VBrick H.264 Distributed Media Engine

VBrick H.264 Distributed Media Engine
VBrick H.264 Distributed Media Engine
VBrick DME v2.0 Admin Guide
November 22, 2011
4410-0294-0002 Rev B
Revision History
Rev
B
Date
Description
22 Nov 2011 Added "How to Use this Manual."
See Page
viii
Copyright
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
12 Beaumont Road
Wallingford, Connecticut 06492, USA
www.VBrick.com
This publication contains confidential, proprietary, and trade secret information. No part of this document may be
copied, photocopied, reproduced, translated, or reduced to any machine-readable or electronic format without
prior written permission from VBrick. Information in this document is subject to change without notice and
VBrick Systems assumes no responsibility or liability for any errors or inaccuracies. VBrick, VBrick Systems, the
VBrick logo, StreamPlayer, and StreamPlayer Plus are trademarks or registered trademarks in the United States and
other countries. Windows Media is a trademarked name of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and other
countries. All other products or services mentioned in this document are identified by the trademarks, service
marks, or product names as designated by the companies who market those products. Inquiries should be made
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VBrick products. This freely available source code is posted at http://www.vbrick.com/opensource.
About VBrick Systems
Founded in 1997, VBrick Systems, an ISO 9001 certified vendor, is a privately held company that has enjoyed rapid
growth by helping our customers successfully introduce mission critical video applications across their enterprise
networks. Since our founding, VBrick has been setting the standard for quality, performance and innovation in the
delivery of live and stored video over IP networks—LANs, WANs and the Internet. With thousands of video
appliances installed world-wide, VBrick is the recognized leader in reliable, high-performance, easy-to-use
networked video solutions.
VBrick is an active participant in the development of industry standards and continues to play an influential role in
the Internet Streaming Media Alliance (ISMA), the MPEG Industry Forum, and Internet2. In 1998 VBrick
invented and shipped the world's first MPEG Video Network Appliance designed to provide affordable DVDquality video across the network. Since then, VBrick's video solutions have grown to include Video on Demand,
Management, Security and Access Control, Scheduling, and Rich Media Integration. VBrick solutions are
successfully supporting a broad variety of applications including distance learning and training, conferencing and
remote office communications, security, process monitoring, traffic monitoring, business and news feeds to the
desktop, webcasting, corporate communications, collaboration, command and control, and telemedicine. VBrick
serves customers in education, government, healthcare, and financial services markets among others.
Contents
DME v2.0 Admin Guide
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
How this Manual is Organized . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
How to Use this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Getting Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Related Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Font Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Safety Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Environmental Awareness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
1. Introduction
DME Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
DME Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
DME Features and Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Server Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Server Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
DME Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
2. Hardware Installation
Installing the Server Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Unpack and Connect the Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Configure the DME as a VOD Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Configuring the DME in VEMs v5.x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Configuring the DME in VEMs Mystro v6.x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3. Getting Started
How it Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Planning and Preparation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
DME Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Streaming Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
VOD Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
FTP Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Caching (HTTP) Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Streaming Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Served VOD Streams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Pushed Streams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Pulled Streams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Transmuxed Streams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
VBAdmin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Home. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
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Using Apply, Revert, and Default . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
System Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Log Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Help. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
VBDirectory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
4. Configuring DME Streams
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Typical Use Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
DME Listener Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
DME Input Streams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
A – Unicast/Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
B – RTSP Announce (RTP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
C – RTSP Announce (RTP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
D – Pull (RTSP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
E – Pull (RTMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
F – Push (RTMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
G – TS In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
DME Output Streams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
H– Relay (Unicast/Multicast) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
I – Serve (RTP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
J – Relay (Unicast/Multicast) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
K – Serve TS via RTSP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
L – Serve (RTMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
M – Push (RTMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
N – Push TS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
O – Push RTP via RTSP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
P – Serve (.wmv) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Q– Create HLS (for iPod, iPhone/iPad) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
5. System Configuration
Configuration Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
IPV4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Domain Name Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
IPV6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Network Time Synchronization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Port Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Security. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
General. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
System Identification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
System Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
System Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Streaming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Caching Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
iv
Contents
Caching Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Caching Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Management SAP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Manage Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
6. Input Configuration
Flash Pull Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
TS In Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
RTP Playlists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
New Media Playlist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
7. Output Configuration
Flash Push Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
RTSP Push Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
TS Out Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
HLS Streaming Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Playlist Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
RTP Relay Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Edit Default Relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
New Relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
8. User Configuration
Username and Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Announce Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
9. Logging
Log Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
10. Monitor
System Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
RTP Connected Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Multi Protocol Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Relay Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Access History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Upgrade Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Error Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
11. Playing DME Streams
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Playing Streams via RTSP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Playing Streams with an SDP File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Playing Streams Using a Flash Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Playing HLS Streams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Playing TS Streams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
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12. Detailed Use Cases
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Configuring a Multicast Relay with a Unicast Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
H.264 Encoder Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
DME Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Configuring a Multicast Relay with an Auto-Unicast Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
H.264 Encoder Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
DME Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
13. System Maintenance
Software Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Installing Security Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Managing Disk Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Backup and Restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Please click on a help topic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
vi
Contents
DME v2.0 Admin Guide
Preface
This document explains how to configure and use VBrick's Distributed Media Engine
(DME). The DME is a versatile, highly-configurable media distribution engine that moves
streaming media to and from a wide variety sources and endpoints. It can for example take a
unicast RTP stream and multicast it to thousands of local IP users, or it can transmux and
serve the same RTP stream to RTMP (Flash) users on the Internet. The information in this
document is available with the DME documentation on the VBrick website. For the latest
technical documentation for other VBrick products, go to www.vbrick.com/documentation
Note This Admin Guide assumes that readers will have a working knowledge of network
addressing, communications protocols, and configuration concepts, as well as
hands-on experience working with streaming video products.
How this Manual is Organized
This documentation in this document is arranged as follows. Some of it is reference material;
some of it is how-to material for specific use cases. For best results, please take a few
moments to familiarize yourself with the way the information is organized and follow the
steps listed below in How to Use this Manual.
1. Introduction
provides a system overview and provides a detailed
explanation of the different DME models available. It also
has a glossary of terms that are used in this document.
2. Hardware Installation
explains how to setup and test the server hardware. It also
explains how to configure the DME as a VOD server in
VEMS.
3. Getting Started
explains how the DME works including an overview of the
major system components. It also explains how to use the
VBAdmin management program.
4. Configuring DME Streams
provides detailed use cases with step-by-step instructions
that explain how to configure DME input and output
streams for all common scenarios.
5. System Configuration
is a reference chapter. It provides a detailed description of
all of the parameters on the System Configuration page in
VBAdmin.
6. Input Configuration
explains how to configure DME input streams including
Flash Pull, TS In, and RTP Playlists.
7. Output Configuration
explains how to configure DME output streams including
Flash and RTSP Push, TS Out, HLS, and RTP Relays.
8. User Configuration
explains how to configure the DME user name and
password and the announce settings that let you push
streams into the DME.
DME Admin Guide
vii
9. Logging
explains how to enable and configure the Access History
and the Error Log.
10. Monitor
explains how to view the various status and log pages to
monitor important DME resources and tasks such as
connected users and CPU Load.
11. Playing DME Streams
explains the most common ways that DME end users can
view live and stored RTP and RTMP (Flash) streams.
12. Detailed Use Cases
shows all of the detailed steps required (on the encoder
and on the DME) to configure input and output for a
common case.
13. System Maintenance
explains how to upgrade the server when new software is
available from VBrick.
How to Use this Manual
We have tried to organize this manual in a useful and constructive manner and encourage you
to become thoroughly familiar with the information it contains before getting started. The
DME is a complex and highly-configurable product that can be used to transmux and stream
video in a variety of different ways. For best results, we recommend you use this manual as
follows:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Read the introduction and install the hardware as explained in the Introduction and
Hardware Installation chapters. Be sure to read the DME Glossary.
Carefully review the Getting Started chapter. Pay particular attention to How it Works
and Planning and Preparation.
Carefully review the Configuring DME Streams chapter. Find the input and output use
cases that are appropriate for your site and follow the step-by-step instructions.
While configuring your DME inputs and outputs, refer to the reference chapters (for
example System Configuration or Input Configuration) for detailed information about
each configurable parameter.
If you run into trouble, see the Logging and Monitor chapters for help with finding
errors or troubleshooting problems. If you experience unexpected behavior, see the
DME Release Notes for caveats that may apply.
For step-by-step procedures that fully explain the encoder setup and the DME setup for
multicast relays, see the Detailed Use Cases chapter.
Getting Help
If you can't find the information you need in this document, or from your reseller, you can
contact VBrick Support Services on the web, by e-mail, or by calling 1-203 303-0222. For
faster service, be sure to have your VBrick product serial number or support contract
number. Support Services can usually answer your technical questions in 24 business hours or
less. Note that all VBrick documentation is posted on the web. For more information about
any VBrick product, go to www.vbrick.com/documentation
Related Publications
VBrick H.264 Encoder Admin Guide
VBrick 5.x Portal Server Admin Guide
viii
Welcome
VBrick 6.x Portal Server Admin Guide
Font Conventions
Arial bold is used to
Programs > VBrick
describe dialog boxes and menu choices, for example: Start > All
Courier fixed-width font
is used for scripts, code examples, or keyboard commands.
Courier bold fixed-width font
is used for user input in scripts, code examples, or keyboard
commands.
This bold black font is used to strongly emphasize important words or phrases.
Folder names and user examples in text
User input in text
are displayed in this sans serif font.
is displayed in this bold sans serif font.
Italics are used in text to emphasize specific words or phrases.
Safety Precautions
There is always a danger present when using electronic equipment. Unexpected high voltages
can be present at unusual locations in defective equipment and signal distribution systems.
Become familiar with the equipment and observe the following precautions:
•
•
•
•
•
Every precaution has been taken in the design of your system to ensure that it is as safe
as possible. However, safe operation depends on you.
Always be sure your equipment is in good working order. Ensure that all points of
connection are secure to the chassis and that protective covers are in place.
Never work alone when working in hazardous conditions. Always have another person
close by in case of an accident.
Always refer to the manual for safe operation. If you have a question about the
application or operation call VBrick for assistance.
Never allow your equipment to be exposed to water or high moisture environments. If
exposed to a liquid, remove power and send unit to be serviced by a qualified technician.
Environmental Awareness
At VBrick, we believe that the same ethics and principles that guide our daily business
decisions should be applied to our communities and to the environment. Running our
company with a "green" conscience is good for the environment and good for business. We
design superior quality, high performance, and energy-efficient products. We're working to
conserve energy and reduce waste and are exploring how we can contribute to sustainable
energy development. You can help by recycling batteries and other consumables and by
finding new and better ways to protect and preserve our environment.
DME Admin Guide
ix
x
Welcome
Chapter 1
Introduction
Topics in this chapter
DME Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
DME Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
DME Overview
The VBrick H.264 Distributed Media Engine (DME) simplifies delivery of high definition
video and other rich media content across multi-site enterprises and campus environments. If
properly configured, you can simultaneously input multiple streams (of different types) into
the DME and output them as the same stream types or as different stream types. For example
you can input RTP and TS (transport streams) into the DME and output those same streams
as RTMP (Flash) or HLS (for Apple iOS devices). The DME also provides video content
caching, storage, and serving to ensure that stored content is delivered from a DME as close
to the end user as possible.
The Distributed Media Engine, typically deployed at the network edge, is a single integrated
platform which provides media redistribution, media transformation and video-on-demand
content storage. The DME accepts multiple H.264 media streams from multiple central sites
and redistributes that content to diverse endpoints including PCs/MACs, mobile phones and
televisions/monitors. This one integrated platform optimizes WAN bandwidth use,
simplifies endpoint support and offers local storage of centrally managed content.
The Distributed Media Engine is offered on a choice of three robust hardware platforms, all
leveraging VBrick's experience building high performance, low touch, appliances. Requiring
only a web browser interface for management, the H.264 DME seamlessly integrates as a
distributed element within the VBrick enterprise IP video platform. This includes working in
concert with a central VBrick Enterprise Management System (VEMS) to intelligently store
and serve content from a local DME. Deploying the H.264 Distributed Media Engine assures
users of access to high definition quality video on both fixed and mobile endpoints, even if
they are located across campus or across the world.
Figure 1. DME Model 7550 Server
DME Admin Guide
1
DME Applications
The H.264 Distributed Media Engine is deployed on the network edge to support endpoints
requiring RTP or RTMP (Flash) streams as well as firewall-friendly HTTP progressive
downloads. It supports enhanced scalability and performance across the VBrick suite of
applications including:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Meeting and Event Broadcasting – Provides ubiquitous access to high quality broadcasts
and corresponding rich media content at the network edge.
Training and Lecture Capture – Flash streaming and progressive download via HTTP
allow for distribution of content to a wide variety of clients including mobile devices.
Television Distribution – Simplifies multicast distribution at remote buildings or
locations that might not be connected by multicast enabled WAN connections.
Enterprise YouTube® – Local content storage reduces burden on WAN.
Surveillance & Monitoring – Deliver more content to diverse endpoints over challenging
or far flung network environments.
Digital Signage – Enhanced performance for greater scalability.
DME Features and Benefits
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
2
Bandwidth Conservation – Redistribute high quality, live or on-demand, media via RTP
multicast; enables more end users to share a single media stream. Leveraging multicast
eliminates the need to incrementally scale network bandwidth to support more viewers.
Media Transformation – Stream high quality H.264 content once and leverage the DME
at distributed locations to deliver multiple formats (RTP, RTMP Flash, and/or HTTP
progressive download) to reach multiple types of endpoints.
Mobile Device Support – Enables delivery of live H.264 content to mobile devices as
Flash video or supports HTTP progressive download of video-on-demand content.
Intelligent Central Management – Content is created once and then intelligently managed
by the VBrick Enterprise Media System (VEMS) regardless of the location. Stored
content is appropriately distributed to local DMEs so users have faster access to
frequently viewed content without the need to contend with constrained WAN or
Internet links.
Robust Appliance Design – Requiring only a web browser for management, the DME
eliminates the need to separately manage patches and security updates on commercial
server operating systems.
Secure – Designed to meet the security requirements of demanding government
information assurance policies.
Firewall Friendly – Supports video on demand content via HTTP download; eliminating
barriers imposed by network security policies.
Enhanced User Experience – Increases user adoption and impact by assuring
outstanding picture quality and response from video applications. The DME easily
accommodates increased user demand without degrading performance or the user
experience.
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Introduction
Table 1. DME – Supported Protocols
Protocol
Description
Incoming
• RTSP Announce
• RTP Over UDP (with RTCP) Unicast and
Multicast
• RTP over TCP (with RTCP) Unicast Only
• RTP over UDP (SDP file delivered via FTP)
• FTP for VOD file transfer
• RTMP via RTMP Push over TCP
• Transport Stream (MPEG2TS delivery of H.264
audio and video content)
Outgoing
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Management
• HTTP/HTTPS for management
• IGMPv3
RTP via RTSP (stream)
UDP, TCP Interleaved, and HTTP Tunneled
RTP via RTSP (relay - Push)
UDP, TCP Interleaved using Announce
RTMP (stream and relay)
HTTP (progressive download)
TS (transport stream)
HLS
Caching Server
Server Models
VBrick currently supports the shelf and rack-mount models shown in Table 2 and the blade
model shown in Table 3. There are no absolute rules for sizing a multipurpose device like the
DME but there are some basic guidelines that can help you select the right model. The
smaller Model 7530 (Figure 2) does not offer redundant power supplies or redundant VOD
storage so if these attributes are important, you should consider the larger models. The
Model 7530 is shelf mount only while the larger models are rack mount 1U and 2U servers.
Users seeking significant VOD content playback should consider one of the two larger
models. The RAID arrays built into the Models 7550 and 7570 are much more powerful and
better suited for frequent requests than for concurrent VOD playback. The single drive on
the Model 7530 is well suited for small to medium offices that have occasional VOD
demands.
Figure 2. DME Model 7530
All of the models have excellent throughput performance and are designed to manage
occasional traffic bursts that exceed recommended performance characteristics. The
DME Admin Guide
3
throughput recommendations are based on a combination of input and output. For example,
a Model 7530 (with 100 Mbps throughput) can support four 1 Mbps streams in and reflect
out 96 1 Mbps unicast streams of RTP or Flash (any combination that equals 100 Mbps).
Also keep in mind that one multicast stream out counts as a single stream from a bandwidth
perspective, regardless of how many users are watching.
Note You can only multicast RTP streams; Flash streams cannot be multicast. All DME
models have a limit of 1000 concurrent users regardless of throughput.
Table 2. DME Rack Mount Models Specifications
DME Model 7530
DME Model 7550
DME Model 7570
Description
BPS
XPS
HPS
Model Number
8000-0222-0000
8000-0223-0000
8000-0224-0000
Concurrent Users 50
500
1000
Max Throughput
100 Mbps
250 Mbps
500 Mbps
CPU
Intel i5
Intel Xeon
Intel Xeon
Memory
4 GB
4 GB
4 GB
Content Storage
(1) 250 GB
(4) 146 GB RAID 5 (6) 300 GB RAID 5
Chassis
Shelf Mount
1RU - Rack Mount
2RU - Rack Mount
Network
Gigabit Ethernet
Gigabit Ethernet
Gigabit Ethernet
Server OS
Embedded
Embedded
Embedded
Power Supplies
102 watt
Redundant 502 watt Redundant 570 watt
Dimensions
Height = 3.8 in
Width = 8.7 in
Depth = 12.9 in
Height = 1.68 in
Width = 8.99 in
Depth = 30.39 in
Height = 3.4 in
Width = 17.44 in
Depth = 26.8 in
Weight
10 lbs
39 lbs
57.5 lbs
Table 3. DME Blade Model Specifications
Processor
Intel T7500 Core 2 Duo processor
Memory
• 4 GB of cache memory
• 4 GB of Flash memory and
• 250 GB hard drive (210 GB of content storage)
Network Bandwidth
Two internal 10-GbE ports to the switch backplane
Power Supplies
Blade leverages the redundant power supplies of ProCurve switch.
Network Connections
Two redundant internal 10-GbE connections between the switch
and the blade.
Server Compatibility
Table 4 shows DME compatibility with other VBrick products:
4
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Introduction
Table 4. DME Compatibility
VBrick Product
Compatible With Version †
VEMS Mystro™ Portal Server
6.0.1
VEMS Portal Server
5.4
H.264 Encoding Appliance
3.0 (RTP)
H.264 Encoding Appliance
3.1 (RTP, RTMP)
H.264 Decoding Appliance
3.0
† Use version shown or higher.
Technical Support
If you can't find the information you need from the documentation or your reseller, you can
contact VBrick Support Services on the web. The Support Services website has downloads,
FAQs, documentation, support guidelines, and an on-line form you can use to submit
questions. VBrick will make every effort to answer your technical questions in 24 business
hours or less.
Figure 3. VBrick On-Line Support Page
DME Glossary
For best results, please take a few minutes to familiarize your self with the glossary items
listed below. These technical terms are used throughout this document.
DME Admin Guide
5
6
Auto Unicast
A transmitter mode that allows an encoder to "automatically" establish and
maintain a connection with a streaming server like Quicktime or Darwin.
The stream is pushed to a configured publishing point external clients can
connect to retrieve the stream.
DASH
Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP. DASH is a multimedia
streaming technology where a multimedia file is partitioned into one or
more segments and delivered to a client using HTTP.
DME
Distributed Media Engine is an integrated platform that provides media
redistribution, media transformation and video-on-demand content
storage.
caching server
The DME caching server serves HLS (HTTP Live Streaming) content to
Apple iOS devices like iPads and iPhones. HLS content is cached at
remote locations so that subsequent requesting clients can acquire it
locally.
FMS
Flash Media Server is a proprietary data and media server from Adobe
Systems. This server works with the Flash Player runtime to create media
driven, multiuser Rich Internet Applications.
Flash
Multimedia platform used to add video and interactivity to web pages.
Flash uses RTMP and is a proprietary Adobe technology.
FMLE
Adobe Flash Media Live Encoder is a media encoder appliance that
streams audio and video in realtime to an Adobe Flash Media Server.
FTP Server
The DME uses File Transfer Protocol to populate the DME with files for
progressive download.
HLS
HTTP Live Streaming is Apple's HTTP streaming protocol for QuickTime
and iPhone. It breaks the stream into small HTTP-based files so that the
client can select from a number of different streams containing the same
material encoded at a variety of data rates, thus allowing the streaming
session to adapt to the available data rate.
HTTP Server
The DME has an internal web server that serves VOD files via progressive
download.
ICP
Internet Cache Protocol coordinates multiple web caches. It finds the
most appropriate location to retrieve a requested object when multiple
caches are in use at a single site. The goal is to minimize the number of
remote requests to the originating server.
multicast
A highly-efficient streaming mechanism wherein one stream is sent to
multiple clients without impacting available bandwidth. Multicast is a
one-to-many connection between client and server. Used only in local IP
networks (not the Internet); requires support from a switch. See unicast.
progressive
download
Progressive download is a method of delivering audio and video that
involves caching and playing the downloaded portion of a file while a
download is still in progress via FTP. The files are downloaded—not
streamed.
pull
The mechanism whereby a video stream is requested, and pulled, from an
RTP server (e.g. QuickTime or Darwin), an RTMP server (e.g. Wowza or
FMS), or another VBrick DME.
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Introduction
push
The mechanism whereby an RTP or RTMP stream is continuously pushed
to a configured destination.
RTMP
Real Time Messaging Protocol is a proprietary protocol developed by
Adobe for streaming audio and video over the Internet, between a Flash
player and a Flash server. The DME has an internal RTMP server for
Flash files. Wowza and FMS are also RTMP servers.
RTP
Real Time Transport Protocol is the Internet-standard protocol for the
transport of realtime audio and video over the web. The DME has an
internal RTP server. Darwin, QuickTime, and VBrick VOD-W streaming
servers are RTP servers.
RTSP
Real Time Streaming Protocol is a network control protocol used to
control streaming media servers. RTSP defines the control sequences in
streaming playback and uses TCP to maintain an end-to-end streaming
connection.
SDP
Session Description Protocol. A standard which provides information
about the timing and format of a live RTP stream and provides
information on how to tune into the stream. It can be provided as part of
a session creation in a protocol such as RTSP or as a text file with a .sdp
extension.
Squid
Publicly available caching engine that supports content acquisition from a
parent and/or multiple peers. It speeds delivery by caching requested
content on a DME closer to the requesting client.
transmux
The process whereby a digital bit stream is converted from one file format
or streaming protocol to another—without changing the compression
method. An example of transmuxing is when a unicast stream is converted
to multicast or when an RTP stream is converted to RTMP.
transport
stream (TS)
MPEG transport stream (MPEG2TS) is a standard format for
transmission and storage of audio and video. Transport Stream specifies a
container format encapsulating packetized elementary streams, with error
correction and stream synchronization features for maintaining
transmission integrity when the signal is degraded.
unicast
A bandwidth-intensive streaming mechanism wherein a separate and
complete video stream is sent to each requesting client. Unicast is a
one-to-one connection between the client and the server. See multicast.
VBAdmin
An integrated management interface that lets you manage the DME
configuration from an external web browser.
VBDirectory
A proprietary VBrick application used to auto-discover VBrick devices
(including DMEs) on a local IP network. It is available on the VBrick
Downloads page for new customers and is automatically installed when
you perform an upgrade.
VBDME
Download
A proprietary VBrick application used to perform a software upgrade on
DME appliances.
VEMS
VBrick's flagship VBrick Enterprise Media System is an integrated
solution that delivers both live and on-demand audio and video over an
IP-based infrastructure. It provides access to a dynamic viewing portal,
scheduling and administrative controls, and a media management engine.
DME Admin Guide
7
8
VEMS Mystro
VEMS Mystro is VBrick's modular enterprise media management system.
Mystro's unique widget-based streaming design lets you personalize and
embed IP video in any communications environment such as unified
communications, learning management, or mobile devices.
VOD
Video-on-demand files are stored streams that can be played from the
DME's FTP server via progressive download.
Wowza
The Wowza Media Server is a proprietary platform that serves multiple
protocols and files.
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Chapter 2
Hardware Installation
Topics in this chapter
Installing the Server Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Configure the DME as a VOD Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Installing the Server Hardware
The installation of the DME server is straightforward. Unpack and inspect the server and
connect the cables as described in the high-level overview on the following pages. As noted,
all software is pre-installed and no additional software installation is required. For complete
installation instructions, please refer to the manufacturer's documentation that was shipped
with your server. Server models 7550 and 7570 are shipped on Dell platforms. You may wish
to refer to the following documents for a detailed technical overview.
Dell PowerEdge R610 Technical Guidebook
Dell PowerEdge R710 Technical Guidebook
Unpack and Connect the Server
Each shipment includes a complete DME server with all power cords and cables.
T
To set up the DME server:
1.
Connect the monitor, keyboard, mouse, and network cables as described below.
Figure 4. DME Model 7550 (Dell R610 – Rear View)
Figure 5. DME Model 7570 (Dell R710 – Rear View)
DME Admin Guide
9
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
If rack mounting the unit, mount the DME server in the rack, using the rack mount kit
provided.
Connect the DME server to the network by plugging the 10/100/1000 BaseT Ethernet
cable into the Ethernet port 1 on the rear of the unit.
Connect the monitor cable to the blue video port (front or rear) on the DME server.
Turn the monitor on.
Connect a mouse and keyboard to any available USB ports (front or rear) on the DME
server.
Plug the DME server into a power source, using the power cords provided. (All VOD
servers have redundant power supplies, each with its own cord.)
Turn the DME server's main power on by pressing the power switch at the front of unit.
Figure 6. DME Model 7550 (Dell R610 – Front View)
Figure 7. DME Model 7570 (Dell R710 – Front View)
8.
The DME server will boot and automatically load using the default settings. Wait 5–8
minutes for the unit to fully power up. As new hardware is attached (for example a
keyboard and mouse) the operating system will automatically find and install the drivers.
Note The DME ships with DHCP enabled and you can use VBDirectory to auto discover
any DMEs in your network. The Login topic explains how to login to the DHCP
address. The IPV4 topic explains how to set a static IP address.
To manage the DME with the VBAdmin web interface, you must have IP access to the
network where the DME is located. Then you can use the VBDirectory management
application to discover and display the name, IP address, and software revision of all VBrick
devices on your network, including DMEs. By default, the DME sends management
information about itself via multicast so a multicast-enabled network is required.
VBDirectory listens for Management Announcements from VBrick devices on the network
and is available free of charge from the Downloads page on the VBrick website. You can also
find the IP address of the DME by connecting a monitor to the blue VGA port (Models 7550
and 7570) or the DVI port (Model 7530) of the DME. The IP address will be displayed at
start-up.
10
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Hardware Installation
Configure the DME as a VOD Server
Optional. When used with VEMS, the DME functions as a VOD server. VEMS will auto
discover all stored content on the DME and make it searchable in VEMS. If you will be using
a DME in this manner server, it must be configured in the VEMS Portal Server before it is
recognized as part of the VEMS system.
Configuring the DME in VEMs v5.x
T
To configure the DME on a VEMS 5.x Portal Server:
1.
2.
Launch VEMS Portal Server and login as an administrator.
Go to Global Settings > Servers and select DME-Media Engine from the dropdown list.
Figure 8. Portal Server 5.x (Add/Modify VOD/FTP Servers)
3.
4.
Enter the IP or Domain , Server Description (optional), FTP User Name (default = admin )
and FTP Password (default = admin ).
Accept the default Publishing Point parameters and click Add when done.
Sync DME with Portal Server
Once the DME is configured in VEMS, the Portal Server will auto discover any VOD
content on the DME. It may take up to 20 minutes before the DME content is available
unless you manually sync the DME server with the Portal Server.
T
1.
To manually sync the DME server with the VEMS Portal Server:
Launch the VEMS Portal Server admin tool and go to Global Settings > Global
Assignments > Assign VOD Polling Interval .
2.
Click Sync Now. Do not change anything else and exit when done.
DME Admin Guide
11
Adding Live DME Streams
The Portal Server can play live streams served from a DME if the URIs are provided to the
VEMS in one of two ways:
•
•
If the stream is sourced from a VBrick H.264 appliance, the URI of the stream can be
automatically provided to the Portal Server server using an external announcement. See
the "Announce Settings" topic in the VBrick H.264 Encoder Admin Guide for details.
The URI can be added manually as a live URL. See the "URLs > Add/Modify a URL for
a Live Video Stream" topic in the Portal Server 5.x Admin Guide for details.
Configuring the DME in VEMs Mystro v6.x
T
To configure the DME on a VEMS Mystro 6.x Portal Server:
1.
2.
Launch VEMS Portal Server and login as an administrator.
Go to Devices > Stored Servers and click Add New Server.
a. On the Server Information page, enter a user-friendly name, a brief description, and
click Submit.
b. On the Entry Points tab, enter the Hostname or IP address.
c. On the Publishing Points tab, click Add New Publishing Point .
Figure 9. Mystro Portal Server 6.x (Stored Server Administration)
3.
4.
From the Type dropdown select DME.
Fill in the remaining fields as appropriate and click Submit when done. In most cases you
can use the defaults. For more information see the Portal Server 6.x Admin Guide.
Refresh Stored Content
Once the DME is configured in VEMS, the Portal Server will auto discover any VOD
content on the DME at a configured interval.
12
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Hardware Installation
T
1.
To force an immediate refresh of stored content on the Portal Server:
Launch the VEMS Portal Server admin pages and go to System Settings > Task
Scheduler.
2.
Find Refresh Stored Content on the Current Tasks page and click Run .
Adding Live DME Streams
The Portal Server can play live streams served from a DME if the URIs are provided to the
VEMS in one of two ways:
•
•
If the stream is sourced from a VBrick H.264 appliance, the URI of the stream can be
automatically provided to the Portal Server server using an external announcement. See
the "Announce Settings" topic in the VBrick H.264 Encoder Admin Guide for details.
The URI can be added manually as a live URL. See the "Live Entered URLs" topic in the
Portal Server 6.x Admin Guide for details.
DME Admin Guide
13
14
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Chapter 3
Getting Started
Topics in this chapter
How it Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Planning and Preparation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
DME Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Streaming Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
VBAdmin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
VBDirectory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
How it Works
The VBrick DME is a multi-faceted platform that performs a variety of serving, reflecting,
and transmuxing (i.e. transcoding) features. In a typical application, a DME receives a unicast
stream over the WAN link (often over TCP) to effectively traverse the LAN and pass through
firewalls. The DME then streams via unicast and/or multicast to a variety of different clients
in the streaming protocol of choice for each client. To conserve bandwidth, reflectors can be
linked across the WAN to relay video streams from one remote site to multiple downstream
DME reflectors. The net effect is that a single unicast stream across the WAN can reach tens
of thousands of viewers. To improve reliability, reflectors can either pull or push streams
across the WAN using TCP. If a network outage occurs, the DMEs will automatically
reconnect and resume streaming without any user intervention. The DME is comprised of
the major components shown in Figure 10.
To reach different classes of clients (e.g. PCs, STBs, and mobile devices), a single stream of
H.264-encoded multi-bitrate (MBR) video can work in concert with reflectors to distribute
streams in the most efficient manner. Reflectors can also transmux video streams, converting
from one type of transport stream on the input to another type of transport on the output. In
transmuxing, a digital bit stream is converted from one file format or streaming protocol to
another—without changing the compression method. An example of transmuxing is when a
unicast stream is converted to multicast or when an RTP stream is converted to RTMP.
H.264 offers a variety of transport protocols to ensure the reliable delivery of video over a
variety of networks. For live broadcasts, the Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) is efficient,
while the Real-time Streaming Protocol (RTSP) offers the player controls (fast forward,
rewind) needed for VOD playback. Newer transport protocols like RTMP (for Flash) and
HTTP are optimized for Internet clients and mobile devices.
Planning and Preparation
The DME provides a powerful way to redistribute media by allowing you to reach multiple/
remote locations and multiple users with minimal use of streaming bandwidth. Streams can
be converted from unicast to multicast or delivered as Flash streams from a RTP source
(Flash multicast is not supported as yet). Since the DME accepts multiple types of input
streams and provides multiple ways to output streams, it may not be entirely clear which use
DME Admin Guide
15
cases apply to you and what is the simplest way to deploy your solution using the DME. The
best way to determine how to use the DME effectively is to understand three basic factors:
•
•
•
How you will be delivering media to the DME. This is typically determined by how your
media is currently being created, for example as RTP, RTMP, etc.
How your clients will be viewing content from the DME and with what players, for
example with StreamPlayer, QuickTime, etc.
Which firewalls, virtual networks, proxies, encryption systems, etc. are in place that will
need to be traversed and/or reconfigured.
Once you have a better understanding of these issues you are ready to start considering what
type of input streams you will have (RTP or RTMP) and how will they be distributed. For
example they can be pushed to the DME, pulled from the DME, or by unannounced unicast
from the source or an announced auto-unicast to the DME. You will also know how your
clients will be viewing the content, for example as RTP, RTMP, or both, using a standalone
player, an embedded web page, or through VBrick's VEMS Portal Server. You will also know
whether or not the content needs to be relayed to another remote DME. Finally, knowing
how many users you have and the bandwidth consumed by each will help to clarify how many
DMEs and which models you will need to distribute the streams. By gathering this
information in advance, and reading this manual carefully, you can help to ensure a successful
deployment of the DME in your own unique environment.
To help you understand the various options available, Configuring DME Streams on page 27
defines a number of typical use cases—not all of which will apply to you. The use cases can
help to simplify the configuration. They can help, for example to avoid deploying a simple
solution in an overly complex way. In other cases you may also choose one method for one
requirement, and have to choose a different method for a second requirement, meaning you
will have two input streams when one could just as easily be used for both.
Firewalls can also play an important role in determining which use cases are appropriate.
When no firewalls apply, a push or an auto unicast solution can be easily deployed. However
if the DME is behind a firewall, you probably cannot reach it with a push without having to
reconfigure the firewall. Similarly, you can probably pull a stream from a source into the
DME. However if the source is also behind a firewall, more network planning, such as
placing the DME in a "DMZ" (which the source can push to and the destination can pull
from) may be a better solution. If virtual IP addresses are used, you will need to know more
about the configuration of the network; and if deploying RTP streams that will travel over
UDP, your firewall may need to be configured to allow UDP data in and out.
DME Components
Streaming Servers
As shown in Figure 10, the DME has an RTP server, a Multi Protocol server, and an HTTP
server for progressive download. Each of these servers supports specific types on inputs and
outputs which are described in detail on the following pages. For example, as shown in
Figure 15 on page 27, the Multi Protocol streaming server supports multiple input methods
and multiple output methods. The streaming servers and the VOD servers are built on a
robust embedded operating system.
16
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Getting Started
VBrick DME: Live Streaming and VOD Reflecting
RTP
Streaming
Server
Multi Protocol
Streaming
Server
Caching
(HTTP)
Server
FTP
Server
Live and
RTP VOD
Live, RTMP
VOD, TS,
RTP, HLS
HTTP VOD
(Progressive
Download)
File Transfer
SAP, SSH,
Other
Embedded OS
Figure 10. DME Server Components
VOD Servers
The DME engine includes an RTP VOD server, a Multi Protocol VOD server, and an HTTP
Progressive Download server. All stored VOD files are added to the DME via FTP. The
VOD servers support all of the file types shown Table 5.
Table 5. Supported VOD File Types
VOD Server
Supported File Types
RTP
mp4, mpg, m4a, m4v
Multi Protocol
flv, f4v, mp4, mov, m4a, m4v (H.264)
HTTP
all available files
FTP Server
The DME has a fully functional web server that uses File Transfer Protocol to populate the
DME with files for progressive download. You can FTP to the FTP folder on the DME or to
a subfolder. When adding VOD files via FTP, you must wait for the ingestion to complete
before the stream will play in VEMS. You can view the ingestion progress on the Status page
in the VEMS client. If the ingestion is not complete, the title will display but the stream will
not play.
Caching (HTTP) Server
The DME has an internal web server that serves VOD files via progressive download. It also
serves HLS (HTTP Live Streaming) content (via the built-in caching server) to Apple iOS
devices like iPads and iPhones. The HLS content is cached at remote locations so that
subsequent requesting clients can acquire the content that is cached on a local server. See
Caching Overview on page 58 for more about the caching server.
Streaming Overview
Depending on how it is configured, the DME can receive or pull from an encoder, a Flash
server, or another DME; it can also serve streams or push streams to an RTMP server or to
another DME. The DME supports unicast and/or multicast for both input and output.
Unicast streams typically have one source and one destination; most network traffic between
DME Admin Guide
17
clients and servers is unicast. Multicast packets however have a single source and multiple
destinations. Instead of sending out individual unicast packets to each client, a single stream
of multicast packets can be viewed by multiple clients. This can save substantial network
bandwidth when multiple clients are accessing the same stream.
Served VOD Streams
The DME has an RTP server, an RTMP server, and an HTTP Progressive Download server
for stored VOD files (including Windows Media files). In server mode, a served stream does
not become active on the network until requested by a client. The client may be a software
player like StreamPlayer or QuickTime running on a PC or a Macintosh, or it can be a set top
box like the VBrick Multi Format set top box. The user requests a stream from the DME by
directing the client to issue an RTSP/RTMP request via a URL to the DME. The client and
the DME then exchange a sequence of RTSP/RTMP messages to direct the DME to send
the program to the client. The DME server examines the file to determine Transport Type,
Video Rate, Audio Rate, and other parameters. It then plays the stream using optimal settings
adjusted for bandwidth, frame rate, etc.
Note New content files that are transferred via FTP will not be available immediately for
VOD RTMP streaming until the associated seek and meta files are generated. Meta
and seek files are typically generated within a few minutes of being transferred.
Table 6. Supported Stored Stream Types/Players
Players
Stream Types
Delivered via:
WM Player iPhone, QuickTime QuickTime Flash StreamPlayer, Silverlight/
iPad
MAC
PC
Player VB MAC Player Smooth Stream
Windows Media Progressive
(wmv, wma, asf) Download
Yes
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Flv, m4v
Progressive
Download
No
No
No
No
Yes
No
No
Flv, m4v
RTMP,
RTMPT
No
No
No
No
Yes
No
No
MP4 (H.264)
Progressive
Download
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
MP4 (H.264)
RTMP,
RTMPT
No
No
No
No
Yes
No
No
MP4 (H.264)
RTSP
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
MPG, TS
(H.264)
RTSP
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
HLS file
DASH
(m3u8 manifest)
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
Smooth
Streaming files
(ism manifest)
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
DASH
Pushed Streams
The DME also pushes live streams to a configured destination. The destination may be a
single endpoint in the case of a unicast, or multiple endpoints in the case of multicast. The
18
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Getting Started
transmitter does not directly depend on a client to initiate the streaming but is always
transmitting (in the case of multicast) and transmits if the client is reachable and listening (in
the case of unicast). The streams are transmitted across the network via RTP or RTMP. Note
that RTMP is a unicast-only protocol.
Pulled Streams
The RTMP Streaming Server can pull live streams from an RTP server or an RTMP server. It
can pull from various outside sources, for example from another DME, or from a Wowza,
FMS, QuickTime, or Darwin streaming server. These streams can then be served or pushed
via RTMP.
Transmuxed Streams
Transmuxing is the process whereby a digital bit stream is converted from one file format or
streaming protocol to another—without changing the compression method (as opposed to
transcoding which actually changes the compression method). The DME transmuxes streams;
it does not transcode streams. An example of transmuxing is when a unicast stream is
converted to multicast or when an RTP stream is converted to RTMP. The following table
shows the live input streams that are supported in the left column and the live output streams
that are supported in the top row. Note that some transmuxing functionality (streams shown
with R2 or R3) will be available in a future DME release.
Table 7. Live Transmux Capabilities
DME Input Streams
DME Output Streams
RTMP RTMP RTP
RTP
RTP
RTP
TS
TS
TS
Apple
Unicast Auto- Unicast Auto- Unicast
Multicast Unicast Unicast
Multicast HLS
Pull
Unicast Push
Unicast RTSP Pull
Push
RTSP Pull
VC
SIP
(R3)
RTMP
Unicast Pull
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
RTMP AutoUnicast
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
RTP Unicast
Push
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
RTP AutoUnicast
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
RTP Unicast
RTSP Pull
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
RTP Multicast Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
TS Unicast
Push
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
TS Unicast
RTSP Pull
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
TS Multicast
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Apple HLS
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
No
(Cache)
VC SIP (R3)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
R3 – Scheduled for future release (DME v3.0)
DME Admin Guide
19
VBAdmin
The VBrick DME server has an integrated management interface (VBAdmin) that lets you
manage the DME configuration from an external web browser. This allows network
managers to remotely configure and monitor the appliances from virtually any location that
has web access. The most convenient way to access the VBAdmin interface is via the
VBDirectory utility. After installing VBDirectory you will see the screen shown in Figure 14
on page 25. Locate a specific DME and simply double-click on the Name to launch the
VBAdmin Login. To optimize the functionality of this tool, set the Host Name of the DME
(on the System Configuration > Network page) to a meaningful text string during initial
configuration.
Alternatively, if you know the DME’s IP address, you can access it directly from a browser.
As shown in Table 8 you can launch VBAdmin in Internet Explorer or Firefox (other
browsers are not supported by VBrick). You connect to VBAdmin by pointing to the IP
Address and Port Number (for example: http://192.168.5.5:8181 ) of the DME and logging
in with valid credentials. Note that the DME’s management interface is not on Port 80. By
default the admin port for the DME is 8181. This allows Port 80 to be reserved for HTTP
downloads.
Table 8. Supported Browsers
Browser
Version
Microsoft Internet Explorer
8.0 or higher
Mozilla Firefox
3.6 or higher
Login
The DME ships with DHCP enabled and you can use VBDirectory to auto discover the IP
addresses any DMEs in your network. The VBDirectory application (which you can install on
a local PC) is provided free of charge. It is available on the VBrick Downloads page for new
customers and is automatically installed when you perform an upgrade. Once you know the
DME's IP address, you can login by entering the server's IP address or host name, and the
management port (8181), in the address bar of your browser. When the login page is
displayed, enter a valid User Name (default = admin) and Password (default = admin) to
launch the VBAdmin management interface. A typical login URL would have the following
format:
http://172.22.2.50:8181
To log out of the application, click Log Out in the navigation panel on the left. As a security
measure, if no keyboard activity is detected for 20 minutes, VBAdmin will automatically
timeout and display the Login page. It is highly recommended that you use the Username and
Password page in VBAdmin to change the user name and password after logging in for the
first time. The user name and password cannot exceed 20 characters.
Note Administrators should be aware that the DME’s management interface is not on Port 80 as
is typical for most web-based admin tools. By default the admin port for the DME is
8181. This allows Port 80 to be reserved for HTTP downloads.
20
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Getting Started
Figure 11. VBAdmin Login Page
Home
The DME "Home" page (Figure 12) has the Configuration Menu on the left and a read-only
snapshot showing the health of the system on the right. Within the Configuration Menu, the
System Configuration pages let you access all configurable DME parameters; the Monitor
pages show important status information. The Configuration Menu also lets you log out or
get online help. The read-only snapshot fields on the right side of the home page are
explained below.
Note Be aware that the VBAdmin pages (including the home page) are not automatically
refreshed. To update the page with the latest information, use the refresh or reload
button on your browser.
Figure 12. DME Home Page
DME Admin Guide
21
Status
Day, date, and time (hh:mm:ss) the server was last reset.
Current Time on Server
System Time (as set on System Configuration > General page.
Up Time
Aggregate up time since the last server reset.
Application Code Revision
DME software code revision currently installed.
RTMP Server Version
RTMP server software code revision.
OS Registration Number
OS registration number.
RTP CPU Load
Current processing load on RTP server.
RTMP CPU Load
Current processing load on RTMP server.
Total CPU Load
Total CPU load as a percentage of available resource.
Current # of Connections
Total number of clients currently connected.
Current Throughput
Current throughput in bits/sec.
Multi Protocol Connections Current number of input and output multi protocol
Count
connections.
Multi Protocol Max Count
Maximum number of multi protocol connections (configured
on System Configuration > Streaming page).
RTP Connections Count
Current number of input RTP connections.
RTP Connections Max
Count
Maximum number of RTP connections (configured on
System Configuration > Streaming page).
Disk Usage
Total megabytes used and megabytes available.
Enable | Disable Server
Use this button to quickly terminate all connections. The
"Server is running" message will be replaced with "Server is
idle."
IP Address
The DME's IP address is shown in the lower right corner.
Using Apply, Revert, and Default
Depending on screen resolution, it may be necessary to scroll down the page to see additional
information and fields. The Apply, Revert and Default buttons however, are always shown at
the bottom of the page when appropriate. You may also see Refresh , Reset Counters, and
other buttons depending on what page you are on.
22
Apply
Applies the changes made on the screen to the appliance. Each
configuration page has an Apply button. You must click Apply before you
exit the page; otherwise your changes will be lost.
Revert
Aborts all changes made on the screen and returns to the values that were
present prior to any changes. The Revert button restores the values that
were present prior to the last "apply."
Default
Returns to the default settings for all parameters on the page. You must
still click Apply for these default settings to take effect.
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Getting Started
System Reset
A System Reset resets (i.e. reboots) the appliance. It does not change, save, or reset any
configuration parameters.
T
To reset the DME:
1.
2.
Navigate to the System Configuration > General page.
Click the System Reset button.
Note Some changes to the configuration will initiate an automatic reset. When this happens,
wait approximately 60 seconds, then refresh the page and log back in with your user
name and password.
Log Out
Click Log Out on the System Configuration Menu to exit VBAdmin and automatically end any
editing sessions. After logging out of VBAdmin, it is a good idea to close the window and exit
your browser. Note a session will be automatically logged out if there is no activity for 20
minutes.
Help
A link to the online help system is available from the Configuration Menu on the left side of
the VBAdmin page. This help system has a powerful full-text search engine that can quickly
find the information you need. You may wish to take a few minutes to familiarize yourself
with the help system. It can save time when tying to find information about DME parameters
or options. When using VBAdmin, click on the question mark hyperlink in the upper-right
DME Admin Guide
23
corner of each page to get context-sensitive help for that page. Be aware that you must have an
Internet connection to see the online help.
Figure 13. DME Online Help
VBDirectory
VBDirectory is VBrick management application that discovers and displays all VBrick
devices (including DMEs) connected to your network. It shows the Name (as DME and MAC
Address), IP Address, and Model (see Table 9) for each DME on your network. VBDirectory
is an easy way to connect to the management pages for the DME or other VBrick devices.
The VBDirectory application is available on the VBrick Downloads page for new customers
and is automatically installed when you perform an upgrade. Be aware that you will need
VBDirectory v5.3 or higher to discover the DMEs on your network. Click on the Upgrade button
to launch the VBDMEDownload upgrade tool. See Software Upgrade on page 99 for more
about upgrading your software.
24
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Getting Started
Figure 14. VBDirectory
Table 9. DME Models
Type
Model
Concurrent Users
DME
BPS 7530
50
DME
XPS 7550
500
DME
HPS 7550
1000
DME Admin Guide
25
26
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Chapter 4
Configuring DME Streams
Topics in this chapter
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
DME Input Streams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
DME Output Streams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Overview
In the following schematic, the most common input and output streams supported by the
DME are keyed with a circled letter. Click on any circled letter to see a step-by-step
description of the configuration steps for that particular use case. The DME Input Streams
shown on the left in the diagram are live inputs from a VBrick encoder or streams from
another live source. These streams can be inputs to either the RTP server or to the Multi
Protocol server in the DME. The DME Output Streams on the right may include live streams
as well as stored streams from any of the three (RTP, Multi Protocol, HTTP) onboard VOD
servers. Live output streams are reflected from the RTP server or the Multi Protocol server.
For an important conceptual overview, see Planning and Preparation on page 15.
DME ENGINE
DME Output Streams
DME Input Streams
H
A
Unicast/Multicast
B
RTSP Announce (RTP)*
RTP
RTP
C
RTP Streaming
Server
O
RTSP Announce (RTP)*
Push (RTSP)
D
I
Relay (Unicast/Multicast)
Serve (RTP)
RTP
RTP
J
Relay (Unicast/Multicast)
RTP
K
Serve TS via RTSP
TS
L
Serve (RTMP)
RTMP
M
Push (RTMP)
RTMP
Pull (RTSP)
RTP
D
Pull (RTSP)
RTMP
E
Pull (RTMP)
RTMP
F
Push (RTMP)
N
Push TS
TS
G
TS In
O
Push RTP via RTSP
RTP
P
Serve (.wmv)
.wmv
`
Multi Protocol
Streaming
Server
HTTP
Progressive
Download
Server
Q
Create HLS
(for iPod/iPhone/iPad)
TS
HLS
FTP Server
* Preferred input method.
Figure 15. Supported Input/Output Streams
DME Admin Guide
27
Note The VBrick H.264 Appliance Admin Guide has complete configuration details for the
H.264 encoder. Please refer to this document when configuring the DME. This
document is included with the DME documentation on the VBrick website.
Typical Use Cases
A – Unicast/Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
B – RTSP Announce (RTP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
C – RTSP Announce (RTP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
D – Pull (RTSP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
E – Pull (RTMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
F – Push (RTMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
G – TS In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
H– Relay (Unicast/Multicast) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
I – Serve (RTP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
J – Relay (Unicast/Multicast) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
K – Serve TS via RTSP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
L – Serve (RTMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
M – Push (RTMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
N – Push TS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
O – Push RTP via RTSP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
P – Serve (.wmv) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Q– Create HLS (for iPod, iPhone/iPad) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
DME Listener Ports
The following table shows the listeners that are configured by default on the DME. They are
used in differing use case scenarios as shown below.
Table 10. DME Listener Ports
DME Port Protocol Description
Where Used
554
RTSP
Auto Unicast Announce (UDP/TCP)
B – RTSP Announce (RTP)
5544
RTSP
Auto Unicast Announce (TCP)
transmuxed to RTP
C – RTSP Announce (RTP)
1935
RTMP
Push from a Flash encoder, for example F – Push (RTMP)
a VBrick encoder or an Adobe FMLE.
DME Input Streams
A – Unicast/Multicast
This input is sourced from a unicast or multicast transmitter on a VBrick 7000 Series (H.264)
encoder. In this scenario, a transmitter is configured to send a live unicast stream (e.g.
172.xxx.xxx.xxx) to the DME or a live multicast stream (e.g. 239.xxx.xxx.xxx) to a multicast
address. For both of these options you will need to manually fetch the SDP file from the encoder and
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Configuring DME Streams
FTP it to the root folder (or a subfolder) on the DME. The SDP file has information describing
the stream such as profile, bit rate, addressing, and transmission method.
T
To get the encoder SDP file:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Launch the VBAdmin page for the encoder.
Go to the Program Configuration > Transmitters page.
Click on the SDP File URL button.
FTP the SDP file to the root folder (or a subfolder) on the DME.
When configuring the encoder, the default Video Port is 4444; the default encoder Audio
Port is 4644. These ports must be unique for each stream and must match those configured
in the DME. The DME administrator must ensure that all DSP files have unique port
numbers and that no port numbers are duplicated across all SDP files. Subsequently the
encoder must also be configured to transmit on unique ports when streaming to the DME.
Figure 16. Encoder Unicast/Multicast Configuration
DME Admin Guide
29
T
To configure a Unicast/Multicast input:
Objective: Send a unicast or multicast RTP set of streams to the DME as input. RTP
streams can be generated either by an encoder or another DME, and the corresponding
SDP file describes the RTP stream(s). Configure your encoder (v3.0 or higher) as follows:
1. Set the desired Audio/Video configuration for frame rate, resolution, video and audio
rate, sampling frequency etc.
2. Select a stream to send, and set the stream type to be RTP, and select the streams you
want to sent to the DME (including audio, video, or both).
3. Select a transmitter to use for selected stream and setup the information to send the
stream out of a port that is not already used on the DME. This is a manual process to
determine which other streams are on the DME. Usually, choosing a high number in the
20000 range is likely safe and will not conflict. Use an even number, then use the next
sequential even number for the next stream (audio or video), for example Video Port
20100, Audio Port 20102.
4. Enable the stream to be sent to the DME either as a unicast or multicast out. The
Destination IP address determines whether it is a unicast or multicast.
5. Extract the SDP stream once the settings above are applied and active. Place the SDP
file in DME via FTP in the root folder. Make sure the SDP filename you use is unique
when placing the file in the DME.
This stream can now be redistributed in several ways by the DME. It can also act as a
source for use case D – Pull (RTSP) or for use cases H– Relay (Unicast/Multicast) and I –
Serve (RTP).
B – RTSP Announce (RTP)
This is the preferred input method for streams. In this scenario the input is sourced from an Auto
Unicast transmitter on a VBrick 7000 Series (H.264) encoder. Auto Unicast is a transmitter
mode that allows the VBrick encoder to "automatically" establish and maintain a connection
with a streaming server. The stream is pushed to a configured publishing point location on
the DME to which external clients can connect to retrieve the stream. For example, you can
place a VBrick encoder inside a private network and configure it to Auto Unicast to a DME.
External clients will then connect to the DME server via the Internet. Auto Unicast uses
RTSP to control the session. It establishes a connection with the streaming server, negotiates
ports, and begins streaming to the server. Once established, the encoder will push this stream
to the DME until the session is terminated (typically by disabling the transmitter).
The Auto Unicast transmitter can be configured to send a UDP stream or a TCP stream. The
key difference is that a TCP stream provides guaranteed delivery and therefore adds
additional overhead; UDP does not and lost UDP packets are not retransmitted. If overhead
is not a factor, TCP is recommended. See the "Auto Unicast Mode" topic in the H.264
Encoder Appliance Admin Guide for more information. In addition, please keep the following
points in mind when configuring this input method:
•
•
•
30
If using UDP, the DME chooses the Audio and video ports. The default DME Auto
Unicast Destination Port = 554.
If authentication is configured on the DME, you will need to configure an Auto Unicast
Destination Username and Password.
The program name used to re-stream the live content is the .sdp file name. This name
must be unique in the DME.
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Configuring DME Streams
Figure 17. Encoder Auto Unicast RTP Configuration
T
To configure an RTSP Announce (RTP) input:
Objective: Send a unicast set of streams via Auto Unicast to the DME as input. RTP
streams can be generated either by an encoder or another DME, and the corresponding
SDP file describes the RTP stream(s). Configure your encoder as follows:
1. Set the desired Audio/Video configuration for frame rate, resolution, video and audio
rate, sampling frequency etc.
2. Select a stream to send, set the stream type to RTP, and select the streams you want to
send to the DME (including audio, video, or both).
3. Select a transmitter to use for the selected stream and setup the information to send the
stream out to the DME. Select either auto-unicast UDP or auto-unicast TCP. (UDP uses
less overhead, but if transmitting the stream over the internet, TCP is probably more
reliable.) The destination of the stream is the IP address or hostname of the DME
appliance. Do not use the hostname of the DME unless the DME hostname is
registered via DNS. Enter the SDP stream name to be used, making sure it is unique on
the DME. Also enter the user name and password for the DME to receive the stream.
You can get this information from the administrator who configured the DME. By
default, the username and password are broadcast/broadcast.
4. Enable the stream to be sent to the DME.
This stream can now be redistributed in several ways by the DME. It can also act as a
source for input use case D – Pull (RTSP) (via an internal pull) or for output use cases H–
Relay (Unicast/Multicast) and I – Serve (RTP).
DME Admin Guide
31
C – RTSP Announce (RTP)
The preferred method is to publish an RTMP stream to the Multi Protocol server on the
DME using an RTMP transmitter on the encoder as in F – Push (RTMP). This use case is
used to publish streams to the DME from encoders running v3.0 or earlier software. In this
scenario the input is sourced from the RTP input from a VBrick H.264 encoder that is
transmuxed into RTMP output. (The user name and password are required when pushing to
DME v2.0 or later (unless Flash Server Authentication is disabled on the DME's Security
page.)
It is the same as method B except that the stream is sent to an Auto Unicast listener on
the Multi Protocol server. With this option the stream is available as RTMP out only. The
stream must be sent to a listener on the DME. Port 5544 is the default. This is configurable
on the DME but must match the Auto Unicast Dest Port configured on the encoder. In this
scenario, the stream is converted to RTMP and can be played on Flash players. The stream
can be played from VEMS or by entering a known URL in the Flash player. As noted, UDP
Auto Unicast is not supported in this option.
Note The name of the program generated in the DME is the name reported in the SDP file.
This name is derived from the Resource Name on the Program Configuration >
Servers page in the encoder and must be unique on the receiver (DME) side.
Figure 18. DME Auto Unicast Listener
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Configuring DME Streams
T
To configure an RTSP Announce (RTP) input:
Objective: Send a unicast set of streams via Auto Unicast to the DME as input. RTP
streams can be generated either by an encoder or another DME, and the corresponding
SDP file describes the RTP stream(s). This use case only applies when the streams will be
delivered as RTMP streams for use cases M – Push (RTMP) or N – Push TS. Configure
your encoder as follows:
1. Set the desired Audio/Video configuration for frame rate, resolution, video and audio
rate, sampling frequency etc.
2. Select a stream to send, set the stream type to RTP, and select the streams you want to
send to the DME (including audio, video, or both).
3. Select a transmitter for the selected stream and setup the information to send the stream
out to the DME. Select only auto-unicast TCP. The destination of the stream is the IP
address or hostname of the DME appliance. Do not use the hostname of the DME
unless the DME hostname is registered via DNS. Enter the SDP stream name to be
used making sure it is unique on the DME. In this case the username and password are
not necessary because the auto unicast input to the RTMP server on the DME does not
support authentication.
4. When publishing the stream directly to the Multi Protocol server, the stream name is
derived from the program name. If you are publishing multiple streams with multiple bit
rates, the destination name must be unique for each stream and cannot be the same
program name. The Announce Session Name Override field (Figure 18) lets you define a
new name for this stream. If you are using multiple RTP streams from this encoder, fill
in this field for each stream.
5. Enable the stream to be sent to the DME. This stream can now be redistributed in
several ways by the DME. It can also act as a source for use cases M – Push (RTMP) or
N – Push TS.
D – Pull (RTSP)
In this scenario the input originates from an RTSP/RTP external
B
C
source, for example the server on an H.264 encoder. The DME
RTP Server RTMP Server
stream is pulled internally (via RTSP) from an external source such as
D
a VBrick server. The DME can pull from various outside sources (e.g.
from another DME, or from a Wowza, QuickTime, or Darwin
server). An RTSP Pull is configured in the DME on the System
RTP
RTMP
Configuration > Flash Pull Settings page. The DME can acquire a live
stream for distribution by pulling it from a live source via RTSP. The
stream packets are received as RTP and transmuxed to RTMP for delivery to Flash clients.
The stream can originate from an external RTSP source or can be pulled from the internal
RTSP server that serves RTP streams. Internal RTSP sources are typically used when the live
stream is already available in the DME's RTP server. In this scenario you can also deliver it as
a Flash stream to Flash clients or relay it to another DME or a Flash server.
Note The name of the program generated in the DME is derived from the Resource Name
on the Program Configuration > Servers page in the encoder and must be unique on
the receiver (DME) side.
DME Admin Guide
33
Figure 19. RTSP/RTMP Pull
34
Type
• RTSP – pull the RTSP stream into the DME. See D – Pull (RTSP).
• RTMP – pull the RTMP stream into the DME. See E – Pull
(RTMP).
Server:Port
The IP address and port number of the VBrick server. Enter a port
number only if you are not using the default RTMP port (1935) or the
default RTSP port (554).
Application
Only required if you are pulling RTMP. See E – Pull (RTMP). This
string is defined by the source. For example, on a VBrick encoder, this
string corresponds to the RTMP Application value on the Program
Configuration > Transmitters page.
Publishing Point
This is the Resource Name on the Program Configuration > Servers
page on the encoder. This name will be the same on the DME unless a
Local Name (see below) is entered.
Stream Name
User-friendly name displayed on the DME. Used, for example, to
simplify cryptic publishing point names coming from a CDN. This
name becomes the incoming stream name the DME uses to distribute
the stream in multiple ways.
User Name
If the incoming stream requires authentication, enter the user name
and password.
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Configuring DME Streams
Password
If the incoming stream requires authentication, enter the user name
and password.
Use RTCP
Lets you turn off RTCP sync reports for the incoming stream.
Status
Displays the high-level status (Disabled | Connected | Receiving) of
the incoming stream.
T
To configure a Pull (RTSP) input:
Objective: Pull an RTSP unicast RTP stream(s) from a source as input to the DME. RTP
streams can be generated by an encoder/camera with an RTSP server, another DME, or a
subcomponent of the same DME. This use case only applies when the streams are to be
delivered as RTMP streams for use case M – Push (RTMP) or N – Push TS. If the stream is
coming from an external server, like a VBrick H264 encoder, follow steps 1 and 2, and 3.
Otherwise the stream should be active and available either from another DME, or internally
from the same DME, and you can start at Step 4.
1. In the encoder, set the desired Audio/Video configuration for frame rate, resolution,
video and audio rate, sampling frequency etc.
2. In the encoder, select a stream to send, set the stream type to RTP, and select the
streams you want to send to the DME (including audio, video, or both).
3. In the encoder, select the stream to be used in the server component of the encoder.
The default name for streams served from the encoder is vbStream1S1. You can change
the name to anything you want. You also need to enable the server.
4. In the DME, launch the management interface, log in, and go to System Configuration
> Flash Pull Settings. You will need to pull an RTSP stream from a source, so find an
open slot from the 25 possible slots and select RTSP as the type. Enter the server IP
address or DNS host name, and enter the port if not already 554 (default port for
RTSP). Since this is RTSP, no entry for Application is required. Enter a publishing point
name like vbStream1S1. The name you use should be unique to this DME, so if you are
pulling a stream from several encoders as vbStream1S1, the local name needs to be
unique across all other input names. If you are pulling a stream specified in use case A –
Unicast/Multicast or B – RTSP Announce (RTP), enter the sdp filename used when
creating the stream. In most cases there will no need for the user name and password
since this is a pull. Note: the pull uses RTSP Interleaved streams delivered by TCP only
so make sure this is supported on the source.
5. If you know the RTSP source does not generate RTCP reports, or the RTCP reports do
not have accurate time sync information, uncheck the Use RTCP box and the DME will
not look for RTCP reports or ignore those coming in. Note: RTCP reports help to
enable audio and video sync. If unchecked, there will be no way to "re-sync" the stream
once it has started. Uncheck only if you have knowledge of the source and the RTCP
reports it sends.
6. Enable the stream and apply, and the DME will start acquiring the stream. This stream
can now be redistributed in several ways by the DME. It can also act as a source for use
cases I – Serve (RTP) and J – Relay (Unicast/Multicast).
E – Pull (RTMP)
This scenario is the same as method D above except that it's an RTMP pull from an RTMP
server (for example Wowza, FMS, QuickTime) or from another DME. In this case the stream
DME Admin Guide
35
is pulled by the DME from a source with a URL similar to: rtmp://server:port/
application/publishing_point. Enter another local name to override the stream name
(which is derived from the publishing point on the source). The following example shows the
original RTMP URL from a VBoss URL and the parameters on the Flash Pull Setting page
from which the URL is derived:
rtmp://fml.2D84.edgecastcdn.net/202D84/fls/2D84
Server:Port
fml.2D84.edgecastcdn.net
Application
202D84/fls
Publishing Point
2D84
Local Name
myprogram
T
To configure a Pull (RTMP) input:
Objective: Pull a RTMP stream from another DME or a Flash server to redistribute via use
case I – Serve (RTP) or J – Relay (Unicast/Multicast).
1. In the DME, launch the management interface, log in, and go to System Configuration
> Flash Pull Settings. You will need to pull an RTMP stream from a source, so find an
open slot from the 25 possible slots and select RTMP as the type. Enter the server IP
address or DNS host name, and enter the port if not already 1935 (default port for
RTMP). Since this is RTMP an entry in Application is required. Enter the source RTMP
server application name, for example live. Also fill in the publishing point name, which
identifies the resource on the remote system that we need to pull from. Enter a local
name if you want this stream to be redistributed using a different name from the name
used in the publishing point field. You will have to enter a local name if the resource
name that you are pulling from already exists as a local/publishing point name on this
DME, since resource names need to be unique. Local names override the publishing
point name and become the resource name. In most cases there will be no need for the
user name and password since this is a pull.
This stream can now be redistributed in several ways by the DME. It can also act as a
source for uses case I – Serve (RTP) and J – Relay (Unicast/Multicast).
F – Push (RTMP)
In this scenario the DME input is a live stream push from an RTMP transmitter on an H.264
encoder (v3.1 or higher) to the RTMP streaming server on the DME. Use this option to push
to a DME by entering the DME's IP address in the Destination field on the Program
Configuration > Transmitters page.
36
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Configuring DME Streams
Figure 20. RTMP Push to DME
DME Admin Guide
37
T
To configure a Push (RTMP) input:
Objective: This use case allows the DME to act like a Flash server and receive a live stream
from a Flash Media Live Encoder (FMLE). In this case that can be a FMLE, a VBrick
encoder, or another DME. If using a VBrick H264 encoder, the software must be v3.1 or
higher. If you are pushing from a VBrick encoder go to "When sending a stream from a
VBrick encoder." If you are pushing from another DME go to "When sending a stream
from another DME." If you are using a FMLE, please refer to the FMLE documentation
for help pushing to a Flash Media Server.
When sending a stream from a VBrick encoder:
1. In the encoder, set the desired Audio/Video configuration for frame rate, resolution,
video and audio rate, sampling frequency etc.
2. Select a stream to send, set the stream type to RTMP, and select the streams you want to
send to the DME (including audio, video, or both).
3. Select a transmitter for the selected stream and setup the information to send the stream
out to the DME. From Stream Select, select the RTMP stream to be used for this
transmitter. Enter either the IP address of the DME or DNS host name. The destination
port is 1935 by default unless the administrator changed it on the DME. Do not use the
hostname of the DME unless the DME hostname is registered via DNS. Enter the
application name in the DME. It can be live, vbrick, vbApp, vod, or just vb. Enter a
unique string name for the RTMP Stream. You need to make sure no other incoming
stream (into the destination DME) is using the same name. Also enter the user name
and password for the DME to receive the stream if authentication is enabled. You can
get this information from the administrator who configured the DME. By default, the
username and password are broadcast/broadcast.
4. Enable the stream to be sent to the DME. The following procedure explains how to
push from one DME to another.
When sending a stream from another DME:
1. In the DME, launch the management interface, log in, and go to System Configuration
> Flash Push Settings. You need to push a RTMP stream to another DME or a Flash
Server emulating a Flash Media Live Encoder (FMLE). Find an open slot from the 25
possible slots, enter the server IP address or DNS host name, and enter the port (1935 is
the default port for RTMP). The port number is required. You also need an entry for
Application name for the destination. If the destination is another DME, most likely the
name would be live. Enter the destination publishing point name. In the Local Name
field, enter the name of the stream that exists on the local DME that you want to push
out. The Target Name is optional and is the synonymous with the publishing point
name. The other fields like Emulate, swfURL , and pageURL are optional and are only
needed if the destination server requires special value to be inserted for them. The DME
push component currently emulates a FMLE v3.0. If a different emulation string is
required, enter it here. In most cases you will need the user name and password so enter
the appropriate values here.
This stream can now be redistributed in several ways by the DME. It can also act as a
source for uses cases I – Serve (RTP) and J – Relay (Unicast/Multicast).
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Configuring DME Streams
G – TS In
T
To configure a Unicast/Multicast (TS) input:
Objective: Use this option if you need to tune into an MPEG2TS carrying an H.264 load
and need to distribute it further. The transport stream is either a multicast on your network
or a unicast directed to this DME from a source. If multicast, you will need to know the IP
address and port the multicast is being sent on. If unicast to you, you will need to know
which port number it being sent to.
1. Fill in the multicast address and port if multicast, or enter 127.0.0.1 and port if unicast.
2. Enter the port number. The port number needs to be unique for all unicast sources
specified in the list.
3. Enter a name for this incoming transport stream. You can also use the default name, or
create another meaningful name for this stream. The name is used to distribute the
stream to other destinations and stream types.
4. Enable the location and click Apply. The status will indicate "Receiving" if the stream is
found and being received. It will display "Waiting For Stream" if the stream is not
detected. For multicast sources, the multicast address and port combination must be
unique. For unicast sources, the port number must be unique (i.e. the same port cannot
be used for multiple unicast receive.)
TS Pull supports true pass-through without any parsing of the stream so the stream and all
of its contents including KLV (if any) can be passed through to other TS destinations. See
use case N – Push TS for more information.
The incoming name specified in the user interface can now also be used to stream the
incoming transport stream as RTMP, RTP (via RTSP), or HLS. Once configured, you can
see details about this stream in the Monitor > Multi Protocol Connections page. Notice the
stream will be labeled with an added "_ts". This is not significant unless you need to pull
this stream from the built-in Multi-Protocol RTSP server. The server runs by default on
port 5544. The entered RTSP URL would be rtsp://IPofDME:5544/TSPullStream1_ts or
replace "TSPullStream1" with your custom name. See use case K – Serve TS via RTSP.
DME Output Streams
The DME supports the output methods described on the following pages. There are
different output scenarios available depending on whether the stream originates from the
RTP server, the RTMP server, or the HTTP server. This is illustrated in the diagram in
Figure 15. Please refer to this diagram when configuring DME output streams.
H– Relay (Unicast/Multicast)
In this scenario, a stream is configured for streaming from the DME to a destination server,
for example a QuickTime Streaming Server (QTSS), a Darwin, or another DME. It can
subsequently be accessed from the destination server by a client or relayed further
(Figure 21). The relay component takes a stream from the DME and relays it to clients.
Relays can be used to relay live multicast streams as unicast or unicast streams as multicast.
As explained below, after you configure the stream source, there are two different ways to
configure the relay destination. You can (1) configure an Announced UDP relay whereby the
stream is announced and transmitted via Auto Unicast; or you can (2) configure an
Unannounced UDP relay whereby the stream is not announced and requires you to edit and
DME Admin Guide
39
place an .sdp file on the destination server. Each of these options is explained below. See
RTP Relay Settings on page 75 for more about relays.
Note For a step-by-step procedure that explains how to configure a multicast relay in greater
detail, see Detailed Use Cases on page 93.
Figure 21. RTP Relay Page
Source Settings
Every relay has one source and one or more destinations. The source is typically the
Hostname or IP address of the DME.
40
Source Hostname
or IP Address
The Hostname or IP address of the DME.
Mount Point
The .sdp filename. Editing the SDP File on page 41 explains how to
find the filename.
Request incoming
stream
Check this box to request an incoming stream from the specified
DME source. If the source is a DME server, you must specify the
administrative username and password of that server.
• User Name – valid administrator name on the DME.
• Password – valid administrator password on the DME.
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Configuring DME Streams
Wait for announced Check this box to wait for a stream to be announced (via Auto
stream(s)
Unicast) from the DME. The DME will start relaying when a new
stream is announced on the source IP address.
Destination Settings
As noted a relay has one source but it can have multiple destinations. Use Add Destination or
Remove Destination to manage the destinations. Always click Apply to save your changes or
the changes will be lost when you exit the page.
Hostname or IP
Address
This is the unicast or multicast destination IP address, typically an
QuickTime or Darwin server or a another DME.
Announced UDP
Check this box when the stream will be announced automatically and
continually via an Auto Unicast configured on the encoder. No .sdp
file is required with this method.
• Mount Point – this is the .sdp file name.
• User Name – valid administrator name on the DME.
• Password – valid administrator password on the DME.
Unannounced UDP
Check this box when the stream will not be announced via Auto
Unicast. The stream will be sent to the specified IP address and port
number. This method requires you to edit and place an .sdp file on
the destination server. See Editing the SDP File below.
• Base Port – the port from which the stream is sent. It may be the
encoder's Destination Port (on the Program Configuration >
Transmitters page) or it can be an arbitrary port. It must however be
an even number and be a unique port number on the destination server.
The Base Port will be used to send either audio or video
depending on the order of streams in the .sdp file. The first
stream uses the Base Port number; the next stream uses Base Port
number + 2.
• Multicast TTL – Used to specify the number of routers the
multicast stream will pass through before it stops propagating
over the network. Range = 1–255. Set this for the topology of the
network you are working on.
Editing the SDP File
As noted the .sdp file must be edited and placed on the destination server. A typical .sdp file
generated by the encoder is shown in Figure 22. The lines you will need to edit are shown in bold.
After editing the file you must FTP it to the FTP folder (or a subfolder) on the server.
T
To fetch and edit the encoder SDP file:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Launch the VBAdmin page for the encoder.
Go to the Program Configuration > Transmitters page.
Click on the SDP File URL string and save the file.
Open the .sdp file in Notepad or a similar editor.
a. Change the IP Address in the line that begins with "c=IN IP4" (see listing below) to
the IP address of the destination server, for example the DME.
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41
b.
5.
Change the video port to the Base Port number (see description above) specified for
the relay, for example 4444.
c. Change the audio port to the Base Port number plus 2, for example 4646.
When done FTP the saved .sdp file to the FTP folder (or a subfolder) on the destination
server.
Figure 22. Typical .sdp File
42
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Configuring DME Streams
T
To configure a Unicast/Multicast output:
Objective: This use case describes how an existing RTP stream can be relayed as a unicast
or multicast output from the DME. This allows the rebroadcast of stream acquired through
use case A – Unicast/Multicast or B – RTSP Announce (RTP). For a step-by-step
procedure that explains how to configure a multicast relay in greater detail, see Detailed Use
Cases on page 93.
• Announced UDP – follow Steps 1–4, and 7.
• Unannounced UDP – follow Steps 1–6.
1. The SDP file generated for input use case A – Unicast/Multicast or B – RTSP
Announce (RTP) will need to be copied, renamed, and modified when relayed to
another destination. The example shown in Figure 22 on page 42 explains as to how to
modify the SDP to prepare it for use to relay. Leave the original SDP file in place.
2. Create a new Relay in System Configuration > RTP Relay Settings by clicking on new
relay.
3. Enter a relay name identifying this relay. If using Announced UDP, go to Step 7.
4. In Source Settings enter the IP address 127.0.0.1, enter the original SDP filename for
mount point, and select Request incoming stream .
5. Enter the multicast or unicast address or hostname to send the stream to in Destination
Settings. Since this is not an auto-unicast relay to another DME (Step 7) or a server that
supports auto-unicast, select Unannounced UDP and enter the first port number used by
the first stream listed in the SDP file. Subsequent streams use an incremental even
number value. If this is a multicast, and needs to adhere to a maximum number of hops,
enter the value in the Multicast TTL field.
6. Enable and apply the relay and stream will start to be delivered. You will need to
distribute the new SDP file created in Step 1 for your destination for subsequent
multicast clients to use to tune into the relay. If using Unannounced UDP you are done.
7. If you are auto-unicasting to another DME, select Announced UDP, use the new SDP
name, and enter the username and password for the destination DME.
I – Serve (RTP)
The RTP server on the DME serves RTP files. You can play the stream in StreamPlayer,
QuickTime, or VLC using a URL similar to this:
rtsp://server:port/publishing_point.sdp
T
To configure a Serve (RTP) output:
Objective: This use case explains how to allow a stream acquired through use case A –
Unicast/Multicast or B – RTSP Announce (RTP), or VOD content, to be served via an
RTSP server from the DME to clients that support RTSP streams.
1. From a client that supports RTSP RTP streams, enter the RTSP url, typically rtsp://
DME_ip_address/streamname.sdp where the streamname.sdp file is the original SDP file
name.
J – Relay (Unicast/Multicast)
This is a variation of use case H– Relay (Unicast/Multicast) which uses a solicited relay.
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43
K – Serve TS via RTSP
You can serve an incoming transport stream via unicast RTSP with the resulting URL as
follows. You must append "_ts" to the stream name as shown.
rtsp://<dme_ip_address>/<stream_name>_ts
L – Serve (RTMP)
The RTMP server on the DME serves RTMP files. You can play the stream in a Flash player
using a URL similar to the following:
rtmp://server:port/application/publishing_point
T
To configure a Serve (RTMP) output:
Objective: This use case is typically used to allow Flash clients using RTMP streaming to
acquire a live stream or a VOD stream.
1. Enter the RTMP URL information in the embedded Flash client with an application of
live or vod depending on the type of content served.
M – Push (RTMP)
In this scenario the DME functions as a live encoder that sends the stream to another RTMP
(i.e. Flash) server such as a Wowza, an FMS, or another DME. The parameters on this page
are similar to those on the Flash Pull Settings page (see Figure 19 on page 34) but there are
also additional fields marked with (o). These (o)ptional fields may be required at the
destination device, for example by a Wowza or other Flash server. For more about these
fields, see Flash Push Settings on page 69.
Figure 23. DME Flash Push
44
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Configuring DME Streams
T
To configure a Push (RTMP) output:
Objective: This use case is similar to use case F – Push (RTMP) where the stream is
incoming into a DME. See F – Push (RTMP) for more details.
N – Push TS
T
To configure a Push TS output:
Objective: This use explains how to distribute an incoming MPEG2TS stream to up to 25
MPEG2TS destinations. At present, only incoming TS streams can be pushed out to other
TS destinations. The destination IP can be either unicast or multicast. There is also a
general TTL value that will be used for all outbound TS streams.
1. Enter the destination unicast or multicast address.
2. Enter the destination port to send the stream to.
3. Enter the name of the incoming transport stream you want to distribute to your
destination. You do not need to add the implicit "_ts" to the name.
4. Enable the stream and click Apply.
5. The status will indicate either "Sending" or "Waiting for Stream" if the specified input
stream cannot be found.
6. You can also verify the detailed status of your outbound transport stream on the
Monitor> Multi Protocol Connections page.
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45
O – Push RTP via RTSP
T
To push an incoming RTMP/RTP/TS stream out via Auto Unicast:
Objective: This use case explains how to push an incoming RTMP/RTP/TS stream via
RTSP RTP as Auto Unicast to another destination. This feature is typically used to bring a
TS or RTMP stream into the DME and send the stream via RTSP to the internal RTP
server so that you can multicast the RTP stream via a multicast relay.
1. Enter the destination address. This is typically the loopback address (127.0.0.1). The
port is assumed to be port 554. If not 554 enter a different port number, for example:
127.0.0.1:555
2. Enter the incoming stream name you want to publish as an RTP stream. This can be
another incoming RTP, RTMP, or TS stream name.
3. Enter the target name (typically name.sdp) which then can be used to serve or relay the
RTP stream using the SDP name. Be sure the name is not already in use when pushing
to this destination.
4. Most likely the destination will require authentication. If so, enter the username and
password.
5. Select Enabled and click Apply.
6. The status will indicate "Active" if a stream is being delivered, "Waiting for Stream" if
the input stream cannot be found, or "Disconnected" if the destination cannot be
written to.
7. You can also verify the detailed status of your outbound TS stream on the Monitor >
Multi Protocol Connections page.
Once the stream is being pushed to the destination, example localhost (127.0.0.1), it can
be used to stream to more clients via RTSP, or you can setup a multicast relay to send the
original incoming RTMP stream out via an RTP multicast.
P – Serve (.wmv)
Use this option to serve .wmv or other files via progressive download. The DME has a builtin HTTP Progressive Download server for stored VOD files only that have been FTPed to
the DME. A Progressive Download server lets you begin viewing the stream before it has
been completely downloaded. It streams all file types supported on the DME (see Table 5 on
page 17) including Windows Media (.wmv) files. This is the only way to serve .wmv files from the
DME. The HTTP server uses Port 80 by default but this can be changed on the System
Configuration > Port Settings page. You can play the stream in an appropriate player (see
Table 11) for example in QuickTime or Flash, using a URL similar to these:
http://<ip_address>/filename.wmv
or
http://<ip_address>/subfolder/filename.flv
Table 11. Outputs and Associated Players
46
DME Output
Supported Players
RTP
VBrick StreamPlayer, QuickTime
RTMP
Flash players (e.g. Adobe, JW, VLC, etc.)
WMV
Windows Media Player, VBrick StreamPlayer
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Configuring DME Streams
T
To configure a Serve (WMV) output:
Objective: This use case allows files to be delivered via HTTP to a destination client. Files
of type .wmv (Windows Media) cannot currently be served via the DME. Files can however
be delivered via HTTP progressive download. This u is not restricted to WMV files, and
almost any file type can be served via HTTP.
Q– Create HLS (for iPod, iPhone/iPad)
T
To create an HLS stream for Serving via HTTP:
Objective: This use case explains how to create an HLS (HTTP Live Streaming) stream
which is essentially a set of TS files made from an input H.264 stream with a playlist, so that
it can be played on Apple iPad/iPhone/iPad devices via a wireless connection. Mac
QuickTime X players (and some VLC players) can also play the stream.
The playlist generated can either be from a single input stream or multiple input streams.
Multiple streams are useful in varying bandwidth environments. If you need to create an
adaptive playlist that allows the player to switch between multiple rate streams to adapt to
the fluctuating bandwidth, you need to create multiple HLS output streams—all with the
same Master Playlist Name.
The playlist generated can vary depending on the configuration. Since the segments must be
generated on an IDR (Key Frame) boundary, the source must be producing IDR frames at a
regular interval in the stream. It is helpful to know how often IDR frames are being
inserted into stream from the source and it is a good idea to set a Minimum Segment
Length that is a multiple of IDR interval number. Larger segment sizes increase latency.
The default settings will create a latency of about 30 seconds (a common latency for HLS).
This is probably optimal in terms of IDR frame interval/segment sizes. You can reduce
latency by forcing the incoming IDR interval to 1 and setting the minimum segment length
to 1 but this will make the source, the DME, and the client work much harder than they
may need to.
You can also enter the bandwidth associated with each incoming stream. The stream
bandwidth is important when generating an adaptive bitrate stream with multiple streams.
Although VBrick 7000 Series (H.264) encoders include the bandwidth information in the
stream, some stream sources do not. You may need to provide this information (if your
encoder does not) because HLS generation for adaptive bitrate streaming requires accurate
bandwidth information to work properly.
1. Enter the stream name for the generated HLS stream.
2. To create an adaptive bit rate playlist, enter a unique name for your master playlist. This
must be different from any incoming stream name, otherwise leave blank. When blank,
the default non-adaptive playlist name created is "HLS" which is required in the
playback URL. Use the same name when creating multiple HLS streams which are then
all associated with the adaptive bitrate master playlist. The highest bandwidth streams
should be at the top of the list of (1 to 25) HLS streams.
3. If you know your incoming stream does not have bandwidth information, enter a value
(in kbps) in the bandwidth override field for the stream. This value supersedes any value
actually in the stream.
4. Playlists that are created using "rolling" means that the old segments are deleted as new
segments are created for a live stream. In some applications, you may want to keep all
your segments and create an ever growing playlist. This lets you create a DVR-like
DME Admin Guide
47
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
48
feature where users can tune in late into a live presentation, and rewind to the beginning
or jump back to the present. Caution: the "appending" setting does not delete segments
and may adversely impact the space available on your hard drive. You could conceivably
use all remaining disk space if you leave a live stream running from the source into the
DME. Thus a built-in safeguard stops creating appending segments and switches to
rolling segments after 7 days. Note: if you need to archive appending (non-rolling
segmentation), the segments and playlist are available via FTP in the folder: /HLS/
streamname or /MultiplePlaylistName/streamname, only when the stream is enabled and
active. When disabled, all associated playlists and segments are deleted from disk.
The Playlist Length field signals the playlist size of segments and controls the length of
DVR functionality when Type = Rolling. This field is ignored when Type = Appending.
Leave at the default (rolling) unless you have a compelling reason to change.
The Minimum Segment Length is a number (in seconds) that determines minimum size
of segments that will be created. Although reducing this number reduces latency, it also
creates smaller files meaning that the player will need to request new segments more
frequently. Make this number a multiple (2x) of the IDR Frame Interval. For VBrick
encoders, the default interval is 4, so that 8 (the default) is a recommended value.
Enable the stream(s) and click Apply.
The status will indicate "Active" if HLS streams are being created or "Waiting for
Stream" if the input stream cannot be found.
You can also verify the detailed status of your outbound TS stream on the Monitor >
Multi Protocol Connections page.
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Chapter 5
System Configuration
Topics in this chapter
Configuration Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Port Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Security. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
General. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Streaming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Caching Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Management SAP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Manage Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Configuration Menu
The System Configuration menu on the left side of the VBAdmin page provides access to all
configurable DME parameters. Use the (plus and minus) tree control to expand or collapse
the menu. Click on any item in the menu to display the corresponding configuration page.
Home
Displays a snapshot of important status
indicators including software version and the
current number of client connections.
System Configuration Provides access to all configurable DME
system parameters. Note that the DME is a
reflector and always sends what is received.
For this reason, there are no video or audio
configuration fields on the DME pages nor
do the destination pages let you select
different video and audio rates.
Input Configuration
Lets you configure input stream types.
Output Configuration Lets you configure output stream types.
DME Admin Guide
User Configuration
Lets you configure the DME user name and
password and the announce settings that let
you push streams into the DME.
Logging
Lets you enable and configure the Access
History and the Error Log.
Monitor
The Monitor pages show status information
for users and relays as well as the Access
History and the Error Log.
49
Log Out
Logs out the current user and displays the
Login. VBAdmin automatically times out and
displays the Login page after 20 minutes with
no activity.
Help
Displays the online help system. You can
also click the question mark (?) icon on any
page to go directly to the help for that page.
You will need an Internet connection to
display the online help.
Network
50
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
System Configuration
IPV4
Network DHCP
Default = Enabled. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. If
DHCP is enabled, the appliance gets its IP Address, Subnet Mask,
and Gateway from the DHCP server. If the DHCP server
supplies the DNS server address, these parameters will replace
the user-entered DNS settings.
The DME is setup by default to acquire an IP address via DHCP.
If the DHCP server is not available at boot time, the DME
DHCP IP address acquisition will fail and the appliance will retry
to re-acquire the address every 10 minutes. During the 10 minute
retry period, the appliance uses a default IP address of
172.17.1.5 with a subnet mask of 255.255.0.0. If you need to
change the DME to use a static IP address instead of getting one
from DHCP, connect the DME to the network, connect a laptop
to the network, set the laptop to be on the same subnet, and give
the laptop a fixed IP address of 172.17.1.6 with subnet of
255.255.0.0. You can then go into the DME management
interface (default: http://172.17.1.5:8181) to login and give the
appliance a static IP address.
IP Address
This is either a static or a DHCP-enabled IPv4 address. If IPv6 is
turned on for this segment of the network, this will be an autogenerated link global IPv6 address. If using IPv6, use the IPV6
Address field below. Note: Although the IPv6 address is
displayed, it cannot be used to manage the appliance as yet.
Subnet Mask
Subnet mask for the DME address.
Gateway IP Address
Gateway IP Address for communicating across distinct network
segments.
Host Name
The Host Name defaults to DME<MAC_Address>, a hardware
address that uniquely identifies each node of a network. The
DME Host Name identifies the appliance to various network
applications including DHCP, SNMP and VBDirectory.
Maximum Transmission Range 500–1500 (default = 1500). The MTU is used for all
Unit Size
network traffic from the DME and defines the largest network
packet size that will be transmitted. A higher MTU brings higher
bandwidth efficiency and VBrick recommends using the default.
However you may wish to reduce MTU size to meet the
requirements of some networks with VPN or other security
tunnels that cannot tolerate 1500 byte packets.
Network Interface
Speed/Duplex
Read only. Displays the current connection speed and duplex.
MAC Address
The Media Access Control address is a unique identifier assigned
to the DME for network communications.
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Domain Name Server
Primary Server IP Address
This is the primary server used for DNS. Note: An invalid
IP address will adversely impact the operation of the user
interface. If the user interface pages are loading slowly, make
sure this is a valid IP address. If you are not using a DNS
server, leave this field blank.
Secondary Server IP Address This is the secondary server used for DNS.
IPV6
IPV6 Address
Optional. Enter an IPv6 address.
Network Time Synchronization
These fields are used to synchronize network time using the host name or IP address of a
known server to provide a synchronized time for all appliances in the network.
Note Network Administrators please note. DHCP Option 4 (TIME) and Option 42 (NTP)
are requested from the DHCP server to obtain SNTP server addresses. One or both
of these options must be enabled in the DHCP server for these addresses to be
returned to the DME. If both are returned, the DME will use the NTP server address.
If the DHCP server configuration is unknown, it is recommended that the address(es)
be manually entered since the DHCP server-supplied address will always override a
manually-entered address.
Network Time Protocol
Check to enable network time synchronization. Default =
Disabled.
Primary Server IP Address
Primary host name (DME Host Name or DNS Host Name)
or IP address of valid SNTP server providing time
synchronization. A blank field indicates the server address
will be acquired via the DHCP server only if the Network
DHCP field above is checked.
Secondary Server IP Address Secondary host name (DME Host Name or DNS Host
Name) or IP address of valid SNTP server providing time
synchronization. A blank field indicates the server address
will be acquired via the DHCP server only if the Network
DHCP field above is checked.
52
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
System Configuration
Port Settings
RTSP Server Port
Default = 554. RTSP port for VOD streams from RTP server.
Cannot be changed. Used to receive an RTP Auto Unicast
stream as input and to serve RTSP RTP clients for output.
RTMP Server Port
Default = 1935. RTMP port for Flash VOD streams from
RTMP server. Allows RTP streams as input. For example a
VBrick H.264 encoder can be an RTMP input stream.
RTMP Server Announce
Listener Port
Default = 5544. Allows for listening for auto unicast sessions
from RTSP clients. Lets you send RTP streams to an RTMP
streaming server via Auto Unicast (for transmuxing to Flash,
HLS, or TS). Also allows TS streams to be served via RTSP on
this port.
VBAdmin Server Port
Default = 8181. Specifies the listener port for HTTP
management connections as follows: http://IPaddress:port
where IPaddress = DME IP address or hostname, and port.
The port number can be moved to another port if required as
long as it does not conflict with another existing port in the
system.
Secure VBAdmin Server
Port
Default = 8383. Specifies the listener port for management and
HTTPS connections. Used for HTTPS connections when
enabled on the Security configuration page. Can be moved to
another port number if required.
HTTP Server Port
Default = 80. Sets the port used for progressive download
(HTTP) and HLS streams.
HTTP Streaming
Tunneling Port
Default = 8080. Sets the port for HTTP tunneling via RTSP.
The default is 8080 but if you are streaming HTTP directly from
a DME via the Internet, it is a common practice to change this
to 80 and to set any other service using port 80 to a different
port.
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53
HTTP Caching ICP Port
Default = 3131. Sets the port used to discover multiple web
caches on the local (source) DME and on remote DMEs.
Security
54
External FTP Server
Default = Enabled. Disabled will prevent FTP sessions to the DME
appliance. Note that this feature must be enabled to upgrade the
appliance firmware.
SSH Shell
Default = Enabled. SSH Secure Shell access may be used by VBrick
Support Services. Do not use except as directed.
RTMP Server
Default = Enabled. Enable the RTMP server for Flash streaming.
RTMP Announce
Receiver
Default = Enabled.
HTTP Server
Default = Enabled. Enable the HTTP server.
Flash Server
Authentication
Default = Enabled. If checked, a Flash server can send streams to
the DME without authentication being required.
External VBAdmin
Default = Enabled. VBAdmin cannot be completely disabled: select
HTTP or HTTPS.
• Enabled – VBAdmin is enabled via HTTP.
• HTTPS Only – VBAdmin is encrypted and secured using
HTTPS.
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
System Configuration
General
System Identification
The Name, Location , and Contact fields are used to identify the appliance. They are not
changed when you click Default . (They are changed when you reset to the defaults on the
Manage Configuration page.)
System Description
Read-only. Company name and product name.
System Model Number See Table 2 on page 4: 7530, 7550, 7570.
System Serial Number
Unique serial number assigned to unit. See label on DME.
System Name
User-defined. System name, for example Biology Dept.
System Location
User-defined. System location, for example West Campus.
System Contact
User-defined. Contact person, for example Jane Doe.
Login
System Login Message This customized message (max = 256 chars) will be displayed on
the login page.
System Time
Date Time
DME Admin Guide
Sets system date and time in mm/dd/yyyy hh:mm format. The
appliance will reset when you click Set Time.
55
Time Zone
Select from list: (GMT-12) Eniwetok – (GMT +12) Auckland.
Daylight Saving Time U.S. only. Check this box and the appliance will automatically adjust
for Daylight Savings Time. This is particularly useful when
monitoring the System Logs.
System Reset
Reset
Resets (i.e. reboots) the appliance. A reset does not change, save, or
reset any configuration parameters.
Streaming
This page is used to set various configuration constraints. Be aware that it is possible to
oversubscribe the DME. That is you can configure the maximum number of RTP
connections (and the maximum throughput) in such a way that performance will be seriously
degraded. If this happens all clients will be affected and some connections may be rejected.
Guidelines for choosing the number of connections depend on the model number (shown on
the System Configuration > General page) of your DME. For best results, use the
recommendations shown below.
56
Max. Number of RTP
Connections
Range: 0–1000. Select this value based on number of expected
connections. Note that the recommendations shown here for each
model are for total throughput (input and output) in megabits per
second:
• Model 8000-0222-0000 – Do not exceed 100 Mbps.
• Model 8000-0223-0000 – Do not exceed 250 Mbps.
• Model 8000-0224-0000 – Do not exceed 500 Mbps.
Max. Number of Multi
Protocol Connections
Read-only. Shows the maximum number of allowed connections.
Default = 500.
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
System Configuration
Max. Throughput
Set maximum allowed throughput in mbit/sec or kbits/sec. See
recommendations above.
Default Authentication
Scheme
• Basic – the DME server sends authentication credentials over
the network in Base64 encoded text.
• Digest – the DME server sends encrypted authentication
using MD5 credentials over the network.
Type of Service
The TOS can be configured in the IP header to establish packet
priority in the network.
Cache System Settings
Used
Be aware that this setting has a direct impact on memory usage. If
not configured properly, system memory will not be available for
other functions. Do not change the default (Normal) unless you
will be using the DME for a different function as explained below.
• Low – the DME will not be used for caching.
• Normal – the DME will be used primarily as a reflector and
secondarily as a caching engine.
• High – the DME will be primarily used as a caching engine and
secondarily as a reflector.
• Exclusive – the DME will be used exclusively for caching.
Caching Settings
The DME has an internal web server that serves VOD files via progressive download. It also
serves HLS (HTTP Live Streaming) content (via the built-in caching server) to Apple iOS
devices like iPads and iPhones. The HLS content is cached at remote locations so that
subsequent requesting clients can acquire the content that is cached on a local server.
DME Admin Guide
57
Display
Select number of sources (20, 50, or 200) and the number of
entries in the Alternate Sources table will be adjusted to match.
Default Parent
A DME can only have one parent. When the DME receives a
request for content, this is the first place it looks. The syntax is:
<ip_address>:<http_port>
Note: The specified port number overrides the displayed port
number. See Port Settings on page 53 for more information.
Alternate Sources
If the DME cannot find requested content on the default parent,
it looks sequentially through the alternate sources. The syntax is:
<ip_address>:<http_port> or <icp_port>
Note: The specified port numbers override the displayed port
numbers. See Port Settings on page 53 for more information.
Caching Overview
The goal of configuring the caches on each of the DMEs in a network is to allow a client in
any subnet (i.e. a "zone" in the VEMS context) to access HTTP content hosted by a another
DME in the network. Although the focus of the feature is to allow access to HLS content
which is being created via segmentation in another DME, the mechanism is generally the
same for all HTTP-accessed content. This scenario is most efficiently accomplished by
creating a configuration of parents and alternate sources (i.e. siblings) on each DME and
directing a local client to the DME located in the same zone as the client. To do this you can
provide the local DME URL to a client player or you can configure the URL in VEMS (either
by manual entry or by using an external SAP from a VBrick H.264 encoder).
As shown on the System Configuration > Caching Settings page, each DME configuration
consists of one Default Parent and multiple Alternate Sources. When the DME receives a
request for HLS content it will first determine if the content is cached locally. It will then (1)
check whether the content is being produced locally; and (2) query each alternate source to
determine if the content is available to that source. If these checks fail, the request will be
passed to its default parent who will follow the same steps to try and locate the content.
Once the content is found, it is delivered to the requesting client via the discovered path. At
each DME in the path, the content is cached to allow efficient delivery to other requestors.
(HLS Playlists are never cached since in the case of a live HLS event, the playlists are
constantly updated with the latest information.)
Figure 24 shows a sample network diagram of multiple DMEs with one DME in each zone.
In general, the goal is (1) to allow any DME to be a source of HLS content, and (2) to allow
clients in any subnet to access HLS content being created in any other DME. Note that in
many cases this generalization will not be true and the configuration requirements will be
reduced accordingly.
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System Configuration
G
Master Parent
B
E
A
D
C
F
Figure 24. Multiple DME Configuration (Sample Network Diagram)
Caching Configuration
When configuring a DME, the first step is to designate one "master" parent DME for the
entire configuration. (Do not confuse this master parent with the Default Parent. Each DME
has its own Default Parent.) In order to minimize the amount of required information, the
master parent (DME A in the diagram above) should be at the "center" of the caching mesh,
although you can actually designate any DME as the master parent. Each DME should
designate as its parent the DME most efficiently on the path to the master parent. The
master parent should designate all other DMEs as Alternate Sources (i.e. siblings). It is
recommended (but not required) that any DMEs which would not be efficiently accessed by
using the master parent path, be designated as Alternate Sources. Table 12 shows the
recommended configuration for the sample mesh shown in Figure 24 .
Table 12. Recommended Sample Configuration
DME
Default Parent
Alternate Source
G
E
None
F
D
G
D
A
E
F
G
A
None
B
C
D
E
F
G
In another example, suppose a client co-located with DME E in the diagram wants to access an
HLS stream initiated on DME G. If this configuration was limited to defining DME A as a
parent, the ultimate path for content delivery would be as follows with asterisks (*) denoting
the DMEs where/when caching will occur:
DME G* > DME E > DME D > DME A* > DME D* > DME E*
Note that if DME G was designated as an alternate source for DME E , the path would simply
be: DME G* > DME E*
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Note that the caching algorithm is used for all HTTP content—not just HLS. It is not
generally beneficial to use the mechanism for HTTP-accessed stored content since the content
is not often fetched by multiple clients simultaneously and large content is not cached. For
stored content the recommended process is to use the DME as a local VOD server.
An example for extending the use of the caching system beyond HLS is to use it for Smooth
Streaming distribution. In the VBrick ecosystem, a VBrick H.264 encoder can generate a
Smooth Stream to a Microsoft IIS server which can then deliver it to multiple Silverlight
clients or to DME caching engines. The IIS server is only configurable as a Default Parent in
the caching network, hence it would need to be considered the Master Parent when
considering the cache configuration. In the configuration example above (Figure 24 ) the IIS
server would be typically defined as the Default Parent of DME A and would be the sole
source of Smooth Streams to all clients in the various zones.
Management SAP
If enabled, this page will send a management SAP to the VBDirectory (Figure 25)
management interface. VBDirectory lets you see the status and code revision level of all
networked VBrick devices.
60
Transmit Enable
Check to enable transmit for management SAPs. Default = Enabled.
Group Name
Optional. This parameter defines the Group Name. It is included in
the Management SAPs used by VBDirectory. It is used for organizing
VBrick devices into groups to simplify use of VBDirectory.
Unit Number
Optional. The appliance unit number (range 0–2147483647) is used to
identify each DME in a group.
SAP Timeout
Provides a configurable timeout, in seconds, for received management
SAPs. If no SAP is received within the timeout period, the entry is
removed. Default = 90 sec.
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
System Configuration
Retransmit Time
Defines the Management SAP Retransmit Time.
Time To Live
The number of hops (between routers) for which an IP packet is valid
in the network.
Differentiated
Services
The six bit Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) field in the
header of IP packets for packet classification purposes. DSCP replaces
the three bit Type of Service byte of the IP header.
IP Address
Defines the Destination IP Address for Management SAPs.
Port
Defines the Destination Port for Management SAPs.
Figure 25. VBDirectory
Manage Configuration
Use this page to manage the DME configuration. It lets you set the defaults or reset to the
factory defaults. It also lets you save the configuration to an xml file or restore the
configuration from a previously saved xml file.
Note Be aware that when you change the user name and password for the server (See
Username and Password on page 79) you are changing the FTP user name and
password as well. However, when restoring previously saved settings, the FTP
username and password will not be the same as the system user name and password.
For best results you will need to login again and change the user name and password
to match the FTP username and password. (To keep the same username and password,
change the username and password to something different, and then change it back
again to the current username and password.)
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Set Defaults
Reset most settings except for Network Settings, and passwords to
defaults.
Set Factory Defaults
Reset all settings including Network Settings and passwords to
factory defaults.
Save Configuration
Save all configuration settings that can be restored at a later time.
Restore Configuration Restore previously saved configuration settings. Note that this
operation will not restore the FTP user name and password. After a
"restore configuration" you will need to manually change this (if
desired) using the Username and Password page. Typically you
would change the user name and password to something and then
change it back to the desired user name and password after a
restore.
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Chapter 6
Input Configuration
Topics in this chapter
Flash Pull Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
TS In Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
RTP Playlists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Flash Pull Settings
Use this page to configure streams that will be pulled into the RTMP (Flash) server on the
DME. You can enable a maximum of 25 streams that are pulled from an RTP server or
another DME.
Enable
Use dropdown to enable or disable the stream. All streams are
disabled by default.
Type
• RTSP – pull the RTSP stream into the DME.
• RTMP – pull the RTMP stream into the DME.
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Source IP/
Address:Port
Enter a unicast or multicast address. Enter a port number only if
you are not using the default RTMP port (1935) or the default
RTSP port (554).
• Unicast – leave blank or enter 127.0.0.1.
• Multicast – enter a valid multicast address, e.g. 239.192.0.0.
Application
Only required if you are pulling RTMP. This string is defined by the
source. For example, on a VBrick encoder, this string corresponds
to the RTMP Application value on the Program Configuration >
Transmitters page. Valid strings are limited to: live, vod, vbrick,
and vbApp.
Publishing Point
This is the Resource Name on the Program Configuration > Servers
page on the encoder.
Stream Name
User-friendly name displayed on the DME. Used to simplify the
cryptic publishing point names typically coming from a CDN. Use
the default stream name (PullStream1, PullStream2, etc.) or
override as desired.
User Name
Client-side authentication may be required by some servers.
Password
Client-side authentication may be required by some servers.
Use RTCP
Default = Enabled. RTCP reports provide feedback on the quality
of service (QoS). Uncheck if your server does not generate RTCP
reports of if you wish to ignore RTCP reports from the source.
Status
Read only: Disabled | Connected | Receiving.
TS In Settings
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Input Configuration
Enable
Use to enable an input stream.
Multicast Source /
Localhost
Source of multicast stream/local host. If the stream is a unicast to the
DME, enter 127.0.0.1. If there are multiple unicast input streams, be
sure that each input stream has a unique port number.
Port
Port on which the stream is unicast or multicast. If there are multiple
unicast input streams, be sure that each input stream has a unique port
number.
Stream Name
User-friendly name displayed on the DME. Use the default stream
name (TSPullStream 1, TSPullStream 2, etc.) or override as desired.
Status
Read only: Disabled | Connected | Receiving.
RTP Playlists
RTP Playlists make it possible to send stored VOD files as live streams. They can consist of a
single file or multiple files can be reordered and concatenated into a single playlist. They can
be weighted and played in differing modes: for example they can be looped or played
sequentially. You can then use a playlist to create a multicast relay using the .sdp file, i.e. the
Mount Point . For more about this scenario, see H– Relay (Unicast/Multicast) on page 39. To
launch a playlist, you can use it in an RTSP URL by specifying the .sdp file name or you can
use it to create an RTP Relay.
Available Playlists
The playlist is playing.
The playlist is stopped.
New Media Playlist
Create a new Media Playlist.
Edit Playlist
Edit the selected Playlist.
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Delete Playlist
Delete the selected Playlist.
New Media Playlist
Name
Unique name for the playlist.
Mount Point
The .sdp file name associated with the playlist in ftproot.
Determines the order in which individual streams are played.
• Sequential – the streams are played once sequentially. Drag the
streams up or down to set the order in which they are played.
• Sequential Looped – the streams are played sequentially in an
endless loop.
• Weighted Random – the streams are played randomly according
to the weighted value. Use the arrow icons to set the weight
from 1–10.
Repetition
66
Items only repeat after nnn other items have played.
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Input Configuration
Available Content
Use the dropdown to go up one folder at a time. Click and drag files
from the left to the right to add to your playlist.
Items in This Playlist
Order – click and drag file up or down to modify order.
Title – click to select.
Weight – use arrow controls to assign weight (1 – 10).
Open Folder
This control is active when you select a folder (icon shown
here) in the Available Content list. Open a folder, then drag in
a file and click Apply.
Remove Item
This control is active when you select an item in the playlist.
Log this playlist's
activity
Log this playlist's activity in the Access History log.
Send this playlist to a
broadcast server
• Hostname or IP Address – enter server host name or IP address
of broadcast server.
• User Name – enter valid administrator name on broadcast
server.
• Password – enter valid administrator password on broadcast
server.
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Chapter 7
Output Configuration
Topics in this chapter
Flash Push Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
RTSP Push Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
TS Out Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
HLS Streaming Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
RTP Relay Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Flash Push Settings
Use this page to configure streams that will be pushed to a Flash server or a CDN (content
delivery network) like Akamai or EdgeCast. You can enable a maximum of 25 streams. Note
that some fields marked with a trailing (o): these (o)ptional fields may be required at the
destination device, for example by a Wowza or other Flash server.
Enable
Use dropdown to enable or disable the stream. All streams are
disabled by default.
Destination IP/
Address:Port
The IP address and port number of the Flash server. Enter a port
number even if you are using the default RTMP port (1935).
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Application
This string is defined by the source. For example, on a VBrick
encoder, this string corresponds to the RTMP Application value on the
Program Configuration > Transmitters page. Valid strings are limited
to: live, vod, vbrick, and vbApp.
Target Name
Optional May be required for some destination devices. This is the
Resource Name on the Program Configuration > Servers page on the
encoder.
Stream Name
User-friendly name displayed on the DME. Used to simplify cryptic
publishing point names coming, for example, from a CDN.
Emulate (o)
Optional May be required for some destination devices.
swf URL (o)
Optional May be required for some destination devices.
Page URL (o)
Optional May be required for some destination devices.
User Name
Client-side authentication may be required by some servers.
Password
Client-side authentication may be required by some servers.
Status
Read only: Disabled | Streaming | Waiting for Stream (Input
<stream_name> not yet available.)
source
RTSP Push Settings
This feature lets you push an incoming stream via RTP Auto Unicast to an internal or
external receiver. It also lets you select an RTMP or TS source stream and transmux to an
RTP stream that can be delivered as an RTP unicast/multicast stream.
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Output Configuration
Enable
Enables the push.
Destination IP/Address:Port Enter the destination IP address. Override the Port if not
using the default (554).
Stream Name
Target Name
Incoming stream name to push.
User-friendly name for destination, for example
mystream.sdp.
User Name
Client-side authentication may be required by some servers.
Password
Client-side authentication may be required by some servers.
Status
Read only: Disabled | Streaming | Waiting for Stream
(Input source <stream_name> not yet available.)
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TS Out Settings
72
Multicast TTL
The number of hops (between routers) for which transmitter packets
are valid on the network. Range = 1–255. Default = 64.
Enable
Enable or disable the output transport stream.
Multicast/
Destination IP/
Address
The multicast destination IP address for specified stream name.
Port
The port number you will be sending the stream to.
Stream Name
The input stream name you will be sending out as a transport stream.
This stream name must be specified as an input stream (see TS In
Settings on page 64).
Status
Disabled | Waiting for Stream | Streaming
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Output Configuration
HLS Streaming Settings
HLS (HTTP Live Streaming) is an HTTP-based media streaming protocol implemented by
Apple Inc. as part of their QuickTime and iPhone software. It works by breaking the overall
stream into a sequence of small HTTP-based file downloads, each download loading one
short chunk of a transport stream. As the stream is played, the client can select from a
number of different alternate streams containing the same material encoded at a variety of
data rates, allowing the streaming session to adapt to the available data rate. At the start of
the streaming session, it downloads an extended M3U playlist containing the metadata for the
various substreams which are available. Since its requests use only standard HTTP
transactions, HLS is capable of traversing any firewall or proxy server that allows standard
HTTP traffic, unlike UDP-based protocols such as RTP.
Enable
Enable or disable the stream.
Stream Name
Input stream used to generate HLS content.
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Master Playlist Name If the stream will be part of a group of streams comprising a master
playlist, enter the master playlist name. A group my consist of
multiple streams with different bit rates and the iOS client will
switch between available streams to provide the best viewing
experience. When using this page to create a group, always put the
highest bit rate stream first (at the top of the list). This is the first
stream the client will try to play. You will typically have more than
one HLS stream referencing the same Master Playlist Name. If this
stream is not part of a master playlist, leave this field blank.
Bandwidth Override
Master Playlists for multiple bit rate streams require the bandwidth
of each individual stream to be included in the Master Playlist. For
example, if the stream is sourced from a VBrick H.264 encoder, the
DME will detect the bandwidth associated with each multiple bit
rate stream. For non-VBrick encoders, enter the bandwidth value (in
Kbps) associated with the stream. In general, use this field only if
the encoder does not supply a bandwidth value. Be aware that if
used, this value will override the encoder–supplied value.
Type
The number of items in a playlist is defined by the Playlist Length.
This field determines how the DME will handle the generated
segments:
• Rolling – the playlist will have a fixed length regardless of the
number of HLS segments generated. Segments will be added or
deleted to maintain a fixed playlist length.
• Appending – the Playlist Length is ignored and the DME creates
a continuously growing playlist. The maximum playlist duration
is seven days.
Note 1: Multiple appending playlists may use a large amount of
disk space unnecessarily. Use this option only if you will need to
return to the beginning of the playlist.
Note 2: The entire playlist will be deleted if you "disable" HLS
generation (on the HLS Streaming Settings page). When the
stream is active, the playlists and associated segments can be
extracted via FTP.
Playlist Length
The number of segments to include in a playlist. Default = 10. This
value is used to enable scroll back in the client player. You can scroll
back up to the number of segments specified here. Be aware that this
function uses disk space for segments that may never be viewed.
Minimum Segment
Length
The number of seconds for which a media segment is created.
Range 1–60. Default = 8. By increasing this number you will also
increase the initial time it takes to play the HLS stream. For best
results, this number should always be a multiple of the IDR Frame
Interval on the encoder. For example, if the IDR Frame Interval is
4, this value should be 8, 12, 16 ...
Status
Disabled | Waiting | Active.
Playlist Conventions
When generating HLS streams it is important to understand the conventions used for
creating playlists so they can be played via an HTTP URL.
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Output Configuration
To Play:
iOS Viewing URL
Individual streams that are
part of a master playlist:
http://<dme_ip_address>/<master_playlist_name>/
<stream_name>/playlist.m3u8
Individual streams that are
not part of a master playlist:
http://<dme_ip_address>/HLS/<stream_name>/
playlist.m3u8
All streams in a master
playlist:
http://<dme_ip_address>/
<master_playlist_name>playlist.m3u8
RTP Relay Settings
Use this page to configure or edit relays. A streaming relay forwards a stream from a source
encoder to a destination server. One of the primary advantages of relays is to minimize the
usage of network bandwidth. Relays can be used to distribute the load across multiple servers.
The destination server, for example a QuickTime, Darwin, or a DME receives the incoming
stream and reflects it to clients. The easiest way to minimize bandwidth usage is to reflect a
multicast stream. In this scenario you will need to place the multicast .sdp file from the
encoder on each destination server. When clients open an RTSP stream to the multicast .sdp
file from a server, they will receive a reflected unicast of the multicast stream. You can use
this method to distribute the live streaming load across multiple destination servers. For
more about configuring this scenario, see H– Relay (Unicast/Multicast) on page 39.
Default Relay Status
Shows the status of the default relay: Enabled | Disabled.
Edit Default Relay
Use the default relay to send the same stream to multiple
destinations. When creating multiple relays, be sure to click Edit
Default Relay and set the Status to disabled.
Other Relays
Shows all defined relays.
New Relay
Define a new relay.
Edit Relay
Edit the selected relay.
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Delete Relay
Delete the selected relay.
Edit Default Relay
The default is used to send the same stream to multiple destinations.
76
Relay Name
Read only. Use this page to edit the default relay.
Status
Enabled | Disabled
Hostname or IP Address
Hostname or IP address of the destination server.
Announced UDP
Use when relaying a stream to another DME or server via auto
unicast.
• User Name – Name used for push authentication to
destination server.
• Password – Password used for push authentication to
destination server.
Unannounced UDP
Use when pushing the stream to another DME or server and
publishing the associated .sdp file.
• Base Port – The base port will be incremented by 2 for each
RTP stream. Use numbers that are not already used for the
entire SDP sequence set.
• Multicast TTL – Used to specify the number of routers the
multicast stream will pass through before it stops
propagating over the network. Range = 1–255.
Remove Destination
A relay can send the stream to multiple destinations. Use this
button to remove a configured destination.
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Output Configuration
Add Destination
A relay can send the stream to multiple destinations. Use this
button to add a destination.
New Relay
Relay Name
Enter a unique relay name.
Status
Check to enable. Remember to click Apply before you exit the page.
Source Settings
These settings describe the source of the stream to be relayed. It can be sourced internally
from the DME (127.0.0.1); it can be fetched from elsewhere; or you can wait for it to be
announced.
Source Hostname or
IP Address
DME Admin Guide
Hostname or IP address of the source server.
77
Mount Point
SDP file name.
Request incoming
stream
Check to request a stream from another DME or server.
• User Name – Name used for authentication on source server.
• Password – Password used for authentication on source server.
Wait for announced
stream(s)
Check to wait for an announced stream from the specified
hostname or IP address.
Destination Settings
78
Hostname or IP
Address
Hostname or IP address of the destination server.
Announced UDP
Use when relaying a stream to another DME or server via auto
unicast.
• User Name – Name used for push authentication to destination
server.
• Password – Password used for push authentication to
destination server.
Unannounced UDP
Use when pushing the stream to another DME or server and
publishing the associated .sdp file.
• Base Port – The base port will be incremented by 2 for each
RTP stream. Use numbers that are not already used for the
entire SDP sequence set.
• Multicast TTL –Used to specify the number of routers the
multicast stream will pass through before it stops propagating
over the network. Range = 1–255.
Remove Destination
A relay can send the stream to multiple destinations. Use this
button to remove a configured destination.
Add Destination
A relay can send the stream to multiple destinations. Use this
button to add a destination.
© 2011 VBrick Systems, Inc.
Chapter 8
User Configuration
Topics in this chapter
Username and Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Announce Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Username and Password
Use this page to change the user name (default = admin) and password (default = admin) for
the DME server (and the FTP server). There is only one user name and password on the
system. If you change the user name and password, be sure to record the new name and
password. If you lose the user name or password you will be unable to login to the server.
Note Be aware that when you change the user name and password for the server you are
changing the FTP user name and password as well. See the Note on page 61 for more
information.
Current User Name
Enter current user name.
Current Password
Enter current password.
New User Name
Enter new administrator user name.
New Password
Enter new administrator password.
Re-enter New Password Re-enter new password and be sure to click Change Password .
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Announce Settings
Use this page to configure a "broadcast" password that will allow you to publish streams to
this server. This password is needed when sending a stream via auto unicast to a DME (Port
554) or when sending an RTMP stream from a live encoder to the DME (port 1935). Only
one login user name and password are used for all inputs into the system. The login name
cannot be the same name as the administrator name.
Current Announce User Read only. Default = broadcast/broadcast (user name/password).
Name
New User Name
Enter new announce user name.
New Password
Enter new announce password.
Re-enter New Password Re-enter new password and be sure to click Change Password .
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Chapter 9
Logging
Topics in this chapter
Log Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Log Settings
The Error Log on the Monitor > Error Log page displays DME status messages as well as
errors. The Access History on the Monitor > Access History page shows files that have been
accessed since the last reset. This page enables or disables logging and sets overwrite rules.
Error Log
Shows DME status messages as well as errors.
Access Log
Shows files that have been accessed since the last reset.
Logging
Check to enable the Error Log and/or the Access Log. Logged
entries are shown the respective Monitor pages. Both logs are
enabled by default.
Roll log
Overwrite the log every nnn days or every nnn KB (whichever
comes first).
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Chapter 10
Monitor
Topics in this chapter
System Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
RTP Connected Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Multi Protocol Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Relay Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Access History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Upgrade Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Error Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
System Usage
Page Refresh Interval From the dropdown, select the desired page refresh interval.
RTP CPU Load
Shows the CPU load on the RTP server.
RTMP CPU Load
Shows the CPU load on the RTMP server.
Total CPU Load
Shows the CPU load on both the RTP and RTMP servers.
Disk Usage
Total megabytes used and megabytes available.
RAM Total
Shows the physical RAM present on system.
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RAM Used
Shows the RAM currently being used.
RAM Free
Shows the RAM available for use.
Swap Memory Total
Shows the total Swap Memory on system.
Swap Memory Used
Shows the Swap Memory currently being used.
Swap Memory Free
Shows the Swap Memory available for use.
Memory Total
Shows total memory (physical and swap space) available.
Memory Used
Shows physical and swap space used.
Memory Free
Shows physical and swap space free.
RTP Connected Users
This page shows all RTP users currently connected to the DME. Click on the column header
to sort the entries up or down.
Display entries
From the dropdown, select the number of entries you wish to
display on the page.
Page Refresh Interval From the dropdown, select the desired page refresh interval.
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Monitor
Connected Users
The DME displays the following information for each connected
user. Click on the header field to sort ascending or descending.
• Type – indicates a stream is present.
• IP Address – user IP address.
• Bit Rate – stream bit rate in Kbps.
• Bytes Sent – total bytes sent.
• % Packet Loss – percentage packet loss.
• Time Connected – total time connected.
• Connected To – target IP address.
Multi Protocol Connections
This page shows all RTMP users currently connected to the DME. Click on the column
header to sort the entries up or down
Display entries
From the dropdown, select the number of entries you wish to
display on the page.
Page Refresh Interval From the dropdown, select the desired page refresh interval.
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Connected RTMP
Streams
The DME displays the following information for each connected
stream. Click on the header field to sort ascending or descending.
• Type – indicates a stream is present.
• Stream Type – the following strings are displayed only when
data is being streamed. "Active" denotes an inbound stream (i.e.
one being generated); "Streaming" denotes an outbound stream.
– In RTMP Active
– In RTP Active
– In TS Active
– Out RTMP Streaming | blank
– Out RTP Streaming | blank
– Out TS Streaming | blank
– Out HLS Active | blank
• IP Address – IP address of connected user.
• Port – port to which user is connected.
• Session ID – unique session ID for connection.
• Packets Sent – number of packets sent.
• Packets Lost – number of packets lost.
• Time Connected – total time of connection.
• Connected To – target IP address.
Relay Status
This page shows the status of all defined relays. Click on the column header to sort the
entries up or down
Display entries
From the dropdown, select the number of entries you wish to
display.
Page Refresh Interval From the dropdown, select the page refresh interval.
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Monitor
Connected Relays
The DME displays the following information for each connected
relay. Click on the header field to sort ascending or descending.
• Relay Name – relay name.
• Source – source IP address.
• Destination – destination IP address.
• Bit Rate – stream bit rate in Kbps.
• Bytes Relayed – total bytes relayed.
Access History
This page shows the file names that have been requested by all users since the last DME
reset. It is enabled and rolls over (i.e. overwrites the information) as configured on the
Logging page.
Files Requested
File names requested since the last DME reset.
Requests
Number of times the individual file was requested.
Upgrade Log
This log shows a history of all DME upgrade activity. Any .rpm upgrades will be reported on
this page as successful, incorrectly signed, or failed. These results are explained in more detail
below. For an explanation of how to upgrade your DME, see Software Upgrade on page 99.
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Success
The .rpm was signed by VBrick and successfully installed.
Not Signed
The .rpm you tried to install does not have the correctly signed VBrick key.
Fail
Either the .rpm upgrade has already been installed or is not valid for this
DME.
Error Log
The Error Log shows status messages as well as errors. It is enabled and rolls over (i.e.
overwrites the file) as configured on the Logging page. To reset the Error Log manually,
scroll to the bottom of the page (if necessary) and click Reset Error Log. If problems occur,
you may be asked to send the error log(s) to VBrick Support Services. The logs are available
in DME root via FTP.
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Chapter 11
Playing DME Streams
Topics in this chapter
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Playing Streams via RTSP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Playing Streams with an SDP File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Playing Streams Using a Flash Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Playing HLS Streams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Playing TS Streams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Overview
DME input and/or output streams can be configured to play on desktops (with a variety of
players), set top boxes, and mobile devices at different locations and in a variety of different
physical configurations. The DME supports live RTP or RTMP (Flash) streams. It also
function as a progressive download server for .wmv and other files. Stored VOD files are
supported by the onboard RTP and RTMP VOD servers and added to the DME via FTP.
To play RTP or RTMP streams you will need a corresponding player. For RTP streams, you
can use a standalone player like StreamPlayer, VLC, or QuickTime, or you can embed one of
these players in a web page. For RTMP, you can use a standalone player like JW or FLV or
you can build a web page with an embedded Flash player. There are numerous ways to play
live and stored streams from the DME and some of the most common scenarios are listed
below and explained on the following pages.
•
•
•
RTSP – using an RTSP URL in StreamPlayer, QuickTime, or VLC.
SDP – using an SDP file with StreamPlayer, QuickTime, or VLC.
Flash Client – play the stream with a standalone Flash player or a player embedded in a
web page.
Table 13. DME File Types and Players
Protocol
Typical Players
RTP
StreamPlayer, Windows Media, QuickTime, VLC
RTMP
Adobe Flash Player, JW Player, FLV Player
Playing Streams via RTSP
You can play live or stored RTP streams (unicast or multicast) in VBrick StreamPlayer, Apple
QuickTime, and other players using RTSP to control the stream. In QuickTime or VLC, you
can launch the stream using the stream URL from the source DME. You can also embed an
RTP player on an HTML page with a fixed URL pointing to the stream, for example: rtsp:/
/<dme_ip_address>/vbStream1S1.sdp In StreamPlayer, enter the full path to the .sdp file
present on your local PC in the IP Address field (Figure 26).
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Figure 26. VBrick StreamPlayer
Playing Streams with an SDP File
You can play live or stored RTP streams using an SDP file. An .sdp file is a text file that
provides descriptive information about the stream and gives the user's computer instructions
for tuning in. When configuring a live stream the SDP file must be manually FTPed to the
DME. For stored streams, the SDP file is automatically created on the RTP or RTMP VOD
server. To play streams with an SDP file you will use a URL similar to the following:
http://<dme_ip_address>/mystream.sdp
If the file is present on your local PC you can play the multicast stream using QuickTime or
VLC to open the file and point to the .sdp file. In StreamPlayer you must enter the complete
path to the file in the IP Address field and click Play.
Playing Streams Using a Flash Client
You can play live or stored RTMP streams from any Flash server including the DME by
downloading and installing a desktop Flash player (Figure 27). You can also can embed the
player in a web page that will invoke a Flash plugin. Adobe, Long Tail and others have
resources on the web explaining how to embed a Flash player in a web page. See http://
www.longtailvideo.com/support/jw-player/13/embedding-flash for a good example. To play
stored streams on a Flash client you will use a URL similar to the following:
rtmp://<dme_ip_address>/application/<stream_name>
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Playing DME Streams
Figure 27. Desktop Flash Player
Playing HLS Streams
HLS streams are typically played on iPhones and similar devices using an HTTP URL. The
HTTP URL syntax is shown below. If the Master Playlist name is blank (on the HLS
Streaming Settings page), the default Master Playlist Name is HLS (all caps). Use the local
DME name if it is configured to cache from the source DME. In this case the local DME
must have the source DME configured on the Caching Settings page.
http://<dme_ip_address>/<master_playlist_name>/<stream_name>/playlist.m3u8
Playing TS Streams
Transport stream output is defined on the TS Out Settings page. When viewing a multicast
stream, use a player like VLC to tune in to the stream via a URL similar to the following. (In
VBrick StreamPlayer, just use the multicast IP address and port number.)
udp://@<multicast_ip_address>:<port>
Alternatively you can play an incoming transport stream via a "served unicast" (see Q– Create
HLS (for iPod, iPhone/iPad) on page 47). The RTSP URL is shown below. In this scenario,
ts (lower case) must be appended to the Stream Name on the TS In Settings page, for
example: TSPullStream1_ts. You will also need a player, like VLC, that supports streaming
via RTSP.
rtsp://<source_dme_ip_address>/<stream_name>_ts
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Chapter 12
Detailed Use Cases
Topics in this chapter
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Configuring a Multicast Relay with an Auto-Unicast Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Configuring a Multicast Relay with a Unicast Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Overview
These use cases describe all of the steps you will need to perform in order to create a
Multicast RTP Relay. The first example explains how to configure for unicast source; the
second example explains how to configure for an auto unicast source. These use cases
provide a complete example of the types of things you will need to do to use the DME
effectively. The VBrick Distributed Media Engine contains a fully featured RTP server which
lets you create an Multicast RTP Relay stream. The relay can be streamed from a unicast
source or from an auto unicast source on a VBrick H.264 encoder. Both of these scenarios
are explained in detail on the following pages. For more information about encoder settings
and parameters, see the VBrick H.264 Encoder Admin Guide.
Note The multicast relay configuration explained here corresponds to the output stream
described in H– Relay (Unicast/Multicast) on page 39. The key difference is that this
topic explains how to configure a multicast relay in much greater detail.
Configuring a Multicast Relay with a Unicast Source
This example shows how to use the DME to relay an H.264 unicast stream from a VBrick
H.264 encoder as a multicast stream. Clients will then be able to join the multicast via HTTP
to the DME. This example shows how a relay can be streamed from a unicast source on a VBrick
H.264 encoder.
H.264 Encoder Setup
1.
2.
Configure an H.264 encoder with a valid RTP stream then configure a transmitter to
unicast to the DME (using higher video/audio port values).
Configure the transmitter with the following settings:
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3.
Copy the sdp file to your local PC, copy and rename (for example pub.sdp and pub1.sdp).
Modify the copied .sdp file with the following. (The original file is on the left; the
modified file on the right.)
4.
Modify the .sdp file as follows:
a. Line 2 – change the address to the IP Address of the DME.
b. Line 5 – change the address to the desired Multicast Address and add the TTL (for
example: /63).
c. Line 13 – add the number of ports needed for the Video Port.
d. Line 19 – add the number of ports needed for the Audio Port.
FTP the modified file to the DME server's root directory. The modified file is needed so
that clients can tune into the active multicast. The file can be distributed by the built-in
HTTP engine and accessed with a URL similar to this:
5.
http://<dme_ip_address>/pub1.sdp
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Detailed Use Cases
DME Setup
1.
Create a new RTP Relay.
2.
Configure the RTP Relay as follows:
a. Enter a Relay Name.
b. Set the Status to Enabled.
c. Enter the IP Address as 127.0.0.1 and enter the original .sdp file name.
d. Select Request incoming stream .
e. Enter the Multicast IP Address from the .sdp file.
f. Enter the Video Port value and Multicast TTL.
The user will view the video using QuickTime and entering the HTTP url to the SDP file
located on the DME. In the example above the original sdp file is taco-uni.sdp and the
modified sdp is taco-uni1.sdp. So the URL will be http://172.22.2.50/taco-uni1.sdp.
Note You will need to generate (and modify) a new sdp file every time the encoder video
settings are changed.
Configuring a Multicast Relay with an Auto-Unicast
Source
The VBrick Distributed Media Engine contains a fully featured RTP server, giving the
administrator the ability to provide an RTP Relay Multicast stream. When configured, clients
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95
will then be able to join the multicast via HTTP to the DME. This example shows how a relay
can be streamed from an auto unicast source on a VBrick H.264 encoder.
H.264 Encoder Setup
1.
Configure the encoder with a valid Auto Unicast (UDP and TCP) stream then configure
a transmitter to unicast to the DME.
2.
Configure the transmitter with the following settings:
a. Set the Auto Unicast Dest Port to the RTSP port of the DME.
b. Configure the Auto Unicast Dest Pub Point Name to the desired sdp file name. This
.sdp file will be automatically placed in the root folder. (Note: The file name must be
appended with .sdp or the auto unicast will fail.)
c. Enable the transmitter and verify it is sending to the DME.
Log into the DME via FTP and copy the sdp file to the client PC.
Open the sdp file and modify it as follows. (The original file is on the left; the modified
file on the right.)
3.
4.
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Detailed Use Cases
5.
6.
Modify the .sdp file as follows:
a. Line 2 – add the IP address of the DME.
b. Line 5 – add the desired Multicast IP address.
c. Line 13 – add the desired Video Port value (must be an even number for RTP) and
number of ports (always 2).
d. Line 19 = add the desired Audio Port value used in line 13 (+ 2) and number of
ports.
Save the new .sdp file with a known name (for example testmulti2.sdp) and FTP it to
the DME server. Put the new .sdp file into the root folder. The modified file is needed so
that clients can tune into the active multicast. The file can be distributed by the built-in
HTTP engine and accessed with a URL similar to this:
http://<dme_ip_address>/testmulti2.sdp
DME Setup
1.
Configure a new Relay:
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2.
Play the Multicast Relay using QuickTime with a URL in the following format. If desired,
a URL can be added to the VBrick's external Announce Settings on the Program
Configuration > Transmitters page.
http://<DME_IP_Address>/<testmulti2.sdp>
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Chapter 13
System Maintenance
Topics in this chapter
Software Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Installing Security Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Managing Disk Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Backup and Restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Software Upgrade
You can upgrade the DME software using VBrick's VBDirectory management application
and the VBDMEDownload upgrade tool. You can launch the upgrade tool from the Start menu
(go to Start > All Programs > VBrick > VBDMEDownload) or from VBDirectory. For
details that explain how to use the tool, see the DME Release Notes. To view the history of all
previous upgrade activity, see the Upgrade Log on page 87.
Figure 28. VBDMEDownload Upgrade Tool
Installing Security Updates
Signed VBrick security updates may be periodically available. Do not neglect to install these
updates but to avoid impacting performance, install updates only when the system is idle. Do
not update the DME with any software except as directed by VBrick.
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Managing Disk Space
Your system has differing amounts of content storage available depending on the model you
purchased. For example the Model 7570 has (6) 300 GB of RAID 5 storage. For best results
and to avoid impacting performance it is important to regularly monitor your CPU Load and
Disk Usage on the Monitor > System Usage page (see Figure 29).
Figure 29. System Usage Page
Backup and Restore
As a best practice you should periodically save your configuration settings in case they need
to be restored at a later time. Manage Configuration on page 61 explains how to save and
restore the configuration as well as how to reset the DME to the VBrick factory defaults.
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VBrick Systems, Inc.
12 Beaumont Road
Wallingford, CT 06492, USA
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