 45,
67, 73, 92, 178, 180,
181, 182, 185, 191,
192, 193, 214, 215,
216, 280, 315, 316
LAN settings 24
LAN1 186, 189, 190,
194, 197, 214, 215,
280, 309, 315
LAN1 and/or 214
LAN1 pool 214
LAN1 tab 197, 214
LAN2 186, 189, 194,
214, 215, 280, 315
LAN2 tab 215
Language 48, 212,
252
Law 217
Layer 320
Layer3 193
Layer4 193
LCP 282, 285
LCR 298
LCR tab 298
LDAP 220, 221
LDAP enabled 221
LDAP tab 221
Least Cost Route 42,
116, 298, 299, 318
Page 394
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Index
Least Cost Route
Form
Alternate route 1
299
Alternate route 2
299
LCR tab 298
Least Cost Route
Form 298, 299
Least Cost Routing
252
Least Cost Routing
Short Codes 115
Leave Word Calling
266, 268
LED 69, 260, 291
Level 2.0 189
Level/layer 1/2 225
Lewis/217 68
Licence Key Server
223
License 309
License Form 309
License Key Manual
309
License Key Server
309
License Server 212
Life 324
Life Type 324
Lightweight Directory
Access Protocol 220
Limit
Maximum
Transmissible Unit
282
Limit 282
Line
number of
channels 226,
238, 241, 243
Line 42, 67, 71, 72,
73, 75, 86, 95, 97,
113, 114, 115, 118,
121, 122, 123, 139,
151, 163, 179, 180,
186, 187, 193, 194,
195, 196, 197, 216,
225, 226, 227, 228,
229, 230, 231, 232,
233, 234, 235, 236,
237, 238, 239, 241,
242, 243, 244, 249,
264, 275, 278, 282,
286, 289, 292, 299,
311, 312, 314, 321,
323
Line (E1-R2) 228
Line (VPN) 243
Line Changes 197
Line Compensation
233, 237
Line Form
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Line tab 226, 238,
241, 243
Shortcodes tab
242, 244
VoIP tab 244
Line Form 118, 226,
234, 238, 241, 242,
243, 244
Line Form (US PRI)
234
Line group id
Incoming call
route 286
Line 226, 238,
241, 243
Line group id 72, 113,
114, 118, 121, 122,
123, 187, 194, 195,
196, 226, 238, 241,
243, 275, 286, 311
Line Group ID 701 72
Line Groups 121,
122, 123, 187, 286
Line Provider 235,
236
Line Provider's
features 122
Line requires
Control Unit 195
Line requires 195
Line Short Codes 115
Line Signaling 230,
233, 237
Line Signaling Timers
230
Line Signaling Type
229
Line sub type 226,
238, 241, 243
Line SubType 228,
231, 234
Line Table 197
Line/terminal 225
LINE1.20 197
LINE5.0 197
Linear 111
Link Control Protocol
282, 285
Link Integrity
Verification Polling
Timer 290
List
configuration tree
displays 75
Listen
RIP-1 214, 280
Listen 212, 214, 280
Listen Only 189, 214,
280
Listn 129
Lite 23, 256
LMI 290
Load last file 35
Load/Unload MIBs
205
Local
Incoming call
route 286
Local 25, 35, 67, 114,
121, 123, 141, 146,
147, 178, 180, 183,
186, 188, 192, 195,
196, 210, 212, 214,
215, 217, 234, 236,
244, 249, 280, 282,
286, 291, 292, 296,
312, 321, 323
Local Account
Password 321
Local Area Network
67, 180
Local busy tone 217
Local dial tone 217
Local End Echo
Cancellation 25ms
192
Local hold music 244,
249
Local IP address 183,
323
Local IP Address
enter 183
Local IP mask 183,
323
Local LAN
Control Units 35
Router 296
Local LAN 35, 296
Local PC 210
Local Telco 234
Local tones 195, 196,
244, 249
Local VPN 321, 323
Local WINS 215
Locale
User 212, 252
Locale 23, 48, 89, 99,
114, 118, 212, 228,
230, 239, 248, 252,
256, 275, 286
Locale sets 48
Log off 256
Logical LAN 319
Login 150, 256, 294
Login code 106, 256
Login idle period 106,
256
Logof 150
Logoff 42
Logon 284
Long Distance
numbers 123
Loop Start 239, 312
Loop Start Caller ID
239
Loop-Start
set 233
Loop-Start 232, 233
Low 239
LWC 268
M
M 221
M,otherMobile 221
MAC 210, 315
MAC address 210,
212, 246, 249, 319
Mail/Web Server's
280
Main 24, 41, 71, 72,
92, 95, 110, 111,
212, 215, 216, 282,
299, 311, 323
Main billing 311
Main Control Unit's
92
Main pool 72
Main Route 299
Maintenance 235
Management
Information Base 205
Manager
Overview 22
Manager 22, 23, 24,
25, 33, 34, 35, 36,
37, 42, 43, 45, 48,
68, 73, 75, 76, 87,
89, 90, 92, 96, 97,
98, 160, 186, 205,
207, 208, 210, 211,
212, 220, 221, 233,
237, 252, 255, 256,
310, 316
Manager Commands
22
Manager displays
Control Unit's 45
Manager displays 45
Manager PC 23, 35,
37, 210, 211, 212
Manager scans
LAN 43
Manager scans 43
Manager Type 256
Manager's
BOOTP/TFTP
services 34
Manager's Working
37
Manager's Working
Directory 33, 36, 43,
92
Mandatory 259, 274,
310
Manual Exclusion
268
Manual Recording
Mailbox 259
MAPI 253
Match
reconfigured 96
system starts 116
Page 395
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Match 42, 45, 48, 72,
73, 74, 76, 78, 96,
115, 116, 117, 121,
122, 178, 182, 183,
185, 186, 188, 193,
195, 196, 205, 207,
217, 219, 221, 223,
226, 228, 235, 239,
244, 249, 252, 263,
271, 278, 284, 286,
289, 292, 296, 299,
310, 315, 316, 318,
322, 324
Match Data 183
Match Length 183
Match Mask 183
Match occurs 299
Match offset 183
MatchGrp
call 286
MatchGrp 286
Matching Digit 239
Matching Order 116
Max frame length 289
Maximum
set 197
Maximum 197
Maximum channels
278
Maximum No
Channels 278
Maximum No 278
Maximum
Transmissible Unit
limit 282
Maximum
Transmissible Unit
282
Maximum Width 248
MCUs 188
MD5 324
Medium 239
MegaCom 236
MegaCom800 235,
236
MegaComWats 235
Menu
pressing 256, 260,
262
Menu key 256
Menu1
Menu12 260
Menu1 260
Menu12
Menu1 260
Menu12 260
Merge config 36, 37
Merging 73
Message Waiting
Lamp Indication Type
248
Messages 255
Metric 189, 190, 296
Mexico 48, 228
Manager 3.0
IP Office
MFC 230
MFC Dialing 229
MFC Group
Default 230
MFC Group 228, 230
MFC Group (E1-R2)
230
Mgmt 289
MIB 205
MIB Database 205
MIB files 205, 207
Michigan
University 220
Michigan 220
Microsoft 220, 285
Microsoft application
282, 285
Microsoft's Callback
Control Protocol 282,
285
Min Call Time 278
Minimum
Set 197
Minimum 197
Minimum Call Time
278, 321
Minimum Calls 278
Minimum channels
278
Minimum No
Channels 278
Minimum No 278
Minimum Width 248
Minimum/Maximum
Flash 99
Mins 281, 321
Minumum call time
278
Miscellaneous 136,
151, 160, 165
MLPPP 179
Mobile 253
Mode 99, 101, 110,
149, 179, 181, 196,
197, 214, 215, 225,
244, 249, 253, 255,
256, 269, 272, 278,
280, 282, 285, 289,
291, 316
Modem
auto-adapting 282
Modem 239, 282
Modem Enabled 239
Modem2
requires 282
Modem2 208, 282
Monday
Friday 111, 293
Monitor
Password 212
Monitor 25, 69, 114,
129, 183, 189, 190,
205, 207, 212, 256,
260, 290
Monitor Calls 114
Monitor group 114,
129, 256
Monitor/control
wishes 252
Monitor/control 252
Monitored Events
Counter 290
Monitoring allows
user 114
Monitoring allows 114
Monthly 281
Morning/Afternoon/Ev
ening 325
Most Idle 271
Most SMNP
manager's 205
Moves
Peter's 111
Moves 111
MPPC
set 285
MPPC 282, 285, 322
Msec 116, 117
MSN 217
MSN Configuration
286
MSN numbers 286
MTU 282
MU-LAW 217
Mulitple 315
Multicast 189, 321
Multicasting 280
Multilink
Check 197
Multilink 179, 197,
282, 285, 299, 322
MultiLink/QoS
Check 196
MultiLink/QoS 196
Multiple Overflow
Groups 271
Multi-Point line
Point 226, 243
Multi-Point line 226,
243
Music On Hold 91,
92, 111, 159
Mwi 248
N
N
place 87, 90
N 72, 87, 88, 89, 90,
96, 113, 114, 121,
123, 128, 160, 166,
179, 194, 195, 196,
236, 254, 273, 299,
312
N391 289, 290
N392 289, 290
N393 289, 290
Nabranch.cfg 33
Name
Directory entry
292
Notes enter 183
Operator 211
RAS 284
System 212
Time profile 293
User 212, 252
Voicemail uses
252, 271
WAN port 289
Name 24, 33, 35, 36,
38, 42, 43, 45, 69,
70, 73, 74, 75, 86,
95, 101, 131, 138,
162, 172, 173, 179,
182, 183, 185, 188,
193, 195, 196, 197,
207, 210, 211, 212,
215, 217, 220, 221,
244, 246, 252, 255,
260, 262, 271, 277,
284, 289, 292, 293,
294, 296, 298, 312,
315, 317, 318, 319,
321, 323, 325
Name Server 182
Name.x 162
Name/Number 38
Named groups
dialing 317
Named groups 317
NAT 183, 186, 214,
280
NATim 169
National 236
National prefix 226,
238, 241, 243
NetCoder 192
NetCoder 8K 193,
244, 249
NetMeeting 192, 193
Netscape 220
Network 197
Network Address
Translation 179, 183,
186
Network Address
Translation (NAT)
186
Network Address
Translation allowing
183
Network News
Transfer Protocol 294
Network Selection
235, 236
Network Selection
Code 235
Network Selection
table 236
Network Specific
Facility 234
NetworkMgmt 289
Page 396
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Index
New 42, 45, 73, 76,
312
New Jersey 286
New Zealand 48
NI2 234
Night 95, 137, 167,
273
Night Service 110,
111
Night Service
Destinations 95, 286
Night service fallback
group
Using 111
Night service fallback
group 110, 111, 273
Night Service Profile
95, 286
NJ 69
Nl 48
Nlb 48
Nld 48
NLDS 235, 236
Nnn 70, 147
Nnn/ppppppp 70, 147
NNTP 294
no answer time 156,
169, 256, 258, 271
No Answer Time
setting 169
No Service 235
NoMatchGrp1 286
NoMatchGrp2 286
Non-Caller Display
86
None 228, 235, 244
None, Daily 281
Non-IP Office Avaya
262
Non-SNMP 205
Non-Standard Port
Browsing 183
Non-Standard Port
183
Normal
Create 74, 185,
195
Normal 74, 185, 195,
233, 237, 325
Normal Service 188
Northeast Corner
ALI 311
Northeast Corner 311
Northwest Corner
ALI 311
Northwest Corner
311
Norway 48
NOT 312
NOT LOGGED ON
106
Notes 22, 23, 24, 36,
48, 68, 69, 70, 71,
72, 73, 74, 75, 86,
Manager 3.0
IP Office
90, 92, 95, 99, 101,
111, 113, 114, 123,
137, 138, 150, 157,
161, 166, 168, 169,
170, 172, 178, 179,
180, 183, 185, 188,
190, 191, 195, 196,
205, 208, 210, 212,
214, 219, 220, 221,
223, 225, 228, 233,
234, 237, 239, 243,
244, 248, 249, 254,
255, 256, 260, 269,
273, 278, 280, 281,
286, 289, 291, 293,
296, 299, 309, 313,
316, 324
Notes enter
name 183
Notes enter 183
Novell's NetWare 220
NSF 234, 235, 236
NT
points 215
NT 215
NT RAS 284
NT Servers 282, 285
NT4 Server 23
Number
Channels 197
Directory entry
292
features sets 274
Number 24, 35, 36,
37, 42, 45, 68, 69,
70, 71, 72, 75, 78,
86, 87, 88, 89, 90,
95, 96, 97, 98, 99,
101, 106, 110, 113,
114, 115, 116, 117,
118, 121, 122, 123,
128, 129, 130, 131,
132, 133, 135, 137,
138, 139, 142, 143,
144, 145, 147, 148,
151, 152, 154, 157,
158, 159, 160, 161,
162, 163, 164, 165,
166, 167, 168, 169,
170, 171, 178, 179,
180, 183, 185, 186,
188, 189, 191, 194,
195, 196, 197, 207,
214, 216, 217, 219,
220, 221, 226, 228,
230, 231, 232, 233,
234, 235, 236, 237,
238, 241, 243, 244,
246, 248, 249, 252,
253, 254, 255, 256,
258, 260, 261, 262,
263, 264, 265, 266,
267, 268, 269, 271,
274, 275, 278, 281,
282, 284, 285, 286,
289, 290, 291, 292,
296, 299, 310, 311,
312, 315, 317, 322,
325
Number affects
user's 75
Number affects 75
Number attributes
221
Number of channels
226, 238, 241, 243
Number of DHCP IP
addresses 214, 215
Number parsing 236
Number sharing 244
Number specified
139, 151
Number/Name 38
Numbering Layout
261
Numbers follow 123
Numbers starting
91900 78
Numbers use 123
O
ObjectClass 221
OCSeq 169
Off Hook Station 160
Off Maximum 239
Offhook station 256
Office 23, 190, 207,
208, 223, 286, 315
Office Control Unit 73
Office Hours 111
Office Job Aid 046 37
Office MIB Files 205
Office system 190
Offline 33, 43, 45
OHStn 160
OK
save 197
OK 43, 197, 207,
208, 231, 234, 313
On
set 248, 271
On/off 268
Online 33
Only
Incoming 278
Outgoing 278
Only 278
Open 22, 33, 35, 41,
42, 43, 45, 48, 71,
73, 162, 163, 186,
187, 188, 197, 281
Open File 43, 45
OpenView Install CD
205
OpenView Network
Node
Start 205
OpenView Network
Node 205
Operator Form 211
Operators 42, 211,
236, 311, 316, 325
Ops files 211
Options 45, 325
Options 4ESS 234
OSI 186
OSPF 185, 296
Other Applications 23
Other Extension
Call Park 265
Other Extension 265
OtherfacsimileTeleph
one Number 221
OtherIpPhone 221
OtherPager 221
Out
Band DTMF 192,
244, 249
played 111, 273
Service 229, 232,
235, 239
Service Fallback
Group 110, 273
Out of band DTMF
192, 244, 249
Out Of Service 232
Out of service
fallback group 110,
273
Outdial 299
Outgoing
Caller ID 310
Channels 226,
238, 241, 243
Incoming 278
Only 278
Trunk Type 232
Outgoing 226, 229,
232, 235, 238, 239,
241, 243, 278, 310
Outgoing call bar
256, 318
Outgoing Calls 36, 37
Outgoing channels
226, 238, 241, 243
Outgoing Digits 122
Outgoing Group 229,
232, 235
Outgoing Group ID
226, 238, 241, 243
Outisde call
sequence
Default 217
Outisde call
sequence 217
Outlook Express
including 220
Outlook Express 220
Outside
Sets 256
Outside 256
Outside call
sequence 169, 256
Page 397
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Outside Ring Pattern
256
Outward Restricted
256
Overflow Group
called 110
Hunt Group called
271
use 111
Using 111
Overflow Group 110,
111, 271
Overflow Group list
111, 271
Overflow lits 271
Overflow time 110,
271
Overflow/Fallback
settings 271
Overriden 115
Overview
Hunt Groups 110
Manager 22
Routing 178
Overview 22, 110,
178
Overview of Hunt
Groups 110
Overview of Manager
22
Overview of Routing
178
P
P 101
P<Telephone
Number 255
P917325559876 255
Packetization 192
Pagers 253
Paging speaker 248
PAP 73, 277, 284,
320
Park
Call 96
Park 69, 96, 268
PARK BLF button 69,
260
Park Call 96, 161,
164, 265
Park timeout 96, 217
ParkCall 123
ParkCall feature 96
Parked call requires
96
Parking a Call 96
Part
Control Units 211
Gateway 193
X.500 220
Part 193, 211, 220
Password
Incoming 277
LDAP 221
Monitor 212
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Operator 211
Service 277
System 212
User 212, 252
Voicemail 216
Password 23, 33, 35,
36, 37, 42, 43, 45,
73, 74, 179, 185,
188, 195, 196, 211,
212, 216, 221, 233,
237, 252, 272, 277,
321, 324
Pattern
Ringing 99
Pattern 99
Pattern 10xxx 235
PBX 75
PBX Features 22
PC
LAN 178
system's Flash 45
PC 22, 23, 24, 35,
42, 45, 48, 75, 86,
178, 179, 181, 182,
197, 208, 210, 212,
216, 223, 272, 278,
280
PC application 98,
223
PC TAPI 86
PC time 210
PC1 181
PC2
address 181
PC2 181
PCall 161, 268
PCs 183
PC's
connect 182
PC's 25, 181, 182,
248
PC's DNS Server 280
PC's IP 182
Performance 192,
291
Persistency 239
Personal Fax
Configuring 97
Personal Fax 97
Personal fax
numbers 97
Peru 48
Peter
moves 111
Peter 111
Peter's extension 111
Phone 248, 252, 255
Phone Change 208,
223
Phone Defaults 96
Phone Manager 24,
76, 87, 89, 96, 97,
98, 160, 212, 220,
221, 252, 256, 310
Phone Manager
application
user's copy 256
Phone Manager
application 87, 89,
90, 256
Phone/ISDN Control
Unit 163
PhyEx 144
PickA 129
PickG 130
PickM 131
Pickup 69, 88, 89,
260, 267
Pickup Call Waiting
89
PINGs
Stopping 183
PINGs 183
Pl 48
Place
N 87, 90
Voice Announce
70
Place 70, 87, 90
Plain Ordinary
Telephone 67
Played
20 111
Out 111, 273
Played 111, 273
Please Enter
Password 36, 37
Plk 48
PM 293
Point lines
Point 226, 243
Point lines 226, 243
Point Protocol
Point 186
Point Protocol 186
Point to Point
Protocol 186
Point to Point
Protocol (PPP) 186
Points
Control Unit 280
Multi-Point line
226, 243
NT 215
Point 294
Point lines 226,
243
Point Protocol 186
sharing 226, 243
Points 186, 215, 226,
243, 280, 294
Point-to-MultiPoint
225
Point-to-MultiPoint
lines 225
Point-to-MultiPoint
mode 225
Point-to-Point 73, 225
Point-to-Point lines
225
Point-to-Point
Protocol
uses 185
Point-to-Point
Protocol 185, 186
Poland 48
Polling
Verification 290
Polling 290
Polling Support 207
POP3 294
Port
Enter 208
Port 208
Port Types 67
Portugal 48
Post Office Protocol
294
POT 67
Power Conference
Book 256
Power Conference
212, 256
Power Conferencing
logon 256
Power Conferencing
URL 212
PPP 42, 73, 141,
146, 147, 185, 186,
191, 196, 197, 208,
214, 282, 285, 291,
299, 320, 322
PPP tab
RAS form 285
Service form 282
PPP tab 196, 197,
282, 285, 291
PPP uses
Internet 186
PPP uses 186
Ppppppp 70, 147
PPPSyncVoice 193
PPTP 294
Preferences 35, 73,
244, 249
Prefix 24, 101, 226,
231, 234, 235, 238,
241, 243, 255
Preinstalled 191
Pre-IP Office 1.4
features use 217
Pre-IP Office 1.4 217
Premium 317
Pressing
Alternate Call 91,
98
Menu 256, 260,
262
Recall 139
Shift 228
Pressing 91, 98, 139,
228, 256, 260, 262
Page 398
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Index
Presubscribed
Carrier 236
PRI
Consider 286
Set 234
PRI 71, 122, 226,
231, 234, 237, 241,
243, 286
PRI lines 122, 234
PRI/T1 197
Primary Incoming
Translation Address
183
Primary IP translation
address
Service 280
Primary IP translation
address 280
Primary Trans 214
Primary trans. IP
address 214, 215,
280
Priority
User 212, 252
Priority 95, 161, 212,
252, 268, 286, 299,
318
Priority Call 161, 268
Priority Calling 268
Private Line 235, 236
Pro 23, 132, 256
Processor 212
Prog 68, 263
ProgA 69
Program
Send All Calls
button 70
Program 70
Program
Files/Avaya/IP
Office/Manager 34
Programming 128,
129, 130, 131, 132,
133, 134, 135, 136,
137, 138, 139, 141,
142, 143, 144, 145,
146, 147, 148, 149,
150, 151, 152, 153,
154, 155, 156, 157,
158, 159, 160, 161,
162, 163, 164, 165,
166, 167, 168, 169,
170, 171, 174, 175,
260, 262, 263, 264,
265, 266, 267, 268,
269
Properties 197
Protocol 146, 186,
282, 294
Protocols Tab 197
Provides
S0 225
Provides 225
Proxy ARP 296
Manager 3.0
IP Office
ProxyARP 296
PSTN
Select 234
PSTN 178, 180, 226,
234, 312
Ptb 48
PTB locale 239
PTB Only 256
Ptg 48
Public/general 23
Pulse Dialing 229,
232, 239
Pulse Metering Bit
230
Pulse Off Width 239
Pulse On Width 239
Put 273
PVC
ends 291
PVC 291
Q
Q.931 192, 193, 217
Q.931 Hold
uses 135, 158
Q.931 Hold 135, 158
Q.931 Suspend
Uses 171
Q.931 Suspend 171
Q933 AnnexA 0393
289
QoS 191, 322
QSig 226, 244
QSIG B 226
QSIGA 228
QSIGB 228
Quality
form 191
Service 219
Quality 191, 219
Queue a call 98
Queuing 111, 274
Queuing a Call to a
Busy extension 98
Queuing Facility 111
Queuing feature 274
Queuing limit 274
Queuing on 111, 274
Queuing ring time
111, 274
Queuing tab 274
Quiet handset 248
Quiet Headset 248
Quota 281
Quota tab 281
Quota time 179, 187,
281
Quotas 42, 138, 179,
187, 281
Quotas and
Timebands 187
Quotas place
time 187
Quotas place 187
R
R 75, 101, 190, 255
R<Caller's CLI 255
R2 DID 229
R2 DIOD 229
R2 DOD 229
R2 Loop Start 229
R7325551234 255
Radio 183
RAM
Flash 36
system copies 24
user changes 24
RAM 24, 36, 37, 45
RAS 23, 37, 44, 73,
74, 95, 178, 185,
188, 195, 196, 197,
252, 258, 278, 282,
284, 285, 286, 289,
291
RAS form
PPP tab 285
RAS tab 284
RAS form 284, 285
RAS name
DCLI 291
WAN port 289
RAS name 73, 195,
196, 197, 289, 291
RAS Name value 197
RAS/data 101
RBak 136, 165
RBSeq 170
Reauthentication 324
Reboot 22, 25, 33,
36, 37, 43, 45, 71,
73, 74, 76, 92, 106,
182, 195, 196, 197,
207, 208, 211, 212,
248, 289, 291, 309
Reboot mode 33, 36,
37, 45
Reboot time 36, 37
Reboot/merge 22
REC 212
Recall
pressing 139
Recall 139
RECALL Button 75
Receive Config 36,
43
Receive filename.cfg
About 43
Receive filename.cfg
43
Receive Window Size
322
Received
ARP 296
configuration 22,
43
Status Inquiry 290
Received 22, 43,
290, 296
Receiving a
Configuration 22, 43
Receiving Config
From 43
Reception
add 111
set 111
Reception 111, 253
RECLAIM 89
Reconfigured
match 96
Reconfigured 96
Recor 132
Record Greeting 162
Record Inbound 274,
310
Record Incoming 259
Record Outbound
310
Record Outgoing 259
Red 260
Reduce Bandwidth
278
Reduce bandwidth
threshold 278
Reduce BW
Threshold 278
Refer
INDeX Level 10
256
Job Aid 046 23,
37
Refer 23, 37, 256
Regional Options 23
Regional Settings 23
Relay 162, 163, 192,
294
Relay Chat 294
Relay Off 162
Relay On 162
Relay Pulse 163
RelayOff 123
RelayOn 123
RelayPulse 123
Release 182
Remote 253
Remote Account
Password 321
Remote Gateway 323
Remote
Homeworker/Agent
256
Remote IP address
321, 323
Remote IP mask 323
RemoteManager 190
Renew 182
Replace Entries 38
Replay Greeting 325
Request DNS 179,
182, 215, 280
Requires
Control Unit 45
Modem2 282
Page 399
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
VCM 325
Requires 45, 282,
325
Reset Volume 248
Resource
Reservation Protocol
294
Restore 36
Restrictions 115, 178,
252, 258, 317, 318
Restrictions applies
user 252
Restrictions applies
252
Result
DID 88, 131
Result 88, 131
Resum 163
Resume Call 163
Resync Interval 221
Resynch interval 221
Retransmission 322
Retrieve Call 164
Retriv 164
Return
Sales 111
Return 111
RFC 1490 291
RFC 1779 221
RFC 1889 192
RFC 2474 191, 192
RFC 2507,2508,2509
192
RFC 2507/2508/2509
191
RFC1490
set 291
RFC1490 291
RFC1700 183
Rfc2213-integratedservices-mib.mib 205
RFC2254 221
RFC2507 285
RFC2508 285
RFC2509 285
Rfc2737-entitymib.mib 205
Richard 111
Richard's extensions
111
Ride Call 161, 164
RideCall 96, 123
Right Mouse Button
45
Rights
Control Unit 73
View 42
Rights 42, 73
Ring Back
Sets 256
Ring Back 256
Ring back sequence
Default 217
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Ring back sequence
217, 256
Ring Back When
Free 97, 99, 165, 217
Ring mode 89, 111,
113, 271
Ring normal 99
Ring Tones 99
Ring Type
set 271
Ring Type 258, 271
Ringback
Voicemail 253
When free 97
Ringback 97, 99,
136, 165, 170, 175,
253, 255
Ringer Off 268
Ringing
Pattern 99
Ringing 99
Ringing Tones 68,
99, 111
RingNormal
ENG 99
support 217
RingNormal 99, 168,
169, 170, 217
RingType0 99
RingType1 99, 168,
169, 170, 217
RingType2 99, 217
RingType3 99
RingType4 99
RingType5 99
RingType6 99
RingType7 99
RingType8 99
RingType9 99
RIP 185, 189, 190,
214, 280, 296
RIP In 190
RIP Out 190
RIP-1
Listen 214, 280
RIP1 189, 214, 280
RIP-1 214, 280
RIP1 Compatibility
189, 214, 280
RIP2 189
RIP-2 214, 280
RIP2 Broadcast 189,
214, 280
RIP2 mulitcast 189
RIP-2 multicast 214,
280
RIP2 Multicast 189,
214, 280
RngOf 268
Rotary 258
Rotary mode 271
Route
identify 298
Route 74, 179, 185,
194, 195, 196, 197,
298
Router
local LAN 296
Router 296
Routing
All 183
Information
Protocol 189, 214,
280
Overview 178
Select 190
Routing 178, 183,
189, 190, 214, 280
Routing Digits
Incoming 230,
233, 237
Routing Digits 230,
233, 237
Routing Table
Viewing 190
Routing Table 190
Routing Table
Changes 190
Routing via ISDN 185
ROW 212, 217
RSVP 219, 244, 249,
294
RTP/RTCP 192, 193
RTP/UDP 193
RTP/UDP/IP Header
191
Ru 48
Rus 48
Russia 48
Rx 239
Rx Gain 232, 235
S
S 48, 70, 190, 197,
264, 278, 282, 285
S0
provides 225
S0 22, 71, 72, 225
S0 Expansion 67
S0 lines 71
S0 module 71, 286
S0 Ports 71
SAC 68, 269
Sales
return 111
Scenario - When
111
Sales 110, 111, 114,
286
SalesHuntGrp 286
Save
OK 197
Save 24, 33, 34, 35,
36, 38, 39, 43, 45,
191, 197, 210
Save As 210
Saved as part
system 210
Saved as part 210
Scans
LAN 45
Scans 45
Scenario - When
Sales 111
Scenario - When 111
SDN 123, 235, 236
Search base 221
Search filter 221
Secondary Dial Tone
121, 123, 165, 239
Secondary Dial Tone
and [n] Characters
121
SecondaryDialTone
121, 123
Secs 217, 221, 256,
278, 282, 285, 299,
322
Security
Tunneling
improves 320
Security 23, 186,
207, 208, 220, 272,
316, 320, 324
Security Payload 324
See 45, 312
Select Add 205
Select Answer 69
Select Compile 205
Select Config 205
Select Filters 190
Select Load 205
Select OK 45
Select Options 205
Select RecvConfig 43
Select Required
Items 111
Select Yes 43
Selecting
Answr 260
AutoLearn 289
Control Unit 36,
37, 43, 45, 214
Daily/Weekly/Mont
hly 281
Disconnect Pulse
Width 248
Edit 231, 234
Events 208
Export
Configuration
Entities 39
PSTN 234
Routing 190
Setup 256
Selecting 36, 37, 39,
43, 45, 190, 208,
214, 231, 234, 248,
256, 260, 281, 289,
312
Selecting E911
Stations 312
Page 400
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Index
Selecting E911
Trunks 312
Seleting 114
Self-Administer 262,
268
Send
configuration 41,
45
DisplayMsg 70
email 253
Send 41, 45, 70, 253
Send All Calls 269
Send All Calls button
Program 70
Send All Calls button
70
Send All Calls/Do Not
Disturb 70
Send Config 33, 36,
45
SendConfig 36
Sender
forwarded/diverted
70
Senders 70, 320
Sending a
Configuration 41, 45
Sending a
configuration back
Control Unit 45
Sending a
configuration back 45
Sending Config To 45
Sending Config To
dialog 33
Sending Traffic to the
Router
Subnet Masks 181
Sending Traffic to the
Router 181
Separate LANs 180
Serial 186
Serial number 210,
246, 309
Serial port 35
Series 67, 68, 76, 88,
144, 260, 261, 262
Series IP 34, 212,
219
Server
DHCP mode set
214
set 214
Server 197, 214, 216,
280
Server PC's Feature
Key 309
Service
Clear Hunt Group
Out 138
Destination select
74, 185, 195
Out 229, 232, 235,
239
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Quality 219
Set Hunt Group
Out 168
Type 191
Using 188
Service 22, 34, 39,
42, 44, 73, 74, 95,
110, 111, 115, 137,
138, 162, 167, 168,
179, 182, 183, 185,
186, 187, 188, 189,
190, 191, 193, 195,
196, 197, 215, 219,
220, 229, 232, 234,
235, 236, 239, 244,
253, 258, 271, 273,
277, 278, 279, 281,
282, 284, 285, 286,
289, 291, 293, 296,
311, 312, 315, 319,
320, 325
Service calling 278
Service Fallback
Group
Out 110, 273
Service Fallback
Group 110, 273
Service Form
Autoconnect tab
281
Bandwidth tab 278
Fallback tab 282
IP tab 280
PPP tab 282
Quota tab 281
Service tab 277
Service Form 187,
215, 277, 278, 280,
281, 282
Service mode 110,
137, 138, 167, 168,
273
Service Mode setting
273
Service Profile 286
Service Providers
179, 186, 281
Service set 236
Service Set Identifier
315
Service signaling 244
Service Tab 196
Service Table 197
ServiceHuntGrp 286
Service-Idle Time
278
Services according
236
Services
interoperates 220
Set
0.0.0.0 296
10 111, 278
127 225, 226, 243
56000 bps 141
64000 bps 141,
147
Any 72
Async 282
AT&T 235
AT&T.It 235
AT&T.Settings
236
AT&T.This 236
CO 233
Community 208
Daily 281
Disable CCP 285
E&M Tie 233
Inside 256
Loop-Start 233
Maximum 197
Minimum 197
MPPC 285
On 248, 271
Outside 256
PRI 234
Reception 111
RFC1490 291
Ring Back 256
Ring Type 271
Server 214
Sync 282
T1 231, 234
Type 197
Set 72, 111, 141,
147, 166, 167, 168,
169, 170, 197, 208,
214, 225, 226, 231,
233, 234, 235, 236,
243, 248, 256, 271,
278, 281, 282, 285,
291, 296
Set Absent Text 166
Set Hunt Group Night
Service 167
Set Hunt Group Out
Service 168
Set Hunt Group Out
168
Set Hunt Group Out
Of Service 168
Set Inside Call Seq
168
Set No Answer Time
169, 258
Set Outside Call Seq
169
Set Ringback Call
Sequence 170
Set Ringback Seq
170
Set Wrap Up Time
170
SetHuntGroupNightS
ervice 123, 187
Settable 256
Settings 23, 24, 42,
45, 48, 68, 69, 74,
90, 99, 106, 114,
138, 144, 183, 185,
196, 197, 211, 217,
219, 225, 228, 230,
231, 234, 235, 244,
249, 252, 253, 255,
256, 258, 271, 272,
293, 296, 298, 299,
312, 315, 318
Settings appropriate
45
Setup
selecting 256
Setup 193, 256
SetupAck 193
Sfunc 264
SHA 324
Shared Secret 322,
324
Sharing
Point 226, 243
Sharing 226, 243
Shift
pressing 228
Shift 111, 228
Shift Key 231, 234,
312
Short code created
user 45
Short code created
45
Short Code Features
275
Short Code Form 275
Short code indicates
299
Short Code List 299
Short Code List Box
227, 242, 244, 254
Short Code
Parameters 118
Short Codes
Understanding
115
Short Codes 22, 39,
42, 45, 68, 69, 70,
72, 78, 87, 88, 89,
90, 92, 110, 111,
113, 114, 115, 116,
117, 118, 121, 122,
123, 132, 145, 173,
179, 187, 194, 195,
196, 217, 226, 227,
232, 235, 236, 238,
241, 242, 243, 244,
254, 260, 273, 275,
281, 282, 286, 299,
311, 312, 317, 318
Short Codes (VPN)
244
Short Codes.name
172
Page 401
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
Short Message
Services 253
Shortcode
trying 299
Shortcode 44, 69,
114, 172, 236, 299,
325
Shortcode features
89, 260
Shortcode features
ParkCall 96
Shortcodes 96, 115,
172, 260, 299, 325
Shortcodes tab
Line form 242,
244
User form 254
Shortcodes tab 242,
244, 254
Show Users 252
SIG DSCP
allowing 219
SIG DSCP 219
Signaling
Type 239
Signaling 239
Silence suppression
192, 244, 249
Simple Mail Transfer
Protocol 294
Simple Network
Management
Protocol 205, 223,
294
Single 117
Single Digit Short
Codes 117
Site
Site B 74, 185,
194, 195, 196
Site B
Site 74, 185, 194,
195, 196
Site B 74, 185, 194,
195, 196
SiteA 195
SiteB 195
SK1 68
SK2 68
SKN 123
SLIP 186
Small Edition 44
Small Office Edition
LAN 214
Small Office Edition
178, 191, 212, 214,
215, 239, 315, 325
Small Office Edition
Auto-Attendant
service 95
Small Office Edition
Control Units 214
Small Office Edition
LAN 315
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Small Office Edition
Only 214
Small Office Edition
systems 95, 162, 212
Small Office Edition
WiFi 315
Small Office Edition's
LAN1 315
Small Office Edition's
PCMCIA 315
SMNP 205
SMNP manager
application 205
Smnp_mibs 205
SMTP 183, 294
SMTP Mail 281
SNMP 205, 207, 208,
223, 294
SNMP Enabled 207,
208, 223
SNMP polling 205
SNMP Port 207, 223
SNMP traps 223
SNMP v1 205
Snmp_mibs/IPOffice
205
Snmp_mibs/Standard
205
SO 22
SoftConsole 96, 212
SoftConsole
Applications 96
Softkey
Abbreviated
Dialing 68
Softkey 68, 262
Softkey features 260
Softkey menu 68
Softkeys Function
Changing 68
Softkeys Function 68
Source
add 101
Source 101
Source Numbers 75,
255
Source PC1 181
South Africa 48
SP2 23
SP6 23
Spain 48
Speak Position action
95
Speakerphone 265,
267
Special 75, 117, 121,
147, 181, 233, 234,
236, 237, 264
Special Access 233,
237
Special functions
DS 147
Special functions 147
Specified 197
Specified number
101
SpectraLink 212
Speech
use 145
Speech 145, 286
Speed 73, 115, 146,
186, 191, 195, 196,
197, 282, 289
Spres 264
Sprint 234
SSID 315
SSON 219
STAC 282, 285
StacLZS
system 285
StacLZS 282, 285
Standard 25, 42, 183,
186, 191, 205, 216,
220, 231, 234, 248,
256, 285, 286, 294,
312, 317, 325
Standard Serial 186
Standard Telephone
248
Start
CastleRock 205
DS 70
OpenView
Network Node 205
Start 70, 205
Start | Settings |
Control Panel 23
State 312
Stats 262
Status
transmitting 290
Status 290
Status Inquiry
receive 290
Status Inquiry 290
Steal 89, 133
Step
dialling proceed
116
Step 73, 116, 197
Step 13 73
Stopping
PINGs 183
Stopping 183
Stored Number View
269
Straightforward 121
Subnet mask 23, 37,
181, 182, 214, 296
Support
analogue 67
Avaya 20 Series
67
Avaya 4400 67
Default Ring 168,
169, 170
faxing 244, 249
RingNormal 217
V.110 286
V.120 286
Support 67, 168, 169,
170, 217, 244, 249,
286
Support.avaya.com
207
Supported Country
48
Supported Country
and Locale Settings
48
Supported Functions
262
SusCW 171
Suspe 171
Suspend 171
Suspend Call 163,
171
Suspend CW 89, 171
SuspendCall 123
Sv 48
Sve 48
Sweden 48
Switch Type 234
Switches CRC 230
Switchover 225
Switzerland 48
Sync
set 282
Sync 282
Sync PPP 141, 147
SyncFrameRelay
196, 289, 291
SynchFrameRelay
289
Synchronous 186
SyncPPP 197, 289
System
caller display
types 212
Gatekeeper
require 212
saved as part 210
StacLZS 285
System 22, 23, 24,
25, 33, 36, 37, 42,
43, 44, 45, 48, 68,
69, 71, 72, 73, 75,
76, 78, 86, 88, 91,
95, 96, 97, 99, 101,
106, 114, 115, 116,
123, 144, 145, 146,
159, 162, 163, 164,
178, 179, 182, 185,
186, 188, 189, 190,
192, 197, 207, 208,
210, 211, 212, 216,
217, 220, 225, 226,
228, 231, 232, 233,
234, 235, 236, 238,
239, 241, 244, 246,
248, 252, 253, 256,
258, 260, 261, 262,
Page 402
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Index
266, 271, 272, 274,
275, 277, 278, 280,
281, 282, 285, 289,
294, 299, 309, 311,
312, 313, 317, 318,
325
System Agent 220
System attempts 285
System begins 116
System Changes 197
System connects
Voicemail Server
216
System connects 216
System copies
RAM 24
System copies 24
System Default
Allocated Answer
Interval 256
System Defaults 99,
248
System form
DNS tab 215
Gatekeeper tab
219
LAN1 tab 214
LAN2 tab 215
LDAP tab 221
System tab 212
Telephony tab 217
Voicemail tab 216
System form 48, 99,
197, 210, 212, 214,
215, 216, 217, 219,
221, 246
System ID 145
System Parameters
312
System performs 278
System Phone 256
System Receives
Time 25
System Resource
Status Prints 25
System Short Codes
115
System Shortcode
236
System starts
match 116
System starts 116
System tab 114, 212,
260
System uses 246
System's Flash
PC 45
System's Flash 45
Systems
Interconnection 186
System's LAN 178
Systems RAM 22, 24,
43, 45
Manager 3.0
IP Office
T
T 190
T1
end 197
Set 231, 234
T1 122, 197, 231,
232, 233, 234, 237
T1 Edit Channel 231,
232, 234
T1 lines 231, 233
T1 PRI 234
T391 289, 290
T392 289, 290
TA 284
TA enabled 284
Tab Separated 38
Take 273
TAPI 252
Tc
10ms 291
Tc 291
TCP 183
TCP/IP
computer/host 180
TCP/IP 180, 186,
197, 220
TCP/IP LAN 181
TCP/UDP/IP 192
TDMInterconnect 246
TEI 225, 226, 238,
241, 243
Telephone Company
86
Telephone No 88
Telephone number
Line 226, 238,
241, 243
Service 277
Source numbers
255
Telephone number
68, 69, 70, 72, 113,
114, 118, 122, 123,
128, 129, 130, 131,
132, 133, 134, 135,
136, 137, 138, 139,
141, 142, 143, 144,
145, 146, 147, 148,
149, 150, 151, 152,
153, 154, 155, 156,
157, 158, 159, 160,
161, 162, 163, 164,
165, 166, 167, 168,
169, 170, 171, 172,
173, 174, 175, 179,
185, 187, 194, 195,
196, 217, 220, 226,
237, 238, 241, 243,
253, 254, 255, 258,
260, 262, 263, 264,
265, 266, 267, 268,
269, 275, 277, 282,
285, 286, 292, 299,
311
Telephone number
including 255
Telephone number
takes 147
TelephoneNumber,ot
herTelephone,homeP
hone 221
Telephony 24, 42, 76,
88, 96, 99, 106, 116,
169, 170, 172, 173,
178, 217, 239, 255,
256
Telephony tab
System form 217
User form 256
Telephony tab 76, 88,
96, 99, 106, 116,
169, 170, 217, 239,
256
TELNET 294
Terminal Equipment
Identifier 225, 226,
243
TFTP
address 212
TFTP 212
TFTP log 41, 92, 210
TFTP server IP
address 212, 214,
215
The Configuration
Tree 45, 277, 311
The user 87, 90
These MIB files 205
Tick Routing Table
190
Ticking
Call Waiting 113
Ticking 113
TIE 232
Tie Automatic 229
Tie Delay Dial 229
Tie Immediate Start
229
Tie Wink Start 229
Til 166
Tile 41
Time
Day 269
Quotas place 187
Time 23, 25, 36, 37,
39, 42, 44, 45, 69,
70, 92, 95, 110, 111,
116, 137, 138, 169,
170, 175, 178, 179,
182, 185, 187, 188,
195, 197, 205, 210,
212, 217, 221, 225,
228, 239, 253, 255,
256, 258, 259, 260,
269, 271, 272, 273,
274, 278, 281, 282,
286, 290, 291, 293,
294, 298, 310, 312,
321, 322, 325
Time applies 293
Time Constant 291
Time Coordinates 25
Time during 281, 293
Time enrty list 293
Time Entry 293
Time Entry List 293
Time of Day 269
Time offset 25, 210,
212
Time profile
Auto connect 281
Dial in 258
Fallback service
282
Hunt group
fallback 273
Least cost route
298
using 111
Time profile 42, 44,
45, 95, 110, 111,
137, 138, 187, 258,
259, 273, 274, 281,
282, 286, 293, 298,
310, 325
Time profile during
259, 274, 286, 310
Time Profile Form
293
Time profile starting
293
Time recreating 39
Time select 228
Time Server 212
Timebands 187
Timeout 233, 278,
290, 299
Timeouts
Control Unit 278
Timeouts 278
Timer 269, 281, 290
Timers 68, 116, 229,
230, 231, 233, 234,
269
Tip/Ring 312
TmDay 68, 269
TNS
values 234
TNS 234, 235, 236
To Receive
Configuration 43
To Receive 43
To Receive a
Configuration
To Receive a
Configuration 22
To Receive a
Configuration 22, 43
To Receive and
Name
Configuration 43
Page 403
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
To Receive and
Name 43
To Receive and
Name a
Configuration 43
To/from
user 114
To/from 114
Toggl 171
Toggle Calls 171
ToggleCalls 123
Tones 99
Toolbars 22
Tools->Internet
Options 197
ToS 191
Total Control
Retransmission
Interval 322
Trace Options 190
Traffic Through
WinProxy 183
Traffic Through 183
Transfer
call 70, 98, 271
Control Unit 45
extension
receiving 98
Transfer 41, 45, 70,
87, 98, 131, 133,
192, 217, 239, 244,
249, 253, 255, 256,
271, 278, 280, 291,
294, 325
Transfer Protocol 294
Transfer Return Time
255
Transferred back 87
Transferring a Call
70, 98, 271
Transit Network
Selector 234
Transmission Control
Protocol 180
Transmitted/received
278
Transmitting
Status 290
Transmitting 290
Transparent 64K 244,
249
Transparent 64K
G711 193
TransTalk 9040
MDW 260
TransTalk MDR 9040
262
Trap Both 183
Trap Destination 208
Trap Ping Replies
183
Trap Pings 183
Trap Sending 208
Trunk Type
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Incoming 232
Outgoing 232
Trunk Type 232, 239
Trusted Locations 75,
101
Trying
shortcode 299
Trying 299
Tunnel 294, 320,
321, 322, 323, 324
Tunnel Selection 320
Tunneling improves
security 320
Tunneling improves
320
Tunneling Protocol
320
Turns CRC 233, 237
Tx 239
Tx Gain 232, 235
Type
Control Unit 178
interconnection
246
Service 191
Set 197
Signaling 239
Type 178, 190, 191,
197, 239, 246
U
U 123
UDP 193, 207, 208,
322
UDP Port Marking
193
UgradeWiz.exe 34
UK 48
UK20 48
ULAW 217
Unable 92
Understanding
Short Codes 115
Understanding 115
Understanding IP
Routing via ISDN 185
Understanding Short
Codes 115
Unit 73
Unit form 210, 246
Unit IP address 186,
214, 246, 280
Unit type 191, 205,
207, 246
United States 22, 67,
71, 122, 311
Universal Dial Plan
216
University
Michigan 220
University 220
Unmaps 186
Unpark 96
Unparked 96
Unparks 96
Unsecure
crosses 320
Unsecure 320
Un-suitable 233, 237,
241
Unticked 210
Up/down 208, 223
Upgrade 23, 34, 37,
41, 210, 212
UpgradeWiz.exe 34
UPLINK button 24
URL 212
US 144, 145, 315
US PRI 234
USA 48, 212
USA/Japan 217
Usable/acceptable 71
Use
3DES 324
BACP/BCP 282
CHAP 321
checkboxes 211
Control Unit 193
Installation Wizard
179
IPsec 320
Overflow Group
111
Point-to-Point
Protocol 185
Q.931 Hold 135,
158
Q.931 Suspend
171
Speech 145
Use 111, 135, 145,
158, 171, 179, 185,
193, 211, 282, 320,
321, 324
Use Hiding 322
Use LMI 289
Use Start 197
Use System Defaults
248
Use winipcfg 280
User
busy signal 128
Call 101
dial in access 258
example allows
101
feature allows
139, 150
Full name 212,
252
Monitoring allows
114
number affects 75
Restrictions
applies 252
short code created
45
to/from 114
voicemail prompts
252
User 22, 24, 35, 42,
43, 44, 45, 68, 69,
70, 73, 74, 75, 76,
78, 87, 88, 89, 90,
95, 96, 97, 98, 99,
101, 106, 110, 113,
114, 115, 116, 117,
118, 121, 122, 123,
128, 129, 130, 133,
134, 135, 136, 137,
138, 139, 143, 144,
148, 149, 150, 153,
155, 156, 157, 159,
160, 161, 165, 166,
168, 169, 170, 171,
174, 175, 178, 179,
182, 183, 185, 186,
187, 188, 193, 195,
197, 212, 214, 217,
220, 221, 226, 227,
231, 234, 236, 238,
241, 242, 243, 244,
252, 253, 254, 255,
256, 258, 259, 260,
262, 263, 264, 265,
266, 267, 268, 269,
271, 272, 277, 278,
284, 286, 290, 291,
294, 299, 310, 312,
314, 316, 317, 318,
321, 322, 325
User changes
RAM 24
User changes 24
User collecting 101
User DSS button 312
User end 269
User form
Dial in tab 258
DND tab 254
Forward tab 258
Shortcodes tab
254
Source numbers
tab 255
Telephony tab 256
User tab 212, 252
Voicemail tab 253
User form 75, 106,
212, 252, 253, 254,
255, 256, 258
User Guide 68, 75
User ID
extension 312
User ID 312
User LED 312
User Name
LDAP 221
User Name 24, 42,
73, 74, 75, 113, 185,
195, 221, 252, 277,
321
Page 404
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Index
User name defaults
24
User Program 262,
263, 264, 265, 266,
267, 268, 269
User programming
Dial 268
User programming
268
User Restriction
Short Codes 115
User Restrictions
115, 116, 317
User setting 322
User shortcode 88
User wants 88, 97
User wishes 113
Users access
Internet 179
Users access 179
User's Button
Programming 69
User's calls 87
User's copy
Phone Manager
application 256
User's copy 256
Users making 318
User's Phone
Manager application
256
Users see 76
User's Short Codes
69, 115, 260
Using
Fallback Service
187
Night Service
Fallback Group
111
Overflow Group
111
Service 188
time profile 111
Using 111, 187, 188
Using a Fallback
Service 187
Using a Night Service
Fallback Group 111
Using a Service 188
Using a Time Profile
111
Using an Overflow
Group 111
Using DisplayMsg 70
Using DSS Keys 96
Using ISDN 188, 278
Using Manager 22,
24
Using Queuing 114
Using Short Codes
Change Group
273
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Using Short Codes
273
Using Special
Characters 121
Using Voicemail 101,
111, 172
Using Voicemail Pro
101, 172
UTC 25
V
V.11 73
V.110
supports 286
V.110 146, 282, 286
V.120
supports 286
V.120 146, 282, 286
V.24 73
V.32 239
V.35 73
V<Callers CLI 255
V110 282
V120 282
V2 192
V201 255
V202 101
V42 239
V7325551234 101
V7325551237 255
Values
TNS 234
Values 234
VCM
requires 325
VCM 178, 191, 223,
325
Venezuela 48
Verification
Polling 290
Verification 290
Version 23, 37, 195,
196, 220, 246
Video 286
Video Call 147
Video conferencing
286
Video Conferencing
Control Units 71
View
rights 42
Routing Table 190
View 42, 45, 190
View Menu 41
View, Edit 42, 312
Viewing the Routing
Table 190
Viewing Your PCs IP
configuration 182
VJ 282
VJ header
compression 282
VJ heder
compression 285
VM 95
VMCol 172
VMOff 174
VMOn 174
VMRB 175
Voice 244, 249
Voice Announce
place 70
Voice Announce 70
Voice Call 282
Voice Channels 226,
238, 241, 243
Voice Compression
Card
Control Unit 195
Voice Compression
Card 195
Voice Compression
Modules 191, 195
Voice Networking
244
Voice over IP 22, 191
Voice over IP Overview 191
Voice Packet 244,
249
Voice Packet
Payload
Sizing/Latency 193
Voice Pkt 244, 249
Voice pkt size 244,
249
Voice Recording
Account Code 310
Voice Recording 259,
274, 310
Voice, Data 229, 235,
236, 239
Voice56 282
Voicemail
Data channels
178
Internal Data
Channels 178
IP Address 216
Password 216
Voicemail 23, 25, 42,
48, 70, 75, 89, 90,
95, 99, 101, 106,
110, 111, 114, 132,
162, 172, 173, 174,
175, 178, 212, 216,
217, 239, 252, 253,
255, 256, 258, 259,
271, 272, 273, 274,
275, 286, 310, 325
Voicemail calls 252,
271
Voicemail code 101,
110, 253, 255, 272
Voicemail Collect 70,
172, 173
Voicemail destination
216
Voicemail email 110,
253, 272
Voicemail help 253,
272
Voicemail Lite 255
Voicemail Node 172,
173
Voicemail Off 174
Voicemail on 111,
162, 174, 253, 272
Voicemail on IP401
162
Voicemail on/off 253
Voicemail Pro 95,
101, 173, 212, 216,
255, 259, 274, 286,
310
Voicemail Pro
application 216
Voicemail Pro Server
25, 216
Voicemail Pro Short
Codes 173
Voicemail prompts
user 252
Voicemail prompts
252
Voicemail reception
253
Voicemail Recording
Level 239
Voicemail ringback
175, 253, 255
Voicemail Ringback
Off 175
Voicemail Ringback
On 175
Voicemail running
216
Voicemail Server
system connects
216
Voicemail Server 25,
101, 111, 212, 216,
253, 272
Voicemail Server
application 253
Voicemail tab
Hunt group form
272
User form 253
Voicemail tab 216,
253, 272
Voicemail Trusted
Source 255
Voicemail type 216
Voicemail type Audix
216
Voicemail uses
name 252, 271
Voicemail uses 252,
271
VoicemailCollect 123
VoicemailOff 123
Page 405
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Manager 3.0
VoicemailOn 123
VoicemailRingbackOf
f 123
VoicemailRingbackO
n 123
VoIP
Protocols 192
VoIP 22, 178, 191,
192, 194, 195, 196,
219, 244, 249, 256,
282, 291, 315
VoIP (VPN) 244
VoIP performance
192
VoIP Protocols 192
VoIP tab
Extension form
249
Line form 244
VoIP tab 244, 249
VPN 243, 244
VPN line 193, 194,
195, 196, 244
W
Wait
enter 264
Wait 264
WAN 23, 37, 44, 67,
73, 74, 178, 180,
185, 188, 191, 193,
195, 196, 197, 219,
229, 277, 279, 280,
282, 289, 290, 291,
321, 323
WAN Link
Configuring 74
WAN Link 73, 74,
219
WAN Port 73, 74,
197, 279, 289
Manager 3.0
IP Office
WAN Port Form
DLCIs tab 291
Frame relay tab
289
WAN port tab 289
WAN Port Form 196,
197, 289, 291
WAN01 289
WAN3 73, 208, 214,
223, 246, 279
WAN3 Control Unit
73
WAN3 Module
Installing 73
WAN3 Module 73
WANPort
Edit 74, 195
WANPort 74, 195,
289, 291
WanPort Tab 196
Wants
Control Unit 182
Wants 182
WARNING 22, 23,
37, 73, 114
Wats 236
Wav 92
Wav file 253, 272
Web 183
Website 207
Week 293
Weekly 281
When free 36, 37, 45,
165
Who Is 43
Wide Area Network
67, 73, 180
Wildcard 76
Wildcards 76, 310
Window Key 231,
234, 312
Window Menu 41
Windows
following 23
Windows 23, 183
Windows 2000
Professional 23
Windows 2000
Server Active 220,
221
Windows 95 DUN
282, 285, 322
Windows 95/98 179,
182
Windows application
22
Windows NT/2000
182
Windows NT4
Workstation 23
Windows PCs 215
Windows XP
Professional 23
Winipcfg 179, 182
Wink-Start 232
WinProxy
Traffic Through
183
WinProxy 183
WinProxy Server 183
WINS 215
WINS scope 215
WINS server IP
address 215
Wireless 316
Wireless 802.11b 315
Wireless Mac
Address 315
Wishes
monitor/control
252
Wishes 252
Wizard 37
Wizard application 34
Working
Hours 281
Working 182, 281
Working Directory 36,
39, 92, 210
WorldCom 234
Wrap up time 256
Wrap-up Time 170
WUTim 170
Www.avaya.com 182
X
X 121
X.500
part 220
X.500 220
XP 182
XP Professional
Server 23
Xxx 147
Xxxx 70, 147
Xxxxxxxxxx 121
Xxxxxxxxxxx 123
Y
Y 121, 122, 128, 160,
166
Y,n,text 166
Yes 183
Z
Zero Suppression
230, 233, 237
Zero/blank 281
Zones 311
Page 406
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
Performance figures and data quoted in this document are typical, and must be specifically
confirmed in writing by Avaya before they become applicable to any particular order or contract.
The company reserves the right to make alterations or amendments to the detailed
specifications at its discretion. The publication of information in this document does not imply
freedom from patent or other protective rights of Avaya or others.
Intellectual property related to this product (including trademarks) and registered to Lucent
Technologies have been transferred or licensed to Avaya.
All trademarks identified by the ® or ™ are registered trademarks or trademarks, respectively,
of Avaya Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
This document contains proprietary information of Avaya and is not to be disclosed or used
except in accordance with applicable agreements.
Any comments or suggestions regarding this document should be sent to
"wgctechpubs@avaya.com".
© 2005 Avaya Inc. All rights reserved.
Avaya
Sterling Court
15 - 21 Mundells
Welwyn Garden City
Hertfordshire
AL7 1LZ
England
Tel: +44 (0) 1707 392200
Fax: +44 (0) 1707 376933
Web: http://www.avaya.com
Manager 3.0
IP Office
Page 408
Issue 16f (8th February 2005)
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