Migrating from Brocade ECFM to Brocade DCFM

Migrating from Brocade ECFM to Brocade DCFM
FROM THE SOLUTIONS CENTER
Solution Guide:
Migrating from Brocade Enterprise Fabric
Connectivity Manager to Brocade Data
Center Fabric Manager
Brocade Data Center Fabric Manager (DCFM) simplifies infrastructure
management with the performance and scalability required in the
Brocade Data Center Fabric, which connects applications to
infrastructure in the majority of the world’s data centers.
FROM THE SOLUTIONS CENTER
Solution Guide
CONTENTS
Introduction........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 3
Supported Firmware ...................................................................................................................................................... 3
Migration Facts .............................................................................................................................................................. 4
Migration Overview ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4
Planning.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 5
Migration Considerations .............................................................................................................................................. 5
The Discovery Switch ..................................................................................................................................................... 5
Deployment Best Practices for Public/Private Networks ............................................................................................ 6
Open Management Network.................................................................................................................................. 6
Private Management Network ............................................................................................................................... 7
Hybrid Management Network................................................................................................................................ 9
Split Management Network .................................................................................................................................10
Firewall Considerations........................................................................................................................................10
Zoning...........................................................................................................................................................................10
Nicknames ...................................................................................................................................................................11
Third-Party Management Products .............................................................................................................................11
Integration APIs (SMI, SWAPI)..............................................................................................................................12
Northbound notification – SNMP, Syslog forwarding .........................................................................................13
Topology Maps .............................................................................................................................................................14
Client Interface .....................................................................................................................................................14
Topology Layout....................................................................................................................................................14
Views .....................................................................................................................................................................15
Installation and Deployment.....................................................................................................................................................................................................16
Installing the Remote Client ........................................................................................................................................16
Running the Client .......................................................................................................................................................19
Importing Names .........................................................................................................................................................19
Post-Deployment Configuration...............................................................................................................................................................................................20
Discovery of Environment............................................................................................................................................20
Missed Switches...................................................................................................................................................20
Validation Testing ........................................................................................................................................................21
Technical Support Information....................................................................................................................................21
Appendix A: Brocade Fabric Management Product Family...........................................................................................................................................22
Appendix B: Integration with Partner Management Frameworks...............................................................................................................................23
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INTRODUCTION
Brocade® DCFM™ is a management application that provides easy, centralized management of the Storage
Area Network (SAN), as well as quick access to all product configuration applications. Using this
application, you can configure, manage, and monitor your networks with ease. In order to introduce higher
scalability and performance, Brocade DCFM was designed to perform discovery through a single Fabric OS®
(FOS) director or switch, whereas Brocade Enterprise Fabric Connectivity Manager (EFCM) discovered all
directors directly over an Ethernet connection. In an existing Storage Area Network (SAN) comprised of
legacy McDATA directors, a Brocade discovery switch must be introduced prior to upgrading from EFCM to
DCFM (see the “Planning” section).
In addition to reading this document, for further details about how to install, configure, and deploy Brocade
DCFM, ensure that you have access to the product documentation:
•
Brocade Data Center Fabric Manager Enterprise User Manual
•
Brocade Data Center Fabric Manager Migration and Transition Guide: provides installation instructions,
migration instructions from both Brocade EFCM and Brocade Fabric Manager, and information about
the differences between EFCM and Fabric Manager interfaces and the Brocade DCFM interface.
•
Brocade Data Center Fabric Manager Enterprise Release Notes
And other Brocade papers:
•
Brocade DCFM Features Guide
•
Brocade DCFM Data Sheet
NOTE: Although there are several different versions of Brocade DCFM, unless otherwise noted, this
document refers to Brocade DCFM Enterprise. Brocade DCFM Professional is another version of the
application with a subset of capabilities.
This document is for Brocade customers who are currently using Brocade Enterprise Fabric Connectivity
Manager (EFCM) and want to find out more about migrating to Brocade DCFM. It is not intended as a
definitive technical reference on Brocade DCFM, but it provides guidelines for field engineers or IT
personnel at customer sites.
Supported Firmware
FOS
•
Version 5.0.0 or later for discovery
•
Version 5.3.0 or later for support for all configuration features
•
Version 6.0.0 for Native Interoperability (NI) fabrics
M-EOS
•
Version M-EOSc 9.6.x, 9.7.x, 9.8.x
•
Version M-EOSn 9.6.x, 9.7.x, 9.8.x
NOTE: Although you do not have to install or know the Java version used because it is bundled with both
versions of Brocade DCFM, development was conducted using Java JDK 1.6.
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Migration Facts
There is no charge for Brocade EFCM license conversion to Brocade DCFM Enterprise:
•
EFCM customers with valid software licenses are entitled to upgrade to a DFCM Enterprise license at
no additional charge.
•
Customers upgrading to DCFM Enterprise are required to purchase a service agreement with a
minimum one-year term.
•
You can upgrade to Brocade DCFM if you currently have the EFCM Enterprise Base, EFCM Enterprise +
Advanced Module, EFCM Standard 9.6 or 9.7 to DCFM Enterprise
•
Data from your Brocade EFCM will be migrated to DCFM Enterprise. Brocade DCFM Enterprise supports
a mixed M-EOS and FOS fabric. On pure M-EOS fabrics, consult your sales representative to help you
decide the right solution for your environment.
MIGRATION OVERVIEW
The migration is described in detail in the Brocade DCFM Migration and Transition Guide. For your
convenience, this section lists high-level steps required for the migration in a Windows environment,
including:
•
Review the “pre-flight” checklist, making sure that:
o
You have the DCFM license key (on the Key Certificate) and serial number (from the DVD jewel
case).
o
A version of EFCM is installed on your server that meets migration requirements.
o
The fabric is using the required version of M-EOS.
o
The EFCM data is fully backed up on your current management servers.
NOTE: Ensure that all instances of the EFCM client are closed on the management server and on
remote workstations.
•
Insert the Brocade DCFM installation DVD into the drive on a Windows management server and follow
onscreen directions.
•
Migrate data from your Brocade EFCM application. This could take up to 30 minutes.
•
Specify the following settings and apply them (could take up to 30 minutes):
•
o
Configure the IP server.
o
Configure server Syslog, Web server, SNMP, and starting ports.
o
Configure the fabric size (small, medium or large).
o
Select the FTP server.
Start the DCFM server and client. Once all the DCFM services are started, you can log in. You can use
your user ID and password from EFCM.
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PLANNING
As with all technology upgrades in the data center, planning is a critical part of the process. When you are
migrating from one software application to another, you need to find out as much as you can about the new
application and how it differs from the application you are currently using, that is, Brocade EFCM. Then
decide when is the right time to upgrade and start putting a task list, task owners, and a timeline in place.
Migration Considerations
There are several things to consider when you are making the decision to migrate to Brocade DCFM.
Note the following:
•
Export to database (MySQL and DB2) not supported: the EFCM flat-file structure is replaced by a
Sybase database in DCFM.
•
EMC ControlCenter (ECC) API support: SMI-S is the management interface for DCFM.
•
Event Management Rules: DCFM has limited Event Management capabilities, see the product
documentation for details.
•
Manager of Managers (MoM): Master/subordinate instances are not supported.
•
Group-by function in Views: All views are migrated, but any views customized by a “Group-by” revert to
their default grouping.
•
The Performance Data Master log is not migrated from EFCM to DCFM.
The Discovery Switch
A switch, which is called a “discovery switch” when it is used in this context, must be a B-Series device
running Fabric OS® (FOS). The discovery switch is a switch in the fabric that uses in-band communication to
get fabric-wide information about the Name Server, Zoning, and fabric membership. There must be at least
one discovery switch configured in pure Fabric OS fabrics and present and configured in mixed fabrics. The
presence of a discovery switch provides significant help in improving the scalability of the application.
NOTE: In the Brocade DCFM interface, the discovery switch may be called the “seed switch.”
The following devices can be configured as a discovery switch:
•
For pure FOS fabrics: B-Series switch running FOS 5.3.x or later
•
For mixed fabrics: B-Series switch running FOS 6.0.x or later in Native Interop mode
Note the following:
•
DCFM expects the FOS discovery switch to be running the most recent level of firmware in the fabric.
•
You cannot use a switch in Access Gateway mode or a switch connected to the fabric either via
EX_Ports or VEX_Ports.
•
DCFM end users need to have administrative privileges on the discovery switch (or equivalent access,
such as root, factory, or admin).
•
Eclipse (McDATA routers) discovery and configuration is not supported.
•
Pure QLogic/Cisco fabrics are not discovered.
•
Only basic information is displayed for non-Brocade devices.
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Brocade DCFM allows you to bring down the current discovery switch for maintenance or replacement. For
High Availability (HA) with one discovery switch, the recommendation is to configure Inter-Switch Links (ISLs)
to more than one switch in the fabric to handle potential port failures. You could also support HA with two
discovery switches, in which case the recommendation is to have at least two B-Series switches for failover
(manual).
General recommendations for a discovery switch are:
•
Small fabrics: Use an entry level switch, such as the Brocade 200E (in switch not Access Gateway
mode) or the Brocade 300.
•
Medium fabrics: You can use a Brocade 5000 Switch, but Brocade DCX Backbone or 48000 Director is
recommended.
•
Large fabrics: You can use a Brocade 5000 Switch, but Brocade DCX Backbone or 48000 Director is
recommended.
Deployment Best Practices for Public/Private Networks
They are many different ways that a DCFM server can be deployed. Some configurations are restrictive and
provide greater levels of security. Other configurations are more flexible and may make it easier to deal
with change. Planning the LAN connectivity for DCFM will help to ensure that your deployment matches the
needs of your environment.
Open Management Network
For the purpose of this document an Open Management Network is one where the DCFM server is attached
to the company intranet with a single Ethernet attachment, as shown in Figure 1. The devices to be
managed by DCFM are also attached directly to the company intranet via Ethernet. Typically the server and
the devices are in the same location and likely on the same subnet, but devices could be remote as well.
Figure 1. Open management network configuration
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There are several advantages to an open management network:
•
Configuring DCFM and the devices is straightforward as there is little concern for IP routes or the DCFM
server having multiple Network Interface Cards (NICs). Furthermore, a SAN administrator who wishes to
use Web Tools, Telnet, SSH, or other management protocols outside Brocade DCFM can easily do so
from any client station with access to the intranet that the SAN devices are attached to.
•
Another benefit of an open management network is that the devices can be configured to send
asynchronous messages to a server other than the DCFM server. For example, SNMP or SYSLOG could
be configured on each of the managed devices to send messages to a server (other than the DCFM
server), which would receive and process those messages accordingly.
•
One of the most important benefits of an open management network is the ability to have a server that
runs scripts that utilize SSH, Perl, Expect, or other scripting protocols to communicate with and make
changes on the Fibre Channel (FC) devices under management.
There are some caveats, however, to using an open management network:
•
Probably the most critical is the other viewpoint of one of the strengths of this configuration, that is,
that any device on the customer intranet can use any of the available protocols to access any
backbone, director, or switch attached to the network.
•
Protecting the FC devices with strong passwords is especially important in this configuration.
•
In addition, access restrictions can be set at either the managed SAN device (backbone, director,
switch) or in the managed Ethernet switch to which the SAN device’s management port(s) are
connected. Restrictions can be set by IP address, IP ports, or both. Doing so reduces the security
concerns of running an open management network. Attaching SAN devices to a company intranet could
expose them to other security threats, including attempts to gain access, denial of service attacks, and
others. As previously explained, the risks of running in an open management network can be greatly
reduced by creating access restrictions.
Private Management Network
In a private management network, Brocade DCFM is attached to both the company intranet with one
Ethernet connection and a private network, to which managed devices are also be attached. DCFM client
connections are accepted on the Ethernet connection attached to the company intranet, and all
management traffic between DCFM and the devices are on the private network, as shown in Figure 2.
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Figure 2. Private management network configuration
The private management network was a common configuration with Brocade EFCM in the past. Many
customers used an Ethernet hub, which was included as part of a rack system into which the FC switches or
directors were installed in. While it is still possible to run DCFM with a private management network on a
hub, you can achieve better performance between the DCFM server and the managed devices using a
minimum of one dedicated fast Ethernet switch (100 MB, full-duplex device). A private Virtual LAN (VLAN)
on a larger network switch would provide the most robust solution.
A private management network provides the benefit of having the DCFM server act as a firewall between
the company intranet and the managed FC switches. Denial of service attacks and attempts to log in could
largely be performed only against the DCFM server itself and not against the managed devices. Access to
the DCFM server should be protected in the same way that other critical servers in the data center are—to
prevent unauthorized access.
While the private management network provides a configuration that can prevent access other than the
DCFM server to managed devices, Note that there are proxy agents on the DCFM server that will allow
limited access to the managed devices through other protocols. A telnet and HTTP proxy both exist in the
DCFM server.
•
(M-EOS only) The telnet proxy requires that you log in to the proxy first with the login/password
combination you would use to log in to the DCFM server, and then a client will be allowed to establish a
telnet session through the DCFM server to a given managed FC device.
•
The HTTP proxy provides a mechanism to use Brocade Web Tools from stations on the company
intranet other than the DCFM server. No proxy agents exist on the DCFM server for SSH, SCP, SNMP,
FTP, or Syslog on the DCFM server.
While it may still be possible to use some level of scripts (Perl, Expect, and so on) to make changes on the
managed devices, it can be much more complex in the private management network configuration mostly
due to the inability to have clients outside the private network communicate directly with the managed
devices. It is likely that the only way to do it securely would be to run the scripts on the DCFM server or add
another connection to the private network from a server that runs the scripts to make changes on the
managed devices.
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Hybrid Management Network
In rare cases, hybrid management networks, that is, private management network topology and open
network management topology are both implemented with the same server, as shown in Figure 3. In most
cases these configurations started as private management networks and later managed devices not close
enough to be included in the private management network were added and were therefore brought under
management in an open management network configuration. Some data centers may decide to stay with a
hybrid configuration for various reasons. There may be mission critical directors on the private network,
while the devices on the company intranet may be much less critical. Note that a hybrid configuration is a
valid configuration and that the benefits and drawbacks of the private and open management network
types apply to their respective portions of the hybrid management network.
Figure 3. Hybrid management network configuration
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Split Management Network
Split management networks are usually found when a Fibre Channel network spans more than one location
or data center, as shown in Figure 4. In a split management network, some portion of the SAN is under
management of a DCFM server in its location, while another portion of the SAN is under management of a
different DCFM server at another location. The actual LAN topology for management is still likely to be either
an open management network or a private network management network as described above.
Figure 4. Split management network configuration
Firewall Considerations
Describe protocols that must be open between the DCFM client and server processes. Also describe other
protocols that could optionally exposed for other services via the intranet connection on the DCFM server,
that is, SMI-S, SNMP, HTTP, SSL, telnet, SSH, and FTP. If a firewall is put between the DCFM server and the
managed devices, which ports must be opened and which are optional. Do not consider just day-to-day
management, but also the also the services listed above. For details, see the Brocade Data Center Fabric
User Manual.
Zoning
Using Brocade EFCM, you can construct offline zone sets and save them into a global library or into
individual per-fabric libraries in the EFCM database. The only time that an EFCM zone set is sent to the
fabric is during a Zone Set Activation operation.
In Brocade DCFM, the Zone DB menu (shown in Figure 5) is equivalent to the Zone Library menu in EFCM
and can display up to three items immediately following a migration:
•
Fabric Zone DB: This function is implemented to access the defined and effective offline zone
configurations stored in the fabric when a FOS switch is present.
NOTE: Because switches in an M-EOS fabric cannot contain more than one zone configuration, EFCM
has no equivalent capability. Legacy EFCM users can disregard the Fabric Zone DB data.
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•
Zone Library: This library reflects zoning information contained in the autonomous EFCM per-fabric
zoning libraries. If you were not using per-fabric libraries prior to migration (that is, using the global
library instead), then this selection will not contain any data.
•
Global Zone Library: This library reflects zoning information contained in the common EFCM global
zoning library. If you were not using the global zoning library prior to migration (that is, using per-fabric
libraries instead), then this selection will not contain any data.
DCFM Operational Difference: The DCFM Global Zone Library is NOT as common a library as it was in
EFCM. During migration, the EFCM Global Zone Library is simply replicated into a per-fabric Zone
Library for each fabric. Therefore, a DCFM Global Zone Library behaves like any autonomous per-fabric
Zone Library.
Figure 5. Zoning window showing the Zone database menu
Nicknames
Called “Nicknames” in Brocade EFCM, you can use Names in DCFM as a way of providing simple userfriendly names for products and ports. During migration, nicknames are converted to names and are
exported to a CSV file. Once you have logged into DCFM, you can import this file. Note that the userconfigurable setting for whether or not to use unique or non-unique names is also migrated.
NOTE: If you have nicknames that are greater than 128 characters in length, they are truncated at 128
characters during data migration. Although it is unlikely that truncating names will cause problems, if you
know you have very long nicknames, you might want to make the 128 characters or less in EFCM before the
migration.
Third-Party Management Products
Many customers use a combination of Brocade EFCM and third-party Storage Resource Management (SRM)
products to manage their storage and fabric infrastructure. The most commonly used SRM products
include:
•
EMC ControlCenter (ECC)
•
IBM TotalStorage Productivity Center (TPC)
•
HP Storage Essentials (SE)
•
Hitachi HiCommand Storage Services Manager (HSSM)
•
NetApp Onaro SANscreen
•
Symantec CommandCentral Storage (CCS)
Customers leverage these SRM products primarily for LUN-level activities (for example, LUN provisioning,
LUN masking/mapping, reporting, chargebacks, and performance characterization). They are also used in
conjunction with EFCM to manage storage provisioning for applications via the connected network fabric
(configuring the fabric ports for appropriate protocol/speed, zoning, configuring QoS parameters, collecting
performance statistics, monitoring for error conditions, and so on).
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EFCM is used to support both proprietary API interfaces (ECC API for EMC ECC, SWAPI for other SRM
products) and standards-based SMI-S interfaces to enable these SRM products to discover and manage
SAN elements. With DCFM, the proprietary APIs are not being carried forward, since they reached End of
Life (EOL) a while ago in favor of the standards-based SMI-S approach. Therefore, customers migrating from
EFCM to DCFM will have to ensure that they use SMI-S for any fabric and switch related activities that they
want managed through these SRM products. All of Brocade’s key partners have already migrated their SRM
products to SMI-S and therefore, this shouldn’t pose any issues.
NOTE: For more details on best practices regarding deployment of SMI-S providers for various scenarios
(public/private networks, FOS and M-EOS intermixed fabrics in IM2 and IM3 modes, and so on), refer to
either the OEM best practices documentation or Brocade best practices managing FC fabrics using Brocade
SMI-S Agent documentation.
Table 1. Compatibility between SRM products and SMI-S for FOS and M-EOS
SRM Product
SRM Product Version
SMI for FOS Version
SMI for M-EOS Version
EMC ECC
6.1
120.7.1
2.2.2
IBM TPC
3.3.0
3.3.1
3.3.2
120.7.0a
2.1
HP SE
5.1
6.0
120.6.0a
NetApp Onaro SANscreen
TO COME
TO COME
TO COME
Symantec CCS
5.0
110.5.0a
N/A
2.2.0
IMPORTANT: Information provided in the table above is current as of the writing of this document
Integration APIs (SMI, SWAPI)
Storage Management Initiative (SMI) is a broad-based initiative sponsored by the Storage Networking
Industry Association (SNIA) that is standardizing all aspects of storage management for multivendor storage
networking products. SMI encompasses the storage aspects of the Common Information Model (CIM) from
the Distributed Management Task Force (DMTF). “CIM provides a common definition of management
information for systems, networks, applications and services, and allows for vendor extensions. CIM's
common definitions enable vendors to exchange semantically rich management information between
systems throughout the network.”
The Brocade SMI Agent (SMI-A) is a “proxy” agent to multiple fabrics; it resides on a separate host. When it
is deployed, the SMI-A does not require any modification or upgrade to deployed fabrics. All the support
required in Brocade switches is already in place.
The Brocade SMI Agent supports the evolving SMI-S standard and the Brocade functionality not available
through the standard.
The Brocade SMI Agent provides the following features:
•
CIM agent compliant with SMI-S, with support for the following profiles:
•
Server profile (supported by the SMI-A with CIMOM vendor-supplied providers)
•
Fabric profile
•
Switch profile
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•
Extender profile (discovery only)
•
Fibre Channel (FC) Host Bus Adapter (HBA) profile
•
Additional support for physical objects such as chassis, blades, fans, power supplies, temperature
sensors, and transceivers
Solution Guide
It supports the following:
•
Connection and account management
•
Port performance and error statistics
•
HBA and device information via FDMI
•
Configuration download to switches
•
Firmware download to switches
•
SLP (Service Location Protocol) to discover SMI-S profiles
•
CIM agent management using CIM
•
Indications: life-cycle indications for fabrics, SANs, nodes, switches, and switch ports; and alert
indications for many fabric events.
•
Basic support for non-Brocade switches (switches, ports, topology information, and so on)
•
HTTP and HTTPS protocols
•
HTTP and HTTPS port configuration
•
Mutual authentication for clients and indications
•
Security authorization using native OS access control mechanisms
•
Provider logging of exceptions, operations, and performance metrics for diagnostic purposes
•
Secure SAN fabrics
•
Secure RPC communication
•
CIM queries, using WBEM Query Language (WQL)
Northbound notification – SNMP, Syslog forwarding
•
SNMP Trap Forwarding: You can configure the application to send SNMP traps to other computers. To
correctly configure trap forwarding, you must configure the target computer’s IP address and SNMP
ports.
•
Syslog Forwarding: Syslog messages are available only on B-Series platforms.
Syslog forwarding is the process by which you can configure the management application to send
Syslog messages to other computers. Switches send the Syslog information only through port 514;
therefore, if port 514 is being used by another application, you must configure the management
application to listen on a different port. Then you must configure another Syslog server to listen for
Syslog messages and forward the messages to the management application Syslog listening port.
Syslog messages are persisted in the database. You can view the Syslog messages from the
management application. However, the management application does not convert the Syslog
messages into event objects except for the audit Syslog messages.
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Topology Maps
Client Interface
Users of EFCM will be very familiar and comfortable with the DCFM interface, as the two are almost
identical. The key difference between the two interfaces is that the Event Management and Security tabs
are in different places.
•
You can access Event Policies available through Monitor > Event Policies .
•
Security Center is available only through the M-Series Element Managers. One change on the toolbar is
that the Export function is no longer available as that functionality has been moved to individual dialog
boxes.
Figure 6: Example DCFM topology screen
Topology Layout
After upgrading to DCFM, the topology layout options may be set back to defaults. If that is the case, you
will still be able to customize various parts of the topology, including the layout of devices and connections
as well as group background colors, to easily and quickly view and monitor devices in your SAN. See the
“Topology Layout” section in the Brocade DCFM Enterprise User’s Manual for details on how to customize
your topology map.
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Views
All of the user-created views are migrated to DCFM during the upgrade process. However, there may be
some views that do not display as expected. For example, views in EFCM can be grouped by many different
fields (labels), such as location, enclosure, vendor, and so on. However in DCFM, views can be grouped only
by fabric.
Figure 7. Create Views dialog box
Instructions to create customized views can be found in the “View Management” section of the Brocade
DCFM Enterprise User’s Manual.
One of the most common uses of views was to group all of the HBAs together for a single server. A better
way to achieve this grouping is to use the Server Port Mapping feature, which performs the same function.
HBA server mapping is useful in situations in which multi-port HBAs connect to different fabrics. Right-click
an HBA to initiate the HBA Server Mapping dialog box, shown in Figure 8.
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Figure 8. HBA Server Mapping dialog box
NOTE: In EFCM, ports from multiple fabrics could participate in a group, whereas in DCFM, only ports from a
single fabric can participate in a group.
INSTALLATION AND DEPLOYMENT
Installing the Remote Client
With EFCM there were two methods to install the client application:
1)
Install the client using the application CD.
2)
Download and install the client from the EFCM server’s Web site.
The DCFM client is now a Web start application launched from the DCFM server; type the IP address of the
DCFM server in the browser window.
NOTE: If SSL was selected during the installation, you will need to use HTTPS:// to access the DCFM Web
site, shown in Figure 9.
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Figure 9. The DCFM Web site
You can change the SSL and port settings after the installation by going to SAN > Options > Server Port, as
shown in Figure 10. (In EFCM, these settings were under Server Connections.)
Figure 10. SAN Options dialog box
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•
If SSL is changed after the Web Start client has been installed, the DCFM client link that is created in
the Start Menu, will no longer function. This is because the network address is embedded in the link
with HTTP or HTTPS. That also means if the network address changes the link will fail.
•
If you go from no SSL to enabling SSL, a “Server not available” message is displayed when you launch
DCFM from the Start Menu:
To correct this you need to reinitiate the “Web Start the DCFM Client” from the DFCM Web page, which
reinstalls the client and fixes the link.
•
If SSL was enabled and you disable SSL, a “Login Error” message is displayed when you launch DCFM
from the Start Menu:
To correct this you need to delete the link, clear out the Java cache and reinitiate the “Web Start the
DCFM Client” from the DFCM Web page. This will reinstall the client and add the correct link.
If you encounter these errors, you can always reach the client via the Web Start until you can fix the
problem.
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Running the Client
Launch the DCFM client by either using the Start Menu link or using “Web Start the DCFM Client” from the
DCFM Web page. This displays the login screen, which is very similar to the EFCM client login screen. The
two differences are the Network Address is now hard coded in and the setup button is missing. The options
that were under the setup button can be changed from inside DFCM which is a more logical place to make
the changes.
The default user name and password have also remained the same, Administrator and password. User
names are no longer case sensitive but passwords continue to be case sensitive.
In some cases, a network may use virtual private network (VPN) or firewall technology, which can prohibit
communication between servers and clients. In other words, a client can find a server, appear to log in, but
is immediately logged out because the server cannot reach the client. To resolve this issue, the ports in the
table below need to be opened up in the firewall.
The EFC Manager remote client application will run on Microsoft Windows 2000 or on Microsoft Windows
2003 or on Microsoft Windows XP Professional Service Pack 2 or later. If the patches have been applied,
click the following button to begin the installation process. You will receive a Java Security warning
requesting permission to download and start the installer program, and to read and write files on your
system. You must grant these permissions to allow installation of the EFC Manager application.
Importing Names
To import names (previously nicknames in EFCM), choose Configure > Names to display the Configure
Names dialog box, shown in Figure 11. Click Import to display the Import Files dialog box, browse to the
location of the CSV file, and follow onscreen instructions.
Figure 11. Configure Names dialog box
NOTE: If you have nicknames that are greater than 128 characters in length, they are truncated at 128
characters during data migration.
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POST-DEPLOYMENT CONFIGURATION
Discovery of Environment
First display the Discovery dialog box by choosing Discovery > Setup. You can also use the Setup icon on the
main toolbar. The RBAC Discovery permission controls access to displaying this dialog box and all its
functions.
If you want to know if a switch has been discovered or not, use the switch’s Properties dialog box.
Missed Switches
If a fabric has been discovered and some of its switches segment out into single or multiple new fabrics,
you can now easily rediscover those new fabrics in the Discover Setup window without entering their
credentials.
Figure 12. Discover Setup window
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Validation Testing
The main way to ensure that data has been migrated from Brocade EFCM to DCFM correctly is to look at the
data in DCFM. For example, check the following types of data:
•
Zones
•
Topology displays that you’ve customized (see also “Topology Maps” section earlier in this document)
•
Role-Based Access Control (RBAC) data
•
User list
•
Names (see also “Names” section earlier in this document)
•
ROV/TOV setting
Technical Support Information
1)
Click the Technical Support Information tab.
2)
In the text field, specify the path to save the DCFM server technical support information to.
3)
Click Capture to gather all the information, and then click Close.
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APPENDIX A: BROCADE FABRIC MANAGEMENT PRODUCT FAMILY
(This information is available in several other documents, but as a convenience, it is added here too.)
Brocade DCFM manages both FOS fabrics and mixed FOS/M-EOS fabrics with product-specific element
managers and enhanced group management functions. The DCFM architecture integrates the best
management features of EFCM and Fabric Manager; it is based on the EFCM Graphical User Interface (GUI)
and Fabric Manager messaging and data management design for improved performance and scalability.
Brocade DCFM is available as two different products—DCFM Professional and DCFM Enterprise.
Brocade DCFM Professional is targeted at customers seeking a less extensive management solution for
smaller SANs. This software is included with Brocade switches and allows management of a single FOS
fabric (up to a 1,000 switch ports) at a time. It performs group switch management beyond the scope of
Brocade Web Tools
DCFM Professional is available with the purchase of any Brocade switch and is also available for download
via the Brocade corporate Web. A seamless migration path is available from DCFM Professional to DCFM
Enterprise.
Brocade DCFM Enterprise is an enterprise-class product targeted at customers that demand a
management software solution with comprehensive support for:
•
Brocade DCX Backbone-based Data Center Fabric (DCF)
•
Fabric-based encryption support for data-at-rest solutions
•
End-to-end manageability of the data center fabric from HBA ports through switch ports to storage ports
DCFM Enterprise provides a holistic view of up to 24 fabrics and the connected devices, whether local to
the data center or geographically dispersed. Policy-based management enables IT organizations to meet
their Service Level Agreements (SLAs). It provides unparalleled scalability and performance over existing
Brocade management products. DCFM Enterprise provides multi-protocol networking support for:
•
Fibre Channel
•
Fiber Connectivity (FICON)
•
Fibre Channel over IP (FCIP)
•
Fibre Channel Routing (FCR)
•
Internet SCSI (iSCSI)
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APPENDIX B: INTEGRATION WITH PARTNER MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORKS
(This information is available in several other documents, but as a convenience, it is added here too.)
Brocade DCFM is designed with open standards interfaces to simplify integration with management
frameworks supplied by server, storage, and infrastructure management partners. The DCFM open
standards architecture has the following characteristics:
•
Simplifies partner integration using open standard interfaces (SNMP, SMI-S, Firefox)
•
Improves customer management of virtualized resources (server, fabric, storage)
•
Reduces management complexity of virtualized data centers
•
Improves administrator productivity, so that human resources scale efficiently with the growth of
storage and virtual server workloads
DCFM provides integrated data path management for server networks, multi-protocol data center fabrics,
and heterogeneous storage environments. Its open interfaces simplify partner management integration,
anticipating the evolution of infrastructure management from physical switch management to policy-based
service management, essential for cost-effective, scalable management of virtual data centers. To ensure
that all of this works together seamlessly, we have architected the appropriate integration hooks into the
code right from the beginning.
© 2008 Brocade Communications Systems, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 09/08 GA-SG-118-00
Brocade, Fabric OS, File Lifecycle Manager, MyView, and StorageX are registered trademarks and the Brocade B-wing symbol,
DCFM, DCX, and SAN Health are trademarks of Brocade Communications Systems, Inc., in the United States and/or in other
countries. All other brands, products, or service names are or may be trademarks or service marks of, and are used to identify,
products or services of their respective owners.
Notice: This document is for informational purposes only and does not set forth any warranty, expressed or implied, concerning
any equipment, equipment feature, or service offered or to be offered by Brocade. Brocade reserves the right to make changes
to this document at any time, without notice, and assumes no responsibility for its use. This informational document describes
features that may not be currently available. Contact a Brocade sales office for information on feature and product availability.
Export of technical data contained in this document may require an export license from the United States government.
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