Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler

Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler
Catalog Number 8990
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler
INSTRUMENT MANUAL
07/03 4ed
Catalog Number 8990
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler
INSTRUMENT MANUAL
© Hach Company, 2002, 2003. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.
eac 07/03 4ed
Visit http: //www.hach.com
Table of Contents
Safety Precautions .................................................................................................................................................... 7
Specifications ............................................................................................................................................................ 9
Section 1 Introduction ...................................................................................................................................... 15
1.1 Controller Cover ................................................................................................................................................ 15
1.2 Front Panel........................................................................................................................................................ 15
1.2.1 Keypad Description.................................................................................................................................. 16
1.2.2 Liquid Crystal Display .............................................................................................................................. 16
1.2.3 Internal Humidity Indicator....................................................................................................................... 17
1.3 Interface Connectors......................................................................................................................................... 18
1.3.1 Receptacle Caps ..................................................................................................................................... 18
1.4 Principle of Operation ....................................................................................................................................... 19
1.4.1 Liquid Sensing ......................................................................................................................................... 19
INSTALLATION .................................................................................................................................................... 21
Section 2 Installation......................................................................................................................................... 23
2.1 Unpacking the Instrument ................................................................................................................................. 23
2.2 Selecting the Installation Site ............................................................................................................................ 23
2.3 Installing the Pump Tube in the Sensor Body ................................................................................................... 24
2.3.1 Attaching the Intake Line ......................................................................................................................... 25
2.3.1.1 Attaching the Vinyl Tubing .......................................................................................................... 25
2.3.1.2 Attaching the Teflon®-Lined Tubing ........................................................................................... 25
2.3.2 Setting Up the Intake Line and Strainer................................................................................................... 26
2.4 Choosing Bottle and Retainer Configurations ................................................................................................... 26
2.5 Setting Up the Bottles ....................................................................................................................................... 27
2.5.1 One-Bottle Sampling ............................................................................................................................... 27
2.5.2 Two- and Four-bottle Sampling................................................................................................................ 27
2.5.3 Eight-, 12-, or 24-bottle Sampling............................................................................................................ 28
2.6 Installing the Distributor (Multiple Bottle Operation).......................................................................................... 29
2.6.1 Distributor Arm Alignment........................................................................................................................ 30
2.7 Installing the Full-Bottle Shut-Off Device (Single Bottle Operation) .................................................................. 31
2.8 Power Connections ........................................................................................................................................... 31
2.9 Auxiliary Receptacle Pin Identification .............................................................................................................. 32
2.9.1 Splitter Interface....................................................................................................................................... 33
OPERATION ......................................................................................................................................................... 35
Section 3 Basic Programming Setup ............................................................................................................ 37
3.1 Initial Power-Up of Sampler............................................................................................................................... 37
3.2 Basic Programming Setup ................................................................................................................................ 37
3.3 Advanced Sampling .......................................................................................................................................... 49
Section 4 Sensor Setup .................................................................................................................................... 61
4.1 Downlook Ultrasonic Sensor ............................................................................................................................. 61
4.1.1 Downlook Ultrasonic Sensor Connection ................................................................................................ 61
4.1.2 Downlook Ultrasonic Sensor Programming ............................................................................................. 61
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4.1.3 Downlook Ultrasonic Sensor Calibration ................................................................................................. 61
4.1.3.1 Liquid Depth................................................................................................................................ 61
4.1.3.2 Sensor Height ............................................................................................................................. 62
4.1.3.3 Setting the Invisible Range ......................................................................................................... 62
4.2 Submerged Area/Velocity Sensor ..................................................................................................................... 63
4.2.1 Submerged Area/Velocity Sensor Connection......................................................................................... 63
4.2.2 Submerged Area/Velocity Sensor Programming ..................................................................................... 63
4.2.3 Submerged Area/Velocity Submerged Area/Velocity Sensor Calibration ................................................ 64
4.3 Submerged Pressure Sensor............................................................................................................................ 65
4.3.1 Submerged Pressure Sensor Connection ............................................................................................... 65
4.3.2 Submerged Pressure Sensor Programming............................................................................................ 66
4.3.3 Submerged Pressure Sensor Calibration ................................................................................................ 66
Section 5 Optional Device Installation.......................................................................................................... 69
5.1 Rain Gauge ....................................................................................................................................................... 69
5.1.1 Rain Gauge Programming ....................................................................................................................... 70
5.2 pH Probe ........................................................................................................................................................... 70
5.2.1 pH Probe Connection .............................................................................................................................. 70
5.2.2 pH Probe Programming ........................................................................................................................... 71
5.2.3 pH Probe Calibration ............................................................................................................................... 71
5.3 ORP Probe........................................................................................................................................................ 72
5.3.1 ORP Probe Connection ........................................................................................................................... 72
5.3.2 ORP Probe Programming........................................................................................................................ 73
5.3.3 ORP Probe Calibration ............................................................................................................................ 73
5.3.3.1 ORP Preamplifier/Junction Box Calibration ................................................................................ 73
5.4 Dissolved Oxygen Probe................................................................................................................................... 74
5.4.1 Dissolved Oxygen Probe Connection ...................................................................................................... 74
5.4.2 Dissolved Oxygen Probe Programming................................................................................................... 74
5.4.3 Dissolved Oxygen Probe Temperature Programming ............................................................................. 75
5.4.4 Dissolved Oxygen Probe Calibration ....................................................................................................... 75
5.5 Conductivity Probe ............................................................................................................................................ 76
5.5.1 Conductivity Probe Connection ............................................................................................................... 76
5.5.2 Conductivity Probe Programming ............................................................................................................ 76
5.5.3 Conductivity Temperature Programming ................................................................................................. 76
5.5.4 Conductivity Probe Calibration ................................................................................................................ 77
Section 6 Communication Setup.................................................................................................................... 79
6.1 RS232 Cable..................................................................................................................................................... 79
6.1.1 RS232 Connection .................................................................................................................................. 79
6.1.2 RS232 Programming ............................................................................................................................... 79
6.2 Modem .............................................................................................................................................................. 80
6.2.1 Modem Connection ................................................................................................................................. 80
6.2.2 Modem Programming .............................................................................................................................. 80
6.2.2.1 Cellular Communication Option .................................................................................................. 81
6.2.2.2 Reliable Communications ........................................................................................................... 82
6.2.2.3 Cellular Modem Scheduling ........................................................................................................ 82
6.2.2.4 Cellular Modem Scheduling Basis .............................................................................................. 83
6.2.2.5 Cellular Modem Triggering ......................................................................................................... 84
6.2.2.6 Pager Option............................................................................................................................... 84
6.2.2.7 Reporting Devices ...................................................................................................................... 85
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6.3 4–20 mA Option ................................................................................................................................................ 87
6.3.1 4–20 mA Connection ............................................................................................................................... 87
6.3.2 4–20 mA Programming............................................................................................................................ 87
6.3.3 4–20 mA Calibration ................................................................................................................................ 88
6.4 Alarm Relays..................................................................................................................................................... 89
6.4.1 Alarm Relays Connection ........................................................................................................................ 90
6.4.2 Alarm Relays Programming..................................................................................................................... 91
6.4.2.1 Trouble Alarms ........................................................................................................................... 91
6.4.2.2 Set Point Alarms ......................................................................................................................... 91
6.5 Analog Inputs .................................................................................................................................................... 93
6.5.1 Analog Inputs Connection ....................................................................................................................... 93
6.5.2 Analog Inputs Programming .................................................................................................................... 94
MAINTENANCE ................................................................................................................................................... 95
Section 7 Maintenance ..................................................................................................................................... 97
7.1 Cleaning the Sampler ....................................................................................................................................... 97
7.1.1 Cleaning the Sampler Cabinet................................................................................................................. 97
7.1.2 Cleaning the Sample Bottles ................................................................................................................... 97
7.1.3 Cleaning the Intake Tubing and Pump Tubing ......................................................................................... 97
7.1.4 No Lubrication Required.......................................................................................................................... 97
7.2 Pump Tubing Maintenance................................................................................................................................ 97
7.2.1 Tubing Life Estimates............................................................................................................................... 97
7.2.2 Replacing Pump Tubing........................................................................................................................... 98
7.3 Upgrades, Repairs, General Maintenance ........................................................................................................ 98
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Considerations ................................................................................................. 99
7.4 Internal Maintenance Items............................................................................................................................... 99
7.5 Removing and Opening the Controller.............................................................................................................. 99
7.6 Re-installing the Bottom Panel........................................................................................................................ 100
7.7 Circuit Board Identification .............................................................................................................................. 101
7.8 Replacing the Fuse ......................................................................................................................................... 103
7.9 Motor/Gear Box............................................................................................................................................... 103
7.10 Internal Desiccant Module ............................................................................................................................ 103
7.10.1 Replacing the Desiccant...................................................................................................................... 103
7.11 Memory Battery ............................................................................................................................................ 104
Appendix A Quick Start Guides......................................................................................................................... 105
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Main Menu Flow Chart ..................................................................... 105
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Setup Flow Chart.............................................................................. 106
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Options Flow Chart........................................................................... 107
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Advanced Sampling Flow Chart ....................................................... 108
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Alarms Flow Chart............................................................................ 109
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Calibration Flow Chart (1 of 2) ......................................................... 110
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Calibration Flow Chart (2 of 2) ......................................................... 111
Appendix B Programming Features .................................................................................................................. 113
Review All Items ............................................................................................................................................. 113
Running a Program ........................................................................................................................................ 113
Displaying Data .............................................................................................................................................. 113
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Selecting the Channel .................................................................................................................................... 114
Tabular or Graph Format................................................................................................................................ 114
Graph Manipulation ........................................................................................................................................ 115
Graphic Display Averaging ............................................................................................................................. 115
Sample History ............................................................................................................................................... 115
Options Menu Features .................................................................................................................................. 116
Setting the Time and Date.............................................................................................................................. 116
Volume Calibration ......................................................................................................................................... 116
Data Log ......................................................................................................................................................... 119
Logging Intervals ............................................................................................................................................ 119
Dynamic Memory Allocation ........................................................................................................................... 120
Data Logging Configuration............................................................................................................................ 121
Diagnostics ..................................................................................................................................................... 121
Load Program................................................................................................................................................. 124
Screen Saver Mode........................................................................................................................................ 124
Flow Totalizer ................................................................................................................................................. 125
Appendix C Troubleshooting and Error Messages............................................................................................ 127
Error Messages .............................................................................................................................................. 127
Trouble Alarm Conditions, Causes, and Solutions ......................................................................................... 129
Downlook Ultrasonic Sensor Troubleshooting................................................................................................ 130
pH Troubleshooting ........................................................................................................................................ 131
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Troubleshooting Issues .................................................................... 132
Appendix D How to Calculate Pulses/Counts.................................................................................................... 133
Appendix E Exploded Drawings ........................................................................................................................ 137
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Assembly Drawing (1 of 3) ............................................................... 137
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Assembly Drawing (2 of 3) ............................................................... 138
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Assembly Drawing (3 of 3) ............................................................... 139
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Composite Sampler Assembly........................................................................ 140
Sigma 900 Composite Refrigerator Assembly................................................................................................ 141
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Discrete Sampler Assembly............................................................................ 142
Sigma 900 Discrete Refrigerator Assembly.................................................................................................... 143
Transition Tray Assembly ............................................................................................................................... 144
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Reference Dimensions ..................................................................... 145
GENERAL INFORMATION .............................................................................................................................. 147
Parts and Accessories .......................................................................................................................................... 149
Contact Information for U.S.A. and Outside Europe ............................................................................................. 153
Contact Information for Europe ............................................................................................................................. 154
Warranty ............................................................................................................................................................... 155
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Safety Precautions
Please read this entire manual before unpacking, setting up, or operating this instrument.
Pay particular attention to all danger and caution statements. Failure to do so could result in serious injury to the
operator or damage to the equipment.
To ensure the protection provided by this equipment is not impaired, do not use or install this equipment in any
manner other than that which is specified in this manual.
Use of Hazard Information
If multiple hazards exist, this manual will use the signal word (Danger, Caution, Note) corresponding to the
greatest hazard.
DANGER
Indicates a potentially or imminently hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in
death or serious injury.
CAUTION
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation that may result in minor or moderate injury.
NOTE
Information that requires special emphasis.
Precautionary Labels
Read all labels and tags attached to the instrument. Personal injury or damage to the instrument could occur if
not observed.
This symbol, if noted on the instrument, references the instruction manual for operation
and/or safety information.
This symbol, when noted on a product enclosure or barrier, indicates that a risk of electrical shock
and/or electrocution exists and indicates that only individuals qualified to work with hazardous voltages
should open the enclosure or remove the barrier.
This symbol, when noted on the product, identifies the location of a fuse or current limiting device.
This symbol, when noted on the product, indicates that the marked item can be hot and should not be
touched without care.
This symbol, when noted on the product, indicates the presence of devices sensitive to Electro-static
Discharge and indicates that care must be taken to prevent damage to them.
This symbol, when noted on the product, identifies a risk of chemical harm and indicates that only
individuals qualified and trained to work with chemicals should handle chemicals or perform
maintenance on chemical delivery systems associated with the equipment.
This symbol, if noted on the product, indicates the need for protective eye wear.
This symbol, when noted on the product, identifies the location of the connection for Protective Earth
(ground).
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Safety Precautions
Safety Precautions
Hazardous Locations
The Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler is not approved for use in
hazardous locations as defined in the National Electrical Code.
DANGER
Although some Sigma products
are designed and certified for
installation in hazardous
locations as defined by the
National Electrical Code, many
Sigma products are not suitable
for use in hazardous locations. It
is the responsibility of the
individuals who are installing the
products in hazardous locations
to determine the acceptability of
the product for the environment.
Additionally, to ensure safety, the
installation of instrumentation in
hazardous locations must be per
the manufacturer's control
drawing specifications. Any
modification to the
instrumentation or the
installation is not recommended
and may result in life threatening
injury and/or damage to facilities.
DANGER
Bien que certains produits Sigma soient conçus et certifiés pour être installés
dans des endroits dangereux tels que définis par le National Electric Code, de
nombreux produits Sigma ne conviennent pas pour de tels endroits. Il relève de
la responsabilité des personnes qui placent les produits dans des endroits
dangereux de déterminer s'ils sont adaptés à cet environnement. En outre, à des
fins de sécurité, le placement de machines dans des endroits dangereux doit
s'effectuer dans le respect des consignes des schémas de contrôle du fabricant.
Toute modification apportée aux machines ou tout déplacement de celles-ci est
déconseillé, car susceptible de provoquer des accidents matériels et/ou
corporels.
Confined Space Entry
Important Note: The following
information is provided to guide
users of samplers on the dangers
and risks associated with entry into
confined spaces.
On April 15, 1993, OSHA's final ruling on CFR 1910.146, Permit Required
Confined Spaces, became law. This new standard directly affects more than
250,000 industrial sites in the United States and was created to protect the
health and safety of workers in confined spaces.
Definition of Confined Space
A Confined Space is any location or enclosure that presents or has the
immediate potential to present one or more of the following conditions:
•
An atmosphere with less than 19.5% or greater than 23.5% oxygen
and/or more than 10 ppm Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S)
•
An atmosphere that may be flammable or explosive due to gases, vapors,
mists, dusts, or fibers
•
Toxic materials which upon contact or inhalation, could result in injury,
impairment of health, or death
Confined spaces are not designed for human occupancy. They have restricted
entry and contain known or potential hazards. Examples of confined spaces
include manholes, stacks, pipes, vats, switch vaults, and other similar
locations.
Standard safety procedures must always be followed prior to entry into
confined spaces and/or locations where hazardous gases, vapors, mists,
dusts, or fibers may be present. Before entering any confined space check
with your employer for procedures related to confined space entry
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Safety Precautions
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Specifications
Specifications are subject to change without notice.
General
Dimensions
Width 61 cm (24 in.), Depth 61 cm (24 in.), Height 110 cm (43.5 in.), Weight 63.3 kg (140 lb)
Cabinet
Fiberglass reinforced plastic with beige UV inhibited polymer laminate.
Temperature Range
-29 to +50 °C (-20 to 122 °F); With optional controller compartment heater, -40 to +50 °C
(-40 to 122 °F).
Recovery Time
With door open one minute in 24 °C (75 °F) ambient and 4 °C sample temperature, 5
minutes.
Pull-Down Time
From 24 °C (75 °F) to 4 °C (39 °F), 15 minutes.
Thermal System
Top mounted compressor/condenser with fan forced air cooled condenser; three-sided
wrap-around evaporator plate; 2 in. rigid foam insulation; microprocessor controlled
thermostat maintains sample liquid at 4 °C (±1 °C); frost free; compression gasket door seal;
refrigeration components and plumbing are corrosion protected with conformal coating.
Power Requirements
115 V ac, 60 Hz (230 and 100 V ac optional); Compressor Running Amperage 1.5–2.0 A.
Locked rotor current 12 amps. Installation Category II.
Optional ac
Power Backup
(Pump Controller Only)
Pump/Controller Only: Rechargeable 6 amp-hour gel lead acid battery takes over
automatically with ac line power failure. Integral trickle charger maintains battery at full
charge (factory installed option).
Internal Battery
Two C cell alkaline batteries; maintains program logic and real time clock for five years.
Internal battery current draws less than 40 micro amps.
Control Panel
21 key membrane switch keypad with 4 multiple function soft keys; 8 line x 40 character
alphanumeric, back lit liquid crystal graphics display. Self prompting/menu driven program.
Data Logging
Records program start time and date, stores up to 400 sample collection times/dates, all
program entries, operational status including number of minutes or pulses to next sample,
bottle number, number of samples collected, number remaining, sample identification
number, and all logged data (i.e. level, flow, pH, stream temperature, refrigerated
compartment sample temperature, ORP, rainfall, and any externally logged data - up to 7
external channels). Also, up to 200 events are logged, including alarm conditions, program
run/stop events, etc.
Set Point Sample Trigger
When equipped with integral flow meter, pH/temperature/ORP meter, conductivity, and/or
D.O. monitoring options, sampling can be triggered upon an upset condition when field
selectable limits are exceeded. Concurrent with normal sampling routine, sample liquid is
deposited in designated “trouble bottle(s)”.
Sampling Modes
Multiple Bottle Time, Multiple Bottle Flow, Composite Multiple Bottle Time, Composite
Multiple Bottle Flow, Composite Time, Composite Flow, Flow with Time Override, Variable
Interval, Start/Stop, and Level Actuation.
Program Delay
Three formats: (1) 1-9,999 minutes or flow pulses in one unit increments (2) programmable
sampler start time/date, and (3) programmable time/day of week.
Overload Protection
Controller: 5 amp dc line fuse. Compressor: Thermal overload relay opens at
110 °C (230 °F).
Diagnostics
Tests keypad, display, ROM, pump, liquid sensors, velocity signal, and distributor.
Program Lock
Access code protection precludes tampering.
Communications
EPROM Flash Memory
Via RS232. Permits embedded software upgrades in the field.
Serial Interface
RS232 compatible; allows on-site collection of stored data.
Modem (optional)
14400, V.32 bis, V.42, MNP2-4 error correction. V.42 bis MNP5 data compression.
MNP10-EC Cellular Protocol.
Pager
Alarm codes sent to up to three separate pagers’ telephone numbers.
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Specifications
Specifications
Sample Bottle Capacity
Single Bottle Mode
6 gal polyethylene (with polypropylene cap)
Two Bottle Sampling: Set of two 2.5 gal glass (with Teflon®-lined lid) or
3 gal polyethylene bottle (with polypropylene cap)
Multiple Bottle Mode
Four Bottle Sampling: Set of four 2.5 gal glass (with Teflon-lined lid) or
3 gal polyethylene bottles (with polypropylene cap)
Eight Bottle Sampling: Set of eight 1.9 liter glass bottles (with Teflon-lined lid) or
2.3 L polyethylene bottles (with polypropylene cap)
Twenty-four Bottle Sampling: Set of twenty-four 350 mL glass bottles (with Teflon-lined lid) or
1000 mL polyethylene bottles (with polypropylene cap)
Sampling Features
Multiple Programs
Stores up to five separate sampling programs.
Cascade
Allows using two samplers in combination where the first sampler at the completion of the
program initiates the second.
Upset Sampling
When equipped with integral flow meter, pH/temperature/ORP meter, conductivity, and/or
D.O. monitoring options, sampling can be triggered upon an upset condition when field
selectable limits are exceeded, concurrent with normal sampling routine, sample liquid is
deposited in designated “trouble bottle(s)”. Can also be triggered from an external trigger.
Status Output
Alerts operator to low main battery, low memory power, plugged intake, jammed distributor
arm, sample collected, and purge failure.
Automatic Shutdown
Multiple Bottle Mode: After complete revolution of distributor arm (unless Continuous Mode
selected). Composite Mode: After preset number of samples have been delivered to
composite container, from 1–999 samples, or upon full container.
Sample Volume
Programmed in milliliters, in one mL increments from 10 to 9999 mL.
Sample Volume
Repeatability
±5% typical
Sampling Interval
Time Proportional Sampling: Selectable in single increments from 1 to 9999 minutes in one
minute increments.
Flow Proportional Sampling: Continuous Volume, Variable Time (CVVT): 1 to 9999 “units” of
flow volume, where “units” are whatever is set up for in the integral flow option or -1 to 9999
external-meter flow pulses: (momentary contact closure 25 msec. Or 5–12 V dc pulse;
4–20 mA interface optional)
Flow Proportional Sampling: Constant Time, Variable Volume (CTVV):
Format: 999: 00 hrs:min. Selectable in 1-minute increments of 1 to 59,940 minutes.
Interval Between
Samples
Selectable in single increments form 1 to 9,999 flow pulses (momentary contact closure
25 msec. or 5–10 V dc pulse; 4–20 mA interface optional), or 1 to 9,999 minutes in one
minute increments, or 1 to 9,999,999 “units” of volume, where “units” are whatever is set up
for the integral flow option.
Multiplex (Multiple Bottle
Mode)
Multiple Bottle Mode: Programming allows multiple samples per bottle and/or multiple bottles
per sample collection.
Sample Pump and Strainer
Sample Pump
High speed peristaltic, dual roller, with 3/8 in. ID by 5/8 in. OD medical grade silicone rubber
pump tube.
Pump Body
Impact/corrosion resistant, glass reinforced Delrin®
Vertical Lift
27 ft maximum (Remote Pump Option recommended for lifts from 22 to 35 ft).
Sample Transport
Velocity
2 fps minimum, at 15 ft vertical lift in a 3/8 in. ID intake tube.
Pump Flow Rate
60 mL/sec at 3 ft vertical lift in a 3/8 in. ID intake line.
Liquid Sensor
Non-wetted, non-contact, ultrasonic.
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Specifications
8990spc.fm
Specifications
Intake Purge
Air purged automatically before and after each sample; duration automatically compensates
for varying intake line lengths.
Pump/Controller
Housing
High impact injection molded ABS; submersible, watertight, dust tight, corrosion & ice
resistant; NEMA 4X,6.
Internal Clock
Indicates real time and date; 0.007% time base accuracy.
Manual Sample
Initiates a sample collection independent of program in progress.
Intake Rinse
Intake line automatically rinsed with source liquid prior to each sample, from 0 to 3 rinses.
Intake Retries
Sample collection cycle automatically repeated from 0 to 3 times if sample is not obtained on
initial attempt.
Intake Tubing
¼ in. and 3/8 in. ID vinyl or 3/8 in. ID Teflon* lined polyethylene with protective outer cover.
Intake Strainers
Choice of Teflon® and 316 stainless construction, and all 316 stainless steel in standard size
and low profile for shallow depth applications.
Factory Installed Options
pH/Temperature/ORP Meter
Control/Logging
Field selectable to log pH/temperature or ORP independent of sample operation or to control
sample collection in response to volume exceeding low/high setpoints.
pH/Temperature Sensor
Temperature compensated; impact resistant ABS plastic body
Combination electrode with porous Teflon junction
Measurement Range
0 to 14 pH, -10 to 105 °C
Operating Temperature
-18 to 80 °C (0 to 176 °F)
Dimensions
1.9 cm dia. × 15.2 cm long (0.75 in. × 6 in.) with 1.9 cm (0.75 in.) mpt cable end
Dissolved Oxygen Meter
Control/Logging
Field selectable to log dissolved oxygen independent of sampler operation or to control
sample collection in response to volume exceeding low/high setpoints.
Measurement Method
Galvanic
Sensor
Temperature compensated; impact resistant polypropylene body
Measurement Range
0 to 20 mg/L
Resolution
0.01 mg/L
Accuracy
±3% of reading or 0.1 mg/L
Operating Temperature
0 to 50 °C (32 to 122 °F)
Dimensions
1.7 mm diameter × 15.7 cm long (0.65 in. × 6.25 in.) with 1.9 cm (0.75 in.)
Conductivity Meter
Control/Logging
Field selectable to log conductivity independent of sampler connection or to control sample
collection in response to volume exceeding low/high setpoints.
Sensor
Temperature compensated; impact resistant polypropylene body
Measurement Range
0 to 20 mS/cm
Resolution
0.01 mS/cm or 1 mS/cm
Accuracy
±2% of reading or 0.01 mS
Operating Temperature
0 to 50 °C (32 to 122 °F)
Dimensions
1.7 cm diameter × 15.2 cm long (0.67 in. x 6 in.) with 1.9 cm (0.75 in.) mpt cable end
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Specifications
Specifications
Rain Gauge Input
General Information
For use with the Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge.
The Sampler Program can be initiated upon field selectable rate of rain.
Sampler records rainfall data.
Each tip = 0.25 mm (0.01in.) of rain.
Analog Input Channels
General Information
Up to 3 additional data logging channels record data from external source(s)
Field assignable units
-4.0 to +4.0 V dc and 0 to 20 mA
4–20 mA Output
General Information
Up to 2 output signals available.
User assignable
Maximum Resistive
Load
600 ohms
Output Voltage
24 V dc–no load
Insulation Voltage
Between flow meter and 4–20 mA output—2500 V ac
Between the two 4–20 mA outputs—1500 V ac
Alarm Relays
General Information
(4) 10 amp/120 V ac or 5 amp/220 V ac form C relays
±0.1% FS Error
User assignable for any internal or external data channel or event.
Downlook Ultrasonic Sensor 40 kHz
Accuracy
0.003 m (±0.01 ft)
Maximum Range
3.35 m (11 ft) with a 3.05 m (10 ft) span
Deadband
38 cm (15 in.) maximum, self-minimizing
Material
PVC housing with Buna-N acoustic window
Cable
4 conductor with integral stainless steel support cable
Submerged Pressure Transducer
Material
Epoxy body with stainless steel diaphragm.
Cable
Polyurethane sensor cable with air vent.
Cable Length
7.6 m (25 ft) standard; 76 m (250 ft) maximum
Sensor Dimensions
2 cm H x 3.8 cm W x 12.7 cm L (0.8 in. x 1.5 in. x 5 in.)
Maximum Range
5 psi, 0.063 to 3.5 mm (0.018 to 11.5 ft)
15 psi, 0.063 m to 10.5 m (0.018 to 34.6 ft)
Maximum Allowable
Level
3x over pressure
Operating Temperature
Range
0 to 71 °C (32 to 160 °F)
Compensated
Temperature Range
0 to 30 °C (32 to 86 °F)
Air Intake
Atmospheric pressure reference is desiccant protected.
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Specifications
8990spc.fm
Specifications
Submerged Area/Velocity Probe
Method
Doppler Principle/Pressure Transducer.
Material
Polymer body, 316 series stainless steel diaphragm.
Cable
8-conductor urethane sensor cable with air vent.
Cable Length
7.6 m (25 ft) standard
Sensor Dimension
Length: 12.7 cm (5 in.)
Width: 3.8 cm (1.5 in.)
Height: 2 cm (0.8 in.)
Velocity
Velocity accuracy: 2% of reading; Zero Stability: <0.015 mps (<0.05 fps).
Response time: 4.8 seconds.
Profile Time: 4.8 seconds.
Range: -1.52 to 6.1 mps (-5 to +20 fps).
Resolution: 0.3 cm (0.01 fps).
Depth Accuracy: 0–3.35 m (0–11 ft) 1.37 mm (±0.054 in.)
0–10.06 m (0–33 ft) 4.09 mm (±0.161 in.)
Maximum Allowable Level: 3x over pressure.
Operating Temperature Range: 0 to 71 °C (32 to 160 °F).
Compensated Temperature Range: 0 to 30 °C (32 to 86 °F).
Depth
Temperature Error:
0.005 to 3.5 m ±0.0022 m/°C (0.018 to 11.5 ft ±0.004 ft/°F)
0.005 to 10.5 m ±0.006 m/°C (0.018 to 34.6 ft ±0.012 ft/°F)
(maximum error w/in compensated temperature range - per degree of change)
Velocity Induced Error on Depth (patent pending):
0 to 3.05 mps (0 to 10 fps) = 0.085% of reading.
Air Intake: Atmospheric pressure reference is desiccant protected.
8990spc.fm
Page 13
Specifications
Visit http: //www.hach.com
Section 1
Introduction
1.1 Controller Cover
The controller is mounted on top of a specially designed refrigerator. The
sample line passes through the top of the refrigerator and into the refrigerated
compartment where the sample containter(s) are located. The compartment
is surrounded by rigid foam insulation and utilizes a 120 CFM condenser fan.
An optional controller cover locks and protects the controller from damage
and unauthorized users.
Sample temperature is controlled by an adjustable air sensing thermostat
maintaining samples at 4 °C (39 °F) in ambients up to 50 °C (120 °F). The unit
has a magnetic door seal and does not require rear ventilation. The
refrigerator interior is food grade plastic and the exterior is coated galvanized
steel (304 stainless steel is optional). As a further barrier against corrosion,
the refrigeration components and copper plumbing are treated with phenolic
resin coating.
1.2 Front Panel
The front panel (Figure 1) of the sampler consists of the keypad, liquid crystal
display, and the internal case humidity indicator.
Figure 1
Front Panel
8
1
7
2
3
6
5
4
1.
Soft Keys
5.
Power OFF Key
2.
Manual Mode Key
6.
Main Menu Key
3.
Run/Stop Key
7.
Status Bar
4.
Power ON Key
8.
Menu Bar
8990int.fm
Page 15
Introduction
Section 1
1.2.1 Keypad Description
The keypad includes the numeric keypad, soft keys, and function keys.
Numeric Keypad
The numeric keypad consists digits 0 through 9, a +/- key, and a decimal key.
“Soft” Keys
Soft keys are blank, white keys located to the left and right of the display. If no
function is shown for a specific key, that key is not currently active. The soft
key labels appear on the display and indicates (with a straight line) the proper
soft key to push for that action.
In some cases during a programming step an item from a list needs to be
selected. The soft keys on the right side of the display will change to display
UP and DOWN arrows. Scroll through the list of choices.
Power ON/OFF Key
To turn the instrument on, press the ON key. When the instrument is turned
on, a green light located next to the ON key flashes to indicate that the
sampler power is turned on. To turn the instrument off, press the OFF key.
Function Keys
Three white function keys (Table 1) are located just above the numeric keypad
re used often while operating the sampler. These functions are dedicated
keys to allow quick access.
Table 1Function Key Descriptions
Function Key
Description
Main Menu
This is the starting point to get to any other point in the program. Press the Main Menu key at any time
during programming to return to the Main Menu Screen. The current action is cancelled if changes are not
yet accepted.
Manual Mode
Manually controls the operation of the sample pump and the distributor arm.
ADVANCED DISTRIBUTOR soft key: Moves the distributor arm to the user selected bottle. Used to verify the
operation of the distributor or when repositioning the arm if it was moved by hand.
GRAB SAMPLE soft key: Takes a sample in the same manner as when a program is running. Includes all
pre-rinses and sample retries, if programmed.
PUMP OPERATION soft key: Allows manual control of the pump in both forward and reverse directions. Once
started, the pump is stopped by pressing any key.
Run/Stop
Runs (or resumes) a program and stops a currently running program.
1.2.2 Liquid Crystal Display
The liquid crystal display (LCD) works in conjunction with the four soft keys.
When a soft key changes function, the display shows the new function.
Menu Bar
The Menu Bar appears in a black band on the top edge of the display.
The upper left corner of the menu bar shows the time and date. The upper
right corner shows the name of the current menu (Figure 1).
Page 16
Front Panel
8990int.fm
Section 1
Status Bar
The Status Bar appears along the bottom edge of the display.
The appearance of the status bar changes depending upon the
function performed (Figure 1). The lower left corner of the Status Bar
indicates whether a program is Complete, Running, Halted, or Ready To Start.
If it is not needed during a programming step, it disappears.
The lower right corner displays system alarm conditions, such as low memory
battery, jammed distributor etc. For a list of possible alarms refer to
section 6.4 on page 89. The status bar also lists the valid choices when
entering certain programming information.
1.2.3 Internal Humidity Indicator
The round window of the internal case humidity indicator (Cat. No. 2660)
turns pink when the internal case humidity exceeds 60 percent.
The sampler is equipped with an internal desiccant module (Cat. No. 8849) to
absorb any humidity that may have been trapped in the case during final
assembly. Under normal operating conditions, this desiccant provides longterm protection against condensed moisture inside the case.
Replacement of the internal desiccant module is only necessary if the
indicator turns pink. (Refer to section 7.10 on page 103 for details on
replacing the internal desiccant.)
Figure 2
Humidity Indicator
Internal Humidity
Replace
Desiccant
When
Pink
8990int.fm
Page 17
Front Panel
Section 1
1.3 Interface Connectors
Interface connectors are located on the left side of the controller housing. An
optional weather tight terminal box located on the back of the sampler
provides conduit termination for all input/output lines.
1
2
3
1.
12 V dc
2.
RS232
3.
Auxiliary
The sampler comes standard with two interface receptacles.
•
12 V dc (Power Input)
•
Auxiliary (Multi-purpose input/output port)
•
RS232 (Serial communications port)
•
Thermal (Control port for heating and cooling system)
In addition, the sampler can be used with a wide variety of optional devices:
•
Level and Flow Monitoring
(Sensors)
Three additional analog inputs of
4–20 mA or -4.0 V dc to +4.0 V dc
•
pH/ORP
•
4–20 mA Current Loop Output
•
Conductivity
•
Modem
•
Dissolved Oxygen
•
Rain Gauge
•
Temperature
1.3.1 Receptacle Caps
Interface receptacles are covered with push-on receptacle caps. These caps
protect the connector pins from dirt and moisture and should be attached to
any receptacle not in use.
Page 18
Interface Connectors
8990int.fm
Section 1
1.4 Principle of Operation
1.4.1 Liquid Sensing
The sampler is designed for indoor, permanent installation. All controls are
located on the front panel. Capped, watertight connectors for interfacing to
external devices are located along the left side of the controller.
The sampler uses a liquid sensing system to detect the absence or presence
of liquid at the peristaltic pump intake. The liquid sensor (Figure 3) is located
on the front of the control housing.
The liquid sensing system provides three primary benefits:
Figure 3
•
Accurate, repeatable sample volumes
•
Intake tube prerinse
•
Sample retry
Liquid Sensor
1
2
3
1.
Sensor Body
2.
Sensor Cover
3.
Knobs (turn to remove)
Accurate, Repeatable Sample Volumes
The liquid sensor detects the presence and velocity of the incoming sample.
This information allows the sampler to automatically dispense the correct
amount of liquid into the sample bottle.
The liquid sensing system allows the sampler to deliver repeatable sample
volumes even with changing suction lifts. Each time the peristaltic pump pulls
a sample, the microprocessor determines the time required for liquid to travel
to the liquid sensor. If the suction lift increases due to a drop in level at the
sample source, the time required for liquid to reach the sensor will increase.
The microprocessor automatically compensates for this change by allowing
the peristaltic pump to deliver sample liquid for a corresponding longer period
of time. Conversely, if suction lift decreases due to an increase in level at the
sample source, the time required for liquid to the sensor will decrease. Again,
the microprocessor automatically compensates for this change by decreasing
the sample delivery time.
8990int.fm
Page 19
Principle of Operation
Section 1
Intake Tube Pre-Rinse
The liquid sensor also rinses the intake tubing with the liquid from the sample
source before taking each sample.
Upon sample initiation, the pump purges the intake line. The pump then
reverses, pulling liquid through the tubing, until it reaches the liquid sensor.
When the sensor detects liquid, the pump purges back to the source, and
then draws a sample. After the desired sample is collected, the pump purges
the intake line and awaits the next sample cycle. The sampler can be
programmed for up to 3 rinses before each sample.
Sample Retry
The liquid sensing system permits the sampler to repeat a collection cycle if a
sample is not obtained during the regular cycle.
The intake line length is user-programmed into the sampler memory. For a
line length of 3 to 99 feet, the sampler has a built-in “look up” table that
detects the maximum time required for liquid to reach the sensor. If liquid
does not reach the sensor within the defined time period, the pump will
automatically purge the intake line and initiate another sample cycle. The
sampler may be programmed for up to three repeated attempts. If a sample is
not obtained, the sampler retains in memory the time, date and reason for the
missed sample.
Page 20
Principle of Operation
8990int.fm
INSTALLATION
DANGER
Some of the following manual sections contain information in the form of warnings, cautions and notes
that require special attention. Read and follow these instructions carefully to avoid personal injury and
damage to the instrument. Only personnel qualified to do so, should conduct the installation/maintenance
tasks described in this portion of the manual.
DANGER
Certains des chapitres suivants de ce mode d’emploi contiennent des informations sous la forme
d’avertissements, messages de prudence et notes qui demandent une attention particulière. Lire et suivre
ces instructions attentivement pour éviter les risques de blessures des personnes et de détérioration de
l’appareil. Les tâches d’installation et d’entretien décrites dans cette partie du mode d’emploi doivent être
seulement effectuées par le personnel qualifié pour le faire.
PELIGRO
Algunos de los capítulos del manual que presentamos contienen información muy importante en forma de
alertas, notas y precauciones a tomar. Lea y siga cuidadosamente estas instrucciones a fin de evitar
accidentes personales y daños al instrumento. Las tareas de instalación y mantenimiento descritas en la
presente sección deberán ser efectuadas únicamente por personas debidamente cualificadas.
GEFAHR
Einige der folgenden Abschnitte dieses Handbuchs enthalten Informationen in Form von Warnungen,
Vorsichtsmaßnahmen oder Anmerkungen, die besonders beachtet werden müssen. Lesen und befolgen
Sie diese Instruktionen aufmerksam, um Verletzungen von Personen oder Schäden am Gerät zu
vermeiden. In diesem Abschnitt beschriebene Installations- und Wartungsaufgaben dürfen nur von
qualifiziertem Personal durchgeführt werden.
PERICOLO
Alcune parti di questo manuale contengono informazioni sotto forma d’avvertimenti, di precauzioni e di
osservazioni le quali richiedono una particolare attenzione. La preghiamo di leggere attentivamente e di
rispettare quelle istruzioni per evitare ogni ferita corporale e danneggiamento della macchina. Solo gli
operatori qualificati per l’uso di questa macchina sono autorizzati ad effettuare le operazioni di
manutenzione descritte in questa parte del manuale.
8990i_stop.fm
Page 21
INSTALLATION
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Section 2
DANGER
This instrument should be
installed by qualified technical
personnel to ensure adherence to
all applicable electrical codes.
Installation
DANGER
Cet appareil doit être installé par du personnel technique qualifié, afin d'assurer
le respect de toutes les normes applicables d'électricité.
2.1 Unpacking the Instrument
Remove the sampler from the shipping carton and inspect it for any damage.
Contact Hach Customer Service at 1-800-227-4224 if any items are missing
or damaged.
2.2 Selecting the Installation Site
DANGER
This product is not designed for
hazardous locations where
combustible environments may
exist.
Figure 4
DANGER
Ce produit n'est pas conçu pour des endroits dangereux dans lesquels il peut
exister des environnements combustibles.
See Figure 4 and follow the simple guidelines below to allow complete
drainage of the intake line and prevent cross-contamination between samples.
•
Install the sampler as close to the sample source as site conditions
permit. This will increase pump tube life and optimize overall sampler
performance.
•
Install the sampler above the sample source, with the intake tubing
sloping downward to the sample.
•
Make sure that the intake tubing is free of kinks or loops.
Setting Up the Instrument
1
2
3
FLOW
1.
Slope tubing down to source (no
loops, kinks, or excessive tubing)
8990hrd.fm
2.
Place sampler on a level surface.
3.
Locate strainer in an area of
turbulent and well mixed flow.
Page 23
Installation
Section 2
2.3 Installing the Pump Tube in the Sensor Body
1. Remove the four screws on the pump cover (Figure 5).
Note: Do not stretch the tubing in
the sensor body, as this could affect
the ability of the sensor to detect
liquid through the pump tubing.
2. Remove the front cover of the pump housing. Remove the tubing. Locate
the black dots on the tubing. The end of the tube that extends farthest
beyond the black dot attaches to the stainless steel tubing connector.
3. Install the pump tube in the pump housing so the black dots are visible
just outside the pump body.
Note: Use the proper length of
silicone tubing in the pump body. An
improper length can reduce the life
of the tubing and pump rollers. Refer
to Figure 5 for the correct length.
Figure 5
4. After inserting the new pump tube as shown, reinstall the front cover and
secure it with the four screws until finger tight.
5. Make sure that the tubing extends through the liquid sensor and out of the
controller as shown in Figure 6.
Pump Tube Loading
11 5/8 in.
(Tubing in Pump)
To Intake Tubing Connector
5 3/4 in. to Sample Fitting
Figure 6
Installing Pump Tube Through the Sensor Body
Page 24
Installing the Pump Tube in the Sensor Body
8990hrd.fm
Section 2
2.3.1 Attaching the Intake Line
2.3.1.1 Attaching the Vinyl Tubing
The connection kit (Cat. No. 2248) contains two identical assemblies, one for
connecting vinyl tubing to the tubing attached to the sampler, and the other for
connecting the vinyl tubing to an intake strainer or remote pump. The kit
contains four hose clamps and two stainless-steel tubing connectors.
1. Push one end of the tubing connector into the vinyl tubing attached to the
controller until the tubing abuts the shoulder of the tubing connector.
Secure with a tubing clamp (Figure 7).
2. Push the other end of the tubing connector into the vinyl tubing until the
tubing abuts the shoulder of the tubing connector and secure with a
tubing clamp (Figure 7).
3. Repeat Step 1 and Step 2 for the fitting that connects the vinyl tubing to
an intake strainer or a remote pump.
Figure 7
3/8” Vinyl Tubing Connector
1.
Vinyl tubing to controller
3.
Tubing clamp (2 required)
2.
Vinyl tubing to strainer or pump.
4.
Stainless-steel tubing connector
2.3.1.2 Attaching the Teflon®-Lined Tubing
The Connection Kit for Teflon-lined Tubing (Cat. No. 2186) contains two
identical assemblies, one for connecting the Teflon-lined tubing to the
stainless steel tubing connector and the other for connecting the Teflon-lined
tubing to the intake strainer. The kit contains six clamps, two lengths of
silicone tubing, and two stainless-steel barbed fittings.
To connect the Teflon-lined tubing follow the instructions and Figure 8 below:
1. Place the Teflon-lined tubing over the tubing connector nipple until it abuts
the shoulder of the tubing connector and secure with a tubing clamp.
2. Place one end of the silicone tubing over the wide end of the tubing
connector and secure with a tubing clamp.
3. Slide a second tubing clamp over the other end of the silicone tubing.
Push the silicone tubing over the stainless-steel fitting on the intake
strainer and tighten the tubing clamp.
8990hrd.fm
Page 25
Installing the Pump Tube in the Sensor Body
Section 2
4. Repeat the procedure for the fitting that connects the Teflon-lined tubing
to the silicone pump tubing.
Figure 8
3/8″
ID Teflon-lined Tubing Attached to Intake Strainer and Tubing Connector
1.
Intake strainer
4.
Stainless-steel tubing connector
2.
Tubing clamp (3 required)
5.
Teflon-lined intake tubing
3.
Two-inch piece of silicone tubing
6.
Wide end of stainless steel tubing connector
2.3.2 Setting Up the Intake Line and Strainer
Note: If site conditions do not permit
the intake to slope downward from
the sampler to the sample source,
disable the liquid sensors by
calibrating the sample volume using
the Timed Calibrate method when
programming the sampler.
Note: Vertical lift should not exceed
27 ft. If the site requires more lift,
you may purchase the Remote
Pump Option. The remote pump
option is factory installed. Any
remote pump installed outside the
factory will void the warranty.
For each sampling location, the intake line should be as short as practical,
and be free of any sharp bends, coils, or loops. Install the intake line with a
downward slope from the sampler to the sample source because:
•
This will ensure the complete drainage of the intake line when it is
air-purged before and after each sample, and will help to prevent
cross-contamination of the individual samples.
•
Complete drainage is important in freezing conditions, as any liquid slugs
that remain could freeze and plug the line and possibly damage the
sampler.
Place the sample intake and strainer in the mainstream of the sampling
source, in an area of turbulent and well mixed flow.
Also, you must account for the vertical location of the intake. A position too
near the surface may yield excess lighter materials, while a position too near
the bottom may yield excess heavy materials. The constituents of interest
must be considered when positioning the intake strainer.
2.4 Choosing Bottle and Retainer Configurations
A broad range of bottle configurations are available for the Sigma 900 MAX
Refrigerated Sampler.
Page 26
Choosing Bottle and Retainer Configurations
8990hrd.fm
Section 2
Figure 9
Bottle Configurations
2.5 Setting Up the Bottles
2.5.1 One-Bottle Sampling
For single bottle composite sampling, install the Full Bottle Shut-off (refer to
Section 2.7 on page 31) and place the bottle in the center of the refrigerator
(Figure 15 on page 31). The Full Bottle Shut-off positions the sample tubing
over the bottle mouth.
2.5.2 Two- and Four-bottle Sampling
For two-bottle sampling, install the distributor (refer to Section 2.6.1 on
page 30) and place the bottles in the Bottle #1 and Bottle #2 positions in the
tray as shown in Figure 10.
8990hrd.fm
Page 27
Setting Up the Bottles
Section 2
For four-bottle sampling, install the distributor and place all four bottles in the
tray as shown in Figure 11.
Figure 10
Two-bottle Locations
2
2
3
1
1
Front
1.
Single Bottle Location
Figure 11
2.
Two Bottle Location
3.
Slots for Wire From Bottle Tray (8 or 24 bottle)
Four-bottle Locations
1
2
3
1
4
2
Front
1.
1, 2, or 4 Bottle Locations
2.
Slot for Wire From Bottle Tray (8 or 24 bottles)
2.5.3 Eight-, 12-, or 24-bottle Sampling
For eight-, 12- or 24-bottle sets, install the distributor (refer to section 2.6.1 on
page 30). Place the bottles in the tray and install the proper bottle retainer
(Figure 12).
Bottle #1 is the first bottle clockwise (looking down on the tray) from the right
side of the tray. Bottle #1 is located on the inside of each bottle tray for all
multiple bottle sets (Figure 12).
Page 28
Setting Up the Bottles
8990hrd.fm
Section 2
Figure 12
Eight-, 12-, or 24-bottle Configuration
1
2
3
1.
Distributor
2.
Retainer
3.
Bottles and Bottle Tray
2.6 Installing the Distributor (Multiple Bottle Operation)
Note: Make sure the sampler is
powered off before removing or
installing the distributor.
For multiple bottle sampling, a motorized arm (Distributor) is provided to
automatically position the sample tube over the proper bottle. The
microprocessor-controlled distributor arm can automatically locate two, four,
eight, 12, or 24 discrete bottles.
To install the distributor:
1. Locate the two slots along one edge of the distributor assembly base
plate (Figure 14). Slide the distributor assembly, slots first, under the
shoulder screws located on the top inside surface of the controller
section.
2. When fully seated, hand tighten the knurled thumbscrew to hold the
distributor in place.
3. To ensure the arm has sufficient freedom of movement, hand-rotate the
arm to the opposite end of the Arm Stop.
4. Install the silicone distributor tubing to the sample fitting on the top
underside surface of the controller housing.
Note: Use care not to force the arm past the Arm Stop clip. The Arm Stop keeps the
arm from being rotated more than 360 degrees and keeps the distributor tubing
from kinking.
The distributor tubing should be installed so that the end of the tubing extends
out of the nozzle end of the distributor arm no more than 1/8 in. (Figure 13). Do
not let the tubing extend more than 1/8 in. past the nozzle end of the arm.
8990hrd.fm
Page 29
Installing the Distributor (Multiple Bottle Operation)
Section 2
2.6.1 Distributor Arm Alignment
1. Program the sampler for 24-bottle operation.
2. Press START PROGRAM to set the distributor shaft to the
Bottle #1 position.
3. Place the arm on the distributor shaft and align the rib on the inside wall of
the control housing skirt.
4. Secure the arm to the shaft by tightening the 1/8 in. hex-head screw,
located on the distributor arm.
Figure 13
Distributor Tubing in Arm
1
2
1.
Distributor Shaft
Figure 14
2.
Nozzle End (1/8 in. max)
Distributor Installation
1
2
3
1.
Refrigerator
2.
Distributor Assembly
Page 30
Installing the Distributor (Multiple Bottle Operation)
3.
Distributor Arm
8990hrd.fm
Section 2
2.7 Installing the Full-Bottle Shut-Off Device (Single Bottle Operation)
1. Install the rubber grommet into the hole provided in the cap of the
composite bottle.
2. Slide the Full Bottle Shut-Off, float first, into the bottle through the center
of the grommet.
3. Insert the Full Bottle Shut-Off connector into the receptacle (Figure 15)
and securely tighten.
Figure 15
Full Bottle Shut-off Installation
2
1
1.
Full Bottle Shut-off
2.
Refrigerator
2.8 Power Connections
Note: Install the sampler on its own
circuit to ensure a continuous,
stable source of power.
Use the ac power cords to apply ac power to the controller and
the refrigerator.
The sampler controller operates on a 12 V dc which is supplied by a built-in
ac/dc power converter. The power supply is permanently sealed in the
compartment located behind the transition plate. An ac line fuse is located on
the left side of the controller.
An optional power backup assembly is located on top of the ac power supply.
The ac power backup is designed to power the pump and controller only. Pull
the rubber hold-downs up and over the clips at each end of the ac Power
Backup to hold it in place.
The short, 2-pin cable on the power supply (or battery) connects to the
controller receptacle labeled 12 V dc.
8990hrd.fm
Page 31
Installing the Full-Bottle Shut-Off Device (Single Bottle Operation)
Section 2
Important: Whenever electricity is present, there is a possibility of electrical
shock. Before connecting the sampler to an ac power source, the following
safety precautions should be taken:
•
Check the power source to make sure that it satisfies the ac power
requirements of the sampler.
•
Make sure that all electrical installations and connections are in
accordance with national and local electrical codes.
•
Before performing any maintenance, disconnect the sampler from the
power source.
•
Do not attempt to make any connection or otherwise handle the electrical
components of the sampler when connected to ac line power if the
immediate area is wet, or if hands or clothing are wet.
•
If the circuit breaker or fuse in the ac power source is tripped, determine
the cause before restoring power to the sampler.
•
Make sure the power circuit is grounded and protected with a Ground
Fault Interrupter (GFI).
2.9 Auxiliary Receptacle Pin Identification
Pin A/White (12 V dc)
Powers an external device or flow meter. Must be used in conjunction with Pin B (ground).
Pin B/Blue (Ground)
Connected to dc ground and is isolated from the earth ground found in the ac power line.
Pin C/Yellow (Pulse Input)
With the sampler in Flow Proportional mode and connected to an external flow meter, a 5 to
12 V dc input pulse lasting at least 25 milliseconds will cause the sampler to decrement one
count. The 12 V dc line found on Pin A can be used directly with a simple contact closure to
Pin C or an external 5 to 12 V dc pulse may be applied providing the ground side of the
external signal is connected to the sampler ground at Pin B. This count is actuated at the
beginning of the input signal (the leading edge of the pulse).
Pin D/Black
(Liquid Level Actuator/
Auxiliary Control Input)
This line is held at 5 V dc inside the sampler. When shorted to ground (Pin B), a signal is sent
to the microprocessor inside the sampler causing it to “wake up” and begin or resume its
sampling program. It can be used in conjunction with a simple level float to actuate the
sampler when liquid is present or to take over after a second sampler has finished its
program. It may also be used with any device (such as a pH meter) that produces a dry
contact output to control the sampler in response to some user-defined condition (i.e. high or
low pH); must be used in conjunction with Pin B.
Pin E/Red (Special Output)
Normally at 0 V dc, this line goes to 12 V dc upon any of the selected events described in.
Normally an open circuit, this line switches to ground for 90 seconds at the conclusion of the
sampling program. Used to “wake up” another sampler to take over sampling or to signal an
Pin F/Green
operator or data logger upon the completion of the sampling program. This pin is also used to
(Program Complete Output)
signal the bottle full condition in a single bottle/continuous mode, and will transmit the bottle #
to an 950 Flow Meter if the program complete signal is disabled.
Page 32
Auxiliary Receptacle Pin Identification
8990hrd.fm
Section 2
2.9.1 Splitter Interface
Use the Splitter Interface (Cat. No. 939) when more than one signal is needed
simultaneously. Connecting the interface to the 6-pin connector on the
sampler provides three additional connectors. Two or more interfaces may be
connected in series to allow for additional connections.
Figure 16
8990hrd.fm
Splitter Interface
Page 33
Auxiliary Receptacle Pin Identification
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OPERATION
DANGER
Handling chemical samples, standards, and reagents can be dangerous. Review the necessary Material
Safety Data Sheets and become familiar with all safety procedures before handling any chemicals.
DANGER
La manipulation des échantillons chimiques, étalons et réactifs peut être dangereuse. Lire les Fiches de
Données de Sécurité des Produits (FDSP) et se familiariser avec toutes les procédures de sécurité avant
de manipuler tous les produits chimiques.
PELIGRO
La manipulación de muestras químicas, estándares y reactivos puede ser peligrosa. Revise las fichas
de seguridad de materiales y familiarícese con los procedimientos de seguridad antes de manipular
productos químicos.
GEFAHR
Das Arbeiten mit chemischen Proben, Standards und Reagenzien ist mit Gefahren verbunden. Es wird dem
Benutzer dieser Produkte empfohlen, sich vor der Arbeit mit sicheren Verfahrensweisen und dem richtigen
Gebrauch der Chemikalien vertraut zu machen und alle entsprechenden Materialsicherheitsdatenblätter
aufmerksam zu lesen.
PERICOLO
La manipolazione di campioni, standard e reattivi chimici può essere pericolosa. La preghiamo di prendere
conoscenza delle Schede Techniche necessarie legate alla Sicurezza dei Materiali e di abituarsi con tutte
le procedure di sicurezza prima di manipolare ogni prodotto chimico.
8990o_stop.fm
Page 35
OPERATION
Visit http: //www.hach.com
Section 3
Basic Programming Setup
3.1 Initial Power-Up of Sampler
After pressing the ON key, the sampler performs a complete diagnostic test
and displays the menu shown when the unit was last turned off. Set the
instrument programming features when the Main Menu is displayed. The Main
Menu is the starting point for all programming operations. The Main Menu
offers four choices:
•
Setup—Basic and Advanced Sampling programming
•
Status—Lists all current sampling status, power supply voltage, and
values of any data channels that are enabled.
•
Display Data—Shows graphs and tables of logged data
(Displaying Data on page 113)
•
Options—Optional Device Programming
Setup and Option functions lead to sub-menus and will configure the basic
and advanced features of the sampler. Refer to the Quick Start Guides on
page 105. The Display Data and Status Menus lead to sub-menus and will
provide information only. Press STATUS to display any data channels that have
enabled logging (flow, pH, temp., etc.)
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
* MAIN MENU*
DISPLAY DATA
SETUP
OPTIONS
STATUS
READY TO START
3.2 Basic Programming Setup
Basic programming setup must be performed, step-by-step and in its entirety,
after the instrument is installed. Refer to the Quick Start Guides on page 105
for more information. The basic program setup will modify the following items:
•
Bottles
•
Intake Tubing
•
Program Lock
•
Program Delay
•
Sample Collection
•
Sample Distribution
•
Liquid Sensor
•
Sample Volume
•
Intake Rinses
•
Sample Retries
•
Site ID
In addition, several advanced sampling features are found on a sub-menu
called Advanced Sampling. Refer to section 3.3 on page 49 for Advanced
Sampling Basic Programming Setup.
8990startup.fm
Page 37
Basic Programming Setup
Section 3
To make changes to the program entries after the basic programming setup,
press MAIN MENU and select SETUP>MODIFY SELECTED ITEMS and highlight
the program entry using the UP and DOWN keys.
To review all information in the Setup and Option menus without worrying
about accidentally changing the information, use the Review All Items function
to verify that the program is properly set up. For more information on this
function refer to Review All Items on page 113.
1. Press SETUP from the Main Menu to prepare the instrument for use.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
* MAIN MENU*
DISPLAY DATA
SETUP
OPTIONS
STATUS
READY TO START
2. From the Main Menu select SETUP>MODIFY ALL ITEMS.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
* MAIN MENU*
MODIFY
ALL ITEMS
REVIEW ALL
ITEMS
READY TO START
MODIFY
SELECTED ITEMS
3. Press ACCEPT to begin setting up the bottles.
Step 1 - Bottles
1-A. Enter the total number of sample bottles in the refrigeration
compartment, using the numeric keypad.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
BOTTLES
NUMBER OF BOTTLES:
—
CLEAR
ENTRY
BACKUP
ENTER: 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, OR 24
Note: The bottles may be installed directly in the refrigeration compartment or in the
removable bottle tray when using sets greater than four bottles.
1-B. Press ACCEPT to continue and move to the Bottle Volume menu.
Page 38
Basic Programming Setup
8990startup.fm
Section 3
1-C. Enter the bottle volume using the numeric keypad and select gallons or
milliliters using the CHANGE UNITS key.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
BOTTLES
BOTTLE VOLUME
——
CHANGE
UNITS
CLEAR
ENTRY
BACKUP
ENTER: 0.500—99.90
1-D. Press ACCEPT and continue to Intake Tubing.
Step 2 - Intake Tubing
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
INTAKE TUBING
INTAKE TUBE LENGTH:
_____
CHANGE
UNITS
CLEAR
ENTRY
BACKUP
ENTER: 3—99
2-A. Enter the intake tube length attached to the sampler, using the numeric
keypad. Length values from 100 to 3000 cm (3 to 99 ft) are valid.
Change the measurement unit using the CHANGE UNITS key.
Note: Intake tube length affects sample volume accuracy, cut the tubing to the nearest
whole foot. Avoid excessively long tubing runs. Doubling the intake tubing length
can quadruple the pump tubing wear if intake rinses or sample retries are
enabled. Always locate the sampler close to the sample liquid source to minimize
tubing, pump, motor, and gearbox maintenance.
2-B. Press ACCEPT to move to the Intake Tube Type menu.
2-C. Select the type of intake tube (3/8 in. Vinyl, ¼ in. Vinyl, 3/8 in. Teflon®)
using the CHANGE UNITS key.
2-D. Press ACCEPT to select the intake tube type and continue with Program
Lock.
Step 3 - Program Lock
Note: The program lock password is
configured at the factory as “9000”
and cannot be changed.
Enabling the Program Lock will provide a protective “password” which will
keep unauthorized personnel from tampering with the instrument keypad.
3-A. Enable or Disable Program Lock using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
Note: When program lock is enabled and a user attempts to make a change in the
program, a screen will ask the operator to enter the password. The operator must
enter 9000 and press ACCEPT.
3-B. Press ACCEPT to continue the basic program setup and continue with
Program Delay.
8990startup.fm
Page 39
Basic Programming Setup
Section 3
Step 4 - Program Delay
Note: If both Setpoint Sampling and
Program Delay are enabled, the
program delay is evaluated first,
prior to any checking for
setpoint conditions.
4-A. Enable or Disable Program Delay using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
Enabling the Program Delay will cause the sampling program to delay
starting until a user specified time and day of week are programmed.
4-B. After enabling the program delay, enter the time and day of week that
the program will begin. Use the soft keys to change the day of week as
well as the AM/PM indicator.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
PROGRAM DELAY
CHANGE
AM/PM
START PROGRAM:
00:00 AM MON
CLEAR
ENTRY
CLEAR
DAY
(USE THE NUMERIC KEYPAD)
4-C. Press ACCEPT to continue with Sample Collection.
Step 5 - Sample Collection
5-A. Select the type of sample collection; Time Proportional,
Flow- Proportional Constant Volume, Variable Time (CVVT), or
Flow-Proportional Constant Time, Variable Volume (CTVV).
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
SAMPLE COLLECTION
SAMPLE COLLECTION
_______________
CHANGE
CHOICE
BACKUP
CHOICES: TIMED, FLOW PROPORTIONAL
Timed-Proportional Sampling Intervals
When the program starts, a sample is taken immediately or delayed until after
the first interval has elapsed. Select either, Take First Sample Immediately or
After the First Interval.
Timed-Proportional samples are taken each time a user defined time interval
has elapsed. Samples can be continually taken at that interval until the
completion of the program.
a. From the Sample Collection menu, press CHANGE CHOICE until
Timed Proportional is displayed. Press ACCEPT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
SAMPLE COLLECTION
SAMPLE COLLECTION
TIMED PROPORTIONAL
CHANGE
CHOICE
BACKUP
CHOICES: TIMED, FLOW PROPORTIONAL
Page 40
Basic Programming Setup
8990startup.fm
Section 3
b. Enter the Interval Between Samples. Press ACCEPT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SAMPLE COLLECTION
ACCEPT
INTERVAL:
00:00 (hrs:min)
CANCEL
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER: 000:01—999.00 (hrs:min)
c. Select either Take First Sample Immediately or After The
First Interval?
Note: When the program is started, the first sample is taken immediately upon
pressing the start button or after the first interval has elapsed.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
SAMPLE COLLECTION
CHANGE
CHOICE
TAKE FIRST SAMPLE:
_______________
CANCEL
CHOICES: IMMEDIATE, AFTER 1st SAMPLE
d. Press ACCEPT to continue to Sample Distribution.
Flow Proportional Constant Volume, Variable Time (CVVT)
CVVT sampling is a flow-proportional method of sampling. CVVT samples are
taken when a user-defined flow volume occurs in the flow stream. This occurs
when the sampler is programmed to take a sample every time a specified
volume of flow occurs in the flow stream. Specified flow volume intervals can
vary with the flow rate of the stream, therefore varied time intervals can occur
when constant (fixed) volume occurs.
Flow volume is determined internally, by the optional integral flow meter or by
an external flow meter.
a. Press CHANGE CHOICE until Flow Proportional is displayed. Press
ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
SAMPLE COLLECTION
CHANGE
UNITS
SAMPLE COLLECTION:
FLOW-PROPORTIONAL
CANCEL
ENTER: 1.00 - 99999999
b. In the Flow Proportional menu, press CHANGE CHOICE until Constant
Volume, Variable Time is displayed. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
FLOW PACING
CHANGE
CHOICE
FLOW PACING MODE:
CONST VOL / VAR TIME
CANCEL
CHOICES: VAR T / CST VOL, CST T / VAR VOL
8990startup.fm
Page 41
Basic Programming Setup
Section 3
c. Select either Integral or External flow meter and press ACCEPT.
d. Enter the flow volume between samples using the numeric keypad
and select a unit of measure using the CHANGE UNITS key, then press
ACCEPT. Refer to Table 2 for flow unit choices.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
SAMPLE COLLECTION
CHANGE
UNITS
TAKE SAMPLE EVERY:
1500 gal
CLEAR
ENTRY
CANCEL
ENTER: 1.00—99999999
Table 2 Sampler Pacing Flow Units
Abbreviation
Volume
gal
gallons
ltr
liters
m3
cubic meters
af
acre-feet
cf
cubic feet
e. Enable or Disable Timed Over-Ride using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
Press ACCEPT to continue, then enter a time period using the
numeric keypad.
Note: Select Timed Over-Ride if the flow rate drops to an unusually low value
during flow-proportional sampling and if the sample is collected once an hour
for example, even if the flow interval has not elapsed.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
SAMPLE COLLECTION
TIMED OVER-RIDE:
00:00 (hrs:min)
CLEAR
ENTRY
CANCEL
ENTER: 000:01 — 999:00 (hrs:min)
f.
Select Take First Sample Immediately or After First Interval?
Note: When the program is started, the first sample is taken immediately upon
pressing the start button or after the first interval has elapsed.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SAMPLE COLLECTION
CHANGE
CHOICE
ACCEPT
TAKE FIRST SAMPLE:
_______________
CANCEL
CHOICES: IMMEDIATE, AFTER 1st SAMPLE
g. Press ACCEPT to continue to Sample Distribution.
Page 42
Basic Programming Setup
8990startup.fm
Section 3
Flow Proportional Constant Time, Variable Volume Sampling (CTVV)
A Level-Velocity Sensor Input must be logged and electrically connected for
the CTVV feature to work correctly.
CTVV samples are taken at user-specified constant (fixed) intervals. However
the actual volume of each sampling is based on the known average flow rate
of the site, the actual metered flow rate for each specific interval, the total
sample volume desired, the user-specified collection period, and the specified
Sampling Interval. Depending on the flow volumes of a stream and various
intervals within the Collection Period, the volume of individual sampling can
vary. Also, the total sample collected during the entire period can carry slightly
above or below the Total Volume Desired. For these reasons, the
manufacturer advises to use a sampling container that has a larger volume
than the Total Volume Desired value.
•
Sample Distribution menus are not available when CTVV is selected.
•
A level-velocity sensor input must be logged and electrically connected for
the CTVV feature to correctly work.
•
The Flow Pacing Mode menu within the Flow Proportional menus
sequence will not remember the previous setting whenever you re-enter
this menu, it will revert to the CVVT default. When re-entering this menu,
press CHANGE CHOICE to select the sampling method, CVVT or CTVV.
Example:
This is an example of how the instrument determines sample volume, based
on user inputs and actual metered flow volume.
The user entered values are the following:
•
Average Flow Rate (historical, site specific): 150 gph
•
Sampling Interval: 2 minutes
•
Total Sample Volume Desired: 1500 mL
•
Collection Sampling Period: 30 minutes
Calculation 1: Total Number of Samples
Sample Period - = 30
min.- = 15 samples total within specified period
-------------------------------------------------------------Sampling Interval
2 min.
Calculation 2: Average Sample Volume
Total
Sample Volume Desired- = -------------------------------------------1500 mL
------------------------------------------------------------------------------- = 100 mL/sample
Total Number of Samples
15 samples Total
Calculation 3: Sample’s Volume per unit of Flow Rate
Avg.
Sample Volume- = 100
mL/Sample- = 0.7mL/gph
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Avg. Flow Rate
150 gph
Calculation 4: Actual Sample Volume to be Collected
Sample Volumes per unit of Flow Rate × Actual metered Flow Rate
0.7 mL/gph × 150 gph = 105 mL for this sample interval
8990startup.fm
Page 43
Basic Programming Setup
Section 3
a. In the Sample Collection menu, press CHANGE CHOICE until Flow
Proportional is displayed. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SAMPLE COLLECTION
CHANGE
UNITS
ACCEPT
SAMPLE COLLECTION:
FLOW-PROPORTIONAL
CANCEL
ENTER: 1.00 - 99999999
b. In the Flow Pacing menu, press CHANGE CHOICE until
Const Time/Var Vol appears. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
FLOW PACING
CHANGE
CHOICE
ACCEPT
FLOW PACING MODE:
CONST TIME/ VAR VOL
CANCEL
CHOICES: VAR T / CST VOL, CST T / VAR VOL
c. In the Average Flow Rate menu use the numeric keypad to enter the
known historical Average Flow Rate for a particular site.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CONST TIME/ VAR VOL
AVERAGE FLOW RATE:
150.00 gph
CLEAR
ENTRY
CANCEL
ENTER: 1.00—99999999
d. In the Interval menu use the numeric keypad to enter the time interval
between sample collections. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CONST TIME/ VAR VOL
INTERVAL:
0:02 (hrs:min)
CLEAR
ENTRY
CANCEL
ENTER: 1.00—999:00 (hrs:min)
e. In the Total Volume Desired menu use the numeric keypad to enter
the total volume of the sample. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CONST TIME/ VAR VOL
TOTAL VOLUME DESIRED:
1500 Ml
CLEAR
ENTRY
CANCEL
ENTER: 10—9999
Page 44
Basic Programming Setup
8990startup.fm
Section 3
f.
In the Collection Period menu use the numeric keypad to enter the
time period for collecting samples.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CONST TIME/ VAR VOL
COLLECTION PERIOD
0:30 (hrs:min)
CLEAR
ENTRY
CANCEL
ENTER: 000:01—999:00 (hrs: min)
g. Press ACCEPT to continue to Sample Distribution.
Step 6 - Sample Distribution
Sample distribution describes the way samples are deposited in a bottle(s).
Several bottle combinations are available with the sampler (Figure 10 on
page 24). Sample distribution is deposited into a single bottle or multiple
bottles. Multiple bottle applications use a distributor arm to automatically aim
the sample intake tubing into the proper bottle. Multiple bottle sets deliver
each sample to all bottles or deliver each sample into individual bottles or a
subset of bottles.
Single Bottle
6-A. Select either Stop After Last Bottle or Run Continuously Stop After Last
Bottle mode stops the program when the sample is deposited into the
last bottle. Run Continuously mode continues running until it is
manually stopped.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
SAMPLE DISTRIBUTION
CHANGE
CHOICE
RUN MODE:
RUN CONTINUOUSLY
CANCEL
CHOICES: CONTINUOUS, STOP AFTER LAST
6-B. Press ACCEPT to continue to Liquid Sensor setup.
Multiple Bottle Sets
Multiple bottle applications use a distributor arm to automatically aim the
sample intake tubing into the proper bottle. Multiple bottle sets deliver each
sample to all bottles or deliver each sample into individual bottles or a subset
of bottles.
6-A. Select YES or NO for Deliver Each Sample to All Bottles.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
8990startup.fm
SAMPLE DISTRIBUTION
DELIVER EACH SAMPLE TO
ALL BOTTLES?
NO
CHOICES: YES, NO
CHANGE
CHOICE
Page 45
Basic Programming Setup
Section 3
If NO is selected:
a. Select Samples per Bottle or Bottles per Sample.
Example 1: Samples Per Bottle
•
Bottles— 8
•
Sample Collection; Time-Proportional; Sampling Interval—30 min.
•
Sample Distribution; Deliver Each Sample to All Bottles?— No
Samples Per Bottle— Yes
Number of Samples Per Bottle— 3
•
Sample Volume—100 mL
Every 30 minutes a sample is initiated. A 100 mL sample is drawn into
bottle #1, 30 minutes later a second sample is drawn into bottle #1, 30
minutes later a third sample is drawn into bottles #1. Thirty minutes later
the distributor arm advances to bottle #2 and a 100 mL sample is drawn
into bottle #2. The sequence continues until all bottles are filled. Each
bottle receives three samples before the distributor moves to the next
bottle.
Example 2: Bottles Per Sample
Note: A high pressure air purge is
automatically applied to the intake
tube between each sample
intake cycle.
•
Bottles— 4
•
Sample Collection; Timed Proportional; Sampling Interval— 30 min.
•
Sample Distribution; Deliver Each Sample to All Bottles?— No
Bottles Per Sample— Yes
Number of Bottles Per Sample— 2
•
Sample Volume— 1000 mL
Every 30 minutes a sample cycle is initiated. A 1000 mL sample is drawn
into the first bottle. The distributor arm immediately advances to bottle #2
and a 1000 mL sample is drawn into the second bottle. Thirty minutes
later, the distributor arm advances to bottle #3, and a 1000 mL sample is
taken. The distributor arm immediately advances to bottle #4 and a 1000
mL sample is drawn into the fourth bottle. The pattern continues each
sample cycle with each set of two bottles receiving a sample each time.
b. Press ACCEPT to continue with Liquid Sensor setup.
If YES is selected:
Each time a sample is taken it is consecutively placed in all bottles. This
allows for split samples.
a. Select Stop After Last Sample or Run Continuously.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
SAMPLE DISTRIBUTION
RUN MODE:
RUN CONTINUOUSLY
CHANGE
CHOICE
BACKUP
CHOICES: CONTINUOUS, STOP AFTER LAST
Page 46
Basic Programming Setup
8990startup.fm
Section 3
b. If Stop After Last Sample is chosen, enter the samples to collect
using the numeric keypad. Press ACCEPT to continue to
Liquid Sensor.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SAMPLE DISTRIBUTION
ACCEPT
BACKUP
SAMPLES TO COLLECT:
2
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER: 1 — 999
Example 1: The following example creates four identical composite
samples automatically if the sampler is programmed as follows:
•
Bottles— 4
•
Sample Collection; Sampling Interval— 30 minutes
•
Sample Collection; Samples to Collect— 25
•
Sample Volume— 100 mL
Every 30 minutes a sample is initiated and a 100 mL sample is drawn into
the first bottle. The distributor arm advances to bottle #2 and 100 mL of
sample is drawn into the second. This also occurs in bottles #3 and #4.
Sampling will continue every 30 minutes until 25 samples are deposited.
Once all samples are deposited the program will terminate. If Run
Continuously is selected the sampling will restart automatically.
Step 7 - Liquid Sensor
The liquid sensor contains a pair of ultrasonic transducers which sense the
presence of liquid inside silicone tubing.
7-A. Enable or Disable Liquid Sensor using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
Note: Sample retries cannot be
enabled when the liquid sensor
is disabled.
Enabling the Liquid Sensor
When the liquid sensor is enabled, the sampler will perform two duties:
•
It senses when liquid reaches the pump during an intake cycle. The pump
then reverses to rinse the line, up to three times.
•
It senses the absence of liquid during a sample intake cycle if the intake
tubing is plugged or if the water level has dropped below the level of the
intake tube strainer. This initiates a Sample Retry if programmed
Disabling the Liquid Sensor/Timed Calibration
Disabling the liquid sensor turns the liquid sensor off. The sample volume is
then metered using a timed method (Timed Calibration), instead of a
sensed method.
7-B. Press ACCEPT to continue to Sample Volume.
8990startup.fm
Page 47
Basic Programming Setup
Section 3
Step 8 - Sample Volume
Note: The minimum sample volume
is ten milliliters.
When multiple bottles are selected in Bottle Per Sample mode all bottles in a
subset receive a full sample volume. The volume is not divided among
the bottles.
8-A. Enter the desired volume of each sample using the numeric keypad.
Press ACCEPT to continue to Intake Rinses.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SAMPLE VOLUME
ACCEPT
BACKUP
SAMPLES VOLUME:
______
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER: 10 — 9999
Step 9 - Intake Rinses
9-A. Enter number of rinses using the numeric keypad.Press ACCEPT to
continue to Sample Retries.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
INTAKE RINSES
ACCEPT
BACKUP
INTAKE RINSES:
0
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER: 0 — 3
Up to three intake rinses are enabled per sample cycle. After the sample
cycle’s initial purge has been completed, the sample liquid is drawn in until it
reaches the liquid sensor. The pump stops and purges the line before any
liquid enters the bottle. This is repeated up to three times before the actual
sample is taken and the line purged for the final time during that cycle.
Intake rinse can prevent cross contamination of samples. When the line is
purged at the end of each sample cycle, a few droplets of sample liquid may
cling to the inside walls of the tubing and the droplets are drawn in with the
following sample. Intake rinses will condition the intake line with a source
liquid that minimizes contamination from the previous sample.
Step 10 - Sample Retries
Note: Excessive intake tube line
lengths combined with multiple
Intake Rinses and Sample Retries
can increase the pump tube and
drive train wear. Locate the sampler
as close to the sample liquid source
as possible to minimize wear and
maintenance requirements.
10-A. Enter the number of Sample Retries using the numeric keypad. Press
ACCEPT to continue to Site ID.
Up to three sample retries are enabled per sample cycle. After the initial purge
is completed, the sample liquid is drawn until it reaches the liquid sensor. If
the sample liquid does not reach the sensor within a reasonable time
(determined using the tubing length), the sample attempt is aborted, a purge
is initiated and the first of up to three sample retries is attempted.
After three attempts and no sample liquid has been collected, the cycle is
aborted, a Missed Sample is reported to the Sample History Log, and the
sampler begins a new sample interval.
Page 48
Basic Programming Setup
8990startup.fm
Section 3
Step 11 - Site ID
11-A. Enter a site identification number of up to 8 digits. This Site ID will
appear on all data printouts. This feature is useful when multiple sites
are monitored using a single flow meter or if data readings from multiple
flow meters are collected.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SITE ID
ACCEPT
BACKUP
SITE ID:
00000000
CLEAR
ENTRY
(USE NUMERIC KEYPAD)
11-B. Press ACCEPT.
11-C. After Site ID is accepted the following menu will appear:
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ADVANCED SAMPLING
DO YOU WISH TO
ACCESS THE ADVANCED
SAMPLING FEATURES?
YES
NO
ENTER: 1 — 999
11-D. If NO, the basic setup program is complete.
Note: To return to the Advanced Sampling options at a later time, from the Main Menu
select, SETUP>MODIFY SELECTED ITEMS>PROGRAM ENTRIES. Highlight
Advanced Sampling and press SELECT. In the Advanced Sampling menu highlight
an item using the UP and DOWN keys and press SELECT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SELECT
PROGRAM ENTRIES
INTAKE RINSES
SAMPLE RETRIES
SITE ID
ADVANCED SAMPLING
RETURN
11-E. If YES, continue to Advanced Sampling, section 3.3.
3.3 Advanced Sampling
When enabled, the Advanced Sampling option will have an arrow pointing at it
on the Advanced Sampling menu display.
Advanced Sampling Choices Include:
8990startup.fm
•
Program Complete Output
•
Timed Bottle Sets
•
Setpoint Sampling
•
Upset Sample
•
Special Output
•
Variable Intervals
•
Start/Stop Times
•
Variable Volumes
•
Storm Water
Page 49
Advanced Sampling
Section 3
Step 12 - Program Complete Output
Program Complete Output sends a +12 V dc signal out Pin F of the Auxiliary
Receptacle at the completion of the sampling program. This signal is also sent
when a Full Bottle condition causes the program to complete. The Program
Complete signal remains on (+12 V dc) for 61 seconds and then turns
back off (0 V dc).
Program Complete Output is used for the following purposes:
•
Multiple Sampler Operation. Samplers are arranged in a “Cascade”
control where the first sampler signals a second sampler to start its
program when the first sampler’s program is complete. This feature
requires the second sampler to be programmed for external
start operation.
•
To interface to a PC to signal the end of the sampling program.
•
To interface to a relay that trips a signal light in a control room to indicate
that sampling is finished and samples are ready to be picked up.
12-A. From the Advanced Sampling menu highlight Program Complete using
the UP and DOWN keys. Press SELECT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ADVANCED SAMPLING
SELECT
RETURN
PGM CMPLT OUTPUT
SETPOINT SAMPLING
SPECIAL OUTPUTS
12-B. Enable or Disable Program Complete using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
12-C. Press ACCEPT to continue to Set Point Sampling.
Step 13 - Setpoint Sampling
Setpoint sampling allows the control of an automatic liquid sampler from one
of up to 14 sources. Setpoint sampling defines a set of limits that inhibit
sampling until an upset condition occurs, causing the limits to exceed.
Sampling is enabled only when the waste stream falls outside the setpoints.
13-A. Highlight Setpoint Sampling using the UP and DOWN keys on the
Advanced Sampling Menu. Press SELECT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SELECT
PGM CMPLT OUTPUT
RETURN
SETPOINT SAMPLING
SPECIAL OUTPUTS
START/STOP TIMES
ADVANCED SAMPLING
13-B. Enable or Disable Setpoint Sampling using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
Press ACCEPT to continue.
Page 50
Advanced Sampling
8990startup.fm
Section 3
13-C. Select either Start on Setpoint or Stop on Setpoint by pressing
CHANGE CHOICE. Press ACCEPT to continue.
•
Start on Setpoint will start a program when the setpoint condition is
met. The program continues to run even if the condition falls back
within the setpoint limits.
•
Stop On Setpoint halts the program if the setpoint condition falls back
within the setpoint limits and starts again if the limits are exceeded.
13-D. Highlight the desired channel to trigger from, then press SELECT.
13-E. Press either HIGH CONDITION or LOW CONDITION.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SETPOINT CONDITION:
SETPOINT SAMPLING
HIGH
CONDITION
LOW
CONDITION
Note: Flow Rate of Change and Rainfall are signals that only increase and never
decrease in value, therefore these signals do not require Low Condition.
The external control signal must be configured on the external equipment for
the desired setpoint. An external control device must provide a dry contact
and can include a float switch, push-button, external flow meter, etc. For
interface connections refer to section 2.10 on page 29.
13-F. Enable or Disable the trigger point using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
13-G. Select the desired high or low trigger point using the numeric keypad.
Press ACCEPT. Refer to Table 3.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
SETPOINT SAMPLING
SETPOINT SAMPLING:
HIGH TRIGGER POINT:
00000 in.
CLEAR
ENTRY
(USE NUMERIC KEYPAD)
13-H. Enter the Deadband value if required or, if programming Flow Rate Of
Change or Rainfall, enter a time interval that the flow or rainfall change
must take place (refer to section 6.4 on page 87).
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
SETPOINT SAMPLING
SETPOINT SAMPLING
DEADBAND:
0.000
CLEAR
ENTRY
(USE NUMERIC KEYPAD)
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Advanced Sampling
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13-I. Enter a delay when input is active. This delay will keep the program
from starting until the end of the delay period. Using the numeric
keypad, enter the delay in minutes and/or hours. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
SETPOINT SAMPLING
DELAY WHEN INPUT
BECOMES ACTIVE:
(hrs:min)
CLEAR
ENTRY
(USE NUMERIC KEYPAD)
Table 3 Sampling Triggers and Settings
Channel
Sampling Trigger
Settings
1
Level
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
2
Flow
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
3
Flow Rate of Change
High Condition within Time Interval
4
pH or ORP
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
5
Process Temperature
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
6
Rainfall
High Condition within Timed Interval
7
Analog Input Channel 1
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
8
Analog Input Channel 2
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
9
Analog Input Channel 3
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
10
Analog Input Channel 4 or DO
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
11
Analog Input Channel 5 or DO Temperature
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
12
Analog Input Channel 6 or Conductivity
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
13
Analog Input Channel 7 or Conductivity Temperature
High and/or Low Condition, Deadband
14
External Control
Configured in External Equipment
Step 14 - Special Output
The Special Output is a +12 V dc signal that appears on Pin E of the Auxiliary
Receptacle (refer to section 2.10 on page 29).
14-A. Highlight Special Output using the UP and DOWN keys on the Advanced
Sampling Menu. Press SELECT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SELECT
RETURN
ADVANCED SAMPLING
PGM CMPLT OUTPUT
SETPOINT SAMPLING
SPECIAL OUTPUTS
START/STOP TIMES
STORM WATER
14-B. Enable or Disable Special Outputs using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
Press SELECT to continue.
14-C. If enabled, select After Each Sample, Only When Pumping, or From
Rinse to Purge.
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Section 3
Bottle Number
If the Program Complete Output is disabled, then it is used in conjunction with
this Special Output to transmit the bottle number to the connected device.
The Special Output signal can be configured to activate during one of the
following conditions:
•
After Each Sample—One second pulse at the completion of each sample
cycle. It signals an external datalogger or PC that a sample cycle was
initiated. When this choice is enabled, the sample success/failure is also
transmitted to the external datalogger by means of Pin F on the
Auxiliary connector.
•
Only When Pumping—During sample intake portion of cycle only,
ignoring all purges and rinse cycles. Used for tipping solenoid or ball
valves when sampling from a pressurized line.
•
From Rinse To Purge—During entire sample cycle, including all purge
and rinse cycles. Used for tripping solenoid or ball valves when sampling
from a pressurized line.
Step 15 - Start/Stop Times
Start/Stop Times start and stop a program at pre-arranged times. For
example, this feature can be used to run a program during weekdays and stop
the program during weekends, restarting on the following Monday. It can also
halt sampling for nighttime shutdowns.
Up to 12 Start and 12 Stop time entries can be set in any one program. Either
a Start Time and Date or a Start Time and Day of the Week may be selected.
15-A. Highlight the Start/Stop Time choices on the Advanced Sampling menu.
Press SELECT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
PGM CMPLT OUTPUT
SETPOINT SAMPLING
SELECT
SPECIAL OUTPUT
START/STOP TIMES
STORM WATER
RETURN TIMED BOTTLE SETS
ADVANCED SAMPLING
15-B. Enable or Disable Start/Stop Times using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
Press ACCEPT to continue.
15-C. Press CHANGE CHOICE to select either Time/Date or Time/Weekday.
Select Time/Date if the start and stop times are longer than one week.
Select Time/Weekday if the program repeats on a daily or weekly basis.
15-D. Press ACCEPT to continue.
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15-E. Enter the Start Time #1, press ACCEPT to continue. Enter Stop Time #
and press ACCEPT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
START/STOP TIMES
PROGRAM START #
(TIME:DAY)
1
CLEAR
ENTRY
HIT CLEAR, THEN ACCEPT, AFTER LAST ENTRY
CHANGE
DAY
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CHANGE
AM/PM
START/STOP TIMES
PROGRAM STOP #
(TIME:DATE)
CLEAR
ENTRY
HIT CLEAR, THEN ACCEPT, AFTER LAST ENTRY
1
CHANGE
AM/PM
CHANGE
DAY
15-F. Continue entering Start and Stop times until finished. To exit and save
entries, enter a blank time and date. Press CLEAR ENTRY and then
press ACCEPT to continue to Storm Water.
Step 16 - Storm Water
EPA regulations for storm water discharges require monitoring of
precipitation, flow, and water samples in order to assess the impact of storm
or snow melt runoff on receiving waters. The manufacturer can help you
create a storm water monitoring system that consists of a multiple bottle
sampler, an external flow meter, and a tipping bucket rain gauge.
In addition to performing basic sampling routines, 900 MAX Series Samplers
that are equipped with the storm water monitoring program have the following
additional capabilities:
Page 54
Advanced Sampling
•
The storm water sampling routine allows collection of automatic grab
sample(s) at user-selectable timed intervals (up to 24 different intervals
may be selected) during the storm's early stage or “first flush.” First flush
grab and main program flow weighted composite samples are
automatically segregated. The first flush sample volume may be set
independently of the sample volume for the flow weighted composite.
•
The special storm water program allows an external device to initiate the
start of the sampling program. A dry contact closure across Pins B and D
on the Auxiliary receptacle, held closed for at least 61 seconds, is
required.
•
When sampling with multiple bottles, the sampler can be programmed to
collect one large “first flush” sample (or small multiple samples) at timed
interval(s). The number of bottles segregated for the first flush sample is
selectable. Concurrently, flow weighted samples are collected from the
beginning of the storm until all remaining bottle(s) are filled, or after a user
selected time has elapsed.
8990startup.fm
Section 3
•
Storm water samplers are equipped with a special prerinse that occurs
only with the first sample collection. This “one time only” rinse ensures a
clean intake for installations that may remain dormant for extended
periods, and extends battery life by eliminating the prerinse for
subsequent samples.
16-A. Highlight Storm Water using the UP and DOWN keys on the Advanced
Sampling Menu. Press SELECT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SETPOINT SAMPLING
SPECIAL PUTPUT
SELECT
START/STOP TIMES
STORM WATER
TIMED BOTTLE SETS
RETURN UPSET SAMPLE
ADVANCED SAMPLING
16-B. Enable or Disable Storm Water using the CHANGE CHOICE key. Press
ACCEPT to continue.
16-C. Select a Start Condition using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
•
Rain
•
Level
•
Rain or Level (either conditions must be met for the program to begin)
•
Rain and Level (both conditions must be met for the program
to begin)
•
Immediate (program starts as soon as the RUN key is pressed, a start
condition is not required)
•
External Trigger (program starts when signaled by an external device
at least 61 seconds through the Auxiliary connector. No start
condition is required).
16-D. Enter the Start Condition Limits. Rainfall times will depend on the
historical rainfall in a specific area. Consult your state or an EPA
regional office for details.
Table 4 Start Condition Requirements
Rain
Enter the amount of rainfall and the time period when it must fall.
Level
Level Limit
Rain and Level
Enter the amount of rainfall and the time period when it must fall, and desired level limit.
Immediate
No start condition required
External Trigger
No start condition required
First Flush Bottles
First flush describes the initial storm water runoff. This runoff may contain
higher concentrations of pollutants and is sequestered in separate bottles
from the flow or time-weighted composite samples.
a. Enter the number of bottles to set aside for the First Flush portion of
the sampling program using the numeric keypad.
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Advanced Sampling
Section 3
The number of first flush bottles will depend on the sample volume
requirements in the NPDES permit.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
STORM WATER
FIRST FLUSH:
NUMBER OF BOTTLES:
1
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER: 1— 4
b. Enter number of samples to collect using the numeric keypad.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
STORM WATER
FIRST FLUSH:
SAMPLER TO COLLECT:
6
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER 1 — 999
c. Enter the first flush sampling interval. This is the time period between
sample cycles. The first flush samples are usually collected within
thirty minutes of the storm.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
SETPOINT SAMPLING
FIRST FLUSH
INTERVAL:
(hrs:min)
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER: 000:00 — 999:00 (hrs:min)
Variable time intervals may be entered or the same interval may be carried
through the entire first flush. Pressing FINAL ENTRY carries the last displayed
interval through the remainder of the first flush sampling period.
d. Enter the first flush sample volume using the numeric keypad.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
STORM WATER
FIRST FLUSH:
SAMPLE VOLUME
100 mL
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER 10 — 9999
e. Enable or Disable Program Time Limit using the CHANGE CHOICE
key. When enabled, the Program Time Limit will stop all sampling
activity at the end of the time limit, however data logging will continue.
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Advanced Sampling
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Section 3
f.
Enter the Program Time Limit. NPDES typically requires monitoring
during the first three hours of any given storm. If the flow volume was
not as high as expected, flow-weighted sampling could continue for
some time as flow rates drop off and sample intervals
become longer.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
SETPOINT SAMPLING
STORM WATER:
PROGRAM TIME LIMIT:
(hrs:min)
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER: 000:01 — 999:00 (hrs:min)
g. Press ACCEPT to continue to Timed Bottle Sets.
Step 17 - Timed Bottle Sets
Timed Bottle Sets enables a single sampler to function like multiple samplers.
Timed Bottle Sets takes a 24-bottle sampler and sample using the first 12
bottles on the first day and the second bottles on the next day.
When a subset of bottles is set aside for each user defined time interval the
sampler will treat that subset as if it were the entire set. At the end of the time
interval the sampler will switch to the next subset and continue sampling.
17-A. Highlight Timed Bottle Sets using the UP and DOWN keys on the
Advanced Sampling Menu. Press SELECT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SPECIAL PUTPUT
START/STOP TIMES
SELECT
STORM WATER
TIMED BOTTLE SETS
UPSET SAMPLE
RETURN VARIABLE INTERVALS
ADVANCED SAMPLING
17-B. Enable or Disable Timed Bottle Sets using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
Press ACCEPT to continue.
17-C. Select a method for switching bottle sets. Select either clock time that
switches bottle sets every 24 hours or select duration that sets the
bottles sets in minutes and hours.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
TIMED BOTTLE SETS
USE CLOCK TIME OR
DURATION:
DURATION (hh:mm)
CHANGE
CHOICE
CANCEL
The number of bottles that were selected in bottles-per-sample mode are
used as the bottle set size. Two bottles per-sample means two bottles per
Timed Bottle Set.
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Advanced Sampling
Section 3
17-D. Enable or Disable Continuous Mode using the CHANGE CHOICE key. If
Continuous Mode is enabled the program will continuously run and
switch bottle sets after every specified duration elapses, until manually
stopped. If Continuous Mode is disabled, then the sampling halts when
the last bottle set in the tray is full.
17-E. Press ACCEPT to continue to Upset Sample.
Step 18 - Upset Sample
Upset Sampling analyzes the collected samples to determine when samples
meet or exceed specified upset limits. The sampler will swing the distributor
arm around to a sequestered set of bottles and grab an upset bottle.
The upset sample bottles are always the last bottles in the tray. For example, if
there are 24 bottles in the tray, 4 first flush bottles and 4 upset bottles, then the
bottles assignment is 1–4 first flush, 5–20 main program, and 21–24
upset samples.
Note: Unlike Setpoint Sampling,
Upset Sampling can be enabled
while the sampler is performing its
regular sampling program. There
must be more than one bottle in the
sampler to perform Upset Sampling.
Upset Samples are collected even when there are no more regular samples to
be taken; when the status screen says Program Complete, but the bottom line
of the display says Program Running.
Refer to the Quick Start Guides on page 103 for more setup information for
individual channels.
18-A. Highlight Upset Sampling using the UP and DOWN keys on the
Advanced Sampling Menu. Press SELECT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
START/STOP TIMES
STORM WATER
SELECT
TIMED BOTTLE SETS
UPSET SAMPLING
VARIABLE INTERVALS
RETURN VARIABLE VOLUME
ADVANCED SAMPLING
18-B. Enable or Disable Upset Sampling using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
Press ACCEPT to continue.
18-C. Press CHANGE CHOICE to select the desired channel to trigger from.
Press ACCEPT to make the selection.
18-D. Press either HIGH CONDITION or LOW CONDITION.
•
Flow Rate of Change and Rainfall are signals that only increase in
value and do not require Low Condition.
•
The external control signal (such as an external flow meter) must be
configured in the external equipment for the desired setpoint.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
UPSET CONDITION:
UPSET SAMPLES
HIGH
CONDITION
LOW
CONDITION
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Advanced Sampling
8990startup.fm
Section 3
18-E. Enter the desired high or low trigger point using the numeric keypad.
Press ACCEPT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
UPSET SAMPLES
UPSET SAMPLING:
HIGH TRIGGER POINT:
00000 in.
CLEAR
ENTRY
(USE NUMERIC KEYPAD)
18-F. Enter the Deadband value or, if programming for Flow Rate Of Change
or Rainfall, enter a time interval when the flow or rainfall change must
take place (refer to Alarm Relays Programming on page 91).
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
UPSET SAMPLES
UPSET SAMPLING
DEADBAND:
0.000
CLEAR
ENTRY
(USE NUMERIC KEYPAD)
18-G. Enter the number of bottles (out of the total set) to set aside for upset
samples. These will be the last bottles in the tray.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
UPSET SAMPLES
UPSET SAMPLING:
NUMBER OF BOTTLES
2
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER 1 — 4
18-H. Select the method of distribution, Sample Per Bottle or
Bottles Per Sample.
18-I. Enter the sample volume using the numeric keypad.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CANCEL
UPSET SAMPLES
UPSET SAMPLING
SAMPLE VOLUME:
0000
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER 10 — 9999
18-J. Press ACCEPT to continue to Variable Intervals.
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Advanced Sampling
Section 3
Step 19 - Variable Intervals
19-A. Highlight Variable Intervals using the UP and DOWN keys on the
Advanced Sampling Menu. Press SELECT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
STORM WATER
TIMED BOTTLE SETS
SELECT
UPSET SAMPLING
VARIABLE INTERVALS
VARIABLE VOLUME
ADVANCED SAMPLING
RETURN
19-B. Enable or Disable Variable Intervals using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
Press ACCEPT to continue.
19-C. Set sample intervals using the numeric keypad. Press ACCEPT to enter
another interval or press ACCEPT AS FINAL to return to the Advanced
Sampling menu and continue to Variable Volumes.
Step 20 - Variable Volume
20-A. Highlight Variable Volume using the UP and DOWN keys on the
Advanced Sampling Menu. Press SELECT to continue.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
TIMED BOTTLE SETS
UPSET SAMPLES
SELECT
VARIABLE INTERVALS
VARIABLE VOLUME
ADVANCED SAMPLING
RETURN
20-B. Enable or Disable Variable Volume using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
Press ACCEPT to continue.
20-C. Enter the Sample Volume counts using the numeric keypad. Press
ACCEPT to return to the Advanced Sampling Menu.
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Advanced Sampling
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Section 4
Sensor Setup
4.1 Downlook Ultrasonic Sensor
4.1.1 Downlook Ultrasonic Sensor Connection
The downlook ultrasonic sensor connection is located on the back side of the
refrigerated cabinet. The gray rectangular box houses the ultrasonic module
and the transducer connector labeled ULTRASONIC. The connector is keyed
and can only be inserted in the proper orientation (key up).
4.1.2 Downlook Ultrasonic Sensor Programming
The downlook ultrasonic sensor does not require specific programming,
unless more than one sensor option is connected to the sampler. When more
than one sensor option is connected to the sampler:
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS>LEVEL SENSOR.
2. Select Ultra-Sonic using the CHANGE CHOICE key. Press ACCEPT.
4.1.3 Downlook Ultrasonic Sensor Calibration
Calibrate the current water level via one of two methods; Liquid Depth or
Sensor Height. An Invisible Range can also be set which allows the
transducer to ignore reflections from obstructions between the sensor and the
water surface, such as ladder rungs, channel side walls, etc. Each method
has its own advantages and disadvantages; selecting the proper method will
depend upon the site conditions. Calibrate the ultrasonic sensor each time the
sensor is installed at a new site.
4.1.3.1 Liquid Depth
This method requires the level or depth of liquid in the channel that is
contributing to flow. In a round pipe, the entire depth typically contributes to
flow. In a weir, only the depth that is flow over the weir plate contributes to
flow. Level Depth calibration is primarily used when:
Note: Always re-check the
Level Adjust when re-installing the
flow meter.
•
Access is available to the primary device for a physical measurement of
the liquid depth, and
•
When water is flowing during installation (channel is not dry).
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS>ADVANCED
OPTIONS>CALIBRATION>ULTRASONIC SENSOR.
2. Select Calibrate U-Sonic using the UP and DOWN keys. Press SELECT.
3. Select Standard as the type of Ultrasonic Transducer using the CHANGE
CHOICE key. Press ACCEPT to continue.
Temperature Time Constant
The speed of sound in air varies with the temperature of the air. The ultrasonic
sensor is equipped with temperature compensation to help eliminate the
effect of temperature variation under normal site conditions. The transducer
must be equal to the ambient air temperature at the site prior to calibration for
optimum results. The manufacturer recommends that sensors be shielded
from direct sunlight for this reason.
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4. Enter the ambient air temperature at the transducer location. For optimum
results, allow enough time (100 minutes) to ensure that the sensor is at
equilibrium with the surrounding ambient temperature. Press ACCEPT.
5. Select the Liquid Depth method and enter the new level.
6. Take a physical measurement of the liquid depth (level) and enter
the value. Press ACCEPT when finished.
4.1.3.2 Sensor Height
This method requires entering the distance between the face of the ultrasonic
sensor and the zero flow point in the primary device. The zero flow point in a
primary device is the level at which flow ceases. In a round pipe the zero flow
point would typically be the invert or bottom of the pipe. In a V-notch weir the
zero flow point occurs when the liquid behind the weir is level with the bottom
of the ‘V’. (There would still be liquid behind the weir plate but it would not be
contributing to flow). Sensor Height calibration is generally used when:
•
Access to the primary device is difficult (such as confined space entry in a
manhole) or
•
There is no liquid flowing during installation of the flow meter
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS>ADVANCED
OPTIONS>CALIBRATION>ULTRASONIC SENSOR.
2. Select Calibrate U-Sonic using the UP and DOWN keys. Press SELECT.
3. Select Standard as the type of Ultrasonic Transducer using the CHANGE
CHOICE key. Press ACCEPT to continue.
The speed of sound in air varies with the temperature of the air. The
ultrasonic sensor is equipped with temperature compensation to help
eliminate the effect of temperature variation under normal site conditions.
4. Enter the ambient air temperature at the transducer location. For optimum
results, allow enough time (100 minutes) to ensure that the sensor is at
equilibrium with the surrounding ambient temperature. Press ACCEPT.
5. Select the Sensor Height method and enter the new level.
6. Enter the distance from the face of the transducer to the zero flow point of
the primary device.
7. Press ACCEPT when finished.
4.1.3.3 Setting the Invisible Range
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS>ADVANCED
OPTIONS>CALIBRATION>ULTRASONIC SENSOR.
2. Select the Invisible Range option using the UP and DOWN keys. Press
SELECT to continue.
3. Enter the Distance to End of the Invisible Range.
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Section 4
4. Select either inches or centimeters using the CHANGE UNITS key. The
distance must be greater than the minimum deadband of 10 in. (25.4 cm)
for the 75 kHz sensor and 15 in. (38.1 cm) for the 50 kHz sensor.
5. Press ACCEPT when finished.
4.2 Submerged Area/Velocity Sensor
The Submerged area/velocity sensor simultaneously measures level
and velocity.
4.2.1 Submerged Area/Velocity Sensor Connection
Table 5 Submerged/Area Velocity Sensor Connection
Pin
Signal Description
Wire Color
Bare Leads
A
+12 V dc
Red
Red
B
ground
Green
Green
C
Receive (ground)
B/W Shield
Yellow
D
Receive (+)
B/W Center
Orange
E
Transmit (ground)
Black Shield
Violet
F
Transmit (+)
Black Center
Gray
G
Depth (-)
Black
Black
H
Depth (+)
White
White
Recommended Routing of Submerged Area/Velocity Cable
Proper routing of the cable serves two functions:
•
Keeps the in-line desiccant assembly inside the cover and out of the way
when installing and removing the sampler from tight manholes.
•
Keeps the desiccant out of direct contact with the elements. Also, keeps
water from dripping directly onto the desiccant assembly.
To secure the submerged area velocity cable, route the cable around the
battery and clip it under the battery hold downs.
4.2.2 Submerged Area/Velocity Sensor Programming
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS>LEVEL SENSOR.
2. Select Submerged Xducer using the CHANGE CHOICE key. Press
ACCEPT.
3. From the MAIN MENU, select SETUP>MODIFY SELECTED ITEMS.
4. Highlight Velocity Direction using the UP and DOWN keys. Press SELECT.
5. Set the velocity direction (upstream, downstream, or always positive)
using the CHANGE CHOICE key. Press ACCEPT to continue.
6. Highlight Velocity Units using the UP and DOWN keys. Press SELECT.
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Submerged Area/Velocity Sensor
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7. Set the Velocity Units (fps or m/s), using the UP and DOWN arrow keys.
Press ACCEPT to continue.
8. Highlight Velocity Cutoff, using the UP and DOWN keys. Press SELECT.
9. Read the Velocity Cutoff information screen. Press any key to continue.
10. Set the Velocity Cutoff using the numeric keypad. Press ACCEPT.
11. Set the Velocity Default, using the numeric keypad. Press ACCEPT. Press
RETURN to go back to the Setup Menu or Main Menu to return to the Main
Menu display.
4.2.3 Submerged Area/Velocity Submerged Area/Velocity Sensor Calibration
This calibration requires a graduated cylinder or bucket with at least
16 cm (6 in.) of water and a ruler. Calibrating the Submerged Area/Velocity
Sensor characterizes the sampler electronics to the unique characteristics of
each individual sensor. In addition, the calibration compensates for any
sensor drift that may occur over time (6 months or greater) as the materials in
the sensor age.
The Submerged Area/Velocity Sensor is a pressure transducer that contains a
stainless steel diaphragm. As the water pressure increases, (with increasing
level in the flow stream) the diaphragm is deflected, or pushed, against a solid
state device called a strain gauge. The strain gauge converts the pressure
against the diaphragm to a voltage. As the level in the flow stream increases,
so does the voltage coming from the Submerged Area/Velocity Sensor. The
voltage is read by the microprocessor in the sampler at regular intervals and
converted to a number that represents the level in the flow stream.
The manufacturer recommends calibrating the submerged area/velocity
sensor when:
•
The sensor is first used.
•
Installing a new or different sensor on a flow meter or input receptacle.
•
The difference between the level reading of the flow meter and the
independent verification (measurement with a dipstick or ruler)
is increasing.
Note: The data is constant if the difference between the level reading of the flow meter
and the independent verification is constant; recalibration is not required.
Note: Errors can occur with the flow meter level reading and the independent
verification. Errors are caused by variation in site conditions and measurement
abilities. These errors may cause slight changes in the difference, therefore, not
indicating a true change in the difference.
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS > ADVANCED OPTIONS >
CALIBRATION > SUBMERGED PROBE.
2. Place the sensor flat on a table top or floor with the sensor (the plate with
holes) facing down onto the surface (Figure 17). Press any key to
continue.
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3. Place the sensor face up in the bucket or liquid. Tap lightly to remove air
bubbles. If these bubbles are not removed you can receive false readings
from the sensor during calibration (Figure 17).
Note: Always check the Level
Adjust when reinstalling the sampler
following a calibration. (See Keypad
Description on page 16.)
4. Place the sensor face down under at least 16 cm (6 in.) of water and wait
20 seconds. Make sure the water surface is calm and the sensor is stable.
5. Press any key to continue.
6. Measure the depth from the bottom of the bucket to the surface of the
water and enter the value using the numeric keypad (Figure 17).
7. Press ACCEPT.
Figure 17
Calibrating the Submerged Area/Velocity Sensor
4.3 Submerged Pressure Sensor
The submerged pressure sensor is a pressure transducer that contains a
titanium diaphragm. As the water pressure increases, (with increasing level in
the flow stream) the diaphragm is deflected, or pushed, against a solid state
device called a strain gauge. The strain gauge converts the pressure against
the diaphragm to a voltage. As the level in the flow stream increases, the
voltage coming from the submerged pressure sensor increases. The voltage
is read by the microprocessor in the Sampler at a regular interval and
converted to a number which represents the level in the flow stream. The level
reading can then be converted by the meter to a flow rate based on the
mathematical formula for the selected primary device.
4.3.1 Submerged Pressure Sensor Connection
The submerged pressure sensor connection is located on the left side of the
controller housing and is labeled submerged pressure sensor. The connector
is keyed and can only be inserted in the proper orientation (key up).
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Submerged Pressure Sensor
Section 4
Table 6 Submerged Level Sensor Base Board Connection (J21)
Pin
Signal Description
Wire Color
A
V+
Red
B
Out +
Yellow
C
Out -
Green
D
Ground
Black
4.3.2 Submerged Pressure Sensor Programming
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS>LEVEL SENSOR.
2. Select Submerged Xducer using the CHANGE CHOICE key and press
ACCEPT.
4.3.3 Submerged Pressure Sensor Calibration
In sites with harsh conditions (extremes of level, temperature, harsh
chemicals, etc.) calibration should be performed more often.
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS > ADVANCED OPTIONS >
CALIBRATION > SUBMERGED PROBE.
2. Choose the orientation that the sensor will be mounted in the flow stream,
horizontal or vertical, using the CHANGE CHOICE key. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
ORIENTATION OF
SUBMERGED PROBE:
HORIZONTAL
CALIBRATION
CHANGE
CHOICE
CANCEL
SELECT APPROPRIATE UNITS
3. Lift the sensor out of the water and hold it in the air in the same orientation
that you selected in the previous step (horizontal or vertical) (Figure 18).
Then press ACCEPT to continue.
Figure 18
Lifting the Sensor Out of the Water
Horizontal
Vertical
4. Follow either the vertical or horizontal procedure below.
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Submerged Pressure Sensor
8990sensors.fm
Section 4
Vertical Orientation Only
a. Place the sensor under at least 16 cm (6 in.) of water in a vertical
orientation. Make sure the sensor is stable and not moving around.
Then press ACCEPT to continue.
b. Carefully measure the depth (D1) from the surface of the water to the
first weld mark that encircles the sensor body just above the breather
vent holes (Figure 19). The weld mark indicates the location of the
internal diaphragm.
c. Enter the depth (D1) and press ACCEPT when done.
Figure 19
Measuring Submerged Depth, Vertical Orientation
1
2
D1
3
1.
Gray Band
2.
Breather Vents
3.
Detachable Nose Cone
Horizontal Orientation Only
Note: Always check the Level
Adjust when reinstalling the sampler
following a calibration.
a. Place the sensor under at least 16 cm (6 in.) of water in a horizontal
orientation. Make sure the sensor is stable and not moving around.
Then press ACCEPT to continue.
b. Measure the depth from the bottom of the bucket to the surface of the
water (D1) (Figure 20) and enter the value. Press the ACCEPT.
Figure 20
Measuring Submerged Depth, Horizontal Orientation
D1
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Submerged Pressure Sensor
Visit http: //www.hach.com
Section 5
Optional Device Installation
This section describes how to setup a rain gauge to the Sampler as well as
how to connect, program, calibrate, and maintain the optional water
quality probes:
•
Rain Gauge (section 5.1 on
page 69
•
Dissolved Oxygen Probe
(section 5.4 on page 74)
•
pH Probe
(section 5.2 on page 70)
•
Conductivity Probe
(section 5.5 on page 76)
•
ORP Probe
(section 5.3 on page 72)
5.1 Rain Gauge
An external “tipping bucket” rain gauge (Cat. No. 2149) can be connected to
the Rain Gauge connector of the sampler (Figure 21). The rain gauge
provides a dry contact closure to the sampler.
As rainfall collects in the 20 cm (8 in.) diameter funnel, it is directed into one
side of a “tipping bucket” assembly. As each bucket fills, it causes the bucket
assembly to tip and empty out into the bottom of the rain gauge. Each tip of
the bucket causes a single contact closure to the rain gauge and sends a
short 12 V dc pulse into pin C of the Rain Gauge connector. Each pulse (tip)
represents 0.025 cm (0.01 in.) of rain.
Figure 21
Rain Gauge Tipping Bucket
Table 7 Rain Gauge Base Board Connections (J5)
8990options.fm
Pin
Signal Description
A
+12 V dc source output
B
not used
C
+12 V dc pulse input
D
not used
E
not used
F
not used
Page 69
Optional Device Installation
Section 5
5.1.1 Rain Gauge Programming
1. From the Main Menu select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>DATALOG.
2. Highlight Select Inputs using the UP and DOWN keys and press SELECT.
3. Highlight Rainfall using the UP and DOWN keys and press SELECT.
Note: When logging is enabled, an
arrow will point to the logged
channel.
4. Press the CHANGE CHOICE key to cycle between Logged and Not
Logged, then press ACCEPT.
5. Enter a logging interval using the numeric keypad, then press ACCEPT.
Valid logging intervals are shown on the status bar along the bottom edge
of the display.
6. Select Rainfall Units (in. or cm).
7. Select another channel to configure, or press RETURN to back up one
step. Press the MAIN MENU key to return to the Main Menu.
5.2 pH Probe
The pH probes are shipped with a wetting cap that covers the probe tip.
Remove the cap by turning it counter-clockwise and gently easing it off. Keep
this cap for long-term probe storage. Rinse the probe tip with distilled water.
Store the probe in a pH 4.0 buffer (Cat. No. 2104) for both overnight and long
term storage. Never store a probe in distilled or deionized water because this
will deplete the probe filling solution.
5.2.1 pH Probe Connection
This connector is for installing the pH or ORP pre-amp interface junction box
or a stand-alone temperature sensor. The pH probe is attached to a terminal
strip in the junction box. The stand-alone temperature probe plugs directly into
the receptacle on the case.
The pre-amplifier junction box is provided to allow for fast, easy replacement
of the pH probe.
Table 8 pH Connector Pin Assignments (J3)
Pin
Signal Description
Wire Color
A
+5 V dc
White
B
ground
Blue
C
reference
Yellow
D
pH/ORP
Black
E
-5 V dc
Red
F
RTD
Green
Since the pH reading needs to compensate for temperature variation, a
temperature sensor is built into every pH electrode. The pH probe consists of
five wires, three for the pH probe and two for the temperature sensor.
Stray electrical currents are sometimes found in wastewater stream. These
stray electrical currents can affect the pH readings. In the case of stray
electrical currents, a grounded pH probe is required. See Figure 22.
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pH Probe
8990options.fm
Section 5
Figure 22
pH Probe Wiring to Junction Box (grounded)
RTD
RTD
REF
GND
Yellow
Green
Red
Black
pH
Clear
Glass
Figure 23
pH Probe Wiring to Junction Box (un-grounded)
RTD
RTD
REF
GND
Yellow
Green
Red
pH
Clear
Glass
5.2.2 pH Probe Programming
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>DATALOG.
2. Highlight Select Inputs using the UP and DOWN keys and press SELECT.
3. Highlight pH using the UP and DOWN keys, then press SELECT.
4. Press the CHANGE CHOICE key to cycle between Logged and Not
Logged, then press ACCEPT.
5. Enter a logging interval, then press ACCEPT. Valid logging intervals are
shown on the status bar along the bottom edge of the display.
6. Select another channel to configure or press RETURN to back up one
step. Press MAIN MENU to return to the Main Menu display.
5.2.3 pH Probe Calibration
Calibrate the pH probe after the pH probe is connected and programmed.
Calibrating the pH probe requires a thermometer and any two of the following
buffer solutions: 4, 7, or 10 pH.
The pH probe is an application sensitive device. When used in harsh
environments, the accuracy and life expectancy of pH probes can decrease.
8990options.fm
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pH Probe
Section 5
Probes must be calibrated to the sampler each time they are cleaned or
replaced. Regular inspection and comparison to a hand-held pH meter can
help determine the optimum cleaning and calibration schedule for
specific applications.
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS > ADVANCED OPTIONS >
CALIBRATION > pH.
2. Place the pH probe into the first buffer solution, then press any key
to continue.
3. Enter the temperature of the first buffer solution using the numeric
keypad. Press ACCEPT to continue.
4. Select the pH for the first buffer solution (4, 7, or 10 pH) using the
CHANGE CHOICE key, then press ACCEPT.
5. Remove the probe from the first buffer solution, rinse it under distilled
water and place it into the second buffer solution (4, 7, or 10 pH, different
from the first buffer used). Press any key to continue.
6. Select the pH for the second buffer solution using the CHANGE CHOICE
key, then press ACCEPT.
If the pH probe is damaged and cannot be calibrated or if the buffer
solutions do not fall within an acceptable range, an error message will be
displayed as shown below.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ERROR MESSAGE
pH CALIBRATION FAILED-GAIN
AND/OR OFFSET OUT OF RANGE
TRY AGAIN
(PRESS ANY KEY TO CONTINUE)
Another attempt at reading the second buffer solution will be made after
pressing a key. If this fails, it is likely that you have a bad pH probe or bad
buffer solutions. Try a new set of buffer solutions and if that fails try a
different pH probe
5.3 ORP Probe
The probes are shipped with a wetting cap that covers the probe tip. Remove
the cap by turning it counter-clockwise and gently easing it off. Keep this cap
for long-term probe storage. Rinse the probe tip with distilled water.
Store the probe in a pH 4.0 buffer (Cat. No. 22834-49) for both overnight and
long term storage. Never store a probe in distilled or deionized water because
this will deplete the probe filling solution.
5.3.1 ORP Probe Connection
This connector is for installing the pH or ORP pre-amp interface junction box
or a stand-alone temperature sensor. The ORP probe is attached to a
terminal strip in the junction box.
Page 72
ORP Probe
8990options.fm
Section 5
Table 9 ORP Connector Pin Assignments (J3)
Pin
Signal Description
Wire Color
A
+5 V dc
White
B
ground
Blue
C
reference
Yellow
D
pH/ORP
Black
E
5 V dc
Red
F
RTD
Green
The ORP probe consists of three wires; a pink, black, and red wire. There is
no temperature sensor on the ORP probe.
1. Attach the clear wire to either screw on the terminal strip labeled GLASS.
2. Attach the black wire to the REF screw on the other terminal strip.
3. Attach the red wire to the GND screw on the terminal strip.
5.3.2 ORP Probe Programming
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>DATALOG.
2. Highlight Select Inputs using the UP and DOWN keys and press SELECT.
3. Highlight ORP using the UP and DOWN keys, then press SELECT.
4. Press CHANGE CHOICE to cycle between Logged and Not Logged, then
press ACCEPT to continue.
5. Enter a logging interval, then press ACCEPT. Valid logging intervals are
shown on the status bar along the bottom edge of the display.
6. Select another channel to configure or press RETURN to back up one
step. Press MAIN MENU to return to the Main Menu.
5.3.3 ORP Probe Calibration
5.3.3.1 ORP Preamplifier/Junction Box Calibration
Calibration of the ORP input circuit requires a source of dc voltage between
500 and 2000 m V dc. The reference voltage must be applied to the ORP
input terminals on the preamplifier/junction box during calibration. A regulated
dc power supply or a standard “C” cell battery (1500 mV dc) make excellent
sources for reference voltage.
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS > ADVANCED OPTIONS >
CALIBRATION > ORP.
2. Install the ORP junction box on the sampler with the ORP probe removed.
3. Apply a positive reference voltage to the ORP probe terminals in the
junction box, using either a 1.5 V dc “C” cell battery or a regulated
power supply.
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ORP Probe
Section 5
4. Attach the positive battery terminal to the terminal block screw labeled
“glass” and the negative battery terminal to the terminal block screw
labeled “ref.”
5. After making all connections, measure the exact voltage on the “C” cell or
power supply with a voltmeter. Then press a key to continue. The sampler
displays the message “Waiting for ORP to Stabilize.”
6. Once the reading is sufficiently stable enter a new millivolt level. The “C”
cell battery should be approximately 1500 mV (or 1.5 V) when new. Enter
the exact voltage of the current source in millivolts.
7. Press ACCEPT to store the new calibration values.
8. Disconnect the “C” cell battery or regulated power supply from the ORP
input terminals.
9. Reconnect the ORP Probe leads to the input terminals.
5.4 Dissolved Oxygen Probe
5.4.1 Dissolved Oxygen Probe Connection
This connection is for interfacing the optional D.O. probe to the
D.O./Conductivity Pre-Amp (Cat. No. 3369).
Table 10 D.O. Connections (J20)
Pin
Signal Description
Wire Color
A
DO - (neg)
Green
B
DO + (pos)
Red
C
Thermister
Black
D
Thermister
Yellow
Strain Relief Recommendation
A strain relief is recommended to protect the cable/probe junction during
application where the sensor will be thrown or tossed into liquid.
5.4.2 Dissolved Oxygen Probe Programming
Note: The membrane thickness
must be programmed into the
instrument. The instrument uses
this information to determine if the
sensor is generating a reasonable
current. Failure to program this
value may result in false error
conditions
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>DATALOG.
2. Highlight Select Inputs using the UP and DOWN keys and press SELECT.
3. Highlight D.O. using the UP and DOWN keys, then press SELECT.
4. Press CHANGE CHOICE to cycle between Logged and Not Logged, then
press ACCEPT.
5. Enter a logging interval, then press ACCEPT. Valid logging intervals are
shown on the status bar.
6. Press CHANGE CHOICE to select the appropriate units (ppm, ppb, mg/L,
sat). Press ACCEPT to continue.
7. Select another channel to configure, press RETURN to back up one step
or press MAIN MENU to return to the Main Menu.
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Dissolved Oxygen Probe
8990options.fm
Section 5
5.4.3 Dissolved Oxygen Probe Temperature Programming
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>DATALOG
2. Highlight Select Inputs using the UP and DOWN keys and press SELECT.
3. Highlight D.O. Temp. using the UP and DOWN keys, then press SELECT.
4. Cycle between Logged and Not Logged, then press ACCEPT.
5. Enter a logging interval using the numeric keypad, then press ACCEPT.
Valid logging intervals are shown on the status bar.
6. Select temperature units (°C, °F) using CHANGE CHOICE. Press ACCEPT.
5.4.4 Dissolved Oxygen Probe Calibration
The Dissolved Oxygen Probe is shipped without an electrolyte or membrane
installed. Install these items before initial use.
1. Connect a suitable power supply to the sampler, and power up the unit by
pressing the ON button.
2. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS > ADVANCED OPTIONS >
CALIBRATION > DO.
3. Enter the ambient air temperature (the current reading is displayed for
reference) using the numeric keypad.
4. Enter the elevation above sea level for the specific location.
5. Enter the membrane thickness. The operation of the sampler will be
affected by membrane thickness for the oxygen sensor.
Note: The membrane of a charged
sensor must be kept moist. If the
membrane is allowed to dry
completely, the electrolyte film
between the membrane and the
platinum will evaporate,
destabilizing the sensor. If the
sensor will be out of water for more
than 30 minutes, put a small amount
of water in the silicon soaking cap,
and install it over the protective
guard. Lift the edge of the cap to
break the seal as it is being
removed. This will prevent a vacuum
from forming inside the soaking cap
while it is being removed which can
result in the membrane becoming
stretched.
For general purpose applications, the 1-Mil membrane is standard. This
membrane allows measurements in the 0 to 20 ppm range of dissolved
oxygen and provides the best response time and durability.
The 2-Mil membrane can be used to measure up to 40 ppm dissolved oxygen.
Its increased thickness slows the response time of the sensor, but this
membrane has increased resistance to cuts and tears. For this reason, it is
recommended for use in wastewater aeration basins where solids in the water
are in rapid motion.
6. Enter the chlorinity (salinity) of the flow stream (typical wastewater is zero,
sea water is higher).
7. Place the D.O. probe in open air and press any key. The sampler will wait
for the reading to stabilize before storing the calibration value. The screen
will automatically return to the calibration menu.
Calibrating the D.O. Temperature
1. Place the probe and the thermometer in a liquid.
2. Wait for the temperature reading to stabilize.
3. Enter the actual temperature of the liquid.
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Dissolved Oxygen Probe
Section 5
5.5 Conductivity Probe
5.5.1 Conductivity Probe Connection
Table 11 Conductivity Probe Wiring (J20)
Pin
Signal Description
Wire Color
A
Probe
Black
B
Probe
Red
C
RTD
White
D
RTD
Green
5.5.2 Conductivity Probe Programming
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>DATALOG.
2. Highlight Select Inputs using the UP and DOWN keys. Press SELECT.
3. Highlight Conductivity (COND.) using the UP and DOWN. Press SELECT.
4. Press CHANGE CHOICE to cycle between Logged and Not Logged, then
press ACCEPT.
5. Enter a logging interval using the numeric keypad, then press ACCEPT.
Valid logging intervals are shown on the status bar along the bottom edge
of the display.
6. Press CHANGE CHOICE to select the appropriate units (ms, µs). Press
ACCEPT to continue.
7. Select another channel to configure or press RETURN to back up one
step. Press MAIN MENU to return to the Main Menu display.
5.5.3 Conductivity Temperature Programming
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>DATALOG.
2. Highlight Select Inputs using the UP and DOWN keys and press SELECT.
3. Highlight Conductivity Temperature (COND. TEMP.) using the UP and
DOWN keys, then press SELECT.
4. Press CHANGE CHOICE to cycle between Logged and Not Logged, then
press ACCEPT.
5. Enter a logging interval using the numeric keypad, then press ACCEPT.
Valid logging intervals are shown on the status bar along the bottom edge
of the display.
6. Press CHANGE CHOICE to select temperature units (°C, °F).
Press ACCEPT.
Page 76
Conductivity Probe
8990options.fm
Section 5
5.5.4 Conductivity Probe Calibration
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS > ADVANCED OPTIONS >
CALIBRATION > CONDUCTIVITY.
2. Clean and dry the probe.
3. Place the sensor and thermometer in the calibration solution
(Cat. No. 3230). The temperature sensor is located in the middle of the
sensor body allowing the probe to be completely submerged in
the solution.
4. Allow the sensor to stabilize in the solution about 10 minutes to ensure
that the probe and the solution are the same temperature.
5. Enter the temperature correction factor or enter zero for no correction
factor.
Note: The temperature correction factor is used to compensate for the effects of
temperature on the conductivity readings at the point of installation. The
conductivity of a solution is temperature sensitive. Therefore the actual
conductivity of the solution will change with the temperature. Each site may have a
different correction factor depending on the major constituent of the flow stream.
This is not used for calibration and has no effect on the calibration of the sensor.
Below are some examples of compensation factors of various liquids.
•
0.96%/°C 5% Sulfuric Acid
•
1.88%/°C Dilute Ammonia
•
1.91%/°C ‘Typical’ Wastewater
•
1.97%/°C Potassium Chloride
•
2.12%/°C Salt (Sodium Chloride)
•
2.84%/°C 98% Sulfuric Acid
•
4.55%/°C Ultra-pure Water
6. With the sensor still in the calibration solution, press any key. Wait for the
sensor to stabilize. Calculate the actual conductivity of the calibration
solution. If using the KCl solution provided by the manufacturer, make
your selection from the Table 12 on page 78. If using a solution other than
1.0 mS @ 25 °C KCl available from manufacturer, calculate the
conductivity of the solution using temperature correction factors. See the
following example.
Example: The KCl calibration solution is 1.0 mS at 25°C. If the actual
temperature of the KCl at the time of calibration is 18.4 °C, then the solution
has a conductivity value of 0.870 mS.
a. Find the difference between the labeled temperature and the actual
temperature of the calibration solution at the time of calibration.
25 °C – 18.4 °C = 6.6 °C
b. Multiply the difference (6.6) by the correction factor per °C (1.97% or
0.0197).
6.6 °C x 0.0197/°C = 0.13002
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Page 77
Conductivity Probe
Section 5
c. If the calibration temperature is lower than the labeled value, then
subtract that value from the standard (1.0 mS) to get the actual value
to be used for calibration.
1.0 mS - (correction factor) 0.13002 = 0.86998 mS
d. If the calibration temperature is higher than the labeled value, then
add that value to the standard (1.0 mS) to get the actual value to be
used for calibration.
7. Using the value that was calculated in step 6, enter the conductivity of the
solution then press ACCEPT to complete the calibration.
Calibrating the Conductivity Temperature
Note: Conductivity temperature
calibration is only necessary when
logging temperature.
1. Place the probe in a liquid and wait for the temperature reading
to stabilize.
2. Enter the actual temperature of the liquid (the current reading is shown for
reference). Temperature calibration is complete.
Table 12 Conductivity Values at Temperature for Hach KCl Solution
Solution
Temp °C
Calibration Value
to be Entered
Solution
Temp °C
Calibration Value
to be Entered
Solution
Temp °C
Calibration Value
to be Entered
30
1.099
25
1.000
20
0.902
29.8
1.095
24.8
0.996
19.8
0.898
29.6
1.091
24.6
0.992
19.6
0.894
29.4
1.087
24.4
0.988
19.4
0.890
29.2
1.083
24.2
0.984
19.2
0.886
29
1.079
24
0.980
19
0.882
28.8
1.075
23.8
0.976
18.8
0.878
28.6
1.071
23.6
0.972
18.6
0.874
28.4
1.067
23.4
0.968
18.4
0.870
28.2
1.063
23.2
0.965
18.2
0.866
28
1.059
23
0.961
18
0.862
27.8
1.055
22.8
0.957
17.8
0.858
27.6
1.051
22.6
0.953
17.6
0.854
27.4
1.047
22.4
0.949
17.4
0.850
27.2
1.043
22.2
0.945
17.2
0.846
27
1.039
22
0.941
17
0.842
26.8
1.035
21.8
0.937
16.8
0.838
26.6
1.032
21.6
0.933
16.6
0.835
26.4
1.028
21.4
0.929
16.4
0.831
26.2
1.024
21.2
0.925
16.2
0.827
26
1.020
21
0.921
16
0.823
25.8
1.016
20.8
0.917
15.8
0.819
25.6
1.012
20.6
0.913
15.6
0.815
25.4
1.008
20.4
0.909
15.4
0.811
25.2
1.004
20.2
0.905
15.2
0.807
Page 78
Conductivity Probe
8990options.fm
Section 6
Communication Setup
Communication setup details connections and programming features of the:
•
RS232 Serial Port (section 6.1 on page 79)
•
Optional Modem (section 6.2 on page 80)
•
4–20 mA Option (section 6.3 on page 87)
•
Alarm Relays (section 6.4 on page 89)
•
Analog Inputs (section 6.5 on page 93)
6.1 RS232 Cable
6.1.1 RS232 Connection
The RS232 connector is a serial input/output port for communicating with a
sampler from an external device such as a Data Transfer Unit (DTU-II) or
direct serial connection to a personal computer with application software.
Table 13 RS232 Connection
Pin
Signal Description
Wire Color
A
not used
White
B
ground
Blue
C
DSR
Yellow
D
RCD
Black
E
DTR
Red
F
TXD
Green
Cable Required
RS232 Sampler/Flow Meter to PC Cable Assembly (Cat. No. 1727), 10 ft long,
6-pin connector on one end, 9-pin D connector on the other end (9-pin to
25-pin D type adapter included).
6.1.2 RS232 Programming
Note: Some early generation IBM
compatibles may have a serial port
that is not capable of
communicating reliable at 19,200
baud. If errors develop at high baud
rates, try lowering the baud rate one
step at a time (on both the sampler
and Streamlogg II™, InSight®, or
Vision® software) until error free
communications is achieved.
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS > ADVANCED OPTIONS >
COMMUNICATIONS SETUP > RS232 SETUP.
2. Select a baud rate for data communications by pressing the CHANGE
CHOICE key to cycle through the possible choices; 1200, 2400, 4800,
9600 or 19,200 baud. The higher the baud rate setting, the faster data will
transfer. Set the baud rate to the highest setting allowed by the computer.
The baud rate must correspond to the baud rate selected in the software.
Press ACCEPT.
Note: Long runs of RS232 cable, especially if they are run near large motors or
fluorescent lights can cause communication errors and may require a slower
baud rate.
8990cm.fm
Page 79
Communication Setup
Section 6
6.2 Modem
6.2.1 Modem Connection
This connection is for interfacing the optional internal modem (Cat. No. 1602)
with a standard public telephone line.
Table 14 Modem CPU Connections (J8)
Pin
Signal Description
A
Tip
B
Ring
C
12 V dc
D
12 V dc Reference
6.2.2 Modem Programming
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS>ADVANCED
OPTION>COMMUNICATIONS SETUP.
Note: There is no way of independently enabling power to just the internal modem
without also enabling the power to the Cellular Communications Option if it is
present. However, this poses no problem even if the sampler is physically
connected directly to a phone line without a cellular phone.
2. Highlight Modem Setup using the UP and DOWN keys. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
COMUNICATION SETUP
SELECT
MODEM SETUP
RS232 SETUP
RETURN
3. Enable modem power by pressing the CHANGE CHOICE key. Modem
power is turned off when not in use to conserve battery power.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
MODEM SETUP
CHANGE
CHOICE
MODEM POWER:
ENABLED
CANCEL
CHOICES: ENABLED, DISABLED
Page 80
Modem
8990cm.fm
Section 6
4. Select either pulse or tone dialing modes. This will depend on the type of
phone service selected for the site phone line. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
MODEM SETUP
CHANGE
CHOICE
DIAL METHOD:
TONE
CANCEL
CHOICES: TONE, PULSE
5. Enter a phone number using the numeric keypad. This phone number is
used by the modem when it sends an alarm report to a personal
computer running InSight software.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
MODEM SETUP
CHANGE
CHOICE
INPUT CHANNEL:
FLOW
CANCEL
(USE NUMERIC KEYPAD)
6.2.2.1 Cellular Communication Option
Note: To ensure reliable
communications between the
sampler and the host computer, it is
required that the host computer is
equipped with a Cellular Compatible
modem, it must support the
MNP.10EC protocol. Computers
equipped with modems that do not
support this protocol are able to
connect to the sampler but will not
be able to maintain a reliable
connection.
This option couples the sampler to an external, 3-watt, cellular phone. The
cellular phone is mounted in a NEMA 4X enclosure and is powered through
the sampler by the sampler power supply. Enabling Modem Power also
provides power to the Cellular Communication via a connector cable.
The cellular phone is set to activate upon an alarm. Additionally, the end user
can use the phone to make cellular voice calls directly from the installation site
as needed.
Site Selection
The quality and availability of cellular service varies considerably from one
geographical location and from day to day. Factors that affect the quality of
cellular service include but are not limited to: weather, time of day, distance to
the nearest cell tower, other cellular traffic, etc.
Installation and Setup
Note: If the display on the cell
phone is not present, check to make
sure the cell phone power is
enabled in the setup of the sampler.
Also check to make sure that the
sampler is connected to a power
source and is turned on.
1. Connect the four conductor cable between the four pin connector on the
side of the cellular phone housing and to the connector in the side of the
sampler case labeled MODEM. This cable supplies both the data and the
12 V dc power for the cell modem.
2. Attach the magnetic base cell phone antenna to any flat metal object in
the immediate area. For optimum performance, mount the antenna in a
vertical position.
Note: Mount the antenna as high and as far away from the sampler as possible. RF
power radiated during transmission by the cell phone antenna in close proximity to
the sampler may have adverse affects on data measurements.
3. When necessary, reposition the antenna to obtain optimum signal
strength.
8990cm.fm
Page 81
Modem
Section 6
4. Loosen the four screws on the cover of the cell phone enclosure and
remove the cover, to view the signal strength. The signal strength is
indicated by the number of dashes across the bottom of the cell phone
display. The more dashes the greater the signal.
6.2.2.2 Reliable Communications
In order to ensure reliable communications between the sampler and the host
computer, it is absolutely essential that the host computer is equipped with a
Cellular Compatible modem. The modem on the host computer must support
the “MNP.10ED” protocol. Computers equipped with modems that do not
support this protocol may be able to connect to the sampler but will not be
able to maintain reliable connections.
6.2.2.3 Cellular Modem Scheduling
With Cellular Modem Scheduling enabled, both the modem and cell phone
power will simultaneously be turned off and on at user defined intervals to
conserve battery power. If Cellular Modem Scheduling is disabled the sampler
will assume that a land line is available and that the cell phone is not
connected to the sampler. With Cellular Modem Scheduling disabled (and the
sampler on battery power) the sampler will leave the modem turned off until a
call is received on the land line.
Note: If the Cellular Modem
Scheduling is disabled and the
sampler is connected to a cell
phone rather than a land line, the
sampler will not be able to answer
any incoming calls.
If the sampler is on ac power or the battery voltage is over 14.5 volts, the
power to both the cell phone and modem will constantly be on regardless of
whether Cellular Modem Scheduling is enabled or not.
Note: If Modem Power is disabled,
the Cellular Modem Scheduling
prompt will not appear.
1. To enable Cellular Modem Scheduling, Modem Power must be enabled.
If the sampler is configured to call a pager for alarms and the alarm condition
is met, the sampler will still call the pager even if modem scheduling is
disabled. In this situation the cell phone and modem will temporally be
powered back up again to allow the sampler to call the pager and transmit the
alarm code. However, as soon as the alarm code is transmitted, the power to
the cell phone and modem will again be turned off.
2. Enable the Cellular Modem Scheduling using the CHANGE CHOICE key.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CELLULAR MODEM
SCHEDULING:
ENABLED
MODEM SETUP
CHANGE
CHOICE
CANCEL
CHOICES: ENABLED, DISABLED
3. Press ACCEPT to continue.
Page 82
Modem
8990cm.fm
Section 6
6.2.2.4 Cellular Modem Scheduling Basis
After enabling Cellular Modem Scheduling it will be necessary to choose the
type of scheduling; Hourly, Daily or Weekly. If Hourly is chosen the modem
and cell phone are powered up once every hour on the hour for a user defined
duration. If Daily is chosen the modem and cell phone are powered up once a
day, every day, at a user defined time and duration. If Weekly is chosen the
cell phone and modem are powered up only once a week, every week, on a
user defined day, time, and duration.
1. To set the Cellular Modem Scheduling Basis press CHANGE CHOICE until
the correct choice appears in the center of the display. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CELLULAR MODEM
SCHEDULING BASIS:
DAILY
MODEM SETUP
CHANGE
CHOICE
CANCEL
CHOICES: HOURLY, DAILY, WEEKLY
2. Set up the actual time and duration when the modem will be enabled.
3. For Hourly, schedule the duration that the modem will be turned on.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
MODEM SETUP
CELLULAR SCHEDULING
DURATION: 5 min.
CLEAR
ENTRY
CANCEL
ENTER: 1 - 59
4. If Daily is selected enter the Cellular Scheduling Start Time and Duration.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
MODEM SETUP
CELLULAR SCHEDULING
START TIME:
1:00 (hrs:min)
CLEAR
ENTRY
CANCEL
ENTER: 000:01 - 024:00 (hrs:min)
5. If Weekly is selected, enter the Cellular Modem Schedule Day, Start time,
and Duration.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
MODEM SETUP
CELLULAR MODEM
SCHEDULE DAY:
FLOW
CANCEL
CLEAR
ENTRY
CHOICES: MON, TUE, WED, THU, FRI, SAT, SUN
8990cm.fm
Page 83
Modem
Section 6
6.2.2.5 Cellular Modem Triggering
When Cellular Modem Triggering is enabled both the cell phone and modem
remains on for a user specified duration after calling a pager or remote
computer when an alarm condition is met. It is useful when calling back to a
site via modem, after receiving an alarm, or viewing the current status.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CELLULAR MODEM
TRIGGERING:
ENABLED
CANCEL
MODEM SETUP
CLEAR
ENTRY
CHOICES: ENABLED, DISABLED
If Cellular Modem Triggering is disabled the sampler is still able to call a pager
or remote computer when an alarm condition is met. However, both the
modem and cell phone will immediately turn off after the call is completed.
Cellular Modem Triggered Duration
After enabling Cellular Modem Triggering, enter a value for Cellular Modem
Triggered Duration. This is the amount of time that the modem remains on
after it dials a pager or remote computer when an alarm condition has been
met. The value is in minutes and can be anywhere between 1 to 120 minutes.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
CELLULAR MODEM
TRIGGERING DURATION:
30 min.
CANCEL
MODEM SETUP
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER 1 - 120
Note: This display will not appear unless Cellular Modem Triggering is enabled.
6.2.2.6 Pager Option
The sampler can be set to call up to three individual pagers or a remote
computer when an alarm condition has been met. The pager setup is an
extension of the Modem Setup menus. To have the sampler call a pager, the
Pager Option must be enabled.
1. Enable the Pager Option, using the CHANGE CHOICE key. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
MODEM SETUP
CHANGE
CHOICE
PAGER OPTION:
ENABLED
CANCEL
CHOICES: ENABLED, DISABLED
Page 84
Modem
8990cm.fm
Section 6
2. Enter the phone number of the paging service. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
PAGER SERVICE
PHONE NUMBER:
555-5555
CANCEL
MODEM SETUP
CLEAR
ENTRY
(USE NUMERIC KEYPAD)
3. Enter the number of pagers to call when an alarm occurs. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
MODEM SETUP
ACCEPT
NUMBER OF PAGERS:
3
CANCEL
CLEAR
ENTRY
ENTER 1 - 3
4. Enter the phone numbers of the individual pagers to send the message to.
This is usually the phone number that is given to the pager when it is
purchased. Press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
PAGER #1
PHONE NUMBER:
555-5555
MODEM SETUP
CHANGE
CHOICE
CANCEL
CHOICES: ENABLED, DISABLED
6.2.2.7 Reporting Devices
The reporting order of the communication devices can be set to MODEM ONLY,
PAGER ONLY, PAGER THEN MODEM, and MODEM THEN PAGER.
1. Press CHANGE CHOICE until the desired reporting method is displayed
then press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
ACCEPT
REPORTING ORDER:
PAGER THAN MODEM
MODEM SETUP
CHANGE
CHOICE
CANCEL
CHOICES: MODEM AND / OR PAGER
When the sampler calls the pager service, it will transmit a Pager Alarm Code
number (Table 15) which corresponds to a specific
alarm condition.
8990cm.fm
Page 85
Modem
Section 6
Table 15 Pager Alarm Codes
Alarm
Code Equipment Reason
Alarm
Code Equipment
Reason
Low Main Battery
1
—
Battery pack is less than 11.5 V
High CH5
28
—
—
Memory Battery
2
—
Internal memory battery is low
High CH6
29
—
—
Low Slate Memory
3
—
Less than 10% slate memory left
High CH7
30
—
—
31
—
—
Slate Memory Full
4
—
Slate memory is used up
High
Reference
Temp.
Modem Failure
5
—
Modem chip/modem board failure
High
Velocity
32
—
—
Missed Sample
6
—
No liquid detected when sampling
High D.O.
33
—
—
Purge Failure
7
—
Water present at sensors after
purge
High D.O.
Temp.
34
—
—
Jammed Distributor
8
—
Sensors indicate arm is not
moving
High
Conductivity
35
—
—
Bottle is Full
9
—
Full bottle option indicator is on
High Cond.
Temp.
36
—
—
U-Sonic Echo Loss
10
—
No return signal detected
Low Level
37
—
—
Xducer Ringing
11
—
The return signal is detected too
soon
Low Flow
38
—
—
U-Sonic failure
12
—
Ultrasonic board detects an error
Low
pH/ORP
39
—
—
RS485 Timed Out
13
—
Comm. problems with RS485
Low
Process
Temp.
40
—
—
Unable to Cool
14
AWRS only
Too high temperature in a
compartment
Low CH1
41
—
—
Unable to heat
15
AWRS only
Too cold a temperature in
compartment
Low CH2
42
—
—
Low Bubbler Pres.
16
(not
applicable)
Possible leak in bubble tank
Low CH3
43
—
—
Clogged Bubbler
17
(not
applicable)
Bubbler tube is plugged
Low CH4
44
—
—
High Level
18
—
—
Low CH5
45
—
—
High Flow
19
—
—
Low CH6
46
—
—
High Flow Rate of
Chg.
20
—
—
Low CH7
47
—
—
High pH/ORP
21
—
—
Low
Reference
Temp.
48
—
—
High Process
Temperature
22
—
—
Low Velocity
49
—
—
High Rainfall
23
—
—
Low D.O.
50
—
—
High CH1
24
—
—
Low D.O.
Temp.
51
—
—
High CH2
25
—
—
Low
Conductivity
52
—
—
High CH3
26
—
—
Low Cond.
Temp.
53
—
—
High CH4
27
—
—
Page 86
Modem
8990cm.fm
Section 6
6.3 4–20 mA Option
The 4–20 mA option provides a current loop for controlling external devices
such as a chart recorder or PC. Either one or both of the 4–20 mA outputs can
be factory installed and are isolated from each other.
6.3.1 4–20 mA Connection
The interface has a 3-ft cable with a connector on one end, and a 10-ft cable
with two open wire leads on the other. Insert the connector into the sampler
receptacle labeled “Auxiliary”, located on the left side of the control housing.
On the 10-ft cable, the wire with clear insulation is positive (+) and the wire
with black insulation is negative (-).
Table 16 4–20 mA Connections (J18)
Pin
Signal Description
Wire Color
A
Output 1 + (pos)
Yellow
B
Output 1 - (neg)
Black
C
Output 2 + (pos)
Red
D
Output 2 - (neg)
Green
Rating:
• Isolation Voltage:
Between sampler and either 4–20 mA output: 2500 V ac
Between the two 4–20 mA outputs: 1500 V ac
•
Maximum Resistive Load: 600 ohm
•
Output Voltage: 24 V dc - no load
Cable Required
4–20 mA Interface Cable (Cat. No. 2924), 25 ft long, 4-pin connector on one
end, tinned wire leads on the other end.
6.3.2 4–20 mA Programming
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS > ADVANCED OPTIONS > 4–20 mA
OUTPUTS > SELECT.
Note: When the 4–20 mA outputs
are disabled and not completely
turned off, they will continue to
output a steady 4 mA.
2.
Enable the 4–20 mA outputs by pressing CHANGE CHOICE while in the
4–20 mA output menu.
3. When the display shows the outputs as enabled, press ACCEPT.
4. Choose either OUTPUT A or OUTPUT B. Use the UP and DOWN keys to
highlight the choice, then press SELECT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SELECT
4–20 mA OUTPUTS
OUTPUT A
OUTPUT B
RETURN
8990cm.fm
Page 87
4–20 mA Option
Section 6
5. Select an analog Input Channel (e.g., channel 1, 2, 3, or, flow, etc.) to
assign to that output. Press CHANGE CHOICE to cycle through the
channel names. When the desired channel is displayed, press ACCEPT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
4–20 mA OUTPUTS
CHANGE
CHOICE
ACCEPT
INPUT CHANNEL:
FLOW
CANCEL
SELECT APPROPRIATE UNITS
6. Assign a channel value to the 4 mA current value. This value is typically 0,
however any value can be set. Enter the value of the input needed to
generate 4 mA of current at the output.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
4–20 mA OUTPUTS
ACCEPT
CLEAR
ENTRY
4 mA INPUT VALUE
0.00 mgd
CANCEL
SELECT APPROPRIATE UNITS
7. Assign an input value to the 20 mA current level.
8. Repeat this process to configure the other 4–20 mA output.
6.3.3 4–20 mA Calibration
After wiring the 4–20 mA connection perform a 4–20 mA output calibration.
The 4–20 mA output calibration requires a digital multimeter or access to the
4–20 mA current loop wiring. Two 4–20 mA outputs are available and are
designated Output A and Output B. Both outputs are calibrated the same way
and are isolated from each other.
Calibration may be performed while the 4–20 mA device is in the current loop,
as shown in Figure 24 or disconnected from the current loop as shown in
Figure 25. In either case, the multimeter must be set to a 20 milliamp dc range
or greater.
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS > ADVANCED OPTIONS >
CALIBRATION > 4–20 mA OUTPUTS.
2. Connect a multimeter to the 4–20 mA current outputs per Figure 24 and
Figure 25.
3. Make sure that the 4–20 mA output is enabled. If it is not enabled, press
CHANGE CHOICE so that the display shows Enabled and press ACCEPT.
4. Select the output (A or B) to calibrate.
5. Press any key to set the selected output to 4.00 mA dc.
6. Measure the current on the selected output using the multimeter and
enter the measured value using the numeric keypad. Press ACCEPT.
Page 88
4–20 mA Option
8990cm.fm
Section 6
7. Press any key to set the output to 20.00 mA dc.
8. Measure the current on the selected output using the multimeter and
enter the measured value using the numeric keypad. Press ACCEPT to
complete the calibration.
By entering the measured current values, the microprocessor will
electronically adjust the outputs to compensate for the difference between the
measured values and the expected values.
Figure 24
Calibration with the Meter in the Loop
Chart
Recorder
Multimeter
900 MAX
Current Loop
Figure 25
Calibration with the 4–20 mA Device Disconnected from the Loop
Multimeter
900 MAX
6.4 Alarm Relays
Note: Current to the relay contacts
must be limited to 5 amps. A means
to remove power from the relays
locally in case of an emergency or
for servicing the product must be
provided by the user. This can be
accomplished with an external
switch and a 5-amp fuse or with a
switched 5-amp circuit breaker.
8990cm.fm
Four alarm relay outputs are available as a factory installed option. The relays
are mounted in an external NEMA 4X enclosure for installation to a wall or
panel. Alarm contacts are rated for 10 amps at 240 V ac (resistive load).
The alarm wiring can be sized according to the load being used. The relay
connector will accept wire sizes from 18–12 AWG with a rating of 300 V, 80 °C
minimum. Do not use wire smaller than 18 AWG.
For relay pin assignments refer to Table 17 and Figure 26.
Page 89
Alarm Relays
Section 6
6.4.1 Alarm Relays Connection
Table 17 Relay Connector (J17)
Pin
Signal Description
Wire Color
A
+12 V dc
Red
B
Relay #1
Yellow
C
Relay #2
Black
D
Relay #3
Red
E
Relay #4
Green
Figure 26
Relay Pin Connections
Table 18 Relays
Connector
Relay
J2
1
J3
2
J4
3
J5
4
Relay Junction Box
Required relay box is an alarm relay box assembly with a 10-ft long cable with
a 6-pin connector on one end and a relay box on the other end (Figure 27).
1. Choose Normally Closed (NC) or Normally Open (NO) connections.
2. Connect one wire to the common (COM) and the other to the connector
with the preferred signal.
Page 90
Alarm Relays
8990cm.fm
Section 6
Figure 27
Single Relay Wiring Inside the Relay Junction Box
6.4.2 Alarm Relays Programming
Program alarms activate based on certain conditions (low battery, low
memory, etc.). When an alarm is tripped, an action is initiated (report via
modem, dial a pager, or set a relay). There are two types of alarms: Trouble
Alarms and Set Point Alarms.
6.4.2.1 Trouble Alarms
Trouble Alarms initiate an action when a trouble condition occurs. For
example, a relay may close when the memory is full. Refer to Troubleshooting
and Error Messages on page 127 for more information on trouble alarms.
1. From the Main Menu, select SETUP > ADVANCED OPTIONS > ALARMS.
2.
Select one of the trouble conditions.
3. Select an action to occur when the alarm is activated. The table below
lists each Trouble Condition. Refer to Appendix C on page 127 for causes
and solutions.
Trouble Conditions:
•
Low Main Battery
•
Memory Battery
•
Low Slate Memory
•
Slate Memory Full
•
Modem Failure
•
Missed Sample
•
Purge Failure
•
Jammed Distributor
•
RS485 Timed Out
Alarm Actions:
•
Set Relay #1
•
Set Relay #2
•
Set Relay #3
•
Set Relay #4
•
Report Via Modem
6.4.2.2 Set Point Alarms
Set Point Alarms look for trip points to be reached (either high or low or both)
before initiating an action. For example an initiated action may be the closing
of a relay when the water level exceeds 60 cm (24 in.) or drops below 10 cm
(4 in.) Set Point Alarms activate when a user-definable high and/or low set
point is reached.
8990cm.fm
Page 91
Alarm Relays
Section 6
1.
Enable one of the alarm conditions.
2. Select an action to occur when the alarm is activated.
3. Set either a High trip point or a Low trip point.
4. After entering the trip point enter the deadband value. The deadband is
the area between the alarm “turn on” and “turn off.”
Note: Log rainfall to use an alarm on a rainfall condition; likewise, log flow in order to
implement an alarm on a flow rate of change.
Set Point Alarm Conditions:
•
Level
•
Cabinet Temperature (refrigerated samplers)
•
Flow
•
Analog Channels 1–3
•
Flow Rate of Change •
Analog Ch. 4 or D.O.
•
pH
•
Analog Ch. 5 or D.O. Temp.
•
ORP
•
Analog Ch. 6 or Conductivity
•
Process Temperature •
•
Rainfall
Analog Ch. 7 or Conductivity Temp.
Note: Rainfall and Flow Rate of Change alarms are HIGH set point conditions; they
take no deadband and they are time dependant.
Deadband
After entering the trip point, enter a deadband value. The deadband is the
area between alarm “turn-on” and “turn-off”.
The purpose of setting the deadband is to eliminate alarm chatter which may
occur if the “turn-on” and “turn-off” values are too close together. Small
fluctuations occurring when the reading is at or near the trip point can rapidly
toggle an alarm relay on and off.
In the pH example (Figure 28) the deadband is set to 0.10 pH. When the pH
reached 6.9 (lower dashed line), the alarm tripped, but the alarm did not turn
off until the pH came back up to 7.00. This difference is the deadband setting
which should be set according to the characteristics of the item
being measured.
Page 92
Alarm Relays
8990cm.fm
Section 6
Figure 28
Deadband Concept
7.60
7.40
pH
7.20
Alarm Off
7.00
Deadband
6.80
Alarm On
6.60
Low Alarm Setpoint= 6.9 pH
6.40
6.5 Analog Inputs
6.5.1 Analog Inputs Connection
Note: 4–20 mA inputs must be
isolated. Maximum load per unit is
200 ohms.
Analog voltage as well as analog current input signals are accommodated in a
single connector.
To connect the analog voltage signal (-4.0 to +4.0 V dc):
1. Tie ground wire to Pin B (ground).
2. Tie analog voltage wire to the appropriate voltage input pin
(Pin C, E, or G).
For example, to connect an analog voltage input to analog input channel 1, tie
the ground wire to pin B and your positive wire to pin C.
To connect an analog current signal (4–20 mA dc)
1. Tie ground wire to Pin B (ground).
2. Connect analog current wire to both voltage and current input pins for the
appropriate channel (Pin C and D, or E and F, or G and H).
Table 19Analog Input Pin Assignments
Pin
8990cm.fm
Signal Description
Wire Color
A
+12 V dc
White
B
Signal Ground
Blue
C
Voltage Input 1 (-4.0 V dc to +4.0 V dc)
Yellow
D
Current Input 1 (4–20 mA dc)
Black
E
Voltage Input 2 (-4.0 V dc to +4.0 V dc)
Red
F
Current Input 2 (4–20 mA dc)
Green
G
Voltage Input 3 (-4.0 V dc to +4.0 V dc)
Gray
H
Current Input 3 (4–20 mA dc)
Brown
J
not used
Violet
K
not use
Orange
Page 93
Analog Inputs
Section 6
There are a total of three analog input channels available on the sampler.
These inputs accept 4–20 mA dc or -4.0 to +4.0 V dc analog signals. They
can be logged and graphed and can also be used to trigger alarms, cause
setpoint samples, and control 4–20 mA outputs.
6.5.2 Analog Inputs Programming
Analog input channels can accept a signal from an external device. This
signal may range from -4.0 V dc (min) to +4.0 V dc (max) or from 4 to 20 mA
dc depending on the input selected. In some cases, input signals from certain
devices may also fall somewhere within those ranges. For that reason, each
analog input channel must be mapped to the minimum and maximum signal
limits of the external device.
To map an external device to an analog input channel:
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>DATALOG.
2. Highlight Select Inputs using the UP and DOWN keys and press SELECT.
Note: If logging is enabled on any
channel, then that channel will have
an arrow in front of the channel
name to signify the channel
is logged.
3. Highlight the analog channel to log using the UP and DOWN keys, then
press SELECT.
4. Press CHANGE CHOICE to cycle between Logged and Not Logged, then
press ACCEPT.
5. Enter a Logging Interval using the numeric keypad. Press ACCEPT to
continue.
6. Select Unit of measurement (ppm, ppb, afd, cfs, cfm, cfd, cms, cmm, cmh,
cmd, gps, gpm, gph, lps, lpm, lph, or mgd).
7. Enter Low Point.
8. Enter High Point.
9. Select another channel to configure, or press RETURN to back up one
step. Press MAIN MENU to return to the Main Menu display.
Page 94
Analog Inputs
8990cm.fm
MAINTENANCE
DANGER
Some of the following manual sections contain information in the form of warnings, cautions and notes
that require special attention. Read and follow these instructions carefully to avoid personal injury and
damage to the instrument. Only personnel qualified to do so, should conduct the installation/maintenance
tasks described in this portion of the manual.
DANGER
Certains des chapitres suivants de ce mode d’emploi contiennent des informations sous la forme
d’avertissements, messages de prudence et notes qui demandent une attention particulière. Lire et suivre
ces instructions attentivement pour éviter les risques de blessures des personnes et de détérioration de
l’appareil. Les tâches d’installation et d’entretien décrites dans cette partie du mode d’emploi doivent être
seulement effectuées par le personnel qualifié pour le faire.
PELIGRO
Algunos de los capítulos del manual que presentamos contienen información muy importante en forma de
alertas, notas y precauciones a tomar. Lea y siga cuidadosamente estas instrucciones a fin de evitar
accidentes personales y daños al instrumento. Las tareas de instalación y mantenimiento descritas en la
presente sección deberán ser efectuadas únicamente por personas debidamente cualificadas.
GEFAHR
Einige der folgenden Abschnitte dieses Handbuchs enthalten Informationen in Form von Warnungen,
Vorsichtsmaßnahmen oder Anmerkungen, die besonders beachtet werden müssen. Lesen und befolgen
Sie diese Instruktionen aufmerksam, um Verletzungen von Personen oder Schäden am Gerät zu
vermeiden. In diesem Abschnitt beschriebene Installations- und Wartungsaufgaben dürfen nur von
qualifiziertem Personal durchgeführt werden.
PERICOLO
Alcune parti di questo manuale contengono informazioni sotto forma d’avvertimenti, di precauzioni e di
osservazioni le quali richiedono una particolare attenzione. La preghiamo di leggere attentivamente e di
rispettare quelle istruzioni per evitare ogni ferita corporale e danneggiamento della macchina. Solo gli
operatori qualificati per l’uso di questa macchina sono autorizzati ad effettuare le operazioni di
manutenzione descritte in questa parte del manuale.
8990m_stop.fm
Page 95
MAINTENANCE
Visit http: //www.hach.com
Section 7
DANGER
Always disconnect power to the
sampler before performing any
maintenance or service.
Maintenance
DANGER
Débranchez toujours l'alimentation de l'analyseur d'echantillonneur avant de
procéder à un entretien ou une réparation.
7.1 Cleaning the Sampler
7.1.1 Cleaning the Sampler Cabinet
Clean the interior and exterior of the sampler cabinet with a damp sponge and
mild detergent. Do not use abrasive cleaners.
7.1.2 Cleaning the Sample Bottles
Clean the bottles using a brush and water with a mild detergent, followed by a
fresh water rinse and a distilled water rinse. Glass bottles may also be
autoclaved.
7.1.3 Cleaning the Intake Tubing and Pump Tubing
Clean the tubing by pumping water with mild detergent or other cleaning
solution through the tubing, using the peristaltic pump in Manual Pump Mode.
Press MANUAL MODE.
7.1.4 No Lubrication Required
The sampler does not require routine lubrication. Do not lubricate the pump
tube with petroleum jelly, silicone grease, oil, or any other lubricant, as this will
substantially reduce the life of the pump tube and roller assembly.
7.2
Pump Tubing Maintenance
DANGER
Always disconnect power to the
sampler before removing the
pump cover.
DANGER
Débranchez toujours l'alimentation de l'analyseur d'echantillonneur avant de
déposer le couvercle de la pompe.
Replacement pump tubing is available from the manufacturer in 15' bulk
length (Cat. No. 4600-15), and 50' bulk length (Cat. No. 4600-50). Use of
tubing other than that supplied by the manufacturer may cause excessive
wear on mechanical parts and/or poor pump performance.
7.2.1 Tubing Life Estimates
Pump tubing life depends on several factors:
8990mnt.fm
•
Distance from sample source. Locate the sampler as close to the sample
source as possible.
•
Vertical lift. Minimize the vertical lift (ideally, 15 feet or less).
•
Intake Rinses. Minimize the number of intake rinses prior to
sample collection.
•
Pump roller assembly condition. Remove (clean) the silicone residue in
the interior of the pump housing and on the rollers before installing a
new tube.
•
Constituents in the sample liquid. Grit and other abrasive solids
cause greater wear on the tubing as they are squeezed through the
pump rollers.
Page 97
Maintenance
Section 7
Note: To extend the life of the
tubing, rotate the pump tube 90
degrees in the pump housing after
approximately 2/3 of the life has
been realized (once the tube life has
been determined through use).
Experience at a particular site will be your best indicator of tubing life. Visually
inspect the tubing and rollers on a regular basis after initial installation to get a
feel for what maintenance your site will require. Be sure to replace the pump
tubing before it splits to prolong the life of the sampler and keep the work area
free of contamination from the sample liquid.
The proper length of silicone tubing must be used in the pump body. An
improper length can reduce the life of the tubing and pump rollers. Refer to
Figure 29 for the correct length.
Figure 29
Pump Tube Loading
11 5/8 in.
(Tubing in Pump)
To Intake Tubing Connector
5 3/4 in. to Sample Fitting
7.2.2 Replacing Pump Tubing
1. To replace the pump tube, remove the four screws on the pump cover.
2. Remove the front cover of the pump housing.
3. Remove the existing tubing. Locate the black dot on the new tubing. The
end of the tube that extends farthest beyond the black dot attaches to the
stainless steel tubing connector.
4. Install the pump tube in the pump housing until the black dots are visible
just outside the pump body.
5. After inserting the new pump tube, reinstall the front cover and secure it
with the four screws until finger tight.
7.3 Upgrades, Repairs, General Maintenance
Only a qualified technician should service the sampler. For example, steps
that require knowledge of CMOS electrostatic discharge precautions and
advanced electronics training and should only be performed by a qualified
technician. If you need assistance in performing any of the following service
steps, contact the manufacturer.
Page 98
Upgrades, Repairs, General Maintenance
8990mnt.fm
Section 7
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Considerations
To minimize ESD risks,
maintenance procedures not
requiring power to the sampler
should be performed with power
removed.
Delicate internal electronic components can be damaged by static electricity,
resulting in degraded instrument performance or eventual failure.
The manufacturer recommends taking the following steps to prevent ESD
damage to your instrument:
•
Before touching any instrument electronic components (such as
printed circuit cards and the components on them) discharge static
electricity from your body. This can be accomplished by touching an
earth-grounded metal surface such as the chassis of an instrument,
or a metal conduit or pipe.
•
To reduce static build-up, avoid excessive movement. Transport
static-sensitive components in anti-static containers or packaging.
•
To discharge static electricity from your body and keep it discharged, wear
a wrist strap connected by a wire to earth ground.
Handle all static-sensitive components in a static-safe area. If possible, use
anti-static floor pads and work bench pads.
7.4 Internal Maintenance Items
The following items require access to the inside of the case for service:
7.5
•
Fuses for the RS485 and analog interface connectors (if equipped)
•
Internal desiccant module
•
RAM memory batteries
•
System upgrades (4–20 mA, modem, alarm relays, etc.)
•
Circuit board repair
Removing and Opening the Controller
CAUTION
Always power the unit OFF and
then disconnect all cables from
the sampler before removing the
controller.
ATTENTION
Débranchez toujours l'alimentation de l'analyseur d'echantillonneur et
débranchez tous les câbles de l'analyseur avant de déposer l'unité de
commande.
To remove the controller from the refrigerator:
1. Turn the unit off by pressing the OFF key.
2. Disconnect and remove all cables to the controller housing, including the
distributor/full bottle shutoff cable.
3. Disconnect all tubing.
4. Remove the two refrigerator mounting screws from the inside of the
refrigerator.
5. Carefully lift the controller assembly up and off the refrigerator.
8990mnt.fm
Page 99
Internal Maintenance Items
Section 7
To open the controller:
1. Remove the 17 screws from around the perimeter of the controller
back panel.
2. Carefully pull open the bottom panel and let the attached connectors
swing out of the way.
3. If necessary for the repair being performed, unplug the appropriate
connectors. Always note each connector location before unplugging
anything. Re-installing a plug into the wrong connector can cause
extensive damage.
Note: The front panel gasket has a light coating of grease to help ensure a watertight
seal. Do not contaminate the grease or gasket area with dirt or debris during
servicing. Always replace the gasket if it is damaged or missing. Never
reassemble the case without the gasket properly installed.
7.6 Re-installing the Bottom Panel
Note: Always follow the procedure
below when re-installing the
sampler bottom panel. Improper
panel installation may result in
damage to
the instrument.
Figure 30
1. Hand tighten each nut until it makes contact with the panel.
2. Tighten the nuts in sequence shown in Figure 30 to 5 in.-lb (0.56 N-m).
3. Repeat the tightening procedure in the same sequence to 10 in.-lb
(1.13 N-m).
Tightening the Nuts on the Bottom Panel
1
10
2
11
9
3
17
12
4
8
13
16
5
7
Page 100
Re-installing the Bottom Panel
15
6
14
8990mnt.fm
Section 7
7.7 Circuit Board Identification
There are two main circuit boards in the sampler; the Utility Board and the
CPU board. The CPU board is attached to the bottom panel and the Utility
board is located inside the control housing behind the motor/gearbox
assembly.
Note: Removal and handling of the circuit boards used in the sampler requires
knowledge of ESD (Electro-Static Discharge) precautions and the CMOS
(Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor) circuit components used in the
sampler. Static electricity has the potential to damage the CMOS components of
the sampler when the boards are unplugged and removed from the case.
Precautions must be taken to assure static-free personnel and work area prior to
handling the circuit boards.
Figure 31
CPU Board
J9
J6
J10
J7
J1
J4
CPU BOARD
F1
J5
J11
J8
J2
Table 20 CPU Board Connectors
ID
Description
ID
Description
J1
Liquid Crystal Display
J7
RS485 Submerged Pressure Transducer
J2
Mechanical Totalizer
J8
Modem Option Module
J3
not used
J9
Liquid Crystal Display (LED back-light)
J4
Base Board
J10
Keypad
J5
Memory Backup Battery Pack
J11
not used
J6
RS232 Serial Port
8990mnt.fm
Page 101
Circuit Board Identification
Section 7
Figure 32
Utility Board
UTILITY BOARD
J17
J21
J6
J19 J7
J18
J5
J1
J3
C11
J20
TB1
J15
J22
J2
F2
J16
J4
J8
J9 J10 J11 J12 J13 J14
Table 21 Utility Board Connections
ID
Description
ID
Description
J1
Distributor
J12
Analog Input Channel 5
J2
Auxiliary
J13
Analog Input Channel 6
J3
pH/ ORP
J14
Analog Input Channel 7
J4
CPU Board
J15
Thermal Control
J5
Rain Gauge
J16
12 V dc Main
J6
Bubbler Module
J17
Relay Output
J7
Fluid Sensor #1
J18
4–20 mA PCB
J8
Analog Input Channel 1
J19
Fluid Sensor #2 (closest to pump)
J9
Analog Input Channel 2
J20
D.O. / Conductivity
J10
Analog Input Channel 3
J21
Submerged Sensor
J11
Analog Input Channel 4
J22
5 amp External Fuse
Page 102
Circuit Board Identification
8990mnt.fm
Section 7
7.8
Replacing the Fuse
DANGER
For continued protection
against fire, replace fuses with
only fuses of specified type and
current rating.
PELIGRO
Para una continua protección contra incendios, reemplace los fusibles
únicamente por los del tipo y capacidad recomendados.
Medium Delay Fuse, 5 Amp
The main 12 volt line is fused as soon as it enters the controller housing. This
is a 5-amp medium delay fuse (Cat. No. 8753) and is accessible from outside
the case on the back side of the controller housing. To remove the fuse
unscrew the cap on the fuse holder with a flat blade screwdriver.
PCB Fuse Removal and Inspection
Pull the fuse straight out of the holding clips to remove the fuse. The wire
strand inside the glass tube will be broken. Use an ohmmeter to tell for sure if
a fuse needs to be replaced.
7.9 Motor/Gear Box
The motor/gear box requires no regular maintenance. The special formulation
gears are self lubricating and require no oil or grease.
7.10 Internal Desiccant Module
Note: The desiccant module cannot
be recharged by heating. Do not
attempt to bake the desiccant
module in an oven to remove the
moisture as this could be a fire
hazard.
The Internal Desiccant Module (Cat. No. 8849) consists of a
moisture-absorbent material inside a poly bag. If the humidity indicator on the
front panel turns pink, replace the module and the back panel perimeter
gasket (Cat. No. 8606). The desiccant module is located under the CPU
board.
7.10.1 Replacing the Desiccant
To replace the desiccant, detach the controller from the refrigerator cabinet,
and remove the screws from the controller bottom panel. Remove the
desiccant bag and replace with a new one. Replace the controller gasket and
cover plate. Reattach the controller to the refrigerator. After replacing the
desiccant module and re-sealing the case, the Internal Case Humidity
Indicator Disc (Cat. No. 2660) should return to its original blue color. If the
humidity indicator is blue the desiccant is dry. Replace the indicator disc if it
fails to return to blue after replacing the desiccant module. To replace the
indicator disc, remove the bottom panel that is held in place by a small clip
and screw.
8990mnt.fm
Page 103
Replacing the Fuse
Section 7
7.11 Memory Battery
Random Access Memory (RAM) is a very reliable data storage medium for
microprocessor applications. However, RAM requires power at all times. If
power is removed, the data stored in the RAM chip is lost. Therefore, RAM
chips cannot be powered from the sampler power supply because data and
program settings would be lost every time the power cord was unplugged. A
separate battery located inside the sampler controller is provided to power the
RAM chips and the real-time clock. The memory battery keeps the program
entries and logged sample data alive inside the RAM memory when the main
power fails or is removed for transport or replacement.
The sampler memory battery consists of two “C” cell alkaline batteries.
Should the memory battery voltage fall too low to properly maintain the
program settings, a warning: MEMORY POWER LOW will alert to replace the
battery. The sampler utilizes a very small amount of energy from the memory
battery during normal operation. The service life of the batteries in this
application is typically five years.
Page 104
Memory Battery
8990mnt.fm
Appendix A
Quick Start Guides
For best results, read the instrument manual before beginning. Use this guide
as a reminder.
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Main Menu Flow Chart
Bottles
Intake Tubing
Program Lock
Program Delay
Sample Collection
Sample Distribution
Liquid Sensor
Sample Volume
Intake Rinses
Sample Retries
Site ID
Advanced Sampling *
Sample
History
Level
Flow
..etc.
Graph Data
Display Data
Date / Time
June15
June15
June15
June15
2:10pm
2:15pm
2:20pm
2:25pm
Flow
Setup
MAIN MENU
314.233
334.118
377.235
423.342
Options
Time/Date
Status
Volume
Calibration
Option Menu
Advanced
Options
4–20 mA Outputs
Alarms
Calibration
Communication
Setup
Datalog
Diagnostics
Flow Meter Setup
Flow Totalizer
Load Program
Velocity Setup
Screen Saver Mode
8990apdx_quickstart.fm
Level
Adjust
Current Level = 12.34 in
Enter New Level:
Program Complete Output
Setpoint Sampling
Special Output
Start/Stop Times
Storm Water
Timed Bottle Sets
Upset Sampling
Power Supply: 15.8 Volts
Sampling Underway
Program Started: 8:30AM
SEP19
Level: 21.957 in
Flow: 0.57 mgd
pH: 6.2
Temp: 73 F
Rainfall: .12
Total (x1000): 31233 gal
Page 105
Quick Start Guides
Appendix A
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Setup Flow Chart
Main Menu
Display Data
Options
Status
Setup
Notes
*1 Note:
grey menu not
available if CTVV
selected for Flow
Pacing
Displays all program items
(no changes allowed)
Review
All Items
or
Steps you through each program item
(same items as Modify Selected Items below)
Modify
All Items
*2 Note:
Flow Pacing menu
will not remember
previous setting
whenever you re-enter
that menu, i.e., it
reverts to default
CVVT. Therefore, if
you re-enter Flow
Pacing menu, be sure
to re-select the
sampling method you
want, CTVV or CVVT.
or
Modify
Selected
Items
Bottles
Enter Number of
Sample Bottles
Enter Bottle
Volume
Enter Intake
Tube Length
Enter Intake
Tube Type
or
Intake
Tubing
or
Program
Lock
Enable / Disable
or
Program
Delay
or
Sample
Collection
Enable / Disable
Flow
Proportional
If Enabled
Flow Pacing
CVVT
Enter Start Time
& Day of Week
Flow Meter: Integral
or External
Take Sample Every:
Vol. or Counts
Timed Over-Ride
Y or N
Take First Sample:
Immediately
or After First Interval
or
Flow Pacing
CTVV *2
or
Enter Average Flow
Rate
Enter Interval
Enter Total Sample
Volume Desired
Enter Collection
Period
or
Time
Proportional
Sample
Distribution
*1
Enter Sampling Interval
(hrs/min)
Deliver Each
Sample to ALL
Bottles? Y/N
Yes
Stop After
Last Sample
No
Run Continuously
or
or
Liquid
Sensor
Enable /
Disable
or
Sample
Volume
Enter Sample Volume
or
Intake
Rinses
Samples to
Collect
Enter Number of Rinses
Samples per
Bottle
or
Bottles per
Sample
Enter number of
Samples per Bottle
Enter number of
Bottles per Sample
or
Sample
Retries
Enter Number of Retries
or
Site ID
Enter Site Identification
or
Advanced
Sampling
Page 106
Quick Start Guides
SEE ADVANCED SAMPLING FLOW CHART
8990apdx_quickstart.fm
Appendix A
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Options Flow Chart
Main Menu
Display Data
Advanced
Options
or
select
4-20 mA
Outputs
Enable
or
Disable
Status
Setup
Select
Output
A or B
select
Select a
Channel to
Assign to Output
A or B
Accept
Enter 4 mA Input Value
Accept
or
Alarms
Time /
Date
select
Options
Enter 20 mA Input
Value
select
See ALARMS Flowchart -
select
See CALIBRATION Flowchart -
or
Calibration
or
Communications
Setup
select
select
Enable / Disable
Modem Power
RS232 Setup
select
Set Baud Rate
Select Inputs
or
Extended
Power
Mode
Enable/Disable
or
Set Memory
Mode
(Slate or Wrap)
select
Modem Setup
or
or
Data Log
select
or
Diagnostics
select
Select Baud Rate
(1200 or 2400)
Enter Phone #
Select either
Arrow
Tone or Pulse
Indicates
Proc. Temp.
dialing
Item is Logged
Rainfall
pH / ORP
Level / Flow
If
Select
Set Logging
Cabinet Temp
Logged
pick
Logged
Interval
Channel 1
one
or
Channel 2
select
Not
Channel 3
Logged
Ch 4 or DO
Select Units
Ch 5 or DO Temp
(if applicable)
Ch 6 or Cond
Ch 7 or Cond Temp
Velocity
Distributor, Event List, Keypad, LCD, Liquid Sensor, Velocity Analysis, Thermal System
or
Flow Meter
Setup
select
or
Flow Totalizer
select
or
Load Program
select
or
Velocity Setup
8990apdx_quickstart.fm
Modify Setup
or
Reset
or
View Totals
select
Select
Level
Units (IN,
FT, M,
CM)
Select Primary
Device (None-Level
Only, Manning, Weir,
Flume, Nozzle, PWR
Equation, Head vs
Flow, Area Velocity)
select
Select Scaling (X n)
select
Reset Totalizer (Y/N)
select
Resettable Total = _____
Non-Resetable Total = _____
select
Select Total
Flow Units
(AF, CF,
GAL, LTR,
M3)
Select Total Flow Units
(af, cf, gal, l or m 3)
Select Program #1 - 5
Direction
select
or
Screen Saver
Mode
(AC power only)
Select Flow Units
(GPS, GPM, GPH,
LPS, LPM, LPH, MGD,
AFD, CFS, CFM, CFH,
CFD, CMS, CMM,
CMH, CMD)
select
Upstream, Downstream, or Always Positive
Units
select
Fps(Feet per Sec), or M/S(Meters per sec.)
Cutoffs
select
Enter Cutoff Value Required for Valid Velocity
Default
select
Value Used When Cutoff is Reached
Enable or Disable
Page 107
Quick Start Guides
Appendix A
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Advanced Sampling Flow Chart
Main Menu
Display Data
Modify
Selected
Items
Options
Status
Setup
An arrow displayed next to an Advanced Sampling
option in the menu display signifies it is enabled.
Advanced
Sampling
Note: Enables pin F for
Program Complete output on
Auxillary connector.
Also disables its use for
Bottle# & Full Bottle Indicator.
Program
Complete
Output
Setpoint *
Sampling
Enable /
Disable
Enable /
Disable
Start on
Setpoint
-orStart /
Stop on
Setpoint
Select Only One Channel or
External Control for Setpoint.
Level
Flow
pH / ORP
Process Temp
Channel 1
Channel 2
Channel 3
Ch4 or D.O.
Ch5 or D.O. Temp
Ch6 or Cond
Ch7 or Cond Temp
Set HIGH
trigger and
Deadband
or
Set LOW
trigger and
Deadband
Set High
Trigger
Flow Rate of Chg
Rainfall
Enter Delay
When Input
Becomes
Active
Set
Time
Interval
External Control
Note: The Special Output
signal is available on pin E of
the Auxiliary connector.
Special
Output
Start /
Stop
Times
* Note: Setpoint Sampling &
Storm Water Cannot
Be Enabled at the Same
Time.
Note: Timed Bottle is not
allowed unless Bottles-perSample mode is selected in
Distribution Menu.
Storm
Water
Timed
Bottle
Sets
Enable /
Disable
Enable: After Each Sample, Only When
Pumping or From Rinse to Purge
Enable /
Disable
Time / Date
or
Time / Weekday
Enable /
Disable
Enable /
Disable
Select Start
Condition: Rain,
Level, Rain AND
Level, Rain OR
Level, Immediate
or
External Trigger
Clock
Time
Variable
Intervals
key:
Grey box indicates function not available with
CTVV sampling enabled. [Even if function is
still listed in screen menus.]
Page 108
Quick Start Guides
Enable /
Disable
Enable /
Disable
Set
Sample
Intervals
Enter Time and Day of
Week for each start and stop
Select
# of
First
Flush
Bottles
Select:
Samples/Bottle
or
Bottles/Sample
Enter Time of next
Bottle Set
Enable/
Disable
Continuous
Mode
or
Duration
Upset
Sample
Enter Time and Date for
each start and stop
Begin with
Bottle 1 on
each New
Start?
Enter Time Interval
till next Bottle Set
Level
Flow
pH / ORP
Process Temp
Channel 1
Channel 2
Channel 3
Ch 4 or D.O.
Ch 5 or DO Temp.
Ch 6 or Cond.
Ch 7 or Cond Tmp
Flow Rate of Chg
Rainfall
Set HIGH
Trigger
or
Set LOW
Trigger
Enter #
of
Upset
Bottles
Enter
Sampling
Interval
Enter
Sample
Volume
Enter
Program
Time Limit
Select:
Samples/Bottle
or
Bottles/Sample
Enter Sample
Volume
Set
HIGH
Trigger
Set
Time
Interval
External Control
8990apdx_quickstart.fm
Appendix A
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Alarms Flow Chart
Main Menu
Display Data
Advanced
Options
Options
Status
Setup
(arrow indicates enabled)
Alarms
Memory Battery
Low Slate Memory
Slate Memory Full
Modem Failure
U-Sonic Echo Loss
X-Ducer Ringing
U-Sonic Failure
RS-485 Timed Out
Modem Failure
Missed Sample
Purge Failure
Jammed Distributor
Full Bottle
Unable to Cool
Unable to Heat
(arrow indicates enabled)
Pick
One
Enable
or
Disable
select
Report via Modem
Set Relay #1
Set Relay #2
Set Relay #3
Set Relay #4
or
Level
Flow
pH / ORP
Process Temp
Cabinet Temperature
Channel 1
Channel 2
Channel 3
Channel 4 or D.O.
Channel 5 or D.O. Temp.
Channel 6 or Conductivity
Channel 7 or Cond. Temp.
Alarm on
HIGH
Condition
Pick
One
select
Enable
or
Disable
select
Enable
or
Disable
if enabled
Set
HIGH
Trigger
Point
Set
Deadband
if enabled
Set
LOW
Trigger
Point
Set
Deadband
or
Alarm on
LOW
Condition
Accept
or
Flow Rate of Chg
Rainfall
Pick
One
Enable
or
Disable
if
enabled
Set
High
Trigger
Point
Set
Time
Interval
Report Via Modem
Set Relay #1
Set Relay #2
Set Relay #3
Set Relay #4
(arrow indicates enabled)
8990apdx_quickstart.fm
Page 109
Quick Start Guides
Appendix A
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Calibration Flow Chart (1 of 2)
Main Menu
Display Data
Options
Status
Setup
Advanced
Options
Calibration
4-20 mA
Outputs
select
Select Output A
or Output B
Output A
Output B
Press a key
for 4 mA
Press a key
for 20 mA
select
select
Enter Actual
Output
Current
or
ORP
select
select
Apply Positive
Reference Signal to
ORP Input
select
Enter Actual
Output
Current
Enter New
mV Value
or
pH
select
Place Sensor in First Buffer
Place Sensor in Second Buffer
select
select
Enter Temperature of Liquid
or
select
Enter pH for Buffer #2
select
Enter pH for Buffer #1
Submerged
Probe
select
Select Orientation:
Horizontal or
Vertical
Remove Submerged Probe
from Liquid and press a key
(hold probe in same
orientation as selected in
previous step)
or
Submerge Probe to Known
Depth (>6") and press a key
(submerge probe in same
orientation as previous step)
Enter Depth of Probe
Proces Temp
select
Place Sensor in Liquid
(32 to 211 deg F)
select
Thermal Setpoint
Enter New Liquid
Temperature
or
Thermal
Setup
or
or
Dissolved
Oxygen
Thermal Calibrate
Enter
Ambient
Temperature
select
Place Sensor in Liquid
(32 to 211 deg F)
select
Enter
Temperature
Correction Factor
select
Place Sensor in Liquid
(32 to 211 deg F)
or
Conductivity
Enter Actual Cabinet Temp.
Enter
Elevation
Above
Sea
Level
select
or
Dissolved
Oxygen Temp
Enter Desired Cabinet
Temp.
Enter
Membrane
Thickness
Place Sensor in
Liquid & Press a Key
Page 110
Quick Start Guides
Place Sensor in
Air
Enter new D.O.
Value
Enter New Liquid
Temperature
or
Conductivity
Temperature
Enter
Chlorinity
Enter New
Conductivity
Value
Enter New Liquid
Temperature
8990apdx_quickstart.fm
Appendix A
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Calibration Flow Chart (2 of 2)
Main Menu
Display Data
Options
Status
Setup
Advanced
Options
Calibration
select
Submerged
Probe
select
Select Orientation
of Sensor
(horizontal or
vertical)
select
Place Probe on
a Flat Surface
and
Press Any Key
select
Remove
Sensor From
Liquid (press
a key)
select
Submerge
Sensor to
Known
Depth
select
Submerge
Sensor to
Known
Depth
select
Enter
new
Depth
or
Submerged
Velocity
Probe
select
Enter
new
Depth
or
Ultra-Sonic
Sensor
select
Calibrate
U-Sonic
select
Enter Ambient Temperature
Level Adjust
or
8990apdx_quickstart.fm
Enter New Level
('B' in dwg below)
select
Enter Sensor Height
('A' in dwg below)
or
Sensor Height
Set Invisible
Range
('C' in dwg )
select
select
Enter Distance to End
of Invisible Range
Page 111
Quick Start Guides
Visit http: //www.hach.com
Appendix B
Programming Features
Review All Items
This function reviews all information in the Setup and Option menus without
worrying about accidentally changing the information. Use this function to
verify that the program is set up properly.
All program entries and the status of all logged channels are displayed. Since
this information fills more than one screen, scroll through the setup
information one page at a time with the arrow keys.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
900 MAX VERSION:
NUMBER OF BOTTLES:
BOTTLE VOLUME:
INTAKE TUBE LENGTH
INTAKE TUBE TYPE
PROGRAM LOCK
SETUP REVIEW
1.00
4
10.00 gal
50 ft
3/8” VINYL
OFF
When you get to the last screen an UP key will be displayed. Scroll back up
the list or press MAIN MENU to exit.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
CHANNEL 3 ppm
CHANNEL 4 ppm
CHANNEL 5 ppm
CHANNEL 6 ppm
CHANNEL 7 ppm
MEMORY MODE
SETUP REVIEW
NOT LOGGED
NOT LOGGED
NOT LOGGED
NOT LOGGED
NOT LOGGED
WRAP
1min
1min
1min
1min
1min
When you are satisfied that all program entries are set up properly, press
MAIN MENU to exit this screen and return to the main menu.
Review All Items Screen Contents
The first line of the Setup Review screen shows the software revision level for
the internal embedded software (firmware) of the sampler and should be
noted before calling the factory.
Running a Program
Note: When selecting Start from
Beginning, all logged data will be
cleared from memory. If this data
needs to be saved make sure it is
downloaded to a DTU or personal
computer prior to pressing START
To run or halt a program, press the RUN/STOP key on the front panel. If the
program has been stopped (and no changes to the program settings were
made while it was stopped), pressing the RUN key will cause the program to
ask to resume the previously running program (and retain all logged data) or
START FROM BEGINNING (and clear all logged data).
FROM BEGINNING.
Displaying Data
The Display Data function provides the recorded data for any channel being
logged in a tabular report or a graph.
In addition, for tabular reports, the data can be viewed from the beginning,
from the end, or from a specific point in time. A graph can display any 24-hour
period, zoom in to any portion of the 24-hour period for finer detail, or center
the graph on a specific point in time.
8990apdx_pfeatures.fm
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Appendix B
Selecting the Channel
Note: Only the channels for
which logging has been enabled
will be listed.
1. Press DISPLAY DATA from the Main Menu to display a list of logged
channels.
2. Highlight the desired channel using the UP and DOWN keys then press
SELECT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SELECT
DISPLAY DATA
FLOW
RAINFALL
PH
RETURN
Tabular or Graph Format
1. Highlight the desired display method using the UP and DOWN keys then
press SELECT.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
SELECT
DISPLAY DATA
DISPLAY DATA
DISPLAY BY GRAPH
RETURN
Table 22 Display Data Functions and Descriptions
Function
Description
Display Data by Table
View from start: Displays the data for the selected channel beginning with the first (oldest) data point in
memory.
View from end: Displays the data for the selected channel beginning from the most recent point in memory.
View from time/date: Displays the data for the selected channel beginning from any desired time and date.
Enters a new desired time and date.
Note: Totals displayed are calculated by summing the logged data. If the date selected precedes available
logged data (memory has wrapped), the total will be incorrect.
Display Data by Graph
Graph day: Displays data for a specified date. Data for the selected date is graphed from midnight to midnight.
Graph point in time: Displays data for a specified time and date. The graph displays three hours of data with
the selected point in the time at the corner of the graph.
Graph partial day: Zooms in on a portion of the logged data.
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Appendix B
Graph Manipulation
Table 23 Graphing Functions and Descriptions
Functions
Description
Status Bar
Displays the time, date, measured value, and unit of measure at the intersection of the data cursor. Placing the
cursor’s data on the status bar eliminates the need for X or Y axis labels and provides a larger graph viewing
area.
Moving the Data Cursor with the Arrow Keys
The data cursor appears as a vertical line in the center of the graph. Move the data cursor to the left or right by
using the soft keys or the numeric keypad.
Moving the Data Cursor with the Numeric Keypad
The keys 0–9 represent a percentage of full scale. Pressing a numeric key on the keypad while a graph is
displayed causes the data cursor to jump to the location on the graph that is represented by that key.
For example, pressing the 0 key moves the data cursor to the far left end or 0% position on the graph. Pressing
the 5 key moves the data cursor to the middle or 50% position of the graph. Pressing the 9 key moves the cursor
to the 90% position.
Next Channel Soft Key
Graphs data from the next logged channel. For example, if the sampler is logging Level, Flow, and pH and the
Level graph is currently displayed, the NEXT CHANNEL key causes the Flow channel to be graphed. Pressing
Next Channel again will create a graph for pH channel. Pressing NEXT CHANNEL again returns to the Level
graph, selects a time period of interest, and compares different graphs.
Graphic Display Averaging
The sampler can display a graph that consists of a maximum of 180 individual
dots. Since a 24-hour period could contain as many as 1440 data points
(assuming a one-minute recording interval, one reading each minute) it would
be impossible to plot every data point on the graph.
When more than three hours (more than 180 minutes worth) of data is
graphed, the data points must be averaged. When graphing a partial day of
three hours or less, all data points are graphed with no averaging.
When viewing a graph with more than 180 data point, zoom in to the area of
interest (using the Graph Partial Day option) before all of the individual data
points are displayed.
Sample History
Sample History displays a running history of the sampling program. Displays
include sampler number, date and time of each sample, the bottle number it
was put in, and the results of the sample cycle. Result messages include:
8990apdx_pfeatures.fm
Message
Results
Success
Sample taken as expected.
No Liquid
No liquid was detected at the liquid sampler.
Key Press
A key was pressed twice during pumping, canceling that sample.
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Programming Features
Appendix B
Options Menu Features
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
OPTION MENU
VOLUME
CALIBRATION
TIME / DATE
ADVANCED
OPTIONS
READY TO START
LEVEL
ADJUST
Optional Programs
•
Time and Date for internal real-time clock
•
Calibrate the sample volume
•
Advanced Features
•
Adjust level readings of optional integral flow meter
Setting the Time and Date
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS>TIME/DATE
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
TIME / DATE
CHANGE
AM / PM
ACCEPT
_ _: _ _ AM _ _ -APR- _ _
CLEAR
ENTRY
MODE: 12-HR FORMAT
CHANGE
MONTH
USE +/- KEY TO CHANGE 12/24 HR FORMAT
2. Adjust the real time clock and date setting, using CHANGE AM/PM and
CHANGE MONTH keys.
Volume Calibration
From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS> VOLUME CALIBRATION.
The liquid sensor on the sampler offers unparalleled sample accuracy and
repeatability. For most site conditions, no volume calibration is necessary, and
the volume collected is accurate within 10% of the requested volume. To
improve volume accuracy to 5%, or when sample volume accuracy is
adversely affected by unusual site conditions (such as the sample source
located higher than the sampler pump), or when the liquid sensor is disabled,
then volume calibration should be performed.
Sensor Disabled
When the sensor is disabled, you must calibrate the sample volume(s). If
more than one volume is programmed (such as when using storm water or
upset sampling), you must calibrate each volume independently (see chart
below).
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Programming Features
8990apdx_pfeatures.fm
Appendix B
Sensor Enabled
When the sensor is enabled, and volume calibration is selected, a single
manual calibration is taken. It does not matter if multiple volumes are
programmed (such as when using stormwater or upset sampling). When the
sensor is enabled, a single “Manual Calibration” choice provides sufficient
information to adjust the sensor to all programmed volumes (see Table 24).
Table 24 Calibration Volumes
Liquid Sampler
Available Calibration Volumes
Enabled
Manual Calibration
Disabled
Main Sample Volume
Main Sample Volume
Disabled/Stormwater
First Flush Volume
Main Sample Volume
Disabled/Upset Sampling
Upset Sample Volume
Main Sample Volume
Disabled/Storm & Upset
Upset Sample Volume
First flush Volume
Disabled/If Timed Rinses Set
Timed Rinse (in addition to the above)
Calibration Procedure—Sensor Disabled:
Note: Before calibrating, make
certain the desired sample volume
in the Setup menu is selected.
1. From the Main Menu, press OPTIONS.
2. Press VOLUME CALIBRATION.
3. Select the desired volume to calibrate if more than one is listed
(see Table 24).
4. Slip the pump tube off the sample fitting (near where it exits the pump
housing) and direct the end of the pump tube into a graduated cylinder.
5. Press START PUMPING. The pump will purge the line, and start pumping a
sample.
6. Press any key when the desired sample volume has been reached in the
graduated cylinder. The pump will stop to allow the line to completely
drain and then reverse to post-purge the line.
7. If the pumped sample volume is correct, press DONE. If not, repeat the
calibration cycle by pressing TRY AGAIN.
8. When finished, re-install the pump tube onto the sample fitting.
Note: To check the sample size after calibration use the Manual Mode function key to
take a grab sample. Do not go back into calibration to check the volume since the
volume compensation is reset to zero at the start of a calibration.
If one or more Timed Rinses are selected (sensor disabled), then they must
be calibrated as well. The Timed Rinse will rinse the intake line up to 3 times
prior to taking a sample.
8990apdx_pfeatures.fm
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Appendix B
When calibrating a Timed Rinse, the line is purged, then liquid is pumped
toward the sensor. When the liquid reaches the predetermined point, press
any key to stop the pump. The pump will reverse and purge the line.
Timed Rinse Calibration Procedure—Sensor Disabled:
1. From the Main Menu, press OPTIONS.
2. Press VOLUME CALIBRATION.
3. Select Timed Calibrate and press SELECT.
4. Press START PUMPING. Wait while the pump purges the line, it will then
start pulling liquid toward the pump.
5. Press any key when the liquid reaches the desired point. The pump then
reverses to post-purge the line. The pump should be stopped when liquid
has reached the point past the sensor, but not into the pump body.
6. If the timed rinse stopped where you wanted, press DONE. If not, repeat
the timed rinse cycle by pressing TRY AGAIN.
Calibration Procedure—Sensor Enabled:
Note: Before calibrating, make
certain the desired sample volume
in the Setup menu is selected.
1. From the Main Menu, press OPTIONS.
2. Press VOLUME CALIBRATION,
3. Main Calibration is the only choice with the sensor enabled. Press
SELECT.
4. Slip the pump tube off the sample fitting (near where it exits the pump
housing) and direct the end of the pump tube into a graduated cylinder.
5. Press START PUMPING. The pump will purge the line, and pump a sample
into the graduated cylinder. The pump will then stop to allow the line to
completely drain and finally reverse to post-purge the line.
Note: To check the sample size after calibration use the Manual Mode function key to
take a grab sample. Do not go back into calibration to check the volume since the
volume compensation is reset to zero at the start of a calibration.
6. If the sample was taken, then press DONE. If not, repeat the cycle by
pressing TRY AGAIN.
7. After pressing DONE, a screen will be displayed asking for the Actual
Volume. This is the volume measured in the graduated cylinder. Enter this
volume and press ACCEPT when done. Note that the requested sample
volume is shown on top for reference.
8. When finished, re-install the pump tube onto the sample fitting.
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Programming Features
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Appendix B
Data Log
From the Main Menu, select SETUP > ADVANCED OPTIONS > DATALOG.
The sampler can record up to 116,000 readings from any or all input channels
and store them in solid state, battery-backed memory for later viewing or
retrieval.
This option allows the selection of channels to log, how often to log, and how
to treat the memory when it becomes full (Slate or Wrap).
The sampler has two data logging modes:
•
Power Save Mode
•
Continuous Mode
Logging Intervals
Logging Intervals are designed to optimize the available memory so that
readings can be logged for a longer period of time. A logging interval is the
time period over which readings are taken and then averaged.
Power Save Mode
Power Save Mode is automatically initiated upon power-up if a battery is
installed on the sampler. When operating in Power Save Mode, the sampler
microprocessor spends most of its time asleep conserving battery power.
Once per minute, the sampler wakes up, logs the readings from all enabled
input channels, performs any other necessary functions and then goes back
to sleep.
Selecting a five-minute logging interval means that the readings are still taken
every minute but the data is not logged until the five-minute logging interval is
complete. At that time the readings are averaged over the previous five
minutes and that average is logged
Continuous Mode
Continuous Mode is automatically initiated upon power up if ac power is
supplied. The microprocessor stays awake at all times taking readings every
second. At the end of the specified logging interval, the readings are averaged
over the previous interval and stored in memory. If a one-minute logging
interval is selected, a reading will be taken approximately every second but no
data is logged until the logging interval ends. At that time, the readings are
averaged over the logging interval and only the average is logged.
If a five-minute logging interval is selected, readings are still taken every
second but the data are not logged until the five-minute logging interval ends.
At that time, the readings are averaged over the previous five minutes and the
average is logged.
Extended Power Mode
Extended Power Mode provides additional battery life by keeping a sampler
powered down during the entire logging interval. For example, if a logging
interval of five minutes is selected, the sampler stays asleep until the five
minutes has expired. It then wakes up, takes a reading, logs it in memory and
goes back to sleep for another five minutes. The sampler does not wake up
every minute as it does in normal
8990apdx_pfeatures.fm
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Programming Features
Appendix B
Power Save Mode.
Selecting a five minute logging interval in Extended Power Mode causes a
reading to be taken and logged every five minutes. All channels must share
the same logging interval.
Note: The Review All Items
selection from the Setup menu
indicates the maximum available
logging hours for the channels and
recording intervals you selected.
The sampler calculates this
information when the program is run
using the RUN/STOP key.
Longer logging intervals result in a longer total recording time. Lower
resolution also occurs since more averaging is done at higher logging
intervals. Choose the shortest logging interval possible, while still making data
collection convenient. If possible, visit the site once per month to collect data,
and choose a logging interval that almost fills memory over the course of
one month.
For example, if the sampler is equipped with the standard complement of
RAM memory (128K) and only one channel is logged, a two-minute logging
interval would take 24 days to completely fill the available memory
If, on the other hand, a one-minute logging interval is selected, the memory
would become full after 12 days.
Table 25 Logging Intervals vs. Total Recording Time for Each Memory Configuration*
Logging Interval
Total Recording Time (days) before
memory is full, with 128K Bytes of
RAM (standard)
(approx. 18,482 readings)
Total Recording Time (days) before
memory is full with 512K Bytes of
RAM (optional)
(approx. 115,630 readings)
1
12.15
80.55
2
24.30
161.10
3
36.45
241.65
5
60.75
402.75
6
72.90
483.30
10
121.50
805.50
12
145.80
966.60
15
182.25
1208.25
20
243.00
1611.00
30
364.50
2416.50
60
729.00
4833.00
* Assuming one logged channel.
Dynamic Memory Allocation
The sampler uses a management scheme called “Dynamic Memory
Allocation.” All readings are logged in battery-backed Random Access
Memory (RAM). RAM memory is allocated to each channel dynamically
during operation. If one channel is logging at five-minute intervals and a
second channel logging at one-minute intervals, the sampler automatically
configures memory so that both channels fill memory at the same time. Five
times as much memory is assigned to the channel that is logging at oneminute intervals than the channel that is logging at five-minute intervals.
Memory can be configured in two ways:
•
Page 120
Programming Features
Slate Modem
•
Wrap Mode
8990apdx_pfeatures.fm
Appendix B
Slate Memory Mode
Slate mode causes logging to stop when memory becomes full. The sampler
continues to operate but no more data is logged. Use this mode to keep data
from the beginning of the logging period.
Wrap Memory Mode
In Wrap mode, when memory becomes full, the oldest reading is discarded
each time a new reading is taken. When memory becomes full, the sampler
continues to operate and log data. This mode is best used when interested in
the most recent data readings.
Memory Mode Configuration
To configure the Memory Mode for either Slate mode or Wrap mode:
1. Select Data Log from the Advanced Options menu.
2. Select Memory Mode using the UP and DOWN keys, then press ACCEPT.
3. Press CHANGE CHOICE to choose either Slate or Wrap, then press
ACCEPT to complete.
Data Logging Configuration
To configure the sampler for data logging:
Note: If logging is enabled on any
channel, then that channel will have
an arrow in front of it to signify that
the channel is logged.
1. Select Data Log from the Advanced Options menu.
2. Highlight Select Inputs using the UP and DOWN keys and press SELECT.
3. Highlight the channel you wish to log using the UP and DOWN keys, then
press SELECT.
4. Press CHANGE CHOICE to cycle between Logged and Not Logged, then
press ACCEPT.
5. Enter a logging interval using the numeric keypad, then press ACCEPT.
Valid logging intervals are shown on the status bar along the bottom edge
of the display for your reference.
6. Select another channel to configure or press RETURN to back up one step
or press MAIN MENU to return to the Main Menu display.
Diagnostics
From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS> ADVANCED OPTIONS > DIAGNOSTICS.
In addition to the automatic diagnostics that are performed upon power up,
the following manual diagnostics are available:
8990apdx_pfeatures.fm
•
Distributor Test
•
LCD Test
•
Event List
•
Liquid Sensor
•
Keypad Test
•
Velocity Analysis
Page 121
Programming Features
Appendix B
Distributor Test
The distributor positions the sample tube over the appropriate bottle during
multiple bottle sampling. If the distributor arm is obstructed or if a problem
exists with the distributor assembly, the arm will not position over the desired
bottle correctly.
This test assumes that 24 bottles are installed which is the most difficult to
position for the distributor (the most stops and the smallest bottle mouth).
Upon selecting the Distributor Test, the arm returns to the bottle #1 position
then moves one bottle at a time for all 24 bottle positions. The arm then
reverses direction and again stops at all 24 positions on its way back to the
bottle #1 position. Make sure no obstructions interfere with the distributor
arm rotation.
Event List
The Event List diagnostic provides a time/date stamped list of significant
events occurring in the sampler. You can review these events to find out when
an event occurred and what events preceded or followed the event of interest.
Events may be viewed in chronological order from the beginning or end of the
event list by selecting View From Start or View From End.
The event list cannot be erase, even when the program is started. Up to 200
events are logged before the list wraps around and the oldest entry is
discarded as each new entry is posted.
Logged events include:
•
Power On/Off
•
Alarm Activation/De-activation
•
Level Adjustments
•
Calibration
•
Program started, stopped,
halted, or resumed
•
Missed Samples (if liquid sensor
is enabled)
•
Error Messages
Keypad Test
Keypad Test provides a simple means of verifying the operation of all front
panel keys. Select Keypad Test from the diagnostics menu to bring up the
following screen:
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
KEYPAD TEST
QUIT
KEYPAD PRESSED:
5
PRESS ANY KEY
Pressing any key on the front panel (except for the upper left soft key) will
cause that key label to appear in the center of the display.
All numeric keypad keys, soft keys, and function keys may be tested in this
manner. To end, press QUIT (this also verifies the upper left soft key
operation).
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Appendix B
LCD Test
Display Test allows you to verify that all pixels in the Liquid Crystal Display
(LCD) are functional. The LCD is made up of 14,400 pixels that are turned on
and off as needed to create the display of graphics and text. Each individual
pixel is turned on and off by its own transistor, which means that if a transistor
failed, the pixel might not turn on, which could cause an unreadable or
confusing display.
Selecting LCD Test from the Diagnostics menu will cause the display to
become black for 3 seconds. This allows verification that all pixels are
functional. A defective pixel will stand out as a white dot in the field of black
dots. A message, “The display will remain inverted for 3 seconds” is shown for
2 seconds followed by a 3 second period with all dots turned on.
Liquid Sensor
The liquid sensor contains a high frequency sound transmitter and receiver.
High frequency sound waves are sent through the silicone pump tubing by
vibrating a piezo-electric crystal. They are picked up on the other side of the
tubing by a receiving crystal acting much like a microphone. Since sound
waves travel much more efficiently through a liquid than they do through air,
the receiving crystal gets a much louder signal when water passes through
the tubing in the sensor. The signal from the receiving crystal is converted to a
voltage which is proportional to the signal strength. This voltage is used by the
sampler microprocessor to sense the exact moment water reaches the
sensor. the liquid sensor compares the voltage (signal strength) when the
tubing is dry (such as when purging the line) to the voltage when the tubing is
full of water (such as when pumping a sample). The dry verses wet voltage
reading must be at least 0.8 V dc higher than the 0.3 volts, then when the
voltage needed to sense liquid would be 1.1 volts or higher.
The Liquid Sensor is designated as #1. The diagnostic screen displays the
voltage coming from the sensor electronics. Should a problem arise where the
liquid sensor is not reliably sensing the liquid, (inaccurate sample volumes,
water getting to the bottle during an intake rinse, purge failure), use of the
Liquid Sensor diagnostics values will provide valuable information as to the
sensor sensitivity.
Velocity Analysis
A velocity probe must be installed in the flow stream and be connected to the
meter in order for this diagnostic to work. This diagnostic allows viewing a
‘real time’ reading directly from the Submerged Area Velocity Probe. It will
show the current velocity Signal Strength (percentage of Doppler signal
returning to the probe) and a ‘real time’ velocity measurement of the flow
stream. Use this diagnostic to determine if the probe is mounted for optimal
velocity measurement. The closer to 100% the Signal Strength is, the more
stable the velocity reading will be. If the signal seems low (50% or less), it may
be due to improper installation of the probe or a lack of particulate in the flow
stream.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
VELOCITY ANALYSIS
SIGNAL STRENGTH: 90‰
VELOCITY: 7.00 fps
RETURN
8990apdx_pfeatures.fm
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Programming Features
Appendix B
Load Program
From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS> ADVANCED OPTIONS>
LOAD PROGRAM.
The sampler stores up to five sets of program instructions. Each program
consists of entries made in the Setup Menu and the Advanced Options Menu.
The sampler is shipped with PROGRAM #1 as the loaded program. To see
what program is currently loaded, press REVIEW ALL ITEMS in the Setup
Menu. All program entries made in the Setup Menu and the Advanced
Options Menu pertain to the currently loaded program. To change programs,
select the program number (1–5), in the Load Program menu, then make the
desired changes in both the Setup Menu and the Advanced Options Menu.
To load a new program
1. Highlight Load Program in the Advanced Options Menu. Press SELECT.
2. Enter a number from 1 to 5 using the numeric keypad. Press ACCEPT.
The Site ID is also displayed on the Load Program Menu for your reference.
The Site ID can be modified in the Setup menu.
Screen Saver Mode
From the Main Menu, select SETUP > ADVANCED OPTIONS >
SCREEN SAVER MODE.
The power required to properly light the LCD can consume valuable battery
life. Screen Saver Mode is a power saving feature of the sampler.
Battery Power
When the sampler senses that it is operating on battery power, Screen Saver
Mode conserves battery life by automatically turning the LCD display off after
3 minutes of keypad inactivity. Pressing any key will turn the LCD display back
on. No configuration is required; the meter automatically senses ac or battery
operation on power up.
ac Power
When operated under ac power, Screen Saver Mode can be enabled or
disabled manually. Enabling the Screen Saver when operating on ac power
will prolong the life of the LCD display by minimizing its use.
To change the Screen Saver mode:
1. Highlight SCREEN SAVER MODE on the Advanced Options Menu using
the UP and DOWN keys, then press SELECT.
2. Press CHANGE CHOICE to select a new Screen Saver Mode (Enabled or
Disabled). When you have made your selection, press ACCEPT to save
the changes.
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Appendix B
Flow Totalizer
The Flow Totalizer consists of three numeric counters that keep track of the
total flow being measured. Two software totalizers are standard with a third
external mechanical totalizer as an option. The two software totalizers consist
of a resettable totalizer and a non-resettable totalizer. Both totalizers are set
to zero upon program start.
Scaling multipliers are provided to allow tailoring of the totalizer response to
meet the requirements of the application. Some applications with high flow
rates will require a high scaling factor, while low flow rates will require a low
scaling factor.
The scaling factor is displayed whenever a total flow number is displayed.
As indicated in the Status Screen below, the total flow is displayed as
“TOTAL (x1000): 465 gal.” Multiplying the displayed total flow by the scaling
factor (1000) gives an actual total flow of 465,000 gallons.
11:00 AM 21 - APR - 01
LEVEL:
FLOW:
TOTAL (X1000):
pH:
BATTERY:
RUNNING
STATUS SCREEN
8.688 in.
71.39 mgd
465 gal
7.2 pH
16.9 volts
1. From the Main Menu, select OPTIONS> ADVANCED OPTIONS > FLOW
TOTALIZER to display the Modify Setup, Reset, and View Total screen.
Modify Setup
Modify Setup selects a totalizer scaling factor and a flow unit of measure.
1. Highlight Modify Setup using the UP and DOWN. Press SELECT.
2. Set the Totalizer Scaling factor using the CHANGE CHOICE key. All three
totalizers are scaled with one of seven scaling factors: X1, X10, X100,
X1000, X10,000, X100,000 or X1,000,000. The selected scaling factor
always applies to all totalizers. Press CHANGE CHOICE to cycle through
the available scaling choices.
3. Press ACCEPT to continue.
4. Set the Total Flow Units using the CHANGE CHOICE key to cycle through
the choices. Total Flow Units are independent of the flow units selected in
the Setup Menu. Flow units of measure include:
•
Acre-feet
•
Liters
•
Cubic Feet
•
Cubic Meters
•
Gallons
5. Press ACCEPT to continue.
8990apdx_pfeatures.fm
Page 125
Programming Features
Appendix B
Reset (Totalizer)
The non-resettable totalizer will only be reset if one of the following
conditions occur:
•
Change in totalizer scaling
•
Change in primary device
•
Change in totalizer units of
measure
•
Start of new program
Note: The totalizer cannot be reset manually.
1. Select RESET from the Totalizer menu. A confirmation message will be
displayed.
2. Press YES to reset the totalizer or press NO to not reset the totalizer.
To reset both software totalizers at once, start a program with the
RUN/STOP key.
Note: If any type of condition occurs, both the resettable and the non-resettable
totalizers are reset. The resettable totalizer can be used to total flow over a finite
period and can be reset as often as desired without affecting the other totalizers.
View Totals
To view the current totals of both the resettable and non-resettable totalizers,
press VIEW TOTALS from the Totalizer menu. Both totalizer values will appear
Page 126
Programming Features
8990apdx_pfeatures.fm
Appendix C
Troubleshooting and Error Messages
Error Messages
Error Message
Reason
*****Warning!*****
Logged data will be lost if you choose to continue? Yes/No.
Making a program change when a program is halted.
•
•
•
A minimum of 4 points are required.
The entered level value must be greater than the
previous value.
No values have been entered in the selectable table.
When entering level-flow or area-level tables, or when
attempting to use the tables, a minimum of four points must
be entered to create a valid table, and level values must
increase value as they are entered.
Bottle number must be: 1–xx
(where xx = #bottles in the tray).
When selecting a bottle to move to after selecting distributor
movement from the manual menu screen.
Bottle quantity must be: 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24.
An invalid bottle quantity was entered.
Calibration requires a minimum submersion of six inches.
Level sensor calibration of the bubbler or submerged sensor.
Day must be: 01—xx (where xx is the last day in month).
Invalid number when setting a date.
Distributor movement halted due to key press.
A key was pressed during the distributor test (diagnostics) or
distributor movement from the manual menu screen.
Error: Distributor arm is not functioning properly!
The distributor test failed due to an arm obstruction, cable
not installed properly, or defect in the distributor assembly.
Function disabled while a program is running.
Use RUN/STOP key.
Attempted to use manual menu functions or the distributor
test while the program is running.
Hours must be: 00—23.
Invalid number entered when setting a time, 24-hour format.
Hours must be: 01—12.
Invalid number entered when setting a time, 12-hour format.
Incorrect password! Access denied.
Incorrect password was entered (password is 9000).
Interval must be: 000:01–xxx:xx
(where xxx:xx is max. interval).
An invalid duration (hrs:min) was entered.
Invalid floating point format, only one decimal point allowed.
A number was entered with two or more decimal points.
Logging intervals must be: 1,2,3,5,6,10,12,15,20,30,60.
An invalid logging interval was entered.
Minutes must be: 00—59.
Invalid number entered when setting a time.
No changes allowed while a pgm is running. Use run/stop key.
An inaccessible selection was made on a menu screen. Stop
the program before proceeding.
No retries are possible when the liquid sensor is disabled.
Occurs if Sample Retries is selected from the Modify
Selected Items scrolling list, and liquid sensor are disabled.
Enable liquid sensor to use retries.
No year entered.
Invalid number entered when setting a date.
pH calibration failed—gain and/or offset out of range.
Try again.
The pH calibration calculations yielded an invalid number.
Try fresh buffers or a new probe.
Pumping took too long, please try again.
Occurs when the maximum time for timed calibration of a
sample volume (or rinse) is exceeded (the maximum is
65000 tens-of-milliseconds, which is roughly equal to
10.5 minutes).
•
•
•
•
•
•
May occur at the end of a sample attempt. Messages are
self explanatory. Investigate the tubing setup from strainer to
liquid sensor. Strainer may be plugged or out of water.
Tubing may not be installed properly in liquid sensor.
Sampling halted because of key press.
Sampling halted because the bottle is full.
Sampling halted due to fluid presence after pre-purge.
Sampling halted during rinse—no liquid detected.
Sampling halted due to fluid presence after rinse purge.
Sampling halted—no liquid detected during sample phase.
Sensor output voltage too low—cannot calibrate.
The D.O. calibration yielded an invalid result.
Try another probe.
Setpoint Sampling and Storm Water cannot both be enabled.
Enabled Setpoint Sampling with Storm Water enabled, or
enabled Storm Water with Setpoint Sampling enabled.
8990apdx_tbl.fm
Page 127
Troubleshooting and Error Messages
Appendix C
Stormwater mode is not allowed when the sampler is
configured with one bottle.
Tried to enable Storm Water with a single bottle.
The program cannot start: timed rinse required.
Occurs if the liquid sensor is disabled and timed calibration
has not been performed for the rinse cycle.
The program cannot start: the primary device is not properly
set up.
If the operator goes partially through the flow meter setup
screens but stops before entering all necessary parameters.
The program cannot start: volume calibration required.
If the liquid sensor is disabled and timed calibration has not
been performed for the main sample, the first flush or the
upset sample volume.
The program setup needs flow to be logged at an
interval < or = the flow time limit.
If an alarm, setpoint or stormwater uses flow rate-of-change
as a trip point.
The program setup needs rain to be logged at an interval < or =
the rainfall time limit.
If an alarm, setpoint or stormwater uses rainfall as a
trip point.
The signal did not stabilize in time—calibration failed.
When calibrating pH, process temperature, ORP, D.O., D.O.
temperature, conductivity, or conductivity temperature, the
signal from the probe did not respond within the calibration
time limits. Replace buffer solutions (if applicable) or try
another probe.
•
•
The time entered is before the first logged value. Data will
be display from beginning.
The time entered is after the last logged value. Data will be
displayed from the end.
When selecting the time/date for graphing and the selected
beginning or ending time falls outside the range of data.
The value must be: xxx—yyy
(xxx is minimum, yyy is maximum).
The value entered was out of the legal range, when
changing any numeric parameter. The appropriate range is
always displayed on the bottom line on the entry screen.
•
•
When entering start/stop times. Start/stop times must be
entered in chronological order.
This program stop is prior to the last program start.
This program start is prior to the last program stop.
Timed bottle sets are not allowed unless distribution is
bottles-per-sample mode.
Tried to enable Timed Bottle Sets when bottles per sample
have not been specified (the bottles-per-sample is used as
the bottle set quantity).
Timed bottle sets are not allowed when the sampler is
configured with one bottle.
Tried to enable Timed Bottle Sets with a single bottle.
Times cannot be more than 24 hours apart.
When selecting a start and stop time for a graph display the
limit (due to screen resolution) is 24 hours.
Too few bottles—review timed bottle sets, upset sampling, &
stormwater. Minimum needed:
Occurs if there are not enough bottles to perform all the
various functions. Either install more bottles or decrease
number of programmed functions.
Too many alarms and setpoints have been requested.
Occurs if more than 20 alarm and setpoint conditions are
set. Storm Water start conditions use one or two setpoints.
Too many samples-per-bottle for the bottle volume:
The sample volume is too large for the bottle volume:
Occurs when the sample volume is checked, if the
requested sample volume is too big to fit in the bottle.
Upset sampling is not allowed when the sampler is configured
with one bottle.
Tried to enable Upset Sampling with a single bottle.
Page 128
Troubleshooting and Error Messages
8990apdx_tbl.fm
Appendix C
Trouble Alarm Conditions, Causes, and Solutions
Trouble Condition
Cause
Solution
Low Main Battery
Power supply voltage is less than 11 V dc.
Change batteries.
Memory Battery
Internal memory battery voltage is too low.
Change memory batteries.
Low Slate Memory
Free slate memory is less than 20%. RAM
memory is almost full and will stop
recording soon.
Download data from unit, halt and restart the
program or download data, halt, and change
data to wrap mode.
Slate Memory Full
No more slate memory. Unit is in slate memory
mode and cannot log any more data.
Download data and restart the program or
download data then change the
memory mode.
Modem Failure
Unable to initialize modem PCB.
If the modem is enabled, the problem may be
found on the modem board and the board
may need to be replaced.
Missed Sample
Sample cycle did not result in getting a sample.
—
Purge Failure
Sensor(s) still detecting liquid after a line purge.
—
Jammed Distributor
Distributor arm has jammed on an obstruction.
Unable to Cool
Refrigeration system is unable to reduce
temperature in refrigeration compartment to
user defined setpoint.
—
Unable to Heat
Heater is unable to increase temperature in
refrigeration compartment to user defined
setpoint.
—
U-Sonic Echo Loss
The echo has been temporarily deflected by a
change in site conditions such as floating debris
or foam in the channel, wind, etc.
Xducer Ringing
Transducer is operating within the deadband
U-Sonic Failure
Transducer not plugged in. Cable damaged.
Transducer thermal sensor damaged.
Communication error between CPU and remote
ultrasonic module.
Check for excessive foam. Remove any debris
or build-up.
—
Check that the transducer is plugged in and
that there is no damage to the sensor.
—
CPU is not communicating with the
Velocity board.
Wait a few minutes to see if it goes away, if it
continues it is an indication that there is a
problem with the CPU board.
Not receiving a good velocity reading.
If the logging interval is 1 or 2 minutes and
conditions are poor with the problem
continuing indefinitely, try increasing the
logging interval to allow more time to capture
the signal.
RS485 Timed Out
8990apdx_tbl.fm
Remove obstruction
Page 129
Troubleshooting and Error Messages
Appendix C
Downlook Ultrasonic Sensor Troubleshooting
Problems
RS485 Time Out—Did not get a
reading with the specified time
allotted.
Loss of Ultrasonic as Level
Measuring Device.
U-Sonic Echo Loss—Flow Meter
Not Receiving a Return Echo
from the Ultrasonic Transducer.
U-Sonic Failure—No Signal from
the Ultrasonic Transducer.
XDucer Ringing—False Return
Echo mask Real Echoes.
Causes
CPU is having trouble communicating
with the Ultrasonic board.
Wait a few minutes and see if the condition
goes away. If it continues there amy be a
problem in the Ultrasonic, Velocity, or
CPU board.
Difficulty receiving a velocity reading.
Indicates an internal problem.
Blown fuse on CPU board.
Replace fuse. The fuse is located in position
F1 under the gray ribbon cable that connects
at position J1.
Problem with the ultrasonic board.
Replace if necessary.
Excessive foam on the water surface
causes sound waves to be absorbed
rather than reflected.
Check for excessive foam.
Sensor is knicked or cut or improperly
installed.
Check for knicks, cuts, and the
sensor installation.
Sensor must be level for proper return
of signals.
Make sure the ultrasonic transducer is level.
Convection currents are present which
varies the speed of sound.
Try shielding the transducer from convection
currents. Echo loss should not exceed more
than two hours.
Temperature calibration set up incorrectly.
Extreme high or low temperature
indicates a bad temperature transducer in
the temperature sensor.
Go through the temperature calibration
procedure and determine what the
temperature the unit is sensing. Replace
transducer if necessary.
Transducer is not connected.
Check the ultrasonic sensor connection on the
flow meter.
Cut or broken cable.
Check for any knick or cuts in the cable.
Unusual temperature or inability to read
new calibrated level.
Re-calibrate the unit.
Liquid is too close to the transducer.
Try moving the transducer farther from the
liquid.
Obstructions under the transducer.
Check for obstructions on the front and sides
of the transducer.
Coating on the face of the transducer.
Clean the transducer face. If this is a constant
problem, try coating the face of the transducer
with a very thin film of silicone grease to keep
the debris from collecting.
The transducer resonates against steel
mounting rails.
Use the proper rubber isolation washers.
—
No Change in Level Readings or
Inaccurate Level Readings.
Solutions
Check the logged data to see when this
started to occur. Go to the event log to see if
anything happened during the same time.
Calibration
Re-calibrate the unit.
Bad transducer.
Try a different transducer.
Page 130
Troubleshooting and Error Messages
8990apdx_tbl.fm
Appendix C
pH Troubleshooting
Symptom
Possible Cause
Solution
•
Meter continuously
reads pH 14 or drifts
above 14.
Open circuit in either
glass or reference
electrode.
•
•
•
Temperature is
constant or incorrect.
Electrode won’t
calibrate.
Interface is wired
wrong.
Check interface wiring.
Thermistor is open.
Check interface wiring. Check for open at electrode RTD wire. Disconnect
to make measurement. (Should read approximately 100–110 ohms.)
Gain or offset error.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Ensure that solutions are fresh and labeled properly.
Confirm that electrode and buffer temperatures have stabilized.
Confirm that the wetting cap is removed.
Check bulb for cracks or other damage.
Confirm that interface wires are connected properly.
Check interface connections for corrosion.
•
Inspect the pH bulb for coating or clogging. If present, clean
thoroughly.
Keep the electrode wet at all times. If it dries out, the impedance will
increase dramatically. To restore performance, soak in 0.1 N HCI
(Cat. No. 1481253) for 30 minutes and rinse well with distilled water.
Chemical degradation of pH glass can occur rapidly in a high
temperature or high pH environment, yielding sluggish response. Low
temperature environments can double the impedance for every 8 °C
drop below 25°C.
A high impedance electrode is extremely sensitive to electrical noise,
e.g., oscillating electrical fields generated by motors, generators or
discharges from electrical thermostats. A free-hanging cable swinging
due to air currents will also generate erratic signals.
Manipulate electrode cable and connections to check for intermittent
continuity. Replace as necessary.
•
•
Very high impedance
in either glass or
reference electrode.
•
Slow response and/or
erratic readings.
•
•
Ground loop problem.
No response to pH
change.
8990apdx_tbl.fm
Inspect the cable and connector of the faulty electrode for evidence of
a crushed or broken cable jacket or brittleness of the cable due to
exposure to heat. Discard the electrode if damage is present.
Manipulate meter/electrode connections to check for intermittent
continuity. Replace if faulty.
Inspect the bulb, making sure it is filled with solution. If not, shake
down (like a clinical thermometer) to displace air in the pH bulb. Retest.
Inspect the bulb for signs of coating.
•
Check to see if the ground wire is connected properly at the pre-amp
junction box.
Check for continuity between the stainless steel lug on the electrode
and the ground wire at the interface.
Temperature is
incorrect.
See “Temperature” symptom in this table.
Cracked glass bulb.
If the electrode gives readings between 5.8 and 6.2 pH in all solutions,
inspect the glass bulb. If damaged, discard.
Short Circuit.
If a constant reading of 7.0 pH or 0.0 mV is obtained, inspect the cable. If
no visible damage exists, remove the connector and test for a short circuit.
Replace if faulty.
High impedance
bridge.
Inspect the connector for moisture or corrosion. If wet, rinse well with
distilled water and dry thoroughly. Determine the cause of wetness and
correct it.
Page 131
Troubleshooting and Error Messages
Appendix C
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Troubleshooting Issues
Problem
Cause
Blown Fuse.
Instrument Will Not
Power Up With ac
Power.
Submerged
Pressure Sensor
level readings are
inaccurate or no
change in level
readings.
Check the 5-amp fuse on the back of the controller.
Circuit breaker issue.
Check the circuit breaker for the main power.
Breaker is good, but still no power.
Check to see if the outlet is receiving power.
Breaker and outlet are good, still no power.
Try using a battery or another power supply
If any holes on the anchor strainer are not
submerged the sampler will not create a lift.
Make sure the anchor strainer is
completely submerged.
Sampler Will Not
Create Sufficient Lift. Intake tubing is nicked or has a small hole.
Inaccurate Sample
Volumes
Solution
Replace with new tubing.
Worn roller assembly and/or pump tubing.
Replace assembly and/or tubing.
The volume was calibrated incorrectly the
first time.
Make sure the proper calibration method is used for
the site conditions (Auto or Timed calibrate).
Incorrect intake tube length is programmed in
the sampler.
Re-enter the tube length.
Intake tubing is not completely purging.
Place the tubing at a downward slope from the
sampler to the liquid source.
Anchor stainer is intermittently submerged.
Install the shallow depth anchor strainer,
(Cat. No. 2071 or 4652).
Worn roller assembly and/or pump tubing.
Replace assembly and/or pump tubing.
When using “Timed Calibrate” (liquid sensor
disabled) variable lifts will cause variable
sample volumes.
Enable sensor and calibrate volume if site
conditions allow.
Liquid sensor is not functioning properly.
Check the liquid diagnostics screen for valuable
information about sensor sensitivity.
RPM’s of the motor vary.
Replace motor if necessary.
Improper calibration.
Make sure the unit has been calibrated.
Desiccant is pink.
Replace the desiccant.
The sensor was not acclimated to the air
temperature before calibrated.
Re-calibrate the sensor making sure the sensor is at
ambient temperature.
Water or debris in the atmospheric
reference tube.
Clean the area and re-calibrate. To reduce debris on
the cable and mounting band, route the cable along
the edge of the band and wrap the cable and
mounting band with plastic tape. The cable should exit
at or near the top of the pipe to keep it out of the flow
stream.
Level is trending downward because debris at
the diaphragm.
Remove the plate and carefully clean the transducer.
Re-calibrate the sensor.
Page 132
Troubleshooting and Error Messages
8990apdx_tbl.fm
Appendix D
How to Calculate Pulses/Counts
The sampler is equipped to receive either a momentary dry contact closure or
a +5 to +12 V dc pulse from a flow meter, where each pulse represents a
known flow increment.
For example, if the flow meter is set to send a flow pulse for every
1000 gallons of measured flow and the sampler can count 1 to 9,999 flow
pulses between sample intervals, you can program the sampler to receive
10 pulses between samples to take one sample for every 10,000 gallons of
liquid flow.
To determine the number of flow pulses between sample intervals, you must
determine the total number of samples (represented by n in the following
examples) to be collected, and the period of time over which they are to be
collected. You must also know the total flow, Q, during the sampling program.
The following two-step method should be useful for determining the value for
INTV = _ _ _ _ CNTS during setup.
1. Determine f, where f represents the flow increment between samples and
n represents the total number of samples to be collected.
f = Q
---n
2. Multiply the flow increment between samples, f, by the pulse frequency
output of the flow meter (i.e. 1 pulse per 100 gallons, 1 pulse per
1000 gallons, etc.). If the pulse frequency output of the flow meter is not
known, consult the flow meter manufacturer.
Note: The final result is not necessarily a whole number. You must round off the result
to the nearest whole number.
Flow-Proportional Sampling Intervals - Using External Pulses
Hach samplers are equipped to receive either a momentary dry contact
closure or +5 to +12 V dc pulse from a flow meter, where each pulse
represents a known flow increment.
Example 1
You want to collect 35 samples over a 24-hour period. The total expected flow
over this period is 235,000 gallons. The flow meter pulse frequency is
one pulse for every 100 gallons.
1. Determine the flow increment between samples:
gallons- = 6,714 gallons/sample
f = Q
---- = 235,000
----------------------------------------n
35 samples
2. Multiply the flow increment, f, by the pulse frequency output of the
flow meter.
1 pulse
6,714 gallons/sample × ------------------------------ = 67.14 pulse/sample
100 gallons
Therefore, the value for INTV = _ _ _ _ CNTS is 67.
(67.14 is rounded off to 67.)
Example 2
You want to collect 24 samples over an 8-hour period. The total expected flow
over this 8-hour period is 85,000 gallons. The flow meter pulse frequency
output is one pulse for every 50 gallons.
8990apdx_pulsecounts.fm
Page 133
How to Calculate Pulses/Counts
Appendix D
1. Determine the flow increment between samples:
gallons- = 3,542 gallons/sample
f = Q
---- = 85,000
-------------------------------------n
24 samples
2. Multiply the flow increment, f, by the pulse frequency output of the flow
meter.
1 pulse
3,542 gallons/sample × --------------------------- = 70.84 pulse/sample
50 gallons
Therefore, the value for INTV = _ _ _ _ CNTS is 71.
Example 3
You want to collect 48 samples over a 16-hour period. The total expected flow
over this period is 1,750,000 gallons. The flow meter pulse frequency output is
one pulse for every 1,000 gallons.
1. Determine the flow increment between samples:
gallons- = 36,458 gallons/sample
f = Q
---- = 1,750,000
---------------------------------------------n
48 samples
2. Multiply the flow increment, f, by the pulse frequency output of the flow
meter.
1 pulse
36,458 gallons/sample × ----------------------------------- = 36.458 pulses/sample
1,000 gallons
Therefore, the value for INTV = _ _ _ _ CNTS is 36.
Flow Proportional Sampling, External—Using 4–20 mA Signal Converted to Pulses, Flow Signal Interface
The Flow Signal Interface (Cat. No. 2021) is an optional 4–20 mA interface
that converts 4–20 mA current signals (from a flow meter) to 12 V dc pulses.
At 20 mA, the interface transmits 10 12-volt pulses per minute. As the current
signal decreases, the 12 V pulses decrease proportionally. Typically, users
collect a certain number of samples over a given period of time when
sampling in proportion to the flow rate.
To calculate the number of 12 V dc output pulses between samples,
determine the total number of samples (represented by n in the following
examples) that you want to collect, and the period of time over which you want
to collect them. Use the three-step method presented below to determine the
“Total Count” value that you will enter while programming the Setup section of
the sampler.
1. Calculate Q, where Q is the average flow rate (during the sampling
program) divided by the maximum flow rate. (The maximum flow rate
corresponds to the 20 mA output of the flow meter.)
2. Calculate t, where t is defined as a/n; n is the total number of samples
collected over a given period of time; and a represents time in minutes,
over which n samples are collected.
3. Multiply Q x t x 10. Enter the result in the programming step:
INTV = _ _ _ _ CNTS.
Note: The product of Q x t x 10 is not necessarily a whole number. You must round off
the result to the nearest whole number.
Page 134
How to Calculate Pulses/Counts
8990apdx_pulsecounts.fm
Appendix D
Use the following examples to help you determine the value that you need to
enter when programming for sampling based on counts.
Example 1
You want to collect 24 samples over a 24-hour period on a 4–20 mA flow
proportional basis.
Average Flow Rate = 3.5 mgd (average flow rate over the 24-hour period)
Maximum Flow Rate = 10 mgd
a = 1440 minutes
1. Calculate Q.
Average Flow Rate- = 3.5
mgd- = 0.35 mgd
Q = -----------------------------------------------------------------------Maximum Flow Rate
10 mgd
2. Calculate t.
1440 min - = 60 min/sample
t = a
--- = ----------------------------n
24 samples
3. Multiply Q x t x 10.
0.35 mgd × 60 min/sample × 10 = 210
Therefore, the value entered for INTV = _ _ _ _ CNTS is 210.
Example 2
You want to collect 48 samples over a 24-hour period on a 4–20 mA flow
proportional basis.
Average Flow Rate = 1.75 mgd (average flow rate over the 24-hour period)
Maximum Flow Rate = 3 mgd
a = 1440 minutes
1. Calculate Q.
Average Flow Rate- = 1.75
mgd- = 0.583 mgd
Q = ---------------------------------------------------------------------------Maximum Flow Rate
3 mgd
2. Calculate t.
1440 min - = 30 min/sample
t = a
--- = ----------------------------n
48 samples
3. Multiply Q x t x 10.
0.583 mgd × 30 min/sample × 10 = 174.9
Therefore, the value entered for INTV = _ _ _ _ CNTS is 175.
Example 3
You want to collect 96 samples over a 24-hour period on a 4–20 mA flow
proportional basis.
Average Flow Rate = 0.52 mgd (average flow rate over the 24-hour period)
Maximum Flow Rate = 2 mgd
a = 1440 minutes
1. Calculate Q.
Average Flow Rate- = 0.52
mgd- = 0.26 mgd
Q = ---------------------------------------------------------------------------Maximum Flow Rate
2.0 mgd
8990apdx_pulsecounts.fm
Page 135
How to Calculate Pulses/Counts
Appendix D
2. Calculate t.
1440 min - = 15 min/sample
t = a
--- = -----------------------------n
96 samples
3. Multiply Q x t x 10.
0.26 mgd × 15 min/sample × 10 = 39
Therefore, the value entered for INTV = _ _ _ _ CNTS is 39.
Example 4
You want to collect 32 samples over an 8-hour period.
Average Flow Rate = 70 gpm (average flow rate over the 8-hour period)
Maximum Flow Rate = 210 gpm
a = 480 minutes
1. Calculate Q.
Average Flow Rate- = ---------------------70 gpm- = 0.33 gpm
Q = ----------------------------------------------------Maximum Flow Rate
210 gpm
2. Calculate t.
480 min - = 15 min/sample
t = a
--- = -----------------------------n
32 samples
3. Multiply Q x t x 10.
0.33 mgd × 15 min/sample × 10 = 49.5
Therefore, the value entered for INTV = _ _ _ _ CNTS is 50.
Example 5
It is desired to collect 30 samples over a 2-day period.
Average Flow Rate = 0.25 cfs (average flow rate over the 48-hour period)
Maximum Flow Rate = 1 cfs
a = 2,880 minutes
1. Calculate Q.
Average Flow Rate- = 0.25
cfs- = 0.25 cfs
Q = -----------------------------------------------------------------------Maximum Flow Rate
1 cfs
2. Calculate t.
2,880 min - = 96 min/sample
t = a
--- = -----------------------------n
30 samples
3. Multiply Q x t x 10.
0.25 cfs × 96 min/sample × 10 = 240
Therefore, the value entered for INTV = _ _ _ _ CNTS is 240.
You will notice from the previous five examples that the average and
maximum flow rate can be expressed in any units, i.e. mgd, gpm, cfs, etc.
However, express the average and maximum flow rate in the same units for
any given situation.
Page 136
How to Calculate Pulses/Counts
8990apdx_pulsecounts.fm
Appendix E
Exploded Drawings
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Assembly Drawing (1 of 3)
12
11
1
10
2
3
4
5
9
6
8
7
Item
Description
Quantity
Catalog Number
1
Hook and Loop Fastener
2
8791
2
Hook Fastener
1
8792
3
Battery Pack
1
8765
4
C-cell Battery
2
2709
5
Power Supply Cable Assembly
1
8783
6
Distributor Cable Assembly
1
8623
7
Nut
17
SE 301
8
Lock Washer
17
SE 306
9
Desiccant Bag
1
8849
10
O-ring (8606) Lubricant
1
SE 1048
11
Screw
17
SE 343
12
Overlay
1
8807
8990apdx_exploded.fm
Page 137
Exploded Drawings
Appendix E
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Assembly Drawing (2 of 3)
17
16
1
2
3
15
4
14
13
12
11
5
6
7
10
8
9
Item Description
QTY
Cat. No.
Item Description
QTY
Cat. No.
1
Screw
4
SE 244
10
Screw
4
SE 738
2
Bracket
1
8898
11
Overlay, Fuse Holder
1
1436
3
Display Assembly
1
8911
12
O-ring, 1 x 10 mm
1
3319
4
Screw
4
SE 105
13
O-ring
1
3321
5
Screw
1
SE 214
14
Fuse, 5-A, 250-V, Slow-blow
1
8753
6
Washer
1
SE 208
15
Fuse Holder, 5 x 20 mm
1
3320
7
Bracket, Desiccant Card
1
2594
16
Gear Box Assembly
1
8910
8
Humidity Indicator Card
1
2660
17
Cable Assembly, Motor
1
8859
9
Cable Assembly, Fuse Holder
1
3146
Page 138
Exploded Drawings
8990apdx_exploded.fm
Appendix E
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Assembly Drawing (3 of 3)
1
17
2
3
16
4
15
14
Insert wires into motor
terminals from the gearbox
side. Solder wires directly to
the motor terminals. Snip excess
wire
13
12
11
5
10
9
8
7
6
Item
Description
1
Sub Probe
2
Relay Option
3
Bubbler
4
pH/ORP
5
Gearbox Assembly (Cat. No. 8910)
6
Fuse Holder, 5 x 20 mm (Cat. No. 3320)
7
DO and Conductivity
8
Three Channel Data Log
9
CPU
10
AUX
11
Distributor
12
Sensor 2
13
Sensor 1
14
Black TB1–3
15
Shield TB1–2
16
Clear TB1–1
17
4–20 mA
8990apdx_exploded.fm
Page 139
Exploded Drawings
Appendix E
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Composite Sampler Assembly
1
2
3
4
5
9
8
7
6
Item
Description
Catalog Number
1
900 Refrigerated Sampler
2
120-V Transition Assembly
8924
3
Composite Refrigerator Sampler
8955
4
Grommet
2050
5
Sample Extension Fitting
8966
6
Composite Tube Support
7
Screw
SE 724
8
Lock Washer
SE 708
9
Washer
SE 728
Page 140
Exploded Drawings
8971
8938
8990apdx_exploded.fm
Appendix E
Sigma 900 Composite Refrigerator Assembly
1
2
3
4&5
10
9
8
6
7
Item
Description
Quantity
Catalog Number
1
Plate
1
8979
2
Screw
3
SE 313
3
Screw
3
SE 312
4
Cable Feed-thru Fitting
1
8967
5
Sealant
1
SE 979
6
120-V Refrigerator
1
7686
7
Molded Fitting (Adhesive SE 1054)
1
8936
8
Screw
2
1519
9
Distributor Mounting Plate
1
8978
10
Standoff
3
1772
8990apdx_exploded.fm
Page 141
Exploded Drawings
Appendix E
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Discrete Sampler Assembly
1
2
3
8
7
4
6
5
Item
Description
Catalog Number
1
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler
8973
2
120-V Transition Assembly
8924
3
Steel Refrigerator
8959
4
Grommet
2050
5
Sample Extension Fitting
8966
6
Screw
SE 724
7
Lock Washer
SE 708
8
Washer
SE 728
Page 142
Exploded Drawings
8990apdx_exploded.fm
Appendix E
Sigma 900 Discrete Refrigerator Assembly
1
2
3
4&5
6
18
7
17
16
8
9
10
15
14
13
12
11
Item Description
QTY
Cat. No.
Item Description
QTY
Cat. No.
1
Plate
1
8979
10
Screw
2
SE 534
2
Screw
3
SE 313
11
Support Bracket
1
2135
3
Screw
3
SE 312
12
Nut
2
SE 404
4
Cable Feed-thru Fitting
1
8967
13
Washer
2
SE 503
5
Sealant
1
SE 979
14
8 & 24 Bottle Positioner
1
1512
6
Rivet
6
SE 840
15
Molded Fitting
1
8936
7
Positioner Mounting Plate
1
2136
16
Screw
2
1519
8
Thumbscrew
2
2137
17
Distributor Mounting Plate
1
8978
9
Screw
2
SE 534
18
Standoff
3
1772
8990apdx_exploded.fm
Page 143
Exploded Drawings
Appendix E
Transition Tray Assembly
1
21
20
2
19
18
6
3
4
7
17
5
8
16
15
14a or 14b
9
10
11
13
12
Item Description
QTY
Cat. No.
Item Description
QTY
Cat. No.
1
Screw
4
SE 225
12
Washer
2
SE 400
2
Power Supply Plate Cover
1
8939
13
Nut
2
SE 407
3
Washer
4
SE 210
14
Replacement Fuse
1
3231
4
Nut
4
SE 201
15
Screw
4
SE 529
5
Gasket
2
8981
16
Lock Washer
4
SE 501
6
Fitting
1
1794
17
Hinge
2
8941
7
Gasket
1
2885
18
Nut
4
SE 201
8
Transition Plate
1
8892
19
Washer
4
SE 210
9
Nut
1
1429
20
Hold Down Latch
1
1593
10
Screw
2
SE 402
21
Screw
4
SE 215
11
Strain Relief
1
8940
Page 144
Exploded Drawings
8990apdx_exploded.fm
Appendix E
110 cm (43.5”) ref.
Sigma 900 MAX Refrigerated Sampler Reference Dimensions
61
cm
(2
4”
8990apdx_exploded.fm
)r
ef.
61
cm
”)
(24
.
ref
Page 145
Exploded Drawings
Visit http: //www.hach.com
GENERAL INFORMATION
At Hach Company, customer service is an
important part of every product we make.
With that in mind, we have compiled the following
information for your convenience.
8990gen_info.fm
Page 147
GENERAL INFORMATION
Visit http: //www.hach.com
Parts and Accessories
Description
Part Number
3-way Splitter Assembly ........................................................................................................................................ 939
4–20 mA Interface, 10 ft Cable............................................................................................................................ 2021
Cascade Sampling for 25-ft Cable ...................................................................................................................... 2817
Cover................................................................................................................................................................... 8963
Desiccant Bag (1 pillow inside case)................................................................................................................... 8849
Distributor Arm for 2 and 4 Sampling .................................................................................................................. 8569
Distributor Arm for 8 Bottle Sampling.................................................................................................................. 8566
Distributor Arm for 24 Bottle Sampling................................................................................................................ 8563
DTU II, 115 V ac ................................................................................................................................................. 3516
DTU II, 230 V ac ................................................................................................................................................. 3517
Flow-thru Module ................................................................................................................................................ 2471
Humidity Indicator ............................................................................................................................................... 2660
Instrument Manual .............................................................................................................................................. 8990
Liquid Level Actuator............................................................................................................................................. 943
Lockable Hasp .................................................................................................................................................. 2143S
Multi-purpose Full Cable, 10 ft .............................................................................................................................. 940
Multi-purpose Full Cable, 25 ft .............................................................................................................................. 540
Multi-purpose Half Cable, 10 ft.............................................................................................................................. 941
Multi-purpose Half Cable, 25 ft.............................................................................................................................. 541
Peristaltic Pump Tube Insert ............................................................................................................................... 8957
Peristaltic Pump Tubing, 15 ft.......................................................................................................................... 460015
Peristaltic Pump Tubing, 50 ft.......................................................................................................................... 460050
Peristaltic Pump Tubing for All Distributors and 800 Series, 15 ft ................................................................... 386615
Peristaltic Pump Tubing for All Distributors and 800 Series, 50 ft ................................................................... 386650
Refrigerator Assembly......................................................................................................................................... 8959
Refrigerator, 115 V ac, Stainless Steel ............................................................................................................... 1030
Refrigerator, 230 V ac, Stainless Steel ............................................................................................................... 2188
Sampler Locking Assembly................................................................................................................................. 1354
Strainer, All 316 Stainless Steel, 6.0 in. long x 0.406 in. OD .............................................................................. 2071
Strainer, All 316 Stainless Steel, 7.94 in. long, x 1.0 in. OD ............................................................................... 2070
Strainer, Stainless Steel, 3.9 in. long x 0.406 in. OD .......................................................................................... 4652
Strainer, Teflon®/Stainless Steel, 5.5 in. long x 0.875 in. OD................................................................................ 926
Strainer, Teflon/Stainless Steel, 11.0 in. long x 0.875 in. OD................................................................................ 903
Suspension Harness........................................................................................................................................... 1355
Synchronizing Sampling for 25-ft Cable .............................................................................................................. 2818
Teflon-Lined Connection Kit ................................................................................................................................ 2186
Teflon-lined Tubing, 3/8 in., 10 ft ............................................................................................................................ 921
Teflon-lined Tubing, 3/8 in., 25 ft ............................................................................................................................ 922
Teflon-lined Tubing, 3/8 in., 100 ft .......................................................................................................................... 925
Vinyl Intake Tubing, 3/8 in., 25 ft ............................................................................................................................ 920
Vinyl Intake Tubing, 3/8 in., 100 ft .......................................................................................................................... 923
Vinyl Intake Tubing, 3/8 in., 500 ft .......................................................................................................................... 924
Page 149
Parts and Accessories
Base/Bottle, Composite/Multiple Sampling Accessories
Part Number
Sampler
Composite
Multiple
Bottle
Bottle Type
Bottle
Full Bottle
Shut-Off
Tube
Support
Extension
Tube
Bottle
Tray/Positioner
Retainer
Distributor
2.5 gal Glass
6559
8847
8986
3527
N/A
N/A
N/A
3 gal Poly.
1918
8847
8986
3527
N/A
N/A
N/A
6 gal Poly.
6494
8847
8986
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
(24) 1 L Poly.
737
N/A
N/A
N/A
1511
1322
8562
(24) 350 mL Glass
732
N/A
N/A
N/A
1511
1056
8562
(8) 2.3 L Poly.
657
N/A
N/A
N/A
1511
1322
8565
(8) 1.9 L Glass
1118
N/A
N/A
N/A
1511
1322
8565
(4) 2.5 gal Glass
2317
N/A
N/A
N/A
2038
N/A
8568
(4) 3 gal Poly.
2315
N/A
N/A
N/A
2038
N/A
8568
(2) 3 gal Poly.
2316
N/A
N/A
N/A
2038
N/A
8568
(2) 2.5 gal Glass
2318
N/A
N/A
N/A
2038
N/A
8568
Area x Velocity Measurement Sensors
Part Numbers
Option
Description
Connectors
Bare
Leads
4041
4041
88000
88001
88002
88003
3564
3564
Junction Box, required for bare lead sensor connection to flow meter
N/A
4730
Remote AV, use when the flow meter to sensor distance is greater than 250 ft
(requires cable SE818 and sensor).
5250
5250
SE818
SE818
4041
4041
Factory Installed Integral Area x Velocity Flow Meter Option
Note: Factory Installed Integral Depth Only Flow Meter Option is not available with
this option.
Note: When ordering flow option and 14.4 modem, flow option must be remote.
Standard Sensor, Range 0-10 ft (requires cable P/N 3564)
Standard Submerged
Area/Velocity Sensor
Standard Sensor, Range 0-30 ft (requires cable P/N 3564)
Cable, sold by the ft, specify length needed per sensor. Min=10’
Max=250’
Remote AV Cable, sold by the ft, specify length needed per sensor.
Min=10’ Max=1,000’
Factory Installed Integral Area x Velocity Flow Meter Option
Note: Factory Installed Integral Depth Only Flow Meter Option is not available with
this option.
Note: When ordering flow option and 14.4 modem, flow option must be remote.
Keppler Submerged
Area/Velocity Sensor
Standard Sensor, Range 0-10 ft (requires cable P/N 3564)
88012
88013
Standard Sensor, Range 0-30 ft (requires cable P/N 3564)
88014
88015
Note: For cleaner
water/few particulates.
Cable, sold by the ft, specify length needed per sensor. Min=10’
3564
3564
Junction Box, required for bare lead sensor connection to flow meter
Max=250’
N/A
4730
Remote AV, use when the flow meter to sensor distance is greater than 250 ft
(requires cable SE818 and sensor).
5250
5250
SE818
SE818
Remote AV Cable, sold by the ft, specify length needed per sensor.
Min=10’ Max=1,000’
Page 150
Parts and Accessories
Depth Measurement Sensors
Option
Description
Ultrasonic Sensor
40 kHz
Part Number
Factory Installed Integral Ultrasonic Flow Meter Option
8851
40 KHz Range 0-10 ft, with 25-ft cable
3028
Ultrasonic Sensor with Horn, 40 KHz, with 25-ft cable
4008
Ultrasonic Sensor, CSA Approved for Class I, Division I, Groups A, B, and D Hazardous
Locations; with 50-ft cable
4010
Ultrasonic Sensor, 40 KHz, Range 0-10 ft, with 25-ft cable with bare lead ends
2653
Junction Box for ultrasonic sensor conduit installations
3658
Factory Installed Depth Only Flow Meter Option
Depth Sensor
Note: Factory Installed Integral Area x Velocity Flow Meter Option is not available with Factory
Installed Integral Depth Only Flow Meter Option
8794
General Purpose Depth Sensor, Range 0-0.576 ft with 25-ft cable
2963
Range 0-10 ft with 25-ft cable
2343
Range 0-23 ft with 50-ft cable
2333
Note: Depth sensor cables cannot be extended.
Sensor Mounting Hardware
Type
Submerged Area/Velocity Sensor
Mounting Rings For 6-24 in. Pipes
Submerged Depth/Velocity Mounting
Bands for 15-42 in. Pipes
Submerged Depth Only Sensor
Mounting Ring for 6-24 in. Pipes
Part Number
Pipe Diameter
(Inches)
Mounting Ring/Band
Mounting Clip
6
1361
3263
8
1362
3263
10
1363
3263
12
1364
N/A
15
1365
N/A
18
1366
N/A
20-21
1353
N/A
24
1370
N/A
15
9706100
N/A
18
9706200
N/A
21
9706300
N/A
24
9706400
N/A
27
9706500
N/A
30
9706600
N/A
33
9706700
N/A
36
9706800
N/A
42
9706900
N/A
45
3766
N/A
6
1361
1771
8
1362
1771
10
1363
1771
12
1364
1771
15
1365
1771
18
1366
1771
20-21
1353
1771
24
1370
1771
Page 151
Parts and Accessories
Submerged Depth Only Sensor
Mounting Band for 15–42 in. Pipes
15
9706100
1771
18
9706200
1771
21
9706300
1771
24
9706400
1771
27
9706500
1771
30
9706600
1771
33
9706700
1771
36
9706800
1771
42
9706900
1771
Option
Description
Part Number
Insertion Tool
To remove P/N 1361–1370 mounting rings.
9574
Mounting Plate Hardware for Directly Mounting to Pipe Wall
Option
Pipe Diameter
Part Number
Submerged Depth/Velocity Mounting Plate
All Pipe Sizes
4939
Submerged Depth Only Mounting Plate
All Pipe Sizes
2312
Ultrasonic Sensor Mounting Hardware
Part Description
Part Number
Permanent Wall Mounting Bracket
2974
Adjustable for Floor or Wall
2904
Tripod with Mounting Bracket for Sensor
9538
Cable Straightener
2883
Cable Grip (Requires P/N 2883)
3183
Page 152
Contact Information for U.S.A. and Outside Europe
Ordering Information for the U.S.A.
By Mail:
Hach Company
P.O. Box 389
Loveland, Colorado 80539-0389
U.S.A
By Telephone:
(800) 635-4567
By Fax:
(970) 461-3915
Ordering information by E-mail:
[email protected]
Information Required
•
Hach account number (if available) •
•
Your name and phone number
•
Billing address
Shipping address
•
Purchase order number
•
Catalog number
•
Brief description or model number
•
Quantity
Ordering Information for Outside the U.S.A. and Europe
Hach Company maintains a worldwide network of dealers and distributors. To
locate the representative nearest you, send E-mail to [email protected] or visit
www.hach.com.
Technical Support
Technical and Customer Service Department personnel are eager to answer
questions about our products and their use. In the U.S.A., call
1-800-635-1230. Outside the U.S.A. and Europe, send E-mail to
[email protected]
Repair Service
Authorization must be obtained from Hach Company before sending any
items for repair. Please contact the Hach Company Service Center serving
your location.
Hach Company
P.O. Box 389
Loveland, Colorado, 80539-0389 U.S.A.
Telephone: 1-800-635-1230 or (970) 669-3050
Fax: (970) 669-2932
Page 153
Contact Information for U.S.A. and Outside Europe
Contact Information for Europe
For technical support, repair service, and ordering information please refer to the contact information below for your
specific country.
Belgium
Lange Group
Ragheno Business Center 2
Motstraat 54
B-2800 Mechelen
Tel.: ++32/(0)15 42/ 35 00
Fax: ++32/(0)15 41/ 61 20
email: [email protected]
Denmark
Dr. Lange Danmark A/S
Jernhoolmen 34-40
DK-2650 Hvidovre
Tel.: ++45/(0)36 77/ 2911
Fax: ++45/(0)36 77/ 4911
email: [email protected]
www.drlange.de
Poland
Dr. Lange Sp. z o.o.
ul. Opolska 143a
PL-52-013 Wroclaw
Tel.: ++48/(0)71/ 3 42 10 -81/-83
Fax: ++48/(0)71/ 3 42 10 79
email: [email protected]
www.drlange.de
Germany (TCS & Service)
Dr. Bruno Lange GmbH & CO. KG
Willstätterstr. 11
D-40549 Düsseldorf
Tel.: ++49/(0)211/52 88-0
Fax: ++49/(0)211/52 88-143
email: [email protected]
www.drlange.com
Germany (Ordering)
Dr. Bruno Lange GmbH & CO. KG
Königsweg 10
D-14163 Berlin
Tel.: ++49/(0)30/80 98 60
Fax: ++49(0)30/80 98 62 70
www.drlange.de
Austria
Dr. Bruno Lange Ges.m.b.H.
Industriestraße 12
A - 3200 Obergrafendorf
Tel.: ++43/(0)2747 - 7412
Fax: ++43/(0)2747 - 4218
email: [email protected]
www.drlange.de
Spain
NEURTEK. M.A-LANGE GROUP
c/ Araba, 45.
Apdo. 220
E-20800 ZARAUZ
Tel.: ++34 943 894.379
Fax: ++ 34 943 130.241
email: [email protected]
www.drlange.com
France
Polymetron/Dr. Lange
Division Lab
33 rue du ballon
F-93165 Noisy le Grand
Tel.: ++33/(0)1/ 48 15 68 70
Fax: ++33/(0)1/ 48 15 68 79
email: [email protected]
www.drlange.fr
Italy
Dr. Bruno Lange s.r.I.
via Riccione, 14
IT-20156 Milano
Tel.: ++39/(0)2 39 23 14 1
Fax: ++33/(0)2 39 23 14 39
email: [email protected]
www.drlange.it
Great Britain
Dr. Lange (UK) Ltd.
Lennox Road
GB-Basingstoke
Hampshire
RG22 4AP
Tel.: ++44/(0)12 56/ 33 34 03
Fax: ++44/(0)12 56/ 33 07 24
email: [email protected]
www.drlange.co.uk
The Netherlands
Dr. Lange Benelux
Postbus 6299
NL-4000 HG Tiel
Tel.: ++31/(0)344/ 63 11 30
Fax: ++31/(0)344/ 63 11 50
email: [email protected]
www.langegroup.nl
Switzerland
Dr. Bruno Lange AG
Juchstrasse 1
CH-8604 Hegnau
Tel.: ++41/(0)1/ 9 45 66 10
Fax: ++41/(0)1/ 9 45 66 76
email: [email protected]
www.drlange.ch
Sweden
Dr. Lange AB
LAB Products
Box 9008
S-40091 Götebord
Tel.: ++46-31-28 50 50
Fax: ++46-31-28 50 39
email: [email protected]
www,lange.se
Sweden
Dr. Lange AB
PROCESS Products
Box 410
S-13525 Tyresö
Tel.: ++46-87-98 05 00
Fax: ++46-87-42 17 24
email: [email protected]
www.lange.se
Page 154
Contact Information for Europe
Warranty
Hach Company warrants this product to the original purchaser against any defects that are due
to faulty material or workmanship for a period of one year from date of shipment.
In the event that a defect is discovered during the warranty period, Hach Company agrees that, at
its option, it will repair or replace the defective product or refund the purchase price, excluding
original shipping and handling charges. Any product repaired or replaced under this warranty
will be warranted only for the remainder of the original product warranty period.
This warranty does not apply to consumable products such as chemical reagents; or
consumable components of a product, such as, but not limited to, lamps and tubing.
Contact Hach Company or your distributor to initiate warranty support. Products may not be
returned without authorization from Hach Company.
Limitations
This warranty does not cover:
•
Damage caused by acts of God, natural disaster, labor unrest, acts of war (declared or
undeclared), terrorism, civil strife or acts of any governmental jurisdiction
•
Damage caused by misuse, neglect, accident or improper application or installation
•
Damage caused by any repair or attempted repair not authorized by Hach Company
•
Any product not used in accordance with the instructions furnished by Hach Company
•
Freight charges to return merchandise to Hach Company
•
Freight charges on expedited or express shipment of warranted parts or product
•
Travel fees associated with on-site warranty repair
This warranty contains the sole express warranty made by Hach Company in connection with its
products. All implied warranties, including without limitation, the warranties of merchantability
and fitness for a particular purpose, are expressly disclaimed.
Some states within the United States do not allow the disclaimer of implied warranties and if this
is true in your state the above limitation may not apply to you. This warranty gives you specific
rights, and you may also have other rights that vary from state to state.
This warranty constitutes the final, complete, and exclusive statement of warranty terms and no
person is authorized to make any other warranties or representations on behalf of Hach
Company.
Limitation of Remedies
The remedies of repair, replacement or refund of purchase price as stated above are the
exclusive remedies for the breach of this warranty. On the basis of strict liability or under any
other legal theory, in no event shall Hach Company be liable for any incidental or consequential
damages of any kind for breach of warranty or negligence.
Page 155
Warranty
Index
Numerics
4-20 mA Option ..................................................... 87
Calibration ...................................................... 88
Connection ..................................................... 87
Interface Connector ........................................ 87
Programming .................................................. 87
Pulse Duration Input ..................................... 133
A
ac Power ............................................................. 124
Access Code ......................................................... 39
Advanced Sampling .............................................. 49
Program Complete ......................................... 50
Setpoint Sampling .......................................... 50
Special Output ................................................ 52
Start/Stop Times ............................................. 53
Storm Water ................................................... 54
Timed Bottle Sets ........................................... 57
Upset Sample ................................................. 58
Variable Intervals ............................................ 60
Variable Volume ............................................. 60
Alarm ..................................................................... 91
Alarm Relays ......................................................... 89
Connections .................................................... 90
Interface Connector ........................................ 90
Junction Box ................................................... 90
Programming .................................................. 91
Alarms
Deadband ....................................................... 92
Set Point Alarms ............................................. 91
Trouble Alarm Troubleshooting .................... 129
Trouble Alarms ............................................... 91
Analog Inputs ........................................................ 93
Connection ..................................................... 93
Programming .................................................. 94
Arm Stop ............................................................... 29
Auxiliary Receptacle ............................................. 32
B
Basic Programming Setup .................................... 37
Battery Power ..................................................... 124
Baud Rate ............................................................. 79
Bottle Number ....................................................... 53
Bottle Volume ........................................................ 38
Bottles ............................................................. 26, 38
Bottom Panel ...................................................... 100
C
Calibration
4-20 mA .......................................................... 88
Conductivity Probe ......................................... 77
Dissolved Oxygen Probe ................................ 75
Page 156
Downlook Ultrasonic Sensor .......................... 61
ORP Probe ..................................................... 73
pH Probe ........................................................ 71
Submerged Area/Velocity Sensor .................. 64
Submerged Pressure Sensor ......................... 66
Cellular Communications ...................................... 80
Cellular Modem Scheduling .................................. 82
Cellular Modem Triggering .................................... 84
Circuit Board ....................................................... 101
Cleaning the Sampler ............................................ 97
Conductivity Probe ................................................ 76
Calibration ...................................................... 77
Connection ..................................................... 76
Programming .................................................. 76
Temperature Calibration ................................. 78
Temperature Programming ............................ 76
Constant Time, Variable Volume Sampling .......... 43
Constant Volume, Variable Time .......................... 41
Continous Mode .................................................. 119
Controller Cover .................................................... 15
Controller, opening ................................................ 99
Controller, removal of ............................................ 99
D
Data Log .............................................................. 119
Deadband .............................................................. 92
Desiccant module, internal ............................ 17, 103
Desiccant module, replacement .......................... 103
Diagnostics .......................................................... 121
Distributor Test ............................................. 122
Event Log ..................................................... 122
Keypad Test ................................................. 122
LCD Test ...................................................... 123
Liquid Sensor ................................................ 123
Velocity Analysis ........................................... 123
Displaying Data ................................................... 113
Dissolved Oxygen Probe
Calibration ...................................................... 75
Connection ..................................................... 74
Membrane Thickness ..................................... 75
Programming .................................................. 74
Strain Relief .................................................... 74
Temperature Calibration ................................. 75
Temperature Programming ............................ 75
Distributor
Arm Alignment ................................................ 30
Installation ...................................................... 29
Downlook Ultrasonic Sensor
Calibration ...................................................... 61
Connection ..................................................... 61
Programming .................................................. 61
DTU-II .................................................................... 79
Index
E
Eight-, 12-, or 24-bottle Sampling ......................... 28
Electrostatic Discharge ......................................... 99
Error Messages ................................................... 127
Extended Power Mode ........................................ 119
F
First Flush Bottles ................................................. 55
Flow Totalizer ...................................................... 125
Flow Units ..................................................... 42, 125
Front Panel ........................................................... 15
Full-Bottle Shut-Off ............................................... 31
Function Keys ....................................................... 16
Fuse Replacement .............................................. 103
G
Graph Manipulation ............................................. 115
Graphic Display Averaging ................................. 115
Graphs ................................................................ 114
H
Humidity Indicator ................................................. 17
I
Installation site ...................................................... 23
Intake Line ...................................................... 25, 26
Intake Rinses ........................................................ 48
Intake Tubing ........................................................ 39
Interface Connectors ............................................. 18
Invisible Range ..................................................... 62
K
Keypad .................................................................. 16
L
Level Adjust .................................................... 65, 67
Liquid Crystal Display ........................................... 16
Liquid Depth .......................................................... 61
Liquid Sensor .................................................. 19, 47
Load Program ..................................................... 124
Logging Intervals ................................................. 119
Lubrication ............................................................ 97
Modem
Connection ..................................................... 80
Programming .................................................. 80
Modify Setup ....................................................... 125
Motor/Gear Box ................................................... 103
Multiple Bottle ........................................................ 45
N
Numeric Keypad .................................................... 16
O
ON/OFF Key ......................................................... 16
Option Menu ........................................................ 116
ORP Probe
Calibration ...................................................... 73
Junction Box ................................................... 73
Junction Box Calibration ................................. 73
Programming .................................................. 73
P
Pager Alarm Codes ............................................... 86
Pager Option ......................................................... 84
Password .............................................................. 39
pH Probe
Calibration ...................................................... 71
Connection ..................................................... 70
Junction Box (grounded) ................................ 71
Junction Box (un-grounded) ........................... 71
Programming .................................................. 71
Troubleshooting ............................................ 131
Pin ......................................................................... 32
Power Connectors ................................................. 31
Power connectors ................................................. 31
Power Save Mode ............................................... 119
Program Delay ...................................................... 40
Program Lock ........................................................ 39
Pulses/Counts ..................................................... 133
Pump Tube
Installation ................................................ 24, 26
Pump Tube Replacement ..................................... 98
Pump tube, installation .......................................... 24
Q
Quick Start Guides .............................................. 105
M
R
Maintenance ......................................................... 97
Memory Allocation .............................................. 120
Memory Battery ..................................... 86, 104, 129
Memory Modes ................................................... 120
Menu Bar and Status Bar ...................................... 16
Rain Gauge ........................................................... 69
Connection ..................................................... 69
Programming .................................................. 70
Tipping Bucket ................................................ 69
RAM .................................................................... 120
Page 157
Index
Receptacle Caps ................................................... 18
Reliable Communications ..................................... 82
Reporting Devices ................................................. 85
Reset (Totalizer) ................................................. 126
Retainers ............................................................... 26
Review All Items ................................................. 113
RS232
Connection ..................................................... 79
Programming .................................................. 79
Running a Program ............................................. 113
S
Sample Collection ................................................. 40
Sample Distribution ............................................... 45
Multiple Bottle ................................................. 45
Single Bottle ................................................... 45
Sample History .................................................... 115
Sample Retries ..................................................... 48
Sample Volume ..................................................... 48
Sample, retry ......................................................... 20
Sampling Triggers and Settings ............................ 52
Screen Saver Mode ............................................ 124
Sensor Body ......................................................... 24
Sensor Height ....................................................... 62
Set Point Alarms ................................................... 91
Setpoint Sampling ................................................. 50
Single Bottle Sampling .......................................... 27
Single-Bottle Sampling .......................................... 45
Site Selection ........................................................ 81
Site selection ......................................................... 23
Slate Mode .......................................................... 121
Soft Keys ............................................................... 16
Specifications .......................................................... 9
Splitter Interface .................................................... 33
Status .................................................................... 37
Strain Relief ........................................................... 74
Strainer .................................................................. 26
Submerged Area Velocity Sensor ......................... 63
Cable Routing ................................................. 63
Calibration ...................................................... 64
Connection ..................................................... 63
Programming .................................................. 63
Submerged Pressure Sensor ................................ 65
Calibration ...................................................... 66
Connection ..................................................... 65
Programming .................................................. 66
T
Tables ................................................................. 114
Time/Date ............................................................ 116
Timed Over-Ride ................................................... 42
Timed Proportional Sampling ................................ 40
Trouble Alarms
Troubleshooting ............................................ 129
Trouble Condition .................................................. 91
Troubleshooting .................................................. 127
Tubing, pre-rinse ................................................... 20
Two- and Four-bottle Sampling ............................. 27
U
Utility Board ......................................................... 102
V
Vertical Lift ............................................................ 10
Vinyl Tubing .......................................................... 25
Volume Calibration .............................................. 116
W
Wrap Mode .......................................................... 121
Page 158
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