Proximity Laser Scanner PLS
Proximity Laser Scanner
P LS
T
E C H N I C A L
D
E S C R I P T I O N
Certification
2
8 008 316
© SICK AG . Safety Systems . Germany . All rights reserved
Technical Description
Table of Contents
1 Approvals and Certificates ................................................................. 4
2 Notices / Regulation Use .................................................................... 6
3 How the PLS Works ............................................................................... 7
Principle of function .................................................................... 7
Fields and measuring range of the PLS ............................. 8
4 Fields of Application – What the PLS Can Do ............................ 9
Area protection ........................................................................... 9
Internal space protection ....................................................... 9
Vehicle protection and navigation ...................................... 10
Measurement of contours ................................................... 10
5 Location Planning .................................................................................. 11
5.1
5.2
5.3
Range of the PLS ....................................................................... 11
Stationary protection with PLS ........................................... 12
Important notes on configuration ...................................... 12
Location planning ...................................................................... 13
Restart definition ....................................................................... 16
Mounting recommendations for PLS ............................... 16
Mobile protection with PLS .................................................. 19
Location planning ...................................................................... 20
Calculation of the necessary protective field ................ 21
Configuration examples .......................................................... 22
If you use several PLS units ................................................. 23
9.11 Interrogate fault memory
(system diagnosis) .................................................................. 57
Initial fault diagnosis .................................................................. 57
Interrogate PLS fault memory ............................................. 57
10 Care and Maintenance ....................................................................... 59
10.1
10.2
10.3
10.4
SICK Service / Hotline ........................................................... 59
LEDs on the PLS ....................................................................... 60
PLS fault table ............................................................................ 61
Service questionnaire ............................................................ 62
11 Appendix .................................................................................................. 64
11.1 Characteristics ........................................................................... 64
11.2 Accessories ................................................................................ 65
PLS variants ................................................................................. 65
Mounting kits .............................................................................. 65
Connection set .......................................................................... 65
Interface cables ........................................................................ 65
Documentation and user software ................................... 65
Other SICK accessories ........................................................ 65
And also … .................................................................................. 65
11.3 Technical data ............................................................................ 66
11.4 Standards and regulations ................................................... 67
12 Glossar ...................................................................................................... 71
6 Supply Package ..................................................................................... 24
Recommended accessories .............................................. 24
Connection set .......................................................................... 24
Interface cable ........................................................................... 24
7 Mounting the PLS .................................................................................. 25
8 Connecting Up the PLS ...................................................................... 28
Connecting the power connector ...................................... 29
Connection examples ............................................................. 29
Notes ............................................................................................. 33
Connecting the interface connector ................................. 34
Short-term connection to a PC .......................................... 35
Permanent connection to an evaluation computer ... 35
9 Programming the PLS with the User Software ........................ 36
9.1
Installing the user software ................................................. 36
System requirements ............................................................. 36
9.2 What to do ................................................................................... 37
Essential steps .......................................................................... 37
Other options ............................................................................. 37
9.3 Entry: The initial configuration .............................................. 38
Configure hardware .................................................................. 39
Send configuration to PLS ..................................................... 42
Edit monitoring range .............................................................. 43
Send monitoring range to PLS ............................................ 46
9.4 Edit/dimension fields ............................................................. 47
Convert fields .............................................................................. 47
Change scale of segmented field ...................................... 47
Copy and paste fields ............................................................. 48
Save individual fields ................................................................ 48
Fix coordinates .......................................................................... 48
9.5 Teach-in protective field ....................................................... 49
9.6 Monitor protective field ......................................................... 51
9.7 Check settings ........................................................................... 52
9.8 Receive and store configuration ....................................... 53
9.9 Change password .................................................................... 54
9.10 Change screen view ................................................................ 55
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
This technical description contains all the information necessary
for project planning and setting up the PLS. You will find in it the
information you need for mechanical mounting, electrical installation and programming of the PLS.
The description covers the following PLS types:
– PLS 101-312
– PLS 101-112 and PLS 101-212
– PLS 201-113, PLS 201-213 and PLS 201-313
Along with the technical description you are also provided with
an instruction manual, containing important information for dayto-day use of the PLS.
Keep the technical description and the instruction manual readily to hand at all times.
Essential sections you should read:
Important notes ................................................ Section 2
Location planning .............................................. Section 5
Supply package,
Mounting and connecting up the PLS: .... Sections 6 to 9
Entry into the user software........................ Sections 9.1 to 9.3
3
1
4
Approvals and Certificates
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
5
2
Notices / Regulation Use
The PLS proximity laser scanner is a device designed to protect
people and property. It is intended to monitor hazardous areas
in enclosed spaces. PLS is not designed for outdoor use.
Observe the instructions relating to regulation use. SICK cannot
be held liable for damage arising from use of the PLS other than
stipulated.
•
Install the PLS in a dry location and protect the unit against
dirt and damage.
•
Lay all wires and connecting cables such that they are protected against damage.
•
Make sure that no obstacles in the monitoring range can
obstruct the field of vision of the PLS or cause shadows.
Such shadow areas cannot be monitored by the PLS.
Where there are unavoidable areas of shadow, check
whether they present any risk. Take additional precautionary
measures as necessary.
•
Keep the monitoring range free of smoke, fog, steam and
other air pollution. The functioning of the PLS may otherwise
be impaired and error shutdowns may occur.
•
Avoid placing strongly reflective objects such as retroreflectors in the scanning plane of the PLS, as they may influence
its measurement results.
•
Mount the PLS so that it cannot be dazzled by sunlight. Also
avoid stroboscopic and fluorescent lamps, as they may influence the PLS under certain circumstances.
•
In mounting, installation and use of the PLS, observe the
standards and regulations applicable in your country. The
Appendix presents a summary of the most important regulations.
•
For programming of the monitoring range, take note of the
description of the user software as from section 9. This describes how to connect the PLS to a PC and how to work
with the user software.
•
Before releasing the machine for use, test whether access
to the hazardous area is fully covered by the safety devices.
After release, also check at regular intervals (such as every
morning before beginning work) that the PLS is activated
properly when an intrusion into the protective field occurs.
This test should be carried out along all protective field limits, in accordance with application-specific regulations.
•
If you want to deploy one or more PLS together with a LSI
(Laser Scanner Interface) in your application, to work with
several different switchable or variable protective fields for
example, please also take note of the technical description
of the LSI.
•
The PLS must be disposed of in a proper and environmentally friendly manner at the end of its useful service life.
6
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
3
How the PLS Works
Principle of function
The PLS is an optical sensor which scans its surroundings with
infrared laser beams. It is used to monitor a hazardous area on
a machine or vehicle. The PLS can be used on manually controlled vehicles, such as narrow-aisle forklifts and other lift trucks,
as well as in driverless transport systems (DTS) such as shunting cars and free-navigating vehicles.
As a result of its scanning principle, the PLS requires neither
separate receivers nor reflectors.
This has the following advantages:
– You can adapt the monitoring range precisely to the hazardous area of a machine.
– Since you do not need any receivers or additional reflectors, you keep the entire area freely accessible and driveable.
– If the hazardous area changes you can alter the sensor simply by reprogramming the software, with no additional
mounting.
– Different reflective materials do not influence the functioning
of the sensor. This makes the PLS highly versatile in its uses.
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t
S
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The sensor operates on the principle of reflex light time measurement. It emits very short light pulses. At the same time an
“electronic stopwatch” runs. If the light encounters an object, it
is reflected and thrown back to the sensor. From the time between sending and receiving, the sensor calculates its distance
from the object.
In the sensor there is also a uniformly rotating mirror which deflects the light pulses such that they sweep a semicircular area.
By determining the mirror angle, the PLS detects in which direction the object is located.
From the measured distance and the direction of the object
the sensor determines its precise position.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
7
Fields and measuring range of the PLS
The monitoring range of the sensor consists of a protective
field and a warning field. You can use the supplied software to
define the two fields and store them in the memory.
The protective field protects the hazardous area of a machine
or vehicle. As soon as the sensor detects an object in the protective field, it shuts down the machine or stops the vehicle immediately.
This is a safety function. Its safety integrity corresponds to cat.
3 to EN 954-1:
The test basis is:
– For PLS 101-312: Type 3 to IEC/EN 61496-1
– For PLS 101-112 and PLS 101-212: Type 3 to EN 50100-1
You can define the warning field such that the sensor detects
an object before it enters the actual hazardous area, and triggers an alarm signal for example.
Independent of its evaluation of the protective and warning
fields, the sensor continuously scans its surroundings within its
measuring range. You can evaluate this data for additional
measuring tasks, such as to navigate a DTS or measure contours.
8
Visible area
(e. g. hall walls)
Measurement
length
Warning field
Protective field
4 m max.
protective
range
approx. 15 m
max. warning range
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
4
Fields of Application – What the PLS Can Do
These pages provide an overview of the key fields of application of the PLS.
Area protection
On hazardous stationary machinery the PLS ensures that the
machine (or only its hazardous movement) is shut down as
soon as someone enters the hazardous area. This is done by
means of a protective field ➊ which you can define according to
your needs and store in the PLS.
You can also define a warning field ➋ in front of the actual hazardous area which triggers an alarm signal as soon as someone
approaches the hazardous area. The person can then move
out of the warning area without the machine or its hazardous
movement having to be stopped. This helps you to safeguard
continuous production.
Host
r
Powpely
Sup
➀
➁
Internal space protection
Where internal spaces exist in large machines, the PLS ensures
the machine can only start up when the internal space is clear.
This is important especially with regard to internal spaces which
are not clearly visible, or not visible at all, from the outside.
In this application the PLS performs only a secondary protective
function. The actual personal protection is provided by a light
grid, whilst the PLS monitors restarting of the machine.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
9
Vehicle protection and navigation
You can employ the PLS on vehicles, such as driverless transport systems (DTS), forklifts and shunting cars, to safeguard a
vehicle’s path – on its way through a factory hall for example.
The protective field ➊ of the PLS then ensures that the vehicle
stops if a person or obstacle is standing in the way. You can
also define a warning field ➋ which, for example, triggers an
alarm signal some distance before the person or obstacle is
reached and cuts the speed of the vehicle. You can protect
both manually controlled vehicles and driverless transport systems (DTS).
Independent of the protective and warning field settings, the
PLS continuously monitors the positions of objects in its
surroundings ➌. Vehicles with an internal navigation system can
use this ambient data to update their system (PLS 101-31x
only). For this, the PLS is permanently linked to the on-board
computer of the DTS. The data transmitted by the PLS is encoded in telegrams. The telegram descriptions can be ordered
from SICK.
➀
➁
➂
Measurement of contours
You can use the measurement principle of the PLS for a wide
variety of measuring tasks, such as:
– Size measurement of goods
– Position detection of goods (e.g. pallets)
– Cross-section measurement in aisles and tunnels
– Profile measurement of goods or vehicles
– Protrusion monitoring of goods in shelves
– Filling level measurement
– Length measurement
If you want solutions for measurement problems of this kind,
please order documentation on our series LMS laser scanner,
which is suitable for such tasks.
10
Y
H
B
X
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
5
Location Planning
The PLS monitors hazardous areas and protects operating personnel and plant. To enable it to fulfill those tasks, you need to
observe a number of rules and safety criteria when choosing its
location. The key information with regard to this is presented on
the following pages.
Note:
It may be that other standards and regulations not cited
here are also of importance to your application.
If you are unsure about your application, please contact your
local SICK office.
Always choose a location
– which provides the maximum safety in the hazardous area
– in which no obstacles can obstruct the field of vision of the
PLS or cause umbra shadows
– in which the PLS is protected against damp, dirt and damage
– in which the PLS is not influenced by sunlight or artificial light
sources
– which is as accessible as possible for electrical installation
work.
The PLS can in principle be operated in any mounting orientation, for measuring tasks for example. But you should note:
When using the PLS in normal area protection and safety applications, only a horizontal orientation of the protective field, with
a slight tilt where necessary, is permitted!
Range of the PLS
The PLS measures its surroundings in a semicircular plane
(scanning angle 180°). Employment of an optoelectronic safety
device as area protection requires a minimum resolution of
70 mm at a specific mounting height. The PLS guarantees this
resolution to a distance of 4 metres. Therefore the system
software of types PLS 101-312, PLS 101-112 and PLS 101-212
limits the maximum radius of the protective field automatically
to 4 metres.
The other PLS types do not have this limitation, and so are not
certified for personnel protection.
The protective field protecting the hazardous area of a machine or vehicle may have a maximum radius of 4 metres. The
PLS shuts the machine down or stops the vehicle in the event
of an intrusion into the protective field.
The warning field may have any radius up to 50 metres. You
should note, however, that the sensor is able to detect objects
with a reflectance of approx. 20 - 30 % only to a distance of 15
metres.
The measuring range of the PLS extends to a radius of 50 metres. Up to that distance the PLS is able to detect the contour
data of its surroundings (e.g. the space contour). It can then
additionally evaluate this data for the protective field and the
warning field, provided the reflectance of the object is sufficient
to be detected.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
Visible area
(e. g. hall walls)
Screen display
Measurement
length
Warning field
Protective field
4 m max.
protective
range
approx. 15 m
max. warning range
11
5.1 Stationary protection with PLS
Important notes on configuration
The sensor should preferably be operated in “with restart inhibit” mode for area protection. The regulations applicable to the
machine must be observed.
In “with restart inhibit” mode the actuating element for the restart inhibit must be positioned such that there is full visibility of
the hazardous area. The actuating element for the restart inhibit
must not be accessible from the point directly in front of the
sensor.
In “without restart inhibit” mode the close-up zone1). of the sensor (4 cm wide area measured from the front screen outer
contour) is either to be rendered inaccessible (e.g. by a bar or
undercut) or a proximity scanner with a 4 cm detection range is
to be mounted over the sensor.
For area protection, side access to the machine base is also to
be taken into account when configuring the protective field. This
assumes that a person approaches the machine base from the
side. If side access is possible (no solid restrictions such as a
wall), the protective field should be configured wider than the
machine base.
In area protection applications it must be ensured that, with
protective field widths over 2 metres, there are no retroreflectors in the immediate proximity of the protective field limits on
the scanning plane. Otherwise corruption of the measured values is to be expected under extreme conditions. If it is impossible to avoid having retroreflectors in the scanning plane, an
extra 20 cm should be added to the maximum measuring error2).
The maximum measuring error is
• 94 mm for protective fields < 2 m
• 131 mm for protective fields > 2 m
Where there are fixed restrictions (walls) there must be no retroreflectors in the scanning plane, as otherwise someone could
move along the wall to bypass the protective field.
For both graphic and numeric programming, it must be ensured
for reasons of functionality (solid barriers should not lead to
unintentional shutdown) that where fixed contours exist a distance of 94 mm for protective fields below 2 metres and 131
mm for protective fields over 2 metres is observed.
Where the teach-in function is used, a 45 mm supplement on
top of the maximum measuring error is required for the accuracy of the learned contour.
12
1)
2)
An optical radar cannot distinguish between a dirty
front screen and an obstacle directly in front of the
sensor. For the sake of sake of functionality, the PLS
was designed to reliably detect solid black bodies
such as black cord or shoe leather only at a distance
of 4 cm measured from the outer contour of the front
screen.
Accuracy of the sensor in safety applications: The
sensor determines the distance of an obstacle from
the flight time of a very short light pulse. To attain
optimum accuracy against obstacles of solid black
material (1.8 % reflectance) up to precision triple
reflectors (10,000 % reflectance), the PLS
compensates the received signal. If there is a dark
object in front of a retroreflector, under certain
circumstances (see above) the error distance of 20
cm may be too large. This would mean a person could
intrude 20 cm into the monitored area without being
detected by the PLS. This measuring error occurs only
when the following conditions simultaneously apply:
– The distance to the target is greater than
2 metres.
– The target is smaller than 140 mm.
– The retroreflector is on the scanning plane.
– The reflector is aligned perpendicular to the
sensor within an angle of ± 30°.
– The target reflectance is in the area of 1.8 %.
– The retroreflector is not more than 2 metres
behind the target.
– The reflector is clean and high-quality.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
Location planning
There are two basic alternative procedures for defining mounting locations:
First option: Using the so-called teach-in mode. In this mode
the PLS measures the ambient contour and stores it (after automatic correction) as the outer protective field limit. The following formulae must be applied to check compliance with the
relevant specifications, such as the safety distance and mounting height, retrospectively.
Hazardous
area
PLS
HD = 0
Second option: Using graphical or numerical protective field input. In this the specifications to be complied with are ascertained at the outset and are then set in programming of the
scanner.
C = 1200
The basis for planning the mounting location of the PLS is pr EN
999. It describes the necessary minimum safety distance from
the hazardous area by:
S = (K x T) + C
Where:
S is the minimum distance in millimetres, measured from the
hazardous area to the detection point, detection line, detection plane or protective field;
K is a parameter in millimeters per second, derived from data
relating to approach speeds of the body or body parts;
T is the stopping time of the overall system in seconds;
C is an additional distance in millimetres which takes account
of the possibility of intrusion into the hazardous area before
tripping of the safety device.
Case 1: Scanning plane parallel to ground (HD = 0)
Hazardous
area
In access protection applications, an approach speed of 1600
mm/s is applied as K.
HD = 875
T results from addition of the response time of the sensor and
the stopping time of the hazardous movement.
C describes the possibility of reaching over the protective field
without tripping the sensor, and varies with the height of the
protective field limit according to the following correlation:
C = 850
C = 1200 mm - 0.4 HD (HD = height of detection)
where C > 850 mm
Consequently:
Where HD = 0 : CHD=0 = 1200 mm
Where HD = 875 : CHD=875 = 850 mm
Case 2a: Scanning plane at maximum height and parallel to
ground. (HD = 875)
This correlation is shown graphically in the adjacent diagrams
(cases 1 and 2).
Note:
The protective field supplement C is to be chosen dependent on the height of detection HD.
In case 2b, protection of marginal areas, note that the
scanning plane is not raised.
Also note that if the sensor is not mounted parallel to the
floor the effective protective field length is reduced.
Hazardous
area
HD = 875
C
C = 900 with multiple evaluation = 2
C = 950 with multiple evaluation = 4
etc.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
Case 2b: Scanning plane at maximum height, not parallel to ground
(HD = 875)
13
As a secondary condition pr EN 999 stipulates the following
minimum height:
HD = 15 x (d - 50) mm
Application of this formula is necessary as the leg diameter
changes with the distance from the floor. In this, d is the resolution of the PLS (d is dependent on the distance from the scanner).
Machine
Lo
ng
The resolution of the scanner must always be determined at
the point of greatest measuring distance, i.e. at the greatest
occurring protective field length SLmax.
Protective
field
Based on the working principle of the PLS by means of radial
scanning of the surroundings, a resolution is produced which
decreases as the distance from the sensor increases.
Thus a protective field length SL greater than 2.70 meters (only
up to this distance is a scanner resolution of 50 mm guaranteed) makes a certain detection height necessary. In this way it
is possible to compensate for the lower resolution with greater
leg diameter.
These correlations between SL, HD, HS and C are shown graphically in the adjacent diagrams. In this, HS is the height of the
scanner plane, measured directly on the sensor.
With horizontal mounting there is no risk of unwanted accessing
at mounting heights below 100 mm (for example crawling under
the scanning plane). To prevent children from crawling underneath, the maximum mounting height is 200 mm max. Mounting
heights of less than 100 mm are generally not to be recommended, as in such cases it is possible that the scanner may
accidentally shut down as a result of the increased dust concentration directly on the floor. For these reasons this mounting
range is often preferred, and consequently is identified as such
in the diagram.
e
fie st p
ro
ld
len tec
gt tive
h
Resolution of the scanner at the point of longest protective
field length SL
Using the diagram:
Define the maximum protective field length SLmax in your layout.
Shift the right Y-axis (HD) in parallel onto the located value
SLmax. Then place the desired scanning plane in the remaining
area shaded light gray. The plotted scanning line must not
leave the gray area at any point.
Within the area shaded gray in the diagram any mounting orientation is possible, provided it does not impair the safety distance.
HS (mm)
1000
HD
875
850
PLS scanning area
C
300
300
Preferred area for horizontal mounting
100
100
0
1200
2m
Longest protective field length
3m
2,9 m
4m
Correlation between protective field length, resolution of
sensor and height of scanning plane
14
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
Read- off example:
You determine a maximum protective field length of 3.50 metres. To determine the minimum field length at the edge of the
protective field, shift the right Y-axis in parallel onto the value
3.50 metres. You will then see that the detection height must
not be lower than 150 mm. The mounting height of the sensor
is freely selectable up to a height of 1000 mm. Thus the scanning plane does not go beyond the gray area.
HS (mm)
1000
HD
875
850
PLS scanning area
C
300
Note:
Please note that the height of the beam HS is 63 mm above
the bottom edge of the housing.
100
150
1200
0
2m
3 m 3,5 m
Longest protective field length
4m
There are three common mounting orientations for the PLS.
The optimum mounting orientation depends on the situation.
The table provides some assistance in making the right choice.
Scanner setting
Advantages
Disadvantages
Case 1: Scanner low (HS < 300 mm)
Scanning plane inclination low
(HD approximately HS)
No external influence
due to glare, no possibility
of crawling underneath
Large protective field
supplement C
Case 2: Scanner high (HS > 300 mm)
Scanning plane inclination low
(HD approximately HS)
Small protective field
supplement C
Danger of crawling underneath
(at front and side)
Case 3: Scanner low (HS < 300 mm)
Scanning plane inclination high
(HD < HS)
Small protective field
supplement C
Danger of crawling underneath
(at front), poss. external
influence due to glare
Any other mounting orientation and intermediate height which
prevents a hazardous situation being reached is possible, provided the safety distance is observed. Always take account of
the marginal area protection.
The protective field supplement C is determined on the basis
of the choice of mounting orientation. We recommend for a first
calculation:
In case 1: C = 1200 mm
In case 2: C = 1000 mm
In case 3: C = 1000 mm
The formula to be applied is:
S = (1600 mm/s x T) + C + ZM + ZR + ZE
Where: ZM is a supplement for the general measuring error of
the PLS
ZR s a supplement for any reflection-related measuring error of
the PLS
ZE is a supplement for the measuring error of the PLS resulting
from teach-in (see Important notes on configuration for stationary protection).
Note:
Every time the parameters are changed, check that the
protective field is still adequately dimensioned and that no
unwanted access (from the side or by crawling underneath
the scanning plane) is possible!
Make sure that all necessary supplements are taken into
account in the calculation.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
15
Restart definition
The machine should preferably be operated with restart inhibit.
If the machine control has no restart inhibit, the internal restart
inhibit of the PLS can be used.
A restart inhibit is always essential when the protective field can
be exited toward the hazardous area. Where necessary, check
whether this can be prevented by plant design (see following
subsection: Mounting recommendations for PLS).
If a machine can only be operated without restart inhibit, it is
essential that the following points should be observed:
– A person must be reliably detected at every point in the
hazardous area.
– A person must not be allowed to exit the protective field in
the direction of the hazardous area (such as by crawling underneath it, stepping behind it or climbing over it).
Make sure this is prevented by plant design (see following subsection: Mounting recommendations for PLS)!
Mounting recommendations for PLS
The following observations are to be applied in designing the
plant:
The mirror pivot point of the PLS determines the position of the
front edge of the protective field. Since the mounting area and
the mirror pivot point are at a set distance from one another, a
zone is produced in front of the mounting area which is not detected by the scanner.
This zone becomes larger if the PLS is mounted on the mounting bracket, for example. The size of this dead zone – measured from the back edge of the PLS or the mounting kit – is:
PLS direct-mounted:
PLS with mounting kit 1:
PLS with mounting kit 1 and 2:
PLS with mounting kit 1, 2 and 3:
109 mm
112 mm
127 mm
142 mm
There are cases in which design measures must be applied to
prevent persons from being in the hazardous area but outside
the protective field (such as by crawling underneath it, stepping
behind it or climbing over it).
To exclude this possibility where a laser scanner is mounted on
the machine, one of the following measures (or a combination
of them) is essential:
– Undercutting
– Retraction of the laser scanner
– Mounting of the laser scanner opposite or to the side of
the machine base
16
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
Undercutting:
The undercut must always be at least as low as the dead zone.
With regard to the mounting height the observations presented
under “Location planning” apply.
US
To prevent entry into the undercut, it is necessary to limit its
height.
Machine
base
H
Scanning plane
Undercutting
Retraction of the laser scanner:
Retraction of the laser scanner into the machine contour
presents an alternative to the undercut.
However, retracting the PLS too far will mean that the scanner is
unable to monitor the full 180°. In such cases you need to design the shadow sides to be inaccessible (point-of-operation
guard).
If you need to monitor the full 180°, for geometric reasons the
retraction depth of the scanner must be limited to a maximum
of 69.5 mm (corresponding to a protrusion of the PLS beyond
the front of the machine of at least 86.5 mm).
The observations regarding the detection reliability of the PLS
and the stipulations of pr EN 999 result in the following correlation between the minimum height of the scanning plane on the
scanner HSmin and the protrusion Z from the front of the machine:
HSmin = 15 x (Z - 90)
where: HS ≤ 1000mm, 86.5 mm ≤ Z ≤ 156 mm
Note:
Before the scanner is mounted it is essential that the height of
the scanning plane HS should be translated into the attachment
height HA!
The necessary dimensions of the scanning plane in relation to
the fixing holes for the scanner are shown in the dimensional
drawings in the section headed “Mounting the PLS”.
The minimum mounting height is based on the retraction depth.
The deeper you can retract the PLS, the lower you can mount it.
Take into consideration the possible shadowing of the marginal
areas when retracting the scanner. With regard to the resolution
of the PLS and the danger of crawling underneath the scanning
plane, the points made under “Location planning” apply.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
Z
Machine
base
Scanning plane
Scanner retraction
17
Mounting of the laser scanner opposite or to the side of
the machine base:
US
If the PLS is in the way when installed on the machine base, it
can alternatively be mounted opposite. For this, because of the
measuring tolerance of the PLS, it is essential that an undercut
be made in the machine base.
Machine
base
The necessary minimum undercut USmin on the machine is calculated on the basis of:
USmin = (2 x SFdistance) – d = (2 x max. measuring error) – d
The maximum measuring error is dependent on the size of the
maximum protective field length, and at up to 2 metres maximum measuring distance is 94 mm; at over 2 metres maximum
measuring distance 131 mm. The resolution at this measuring
distance is given in the diagram. For application of this formula
the distance between the protective field limit and the machine
base must not be greater than the maximum measuring error. If
the protective field limit is further away from the machine, USmin
is increased accordingly.
USmin
H
Scanning plane
Machine base
Ma
x
fie . Pro
ld
len tecti
gth ve
Protective
field
Mounting of a PLS opposite or to the side of the machine base
Resolution d
in mm
Read-off example:
In your protective field you determine the maximum protective field length as 3500 mm. From the diagram you read off
a resolution dmax of 60 mm.
600
400
200
Characteristic A
Protective field
100
60 70
40
Characteristic B
Warning field
20
10
1
0,1 0,2
0,5
1
2 3 4 6 10 20 30 50
3,5 Protective field length SL
Diagram: Protective field length and resolution
18
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
5.2 Mobile protection with PLS
In mobile protection the sensor can be operated both with and
without restart inhibit, depending on application. The regulations
applicable to the vehicle must be observed.
In “with restart inhibit” mode the actuating element for the restart inhibit must be positioned such that there is full visibility
into the hazardous area. The actuating element for the restart
inhibit must not be accessible from the point directly in front of
the sensor.
In “without restart inhibit” mode the close-up zone1) of the sensor (4 cm wide area measured from the front screen outer
contour) is either to be rendered inaccessible (e.g. by a bar or
undercut) or a proximity scanner with a 4 cm detection range is
to be mounted over the sensor.
For mobile protection, side access to the vehicle is also to be
taken into account when configuring the protective field. This
assumes that a person approaches the vehicle from the side,
for example in concealed areas (crossways). If side access is
possible (no solid restrictions such as a wall), the protective
field should be configured wider than the vehicle.
In mobile protection applications it must be ensured that, with
protective field widths over 2 metres, there are no retroreflectors in the immediate proximity of the protective field limits on
the scanning plane. Otherwise corruption of the measured values is to be expected under extreme conditions. If it is impossible to avoid having retroreflectors in the scanning plane, an
extra 10 cm should be added to the maximum measuring error2). The halving of the supplement in relation to stationary applications is due to the dynamics.
The maximum measuring error is
• 94 mm for protective fields < 2 m
• 131 mm for protective fields > 2 m
Where there are solid restrictions (walls) there must be no retroreflectors in the scanning plane, as otherwise someone could
move along the wall to bypass the protective field.
For both graphic and numeric programming, it must be ensured
for reasons of functionality (solid barriers should not lead to
unintentional shutdown) that where fixed contours exist a distance of 94 mm for protective fields below 2 metres and 131
mm for protective fields over 2 metres is observed.
Where the teach-in function is used, an additional 45 mm on
top of the maximum measuring error is required for the accuracy of the learned contour.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
1)
2)
An optical radar cannot distinguish between a dirty
front screen and an obstacle directly in front of the
sensor. For the sake of sake of functionality, the PLS
was designed to reliably detect solid black bodies
such as black cord or shoe leather only at a distance
of 4 cm measured from the outer contour of the front
screen.
Accuracy of the sensor in safety applications: The
sensor determines the distance of an obstacle from
the flight time of a very short light pulse. To attain
optimum accuracy against obstacles of solid black
material (1.8 % reflectance) up to precision triple
reflectors (10,000 % reflectance), the PLS
compensates the received signal. If there is a dark
object in front of a retroreflector, under certain
circumstances (see above) the error distance of 10
cm may be too large. This would mean a person could
intrude 10 cm into the monitored area without being
detected by the PLS. This measuring error occurs only
when the following conditions simultaneously apply:
– The distance to the target is greater than
2 metres.
– The target is smaller than 140 mm.
– The retroreflector is on the scanning plane.
– The reflector is aligned perpendicular to the
sensor within an angle of ± 30°.
– The target reflectance is in the area of 1.8 %.
– The retroreflector is not more than 2 metres
behind the target.
– The reflector is clean and high-quality.
19
Location planning
The following observations take into account only the vehicle
speed, not the speed of a moving person. The reason is that it
is assumed that a person approaching the vehicle recognizes
the danger and at least stands still.
Vehicle
Scanning plane
H
Mounting of a PLS on a vehicle
Attachment height:
Due to the intrinsic movement of the scanner in the mobile application, a resolution of 70 mm is adequate for detection of
persons in mobile applications (stationary application: 50 mm).
For this reason, the mobile application requires no higher-level
mounting for protective field widths over 2.90 meters.
The sensor is to be calibrated in accordance with EN 1525
such that a body of maximum 200 mm height under all circumstances is detected in the protective field range necessary to
bring the vehicle to a safe stop. (Recommendation: setting to
150 mm height).
Pre-set
protective field
length
Vehicle
max. 272 mm
150 mm
Mounting height
The scanning plane should not be below 100 mm, as the increased dust concentration on the floor could cause the scanner to shut off unintentionally.
Attachment mode:
A basic distinction is made between two modes of attachment:
Dead zone
Protruding front mounting:
The dead zones created at the sides of the sensor in protruding front mounting must be eliminated by mechanical trim covers or switch strips, or the vehicle must not be accelerated to
speeds above 0.3 m/s in less than three seconds.
Vehicle
Integral in vehicle trim panel:
The sensor is installed such that no dead zones, or no dead
zones < 70 mm, are created to the side of it. The vehicle may
then be accelerated to a speed of 0.3 m/s within one second.
In order to meet this condition, the PLS must not protrude
more than 109 mm over the front edge of the vehicle.
If the close-up zone of the sensor (4 cm wide area measured
from the front screen outer contour) is either rendered inaccessible (e.g. by a bar or undercut) or is monitored by a proximity scanner or a switch strip with a 4 cm detection range, the
vehicle may be accelerated at will.
Protective
field
Mounting mode: Protruding front mounting
max. 109mm
Vehicle
Protective
field
Mounting mode: Integral in vehicle trim panel
20
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
Calculation of the necessary protective field
When configuring the protective field for vehicle applications, in
addition to the actual stopping distance of the vehicle the following supplements must also be taken into account:
For the protective field length SL:
SL = SA + ZM + ZR + ZE + ZF + ZB
where: SA is the stopping distance of the vehicle
ZM is the supplement for the general measuring error of the vehicle;
ZR is the supplement for any reflection-related measuring error
of the PLS;
ZE is the supplement for the measuring error of the PLS resulting from teach-in (see Important notes on configuration for mobile protection);
ZF is the supplement for a lack of ground clearance of the vehicle;
ZB is the supplement for the decreasing braking force of the
vehicle.
The stopping distance SA is composed of the actual braking
distance of the vehicle from maximum speed and the maximum
load SBr, as well as its distance covered during the response
time of the sensor SAns.
SA = SBr + SAns
where: SBr is given in the specification of the vehicle manufacturer;
SAns = TAns x Vmax ist.
The response time of the sensor TAns set when the PLS is
shipped is 80 ms.
The supplement ZM results from the maximum measuring distance of the PLS. For measuring distances up to 2 meters the
maximum measuring error is 9.4 cm; for measuring distances
above 2 meters the error is 13.1 cm. The maximum protective
field length SLmax results from the maximum distance of the
edge of the protective field from the center of the PLS (see
Important notes on configuration for mobile protection).
The supplement ZR is necessary when there are objects with
retroreflective properties on the scanning plane. If the presence of retroreflectors cannot be excluded, for protective field
lengths above 250 cm a supplement of 10 cm is required (see
Important notes on configuration for mobile protection).
The supplement ZE is necessary when you define the protective
field by the teach-in method. This supplement takes account of
the accuracy in registering the ambient contour. This supplement is independent of background conditions, and needs to
be set at a constant 45 mm.
The supplement ZF is necessary because people are generally
detected above foot level, and so the braking action is unable
to take account of the length of the foot in front of the point of
detection. A person could therefore suffer injuries to the foot
as a result of a lack of ground clearance.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
21
The adjacent diagram shows the necessary extension of the
protective field based on the supplement necessary for the
lack of ground clearance of a vehicle.
The supplement for the declining braking force of the vehicle ZB
must be set at 10% of the stopping distance, unless already
taken into account in the stopping distance.
Vehicle
Protective field
length
Ground Clearance GC
As ZM for the protective field width – like ZM for the protective
field length - results from the maximum protective field length
SLmax, those supplements are always identical.
GC
The protective field width SB also requires a supplement. Here
the supplement ZM for the general measuring error of the PLS is
applied (as necessary ZR and ZE).
ZF
120
60
50
0
50
100
150
Supplement Z F
Supplement on protective field resulting from lack of ground
clearance
Configuration examples
Notes:
In the user software always enter whole values in centimeters.
For this, the results of all calculations must be rounded up to 1
cm.
The stopping distance s is the stopping distance required by
the vehicle (including the sensor response time) from maximum
speed.
Calculation example 1: (Scan rate set as default)
Calculation example 2: (Scan rate set as default)
Stopping distance:
Vehicle width:
Ground clearance:
Stopping distance: 300 cm (excluding brake wear)
Vehicle width:
200 cm (PLS arranged in the center)
Ground clearance: < 5 cm
Retroreflectors may occur on the scanning plane.
180 cm (taking into account brake wear)
140 cm (PLS arranged in the center)
> 12 cm
Max. measuring distance = 1802 + 702 = 193.1 cm
ZL =
9.4 cm measuring error PLS
(max. measuring distance < 2 m)
+
0 cm for ground clearance
(ground clearance > 12 cm)
+
0 cm for brake wear
(already included in stopping distance)
Max. measuring distance = 3002 + 1002 = 316.2 cm
ZL =
13.1 cm measuring error PLS
(max. measuring distance > 2 m)
+ 15.0 cm for ground clearance
(ground clearance < 5 cm)
+ 30.0 cm for brake wear
+ 10.0 cm for possible retroreflectors on scanning plane
= 9.4 cm
= 68.1 cm
The protective field length to be configured is 190 cm.
The protective field length to be configured is 369 cm.
ZB =
ZB =
9.4 cm measuring error PLS
13.1 cm measuring error PLS
+ 10.0 cm measuring error reflection ZR
= 9.4 cm
The protective field width to be configured is 80 cm
(on both sides of the PLS).
22
=
23.1 cm
The protective field width to be configured is 124 cm
(on both sides of the PLS).
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
5.3 If you use several PLS units
The PLS is designed such that mutual interference by sensors
where more than one are deployed is highly unlikely.
To be absolutely sure of avoiding error shutdowns, you should
mount the sensors offset to one another. The diagrams show
various options.
In any event, be sure to observe the stipulations of pr EN 999.
There are three different mounting kits which will allow you to
align the sensors at various angles.
You will find diagrams illustrating all mounting kits and more detailed information in the section headed “Mounting the PLS”.
PLS1
PLS2
min 10
0 mm
PLS 1
PLS 2
0 mm
min 20
PLS1
min. 200 mm
PLS2
PLS 2
PLS 1
min 1
00 m
m
min. 2 m
PLS1
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
min. 200 mm
PLS2
23
6
Supply Package
You receive:
– a PLS sensor
– a connection set (one connection box each for power supply and interface)
– the PLS user software (on a 3.5" floppy)
– the operating instructions manual
– this technical description manual.
Recommended accessories
At this point we can only give you a few pointers to the major
accessories. You will find a complete list in the Appendix.
Connection set
You will normally receive connection set 1. It contains one connection box each for the power supply and the interface, without cables.
If you wish, instead of connection set 1 you can order one of
the connection sets 2 to 7, which include a cable fitted to the
power connector. The cable is routed upward out of the connection box.
Various cable lengths are available:
Order no.
Connection set 2, with 3 m cable
2 016 185
Connection set 3, with 5 m cable
2 016 186
Connection set 4, with 10 m cable
2 016 187
Connection set 5, with 15 m cable
2 016 188
Connection set 6, with 20 m cable
2 016 189
Connection set 7, with 30 m cable
2 016 190
Interface cable
To connect the sensor to a PC you can use the interface cable.
It is available in three lengths.
For RS 232 (all PLS types) and for RS 422 (PLS type 101212):
Order no.
3 m interface cable
2 016 401
5 m interface cable
2 016 402
10 m interface cable
2 016 403
For RS 422 (PLS types 101-312 only):
Order no.
3 m interface cable
2 019 130
5 m interface cable
2 019 131
10 m interface cable
2 019 132
24
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
7
Mounting the PLS
You can mount the PLS without additional fixings directly on a
wall or on the floor. Threaded holes are provided for this on the
bottom and on the back of the PLS.
Note:
Mount the PLS so it is protected against damp, dirt and damage.
Also avoid excessive shock and vibration impact on the scanner. Please observe the relevant specifications set out in the
Appendix under “Technical data”.
13,5
20,5
9,1
210
185
136,8
23,5
63
53,2
38
31,7
50
120
78,5
M8x9
Space allowed for
connection approx. 265
M6x8
77,5
69,5
155
18,5
156
45
59
118
55
M6x8
21
12
(All dimensions in mm)
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
25
There are three mounting kits which allow the PLS to be fineadjusted and then securely fixed in position.
Mounting kit 1 is attached directly to the back of the PLS, and is
for wall mounting. The contact areas on the PLS and on mounting kit 1 are so precise that you can replace the PLS at any time
without re-aligning, if this becomes necessary.
Mounting kit 2 is attached as an add-on to mounting kit 1, and
permits fine adjustment of the PLS in two planes (see arrows in
illustration). The maximum adjustment angle is ± 11°.
Mounting kit 3 (only in conjunction with mounting kits 1 and 2)
can be used either for stable floor mounting of the PLS or, on
uneven wall surfaces, ensures that the transverse axis on
mounting kit 2 remains precisely adjustable. The maximum adjustment angle is ± 3.3°.
Dimensional drawings for all mounting kits are set out on the
next page.
Note:
Where systems are subject to heavy vibration, you should prevent the adjusting and fixing screws from working loose by suitable locking mechanisms, and regularly check that the screws
are tight.
Sensor mounting screws
Sensor mounting screws
26
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
Notes:
The scanning plane is 63 mm above the bottom edge.
When a PLS is mounted using mounting kits 1, 2 and 3, the
scanning plane (with horizontal alignment) is 102.5 mm above
the bottom edge of mounting kit 3.
183
62
160
220
80
46 0
6 1
7
30
(All dimensions in mm)
32,5
102
71
51,5
66,6
30
9
51,8
ø9
247,77
For count-sunk M6 fixings
Recess
DIN 74 - Am6
120
19,1
17,5
193,2
87,5
22,5
175
(All dimensions in mm)
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
27
8
Connecting Up the PLS
The PLS is supplied with two plug-in connection boxes for the
power supply and interface. The electrical contact in each case
is made by a 9-pin sub-D connector screwed into the connection box.
Interface connector
Power connector
Only when both connection boxes, with their seals under them,
are inserted flush with the housing and fixed with the side fixing
screws does the PLS conform to protection class IP65. If the
interface is not used, the dummy plug must be fitted.
Cable termination
upward or to the rear
You can order pre-assembled connection sets in which the
power connector is fitted with an upward-routed cable. You will
find more details on the available connection sets in the Appendix under “Accessories”.
If you assemble the connection yourself, you can choose
whether the connecting cable is routed out of the connector
housing upward or to the rear. The unused threaded hole in either case must be plugged with a dummy plug.
Notes:
Lay all wires and connecting cables such that they are protected against damage.
If you are using the PLS to protect hazardous areas: make sure
that the connected controller and all other devices also have
the necessary safety level!
Make sure the connectors for the power supply and the interface are not mixed up when assembling the cable sets.
Do not drop the connectors. The sub-D connector could be
pushed into the housing as a result.
•
•
Check that the seals sit firmly on the connectors.
•
Only then should you secure the connectors with the hexagon socket screws on the sides.
28
Insert the connectors right-side up into the receptacles in
the PLS housing. Push the connectors lightly into the housing. You will know that a proper connection has been made
if the connectors terminate flush on the housing.
Connecting up the PLS
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
Connecting the power connector
The PLS requires a D. C. voltage of 24 V for its power supply.
You will find more details on this in the Appendix under “Technical data”.
The power connector must have the following terminals:
– VCC_EXT and GND_EXT: A 24 V DC power pack to deliver
the power
– RESTART: The restart button to release the PLS after a protective field infringement
– OSSD1 and OSSD2: The two protective semiconductor outputs which safely activate when the protective field is infringed
– WEAK SIGNAL: An additional output which activates optionally in case of dirt contamination of the front screen or infringement of the warning field, or both. If the PLS detects
an error in its routine self-test, the output activates 4 times
per second (see section 10: “LEDs on the PLS”).
Note:
If you connect loads such as lamps directly to the semiconductor outputs, you must pay attention to the following points:
– As a result of the initial resistance of a load (such as a lamp)
the maximum permissible current rating of the outputs must
not be exceeded, as otherwise the outputs’ current limiter
will be activated.
– The loads must exhibit low-pass behavior (fg > 500 Hz) so
that the test pulses monitoring the outputs do not cause a
shutdown.
– The maximum capacitive load is 100 nF. This must be observed in particular when using downstream safety modules.
1
2
3
4
5
Sensor
PIN
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Machine
GND_EXT
RESTART
VCC_EXT
NC
WEAK-SIGNAL
NC
NC
OSSD_2
OSSD_1
6
7
8
9
Cable:
Ø4 ... Ø8 mm
6 x 0,5 mm 2
OSSD:
I max = 250 mA
WEAK-Signal:
I max = 100 mA
4 031 586
Sensor
PIN
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
LSI/LMI
GND
NC
DC24V
NC
NC
NC
NC
NC
NC
Power connector for PLS type 101-312
and for PLS types 101-112 and 101-212
Pin no.
Signal designation
Wire colours
1
2
3
4
5
GND_EXT (Ground)
RESTART
VCC_EXT (24 V DC)
NC
WEAK-SIGNAL
(contamination signal
or warning field infringed)
NC
NC
OSSD_2 (protective output 2)
OSSD_1 (protective output 1)
brown
blue
red
–
grey
6
7
8
9
–
–
turquoise
orange
Power connector: Wire colours
Connection examples
You need to connect the power connector pins differently depending on application.
The following pages give examples of various applications.
If you want to use one or more PLS together with a LSI (Laser
Scanner Interface), you will find relevant connection examples in
the technical description of the LSI.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
29
+24V
1)
PLS
3
k1
8
y
x
k2
x
9
y
z
k1
5
1
k2
Y36 S12
S52
z
A1 13 23 33 41
pilz
PNOZ8
Y1 Y2 A2S21 S22 14 24 34 42
k1
*
*
k2
H2
K1
K2
0V
* Arc suppressor
PNOZ 8 / Without restart inhibit, with contact monitoring
+24V
k1
1)
k2
k1
k2
x
2)
y
z
A1 A2 PE To PE T13T14X11 X12 T21 T22X21X22 13 23 31
k1
LCU-X
k2
C1 D1 PE C2 D2 PE T3 T4 C3 D3 PE C4 D4 14 24 32
PLS
y
x
z
3
8
9
5
*
1
K1
*
K2
0V
PE
* Arc suppressor
LCU-X / Protective operation without restart inhibit, with contact monitoring
30
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
+24V
1)
x
PLS
3
k1
8
9
y
k2
k3
5
k3
x
1
y
z
k1
k1
k2
k3
z
k1
k3
k2
k3
k2
*
*
K1
K2
K3
2)
0V
* Arc suppressor
Evaluation of PLS outputs by relay with positively-driven contacts, mode: without restart inhibit
+24V
1)
PLS
3
k1
8
y
x
k2
x
9
y
z
k1
5
1
k2
Y36 S12
S52
z
A1 13 23 33 41
pilz
PNOZ8
S1
Y37 Y2 A2S21 S22 14 24 34 42
k1
H2
*
k2
K1
*
K2
0V
* Arc suppressor
PNOZ 8 / With restart inhibit and contact monitoring
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
31
+24V
1)
PLS
x
S1
3
k1
8
9
y
k2
k3
5
k3
x
1
y
z
k1
k1
k2
k3
k3
z
k1
k3
k2
*
k3
k2
*
K1
K2
*
K3
0V
* Arc suppressor
Evaluation of PLS outputs by relay with positively-driven contacts, mode: with restart inhibit
+24V
S1
k1
1)
k2
k1
k2
x
2)
y
z
A1 A2 PE To PE T13T14X11 X12 T21 T22X21X22 13 23 31
k1
LCU-X
k2
C1 D1 PE C2 D2 PE T3 T4 C3 D3 PE C4 D4 14 24 32
PLS
y
x
z
3
8
9
5
*
1
K1
*
K2
0V
PE
* Arc suppressor
LCU-X / Protective operation with restart inhibit and contact monitoring
32
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
Notes
Note:
Use only relays with positively-driven contacts. The RC elements
switched in parallel with the contactors are for arc suppression.
1) Output circuits. These contacts are to be inserted into the
control such that, when the output circuit is opened, the
hazardous state is eliminated. In categories 4 and 3 to EN
954-1 this insertion must be in two channels (x, y paths).
Single-channel insertion into the control (z path) is only possible with single-channel control and taking account of the
risk analysis.
2) To safeguard activation of K1 and K2 during the switchover
phase, K3 should be executed with a release delay in accordance with the contactors used and the operating voltage.
The control circuits must be provided with a selective overcurrent protection device (fuse).
Important:
Use only relays with positively-driven contacts!
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
33
Connecting the interface connector
Where long cable lengths (over 15 metres) or high data transfer
rates are required, you can modify the interface into a RS 422
interface. There are two ways of doing this: Either jumper pins 7
and 8, or use the RS 422 interface cables, which already include
the jumper (see the “Accessories” section in the Appendix).
PLS types PLS 101-112 and 101-212 do not have this switch
option, and so can only be operated with the one specified interface.
Stand alone
Sensor
with LMI
Cable: Ø4 ... Ø8 mm
4 x max. 0,5 mm 2
Host
shielded
PIN PC(RS-232) PC(RS-422)/LMI LSI
1
NC
RXDRXD2
RXD
RXD+
RXD+
3
TXD
TXD+
TXD+
4
NC
TXDTXDshield
5
GND
GND
Housing
6
NC
NC
NC
7
NC
NC
NC
8
NC
NC
NC
9
NC
NC
NC
with LSI
NC RXD- RXDRXD RXD+ RXD+
TXD TXD+ TXD+
TXD- TXDNC
NC
GND GND
NC
NC
NC
RS-422
NC RS-232
NC
NC
NC
NC
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
PIN
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
RS-422
8
9
RS-232
RS-422
Interface connector for PLS type 101-312
4 028 604
When self-assembling the cables, make sure the shielding is
attached on both sides.
4 031 580
PLS type PLS 101-312 has a universal interface. Unmodified, it
operates as a RS 232 interface and so can be connected to
standard computers without problem.
Ltg-Ø: 4 . . 8 mm
4 x max. 0,5 mm2
geschirmt
Sensor PLS
RS232
NC
RXD
TXD
NC
GND
NC
:
NC
RS422
RXDRXD+
TXD+
TXDGND
NC
:
NC
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
PIN-Nr.
1
2
3
4
5
6
:
9
Schirm
RS232/RS422
Rechner
PIN-Nr.
1
2
3
4
5
6
:
9
RS232
NC
RXD
TX
NC
GND
NC
:
NC
RS422
RDXRXD+
TXD+
TXDGND
NC
:
NC
Interface connector for PLS types 101-112 and 101-212
34
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
Short-term connection to a PC
You normally only connect the PC to the sensor for programming purposes, for example when using the sensor to protect a
hazardous area. All settings and fields remain stored in the sensor after the PLS is disconnected from the PC, until changed
again by you. The sensor will not lose its data even in the event
of a power failure!
To connect to the PC, use an interface cable (refer to the Appendix under “Accessories).
Note:
If you want to connect a sensor to a computer by a RS 422 interface, you must use a suitable cable. Refer to the notes on
switching interfaces on the previous page.
•
Remove the connection box over the interface socket on
the PLS.
Note:
When the connection box has been released the PLS conforms
only to protection class IP 40.
•
•
Connect the sensor interface to the PC.
•
•
Detach the interface cable from the PLS.
Program the PLS. For detailed information refer to the user
software description as from section 9.
Reconnect the connection box and screw it in tight.
Note:
The pin assignment of a RS 422 interface is not standardized.
Compare the pin assignment of the connecting cable with the
one on the PC and adapt it accordingly.
Permanent connection to an evaluation computer
If you want to evaluate the measurement data of the PLS on a
continuous basis, for example to navigate a vehicle, you must
connect the PLS permanently to an evaluation computer (PLS
101-31x only).
•
Wire the 9-pin sub-D connector in the connection box with
a suitable cable (RS 232 standard, RS 422 twisted pair).
You can choose whether to route the cable out of the box
upward or to the rear.
Note:
The cable outlet is PG 9 size, and is suitable for all cable diameters from 4 to 8 mm.
•
•
Plug the connection box into the PLS and screw it in tight.
Lay the cable permanently to the evaluation computer or to
the vehicle’s on-board computer.
Note:
Lay all cables such that they are protected against damage.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
35
9
Programming the PLS with the User Software
9.1 Installing the user software
Note:
This section describes how to program a PLS proximity laser
scanner.
If you want to deploy one or more PLS together with a SICK LSI
(Laser Scanner Interface), refer instead to the technical description of the LSI, section 9: “Programming the LSI with the
User Software”.
The SICK user software as from version 3.20 can be used to
program the PLS or PLS/LSI systems.
If you have older SICK user software installed on your PC which
you want to continue using, specify a different program directory/folder when installing the new PLS/LSI software.
System requirements
–
–
–
–
–
min. 80486 processor
min. 4 MB RAM
min. 4 MB available hard disk capacity
MS-Windows™ (version 3.1 or higher) or Windows 95™
Colour monitor recommended
When installing your SICK user software you are guided by the
installation program. You only need to start the installation program:
•
•
•
Boot your PC.
•
•
Select and run “Install.exe”.
•
Follow the on-screen instructions.
Insert the PLS/LSI program disk in your PC’s floppy drive.
Under Windows:
Choose from the File Manager File – Run.
Under Windows 95:
Choose Run from the Start menu.
As necessary, enter the program directory/folder where you
want the new PLS user software to be installed.
When the installation is finished a message box appears telling
you that the setup has been completed successfully.
The PLS user software is now installed. You can run it any time
by clicking on its icon.
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SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
9.2 What to do
Note:
When the program starts you are automatically logged on as
the machine operator. As such, you can poll data but cannot
transmit any.
To be able to transmit configuration data and monitoring areas
to the PLS, you must log on as an “Authorized Client”. How to
log on is described in section 9.3.
Essential steps
In creating a new configuration you are guided by the user software. It guides you through the following steps:
•
•
•
Configure hardware:
You log the PLS on and define the restart inhibit mode of
the output. You select the number of multiple evaluations
and define whether you are using the sensor for area protection or for protection on a vehicle. You also define the
switching behavior of the “Weak Signal” output.
Define monitoring range:
You define the range to be monitored by the PLS. If you
wish, you can also determine the shape and size of the protective field and warning field here.
Send configuration to PLS:
You now transmit all the configuration settings you have
made to the PLS. You must be logged on as an “Authorized
Client” to be able to do this.
•
Edit monitoring range:
Here, if you wish, you have the chance to alter the shape
and size of the protective field and warning field.
•
Send monitoring range to PLS:
Finally you transmit the protective field and warning field to
the PLS. For this too, you must be logged on as an “Authorized Client”.
Other options
In addition to the essential steps, you can use a number of other options when configuring your PLS system.
– Edit fields:
To edit the protective and warnings fields the user software
provides you with a number of useful edit functions.
– Teach-in and check protective field:
In the teach-in process you run over the contours of the
desired protective field with the sensor active, and the PLS
stores the learned contour. You have to check learned protective fields.
You can also edit a learned protective field subsequently,
just like any other segmented field.
– Monitor protective field:
You can monitor the protective field and warning field in operation using a connected PC. You can also store the defined space contours of the sensor as a check.
– Check settings:
You can view, check and print all configuration settings in a
page view.
– Receive and store configuration:
You can receive and print the configuration data stored in
the PLS. You can save any configuration to the hard disk or
to a floppy.
– Change password:
To protect your PLS against manipulation, you should
change the logon password.
– Change screen view:
You can zoom, unzoom or move the screen view, for example.
– Interrogate fault memory (system diagnosis):
For troubleshooting purposes you can interrogate the fault
memory of the PLS.
WWhen you have completed these steps the PLS system is
ready for operation.
Note:
Change the logon password, to protect your PLS system
against manipulation (see section 9.13).
Log your configuration data stored in the PLS, and back up the
configuration on the hard disk or on a floppy (see section 9.12).
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
37
9.3 Entry: The initial configuration
The PLS is shipped with certain pre-configured settings. This
section describes how you can adapt those settings to your
application.
•
Switch on your PLS system
(it takes a few seconds to start up).
•
Start the user software.
The following dialog box appears:
•
Click on “Yes”.
The PC receives the pre-configured settings and displays them
on-screen.
This dialog box appears.
To be able to send the configuration and monitoring area to the
PLS, you must log on as an “Authorized Client”.
•
•
Choose “Authorized Client” from the category list.
Enter the password “SICK_PLS” and click on “Logon”.
You are now logged on as an “Authorized Client” (see status
bar at bottom of screen).
Note:
Always log off when leaving your workstation! This will prevent unauthorized persons from manipulating your PLS system.
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SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
Configure hardware
You can edit the received configuration or create a new one.
To create a new configuration:
•
From the menu choose File – New
and click on “PLS Configuration”.
•
Click on “OK”.
This dialog box appears. This is where you set the sensor type
you want to work with.
•
Select your sensor type or have the sensor automatically
detected by clicking on “Detect”.
•
Click on “Continue”.
The remaining steps to follow and dialog boxes which appear
are the same as the following steps under “Edit configuration”.
To edit the received configuration:
•
•
From the menu choose PLS – Configuration – Edit.
Or choose the “Edit Configuration” button from the toolbar.
This dialog box appears. Here you can enter a symbolic name
for the sensor and the monitoring range.
•
Enter a name for the sensor and the monitoring range.
These names have no functional significance, they are only
intended as an aid to better allocation.
•
Click on “Continue”.
This dialog box appears. This is where you set the address under which the PLS is to be addressed.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
•
Select whether you want to use a universal or single address.
Universal address (zero):
This is the recommended setting. If you set “Universal address”, the stored configuration can be transferred at a later time to any other PLS.
Single address (between 1 and 99):
If you set “Single address” you assign the PLS the address
specified here for transferring the configuration. It is then
only possible to reload a configuration at a later time if the
address specified here and the one stored in the PLS
match.
This makes sense when you want to ensure that a configuration saved as a file can only be transmitted to specific PLS
units.
•
Click on “Continue”.
39
This dialog box appears. This is where you set the restart behavior of the output and the startup testing.
•
Select how the PLS is to restart after a protective field infringement.
With restart inhibit:
The system only restarts after a protective field infringement or a reset when the protective field is free and the
restart button is pressed.
Without delay:
The system restarts immediately as soon as the protective
field is free.
Delayed by n seconds:
The system only restarts when the time set here has
elapsed after the protective field has become free again.
•
Check the checkbox for whether you want startup testing.
If you select this option, you must intentionally interrupt the
protective field one time after switching on the system. Only
then is the system ready for operation.
•
Click on “Continue”.
This dialog box appears. This is where you define the field of
application of your PLS system.
•
Select whether you want to use the PLS for area protection
or for protection on a vehicle.
•
Click on “Continue”.
This dialog box appears. This is where you set how often (that
is, in how many consecutive scans) the sensor must detect a
foreign body in the protective field before it signals an infringement (between 2 and 16 scans are possible).
40
•
Enter the desired number of scans.
Note:
For safety reasons, always select the lowest possible setting! If you increase the setting the system will become
more stable, but will also respond more slowly. In this way
you can achieve a good level of availability in an environment
with a high dust concentration, for example. The current response time is shown in the box.
•
Click on “Continue”.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
This dialog box appears. This is where you set when the “Weak
Signal” output is to activate.
•
Select the desired condition:
– Contamination of front screen or object in warning field
– Object in warning field
– Contamination of front screen
•
Click on “Continue”.
If you create a new configuration this dialog box appears. This is
where you define the monitoring range.
•
Select the shape of the protective field and warning field.
You can define the sizes of the fields now or later. If you
want to define them now, click on “Dimensions” and enter
the dimensions you want.
Note:
You will find more details on editing the protective field and
warning field in section 9.4.
•
Click on “Continue”.
•
Click on “OK” to accept the configuration.
The configuration is defined. You can now transmit the settings
to the PLS, as described in the following section.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
41
Send configuration to PLS
•
Make sure you are logged on as an “Authorized Client” (see
status bar at bottom of screen).
•
If you are not logged on as an “Authorized Client”, choose
PLS – User Category from the menu, or click on the “Logon/Logoff User Category” button on the toolbar.
This dialog box appears.
•
•
Choose “Authorized Client” from the list of user categories.
Enter the password “SICK_PLS” and click on “Logon”.
You are now logged on and can send data to the PLS.
•
From the menu choose PLS – Configuration – Send to PL
from the menu,
or click on the “Send Configuration” button on the toolbar.
The screen displays an overview of the configuration settings
for you to check through once again.
To correct settings:
•
Click on “Cancel” to close the overview and change the settings.
To confirm settings:
•
Click on “Confirm”.
The configuration data are sent to the PLS and stored there.
This dialog box appears.
42
•
If you want to transmit the monitoring ranges unchanged,
click on “Yes”. You can then skip the next section, “Edit
monitoring range”.
•
If you also want to alter the shape and size of the monitoring ranges, click on “No”. You can then edit the protective
and warning fields, as described in the following section.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
Edit monitoring range
The screen displays the protective field you have defined. You
can edit the size of the protective field and the warning field
after defining them.
•
From the menu choose Monitoring Range – Edit from the
menu, or click on the “Edit Monitoring Range” button on the
toolbar.
•
From the “Active Field” list select the protective field or
warning field you want to edit.
•
From the “Active Background Field” list select the protective field or warning field that you want to see in the background for comparison purposes.
The selected fields and the space contour of the sensor are
shown on-screen.
Convert field shape:
•
To convert a field into a different shape, choose Edit – Convert Into from the menu.
Three different field shapes are available to choose from:
– Rectangle: This is the default. Newly defined fields are always this shape, unless you select a different setting. You
can adjust the height of the rectangle and the width at the
right and left.
– Semicircle: Here you define the radius.
– Segmented field: You can select various resolutions. The
more segments a field has, the higher is its resolution. You
can define the coordinates for each segment individually.
Notes:
Warning fields are always segmented fields. If you have defined
a warning field as a rectangle or semicircle, it is automatically
converted into a segmented field with the appropriate dimensions.
When you convert a field or change the resolution of a segmented field, the shape of the field may change minimally, but it
is displayed on-screen.
The following sections set out only the basic means of defining
the sizes of the various field shapes. For more information on
editing fields, refer to section 9.4.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
43
Define rectangular field:
•
To set or move a corner point:
Double-click on the desired position with the mouse.
Note:
In the example a rectangular grid pattern was chosen for the
screen view. You can switch between circular and rectangular
grid patterns. For more details refer to section 9.14.
… or:
•
From the menu choose Edit – Field Coordinates.
This dialog box appears, showing the dimensions of the rectangle.
•
•
Enter the dimensions you want.
Confirm with “OK”.
The dimensions of the rectangle are changed accordingly.
Define semicircle:
•
Double-click with the mouse on the desired position to define the radius of the field.
… or:
•
From the menu choose Edit – Field Coordinates.
This dialog box appears, showing the radius of the semicircle.
•
•
Enter the dimension you want.
Confirm with “OK”.
The radius of the semicircle is changed accordingly.
44
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
Define segmented field:
•
To set a point with the mouse:
Double-click on the desired position.
•
To move a point with the mouse:
Select the point and drag it to the desired position.
•
To delete a point:
Select the point and click on the “Delete” button on the
toolbar.
… or:
•
From the menu choose Edit – Field Coordinates.
This dialog box appears, showing the coordinates of all defined
points. You can add any points to the list, or you can select a
point and edit it or remove it.
•
To set a point:
Click on the “Add” button and enter your desired coordinates in the dialog box.
•
To move a point:
Select the point in the list and click on the “Edit” button.
Enter your desired coordinates in the dialog box.
•
To delete a point:
Select the point in the list and click on the “Remove” button.
Note:
You can also select a point with the mouse before choosing
Edit – Field Coordinates. The coordinates of the point in question are then already highlighted in the list.
•
When you have defined the protective and warning fields as
you want, deactivate the Monitoring Range – Edit menu
function,
or deactivate the “Edit Monitoring Range” button on the
toolbar.
Note:
After programming, check on the plant or vehicle that the
monitoring range is the correct size and shape! You can do
this by intruding intentionally into the monitoring range.
This also applies where you upload a field from a floppy
disk into the PLS.
Only start up the plant or vehicle when you are sure the
monitoring range is operating effectively!
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
45
Send monitoring range to PLS
•
From the menu choose Monitoring Range – Send to PLS
from the menu,
or click on the “Send Monitoring Range” button on the toolbar.
This dialog box appears.
•
Click on “Add All”,
or – if you only want to transmit individual fields – select the
fields you want from the list at the top and click on “Add”.
The fields are entered in the list at the bottom.
•
Click on “Send” and confirm for each individual field with
“Yes” or “OK” as appropriate.
This dialog box appears. The transmitted fields are now marked
with asterisks in the list.
•
Check that protective fields and warning fields are marked
with an asterisk, and so have been transmitted correctly.
•
If you sent the configuration before, you can click on “No”.
If you have not yet sent the configuration, click on “Yes” and
transmit it as previously described under “Send configuration to PLS”.
When you have transmitted the configuration and the monitoring range, the system is ready for operation.
Note:
When leaving your workstation log off by way of the PLS – User
Category menu function!
Also change the “Authorized Client” logon password. Make a
note of the new password at a location accessible only to authorized persons. This will prevent unauthorized persons from
manipulating the PLS system (how to change the password is
described in section 9.13).
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SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
9.4 Edit/dimension fields
Section 9.3 describes the basic way to edit a protective field or
warning field. You can use rectangular, semicircular or multiplesegmented fields. You can draw the fields using the mouse or
type in their coordinates.
This section describes additional options of defining the size
and shape of the protective and warning fields for your application. Various edit functions will assist you in drawing up the
fields.
Note:
After programming, check on the plant or vehicle that the monitoring range is the correct size and shape! You can do this by
intruding intentionally into the monitoring range.
Only start up the plant or vehicle when you are sure the monitoring range is operating effectively!
Convert fields
You can convert a field into a different shape - for example, a
rectangular field into a segmented field.
•
From the menu choose Edit – Convert Into.
Three different field shapes are available to choose from:
– Rectangle: This is the default. Newly defined fields are always this shape, unless you select a different setting. You
can adjust the height of the rectangle and the width at the
right and left.
– Semicircle: Here you define the radius.
– Segmented field: You can select various resolutions. The
more segments a field has, the higher is its resolution. You
can define the coordinates for each segment individually.
Notes:
Note that during conversion slight deviations in the protective
field coordinates can occur, which are nonetheless visible onscreen.
Warning fields are always segmented fields. If you have defined
a warning field as a rectangle or semicircle, it is automatically
converted into a segmented field with the appropriate dimensions.
Change scale of segmented field
When you have defined a segmented field you can enlarge or
reduce it in scale.
•
•
Choose Edit – Select All to select all the points in the field.
Pick up one of the points with the mouse and drag the field
to the size you want.
Each point is dragged on a measuring ray of the sensor away
from or toward the zero as appropriate.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
47
Copy and paste fields
You can copy fields to the clipboard and paste them at a different location. But you cannot mix field types: you can only paste
a protective field back in as a protective field, and a warning
field as a warning field.
•
From the menu choose Edit – Copy to copy the current
field to the clipboard.
•
Choose Edit – Paste to paste the field from the clipboard.
You can then edit the field you have just pasted as normal.
Save individual fields
You can save individual fields as files so they are available to be
used in other configurations.
•
Choose Edit – Copy To and save the current field under
the desired file name on the hard disk or on a floppy.
•
To insert the stored field at the desired location, such as in
another configuration, choose Edit – Paste From and enter
the file name and storage location.
The field is inserted. You can then edit the field as normal.
Fix coordinates
When editing a segmented field you can fix one of the coordinates of a point. This may be necessary when the coordinate in
question must not be changed, such as when configuring a protective field for a narrow alley.
•
•
From the menu choose Edit – Field Coordinates.
In the list select the point whose position you want to
change and click on “Edit”.
This dialog box appears.
•
•
Enter the coordinates you want for x and y.
Select which coordinate must not deviate from the entered
value, for example “Fix X-value”, and click on “Calculate”.
The next closest point on a measuring ray with the desired coordinates is calculated.
•
48
The calculated coordinates are displayed. To accept them,
click on “OK”.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
9.5 Teach-in protective field
You can teach-in protective fields. To do so, you run over the
contours of the desired protective field with the sensor active,
and the PLS stores the learned contour. You have to check
learned protective fields.
You can also edit a learned protective field subsequently, just
like any other segmented field.
•
•
•
From the “Active Field” list select the protective field.
From the menu choose Monitoring Range – Teach-in.
Or click on the “Teach-in Monitoring Range” button on the
toolbar.
This dialog box appears. The protective field is represented onscreen as a coloured area.
The active sensor scans its surroundings and shows you the
results. The contour you see on-screen is the largest possible
extent of the protective field (the precise contour of the protective field is based on the ambient contours).
•
If you want to reduce the size of the learned contour, run a
target (e.g. a piece of cardboard, at least 10 x 10 cm in size)
slowly along the edge of your desired protective field.
The contour of the protective field is reduced at the relevant
point. On the screen you can track how the protective field
takes on the taught-in contour.
Note:
Do prevent fixed obstacles in the scanning plane subsequently
producing false signals, 13 cm (= max. measuring error of PLS)
is automatically deducted from the learned contour. Take this
into account as appropriate when running over the protective
field. Also note that the teach-in process may result in an additional error of 4.5 cm.
•
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
To terminate teach-in, deactivate the “Teach-in Monitoring
Range” button.
49
This dialog box appears. You now have three options:
– You can use the taught-in protective field.
– You can edit it as a segmented field.
– Or you can check it and then activate it in the PLS.
Reject protective field:
• Click on “Cancel”. The taught-in protective field is rejected
and the old field retained.
Edit protective field:
• Click on “Edit”. You can then edit the taught-in protective
field like a segmented field and then transmit it to the PLS.
Check protective field:
• Click on “Check”:
The taught-in protective field is shown on-screen. The space
contour of the sensor is displayed for comparison purposes.
•
Infringe the contour of the protective field intentionally at all
points and on all measuring rays (in a range up to 70 cm into
the protective field).
The status bar at the bottom of the screen indicates to you
whether you have checked all points.
•
Deactivate the Monitoring Range – Check menu function,
or deactivate the “Check Monitoring Range” button on the
toolbar.
•
Click on “Yes” to transfer the monitoring range into the PLS
and confirm with “OK”.
The taught-in protective field is now active in the PLS.
Note:
You can also edit the taught-in protective field subsequently
and then transmit it as a segmented protective field to the PLS.
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SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
9.6 Monitor protective field
You have the option of monitoring the contour lines and the defined protective field in operation, by means of a connected PC.
•
•
From the menu choose Monitoring Range – Monitor.
Or click on the “Monitor Monitoring Range” button on the
toolbar.
You see the protective field and the space contour on-screen.
Save space contour
You can receive and save the defined space contour of a sensor. In this way, when error shutdowns occur you can check at
which point the protective field was infringed.
•
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
From the menu choose PLS – Tools – Save Space Contour.
51
9.7
Check settings
You can call up an overview at any time showing all the configuration and monitoring range settings. You can also print out the
overview.
Note:
This page view does not show you the actual configuration active in the PLS, but only the settings you are currently editing on
the PC. How to receive the active configuration from the PLS
and print it is described in the next section.
•
From the menu choose File – View.
A page appears listing all the configuration settings in text and
diagrams. You can check over your settings any time here.
Change size of screen view:
You can zoom the screen view in or out in two stages.
•
Click on the “Zoom In” or “Zoom Out” button. The view is
zoomed or unzoomed one stage.
•
Or click on the place you want to zoom into. The view is
zoomed one stage at the selected point.
Print page:
•
52
Click on the “Print” button.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
9.8 Receive and store configuration
Receive configuration from PLS
You can receive and print the configuration data stored in the
PLS.
•
From the menu choose PLS – Configuration – Configuration Log.
The PC receives the current configuration from the PLS.
The screen displays an overview of all the configuration settings
stored in the PLS.
Change size of screen view:
You can zoom the screen view in or out in two stages.
•
Click on the “Zoom In” or “Zoom Out” button. The view is
zoomed or unzoomed one stage.
•
Or click on the place you want to zoom into. The view is
zoomed one stage at the selected point.
Print log:
•
Click on the “Print” button.
Store configuration
You can save all configuration and monitoring range settings to
the hard disk or to a floppy.
•
From the menu choose File - Save As to save the settings.
You can call up the stored file again later to change the settings
or transmit them to the PLS.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
53
9.9 Change password
To be able to send configuration data and monitoring areas to
the PLS, you must log on as an “Authorized Client”. This requires
a password (default: “SICK_PLS”).
To protect your PLS system against manipulation, you should
change the default password and keep it in a safe location accessible only to authorized persons.
To change the password:
•
From the menu choose PLS - User Category, or click on the
“Logon/Logoff User Category” button on the toolbar.
•
Log on as an “Authorized Client”, using the old password
(e.g. “SICK_PLS”).
•
Choose PLS - Password - Change for Authorized Client.
This dialog box appears.
•
Type in the new password twice – once in each box. Onscreen it is shown only as a series of asterisks.
•
Confirm with “OK”.
The new password is stored in the PLS.
•
•
Log off.
Make a note of the new password at a location accessible
only to authorized persons.
Note:
The new password takes immediate effect.
But please be sure to always log off before leaving your workstation! Only if you do so can the password protect your PLS
system against manipulation.
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SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
9.10 Change screen view
You can enlarge, reduce or move the fields on-screen to make
them look as you want.
You can also choose between a circular and a rectangular background.
Enlarge or reduce view
•
Click on the “Zoom In” button on the toolbar.
The zoomed segment is zoomed one stage further with every
click of the mouse.
•
Or click on the “Zoom Out” button on the toolbar.
The zoomed segment is unzoomed one stage further with every click of the mouse.
Move view
•
Click on the “Move” button on the toolbar. The cursor
changes shape into a four-pointed arrow.
•
Hold the mouse button pressed down and move the
screen segment to where you want it.
… or:
•
Move the view using the scroll bars at the right and bottom
of the screen.
Center view
•
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
Click on the “Center” button on the toolbar. The zero point
is now back in the center of the screen.
55
Change grid pattern
You can switch between rectangular and circular grid patterns.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
From the menu choose View – Options
In the dialog box select the “View” tab.
Check the checkbox for rectangular or circular grid pattern.
Set your desired grid width.
Set your desired maximum visible area.
Check the checkbox for metric or imperial units.
Check the checkboxes to display the grid pattern, labels
and visible area on-screen.
Restore defaults:
• Click on the “Default” button. All values are reset to their
defaults.
Confirm setting:
• Click on “OK”.
Set displayed data
You can set how many measured values of the space contour
are to be displayed in monitoring and editing of the fields.
Note:
The more measured values you display, the more accurate the
display will be, but the slower it will be too.
56
•
•
•
From the menu choose View – Options.
•
Enter the time intervals at which new values are to be requested during editing.
Select the “Data” tab.
Select how many measured values of the space contour
you want to evaluate.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
9.11 Interrogate fault memory
(system diagnosis)
If your PLS is not functioning as you would like it, you can interrogate the fault memory of the PLS in a number of different steps
to localize possible faults.
The fault table in section 10.3 will tell you what to do then to
rectify the fault.
Initial fault diagnosis
As the first step you can carry out a simple diagnosis to localize
faults.
•
From the menu choose PLS – Diagnosis.
This dialog box appears.
•
Click on “Execute”.
The diagnosis is carried out and the window displays information on the current status of your PLS system.
The fault codes are given in the bottom section of the list display. To find out what the fault codes mean, and whether you
can rectify the fault yourself, refer to the fault table in section
10.3.
If necessary you can also carry out a second diagnosis to get
more detailed information. The more detailed diagnosis is described in the following.
Interrogate PLS fault memory
•
From the menu choose PLS - SICK Diagnosis.
This dialog box appears.
•
Make sure zero is entered as the device address and
“PLS” as the device type, and confirm with “OK”.
The “Execute Diagnosis” dialog box appears. In it you will find
various telegrams with which you can execute additional commands and functions.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
57
•
In the list of available telegrams select the “Read fault
memory” telegram and click on “Add”.
•
Select the “Read sensor status” telegram and click on
“Add”.
The two telegrams are now entered one under the other in the
list of telegrams for diagnosis.
•
Click on “Execute”.
The fault memory of the PLS and the sensor status are read,
and the result log is displayed in the box at the bottom of the
screen. You can find out what the listed fault codes mean from
the fault table in section 10.3.
You can add supplementary information to the result log, print it,
or save it as a file.
Enter supplementary information:
• Click on “Input” and enter the text you want. Your text is
then appended to the result log.
Print result log:
• Click on “Print”.
Save result log as file:
• Click on “Save” and enter a file name and destination directory/folder.
Note:
When you have rectified the fault reset the PLS: choose PLS –
Initialize.
Or execute the “Reset and initialization” telegram in the SICK
diagnosis.
The PLS system is then restarted.
58
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
10 Care and Maintenance
The PLS is maintenance-free.
Note:
Do not open the sensor up! It does not contain any parts
you can repair. In case of damage to the PLS contact SICK
Service.
Cleaning the front screen
To enable the sensor to function fault-free, you should clean the
front screen as soon as slow rhythmic flashing (once per second) of the yellow LED accompanied by a steadily lit green LED
signals slight contamination.
The PLS will still keep working in this state. Only as the degree of
dirt contamination increases will the yellow LED come on steadily, the PLS switches off and the red LED lights up (see “LEDs on
the PLS”).
Clean the front screen only with a soft cloth and plastic cleaner.
Never use rough rags or aggressive cleaning agents such as
acetone etc.! Otherwise the front screen may be damaged.
If the front screen is scratched or damaged and needs to be
replaced, you can order a replacement from SICK (see Appendix under “Accessories”) and replace it yourself.
Replacing the front screen
Notes:
The front screen must only be replaced by knowledgeable personnel, in a clean environment.
10.1 SICK Service / Hotline
If a fault occurs (e.g. the yellow LED is flashing rapidly, at around
4 times per second), be sure that your first step is always to
carry out the fault diagnosis in the PLS user software. You will
find more details on this in section 9 under “Interrogate fault
memory - System diagnosis”. This SICK diagnosis function will
provide you with detailed information about the fault which has
occurred. You can find out what the fault code means from the
fault table in section 10.3 and ascertain whether you can rectify
the fault yourself.
If you are unable to rectify the fault yourself, please contact your
nearest supplier.
Print out the fault report produced by the SICK Diagnosis
function and have it to hand when you contact SICK Service.
If you need to send in the PLS, please also enclose the fault
report together with the completed Service questionnaire. You
will find a master copy of the Service questionnaire in section
10.4.
If you are having difficulties or are unsure about how to use your
PLS, please contact our hotline. You can reach it under the
number given above.
SICK also offers an Installation and Commissioning service
package. Our Service department will be able to help you if you
need further assistance.
The front screen of the PLS is an optical component which must
not be contaminated with dirt or scratched during replacement.
Before removing the front screen disconnect the power
connector to cut power to the unit!
•
Loosen the eight hexagon socket screws on the front
screen and remove the old screen.
•
Mount the new screen (as far as possible holding it only with
a clean, soft cloth).
•
First screw the four screws in the middle of the screen
back in, then the four at the ends (slots). Tighten the screws
to around 0.7 Nm.
•
Reconnect the power to the PLS and calibrate the contamination measurement by means of the PLS user software:
From the menu choose “SICK Diagnosis”, select the “Setup
mode” and “Calibration of contamination measurement”
telegrams and execute them.
(You will find more details on this in section 9 under “Interrogate fault memory – System diagnosis”).
The new front screen must not be contaminated with dirt
when the calibration is performed.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
59
10.2 LEDs on the PLS
The PLS has three light-emitting diodes (LEDs) which deliver
important information.
In this regard also refer to the description of the user software
as from section 9, which gives detailed information on programming of the fields and outputs.
Green
Yellow
Red
Red and green LEDs:
The red and green LEDs indicate the status of the protective
field and the outputs.
For PLS type 101-312:
Yellow LED:
PLS LEDs:
Status
Green
The yellow LED indicates whether the warning field has been
infringed or the front screen of the sensor is contaminated with
dirt. You can set which option you want in the user software. The
description of the user software, section 9.3, gives detailed information on setting the “Weak Signal” output.
Protective field free
Also, in conjunction with the red LED this yellow LED indicates
whether the sensor is awaiting release (restart).
Contamination *
Yellow
Red
Object in protective field
Object in warning field
Waiting for restart
1 Hz
Contamination warning *
1 Hz
Self-test negative **
1 Hz
4 Hz
4 Hz
= LED lit
= LED flashing slowly
= LED flashing rapidly
* Clean front screen with plastic cleaner and a soft cloth.
** Carry out system diagnosis (see section 9).
For PLS types 101-112 and 101-212:
Yellow LED:
The yellow LED indicates whether the warning field has been
infringed or the front screen of the sensor contaminated with
dirt. You can set which option you want in the user software. The
description of the user software, section 9.3, gives detailed information on setting the “Weak Signal” output.
PLS LEDs:
Status
Green
Yellow
Red
Protective field free
Object in protective field
Object in warning field
1 Hz
Contamination warning *
Contamination *
Self-test negative **
1 Hz
4 Hz
4 Hz
= LED lit
= LED flashing slowly
= LED flashing rapidly
* Clean front screen with plastic cleaner and a soft cloth.
** Carry out system diagnosis (see section 9).
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SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
10.3 PLS fault table
For safety reasons your PLS continuously performs self-test
routines to guarantee fault-free functioning of the unit in case of
danger. If one of these tests fails when the system is starting up
or during operation, the PLS automatically shuts down the dangerous machine or plant as a safety precaution.
This table enables you to find out what the SICK diagnosis fault
codes mean, and whether you can rectify the fault yourself. How
to execute the SICK diagnosis is described in section 9.11.
Note:
If you get a fault code which you cannot find in this table, please
contact SICK Service.
Fault code:
Cause / What you can do about it:
0
System working properly
2
Memory test failed:
Cut the power to the PLS for at least three seconds. If the problem persists, contact the SICK
Hotline.
17-20
Dirt contamination of the front screen:
Clean the front screen or replace it (note that you will need to carry out the front screen
calibration in the SICK diagnosis after replacing a screen).
23
Mutual interference between several PLS units:
Eliminate the interference by changing the PLS mounting configuration. Follow the mounting
instructions in section 7.
Motor speed incorrect:
Operating at low temperatures. Observe the specifications of the unit (see Technical data).
27
External circuitry of OSSD 1 faulty:
Check the wiring of the external circuitry. Test for short-circuit in the shutdown path to 0 Volts, to
24 Volts and to the second shutdown path. Make sure the resistive and capacitive load on the
shutdown path complies with the unit specifications. Also test the connectors and the crimping of
the cabling.
Undervoltage in power supply to unit:
Make sure the power supply to the unit complies with the specifications in the technical data.
Measure the voltage directly on the PLS, to take account of any voltage drop resulting from long
supply lines.
28
External circuitry of OSSD 2 faulty:
See error code 27
Undervoltage in power supply to unit:
See error code 27
29
Motor speed incorrect:
Operating at low temperatures. Observe the specifications of the unit (see Technical data).
41
Shutdown paths not interacting correctly:
See error codes 27 and 28
42
Sensor receiving no data over 90° of its measuring range:
To ensure fault-free functioning of the sensor, make sure it is always receiving measured data
within a range of 90°, freely adjustable within the scanning area. In area protection this is normally
always the case, so the PLS signals the fault after three seconds. In vehicle protection a condition
of this kind may occur briefly while the vehicle is moving across the hall, so the unit only signals
this fault after two hours.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
61
10.4 Service questionnaire
On the following pages you will find our Service questionnaire.
The questionnaire is designed to record all relevant data relating to any PLS laser scanner sent in to us.
Based on the information you give, we are able to take all necessary measures straight away to ensure your scanner is returned to you as soon as possible.
Please return the completed questionnaire with the scanner.
62
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
PLS Service Questionnaire
By completing the questionnaire below you will help us in carrying out fault diagnosis. As soon as we have
the following details, we will get back to you as quickly as possible. This makes efficient handling of
claims possible.
Company
_______________________________________________________________
Contact
_________________________ SICK contact _________________________
Address
_______________________________________________________________
Phone
_________________________ Fax: _________________________________
Hardware as per rating plate:
PLS model:
Order number:
Device number:
PLS _ _ _ - _ _ _
1 0__ ___
9___ ____
Software:
PLS user software version: 0_ . _ _
– Choose “About User Software” from the “Help” menu.
Sensor status:
Please enclose printout:
– Log on to the user software as an “Authorized Client”.
– Choose “Sick Diagnosis” from the “Sensor” menu.
– Select, add, execute and save the telegrams “Read sensor status”
and “Read fault memory”.
Application:
Area protection
Problem:
_______________________________________________________________
Mobile application
_______________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________
If the yellow LED is flashing rapidly (4 times per second):
– Is the voltage to the PLS power connector in the permissible range?
No
Yes
Please enter the mean voltage: ___V
If the red LED is flashing (approx. 2 times per second):
– Does the 24 V power pack of the PLS have a load capacity of at least 1.5 A ?
No
Yes
If the red LED is active:
– Where is the protective field being infringed ?
Interior
Edges
– Please describe the application and any critical ambient conditions:
________________________________________________________________________
_
_________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________ Sketch of application on back: Yes
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
No
63
11 Appendix
11.1 Characteristics
Resolution
in mm
Remission
in %
Examples of
remissions
600
400
600
400
Reflectors > 2000%
Reflectors > 300%
200
Characteristic A
Protective field
100
70
40
200
White plaster
Writing paper
100
70
40
Characteristic B
Warning field
20
10
8
6
4
10
8
6
4
2
2
1
0,1 0,2
0,5
1
2 3 4 6 10 20 30 50
Range in m
Grey card
20
Matt black paint
Black shoe leather
1
0,1 0,2
0,5
1
2 3 4 6 10 20 30 50
Range in m
Characteristics: Correlation between reflectance of object,
range and resolvable object diameter.
The given remission relates to a worst-case contaminated front
screen.
64
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
11.2 Accessories
Interface cables
Note:
If you want to deploy one or more PLS together with a LSI (Laser Scanner Interface), you will find the necessary accessories
listed in the appendix to the technical description of the LSI.
PLS variants
Order no.
PLS 101-312
1 016 066
For RS 232 (all PLS types) and for RS 422 (PLS type 101212):
Order no.
3 m interface cable
2 016 401
5 m interface cable
2 016 402
10 m interface cable
2 016 403
For RS 422 (PLS types 101-312 only):
Order no.
PLS 101-112
1 012 571
3 m interface cable
2 019 130
PLS 101-212
1 012 572
5 m interface cable
2 019 131
10 m interface cable
2 019 132
PLS 201-113
1 012 569
PLS 201-213
1 012 570
PLS 201-313
1 016 189
Mounting kits
Order no.
Mounting kit 1, incl screws for
2 015 623
Mounting kit 2, incl screws for
mounting kit 1
2 015 624
Mounting kit 3, incl screws for
mounting kits 1 and 2
2 015 625
Documentation and user software
Technical description, German, SW 3.xx / 4.xx
with user software, German
2 019 127
Technical description, English, SW 3.xx / 4.xx
with user software, English
2 019 128
Technical description, French, SW 3.xx / 4.xx
with user software, French
2 019 129
Other SICK accessories
Order no.
Power pack 24 V, 2,5 A
6 010 361
Power pack 24 V, 4 A
6 010 362
Connection set
Interface module LCU-X
1 013 410
Instead of connection set 1, which is supplied as standard, you
can order one of the connection sets 2 to 7, which include a
cable fitted to the power connector (cable outlet
upward).Various cable lengths are available:
Replacement front screen
(with seal and screws)
2 016 408
Order no.
Connection set 1, power and
interface connectors without cable
2 016 184
Connection set 2, with 3 m cable
2 016 185
Connection set 3, with 5 m cable
2 016 186
Connection set 4, with 10 m cable
2 016 187
Connection set 5, with 15 m cable
2 016 188
Connection set 6, with 20 m cable
2 016 189
Connection set 7, with 30 m cable
2 016 190
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
And also …
You can obtain the following accessories as required from computer equipment suppliers:
– Interface adapter 9-pin (plug) to 25-pin (socket):
If you want to connect a PC which only has a 25-pin serial
port connector.
– Crimping tool:
If you want to self-assemble your power and interface connectors.
Available from: Please telephone your nearest stockist.
65
11.3 Technical data
Here you will find the key technical data of the PLS.
Data lines
Note:
If you want to deploy one or more PLS together with a LSI (Laser Scanner Interface), please also take note of the technical
data of the LSI (see technical description of LSI.).
RS 232 C
RS 422 A
Protective field
Scan area
Angular resolution
Supply voltage
Range
Response time, typ.
Min. remission
Max. remission
4 m radius
Adjustable, min. 80 ms
1.8 % diffuse
Unlimited
(safe operation also on reflectors)
Resolution
Better than 70 mm (see diagram)
Output
2 x protective semiconductor outputs
PNP, 24 V / 250 mA
Load must exhibit low-pass behavior (fg: approx. 500 Hz)
Residual voltage (at 250 mA load) max. 3.4 V
Max. switching frequency 12.5 Hz
Category:
Single-fault safe,
Comparable cat. 3 to EN 954-1
PLS type 101-312: Type 3 to IEC/EN 61496-1
PLS type 101-112 and 101-213: Type 3 to EN 50100-1
Warning field
Range
Approx. 15 m radius
Remission/resolution
(See characteristic B in diagram)
Typ. for 15 m
20%, 80 mm object diameter
Output
Semiconductor output, PNP, 24 V / 100 mA
Measuring range
Range
Remission
Resolution
Distance measurement
Angular resolution
Max. 50 m
(See diagram)
± 50 mm
0.5°
Power and signal lines
PLS 101-312:
VCC_EXT
+ 24 V +20%/-30% (+ 24 V = Unom)
PLS 101-112, 101-212:
VCC_EXT
Residual ripple
OSSD
I max
Load capacitance
Short-circuit-protected
Load
Residual voltage
WEAK-SIGNAL
I max
Load
RESTART
Line length Lmax
66
+ 24 V +/-15% (+ 24 V = Unom)
500 mV (VPMS)
Transistor output PNP
250 mA
100 nF
By monitoring of outputs
Apply to GND_EXT
(at 250 mA load) max. 3.4 V
Transistor output PNP
Contamination = Low
100 mA, short-circuit-proof
Apply to GND_EXT
Apply button to VCC_EXT
30 m (with cross-section 0.5 mm2)
Transmission range max. 15 m
Transmission range max. 100 m
General data
Max. 180°
0.5°
24 V DC
via isolating transformer to EN 60 742
(also charger for conveyor vehicles)
Power consumption
≤ 17 W, plus load at outputs
(max. 24 V / 2 x 250 + 100 mA)
Laser protection class
1
Enclosure rating
IP 65, to EN 60529
Protection class
Totally insulated, protection class 2
Ambient operating temperature
0 ... + 50°C
Storage temperature
- 25 ... + 70°C
Dimensions (WxHxD)
155 mm x 185 mm x 156 mm
Measuring error
Typ. ± 50 mm
Worst case:
Max. 94 mm at 2 m distance
Max. 131 mm at 4 m distance
Interface
RS 232: PLS type 101-112
RS 422: PLS type 101-212
Universal: PLS type 101-312
Transfer rate
RS 232: 9600 Baud - 56 kBaud
RS 422: 9600 Baud - 500 kBaud
Electrical connection
Plug-in connection box
for 0.5 mm2
Crimp connection, PG 9
Sender
Infrared laser diode
Receiver opening angle
± 1°
Housing material
Die-cast aluminum
Front screen
Polycarbonate, with scratch-proof coating
EInputs
Command unit for “with restart inhibit” mode
Make contact to VCC_EXT, dynamically monitored
Humidity
DIN 40040, table 10,
code letter E (moderately dry)
Vibration
IEC 68, part 2-6, table c2
Frequency range
10 ... 150 Hz
Amplitude
0.35 mm or 5 g
Single shock
IEC 68, part 2-27, table 2
11 g / 11 ms
Continuous shock (1000)
IEC 68, part 2-29,
10 g / 16 ms
Interference immunity (EMC)
PLS 101-312 to IEC 61000-4
PLS 101-112, 101-212 to IEC 801 part 2 - part 6
Additional emission tests to:
EN 55 011
EN 55 022
EN 55 014
EN 50081 - 1/2
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
11.4 Standards and regulations
The following lists the key standards and regulations applicable
to the use of optoelectronic safety devices in Europe and in
the Federal Republic of Germany. Depending on field of application, additional regulations may be of importance for you. You
can get information on other device-specific standards from
local regulatory authorities, or from professional bodies.
If the machine or vehicle is operated in a country not belonging
to the European Union, we recommend contacting the plant
operators and the local authorities.
Regarding the use and installation of safety devices:
Maschinenrichtlinie 89 / 392 EWG
Machinery directive 89 / 392 EEC
Safety of machines – Basic terms, general design guidelines
(EN 292)
Safety of integrated manufacturing systems (DIN EN 1921)
Safety of machines – Electrical equipment on machines – Part
1: General requirements (EN 60204)
Safety of machines – Safety distances to prevent reaching hazardous areas with upper limbs (EN 294)
Safety requirements for robots (EN 775)
Safety rules for non-contact safety devices on power-driven
machinery (ZH 1/597)
Safety of machines – Arrangement of safety devices with regard
to approach speed of body parts (prEN 999)
Safety of machines - Risk assessment (prEN 1050)
Regarding construction and equipping of safety devices:
Safety of machines – Non-contact safety devices – Part 1: General requirements (prEN 50100-1 and -2 / DIN VDE 0113, part
201)
Safety of machines – Electrical equipment on machines – Part
1: General requirements (EN 60204)
Safety of machines – Safety-related components of controls –
Part 1: General design guidelines (prEN 954)
On these subjects please also order our brochure “Safe machines with optoelectronic safety devices”.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
67
68
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
69
2 Notices / Regulation Use
The PLS types 201-113, 201-213 and 201-313 are not certified as safety devices. Their use for personal protection is
therefore not permitted.
The recommendations regarding mounting apply.
3 How the PLS Works
This section applies.
4 Fields of Application – What the PLS Can Do
Not relevant.
5 Location Planning
5.1 Not relevant.
5.2 Only relevant for collision protection if danger to persons
resulting from a collision can be excluded.
6 Supply Package
This section applies.
7 Mounting the PLS
This section applies.
8 Connecting Up the PLS
Not relevant.
9 Programming the PLS with the User Software
This section applies.
10 Care and Maintenance
This section applies.
11 Appendix
Technical data: The protective field radius for these PLS
types is programmable up to 50 meters. Since the resolution dependent on the distance from the scanner is more
than 70 mm, these PLS types must not be used for personal protection. Therefore a test to EN 50100 or IEC 61496 is
also irrelevant.
The resolution of these scanners is shown in the adjacent
diagram.
Resolution
in mm
600
400
Characteristic A
Protective field
200
100
70
40
Characteristic B
Warning field
20
10
8
6
4
2
1
0,1 0,2
70
0,5
1
2 3 4 6 10 20 30 50
Range in m
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
12 Glossar
DTS
Verification of the protective field
Driverless Transport System (industrial conveyors).
To ensure the registered contour really matches the area being
protected, especially when teaching-in a protective field, it is
necessary to “show” the sensor the desired field a second
time as confirmation. This is done in the so-called verification
process, by slowly running a target board over the contour
along the inside of the protective field (toward the sensor), but
no more than 70 cm from the edge of the protective field. The
process can be tracked on-screen by following the change in
beam color from red to green.
Measurement zone
The field of vision of the PLS is its measurement zone. It is heavily dependent on the remission of the object struck, but without
special measures also extends to around 15 metres. When using heavily reflective materials the maximum range of 50 metres
is also achievable.
With the PLS the distance to objects can also be measured in
order to display them on the PC (by way of the computer interface) or to carry out any other evaluations on a computer.
Offset value
Tolerance supplement due to measuring error for full availability.
Protective field
In the “close-up zone” (radius 4 meters) the PLS offers a sensor field with fail-safe accident prevention functions in accordance with category 4 of DIN 19250 – for area protection but
also as a (non-tactile) bumper replacement.
Teach-in process
Method by which a contour is entered by running along a target
board.
Warning field
The warning field is a sensor field with a radius up to 15 meters.
It can be used to monitor larger areas and to trip simple
switching functions (e.g. warning functions) or to switch a driverless transport system to slow running.
Remission
The remission describes the diffuse reflectance of surfaces.
OSSD
The OSSD output is the switching output of the PLS. It is semiconductor-based, and its fault-free functioning is tested periodically. The PLS has two parallel-working OSSD outputs, which for
safety reasons must be evaluated on two channels.
Segmented field
Protective fields are handled in segmented form; that is to say,
a protective field consists of triangular areas touching each other at the edges of the field. You can freely select the number of
segments on which a field is based between 90 and 360. You
should note, however, that the earlier software version 3.0X was
only capable of processing 180 segments. If you program a
field with a new 3.2X user software version and view it subsequently using the old software, the display may be distorted. It
is therefore advisable to replace all old 3.0X software versions
with the new 3.2X version.
Startup testing
When the power has been connected the sensor releases the
plant only when the protective field has been purposely infringed one time.
Restart inhibit
The sensor releases the plant only after acknowledgment by
way of an externally connected command unit.
Fault memory
A code describing the occurring fault is written to the fault
memory. The code can be read-out by the SICK diagnosis system to enable fault analysis.
Sensor status
The sensor status characterizes the overall state of the system
in detail. The data it contains are required to analyze the system.
SICK Technical Description PLS – 07/98
71
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