DMX OWNER`S MANUAL

DMX OWNER`S MANUAL
DMX OWNER'S MANUAL
By
DANIEL SOFER
Third Edition
June 1982
Copyright 1982 Oberheim Electronics, Inc.
Oberheim Electronics, Inc.
2250 South Barrington Avenue
Los Angeles, California 90064 USA
CAUTION:
To prevent fire or shock hazard do not expose this appliance to
rain or moisture. Do not remove cover. No user serviceable
parts inside. Refer servicing to qualified service personnel.
WARNING:
This equipment generates and uses radio frequency energy and if
not installed and used properly, i.e., in strict accordance with
the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. It has been tested and found to comply with the
limits for a Class A computing device pursuant to Subpart J of
Part 15 of FCC Rules, which are designed to provide reasonable
protection against such interference when operated in a
commercial environment.
Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to
cause interference in which case the user at his own expense will
be required to take whatever measures may be required to correct
the interference.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
--------------------------------------------------------------------------1.
2.
3.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
INTRODUCTION......................................................1
HOOKUP........................................................... 2
OPERATION........................................................ 3
Selecting A Sequence
3
Playing A Sequence
3
Recording A Sequence
3
Overdubbing
4
Erasing
4
Tempo
5
Metronome
6
Length
6
Signature
6
Quantize
8
Step
9
Swing
9
Copying Sequences
10
Appending Sequences
11
COMBINING SEQUENCES INTO SONGS...................................12
Playing A Song
12
Recording A Song
13
Erasing A Song
15
ABOUT THE DMX VOICES.............................................16
The Sounds
16
Tuning
16
CASSETTE INTERFACE ..............................................17
Connections
17
To Record Programs Onto Tape
17
To Play Programs From Tape
18
To Check Tapes
19
Possible Causes Of Data Transfer Errors
20
DMX SOFTWARE REVISIONS...........................................21
BATTERY BACKUP.................................................. 21
INTERFACING THE DMX..............................................22
Synchronizing The DMX and The DSX
22
Sync To Tape
23
Synchronizing The DMX And Other Sequencers
24
Controlling The DMX With External CVs And Gates
24
Footswitches and Pedals
25
THE DMX FACTORY SEQUENCES........................................26
List of Programmed Sequences
27
List of Programmed Songs
28
A WORD ABOUT DIGITAL AUDIO.......................................29
GLOSSARY........................................................ 30
SPECIFICATIONS...................................................31
INTRODUCTION
--------------------------------------------------------------------------CONGRATULATIONS!
You have just purchased a most powerful tool for synthesizer
composition and performance. The Oberheim DMX programmable
Digital Drum Machine represents a new concept in electronic
sound. The DMX has been designed by the Oberheim staff with the
idea of giving you better sound, and more intimate control of it,
than has been previously available in a percussion synthesizer.
The DMX generates the sounds of real drums. Recordings of real
drums are digitized, stored in computer memory, and are made
available at the touch of a button. A drumbeat may be recorded
in realtime at any speed, remembered, and edited to make any beat
of any length, tempo, or style—in short, any drum beat that you
hear in your head, you can create on the DMX. After you have
created your drumbeats, you can save them on tape for future use.
The DMX even has a battery to keep the memory on when the power
is off.
The DMX operates like a tape recorder: press RECORD
your rhythms; then press PLAY and hear it back. But
to it than that. There are many more features that
incorporated into the DMX to actually give you much
over your music than a tape recorder gives you.
and Record
there's more
are
more control
And isn't more control what synthesizers are all about?
1
HOOKUP
-------------------------------------------------------------------------POWER
The DMX comes from the factory set to operate on 115 Volts. If the
local power is 220-240 Volts, you will need to change the power
selection switch inside the DMX. Remove the two screws at the
front of the chassis and then lift up the front panel. You will
find the power selection switch on the right side, behind the
transformer.
For 100-120 Volt operation, switch it to "115". For 220-240 Volt
operation, set the switch to "230". Close the lid and replace the
screws.
SIGNAL
Connect either the LEFT and RIGHT, or the MONO outputs to your
amplifier or mixer. The slide pots on the front panel control the
relative volumes of each drum voice in the mixed outputs. Each
voice has its own output as well; these are useful if you are
connecting the DMX to an external mixer. The volume controls have
no effect on the level of the individual outputs, so it is possible
to use the SNARE and BASS individual outputs, for example, and the
mixed outputs for the other voices (turning the SNARE and BASS
VOLUME controls to minimum to remove them from the mixed outputs).
2
OPERATION
-------------------------------------------------------------------------SELECTING A SEQUENCE
The DMX can store up to 100 drum sequences, numbered 00 thru 99.
Select one by pressing two numbers. The display will show you which
sequence you have selected.
PLAYING A SEQUENCE
Press PLAY. The sequence will play over and over until you press
STOP. You may also select another sequence while playing and the
DMX will play it immediately after the first sequence has finished.
RECORDING A SEQUENCE
There are two ways to record on the DMX: REALTIME and SINGLE STEP.
In REALTIME, the sequence plays over and over and you simply press
the buttons where you want the drums to sound. In SINGLE STEP, the
sequence advances one beat each time you press a button for a note
or a rest, which allows you to record your drum beat very slowly.
The REALTIME mode of recording is explained below. The SINGLE STEP
mode of recording is explained in the section entitled STEP.
Press and hold RECORD and then press PLAY. The Metronome will click
in eighth notes and the DMX will record over and over on two
measures (you can change the length of the sequence—see "LENGTH").
In RECORD, the DMX does not ERASE, so you can build your drumbeat as
it loops over, playing the cymbal first, the bass drum, then the
snare, etc., until you are finished. Then press STOP.
** NOTE **
The DMX will not enter RECORD, ERASE, COPY, or
STEP modes if the MEMORY PROTECT switch on the
rear panel is ON. The display will read "MEM.
PROTECTED" and the unit will "beep". In
addition, the length or time signature of a
sequence may not be changed although they may
be examined.
Example 1: Recording on Sequence 00
OPERATION
-----------------------------
PRESS
---------------
Select Sequence 00
00
Start Recording
DISPLAY READS
---------------SELECT SEQ 00
RECORD (hold)
SELECT SEQ 00
PLAY
* RECORD SEQ 00
(the “*” flashes at the beginning of the sequence)
(play drums)
Stop Recording
STOP
SELECT SEQ 00
----------------------------------------------------------------
3
OVERDUBBING
-------------------------------------------------------------------------OVERDUBBING
Overdubbing is the process of recording more parts in synchronization
with parts already played. With the DMX, overdubbing is the same as
normal recording. Whenever you press RECORD and PLAY, the DMX simply
adds whatever you play to what has already been recorded. In RECORD,
the DMX does not erase. ERASE is a separate process.
ERASING
If you have made a mistake, or would like to record over again,
press and hold ERASE and while holding ERASE press RECORD. Your
previous recording will be erased, and you may record again from
scratch. The DMX will "beep" when the erasure actually takes place.
The volume of the beep is controlled by the metronome volume
control.
Example 2: Erasing Sequence 00
OPERATION
----------------------------Erase Sequence 00
PRESS
--------------ERASE (hold)
RECORD
DISPLAY READS
---------------ERASE SEQ 00
ERASE SEQ 00
The DMX will "beep" and then display:
SELECT SEQ 00
----------------------------------------------------------------There are several other Erase Modes:
You can erase any single drum (or cymbal) from the entire sequence.
Hold ERASE and then press the drum you wish to erase.
Example 3: Erasing Crash Cymbal from Sequence 00
OPERATION
----------------------------Erase Crash Cymbal
PRESS
--------------ERASE (hold)
CRASH
DISPLAY READS
---------------ERASE SEQ 00
ERASE SEQ 00
The DMX will "Beep" and then display:
SELECT SEQ 00
----------------------------------------------------------------You can erase individual notes "on-the-fly" while in RECORD:
pressing any drum button while holding ERASE will remove that drum
note from the sequence. The drum button must be played in time with
the note you wish to erase.
It is also possible to erase individual notes while in the STEP mode
(See "STEP").
If you want to erase all of the sequences and songs, press ERASE and
while holding ERASE, press both of the ARROW buttons simultaneously.
4
TEMPO
---------------------------------------------------------------------------TEMPO
The DMX defaults to a tempo of 80 Beats per Minute, but can be
varied within a range of 25 to 250 Beats per Minute. You can change
the tempo at any time by entering the tempo mode. Press TEMPO. The
display will show the tempo currently selected. You can change the
tempo by pressing the buttons with the arrows to increase or
decrease the tempo, or you can enter the desired Beats per Minute on
the keypad. To exit the tempo mode press TEMPO once again.
When recording a sequence, the DMX will store the tempo with the
sequence. Whenever that sequence is recalled, the DMX will recall
the tempo as well. You may change the tempo, but it will only
update the programmed tempo when the tempo is changed in record.
Example 4: Setting the Tempo to 105 Beats per Minute
OPERATION
-----------------------------
PRESS
---------------
DISPLAY READS
----------------
Enter Tempo Mode
TEMPO
TEMPO = 080
Set 105 Beats per Minute
105
TEMPO = 105
Exit Tempo Mode
TEMPO
SELECT SEQ 00
----------------------------------------------------------------** NOTE: **
Not every tempo marking between 25 and 250 Beats per Minute can be
played. Near the high end of this range the tempo steps are larger
than one Beat per Minute. If you enter a tempo which cannot be
played, the display will show an exclamation point ("!") to inform
you that the DMX is playing the nearest valid tempo to the one which
you entered. Also, if you try to RECORD an invalid tempo, the DMX
will actually record the nearest valid one.
If you enter a number that is out of the tempo range, a question
mark ("?") will appear on the display. You must set the tempo to be
in range before you can exit from the tempo mode.
The arrow buttons will always step between valid tempos.
5
METRONOME
---------------------------------------------------------------------------METRONOME
The metronome can be set to click in any note value between quarter
notes and thirty-second notes. The metronome defaults to eighth
notes and varies in speed according to the tempo. To change the
value of the metronome clicks, see SIGNATURE.
The METRONOME is heard through the mixed outputs of the DMX while in
RECORD, and is accented on each downbeat. At the beginning of the
sequence, an asterisk "^" will flash on the left side of the
display, and on subsequent downbeats, the bar number will flash.
The METRONOME also appears at the CLICK OUT jack on the rear panel
while in RECORD or PLAY and may be routed through an external mixer.
The output of the CLICK OUT jack is not accented and has been
designed to be used to clock analog sequencers and other devices as
well. See SYNCHRONIZING THE DMX AND OTHER SEQUENCERS.
LENGTH
A sequence can be any length from 1 to 99 measures. The DMX sets a
length of 2 measures for each sequence unless you set it differently
by accessing LENGTH. You can then set the desired number of
measures with the arrows or directly on the keypad. LENGTH also
displays the amount of memory space left.
Example 5: Setting the Sequence Length to 16 Bars
OPERATION
----------------------------Enter Length Mode
PRESS
--------------LENGTH
DISPLAY READS
---------------2 BARS-85% LEFT
Set Length to 16 Bars
16
16 BARS-83% LEFT
Exit Length Mode
LENGTH
SELECT SEQ 00
----------------------------------------------------------------If you have recorded a sequence and then shorten the length, you
will lose the measures you have cut. If you lengthen a sequence you
have recorded, rests will appear at the end.
The length of a bar is set by SIGNATURE.
SIGNATURE
SIGNATURE has two functions. The first is to change the click value
of the metronome. The second is to change the time signature.
You can set the DMX to play in most any time signature. There can
be between 1 and 99 beats per measure, and between a quarter note
and a thirty-second note can receive one beat.
6
SIGNATURE (CONT.)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------Press SIGNATURE. The current metronome click value will appear on
the display. The click value can be set to any standard note value
by pressing the arrow buttons. After you have set the desired click
value, you may exit by pressing STOP or you may continue on to the
time signature.
Press SIGNATURE once more. Now the current time signature will
appear on the display. If you press SIGNATURE once more, the
display will show the current beats per measure. You can use the
arrows to increase or decrease either the beats per measure or the
beat value (as with the click value), or you can enter the desired
value with the keypad (beats per measure only).
When the time signature is changed, the length of the sequence is
affected, so before you can exit the time signature mode you must
pass through LENGTH to set the length of the sequence.
NOTE: You can only change the time signature if the selected
sequence is empty. If the sequence contains any drum beats you will
not be able to access beats per measure or beat value.
Example 6: Setting the Metronome to Quarter Notes and the Time
Signature to 3/4
OPERATION
----------------------------Access Signature Mode
PRESS
--------------SIGNATURE
DISPLAY READS
---------------CLICK VALUE=1/08
Change Metronome to 1/4 Notes
<
<
CLICK VALUE=1/06
CLICK VALUE=1/04
Access Time Signature
SIGNATURE
Access Beat per Bar
SIGNATURE
BEATS/BAR:
04
Choose 3 Beats per Bar
03
BEATS/BAR:
03
Access Beat Value
SIGNATURE
BEAT VALUE=1/04
Exit time signature
SIGNATURE
LENGTH=
TIME= 4/4
2 BARS
Maintain length at 2 bars
SIGNATURE
SELECT SEQ 00
-----------------------------------------------------------------
7
QUANTIZE
---------------------------------------------------------------------------QUANTIZE
Quantizing automatically corrects your playing to the nearest beat.
The quantizing value also establishes the smallest beat that can be
recorded and is also used for establishing the value of a "Beat" as
used in STEP and SWING.
The DMX is normally set to quantize to a sixteenth note. To change
the quantizing, press QUANTIZE. The display will show the value of
quantizing currently set. You can now enter the note value that the
DMX will round off to by using the arrows to increase or decrease
the number in the display. The quantize values are;
04
06
08
12
16
24
32
48
OFF
Quarter Note
Quarter Note Triplet
Eighth Note
Eighth Note Triplet
Sixteenth Note
Sixteenth Note Triplet
Thirty-Second Note
Thirty-Second Note Triplet
Quantize Defeated (1/192 note resolution)
Example 8: Set Quantizing to Eighth Notes
OPERATION
----------------------------Access Quantize Mode
PRESS
--------------QUANTIZE
Set Eighth Notes
<
<
DISPLAY READS
---------------QUANTIZE 1/16
QUANTIZE
QUANTIZE
1/12
1/08
Exit Quantize Mode
QUANTIZE
SELECT SEQ 00
----------------------------------------------------------------Quantize is a record function. That is, it only corrects what you are
recording. This enables you to record over and over on the same
sequence in different quantize modes. Quantizing is also independent
of the metronome. It is possible to quantize to the nearest quarter
note, even though the metronome is clicking in sixteenth notes.
8
STEP
---------------------------------------------------------------------------STEP
STEP allows you to record one beat at a time. Normally the beat is
set to a sixteenth note (this can be changed—see QUANTIZING). From
stop, pressing STEP places you at the beginning of the sequence.
Every time a drum is pressed, the sequence advances one beat. To
program a rest, press the forward arrow. To stop, press STEP once
again. If you press STEP while in PLAY or RECORD, the sequence will
step from its present location and go back to play or record when
STEP is pressed again.
While in STEP, you can erase any of the drums one beat at a time.
Pressing ERASE and the desired DRUM erases only that drum on that
beat.
Example 7: Recording and Erasing in STEP
OPERATION
-----------------------------
PRESS
---------------
DISPLAY READS
----------------
Access Step Mode
STEP
BAR
1 + BEAT 00
Step to beat 4
>
>
>
>
BAR
BAR
BAR
BAR
1
1
1
1
Record Snare on beat 5
SNARE
BAR
1 + BEAT 05
Step to beat 7
>
>
BAR
BAR
1 + BEAT 06
1 + BEAT 07
Erase Crash on beat 7
ERASE (hold)
BAR 1 + BEAT 07
CRASH
BAR 1 + BEAT 07
(the DMX will "beep")
+
+
+
+
BEAT
BEAT
BEAT
BEAT
01
02
03
04
Exit Step Mode
STEP
SELECT SEQ 00
-----------------------------------------------------------------
SWING
SWING is similar to QUANTIZE in that it corrects the timing of your
recordings, however SWING will alter the time so that the first half
of the beat gets more than half of the time, creating a "shuffle"
feel.
9
SWING (CONT.)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------Press SWING. The display will show the current swing value which is
normally set to 50% (the first half of the beat gets 50% of the
time). To change the swing value, press the arrows to increase or
decrease the percentage (between 50% and 71% in six steps). SWING is
a RECORD function. That is, it will record your playing corrected
to the swing value you have selected.
Example 9: Setting Swing Value to 66%
OPERATION
----------------------------Access Swing Mode
PRESS
--------------SWING
Increase Swing to 66%
>
>
>
>
DISPLAY READS
---------------SWING 50%
SWING
SWING
SWING
SWING
54%
58%
62%
66%
Exit Swing Mode
SWING
SELECT SEQ 00
----------------------------------------------------------------You can swing in either eighth or sixteenth notes by selecting
eighth or sixteenth note quantizing. If QUANTIZE is set to a value
other than eighths of sixteenths, the display will read;
"WRONG QUANT"
COPYING SEQUENCES
It is possible to copy one sequence to another. Press COPY. The
display will ask you to specify which sequence to copy to which
location:
Example 10: Copy Sequence 25 to Sequence 01
OPERATION
----------------------------Access Copy Mode
PRESS
--------------COPY
DISPLAY READS
---------------COPY FROM SEQ 00
Select Sequence 25
25
COPY
COPY FROM SEQ 25
COPY TO SEQ 00
Select Sequence 01
01
COPY
TO
SEQ 01
Execute the copy
COPY
(DMX "Beeps" and then exits Copy Mode)
SELECT SEQ 01
-----------------------------------------------------------------
10
APPENDING SEQUENCES
---------------------------------------------------------------------------APPENDING SEQUENCES
There are two ways to join sequences together. One is by playing
one sequence after another in a SONG (see COMBINING SEQUENCES INTO
SONGS, below); the other is to APPEND several existing sequences
into one larger sequence. Appending sequences is useful when the
same set of rhythms is to be played over and over, for example in a
composition having 3 bars of 4/4 followed by 1 bar of 7/8 as a basic
phrase element. By making a sequence of 3 bars of 4/4, another of 1
bar of 7/8, and then appending the 7/8 onto the end of the 4/4, you
have quickly created your basic phase element, which can then be
repeated over and over, and combined with other sequences as part of
a song.
Appending sequences is similar to copying them except that while
COPY REPLACES the old sequence with the new one, APPEND ADDS the new
sequence to the end of the old one. The process is the same except
that you must press RECORD while pressing COPY to execute.
Example 11: Append Sequence 25 to Sequence 01
OPERATION
----------------------------Access Copy Mode
PRESS
--------------COPY
DISPLAY READS
---------------COPY FROM SEQ 00
Select Sequence 25
25
COPY
COPY FROM SEQ 25
COPY TO SEQ 00
Select Sequence 01
01
COPY
Access Append Mode
RECORD (hold)
APPEND TO SEQ 01
TO
SEQ 01
Execute Appended Copy
COPY
APPEND TO SEQ 01
(DMX "Beeps" and then exits Copy Mode)
SELECT SEQ 01
----------------------------------------------------------------It is possible to append a sequence to itself. This effectively
doubles the length of the sequence. It is also possible to append
several sequences, one after another, to one sequence. Appended
sequences may be of any time signature or length, however the tempo
of the first part of the sequence will be applied to the rest of the
sequence as well. If sequences of different time signatures are
appended together, the length may not equal an exact number of
measures and this will be reflected by a "+" in the length of the
sequence. For example, appending a 7/8 sequence to a 4/4 sequence
(each of 1 bar length) will cause the display to read:
"1+ BARS-85% LEFT"
because the length of the new sequence is not quite 2 bars of 4/4.
11
COMBINING SEQUENCES INTO SONGS
---------------------------------------------------------------------------SONGS
One prominent feature of music is that it is organized into sections
that repeat and alternate with each other. A SONG allows you to
record each section of a piece as a separate sequence and then
combine sequences into a complete composition, saving a lot of
memory space, not to mention time and effort.
A song then, is a combination of sequences. In addition to the 100
sequences, the DMX also contains 50 songs, numbered 00 thru 49.
Unlike a sequence (appended or otherwise), a song does not remember
the notes, only the order of sequences that you wish to play. There
can be as many as 255 sequences contained within a song, and each
sequence within a song can have its own tempo, length, or time
signature.
PLAYING A SONG
To enter the song mode, press SONG.
last selected.
The DMX will select the song
Example 12: Play song 00
OPERATION:
----------------------Access song mode
PRESS:
----------------------SONG
DISPLAY READS:
---------------SELECT SONG 00
Play song 00
PLAY
PART 1= SEQ 01
----------------------------------------------------------------As the song plays through the different sequences in it, the
sequence number on the display will change to reflect the actual
sequence presently being played. Each sequence in the song is given
an ascending PART number that reflects its order in the song. When
the song reaches its conclusion the display will read:
"SONG 00 -END-"
To exit the song mode, press SONG again.
12
RECORDING A SONG
---------------------------------------------------------------------------RECORDING A SONG
Recording a song is different than recording a sequence, because you
are not playing any notes, just making a list of sequences.
Actually you don't "record" a song, you "edit" a song.
To edit a song press SONG, then EDIT. Once you enter SONG EDIT
mode, the DMX will ask you to select the sequences that will make up
the song; the SONG LIST.
Example 13: Recording Song 00
OPERATION:
PRESS:
DISPLAY READS:
----------------------- ----------------------- ---------------Access Song Mode
SONG
SELECT SONG 00
Access Edit Mode
EDIT
PART 1= SEQ **
(If there is a number rather than asterisks after
"SEQ", the song is not empty and should be erased
before recording; see ERASING A SONG)
Start Song with
Sequence 01
01
PART 1= SEQ 01
(The DMX will "beep" whenever you insert or delete a sequence)
Advance to Part 2
>
PART
2== SEQ **
Continue with
Sequence 02
02
PART
2= SEQ 02
Advance to Part 3
>
PART
5= SEQ **
Continue with
Sequence 01
01
PART
3= SEQ 01
Advance to Part 4
>
PART
4= SEQ **
Continue with
Sequence 00
00
PART
4= SEQ 00
Advance to Part 5
>
PART
5= SEQ **
Repeat Sequence 00
00
PART
5= SEQ 00
Finish
EDIT
SELECT SONG 00
----------------------------------------------------------------To play the song you have just created, press PLAY.
13
RECORDING A SONG (CONT.)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------You can revise the listing in a song by repeating the steps in
example 13. If there are already sequences contained in the song
the display will display the sequence contained in the first part.
You may move through the song list by using the forward and reverse
arrows to get to the part of the song that you wish to revise. You
have three editing options:
REPLACE
You can REPLACE any sequence currently displayed
with another simply by entering the new sequence
number.
INSERT
By pressing RECORD and EDIT, the DMX will insert
sequence 00 into the song list before the sequence
previously displayed. You can then REPLACE sequence
00 with the desired sequence by entering its number.
ERASE
By pressing ERASE and EDIT, the DMX will remove the
displayed sequence from the song list.
Example 14: Re-editing Song 00
OPERATION:
----------------------Access Song Mode
PRESS:
----------------------SONG
DISPLAY READS:
---------------SELECT SONG 00
Access Edit Mode
EDIT
PART
1= SEQ 01
Advance to the next
Part
>
PART
2= SEQ 02
Advance to the next
Part
>
PART
3= SEQ 01
Replace Sequence 01
with Sequence
05
PART
3= SEQ 05
Advance to the next
Part
>
PART
4= SEQ 00
Advance to the next
Part
>
PART 5= SEQ 00
---------------------------continued-----------------------------
14
RECORDING A SONG (CONT.)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------OPERATION:
-----------------------
PRESS:
-----------------------
Erase Sequence 00
ERASE (hold)
EDIT
("beep")
DISPLAY READS:
---------------PART
PART
5= SEQ 00
5= SEQ **
(You just removed the last
sequence in the song so you
are now at the end)
Rewind back
<
PART
4= SEQ 00
Rewind back
<
PART
3= SEQ 05
Insert a sequence
RECORD (hold)
EDIT
PART 3= SEQ 00
("beep")
(Remember, you just inserted
a sequence, so all the
sequences after get moved
back accordingly.)
Replace Sequence 00
with Sequence 26
26
Finish Editing
EDIT
PART
3= SEQ 26
SELECT SONG 00
ERASING A SONG
You may erase an entire song by holding ERASE and pressing SONG.
Individual sequences within a song may be erased in the edit song
mode (see RECORDING A SONG).
SONG TEMPO
Each sequence within a song will play at its programmed tempo,
allowing tempo changes within a song. When in song mode, changing
the tempo changes all of the tempos by a proportional amount, and
the display will show the original tempo plus the percent change
i.e., "TEMPO = 120 + 10%".
A WORD ABOUT THE UTILIZATION OF MEMORY
The total memory capacity of the DMX is 2000 events. There are many
ways this capacity can be divided amongst sequences. For instance,
the DMX can accommodate one sequence of 2000 notes, or 100 sequences
of 20 notes each. In general, it is best to take advantage of the
repetitive nature of music by constructing songs from short
sequences.
Each part of a song requires one-third as much memory as a single
event in a sequence! A song consisting of one bar repeated eight
times uses only one fifth the memory of an eight bar sequence.
Therefore, the most efficient use of memory is achieved by using the
SONG mode whenever possible.
15
ABOUT THE DMX VOICES
---------------------------------------------------------------------------ABOUT THE DMX VOICES
The DMX contains eight sets of voices. Each voice has three
variations, and some of the voices contain two completely different
sounds. The sound of each voice is contained on one or several
memory chips.
THE SOUNDS
The DMX comes from the factory with the following voices and these
variations:
BASS
Bass drum, with three volume levels.
SNARE
Snare drum, with three volume levels.
HIHAT
A hihat, with a closed and an accented sound, plus a
longer "open" sound.
TOM 1
A tom-tom, with three individual pitches.
TOM 2
A tom-tom, lower in pitch than TOM 1, again with
three pitches.
CYMBAL
This voice contains two sounds, a ride cymbal which
can be played accented or unaccented, as well as a
crash cymbal.
PERC 1
This voice also contains two sounds, a tambourine
with accent, as well as a rimshot.
PERC 2
two sounds, a shaker with accent, plus hand claps.
TUNING
The pitch of each of the voices can be tuned up or down half an
octave by adjusting the pitch controls located inside the DMX on the
top rear of each of the voice cards. The voice cards can be
accessed by removing the two screws at the front of the unit, and
then lifting up the front panel.
Additionally, the pitch of each voice may be controlled with pedals
or control voltages connected to the CV IN connector on the rear
panel of the unit (see CONTROLLING THE DMX WITH EXTERNAL CVS AND
GATES).
16
CASSETTE INTERFACE
---------------------------------------------------------------------------The DMX is equipped with a Cassette Interface which allows programs
contained in the program memory to be stored externally on an audio
cassette. All that is required to use the Cassette Interface feature is an
audio cassette recorder with reasonable frequency response and a pair of
mini-plug to mini-plug audio connecting cables. The cassette player must
have an earphone or ext. speaker output.
CASSETTE INTERFACE CONNECTIONS
See the diagram in the "REAR PANEL CONNECTIONS" section of the manual.
Connect the Earphone or Speaker output of your cassette recorder (a Line
output will not work) to the jack labeled "TO OUTPUT" on the rear of the
DMX. Connect the "TO INPUT" jack on the rear panel of the DMX to the Line
or Aux input of your cassette recorder.
** NOTE **
To reduce hum, remove the cables to the cassette
recorder when not using the Cassette Interface.
TRANSFERRING DATA
---------------------------------------------------------------------------TO RECORD PROGRAMS ONTO TAPE:
1)
Connect the Cassette Recorder to the Cassette Interface Jacks
on the rear panel of the DMX as described in "CASSETTE
INTERFACE CONNECTIONS", above.
2)
Enable the Cassette Interface by throwing the switch on the
rear panel.
3)
Press the RECORD switch on the tape recorder. You should
now hear a steady tone through the MIXED OUTPUTS of the DMX.
The volume of the tone is controlled by the Metronome
control.
4)
Press the CASSETTE RECORD switch on the DMX (it shares a
button with the STEP switch ). After the RECORD switch is
pressed, ten seconds of the steady "leader" tone will be
sent out followed by the actual memory information. During
this time, the display will read "RECORDING DATA". After
all of the memory information has been transferred, the
display will read "DATA COMPLETED".
17
CASSETTE INTERFACE (CONT.)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------TO PLAY PROGRAMS FROM TAPE INTO THE DMX:
1)
Connect the Cassette Recorder to the Cassette Interface Jacks
on the rear panel of the DMX as described in "CASSETTE
INTERFACE CONNECTIONS", above.
2)
Set the playback volume on the tape recorder to 3/4 of
maximum.
3)
Enable the Cassette Interface by throwing the switch on the
rear panel.
4)
Press the PLAY switch on the tape recorder. You will now be
able to monitor the tape through the MIXED OUTPUTS of the DMX
5)
As soon as the "leader" tone is heard, press the CASSETTE
PLAY switch on the DMX (it shares a button with the EDIT
switch ). At least three seconds of the "leader" tone must
come between pressing PLAY and the rough sound of the memory
information. The display will read "PLAYING DATA" from the
time the switch is pressed until the information transfer
has been completed. The display will then read "DATA
COMPLETED".
6)
If an error is detected, the display will read "ERROR IN
DATA".
*** NOTES ***
If the MEMORY PROTECT SWITCH on the rear panel of the
DMX is switched ON, the display will read "MEM.
PROTECTED" and the DMX will "beep".
Some cassette recorders invert the phase of the
signal in the process of recording and playing back.
If your cassette recorder NEVER plays data properly,
the inverted phase may be the problem.
The software
version 2.10 (released in June 1982) enables inverted
data to be read properly by the DMX
Cassette
Interface.
To set the DMX to read inverted data,
hold the "0" button while pressing PLAY.
The first
digit of the display will show a "!", indicating that
the DMX is expecting inverted data.
18
CASSETTE INTERFACE (CONT.)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------TO CHECK
The
the data
memory.
TAPES;
CHECK function of the Cassette Interface enables verification of
on a tape without actually transferring the data into the DMX's
A tape should always be checked after recording.
1)
Connect the Cassette Recorder to the Cassette Interface Jacks
on the rear panel of the DMX as described in "CASSETTE
INTERFACE CONNECTIONS", above.
2)
Enable the Cassette Interface by throwing the switch on the
rear panel.
3)
Press the PLAY switch on the tape recorder. You will now be
able to monitor the tape through the MIXED OUTPUTS of the DMX.
4)
As soon as the "leader" tone is heard, press the CASSETTE
CHECK switch on the DMX (it shares a button with the SONG
switch ). At least three seconds of the "leader" tone must
come between pressing CHECK and the rough sound of the
memory information. The display will read "CHECKING DATA"
from the time the switch is pressed until the data check has
been completed. The display will then read "DATA
COMPLETED".
5)
If an error is detected, the display will read "ERROR IN
DATA".
** NOTES **
Once the leader tone has started
interface must complete its cycle.
the
cassette
Some cassette recorders invert the phase of the
signal in the process of recording and playing
back. If your cassette recorder NEVER checks data
properly, the inverted phase may be the problem.
The software version 2.10 (released in June 1982)
enables inverted data to be read properly by the DMX
Cassette Interface.
To set the DMX to read
inverted data, hold the "0" button while pressing
CHECK. The first digit of the display will show a
"!", indicating that the DMX is expecting inverted
data.
19
CASSETTE INTERFACE (CONT.)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------POSSIBLE CAUSES OF TAPE TRANSFER ERRORS
If errors are found during the play or check process, the display will
read "ERROR IN DATA". If this happens, one of the following reasons
might be responsible:
A) The playback volume is too high or too low. Some trial and
error may be required. Generally the best level is as high as
possible before distortion occurs (approximately 3/4 of the way
up). If the playback volume is very low, the DMX will not
acknowledge the data at all.
B) The leader tone is too short. At least three seconds of the
"leader" tone must come between pressing PLAY and the rough sound
of the memory information.
C) The tone control may be set improperly. It is important that
the tone control(s) be set so that neither the high nor the low
frequencies are attenuated.
D) Some cassette recorders invert the phase of the signal in the
process of recording and playing back. If your cassette recorder
NEVER checks or plays data properly, the inverted phase may be the
problem. The software version 2.10 (released in June 1982) enables
inverted data to be read properly by the DMX Cassette Interface.
To set the DMX to read inverted data, hold the "0" button while
pressing CHECK or PLAY. The first digit of the display will show a
"!", indicating that the DMX is expecting inverted data.
E) The playback head azimuth of the tape recorder may be out of
alignment. This will only affect recordings made on other tape
recorders.
F) Tapes recorded on older DMX's (software version 1.00) will not
play on newer units and vice versa (see DMX SOFTWARE REVISIONS,
next page).
G)
The Batteries in the cassette machine are too weak.
H)
There is a bad spot on the tape.
I) Sometimes tape errors are caused by poor recordings.
Set the
recording level manually if possible, and use a LINE or AUX input
if available.
The Cassette Interface is designed to work with portable cassette
recorders having an "Earphone", "Speaker", or "Monitor" output. The
Interface is not designed to work with tape recorders having only a line
level output.
20
DMX SOFTWARE REVISIONS
---------------------------------------------------------------------------The Cassette Interface (and other functions) in the DMX have undergone
several revisions since the DMX was first introduced. These revisions are
noted here.
DMX 1.00
-
This is the original software release, shipped in units
starting in November 1981.
DMX 2.00
-
The DMX software Revision 2.00 (shipped in units starting
with serial numbers B20801) contains a new cassette
interface. This interface is much more tolerant of the
data played back into it, and the volume setting does not
have to be set as high as with the original software (DMX
1.00), although an speaker or earphone level output is
still required.
Note that tapes recorded on the original DMX software
(1.00) cannot be played into newer DMX's (2.00 and 2.10)
and vice versa.
DMX 2.10
-
Many tape recorders invert the phase of the signal
during the recording process, causing problems during
data transfers. This software version (shipped in units
starting with serial number B22505) enables inverted
data to be read properly by the DMX Cassette Interface.
To set the DMX to read inverted data, hold the "0"
button while pressing CHECK or PLAY. The first digit of
the display will show a "!", indicating that the DMX is
expecting inverted data.
To display the software version contained in the DMX, press "3", "5",
and "7" simultaneously.
Any DMX may be retrofitted with new software by bringing the unit to one
of Oberheim’s authorized service centers.
BATTERY BACKUP
The DMX contains a rechargeable battery that maintains power to the
memory even when the DMX is unplugged. This way you can turn off the power
and/not lose your sequences, much like the battery backup in the OB-Xa
Polyphonic Synthesizer. However, the memory in the DMX is much larger, and
as a result a rechargeable Nickel-Cadmium battery is used.
With normal use the battery will rarely be drained completely, since the
battery is able to maintain power to the memory for several weeks, when
fully charged. However, if the battery does become completely discharged,
leave the DMX plugged in and turned on for 14 hours to fully recharge the
battery.
As a safeguard, you should record important sequences onto cassette,
using the Cassette Interface.
21
INTERFACING THE DMX
---------------------------------------------------------------------------SYNCHRONIZING THE DMX AND THE DSX DIGITAL POLYPHONIC SEQUENCER
The DMX and the DSX have been designed to operate in sync with each
other. When the DMX runs in tandem with a DSX or another DMX, one
unit must be the master and the other the slave.
HOOKUP
Using a cable with a mono or stereo 1/4" phone plug at each end,
connect the CLOCK OUT jack on the rear panel of the unit to be the
master to the CLOCK IN jack on the rear panel of the unit to be the
slave.
OPERATION
Each unit will operate the same as before with the following
exceptions:
The TEMPO is controlled by the master. Increasing the tempo
on the master will increase the tempo on the slave as well.
The DMX and DSX have the same TEMPO programming. Recordings
may be made separately and synchronized later.
To Record, press RECORD and PLAY as before. The only
difference here is that recording on the slave will not start
until the master is playing.
SYNCHRONIZATION TRICKS
The synchronization between the DMX and the DSX is the EXTERNAL
CLOCK, which is a subdivision of the metronome. The tempo of the
master unit will control the tempo of the slave. Sequences may be
any length on either machine. When the master starts, the interrupt
clock will start the slave at the same time (the slave must be in
PLAY or RECORD). When the master sequence stops, the interrupt
clock from the master will stop and consequently, so will the slave,
even if it has not finished its sequence or if it finished and
started over.
The same with songs. The sequences within a song
will play one after the other until the end of the master song.
22
SYNC TO TAPE
---------------------------------------------------------------------------SYNC TO TAPE
The DMX has been designed to sync to tape as well. Sync to tape is
achieved by recording a sync tone from the SYNC OUT jack on the rear
panel on to a track of a tape recorder, and then playing it back
into the SYNC IN jack.
RECORDING THE TONE
The DMX will output the sync tone only while in RECORD or PLAY. In
STOP or other modes, the output will be a leader tone like the
cassette interface. Make sure the tempo that is set on the DMX is
the proper tempo, because the tempo will be governed by the sync
tone when playing back. As a result, the DMX will respond to
changes in the tape speed within a range of about 20% up or down.
Start recording the leader tone on your tape recorder. To reduce
crosstalk between the tone and other tracks, you may wish to record
the tone at a reduced level, but not below -10VU. Press PLAY on the
DMX at the point you wish the sequence to start. The leader tone
will give way to a chattering sound much like the sound of the
cassette data. When the DMX stops playing, either by pressing STOP
or at the end of a SONG, the leader tone will return.
PLAYING BACK THE SYNC TONE
Start the tape recorder and then press PLAY on the DMX. The DMX
will wait to start playing until the chattering sound starts. The
DMX will continue to play until the chattering sound stops.
RECORDING WHILE SYNCHRONIZED TO TAPE
Recording onto the DMX while syncing to tape is much the same as
normal recording. Start the tape recorder, then press RECORD and
PLAY on the DMX. The DMX will wait to record until the sync tone on
the tape starts. The DMX will not record beyond where the sync tone
stops.
HINT:
If you are going to be recording on the DMX while synchronized to
tape, you might consider recording sync longer than you need just to
be safe. The DMX will stop at the end of a song even if the sync
tone continues.
SYNCHRONIZING BOTH THE DMX AND THE DSX TO TAPE
The sync to tape tones generated by the DMX and DSX Digital
Polyphonic Sequencer are compatible, allowing a sync tone recorded
by the DMX to be played back into the DSX, and vice versa. The DMX
can generate a sync tone and slave a DSX at the same time.
Similarly, the DMX can generate a sync tone while it is being slaved
to a DSX. However, the DMX will not slave the DSX (via the CLOCK
OUT) while the DMX itself is synchronizing to a tape tone.
23
SYNCHRONIZING BOTH THE DMX AND THE DSX TO TAPE (CONT.)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------There are several methods to synchronize both the DSX and the DMX to
tape (after the tone is recorded on tape):
1) "Y" the sync tone from the tape into the SYNC TO TAPE
INPUTS on both machines;
2) Play the sync tone from the tape into the DSX (SYNC TO
TAPE INPUT) and then out of the DSX (CLOCK OUT) to the DMX
(CLOCK IN). This is the most reliable way;
3) Play the sync tone from the tape into the DMX (SYNC TO
TAPE IN) and then out of the DMX (SYNC TO TAPE OUT) into
the DSX (SYNC TO TAPE IN).
SYNCHRONIZING THE DMX AND OTHER SEQUENCERS
The DMX has been designed to slave other sequencers as well, digital
or analog, using the metronome output to clock the sequencer. The
CLICK OUT outputs the metronome at all times for this reason. The
tempo of the DMX will control the tempo at which both units play,
and the metric relationship of the external sequencer relative to
the DMX may be changed by changing the CLICK VALUE of the metronome
(see SIGNATURE).
CONTROLLING THE DMX WITH EXTERNAL TRIGGERS AND CVS
Each of the eight drum voices in the DMX has a connection for
external triggering as well as external voltage control of pitch.
These trigger and CV inputs provide additional means to control the
DMX. For example, you might place contact microphones on the heads
of a drum kit and play the drums to control the DMX. Another
possibility would be to wire a foot pedal to a drum voice control
voltage and control the pitch with the pedal (something like
electronic tympani). Still another would be to use a sequencer with
CVs and GATEs out (like the Oberheim DSX) to trigger the drums.
The TRIGGERS IN on the DMX act essentially the same as pressing any
of the bottom row of buttons on the front panel. When in record,
triggering any of the voices externally will cause them to be
recorded subject to the same correction schemes (QUANTIZE and SWING)
that would apply to the buttons on the front panel. Any signal of
+1 Volt or more will trigger the drums.
The CONTROL VOLTAGES IN on the DMX are essentially wired in parallel
with the pitch controls on each of the voice cards. For maximum
range, tune the drums to the lowest pitch.The voltage input range is
0 to +6 Volts. An increase in the voltage applied to the CV inputs
causes a decrease in the pitch of the drum. Unlike the trigger
inputs, the control voltage inputs are not recorded.
The picture of the rear panel contains a diagram of the Molex pin
connections for the CVs and GATEs.
24
FOOTSWITCHES AND PEDALS
---------------------------------------------------------------------------FOOTSWITCHES AND PEDALS
On the rear panel are two jacks for footswitches. These inputs are
designed to be used with switches with a MOMENTARY CLOSED
configuration such as those available from Oberheim.
START FOOTSWITCH
When in sequence mode (display reads "SELECT SEQUENCE 00")
pressing the START footswitch will play the sequence from the
beginning. Pressing the footswitch will stop it. Pressing
it again will restart the sequence from the beginning.
When in song mode (display reads "SELECT SONG 00") the switch
works a bit differently. From STOP, pressing the footswitch
starts the song from the beginning. Pressing it again will
stop it. If the footswitch is pressed once more, the song
will continue from where it stopped.
NEXT FOOTSWITCH
When in sequence mode (display reads "SELECT SEQUENCE 00")
pressing the NEXT footswitch advances the DMX to the next
sequence. When playing a sequence, the DMX will wait until
the sequence currently being played is finished before
starting the next sequence.
When in song mode (display reads "SELECT SONG 00")
works a bit differently. From STOP, pressing the
advances the DMX to the next song. While playing
the NEXT footswitch is held down at the end of a
the DMX will "vamp", that is, repeat the current
and NOT advance to the next sequence in the song.
the switch will allow the song to continue.
the switch
footswitch
a song, if
sequence,
sequence,
Releasing
PEDALS
Foot pedals may be used to control the pitch of individual voices by
connecting them to the CV IN Molex connector on the rear panel. Use
a pedal of 50K Ohms with an audio taper potentiometer for full range.
The Oberheim P-OBX pedal will work but since it uses a potentiometer
with a linear taper, you will find that most of the control range is
at one end of the pedal.
The pin connections on the Molex connectors are detailed in the rear
panel diagram.
25
DMX - FACTORY SEQUENCES
---------------------------------------------------------------------------The Oberheim DMX Digital Drum Machine comes with a set of stock
sequences recorded on cassette. These sequences may be used as-is so that
you can start using your DMX right away, or they can be edited and modified
to suit your needs.
The 78 sequences are organized into groups of four: Each group consists
of an "A" version, a "B" version (essentially two variations of the same
beat), and an "A" and a "B" fill. These four parts are designed to go
together for maximum ease in constructing songs. For instance, the "A" part
may be used as a verse of a song,- and the "B" variation may be used as a
chorus or bridge. The "A" and "B" fills are designed to provide smooth
transitions from "A" to "B" and back again. Of course it is possible to
freely intermix any of the sequences and fills, and this is done in some of
the example songs. Sequence 77 is a single beat that can be used as a
simple ending for many of the possible songs. Sequence 00 is intended as a
brief demonstration of the kinds of things it is possible to program with
the DMX.
The factory tape also comes with 19 songs, which are not complete
songs, but are intended as examples of how typical songs can be constructed
using the stock sequences. As with the sequences, these songs may be edited
to suit your needs. Song 00 is esentialy a "directory" of all the stock
sequences: It simply plays all of the 76 rhythms in order, to provide a
quick & easy way to audition the stock beats.
The factory sequences consume about 5/4 of the DMX's memory capacity.
If you want to program your own rhythms and songs, it is best to erase any
or all of the stock sequences you do not intend to use. Save the factory
cassette, so that you can re-load the factory stocks whenever you want.
26
LIST OF PROGRAMMED SEQUENCES
---------------------------------------------------------------------------0.
Demonstration
1.
2.
3.
4.
Rock
Rock
Rock
Rock
1A
1A Fill
1B
1B Fill
41.
42.
43.
44.
Disco
Disco
Disco
Disco
5.
6.
7.
8.
Rock
Rock
Rock
Rock
2A
2A Fill
2B
2B Fill
45.
46.
47.
48.
Funk
Funk
Funk
Funk
9.
10.
11.
12.
Rock
Rock
Rock
Rock
3A
3A Fill
3B
3B Fill
49.
50.
51.
52.
Polka
Polka
Polka
Polka
A
A Fill
B
B Fill
13.
14.
15.
16.
Rock
Rock
Rock
Rock
4A
4A Fill
4B
4B Fill
53.
54.
55.
56.
Samba
Samba
Samba
Samba
A
A Fill
B
B Fill
17.
18.
19.
20.
Rock
Rock
Rock
Rock
5A
5A Fill
5B
5B Fill
57.
58.
59.
60.
Bossa
Bossa
Bossa
Bossa
A
A Fill
B
B Fill
21.
22.
23.
24.
Shuffle
Shuffle
Shuffle
Shuffle
61.
62.
63.
64.
Mambo
Mambo
Mambo
Mambo
A
A Fill
B
B Fill
25.
26.
27.
28.
Honky-Tonk
Honky-Tonk
Honky-Tonk
Honky-Tonk
65.
66.
67.
68.
Waltz
Waltz
Waltz
Waltz
A
A Fill
B
B Fill
29.
30.
31.
32.
Boogie
Boogie
Boogie
Boogie
69.
70.
71.
72.
Reggae
Reggae
Reggae
Reggae
33.
34.
35.
36.
Swing
Swing
Swing
Swing
73.
74.
75.
76.
7/4
7/4
7/4
7/4
37.
38.
39.
40.
Country
Country
Country
Country
77.
End
A
A Fill
B
B Fill
A
A Fill
B
B Fill
A
A Fill
B
B Fill
A
A Fill
B
B Fill
A
A Fill
B
B Fill
27
A
A Fill
B
B Fill
A
A Fill
B
B Fill
A
A Fill
B
B Fill
Rock
Rock
Rock
Rock
A
A Fill
B
B Fill
LIST OF PROGRAMMED SONGS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
0.
Directory
10.
Country
1.
Hard Rock 1
11.
Disco
2.
Hard Rock 2
12.
Funk
3.
Rock Ballad
13.
Polka
4.
Old-time Rock
14.
Samba
5.
Slow Rock
15.
Bossa Nova
6.
Shuffle
16.
Mambo
7.
Honky-Tonk Rock
17.
Waltz
8.
Boogie
18.
Reggae
9.
Swing
19.
7/4 Rock
28
A WORD ABOUT DIGITAL AUDIO
---------------------------------------------------------------------------A WORD ABOUT DIGITAL AUDIO
The DMX is not a Synthesizer. It does not synthesize sound. What
it does is play back sounds from its memory. These sounds are
stored as numbers, inside special integrated circuits called EPROMs
(Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory) which are programmed at the
factory.
Before explaining how digital audio works, let's digress for a
minute and discuss how regular analog audio works:
Sound, as far as your ears are concerned, is caused by very small
but regular changes in atmospheric pressure. The air moves back and
forth, over and over, alternately pushing and pulling on your
eardrums and the rest of your body. When these waves of air occur
between 20 and 20,000 times per second, your brain perceives them as
sound. So anything that makes noise ultimately must disturb the air
in this sort of regular way. Look at the low frequency speaker in
your sound system. If you turn the volume way up (don't damage your
speakers, though!) you will see the speaker (and feel the air near
it) moving in and out, in exactly this sort of regular movement.
So what any analog audio system does, then, is provide a pattern of
regular movement (Oscillation) for the speaker to move in, so that
you feel the air moving in this same pattern so that your brain can
translate all this into sound and you can HEAR! Look at a phonograph record very closely and you will see the same repeating
wiggles that are amplified by your amplifier to move your speakers.
Digital audio stores, not the oscillations that move your speakers,
but a series of numbers that represents those oscillations. Take
the groove from that phonograph record and, in your mind, stretch it
out in a straight line and place it on a piece of graph paper. Now
if you went from the left end of the graph to the right, and every
centimeter wrote down a number that represented how far that phonograph wiggle moved up and down, you would become a recorder of
digital audio. Now, if you took another piece of graph paper and
plotted all those numbers that you just wrote down, you would do
what a digital audio recorder does to play back.
So what is programmed inside an EPROM in the DMX is a series of
numbers (lots of numbers!) that represents the sound of a snare
drum. Another one has the representation of the sound that a cymbal
makes, and so on, for all of the sounds.
29
GLOSSARY
---------------------------------------------------------------------------This Glossary contains definitions of terms as used in the DMX Manual.
BEAT VALUE
The note value of the time signature. In a time signature of 3/4,
the BEAT VALUE is equal to a quarter note, and there are three
quarter notes per measure.
CLICK VALUE
The note value of the metronome click.
same or different than the BEAT VALUE.
The CLICK VALUE may be the
CONTROL VOLTAGE
An electrical signal which can be used as an input to Voltage
Controllable devices such as Oscillators, Filters, Amplifiers, etc.
DATA
DATA is the information that is processed by the MICROPROCESSOR.
is stored in an ADDRESS.
It
DEFAULT
The result of not making decisions concerning parameters in the DMX.
If you do not specify how long a sequence is to be for example, the
DMX will DEFAULT and specify that the length is to be two bars.
EPROM
This acronym stands for Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory,
which is exactly what it is, a memory chip that is programmed at the
factory with a computer program. Once programmed, the memory can
only be read by the MICROPROCESSOR, and can not be written into like
the Random Access Memories (RAM).
EVENT
Any number of drums that are played on the same beat. The DMX has
the capacity to store 2000 EVENTS, each of which may contain between
1 and 8 notes.
GATE
An electrical signal which can be used to trigger Envelope Generators
and other time dependent devices.
SONG
A combination of sequences.
30
GLOSSARY (CONT.)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------MICROPROCESSOR
The MICROPROCESSOR is
SOFTWARE instructions
the proper ADDRESSES,
writing the result in
the "brain" of the computer. It looks at the
and then carries them out, reading DATA from
performing the instructed function, and then
the proper ADDRESS.
PART
In the DMX the term PART refers to a segment of a Song. Each
Sequence recorded in a Song adds another PART to the Song. There is
no set limit to the number of PARTS that a song may contain, however
each PART can only be one of the one hundred sequences.
PROMPT
A statement which appears on the display when the DMX needs information from you; for example, which sequence to play, what tempo to
play at, etc.
QUANTIZE
A process of Founding off, in the case of the DMX the rhythms that
are played, to the closest specified increment. In the DMX, your
recordings can be QUANTIZED to the nearest Quarter note, Eighth note,
or other smaller subdivisions down to a Forty-Eighth note.
RANDOM ACCESS MEMORY (RAM)
Random Access Memory acts like a piece of scratch paper for the
MICROPROCESSOR. Unlike Read Only Memory (ROM, PROM, or EPROM), RAM
can be read from AND written into by the MICROPROCESSOR. RAM is
usually used in a computer system to store information that is
constantly changing. In the case of the DMX, that includes notes,
tempos, sequences, etc.
SEQUENCE
A succession of events stored in the DMX as numbers. The DMX will
remember the events as played and then will repeat them upon command.
SOFTWARE
The computer program or instructions that the computer follows to do
its assigned task. In the DMX and X-series synthesizers, the SOFTWARE is stored in EPROMS located on the circuit boards.
31
SPECIFICATIONS
---------------------------------------------------------------------------NUMBER OF SOUNDS: 24
FREQUENCY RESPONSE: 10-16,000 Hz
(varies among voices and is dependent upon tuning)
DYNAMIC RANGE: 80 Db
MAXIMUM NUMBER OF NOTES: 2000 Events, each of which may contain as many as
eight notes occurring simultaneously
NUMBER OF SEQUENCES: 100
NUMBER OF SONGS: 50
MAXIMUM TYPICAL SEQUENCE LENGTH: 6 Minutes of 1/8 Notes at 80 Beats/Minute
MAXIMUM SEQUENCE LENGTH: Over 5 Hours at 25 Beats/Minute
MAXIMUM SONG LENGTH: 255 Sequences
TEMPO RANGE: 25-250 Beats per Minute (programmable with each sequence and
song)
RECORDING MODES:
REAL TIME: Records rhythm as buttons are pressed. Selectable
Quantize Mode rounds off rhythms from 1/32 notes to 1/4
notes.
STEP: Notes and rests are programmed separately, one beat at a time.
Value of beat may be between 1/4 note and 1/32 note.
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SPECIFICATIONS (CONT.)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------INPUTS:
TRIGGER (one for each voice): Level: 1 Volt or greater
Impedance: >4.7 K
CONTROL VOLTAGE (one for each voice): Level: 0-+6 Volts
Impedance: >500 Ohms
Approx. -2.5 Volts/Octave
EXTERNAL CLOCK INPUT; 5 Volt positive pulse, TTL compatible
SYNC TO TAPE INPUT: 550 mV RMS
FOOTSWITCHES: Start/Stop, Next Sequence; contact closure to ground
OUTPUTS:
SIGNALS: Stereo and Mono mixed outputs, individual voice outputs
Level: +4dBm (nominal)
Impedance: 50 Ohms, unbalanced
METRONOME: +10V Pulse
EXTERNAL CLOCK: TTL compatible
SYNC TO TAPE: 350mV rms
POWER: 95-130 or 190-260 Volts AC, 30 Watts
DIMENSIONS: 18"L X 11.8"W X 5"H
(45.7cm.L X 30.Ocm.W X 12.7cm.H)
WEIGHT: 12 Lbs. (5.4 Kg)
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