Continental Instruments Systems CardAccess 3000 Operator`s Guide

Continental Instruments Systems CardAccess 3000 Operator`s Guide
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Continental Instruments
Systems
CardAccess 3000
Operator’s Guide
WI1189 2/03
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Continental Instruments Systems LLC
355 Bayview Avenue
Amityville, New York 11701
Phone (631) 842-9400 Fax (631) 842-9135
Email cic@cicaccess.com
Web Site cic@cicaccess.com
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Table of Contents
CARDACCESS MAIN SCREEN DESIGN................................ 9
CARDACCESS MONITOR SCREEN DESIGN .................................. 10
THE ALERTS GRID ..................................................................... 12
EVENTS GRID NAVIGATION CONTROLS AND BUTTONS .............. 14
EVENTS GRID RIGHT CLICKS AND VIEW FILTERS ...................... 18
Filter Menu ........................................................................... 18
View Records Menus............................................................. 19
MONITOR MODE VS. STATUS MODE .......................................... 25
STATUS SCREEN STATIONS TAB ................................................ 31
STATUS SCREEN STATUS TAB .................................................... 33
LOG IN AND OUT..................................................................... 36
LOG IN ....................................................................................... 36
LOG OUT.................................................................................... 39
PROGRAMMING THE CARDACCESS ................................ 42
SETTING UP PRIORITIES ............................................................. 42
Panels.................................................................................... 43
Readers ................................................................................. 44
Inputs..................................................................................... 45
Relays.................................................................................... 46
Links...................................................................................... 46
ALERT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT ..................................................... 47
Manual Alert Acknowledgement ........................................... 47
Auto Alert Acknowledgement................................................ 48
Enable Auto-Acknowledge .................................................... 49
Response Required Schedule ................................................ 50
Alert Ack Time....................................................................... 51
LANGUAGE CONTROL ................................................................ 53
Language Control Design..................................................... 53
SYSTEM SETTINGS ..................................................................... 58
Setting Up the System Settings.............................................. 58
General Tab .......................................................................... 58
Archive Tab........................................................................... 63
Printers Tab .......................................................................... 65
Alerts Tab.............................................................................. 68
Custom Fields Tab ................................................................ 76
Video Badging Tab ............................................................... 78
CCTV Tab ............................................................................. 82
Databases Tab ...................................................................... 93
ARCHIVE DATA .......................................................................... 95
Create an Archive Database................................................. 96
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Backup Configuration Data.................................................. 99
Archive Events from the Main CardAccess Database ........ 102
Connect to an Archive Database ........................................ 105
Restore Configuration Data................................................ 106
Archive Events from a Different Database ......................... 109
BACKUP & RESTORE................................................................ 113
Backup a Database ............................................................. 114
Restore a Database ............................................................. 116
VIEW HISTORY......................................................................... 119
Connect to a Database........................................................ 119
Set the Date Range.............................................................. 121
Select an Events Filter ........................................................ 122
Print the History ................................................................. 125
Status Bar............................................................................ 125
Change the List Sort............................................................ 125
AUDIT TRAIL ........................................................................... 126
MANUAL CONTROL.................................................................. 130
The Manual Control Screens .............................................. 130
SCHEDULED CHANGES ............................................................. 143
Create a Scheduled Change................................................ 144
Delete a Scheduled Change ................................................ 146
PERSONNEL .............................................................................. 147
Create a Basic Badge.......................................................... 147
Personnel Screen Controls & Functions ............................ 149
BATCH SAVE UTILITY .............................................................. 186
Run a Batch Save ................................................................ 188
Run a Batch Save ................................................................ 189
Batch Save Utility Screen Controls..................................... 194
BADGE HOLDERS IN LIST ......................................................... 200
Set Up the Badge Holders In Screen................................... 203
ACCESS GROUPS ...................................................................... 205
What is an Access Group .................................................... 205
Personnel Access Group Controls ...................................... 210
Create an Access Group ..................................................... 214
Access Group Templates..................................................... 215
Delete an Access Group...................................................... 216
Edit an Access Group.......................................................... 216
FIND USAGE UTILITY ............................................................... 217
Panel Statistics (Counts)..................................................... 218
Use the Counts Section ....................................................... 221
Show Schedule Usage ......................................................... 222
Show Unused Time Schedules............................................. 224
Show Access Group Usage ................................................. 225
Show Unused Access Groups.............................................. 227
BADGE FORMATS ..................................................................... 228
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What is a Badge Format ..................................................... 229
Bit Position, Offset and Length........................................... 232
Predefined Badge Formats ................................................. 234
Create a Badge Format ...................................................... 242
Delete a Badge Format....................................................... 250
Restore Deleted Factory Formats....................................... 250
Download Badge Formats to Panels .................................. 251
FACILITY CODES ...................................................................... 253
About Facility Codes........................................................... 253
Add Facility Codes.............................................................. 255
Set Facility Codes in the Personnel Screen ........................ 255
SCHEDULES .............................................................................. 258
What is a Schedule .............................................................. 258
Create a Schedule ............................................................... 260
Edit a Schedule ................................................................... 262
Delete a Schedule................................................................ 263
HOLIDAYS ................................................................................ 264
GROUPS ................................................................................... 266
Create a Group ................................................................... 266
Edit a Group ....................................................................... 267
Delete a Group.................................................................... 267
List Groups Alphabetically ................................................. 267
OPERATORS ............................................................................. 268
Create an Operator............................................................. 269
Edit an Operator Definition................................................ 275
Delete an Operator Definition ............................................ 276
General Tab ........................................................................ 278
Operators Screen Event Viewing Tab................................. 280
Operators Screen Privileges Tab........................................ 281
OPERATOR PRIVILEGES ............................................................ 284
Forms Control..................................................................... 286
Personnel Fields Control.................................................... 288
Database Partitions ............................................................ 289
Create an Operator Privileges Template............................ 291
Delete an Operator Privileges Template ............................ 297
Edit an Operator Privileges Template................................ 298
OPERATOR RESPONSES ............................................................ 299
Operator Response Screen.................................................. 299
Event Response Screen ....................................................... 303
MAPS ....................................................................................... 312
Enable Maps ....................................................................... 313
Create a Map ...................................................................... 314
Delete a Map....................................................................... 320
Edit a Map........................................................................... 321
Find a Map.......................................................................... 321
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Displaying Maps ................................................................. 323
PANELS .................................................................................... 329
Create a Basic Panel Record.............................................. 337
Panel Screen Controls ........................................................ 339
Download Configuration and Data to Panels .................... 354
READERS.................................................................................. 360
Create a Basic Reader Record............................................ 362
Reader Functional Types .................................................... 363
Reader Screen Controls ...................................................... 373
Elevator Control ................................................................. 405
Software Setup for Elevator Control................................... 415
INPUTS ..................................................................................... 419
Create a Basic Input Definition .......................................... 421
General Tab ........................................................................ 422
CCTV Tab ........................................................................... 432
Map Tab .............................................................................. 434
Virtual Inputs ...................................................................... 436
RELAYS .................................................................................... 442
Create a Basic Relay Definition ......................................... 444
General Tab ........................................................................ 446
Map Tab .............................................................................. 456
DUPLICATE DEFINITIONS ......................................................... 458
LINKS ....................................................................................... 462
Links General Discussion ................................................... 464
Create a Basic Link Definition ........................................... 465
Create a Local Link ............................................................ 466
Create a Global Link .......................................................... 469
General Tab ........................................................................ 472
Input Tab............................................................................. 481
Output Tab .......................................................................... 483
Map Tab .............................................................................. 484
COM PORTS .............................................................................. 486
Configure Com Ports .......................................................... 488
Configure LAN Connections ............................................... 492
DIAL UP ................................................................................... 496
Create a Basic Node Definition .......................................... 499
Modems Screen Controls .................................................... 504
General Modem Setup......................................................... 517
Continental Approved Modems........................................... 523
US Robotics Courier V.Everything Modem ........................ 524
US Robotics Sportster Modem ............................................ 527
Dial Node Setup and Testing .............................................. 530
Modem Setup and Testing................................................... 536
LAN ADAPTERS ...................................................................... 547
General LAN Adapter Setup ............................................... 548
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UDS-10 Setup...................................................................... 549
CARDACCESS UTILITIES.................................................... 559
CACLIENTCONNECT UTILITY .................................................. 560
Connect a Workstation to the Events Server....................... 560
CaClientConnect Utility Controls....................................... 561
CADBUTILS UTILITY ............................................................... 563
Start the CaDbUtils Utility ................................................. 564
Database Connection Tab................................................... 566
Attach Database Tab........................................................... 569
Detach Database Tab ......................................................... 571
Update Database Tab ......................................................... 573
Link Servers Tab ................................................................. 576
Drop Server Tab ................................................................. 577
DBUPDATE UTILITY................................................................. 578
Upgrade a Paradox Database ............................................ 578
DbUpdate Utility Controls.................................................. 581
EVENTTRANSFER UTILITY ....................................................... 585
Transfer Events ................................................................... 587
Events Transfer Utility Controls......................................... 588
FIND RECORDS UTILITY ........................................................... 591
Create a Basic Find Records Search .................................. 593
Find Records Screen Controls ............................................ 594
Expression Section .............................................................. 594
Conditions Section .............................................................. 598
Program Control Buttons ................................................... 599
BATCH SAVE UTILITY .............................................................. 601
Run a Batch Save ................................................................ 603
Batch Save Utility Screen Controls..................................... 609
PDXSQL UTILITY ..................................................................... 616
Transfer Events from a Paradox Database ........................ 617
PdxSQL Controls ................................................................ 620
SQLDBEXPLORER UTILITY ...................................................... 625
Run the SqlDbExplorer Utility............................................ 625
SQLDbExplorer Controls ................................................... 627
REPORTS.................................................................................. 634
PRINT PREVIEW SCREEN .......................................................... 635
ACCESS GROUP REPORT .......................................................... 639
Create a Basic Access Group Report.................................. 639
Access Group Report Screen Controls ............................... 640
ALERT RESPONSE REPORT ....................................................... 644
Create a Basic Alert Response Report................................ 644
BADGES REPORT ...................................................................... 645
Create a Basic Badges (Personnel) Report ........................ 647
Badges Report Screen Controls .......................................... 649
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EVENT REPORT ........................................................................ 658
Create a Basic Event Report............................................... 659
Events Report Screen Controls ........................................... 664
FACILITY CODE REPORT .......................................................... 682
Create a Basic Facility Code Report .................................. 682
GROUPS REPORT ...................................................................... 683
Create a Basic User Group Report..................................... 683
HARDWARE REPORT ................................................................ 684
Create a Basic Hardware Report ....................................... 686
Hardware Report Panels Tab ............................................. 687
Hardware Report Readers Tab........................................... 690
Hardware Report Inputs Tab .............................................. 693
Hardware Report Relays Tab ............................................. 696
Hardware Report Composite Tab....................................... 699
HOLIDAY REPORT .................................................................... 702
Create a Basic Holiday Report ........................................... 702
IMPORT UTILITY ...................................................................... 703
Perform a Basic Badges Import from File.......................... 705
Import Utility Screen Controls............................................ 708
INLIST /BADGEHOLDERS IN REPORT ....................................... 721
Create a Basic Badgeholders IN Report............................. 722
Badgeholders IN Report Controls ...................................... 722
LINKS REPORT ......................................................................... 724
Create a Basic Link Report................................................. 724
Links Report Screen Controls ............................................. 726
MODEM REPORT ...................................................................... 732
Create a Basic Modems Report .......................................... 733
Modems Report Screen Controls ........................................ 734
OPERATORS REPORT ................................................................ 735
Create a Basic Operators Report ....................................... 735
PERSONNEL REPORT ................................................................ 736
Create a Basic Personnel Report........................................ 736
SYSTEM SETTINGS REPORT ...................................................... 739
Create a Basic System Settings Report ............................... 739
TIME AND ATTENDANCE REPORT ............................................ 740
Create a Basic Time and Attendance Report ...................... 741
Time and Attendance Report Screen Controls.................... 743
TIME SCHEDULE REPORT ......................................................... 748
Create a Basic Time Schedule Report ................................ 748
APPENDICES ........................................................................... 751
APPENDIX A – LIST OF FIGURES .............................................. 751
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CardAccess Main Screen Design
To begin, in the CardAccess world the words ‘Events’ and ‘Alerts’ are
two terms that generally refer to the same thing. In operation, the
CardAccess software regularly communicates with security panels.
During this communication process, the CardAccess communication
driver picks up event messages from the panels. These messages describe
every activity that the panel has been involved with since the last
communication.
Event messages that have been picked up from panels are stored in the
CardAccess SQL database. Once they are stored in the CardAccess
database, CardAccess software rules can be applied to the display of
those events. You have the ability to set priority rules in the software that
determine how those events will be displayed in the CardAccess main
screen.
The rules that you apply to the display of panel event messages are called
'Priorities'. Effectively, you apply a priority value to each one of the
possible CardAccess event messages during the setup of the CardAccess
software. The software will then use these associated priority values to
determine where to display these events in the CardAccess main screen.
There are two display 'grids' on the CardAccess main screen - the 'Events'
grid and the 'Alerts' grid. The Events Grid is where most alerts are
displayed. The Alerts Grid exists primarily as a place where important
events will be displayed (those with the highest priority numbers
assigned).
In other words, you will route most event messages to the Events Grid
and you will route high priority events to the Alerts Grid so that they can
be noticed more easily and acted upon. In a busy system, you might see
hundreds of event messages per hour; this will tend to make the display
very busy. In the case where hundreds of events are scrolling off the
screen, it would be hard to notice a 'violation' message indicating a break
in at a given door, or other illegal access. The Alerts Grid exists as a way
to segregate important messages to have them display in a part of the
screen that does not get cluttered with a lot of events.
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CardAccess Monitor Screen Design
Figure 1 – Events & Alerts Grids
The CardAccess main monitoring screen has been divided into two view
windows (see Figure 1), or 'grids' as they are commonly referred to. The
top half of the screen (the Events Grid) is designed to receive 'normal'
event messages. Normal events can be defined as 'routine' and 'expected'
occurrences. These events would require no action from the security staff
because they would be 'valid', expected, and approved activities.
The bottom half of the screen (the Alerts Grid) is reserved for 'abnormal'
events. Events such as a door break in, invalid badge accesses and other
alarms are typically displayed in the lower portion of the screen. This
separation of normal and abnormal events enhances the readability and
usefulness of the main alarm monitor screen.
Large organizations can generate thousands of events per day. If one
common view window were employed to display all event types, security
personnel would find it impossible to locate a given alarm on the screen
amongst hundreds of normal events streaming in. The Alerts Grid
provides a means for the CardAccess administrator to decide which
event types should be segregated into a dedicated, filtered view window.
This CardAccess design feature enables security staff to respond to
abnormal alerts more quickly by placing them in a dedicated area of the
screen.
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As we mentioned, the grids are 'programmable'. The CardAccess
administrator can decide which types of events appear in the upper and
lower portions of the screen by setting parameters in the CardAccess
configuration screens. Later sections of the CardAccess manual and this
chapter will explain the use of the 'alert priority' system.
Also note that the Alerts portion of the screen is not intended to display
events for a long period of time. This would compromise the usefulness
of the Alerts Grid. The design idea behind the Alerts part of the screen is
that it should be reserved for special events only. It is intended that an
operator should notice an alert, perform some physical action to correct
the situation, then ‘Acknowledge’ the alert and clear that alert from the
Alerts grid. This keeps the Alerts Grid clear of events making it more
noticeable when an event does appear in that grid.
Quick Tip - To ‘Acknowledge’ an alert means to move that alert from
the Alerts Grid into the Events Grid. When any alert is acknowledged, a
time/date stamp is attached to the alert, which includes the operator
number of the operator who acknowledged the alert.
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The Alerts Grid
Figure 2 – The Alerts Grid and Alerts Grid Button Bar
Quick tip - When events are displayed in the Events section of
the main monitor screen, they are referred to as “Events”. When
events are displayed in the Alerts portion of the Main Monitor
screen, they are called “Alerts”. So when we mention ‘Alerts’ in
the following text, we mean events that appear in the Alerts Grid.
The Alerts Grid (the bottom half of the Main Monitor Screen) was
designed to display ‘important’ alerts based on settings in various
CardAccess configuration screens. This allows you to decide which
events are important enough to be displayed in the Alerts area of the
screen. (See the section on Setting Up Priorities for more information).
There are several options available for the displaying of alerts in the
Alerts portion of the CardAccess main screen.
•
•
•
Only the most important alerts display.
Display all events in the Alerts Grid.
Display events types that you select in the Alerts grid.
Note that if you elect to display any alerts in the Alerts grid, those alerts
must eventually be moved out of the Alerts Grid and into the Events
Grid. The process of moving an alert to the Events Grid from the Alerts
Grid is commonly referred to as ‘resolving the alert’. Alerts can be
resolved manually or automatically by the system. Generally, there are
several options for Acknowledging alerts.
•
•
•
Have the alerts stay in the alerts grid until they are manually
resolved by an operator.
Have the alerts remain visible in the alerts grid until a timeout
value has expired. This timeout is set in the Operators screen.
Each operator has an operator ‘Alert Ack Time’ value. For more
information see the Setting Up Auto-Acknowledgement section.
Force the operator who responds to an alert to fill in a ‘Manual
Response Screen’.
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In any case, the first thing to decide is which event types should
appear in the Alerts Grid and which ones should go to the Events
Grid. You do that by setting the event priorities. For more
information, see the next section entitled Setting Up Priorities.
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Events Grid Navigation Controls and Buttons
There are two control bars that operate on the Events Grid.
• The Events Grid Button Bar (Figure 4) - Found immediately above
the Events Grid.
• The Events Navigation Bar (Figure 5) - Found immediately below
the Events Grid.
Both tool bars are explained in more detail below. In addition to the
above tool bars, you have two standard scroll bars (vertical and
horizontal) that appear when the screen contains more information than
can be displayed in the current window size. You will use these scroll bars
to move to data that is displayed off the current screen size, just as you
would in any standard Windows program.
Column Adjustability
Figure 3 - Events Grid Column Headings (shown condensed from
default)
Note that the Events Grid has adjustable column widths, so you can
condense columns to view more information per screen if needed. To
move a column boundary, do the following.
• Position the Cursor - Position your cursor over the junction of two
columns at the top of the column where the headings are displayed
(immediately over the line between the column headings. Consult
Figure 3). If you are in the correct position, your cursor will change to
a double arrow type cursor.
• Click and Hold - Hold down the left mouse button.
• Drag the Column - Drag the column boundary where you need it
and release the mouse button.
Note that the column position changes are not 'persistent'. That is, the
columns will revert to their default positions if you restart the
CardAccess.
Column Relocation
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The positioning of the columns of the Events Grid can be rearranged if
you find the current organization of the columns to be inconvenient. To
relocate any column, do the following.
• Position the Cursor – Position your cursor over the approximate
center of the column heading of any column that you wish to move.
• Click and Hold - Hold down the left mouse button
• Drag the Column - Drag the column where you need it
• Release - Release the cursor
The columns will revert to their default positions if you restart the
CardAccess.
Event Order Sorting
By default, the Events Grid is sorted by the 'Acknowledged At' column
(Seen to the right of Figure 3) - sorted according to the time the event
was acknowledged. However, the events that appear in the Events Grid
can be sorted by using the contents of any column. Simply click the
column heading of any column, and the Events Grid will be resorted,
using the selected column as the sort criteria. You will recognize the
column that is being used as the sort criteria because it has its column
heading highlighted in yellow.
Events Grid Button Bar
Figure 4 - The Events Grid Button Bar
Some of the buttons shown in Figure 4 may be missing or may be grayed
out on your Events Grid tool bar. This is because some buttons are only
active when you have highlighted an event of a specific type. For
example, the 'Photo' button is only visible if you have highlighted a badge
type event and that badge holder has a photo stored in his or her
personnel record. Similarly, the 'Control' button will be grayed out unless
you highlight an event that concerns a door, relay or link that can be
manually controlled. More detail follows on each button and its uses.
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• Track/Browse Button - The 'Track' button switches the events
display between 'Track' and 'Browse' modes.
o Track Mode - In Track mode, the Events Grid displays each
new event as it arrives. In a busy system, this will cause the oldest
events to scroll up and off the screen.
o Browse Mode - If you need to look more closely at a selected
event, it may be hard to do in a busy system where events are
rolling in constantly and scrolling the screen. The 'Browse' mode
freezes the screen so you can select a specific event to examine.
• Respond Button - The manual Respond button brings up the
manual response screen. You can attach comments to the selected
event for later reference. See the manual section entitled 'Manual Alert
Acknowledgement' for more information on manual responses.
• Map Button- If the selected event concerns a panel, reader, input,
relay or link and that device has a map assigned, clicking the 'Map'
button will display that map.
• Photo Button - If the selected event concerns a badge holder and
that badge holder has a photo stored in their personnel record,
clicking the 'Photo' button will display that photo. Note that the
Photo button will be grayed out if there is no photo associated with
the event or if there is no photo in the badge holder record.
• Control Button - The 'Control' button will be available if the event
concerns a device that can be manually controlled, such as a door,
relay or link. The button is normally grayed out unless one of the
aforementioned event types is highlighted. When the button is not
gray, manual control is available. Clicking the Control button opens
the appropriate manual control screen (door, relay or link). The device
mentioned in the selected event will be automatically selected, and will
be ready to be manually activated or deactivated.
• Previous, Recent, Next Navigation Buttons - The 'Previous',
'Recent' and 'Next' buttons allow you to scroll from the top of the
Events Grid to the bottom of the Events Grid, one week at a time.
There are three buttons shown in Figure 4, but only the 'Recent'
button is visible by default. You can click any column heading to
expose all three navigation buttons. The functions of the buttons are
as follows.
o Previous - Scrolls back to the oldest events, scrolls 1 week per
click.
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o Recent - Restores the display to the most current events.
o Next - Scrolls the display toward the newest events, scrolls 1
week per click.
Events Grid Navigation Bar
Figure 5 - The Events Navigation Bar
The Events Navigation Bar is used to scroll forward or backwards
through the events in the events display window. Recall from the System
Settings chapter that you are permitted to select the 'number of viewable
events' in the 'Alerts' tab. The Events Grid navigation bar allows you to
scroll from the most recent event to the oldest event, as defined in the
current event buffer size which is set in the System Settings 'Number of
Viewable Events' setting. Clicking the arrow keys scrolls one event per
click.
For example, if the number of viewable events control is set to '100', the
navigation bar will allow you to scan a maximum of 100 events. The
navigation buttons will not allow you to proceed past the oldest 'viewable'
event as defined in the System Settings. Thus, you cannot use this tool
bar to navigate to archive events, only to the current most 100 (or
whatever the setting is in the System Settings).
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Events Grid Right Clicks and View Filters
There are two right click menus available in the Events Grid.
• Filter Menu - The 'Filter' menu allows you to select specific event
types to view. When a filter is enabled, events that don't match the
filter type are removed from view in the events grid. For example, you
can view only 'System' event messages, 'Door' event messages or
others. See below for more detail on the operation of the events
filters.
• View Records Menu - The 'View Records' menu allows you to select
an event and view the configuration record of the badge holder, or
hardware device mentioned in the event. See below for more detail.
Filter Menu
The Filter menu is available by right clicking on the column headings or
anywhere under the columns depicted in Figure 6.
Figure 6 - The Events Grid Columns Where the Filter Menu is Available
by Right Click
Figure 7 - The Events Grid Filter Popup Menu
The Events Grid filter menu (Figure 7) allows you to change the events
screen view to include only the type of events that you select. The
CardAccess will query the events database and return all records of the
selected type. You still have access to the entire events database, but the
view is 'filtered' to include only the type of event that you want to see.
The selected display filter will remain in effect until you change the filter
selection again.
Quick Tip – To return the display to the default
(see all events) at any time, select ‘Show All’.
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The available menu choices seen in Figure 7are explained below.
• Show All - The events screen will show all event types. This is the
default. No filter is applied.
• Show Badges - Enables a filter that shows only badge type events.
Any type of badge related event is displayed, excluding vehicle tags.
• Show Doors - Enables a filter that shows only reader related events
(door forced, door now closed, etc.).
• Show Inputs - Enables a filter that shows only input related events
(input abnormal, input normal, etc.).
• Show Links - Enables a filter that shows only link related events (link
activate, link deactivate).
• Show Relays - Enables a filter that shows only relay related events
(output on, output off).
• Show System - Enables a filter that shows only system related event
messages (panel trouble, etc.).
• Show Vehicle Tags - Enables a filter that shows only vehicle tag type
events.
The events filter is helpful when you need to locate an event and you
know what type of event you are searching for. In an events database of
possibly thousands of events, the events filter is time saving tool.
View Records Menus
There are two View Records menus. The menu you will see depends on
which column, the 'Description' or the 'Location' column that you right
click. See below for details.
• View Records Description Menu
The View Records Description menu is available by right clicking on
the column title or anywhere under the 'Description' column (Figure
8).
Figure 8 - The Events Grid Description Column Where the View
Records Menu is Available by Right Clicking
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Figure 9 - The Events Grid View Records Description Menu
The available menu choices (Figure 9) are explained below.
o View Record - Opens the configuration record of the hardware
device or badge holder that is currently selected.
o Show This - Re-filters the events screen to display only events
that mention the currently highlighted hardware or badge holder.
o Show Usage - One of several things can happen depending on
which event type mentioned below is highlighted.
!
Badge Type Event - Selecting 'Show Usage' when a badge
type event is selected brings up the Show Usage utility screen,
which displays a listing of the doors that the selected badge
holder has access to, along with a listing of the time schedules
that the badge holder is permitted to access those doors.
!
Reader Type Event - Selecting 'Show Usage' when a door
type event is selected also brings up the Show Usage utility
screen, but you will see a listing of badge holders that have
access to the door mentioned in the highlighted event. The
time schedules that the badge holders have access at that door
are also listed.
o Badge # - When clicked will bring up the Personnel record of
the badge holder mentioned in the highlighted event message.
This option is not available in the pop up list unless a badge type
event is selected.
o Tag # - When clicked will bring up the Personnel record of the
badge (vehicle tag) mentioned in the highlighted event message.
This option is not available in the pop up list unless a vehicle tag
type event is selected.
• View Records Location Menu
The View Records menu is available by right clicking on the column
title or anywhere under the 'Location' column (Figure 10).
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Figure 10 - The Events Grid Location Column Where the View
Records Menu is Available by Right Clicking
Figure 11 - The Events Grid View Records Location Menu
The available menu choices in Figure 11 are explained below.
o View Record - Opens the configuration record of the selected
hardware device or badge holder.
o Show This - Re-filters the events screen to display only events
that mention the currently highlighted hardware or badge holder
event.
o Show Access List - (Badge related events only) Selecting 'Show
Access List' brings up the Access List utility screen which displays
a listing of the badge holders that have access to currently
highlighted door event message.
• The 'Map' and 'Photo' Popup Screens
Figure 12 - The CardAccess Events Grid Button Bar
The Map and Photo buttons can be found on the Events Grid button
bar. Clicking the 'Map' button manually will bring up a pop up
window that contains a bitmap representation of the area mentioned
in the selected event (if a map has been stored in the configuration
record for that device). Clicking the 'Photo' button manually will bring
up will also bring up a pop up window, but this window will display a
bitmap photograph of the badge holder mentioned in the selected
event (the event must be a badge related event and the badge holder
must have a photo stored in their Personnel record).
The system also supports automatic Map and Photo window pop ups.
Right clicking on the Map or Photo buttons and selecting your option
enables the feature. Once the feature is enabled for photos or maps,
the photo or maps pop up screen will appear under the following
conditions.
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o When an alert that has a map or photo associated with it comes
to the top of the Alerts Grid
o When you highlight an alert that has a map or photo associated
with it
You can enable map pop up without photo pop up (and vise versa),
or you can enable both map and photo pop ups. Maps and photos
will appear in two independent windows for alerts that have both
maps and photos associated with them.
The right click menu choices for the Map and Photo buttons are as
follows.
o Map Button
!
Auto-Show Off - Disables the automatic pop up of a map
window for all alert types. Note that the manual map pop up
window is still available by clicking the map button.
!
Auto-Show All - Enables the pop up map window for all
alerts. If an alert has a map associated with it, the map pop
up window will open automatically when that alert moves to
the top of the Alerts Grid.
!
Auto-Show This Area - Enables the pop up map window
only for alerts that concern the hardware mentioned in the
currently selected alert (door, relay, input, link).
Example - Select a given door alert. Right click on the Map
button, select the 'Auto-Show This Area option. From that
point on, each alert that appears in the Alerts Grid for that
door will open the map window (if a map is stored in the
reader record).
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Figure 13 - The Map Popup Window
o Photo Button
!
Auto-Show Off - Disables the automatic pop up of a
personnel photo window for all alert types. Note that the
manual photo pop up window is still available by clicking the
photo button.
!
Auto-Show All - Enables the pop up personnel photo
window for all alerts. If an alert has a photo associated with
it, the photo pop up window will open automatically when
that alert moves to the top of the Alerts Grid.
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Figure 14 - The Personnel Photo Popup Window
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Monitor Mode vs. Status Mode
The CardAccess main monitoring screen has two modes of operation.
• Monitor Mode - In 'Monitor Mode' the CardAccess display tracks
events and alerts as they are gathered from the panels. For
convenience, the events monitoring screen is divided into two display
'grids' (events and alerts) that allow an operator to track event and alert
messages in individual, but conjoined view windows of the main
screen (Figure 15).
Figure 15 - The CardAccess Main Monitoring Screen in Monitor
Mode
• Status Mode - Clicking the 'Status' button on the CardAccess main
toolbar enters 'Status Mode'. Clicking the status button changes the
CardAccess main monitoring screen display from Monitor Mode to
Status Mode (Figure 16). Clicking the button again returns the display
to Tracking Mode (the default).
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Figure 16 - The CardAccess Status Screen - The Doors Menu is
expanded, a Door is highlighted, a Map is displayed
Status Mode offers the operator a way to view the current status or
manually control CardAccess system components. There are three
folder tabs available that allow the operator to perform the following
functions.
o Control Tab - The Control tab contains a Windows Explorer
type menu. You can double click any door, relay or link in this
menu and bring up the manual control screen for that hardware
device.
o Status Tab - The Status tab allows the operator to observe the
hardware status of all enabled hardware devices. There is a listing
of all active hardware devices and their current status (open,
closed, abnormal, normal, etc.).
o Stations Tab - The Stations tab displays a listing of the
CardAccess workstations that are currently connected to the
CardAccess database. The information displayed includes the
workstation UNC name and the name of the operator who is
currently logged in.
To view the Status screen, you must set the CardAccess main screen to
'Status' mode. To enable Status Mode, do the following.
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• Click the Status Button - Click the 'Status' button on the
CardAccess main toolbar (Figure 17).
Figure 17 - The Main Toolbar Status Button
• Click the Selected Folder Tab - Click the folder tab of your choice
and proceed as described in the sections on each folder tab.
Figure 18 – The Status Mode Folder Tabs
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Status Screen Control Tab
Figure 19 - The Status Screen Control Tab - All Categories Expanded
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The Control tab of the Status screen displays a listing of all of the enabled
hardware devices in the CardAccess system. You can manually control
any hardware device by double clicking its icon in the Status screen.
When the CardAccess main display is first switched into Status Mode, the
devices list in the Control tab is collapsed. The Control tab menu
operates very much like Windows Explorer. You can click the plus sign
to the left of a menu to expand the branch. If no devices are enabled, the
menu will not show any devices in the list.
To view the Control tab, you must set the CardAccess main screen to
'Status' mode. To enable Status Mode, do the following:
• Click the Status Button - Click the 'Status' button on the
CardAccess main toolbar (Figure 20).
Figure 20 - The Main Toolbar Status Button
• Click the Control Folder Tab - Once you enter status mode, click
the Control folder tab. The Control folder tab contains a Windows
Explorer type menu system. When you first open the Status screen,
the Control tab shows three collapsed menus.
o Doors - This menu contains a listing of the enabled active doors
in the CardAccess system. Click the plus sign to the left of the
doors icon to expand the branch. Double clicking on any icon
under the doors category will open the manual control screen with
the highlighted door selected and ready to be manually controlled.
o Relays - This menu contains a listing of the enabled active relays
in the CardAccess system. Click the plus sign to the left of the
relays icon to expand the branch. Double clicking on any icon
under the relays category will open the manual control screen with
the highlighted relay selected and ready to be manually controlled.
o Links - This menu contains a listing of the enabled active links in
the CardAccess system. Click the plus sign to the left of the links
icon to expand the branch. Double clicking on any icon under the
links category will open the manual control screen with the
highlighted link selected and ready to be manually controlled.
The three items listed above correspond to the three manual control
screens that are also available from buttons on the CardAccess main
toolbar. When you double click any hardware item icon, the appropriate
manual control screen will open, with the specific hardware item
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automatically selected in the manual control screen, ready to be manually
activated.
Note that there is a section to the right of the Control folder tab labeled
'Map' (Figure 21). When you click a device in the 'Controlled Equipment'
area of the Control tab that has a static bitmap stored in the hardware
configuration record for that device, the bitmap is displayed in the Map
area. If a selected device has no map, no bitmap will be displayed in the
map area (it will remain plain gray).
Figure 21 - The Status Screen with Map Display
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Status Screen Stations Tab
Figure 22 - The Status Screen Stations Tab
You can use the Stations tab of the Status screen to find out which
CardAccess workstations are currently online with the CardAccess
database, and which operators are currently logged in. To view the
Stations tab, you must set the CardAccess main screen to 'Status' mode.
To enable Status Mode, do the following:
• Click the Status Button - Click the 'Status' button on the
CardAccess main toolbar (Figure 23).
Figure 23 - The Main Toolbar Status Button
• Click the Stations Tab - Click the Stations Tab. The Stations tab will
display a listing of all currently connected workstations. The display
has a number of columns, as explained below.
o Station - The Station column will contain the workstation
number or name of every CardAccess workstation (and host) that
is currently connected to the CardAccess database. You will notice
in Figure 22 above that there are two entries, marked 'Master' and
'Master Comm'. These entries refer to the Host PC and the two
software components that run on that PC - the Host user screen
(Master) and the Communications Server (Master Comm).
o Name - The Name column displays the name of the operator
that is currently logged in to the indicated workstation. The name
displayed in this field is taken from the operator record, in the
Operators configuration screen, in the 'Name' field.
o Active - The 'Active' column denotes whether the referred to
workstation is currently logged in to the CardAccess system and is
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actively accessing the CardAccess database. 'Yes' means that the
workstation is active, 'No' means that the user has logged off.
o Operator - The 'Operator' column displays the 'screen name' of
the operator who is currently logged in to the indicated
CardAccess workstation. The screen name is taken from the
'Screen Name' field of the Operators screen.
o Time - The 'Time' field denotes when the indicated operator
logged in to the CardAccess database.
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Status Screen Status Tab
Figure 24 - The Status Screen Status Tab
The Status tab displays the current operational status of all hardware
items that are enabled in the CardAccess system. You will find line
entries for all enabled doors, inputs, relays and links in the system, and
the current operational status will be indicated as well.
Note: The default selection in the ‘Category’ selection control is ‘None’.
When the Category selection is set to none, you will not see any devices
listed in the space below the Category field. You must make a selection
in the Category field to see the status of CardAccess hardware.
Devices that are not enabled are not shown on the Status screen. The
selections in the Category field allow you to filter the display to show only
hardware items that match the selected alert type. The available Category
field selections are listed below.
• None - The display will not show any hardware devices (this is the
default).
• All - The display will show all enabled hardware devices.
• All Normal - The display will show all devices that are not in an
abnormal state.
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• All Abnormal - The display will show all devices that are in an
abnormal state.
• All Doors - The display will show only normal and abnormal door
devices.
• Doors Forced - The display will show only doors that are currently in
a forced door state.
• Doors Free Access - The display will show only doors that are
currently in free access.
• Doors Bypass - The display will show only doors that have been
bypassed.
• Doors Manually Unlocked - The display will show only doors that
have been unlocked using the manual door control screen (and are
currently being held unlocked).
• Doors Manually Locked - The display will show only doors that
have been locked down using the manual door control screen.
• Doors Disabled (Manual Mode) - The display will show only
readers (doors) that have been disabled using the manual door control
screen.
• Doors Disabled (Schedule) - The display will show only readers
that are currently disabled by a time schedule.
• All Inputs - The display will show all enabled input devices only.
• Abnormal Inputs - The display will show only input devices that
have reported 'input abnormal'.
• Supervised Trouble - The display will show only abnormal
supervised input devices.
• Inputs Schedule Disabled - The display will show only inputs that
have been disabled by a time schedule.
• Activated Relays - The display will show only relays that are
currently energized (latched).
The Status tab display has a number of columns, as explained below.
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• Panel - Displays the panel number of the panel that is hosting the
connected hardware device. The panel number is taken from the
'PnlNo' field of the Panels screen.
• Device - This field displays the name of the hardware device.
This name is taken from the 'Name' field in the Panels, Readers,
Relays, Inputs or Links screens.
• Status - Indicates the current status of the connected hardware
device. The message displayed is related to the type of device.
• Last Change - This field indicates the date and time of the most
recent change in status of the indicated hardware item.
• Number - Indicates the number of the hardware item, in the list
of items, in the configuration screen where the item is mentioned.
For example, if a door is mentioned on the Status tab, the number
of the door record in the Readers screen is mentioned in the
Number field. Thus, you have the panel number that the device is
connected to in the 'Panel' field and you have the reader number
(as found in the 'Reader' field for the Readers screen). With this
information, you can easily locate the configuration record of a
hardware device.
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Log In and Out
Log In
Figure 25 The CardAccess Login Screen
The CardAccess software presents you with a login screen shortly after
you start the software. This login screen exists to prevent unauthorized
tampering with security permissions and history reports in the
CardAccess database. Before you can log in to the CardAccess, you must
know a valid login identity and password. There are only two options.
• Default Login - The default login identity is stored in the CardAccess
database by the CardAccess software installation program
automatically. This default login provides enough security to prevent
unauthorized access of the software before 'official' security
permissions have been set up, during the time after the software is
started for the first time, after a new installation.
It is strongly recommended that you change the password of the
default login upon the first access to the software after installation.
Continental Instruments has many customers and clients who are
familiar with the default login listed below. For your system to be
considered truly secure, do not keep the default password for the
administrator login.
Default Login Name = Admin (or admin)
Default Password = q (the lower case letter 'Q')
Quick Tip - The 'User Name' and 'Password' fields are
case sensitive on all user names and passwords except the
default user name. The user name 'admin' can be typed in
as 'Admin' or 'admin' (without the quotes)
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• Custom Login - Custom logins can be created after you have
successfully logged into the CardAccess software after an installation.
To create login identities, you must create operator privilege templates
in the 'Operator Privileges' screen and you must create user profiles
(login identities) in the 'Operators' screen (in that order). See more
information in the manual sections entitled 'Operators' and 'Operator
Privileges'
To log into the CardAccess software, do the following.
• Type in a Login Name - Type a login name into the 'User Name'
field. If this is the first time you have used the software after a new
installation, use the login name 'admin' (without the quotes).
Figure 26 – The User Name Field
• Type in a Password - Type a password into the 'Password' field. If
this is the first time you have used the software after a new installation,
use the password 'q' (without the quotes).
Figure 27 – The Password Field
Note that there are some options to consider during log in.
• You May Elect to Change Your Password - If you are using the
default administrator password or if you have logged in at least once
with your current identity, the change password button will appear
after you have entered a known valid user name and password.
Clicking this button is the only way to change your current password.
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Figure 28 The Login Screen With Change Password Button Visible
• You May be Required to Change Your Password - Note that
when you log in for the first time with a newly created login identity,
you will see the change password screen in the figure below after you
click the OK button. This password change is required by the system
for your protection. Your login identity password should not be
known to anyone but you, so that no one can impersonate your login
and cause problems using your identity as the source of those
problems. However, if you desire, you can re-enter your current
password into both fields.
Figure 29 – The Change Password Screen
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Log Out
Logging out of the CardAccess is a two-step process. More accurately,
there are two 'degrees' of logging out.
• Exit the Main Screen - You may exit the CardAccess main screen
and return to a Log In prompt. This option is useful if you wish to
step away from a CardAccess workstation and you do not wish to
leave the CardAccess main screen open to access by unauthorized
users. Exiting the software in this manner closes the CardAccess user
interface, which will prevent tampering, but the software is left fully
operational. The below image shows the CardAccess Log In screen, in
'Logged Out mode'. Note the 'Shutdown' button. Clicking this button
terminates the program as mentioned in the below paragraph.
Figure 30 – The CardAccess Logout Screen
• Shut Down the Software - Once you have exited the CardAccess
main screen as mentioned in the previous paragraph, and have
returned to the Log In screen, you can shut down the software
completely from the Log In window by clicking the 'Shutdown'
button.
However, the software will require the password of the currently
logged in operator in order to process the shut down request. The
below screen will appear, requesting that password. You must know
the password of the currently logged in operator. If not, your
shutdown request will be ignored and the system will return to the
Log In screen.
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Figure 31 – The CardAccess Logout Screen
How to Log Out
There are two ways to leave the CardAccess main screen.
• Log Out Button - Click the 'Log Out' button that is located on the
extreme right side of the CardAccess main toolbar.
Figure 32 – The Logout Button
• System Menu - The System menu has a 'Log Out' shortcut. Click the
'System' menu shortcut at the top left of the CardAccess main screen.
Then click the 'Log Out' shortcut at the top of that menu.
Both methods of logging out above will close the CardAccess main
screen and cause the CardAccess to return to the Log In screen. The
software will remain running.
How to Shut Down
• Log Out - Log out as in the above section 'How to Log Out'
Figure 33 – The Logout Button
• Click Shutdown - Click the 'Shutdown' button
Figure 34 – The Shutdown Button
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• Enter Your Password - Enter the password of the currently logged
in user in the 'Enter Password' field and click the 'OK' button. The
CardAccess GUI will shut down and will also shut down the
communications driver (if you are shutting down the host computer
GUI only). Shutting down the CardAccess GUI on a workstation will
not terminate the communications driver.
Figure 35 – The Enter Password Screen
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Programming the CardAccess
Setting Up Priorities
Every displayable event that the CardAccess generates has a
programmable Priority setting. Attaching priority numbers to events
allows the system to route alerts of a higher priority to the Alerts window,
lower priorities to the Events window.
Quick Tip - Every alert type is assigned a priority number by
the system as a default. You can use the system assigned
priority numbers, or change them to any value you want.
The Priority Number range is 1-99. The highest priority (most urgent) is
1. The least important is 99. Note however that 99 is a ‘special’ number.
When an event priority is set to 99, it does not report at all. Events set to
a priority of 99 are suppressed. Thus, the actual usable range of
‘reporting’ priority numbers is 1-98.
Here is a list of the screens that have controls for setting up
priorities. Let’s look at each in the following sections.
• Panels
• Readers
• Inputs
• Relays
• Links
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Panels
Figure 36 – Panels Priorities Tab
Notice in Figure 36 that
• Each of the 4 spin controls has a descriptive label that tells you
its function.
• There are default priority values loaded by the system
• Each of the 4 priorities listed also has a check box labeled
‘Requires Operator Response’. If a priority has this check box
checked, any automatic acknowledgement of this alert type will
be disabled. Manual acknowledgement is required to resolve that
alert.
To set a priority value for a panel event item
• Click Edit – Click the edit button on the Panels main toolbar.
• Click Priorities – Click the Priorities tab.
• Use the Spin Control – Use the spin control or type over the
numeric value that is currently displayed.
• Click Requires Alert – Check the ‘Requires Alert’ check box if
appropriate.
• Click Save – Click the Save button.
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Readers
Figure 37 – Readers Priority Tab
Notice in Figure 37 that the Priorities folder tab is divided into two
sections – ‘Priority Settings’ and ‘Miscellaneous Priorities’. Also
notice that the reader priorities listed on the left are ‘serious’ door
events. Door break-ins, doors not closed on time, bad badges and the
like. The priorities listed on the right are all of the events that are
expected when a door is being accessed ‘normally’ (with permission).
The segregation of these two event types on this screen is by design.
Violation events are treated quite differently from normal, expected
events.
As we have stated previously, we have numerous corporate
customers who generate thousands of events per day. The majority of
these events are valid access type events. In the current system
design, all event messages retrieved from panels are deposited in an
SQL database table called ‘Events’.
Since all events are deposited into one common database table, the
total number of events stored in the active events database could
eventually become large enough to compromise the efficiency of the
system.
To prevent system response time degradation due to a swelling
events database, CardAccess design engineers created an events
archive engine. The archive engine purges the online events database
once per hour in an effort to maintain a manageable events table size
(see the manual section entitled ‘System Settings’ for more
information on events archiving).
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All of the valid alert types mentioned in the Miscellaneous Priorities
section are set by default to bypass the Alerts Grid. The priority
setting in the ‘Priority’ field will be ignored and all valid alerts
mentioned in this section will be dumped to the events portion of the
CardAccess main screen unless the ‘Enable Oper Acknowledge’
check box is checked for any of those alert types.
If Enable Oper Acknowledge is checked, the selected alert types will
appear in the Alerts Grid, unless the ‘Enable Auto-Acknowledge’
feature is enabled in the System Settings (see the manual section
entitled ‘System Settings’). If the auto-acknowledge engine is enabled,
then the priority setting will determine which events will appear in
the alerts grid.
Inputs
Figure 38 – Inputs General Tab
There are only two events associated with inputs – ‘Normal’ and
‘Abnormal’. You set one alert priority for both event messages in the
control highlighted above.
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Relays
Figure 39 – Relays General Tab
There are only two events associated with Relays – ‘Output On’ and
‘Output Off’. You set one alert priority for both event messages in
the control highlighted above. Note that unless the check box ‘Alert
on Change’ is checked, you will not get any relay event messages.
They don’t report by default.
Links
Figure 40 – Links General Tab
There are only two events associated with Links – ‘Link Activate’ and
‘Link Deactivate’. You set one alert priority for both event messages
in the control highlighted above.
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Alert Acknowledgement
Alerts can be acknowledged in two ways.
• Manually
• Automatically
The following two sections describe the set up and operation of
Manual and Auto Acknowledgement.
Manual Alert Acknowledgement
There are two kinds of Manual Acknowledgement. ‘No Response
Required’ and ‘Response Required’.
The no response required manual acknowledgement does not require
any set up. When an alert appears in the Alerts Grid, you simply click
the ‘Acknowledge’ button (see Figure 41). Clicking the Acknowledge
button immediately moves the top most alert from the Alerts Grid,
into to the Events Grid.
Figure 41 – Alerts Grid Acknowledge Response Buttons
The ‘Respond’ button is another optional way to acknowledge a no
response required alert. When you click the Respond button, a
response window opens (see Figure 42), allowing the operator to type
in a response message. In this case, even though the operator is not
required to create a response message, they have elected to do so by
pressing the Respond button.
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Figure 42 – Response Window
To manually acknowledge an alert using the Alerts toolbar Respond
button, left click the Respond button, fill in a (optional) response in the
Respond Message area, then press the Acknowledge button on the
Response form (see Figure 42). The result is (mostly) the same as
pressing the Acknowledge button alone. The alert moves from the Alerts
Grid into the Events Grid.
The major reason to use the Response button instead of the
Acknowledge button is to add comments to the event, which will be
permanently linked to that event. A new shift of security guards can
examine specific events later to see what action was taken by other
guards.
Auto Alert Acknowledgement
In the section called Setting Up Priorities, we explored setting up
priority values for event messages. Those steps should be completed
before you attempt to enable Auto-Acknowledgement of alerts.
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As we stated previously, alerts can be acknowledged manually or
automatically. In Auto-Acknowledgement of alerts, we are setting up
the CardAccess software to resolve alerts automatically, without
human intervention. There are several CardAccess screens and
menus involved in setting up Auto-Acknowledgement, let’s look at
them.
To get Auto-Acknowledgement working, you need to set up two
features. Firstly, to enable the Auto-Acknowledge engine, you go to
System Settings -> Alerts tab (see Figure 43). There are three
controls of interest explained below.
Figure 43 – System Settings Alerts Tab
Note – Remember that you must be in Edit Mode in most CardAccess screens
in order to change the settings of any control. You enter edit mode by clicking
the ‘New’ button (to create a new record) or the ‘Edit’ button (to edit an
existing record). The buttons are located on the top toolbar. Click ‘Save’ when
you are done to save the changes you have made.
Enable Auto-Acknowledge
Figure 44 – The Processing Section of the System Settings Alerts Tab
In the System Settings, on the Alerts tab, the 'Enable Auto-Acknowledge'
check box enables and disables the Auto-Acknowledge feature. If the
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box is checked, the feature is enabled, unchecked the feature is disabled.
When disabled, the system will not automatically acknowledge alerts.
The numeric spin control ‘Auto Ack Priority Set Point’ determines which
alert priority levels will be auto-acknowledged. This control sets the ‘setpoint’ that the system uses to determine which alerts will stay in the
Alerts Grid and which alerts will be automatically moved to the Events
Grid.
For example, if the set-point number is set to 5 as above, alerts that have
a priority of 5-98 will be automatically acknowledged. Alerts with a
priority of 1-4 will remain in the Alerts Grid until manually
acknowledged.
Response Required Schedule
If you review the figures above, starting with Figure 36 and ending
with Figure 40, you will notice a check box on each of those screens.
That check box may have one of the following labels; “Requires Alert
Response”, “Response Required”, “Alert Requires Response”, or
“Requires Operator Response”. All of those labels mean the same
thing.
When that check box is checked for a given event type, a response
window will be brought up on every alert of that type that is
acknowledged (remember that when we say ‘acknowledged’, we mean
to move an alert from the Alerts Grid to the Events Grid).
So by requiring an alert response, we are requiring that the operator
perform an extra step for every alert that is acknowledged. Normally,
you have the option of adding a response to an alert (see the section
titled Manual Alert Acknowledgement). The ‘requires response’
option takes away that choice. You must encounter the response
window before you are allowed to acknowledge an alert.
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Alert Ack Time
The final component that must be set to enable alert autoacknowledgement is in the Administration -> Operators menu. Each
operator has a value set in the General tab of each operator record
called “Alert Ack Time” (see Figure 45).
Figure 45 – Operators General Tab, Alert Ack Time control
The Alert Ack Time value is a (clock) timer that represents the
amount of time in seconds that an alert will remain in the Alerts Grid
before it is automatically moved into the Events Grid. This value is
attached to each operator definition.
Therefore, the auto-acknowledge timer can be different for each
operator. This means that the amount of time that an Alert stays in
the Alerts Grid is not fixed. It depends on the timer value that is set
in the operator definition, for the operator that is currently logged in.
Note the following points.
• If you set the Operator Alert Ack Time to zero, alert
acknowledgement will default to 1 second for that operator
logon.
• When there is no operator logged into the CardAccess, but the
software is running and alerts are coming in, automatic
acknowledgement is turned off. An operator must be logged in
and must have an Operator Ack Time set (in their operator
record) in order for automatic acknowledging to be operational.
An operator does all acknowledging.
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In a system of several CardAccess computer workstations and a
server, in order for auto-ack to take place, at least one operator
must be logged in at any computer in the system.
•
•
The longest operator Alert Ack Time possible is 9999 seconds
(166.65 minutes, 2.778 hours).
In a larger system where several operators may be logged into
CardAccess equipped workstations, each workstation will
‘compete’ to automatically acknowledge alerts. The operator
workstation that has the shortest alert Ack Time set will
acknowledge alerts before other workstation with longer times
set.
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Language Control
Figure 46 – Language Editor Utility
English
Translation
Language Control Design
Language translation for the CardAccess is accomplished by using
text ‘overlay’ files. The text labels for every control, message and
screen menu used by the CardAccess, Host polling program and the
CardAccess reports have been added to three tab separated text files
(one for CardAccess, one for Host and one for all of the Reports).
Because these are ordinary tab separated text files, a user can easily
edit the files by using a text editor such as WordPad or you can use
the included utility (recommended). All of the relevant language files
can be found in a folder called “Language” under the
CardAccess3000 root folder (see Figure 47).
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Figure 47 – Language Editing & Control Files
The language of the CardAccess software does not actually change, it
is always in English. It is the display of the labels of the various
CardAccess controls and messages that is changed.
On start up, the CardAccess will read the language setting.
CardAccess will then access a language translation text file and load
the translation key for that language. The labels for all controls then
display in the appropriate language if there is translation text in the
translation file that was used.
It is possible to change the language settings and not be able to see
any language changes in the CardAccess screens. The text files used
for translation must have translation text filled into every row under
the chosen language column. The files can be edited by the user, so
translations for the English words found in the leftmost column of
the file can be added by users in the country of use.
There are four important files used for language translation. All four
files are located in the CardAccess\Language folder. Here is a list of
those files and what they are used for.
•
Language.exe – This is the language editor program. It creates a
convenient utility interface so the user can edit the language text
files. You can also use Microsoft WordPad, Notepad or Excel to
edit the text files. It is recommended that you use the CardAccess
language editor tool.
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Language.txt – This file contains the language translations for
the CardAccess GUI.
TranslatHost.txt – This file contains the language translations
for the Host communications driver program.
TranslatRpt – This file contains the language translations for the
(all of the) reports.
Using the Language Editor Utility
• Use Explorer – Use Windows Explorer to locate the
CardAccess3000 \ Language folder.
• Click the File – Double click the file “Language Editor”.
Figure 48 – The CardAccess3000 Folders
•
Select the Program – Click the arrow to the right of the
‘Program’ control, select the screen text that you want to edit.
The choices are CardAccess 3000, Host Communications Driver
or Reports. Once you select an option from the menu, the system
will go busy momentarily while it opens the requested file.
Figure 49 – The Program Control with Menu Visible
•
Select the Language – Click the arrow to the right of the
‘Language’ field. Use the scrollbar to scroll up or down to locate
the language you wish to edit. Click on that language to select it.
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Figure 50 – The Language Editor Language Field
•
Start Editing – The editing window will now show the English
control names on the left and the translation text on the right
(Figure 51). You can begin to fill in the translations on the right.
You can also clear the entire right hand column by using the
‘Clear All’ button on the top right of the Language Editor utility
screen. Changes are not committed until you click the ‘Save’
button at the bottom of the screen
Figure 51 – The Language Editor Utility Window – Dutch Language
Selected
•
Click Save – Click the ‘Save’ button when you are done to
commit the changes. If you close the utility before you click Save,
the changes will be discarded.
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Figure 52 – The Save Button
• Click Exit – Click the ‘Exit’ button to exit the utility
Figure 53 – The Exit Button
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System Settings
The System Settings of the CardAccess is a set of screens where you
set the default operating characteristics of the software. These
screens are typically accessed during the set up phase of the software.
After that, the settings on these screens are rarely changed. You can
access the System Settings menu by clicking the System menu at the
top left of the CardAccess screen, then selecting System Settings.
Warning - Some of the settings on the System Settings screens
can profoundly change the behavior of the CardAccess or even
disable the software. Therefore, it is strongly suggested that access
to the System Settings be limited to Administrator level users only.
Setting Up the System Settings
When you open the System Settings, you will see several folder tabs
(see Figure 54). We will discuss the controls on each folder tab
below.
Figure 54 – System Settings Folder Tabs
Quick Tip – Some of the controls on the System Settings screens
are ‘Local’, meaning they affect your workstation only. Some
controls are ‘Global’, meaning they affect the entire system. Some
of the settings affect only the server. We have indicated where a
particular control is local, global or server in each section.
General Tab
Station Name
[Local]
It is important to note that the System Settings of any CardAccess
equipped workstation is capable of editing the settings for any other
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workstation, or even the Server. The System Settings window has a
selection control called “Station Name” that allows you to choose
which workstation’s settings you wish to edit.
When you first open the System Settings, you will be looking at the
settings for the workstation that you are currently editing from. You
always need to be sure which workstation’s settings you are editing.
Look at the Station Name control in Figure 55. This is the control
that you use to select which workstation’s settings you wish to view
and edit. You will know if you are looking at the settings for your
workstation, if the “Assign As This PC” check box is checked.
Figure 55 – Station Name Control
The station name control performs several functions.
• This control is where you could change your workstation
number.
• This control is where you could change the view to allow you to
edit the settings for someone else’s workstation.
• When set to “Host PC”, this control allows you to change your
workstation into a Communications Server. When Station Name
= Host PC, the CardAccess will look for and start the
communications driver program upon start up.
Quick Tip – In the current CardAccess, you are not allowed to set
more than one computer’s Station Name = “Host”. There can be
only one computer in the system that communicates to the panels.
Change the Station Name
[Local]
• Open the System Settings.
• Click the arrow at the right of the Station Name box.
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Choose a new workstation number. Left click it.
Click the Edit button.
Left click the ‘Assign As This PC’ check box (note – if you don’t
click the Assign as this PC check box, the new workstation
number assignment will not be saved).
Left click the ‘Save’ button.
Some settings changes require a restart of the CardAccess
software.
View Another Workstation’s Settings
• Open the System Settings.
• Click the arrow at the right of the Station Name box.
• Choose a new workstation number. Left click it.
• You are now viewing the settings for the selected workstation.
You do not need to be in Edit mode to view these settings.
Assign Modems
[Server]
Modems are used by the CardAccess for dial out to, and dial in from
the panels. If you wish to use a modem with the CardAccess, the
driver for that modem must be installed in Windows first. The
CardAccess list of available modems is taken from the Windows
modem list.
To assign a modem use the following steps.
• Open the System Settings.
• Click the Edit button.
• Left click the arrow to the right of the ‘Line 1 Modem Name’ box
(or Line 2 Modem. Which modem is assigned first does not
matter).
• Select a modem and click it.
• Click the Save button. The modem selection has been saved.
Quick Tip – You can assign a maximum of two modems in the System
Settings. This will make up to two modems available for use by the software.
The modems are not dedicated to ‘dial out’ or ‘dial in’ in the System Settings
screen. See the section entitled Dial Up for more information.
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Max Badge Digits at Panel
[Global]
Quick Tip – The maximum number of badge number
digits that the CardAccess will allow is 9. Do not use
badges with card numbers that are longer than 9 digits.
Figure 56 – Badge Digit Selection Control
The access control panels have limited memory. When a panel is first
set up, one of the items downloaded to each panel is how the
memory should be organized. There are spaces made for data items
based on settings that you set in the CardAccess software.
The Max Badge Digits at Panel setting controls how much panel
memory is allocated for badge numbers. If less storage is needed for
badge numbers, the panel can store more events.
You will set the Max Badge Digits at Panel control to reflect the
number of digits in the longest card number that you intend to use.
There are several industry standard card format types and this control
reflects the standard available types.
The choices are 5, 7 or 9 digits. If you are unsure, set it to 9 digits
(the maximum number of digits).
Badge Tagging Type
[Global]
Figure 57 – Badge Tagging Type Control
There are two options available here – ‘None’ and ‘Vehicle Tracking’.
Select ‘None’ if you will not be using Vehicle Tagging and select
‘Vehicle Tracking’ if you will be using Vehicle Tags. When you select
Vehicle Tagging, several menu items become visible in other screens.
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A ‘Vehicle Tag’ check box becomes visible in the Personnel screen,
on the ‘General’ tab.
Figure 58 – Personnel Screen Vehicle Tag Check Box
A ‘Vehicle Superterm Reader Link’ selection control becomes visible
in the Readers screen, on the ‘Options’ tab.
Figure 59 – Readers Screen Vehicle Tag Linking Control
For a detailed explanation of vehicle tagging, see the Readers section
of the manual.
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Disable Clock Synchronization
[Global]
Figure 60 – Clock Synchronization Control
This feature is enabled by default. It keeps the clocks of all of the
CardAccess workstations synchronized. This insures that timestamps
attached to events, which were acknowledged from any of the
CardAccess workstations, will be synchronized with a master clock.
To Disable clock synchronization, check the box.
Use Facility Maps
[Local]
Figure 61 – Mapping Enable Control
The mapping engine is disabled by default. To enable it, check the
box. Once maps are enabled, a “Maps” menu choice appears in the
Administration menu. You also get a “Maps” folder tab that appears
in the following screens.
• Panels
• Readers
• Inputs
• Relays
• Links
Archive Tab
[Server]
The Archive tab displays the name of the archive database and the
server that the archive database is connected to. The archive database
can be any CardAccess compatible SQL server database (desktop
MSDE or server) except the CardAccess main database. It is
recommended that you create your events archive database on the
same server that is running the CardAccess database.
When we say ‘CardAccess compatible’ database, we mean an SQL
server database that was created by using the utility called
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‘CaDbUtils’. CaDbUtils.exe is a file supplied with the CardAccess
software and is located in the CardAccess3000 tools folder (a
shortcut is also available from the CardAccess3000 program group).
An SQL database created with the CaDbUtils utility has all of the
stored procedures and database tables that are unique to the
CardAccess software. The CaDbUtils utility is available from the
CardAccess program group, in the ‘Tools’ menu.
To select a backup database do the following.
• Select the Server
Figure 62 – The System Settings, Archive Tab, Server Name Field
By default, the name of the CardAccess server is loaded into the
‘Server Name’ control. If you wish to change the path, click in the
white space, delete the old name and type in the new name. Do
not use slashes in the computer name.
The CardAccess software will attempt to locate the server name
you entered once you click the ‘Database Name’ field. If the
attempt fails, you will get the error message in Figure 63. Check
the name, or look for the server by using other means (network
neighborhood for example).
Figure 63 – Archive Database Connect Fail Message Box
• Select the Database
Figure 64 – The System Settings, Archive Tab, Database Name Field
If the CardAccess has successfully connected to the server, there
will be a list of databases available in the ‘Database Name’ control.
If there are no database names available, it may mean that no
CardAccess compatible databases were created on the server
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machine listed in the ‘Server Name’ control. Use Enterprise
manager (if available) to check the databases available on the target
server.
To see the list of databases, click the arrow button to the right of
the Database Name control and scroll up or down to locate the
database you wish to use as the archive (events) database, and click
it. If connection to the selected database was successful, the
database name will appear in the Database name control.
Printers Tab
Report Printer
[Local]
Figure 65 – Report Printer Selection Control
This control selects the printer that will be used when any of the
reports is printed. The list of printers is taken from the Windows
printers list. Thus, at least on printer must be installed in Windows or
no selections will be visible in the list.
To select a Report printer
•
•
•
•
Click the Edit button
Click the down arrow on the right side of the Report Printer
control
Click the selected printer
Click the Save button
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Event Printer
[Local]
Figure 66 – Event printer selection controls
Events printing is disabled by default. You enable the event printer
by selecting a printer in the ‘Event Printer’ control. Once printing is
enabled, the event-printing engine prints every violation and system
event message that appears in the CardAccess Events Grid, 24 hours
per day, every day of the year by default.
Valid access messages are not printed by default, in the interest of
saving paper. Since the majority of event transactions are valid access
events, a considerable amount of paper could be used in a busy
system.
To enable valid event message printing, select a time schedule in the
‘Valid Access Events by Schedule’ control. When that schedule is in
effect, valid access events will be printed. When the schedule is not in
effect, valid access events will not print.
Note – A high-speed dot matrix printer will offer line by line printing
capability. A laser printer will not eject a document until the entire page
has been filled with text. In a case where the event printer is being used
to monitor violation event traffic, a dot matrix printer is advised if
action is to be taken as events are printed. If event printing is for
‘historical’ purposes, the laser printer will suffice.
To Enable Event Printing do the following.
•
Click Edit – Click the Edit button
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Figure 67 – The Edit Button
•
Select an Event Printer – Click the down arrow on the right
side of the Event Printer control and click the selected printer
Figure 68 – The Event Printer Selection Control
•
Set the Priority – The ‘Print Events Above Priority’ control
allows you to dictate a ‘set point’ for event printing. The number
in this control refers to the priority level of the events that you
wish to print.
For example, the control in Figure 69 has a priority of 6 set. This
means that the event printer will print all events that have a
priority level of 5 or higher (1-5. Lower numbers are higher
priority. See the manual section entitled ‘Setting Up Priorities’ for
more information). 99 is the lowest priority, 1 is the highest
priority.
Figure 69 – The Print Events Above Priority Spin Control
•
Set up a Valid Access Printing Schedule – If you wish to have
valid events printed, you need to select a schedule in the ‘Valid
Access Events by Schedule’ control. If no schedule is selected,
valid access events will not be sent to the event printer. Only
violation and system messages will be sent as explained above.
To select a schedule, click the arrow at the right of the Valid
Access Events by Schedule control, scroll up or down to locate
the desired schedule, and click it.
If there are no schedules visible in the control, you need to create
some in the Schedules screen, available from a button on the
CardAccess main toolbar (see ‘Schedules’ for more information).
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Figure 70 – The Valid Access Events by Schedule Selection Control
•
Click Save – Click the Save button
Figure 71 – The Save Button
Printer Properties
[Local]
Figure 72 – Printer Properties button
The Printer Properties button is provided as a convenience for the
user. This button gives access to the settings of the printers chosen as
Events or Reports printers. To use this button, first click the printer
whose settings you wish to edit. Then click the Printer Properties
button.
Alerts Tab
Processing Section
There are a number of controls in this section that are explained in
detail earlier in this manual, in the section called Auto Alert
Acknowledgement. This section will demonstrate how to make
selections with these controls.
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Figure 73 – Acknowledgement Controls
•
•
•
Enable Auto-Acknowledge – If checked the feature is enabled.
Auto Ack Priority Set Point – Informs the CardAccess which
event belong in the Events Grid, and which belong in the Alerts
Grid. The acceptable range for this control is 1-99.
Response Required Schedule – If Response Required is set on
any event types, the default condition is that the Response
Required window will display at all hours of the day (24/7/365).
This control allows you to set a limit on when the Response
Required window will appear. Note that if the Response Required
function is disabled by a time schedule, the Response Required
window will not display for any type of event.
Number of Viewable Events
Figure 74 – Viewable Events Selection Control
The ‘Number of Viewable Events’ control works in conjunction with
the event auto archive engine that was mentioned in the ‘Archive
Tab’ section earlier in this chapter. As you may recall from that
discussion, the auto archive engine purges events from the events
database table once per hour to maintain system performance.
The Number of Viewable Events control selects two things.
• The number of events that will be seen by all operators in the
Events Grid
• The number of events that will remain in the events database table
Thus, the Number of Viewable Events control selects the number of
events that will not be automatically archived once per hour. Only
the most recent events will be left in the events table during the
hourly event archive.
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It is strongly suggested that you set the Number of Viewable Events
control to a low number. Smaller numbers will increase system
response times. In no case should the number be set to more than
35,000.
Alert Sound
There are actually two sound generators included with the
CardAccess. Each sound engine has it’s own sound(s) and it’s own
‘switch’ to turn it on and off (see Figure 75)
Standard Bell Sound
Figure 75 – Standard Bell Sound On/Off Switch
The standard bell sound is active by default every time you re-start
the CardAccess. It uses the standard Windows Default Beep sound.
The standard Windows bell sound is not selectable from inside the
CardAccess. This bell rings whenever an alert is received, at an
interval of every two seconds. The time interval for this sound is also
not selectable.
To turn this bell on and off, go to the menu bar between the Events
Grid and the Alerts Grid, right click on the words ‘Pending Alerts’,
left click the ‘Silence’ box that appears. If the Silence box appears and
it has a check mark in it, the bell sound has already been turned off
(see Figure 76).
Figure 76 – Bell Sound Turned Off
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Alert Sound Generator
Figure 77 – Alert Sound Generator Controls
The CardAccess has a built in alert sound generator. When alerts take
their place at the top of the Alerts Grid, it is possible to have the
CardAccess play a sound that is linked to the severity of the alert
priority.
In Figure 77, you will note a number of ‘Sound File’ controls. These
controls allow you to assign a different sound file to each of four
priority level ranges listed below.
• Priority 1-5
• Priority 6-10
• Priority 11-20
• Priority 21-30
Priorities lower than 30 (31-99) are not assigned an alert sound
because it is assumed that events of that lower priority level will not
appear in the Alerts Grid at all.
The Alert Sound section controls are explained below.
• Enable Sound
Figure 78 – The Enable Sound Check Box
Enables the alert sounds engine. Checked is enabled, unchecked is
disabled. To enable the sound generator engine, click the check
box
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• Play Interval
Figure 79 – The Play Interval Spin Control
Each sound file control has an associated ‘Play Interval’ selection
control. This control sets how often the associated sound will
repeat (in seconds). The minimum is 0 seconds (which is constant
repeat) and the maximum is 90 seconds.
To select a Play Interval, click the up or down arrow buttons to
the right of the preferred Play Interval control or click in the white
space and type a number from 0 - 90
• Sound File 5
Figure 80 – The Priority 5 or Above Sound File Selection Control
The Sound File 5 control selects the sound that is to be associated
with alerts of priority 1-5. To select a sound file, click the arrow to
the right of the Sound File selection control, scroll up or down to
locate a sound file, click the file to select it. Don’t forget to assign
a Play Interval for the sound of 0 seconds or more. If the Play
Interval is set to 0 the sound will be constantly played for all alerts
in this alert priority range
• Sound File 10
Figure 81 – The Priority 10 or Above Sound File Selection Control
The Sound File 10 control selects the sound that is to be
associated with alerts of priority 6-10. To select a sound file, click
the arrow to the right of the Sound File selection control, scroll up
or down to locate a sound file, click the file to select it. Don’t
forget to assign a Play Interval for the sound of 0 seconds or
more. If the Play Interval is set to 0 the sound will be constantly
played for all alerts in this alert priority range.
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• Sound File 20
Figure 82 – The Priority 20 or Above Sound File Selection Control
The Sound File 20 control selects the sound that is to be
associated with alerts of priority 11-20. To select a sound file, click
the arrow to the right of the Sound File selection control, scroll up
or down to locate a sound file, click the file to select it. Don’t
forget to assign a Play Interval for the sound of 1 second or more.
If the Play Interval is set to 0 the sound will be constantly played
for all alerts in this alert priority range
• Sound File 30
Figure 83 – The Priority 30 or Above Sound File Selection Control
The Sound File 30 control selects the sound that is to be
associated with alerts of priority 21-30. To select a sound file, click
the arrow to the right of the Sound File selection control, scroll up
or down to locate a sound file, click the file to select it. Don’t
forget to assign a Play Interval for the sound of 0 seconds or
more. If the Play Interval is set to 0 the sound will be constantly
played for all alerts in this alert priority range
• Response Required Events
Figure 84 – The Response Required Events Selection Control
The Response Required events control selects a sound to be
played whenever an alert comes to the top of the Alerts Grid that
has the ‘Response Required’ pop up screen feature enabled. This
sound will play on all Response Required enabled alerts and will
override the alert priority settings in the Sound File controls
mentioned immediately above
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• Import Button
Figure 85 – The Import button
The Import button opens an Explorer window that allows you to
import a sound file into the CardAccess3000\Sounds folder. The
CardAccess software is installed with 20 default sound files in the
\CardAccess\Sounds folder.
However, you can import as many sound files of your own
choosing as you wish. For each file you import, a copy will be
made of the original source sound file and stored in the Sounds
folder. Files are expected to be in ‘.wav’ format. Click the Import
button to search for a file.
• Remove Button
Figure 86 – The Remove Button
The Remove button will allow you to delete a sound file
association from one of the ‘Sound File’ fields. The remove button
will not delete the sound file from the \CardAccess3000\Sounds
folder. It will only remove the linkage between the sound file and
the selected alert priority range.
To remove a sound file for a given alert priority range, do the
following:
o Click the Sound – Click the Sound File field that you wish to
remove the sound from.
o Click Remove – Click the Remove button.
o Click Yes – Click the Yes button on the warning message box
that appears (Figure 87). The sound has been removed from
the selected Sound File Control.
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Figure 87 – The Delete Sound Warning
Using Socket Alert Notify
Figure 88 – The Socket Notify Control
This feature is disabled by default. Socket Alert Notify is a feature
that operates much like event printing. In event printing, event
messages are routed to the database (they are then displayed on the
screen) and copies of those event messages are sent to the event
printer. When Socket Alert Notify is active, event messages are sent
to the database as usual, but copies of those event messages are also
sent out onto the network via a TCP socket message. The
CardAccess server creates a TCP client socket that connects to IP
127.0.0.1 (loop back) and TCP port 5001.
The Event protocol Message is encapsulated in a standard TCP
packet. The data portion of that TCP packet is stuffed with a comma
delimited string of ASCII characters (plain text), which has the
following format.
Date
BadgeNo
Class
Description
Name
To turn on Socket Notify, check the check box (see Figure 88).
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Custom Fields Tab
Figure 89 – Custom Fields Tab in System Settings
The Custom Fields tab in the System Settings contains controls that
allow you to create field types of your own design that appear in the
Personnel screen. Custom fields are not enabled by default.
To Enable Custom Fields
• Open the System Settings.
• Go into Edit mode.
• Go to the Custom Fields tab.
• Type in a suitable folder name in the “Page Title” field (see
Figure 89).
• Click the Save Button.
• Once a Page Title has been filled in (even if it’s one character)
and the settings have been saved, a folder with your title on it
appears in the Personnel screen (see Figure 92). For the sake of
this example, we called the folder “Custom Fields”, but the title
of every field is under the user’s control.
To Disable Custom Fields
• Open the System Settings.
• Go into Edit mode.
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Go to the Custom Fields tab.
Delete every entry, in every field.
Click the Save button.
When you go to the System Settings Custom tab for the first time
after installing the CardAccess, you will note that all fields in that
screen are blank. To turn the custom fields feature on, you need to
fill in a title in the field called “Page Title”.
After you have filled in a page title and have saved the settings, an
additional folder tab appears in the Personnel screen. Note that this
folder tab has a title but no other items on it (Figure 90).
Figure 90 – Personnel Custom Fields Tab with No Fields Created
To create visible fields on the Personnel Custom Fields folder tab, as
you see below in Figure 92, you must fill in titles for each of the
fields you wish to use, much as you see in Figure 89. Each field
becomes visible on the Personnel Custom Fields form, once you fill
in a title in appropriate field in the System Settings.
You are not obligated to choose particular fields. You can choose
them in any order. Any or none of the fields can be enabled. For
example, if you need only Alphanumeric Long Field 9, fill in a title
for that field in the System Settings and leave all of the other fields
without titles. You will get one usable field in the Personnel screen as
below in Figure 91. Figure 92 shows all fields created.
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Figure 91 – Personnel Custom Fields Folder Tab with One Field (field 9)
Enabled
Figure 92 – Personnel Custom Fields Tab with All Fields Enabled
Video Badging Tab
Video badging is disabled by default. The controls to enable Video
Badging are in the System Settings, on the Video Badging tab (see
Figure 93).
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Figure 93 – Video Badging Tab Controls
There are 3 modes of Video Badging Operation.
• Video Badging turned off.
• Video Badging turned on, Photos Only mode.
• Video Badging turned on with badge creation (Goddard mode).
Enable Video Badging
The Video Badging Feature is turned on or off from the “Video
Badging Package” control on the Video Badging Tab (Figure 94).
Figure 94 – Video Badging Package Selection Control
To set the three mode of operation, change the Video Badging
Package to one of the following.
• None – Video Badging is off.
• Photos Only – Video Badging is turned on. Badge Template
Editing is not available.
• Goddard – Video Badging is turned on. Badge Editor is turned
on.
When you enable Video Badging, two things happen. A folder tab
named “Photo” appears in the Personnel screen and a menu choice
called “Photo ID” appears in the Administration menu.
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When you click the Photo ID menu choice in the Administration
menu, it starts the Badge Editor software. Using this software is
discussed in the section of this manual called ‘ID Badging’.
The controls on the Photo tab in the Personnel screen are discussed
in the section about the Personnel screen called Photo Tab.
Select the Badging Printer
Figure 95 – Badging Printer Selection Control
To select a printer
• Click the Edit button
• Click the arrow to the right side of the Badging Printer control
• Click your printer selection
• Click the Save button
Note that the list of printers that is displayed in the Badging Printer
control is taken from the Windows printers list. If there are no
printers installed, there will be no printers in the list.
Also note that any printer can be used to accept output from the
badging software. A badge printer is the standard printer used, but
the print output could just as easily sent to a document printer or
even a file. This fact might prove useful during the badge design
phase. To help save badge stock, the print output can be sent to a
document printer temporarily until the badge design is perfected.
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Mag Encoding Schema
Figure 96 – Mag Encoding Schema Selection Control
This control has no effect if you are not programming magnetic cards
using your badging printer.
Whenever a magnetic stripe card is encoded, a message is set to the
printer card encode head. That message includes a string of
information that you as the CardAccess Administrator have
programmed into the CardAccess Badge Editor software (such as
badge number, facility code, etc. See ID Badging). Also included in
the message are a number of hidden control characters that are
embedded in that message by the badging software.
What control characters are sent depends on the printer brand. Fargo
printers accept different control character strings than Eltron
printers.
The Mag Encoding Schema control selects which control characters
are to be sent to the encoding hardware of the badging printer. This
selection control offers three options.
• Fargo – Used for Fargo (Cheetah) brand printers.
• Eltron – Used for older Eltron brand printers (P300/400/500).
• Eltron 310 – Used for newer Eltron brand printers
(P310/420/520).
To Select an Encoding Schema
•
•
•
•
Click the Edit button.
Click the arrow to the right side of the Mag stripe Encoding
control.
Click your encoding selection.
Click the Save button.
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CCTV Tab
M A N U A L
CCTV control in the CardAccess software is disabled by default. If
the ‘Using CCTV’ check box is not checked, CCTV is not enabled
(see Figure 97).
Figure 97 – CCTV Tab With CCTV Disabled
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CCTV Command Strings
Figure 98 - CCTV Tab With CCTV Enabled and Command Strings
Entered
Figure 98 above shows the CCTV folder tab with three CCTV
command strings typed in. Each command string consists of two
parts as seen in Figure 98, the “CCTV Command Name” and the
“Command String”.
The CCTV Command Name is nothing more than a descriptive label
that is attached to a Command String. The Command Name label is
typically worded to describe what the Command String actually does.
As you can see from the example above, Command Strings can be
quite unintelligible. What Command Strings are used, and how they
look syntactically, depends on the brand and model of CCTV switch
being used. A short general explanation of CCTV control may be in
order.
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CCTV Control
Typical CCTV switches have built-in serial interface ports. These
ports are designed to be connected to an outboard device (like a
computer) that can remotely control the actions of the switch.
The typical CCTV switch is responsible for switching video monitors
and surveillance cameras. Control over the switching actions of any
CCTV switch is usually available from any one of three places.
• The front panel – you can manually switch any camera to any
monitor
• User programmable, automated, mini-programs (Guard Tour)
• External Control – Most switches have a communications port
built in.
In order to use this communications port, you must use the
manufacturer’s proprietary communications protocol. This
protocol usually consists of ASCII ‘command strings’, which are
recognized by the switch.
Quick Tip – When we say ‘ASCII’ protocol, we mean a message
format that consists of ordinary characters (letters and numbers),
plus ‘control codes’ as defined in the ASCII character table.
The CardAccess does provide a means to send strings of these
ASCII characters from any serial port of the communications
server PC (USB currently not supported). CCTV control from
workstations is not currently supported.
The essence of how CCTV control works in the CardAccess is,
• The user will enter ASCII strings in the ‘Command String’
section of the CCTV screen
• Each of the commands defined in the CCTV screen can then
be ‘bound’ to a reader or input hardware device.
• When there is a change in the ‘state’ of the reader or input, the
associated CCTV command will be sent from the designated
CCTV com port
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Let’s look at how to set up CCTV control.
Enable CCTV
Open System Settings and click the CCTV tab
• Click the Edit button
• If the ‘Using CCTV’ check box is not checked, click it
• Assign a Com port for CCTV. Click the arrow at the right side of
the ‘Com Port’ control. Select a port by clicking on the port
number desired. Note that the com port list in this control shows
128 com ports. This is a ‘static’ list. Even though 128 ports are
listed, they may not exist in Windows. Be sure that the port that
you want to use has been created in Windows, has been tested
working, and has been physically connected to the CCTV switch.
Add a CCTV Command String
CCTV must be enabled as above. To add a command string do the
following.
• Open System Settings and click the CCTV tab.
• Click the Edit button.
Figure 99 – CCTV Command Entry Area
• Click in the white space below the ‘CCTV Command Name’
column (Figure 99).
• Enter a title for your command string in that space.
• Click in the white space below the ‘Command String’ column.
• Enter a Command String that is compatible with your CCTV
switch.
• If you want to add more strings, locate the down arrow key on
your computer keyboard. Press it once for every new line of
commands you want to add.
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Delete a CCTV Command Line
Figure 100 – Remove Entry Button
•
•
•
•
•
Open System Settings and click the CCTV tab
Click the Edit button
Click the line you want to delete
Click the ‘Remove Entry’ button
Click the Save button
Select the Com Port
Figure 101 – Com Port Selection Control
•
•
•
•
•
Open System Settings and click the CCTV tab
Click the Edit button
Click the arrow to the right of the ‘Com Port’ control
Select the Com port that you will use for CCTV control. Note
that the com port list in this control shows 128 com ports. This is
a ‘static’ list. Even though 128 ports are listed, they may not exist
in Windows. Be sure that the port that you want to use has been
created in Windows, has been tested working, and has been
physically connected to the CCTV switch.
Set the properties of the Com port by clicking the ‘Port
Properties’ button.
Setting Up Readers and Inputs
Once CCTV control has been enabled in the System Settings, two
CCTV folder tabs appear, one in the Readers screen (Figure 102) and
the other in the Inputs screen (Figure 103).
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Activate CCTV for a Reader
Figure 102 – Readers CCTV Tab
• Open the Readers screen
• Click the Edit button
• Click the CCTV tab. If you don’t see the CCTV tab, enable CCTV
as in the previous section entitled System Settings
• In the field called “CCTV Control Name” click the arrow at the
right of the box. Select a CCTV command from the list. If there
are no commands in the list, you must create some as explained in
the previous section entitled CCTV Command Strings
• Next, select which types of door events will send the selected
command to the switch. You can check any or all of the event
types listed
• Click the Save button
Once you complete the above steps, when one of the selected CCTV
Activation Conditions occurs, the CCTV command selected in the
CCTV Control Name control will be sent from the com port,
selected in the System Settings CCTV tab.
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Activate CCTV for an Input
Figure 103 – Inputs CCTV Tab
• Open the Inputs screen
• Click the Edit button
• Click the CCTV tab. If you don’t see the CCTV tab, enable CCTV
as in the previous section entitled System Settings
• Click the “Enabled” check box
• There are two conditions that you can assign CCTV commands
to, Input Abnormal and Input Normal. You can assign a
command to either one or both, in any order. You can assign the
same, or different command names to both the normal and
abnormal conditions. To select a CCTV command in either
control, click the arrow at the right of the box. Select a CCTV
command from the list. If there are no commands in the list, you
must create some as explained in the previous section entitled
CCTV Command Strings
• Click the Save button
Once you complete the above steps, when the input state changes,
the CCTV command selected in the CCTV Command Name control
will be sent from the com port selected in the System Settings CCTV
tab
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Manual CCTV Control
In the above sections, it was explained how to set up automatic
transmission of CCTV command strings. In those cases mentioned
above, when there is some event or change at a reader or input, the
CCTV command is sent without user intervention.
There is also a way to send command strings manually. The manual
control for sending CCTV commands can be found in the
“Response” Window. The Response window is accessible by clicking
the ‘Respond’ button from the toolbar above the Events Grid or by
using the Respond button on the toolbar above the Alerts Grid.
Figure 104 – The CCTV Manual Control in the Response Window
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How to Use CCTV Manual Control
•
•
•
•
•
•
Go to the Events or Alerts Grid
Find an event that is a Reader event or an Input event. Click on it
Click the Respond button above the Grid where you clicked the
event
When the response window opens, click the CCTV tab
You will see a selection control with two arrow buttons to the
right of it. Click the down arrow to find the CCTV command
that you want to test. If you don’t see any CCTV commands in
that control, you must create some as explained in the previous
section entitled CCTV Command Strings
Click the “Send” button. Every time you click the send button,
the software will send the command string shown in the selection
control once. You can send the string as many times as you want.
Control Codes
Figure 105 – Control Codes Legend
Notice that in the System Settings there is a Control Codes ‘key’
printed on the CCTV folder tab. This key is your guide to adding
ASCII ‘control codes’ to your CCTV strings. Some CCTV switches
require these control codes to be imbedded in the command string.
Table 1 lists the function of each of the available codes.
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Table 1 – Control Codes
Code
^B
^C
^J
^H
^M
^W
ASCII Equivalent
STX (Start of Text)
ETX (End of Text)
LF (Line Feed)
Hex On/Off
CR (Carriage Return)
Delay (.5 Second)
Result
Send Hex 02
Send Hex 03
Send Hex 0A
Start/End Hex Mode
Send Hex 0D
Wait ½ Second
Explanation of Control Codes
•
•
Some of the codes listed do not result in any output. Those codes
are explained in more detail below
There are 32 control codes in the ASCII table (00 to 1F Hex.
Control @ through Control _). They are not all represented in
the legend on the CCTV tab in the System Settings. You can use
all of the codes in the ASCII chart between 00 hex to 1F hex.
However, some of those codes have been ‘reassigned’ by
Continental engineers and are dedicated to CardAccess functions.
A table of those reassigned functions appears below.
Table 2 – Reassigned Control Codes
Code
^H
^W
ASCII Equivalent Reassigned Function
BS
Hex On/Off
ETB
Delay (.5 Second)
Result
Start/End Hex Mode
Wait ½ Second
Hex On/Off Mode
Hex mode allows you to create hexadecimal output to a CCTV
switch. Typically, if you create a CCTV command string like
“ABCDEF1234567890”, what will be output is exactly what you put
in. The characters arriving at the switch will be
ABCDEF1234567890.
In hex mode, the CardAccess CCTV control converts characters that
you enter as command strings into hexadecimal output to the CCTV
switch. Let’s use the same command string input, but we will turn
hex mode on and off. Here is the command string we enter in the
CCTV screen.
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^HABCDEF1234567890^HABCDEF1234567890
Here is what is output to the CCTV switch.
0A0B0C0D0F01020304050607080900ABCDEF123456789
Note that the first group of 16 characters has been converted to hex
output. The first ^H turns on hex mode and the second ^H turns off
hex mode. The second group of 16 characters was output exactly as it
was input.
When hex mode is turned on, a leading zero is added to whatever
character you input, converting it a hexadecimal character of the
format ‘0x‘ (where x is the character that you input).
Important Note – The acceptable range of hexadecimal
characters for Command String input is 0-9, A-F. When using
Hex Mode, do not try to input characters outside of this range.
Delay
When you put the characters ^W anywhere in a command string, the
output of that string will pause for ½ second. The command string
A^WB will output the ASCII character ‘A’, wait ½ second the output
the ASCII character ‘B’.
Enter a Control Code
•
•
Click on the ‘Command String’ line of any CCTV command line
Press the Shift key on your keyboard and type the number 6.
Shift 6 gives the character ^ (called ‘control’). Then type the letter
of the control code from the legend that you see above. For
example, to add the ASCII character ‘Line Feed’, type ^J (use
capitals only).
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Databases Tab
Figure 106 - The System Settings Databases Tab
The 'Databases' tab of the System Settings is where you can register
archive databases with the CardAccess software. The CardAccess will use
the list of archive databases created in this screen as the list of available
databases found on the System Settings 'Archive' tab, and in the 'Archive
Data' utility. You must first manually register a database with the
CardAccess on the Databases tab before it will appear in the list of
available archive databases in any screen that displays that list.
CardAccess utility screens that use the list of archive databases generated
on the Databases tab include.
• System Settings Archive Tab - The System Settings Archive tab sets
the default destination database for archived events and configuration
back ups. The database that is set in the 'Database Name' field of the
Archive tab is used as the default target database for all configuration
and event message back ups
• The Archive Data Utility - The 'Database Name' field of the
Archive Data utility allows you to manually select a destination
database for a manually initiated backup and restore of the
CardAccess software configuration and events.
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Other CardAccess screens that display a list of CardAccess compatible
SQL server databases do not use the list generated in the Databases tab.
To add archive databases to the list, do the following.
• Link Your SQL Servers to the CardAccess - You must first register
your CardAccess database equipped SQL servers with the local
CardAccess instance by using the caDbUtils utility (on the 'Linked
Server' tab). caDbUtils is found in the CardAccess tools folder. Once
all of your servers have been registered, that list of servers will then be
visible in the 'Server Name' field mentioned in the next step
• Select a Server - The 'Server Name' field will contain a listing of all of
the CardAccess compatible servers that we linked to the CardAccess
in the previous step. Select a server by clicking on it
• Select a Database - When you click on a server name as stated in the
step above, the CardAccess queries the sever to locate CardAccess
compatible databases. That list of databases is loaded into the
'Database Names' control. When you click your selection, you will
notice that the 'Add' button becomes enabled
• Add the Database to the Database List - Click the 'Add' button to
add the database to the listing of connected archive databases at the
bottom of the Databases tab
• Save the File - Click the 'Save' button on the System Settings toolbar
to save the changes. If you click 'Cancel' before saving, the changes are
not committed.
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Archive Data
Figure 107 – Archive Data Utility Screen
Archive Data is a utility, available from the System menu that allows you
to create a full working backup of the CardAccess main database. This
utility is unlike another similar CardAccess backup utility called
‘Backup/Restore Database’ (also available from the System menu), which
backs up the CardAccess database to a data file (.dat extension), so you
can later restore from it.
The data file created by the Backup/Restore Database utility is unusable
by the CardAccess until you restore it to a previously created CardAccess
compatible SQL database. The database created by Archive Data is
immediately usable because it’s a fully functioning exact copy of the
CardAccess main database. Should you have a problem with your main
database, you might use the CardAccess utility ‘DBConnect’ to connect
the CardAccess software to the backup database, in one step.
Perhaps this is a good time to generically look at what a CardAccess
compatible SQL database actually is. When an SQL database is created,
two linked files are created as part of the process. An .mdf file (database
file) with an associated .ldf file (log file) comprises the SQL database.
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When you let SQL server create a database for you, that database is
created with fields and data that are useful to SQL server. There are no
CardAccess compatible fields in the SQL server created database. If you
want to create a CardAccess compatible SQL database, you must use the
CardAccess utility ‘DBUtils’ available in the CardAccess\Tools folder to
do so.
You must first create an empty, CardAccess compatible database before
you can move archive data into it. You would then use the Archive Data
utility to attach to that empty database, and move or copy the data from
the CardAccess main database into the archive database.
Create an Archive Database
To create an archive database, you must use a program from the
CardAccess Tools folder called DBUtils. To use DBUtils do the
following.
•
Open the DBUtils utility – Use Windows Explorer to open the
\CardAccess\Tools folder. Double click the executable file ‘DBUtils’
•
Click the Create Database Button
Figure 108 – The Create Database Button
•
The server name is fixed to your local server name by default. You
must create the archive database on the local machine. Make sure
your local server name is displayed in the ‘Select a server instance for
the new database’ field. If it is not, enter it now
Figure 109 – Select Server Name Field
•
Create a Name for Your Database – Enter it in the ‘Select a name
for your new database’ field. It’s best to use a descriptive name that
clearly describes some details about the file
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Figure 110 – Select Archive Database Name Field
•
Select a Target Directory – It is customary to store archives in the
\CardAccess\Data folder, but the system allows you to place the
new database in any folder on any hard drive of the local machine
Figure 111 – Select Destination Directory Field
•
Enter the sa User Password – When your SQL server was set up,
the administrator was required to set a password for the system
administrator log in (sa). The CardAccess requires the sa password to
be able to gain system administrator level access to the SQL server
for the purpose of creating the database. If there is no password set
for the sa user, leave the field blank. Note that having no password
for the sa user is a serious security hazard.
Figure 112 – SQL Server System Administrator Password Field
If you enter the wrong sa password, the system displays an error
message like Figure 113 below when you try to connect to the SQL
server. Click the OK button, and re-enter the sa password correctly
and try to create the database again
Figure 113 – Bad sa Password Error Message
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Click the Create Database Button – You will see several screens
as your Archive database is being created. The database is created first,
then it is updated to the most current version. There are screens that
inform you when the database has been created, when it has been
updated and when the whole process is complete. Some of those screens
appear in the three figures below.
Figure 114 – Creating Tables Activity Gauge
To stop the database creation, click the ‘Stop Script’ button
Figure 115 – Database Created Success Message
Click the OK button and the process will continue to the database
update section
Figure 116 – Database Update Completed Success Message
Click the OK button to finish the process.
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The Archive Data utility can be used for the following functions,
which are described in more detail below.
•
Backup the CardAccess configuration data
•
Backup (and purge) the CardAccess Events table
•
Backup to an existing database
•
Restore configuration data from an existing backup database
Backup Configuration Data
To backup the CardAccess main database do the following.
Warning – The Archive Data utility overwrites configuration data in
the target database. This will destroy any existing data in that database.
•
First, be sure that Archive tab is selected at the top of the screen.
Click on it, if it is not
•
Choose or Type in a Server Name – Fill in the computer name of
any server on your network that has SQL server running
Figure 117 – Server Name Selection Control
•
Select a database – Click the arrow to the right of the Database
Name control. Scroll up or down to locate the name of your target
archive database. Click on that name. If you don’t have an existing
archive database, you can create one by clicking the ‘Create New’
button. See the section entitled ‘Create an Archive Database’ above
for more information.
Figure 118 – Database Name Selection Control
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Connect to the Backup Database – Click the ‘Connect’ button. Be
sure that the indicator above the Connect button changes from
‘Disconnected’ to ‘Connected’ (and that the label on the Connect
button changes from ‘Connect’ to ‘Disconnect’). To disconnect from
the database, click the Disconnect button (again)
Figure 119 – The Connect/Disconnect Button in a Disconnected
State
Figure 120 – The Connect/Disconnect Button in a Connected State
•
Select the Configuration Items to Backup – Be sure that the
‘Configuration’ folder tab is selected first. After that, you generally
have two options. You can elect to back up all items, or you can
select the individual items that you prefer.
To select all of the items, click the ‘All’ check box or click each item
individually until all of them are selected. To select individual items,
click only those items that you wish to backup.
Figure 121 – Configuration Folder Tab – note the select All check
box
•
Click the Archive Button – If the Archive button is grayed out it
means that you are not connected to your target database.
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Figure 122 – The Archive Button
•
Click the Yes Button on the Warning Box That Opens – Be
very sure that the target database that you have selected is correct.
The Archive Data utility will overwrite any existing configuration
data in the target database.
Figure 123 – The Confirm Warning Box
•
When the utility has completed the transfer of data, you will get a
message box. Click the OK button to finish the procedure
Figure 124 – The Transfer Complete Message Box
•
Close the Archive Data Screen – Click the Close button
Figure 125 – The Close Button
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Archive Events from the Main CardAccess Database
To backup Events do the following.
•
First, be sure that Archive tab is selected at the top of the screen.
Click on it, if it is not
•
Choose or type in a server name – Fill in the computer name of
any server on your network that has SQL server running
Figure 126 – Server Name Selection Control
•
Select a database – Click the arrow to the right of the Database
Name control. Scroll up or down to locate the name of your target
archive database. Click on that name. If you don’t have an existing
backup database, you can create one by clicking the ‘Create New’
button. See the section entitled ‘Create an Archive Database’ above
for more information.
Figure 127 – Database Name Selection Control
•
Connect to the Archive Database – Click the ‘Connect’ button. Be
sure that the indicator above the Connect button changes from
‘Disconnected’ to ‘Connected’ (and that the label on the Connect
button changes from ‘Connect’ to ‘Disconnect’). To disconnect from
the database, click the Disconnect button (again)
Figure 128 – The Connect/Disconnect Button in a Disconnected
State
Figure 129 – The Connect/Disconnect Button in a Connected State
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Select a Date Range or Select ‘All Events’ – Be sure that the
Events folder tab is selected first. Then, do the following.
Archive Events Prior to a Date – Click the calendar button on the
right side of the ‘Prior To’ control (Figure 130). All events prior to
the date selected will be backed up and purged from the main
database. Note that the ‘All Events’ check box will become checked
when you select a date. Leave All Events checked if you have a date
selected in the Prior To field
Figure 130 – The Events Folder Tab – With Select Date Range
Settings
Archive All Events – If you want to archive and purge all events from
the main database, make sure that you clear any date from the Prior
To control. Click the All Events check box and make sure that it is
checked (Figure 131).
Figure 131 – The Events Folder Tab – With All Events Backup
Settings Displayed
•
Click the Archive Button – If the Archive button is grayed out it
means that you are not connected to your target database.
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Figure 132 – The Archive Button
•
Click the Yes Button on the Warning Box That Opens – The
Archive Data utility will append the archived events to any existing
events in the target database.
Figure 133 – The Confirm Warning Box
•
When the utility has completed the transfer of data, you will get a
message box. Click the OK button to finish the procedure
Figure 134 – The Transfer Complete Message Box
•
Close the Archive Data Screen – Click the Close button
Figure 135 – The Close Button
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Connect to an Archive Database
To connect to an archive database, do the following.
•
Choose or type in a server name – Fill in the computer name of
any server on your network that has SQL server running
Figure 136 – Server Name Selection Control
•
Select a database – Click the arrow to the right of the Database
Name control. Scroll up or down to locate the name of your target
archive database. Click on that name.
Figure 137 – Database Name Selection Control
•
Connect to the Archive Database – Click the ‘Connect’ button. Be
sure that the indicator above the Connect button changes from
‘Disconnected’ to ‘Connected’ (and that the label on the Connect
button changes from ‘Connect’ to ‘Disconnect’). To disconnect from
the database, click the Connect/Disconnect button (again)
Figure 138 – The Connect/Disconnect Button in a Disconnected
State
Figure 139 – The Connect/Disconnect Button in a Connected State
•
If the Connected indicator is yellow and the ‘Archive’ button is no
longer grayed out, then you have successfully connected to the
archive database.
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Restore Configuration Data
To restore configuration data from an archive, do the following.
Warning – The Archive Data utility overwrites configuration data in
the target database. This will destroy any existing data in that database.
•
First be sure that the ‘Restore’ folder tab is selected at the top of the
Archive Data screen. Click on it if it is not.
•
Choose or type in a server name – Fill in the computer name of
the server where your archived data is stored. This will be the server
where you are restoring from
Figure 140 – Server Name Selection Control
•
Select a database – Click the arrow to the right of the Database
Name control. Scroll up or down to locate the name of your source
archive database. Click on that name. This will be the database where
you are restoring from
Figure 141 – Database Name Selection Control
•
Connect to the Archive Database – Click the ‘Connect’ button. Be
sure that the indicator above the Connect button changes from
‘Disconnected’ to ‘Connected’ (and that the label on the Connect
button changes from ‘Connect’ to ‘Disconnect’). To disconnect from
the database, click the Disconnect button (again)
Figure 142 – The Connect/Disconnect Button in a Disconnected
State
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Figure 143 – The Connect/Disconnect Button in a Connected State
•
Select the Configuration Items to Restore – You cannot restore
archived events to the main database. The Archive Data utility will
only permit hardware and configuration information to be restored.
That being said, you generally have two options. You can elect to
restore all items, or you can select the individual items that you
prefer.
To select all of the items, click the ‘All’ check box or click each item
individually until all of them are selected. To select individual items,
click only those items that you wish to restore. The restored data will
replace any current data in the database tables that you have selected.
The rest of the target database will remain untouched
Figure 144 – Configuration Folder Tab – note absence of Events
folder tab
•
The target database is the main database. The name of the main
database is always displayed at the bottom right of the Archive
Data screen, in the status bar. To change the main database (the
target in this case), you must use the DBConnect utility available
in the CardAccess\Tools folder
Figure 145 – Archive Data Status Bar – Main Database Name
Display
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Click the Restore button
Figure 146 – The Restore Button
•
Click the Yes Button on the Warning Box That Opens – The
Archive Data utility will append the archived events to any existing
events in the target database.
Figure 147 – The Confirm Warning Box
•
When the utility has completed the transfer of data, you will get a
message box. Click the OK button to finish the procedure
Figure 148 – The Transfer Complete Message Box
•
Close the Archive Data Screen – Click the Close button
Figure 149 – The Close Button
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Archive Events from a Different Database
To archive events from a different database, do the following.
•
First, be sure that Archive tab is selected at the top of the screen.
Click on it, if it is not
•
Choose or Type in a Destination Server Name – Fill a computer
name into the ‘Server Name’ field. It can be any server on your
network that has SQL server running
Figure 150 – Server Name Selection Control
•
Select a Destination Database – Click the arrow to the right of the
‘Database Name’ control. Scroll up or down to locate the name of
your destination archive database. Click on that name. If you don’t
have an existing backup database, you can create one by clicking the
‘Create New’ button. See the manual subsection entitled Create an
Archive Database for more information.
Figure 151 – Database Name Selection Control
•
Connect to the Destination Archive Database – Click the
‘Connect’ button. Be sure that the indicator above the Connect
button changes from ‘Disconnected’ to ‘Connected’ (and that the
label on the Connect button changes from ‘Connect’ to
‘Disconnect’). To disconnect from the database, click the Disconnect
button (again)
Figure 152 – The Connect/Disconnect Button in a Disconnected
State
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Figure 153 – The Connect/Disconnect Button in a Connected State
•
If you have not already done so, click on the ‘Events’ folder tab
(Figure 154)
Figure 154 – Events Tab Advanced Features
•
Click the ‘Advanced’ checkbox (Figure 154). Note that several
advanced controls appear. The advanced feature allows you to
archive events from a CardAccess database other than the
CardAccess main database. The CardAccess main database is always
the source database for the Archive Data utility, unless you select a
different source using the advanced feature. However, the advanced
feature is only available when you are archiving events.
•
Choose or Type in a Source Server Name – Fill in the computer
name of any server on your network that has SQL server running
and has a CardAccess database
Figure 155 – Server Name Selection Control
•
Select a Source Database – Click the arrow to the right of the
Database Name control. Scroll up or down to locate the name of
your alternative source archive database.
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Figure 156 – Database Name Selection Control
•
Connect to the Source Archive Database – Click the ‘Connect’
button. Be sure that the indicator above the Connect button changes
from ‘Disconnected’ to ‘Connected’ (and that the label on the
Connect button changes from ‘Connect’ to ‘Disconnect’). To
disconnect from the database, click the Disconnect button (again)
Figure 157 – The Connect/Disconnect Button in a Disconnected
State
Figure 158 – The Connect/Disconnect Button in a Connected State
•
Select a Date Range or Select ‘All Events’ – Do the following.
Archive Events Prior to a Date – Click the calendar button on the
right side of the ‘Prior To’ control (Figure 159). All events prior to
the date selected will be backed up and purged from the main
database. Note that the ‘All Events’ check box will become checked
when you select a date. Leave All Events checked if you have a date
selected in the Prior To field
Archive All Events – If you want to archive and purge all events from
the main database, make sure that you clear any date from the Prior
To control. Click the All Events check box and make sure that it is
checked (Figure 159)
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Figure 159 – The Events Tab with Date Range Selected
•
Click the Archive Button – If the Archive button is grayed out it
means that you are not connected to your target database
Figure 160 – The Archive Button
•
Click the Yes Button on the Warning Box That Opens – The
Archive Data utility will append the archived events to any existing
events in the target database.
Figure 161 – The Confirm Warning Box
•
When the utility has completed the transfer of data, you will get a
message box. Click the OK button to finish the procedure
Figure 162 – The Transfer Complete Message Box
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Close the Archive Data Screen – Click the Close button
Figure 163 – The Close Button
Backup & Restore
Figure 164 – The Backup & Restore Utility Screen
The CardAccess Backup & Restore utility is used to create a backup of
the entire CardAccess database, or to restore from such a backup. This
utility creates a backup data file (.dat extension) that differs from the
Archive Data utility, which ‘clones’ the CardAccess database into a
duplicate, working SQL database (.MDF and .LDF files).
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The utility allows you to choose any SQL database to back up to a data
file. The choice is not limited to a CardAccess type database; any SQL
database can be backed up. The utility is not available from CardAccess
workstations. The Backup & Restore menu choice will only appear on
CardAccess stations that are set up as ‘Host’ systems.
To create a backup from the CardAccess main database or restore from a
backup to the CardAccess main database, follow the below steps.
Backup a Database
To backup a database, do the following.
• Open the Backup & Restore Utility – Click the ‘System’ menu,
select Backup & Restore
• Make Sure That the ‘Backup’ Folder Tab is Visible – If it is not,
click it
Figure 165 – Backup Tab
• Select a Database to Back Up – Selections are limited to the local
SQL server only. You cannot select databases that are not installed on
the PC you are working from. To select a database, click the arrow on
the right side of the ‘Database’ selection control. The list includes all
database names, taken from the SQL server on the local machine
Figure 166 – Database Selection Control
• Enter a Name for Your Backup Database – Type a name in the
‘Name’ control. A database backup file will be created in the
destination directory. That file will have the name you specify in the
Name control. The rules for this file name are the same as those for
any Windows file name – no spaces or special characters are allowed
Figure 167 – The Name Control
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• Select a Destination Directory – If you don’t wish to store the
resulting backup file in the C:\ directory, which is the default
destination, click the ‘Select Directory’ button. Then use the browse
window that opens to select a local or network directory to receive the
backup file
Figure 168 – The Select Directory Button
• Click the Backup Button
Figure 169 – The Backup Button
•
Click the Warning Message OK button – You will get a warning
message. Click the ‘OK’ button to proceed, click ‘Cancel’ if you have
changed your mind about backing up
Figure 170 – The Confirm Message Box
•
Click the Backup Complete OK Button – When the backup is
complete, there will be a message box displayed. Click the OK
button to close the box
Figure 171 – Backup Complete Message Box
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Restore a Database
• Open the Backup & Restore Utility – Click the ‘System’ menu,
select Backup & Restore
• Make Sure That the ‘Restore’ Folder Tab is Visible – If it is not,
click it
Figure 172 – The Restore Folder Tab
• Select a Database to Restore Into – Selections are limited to the
local SQL server only. You cannot select databases that are not
installed on the PC that you are working from. To select a database,
click the arrow on the right side of the ‘Restore as Database’ control.
The list includes all database names, taken from the SQL server on the
local machine
Figure 173 – Restore Database Selection Control
• Select a Source File – You will search the local hard drive or a
network drive for a back up file. The file extension is .DAT. Click the
‘Browse’ button, and use the browse control to find a source database.
Once you find a suitable file, click the OK button.
Figure 174 – The Restore Browse Button
• Disconnect the Original Source Database – SQL server will not
permit you to restore from a database that is connected to the SQL
server if using a .dat file as the source. Per Microsoft SQL server
convention, the identity of the source database that was used to create
the backup .dat file is stored in that .dat file. The SQL server requires
that you disconnect that original source database from the SQL server
before you restore from the .dat file.
To disconnect a database do the following.
•
Make sure that the CardAccess is not running
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•
Start the caDbUtils utility. There are two ways to launch the
utility. Go to Start -> Programs -> CardAccess3000 -> Tools,
and click on Database Utilities. Alternately you can use Windows
Explorer to locate the CardAccess\Tools folder. Double click the
file called caDbUtils in that folder. The utility will refuse to launch
if the CardAccess is running
•
When the utility opens, click the Detach Database button at the
top of the screen
Figure 175 – The Detach Database Button
•
If your server name is not displayed in the ‘Database Server
Name’ control, either click the down arrow to the right of the
control and select your sever or click the green circular arrows to
the right of the control.
Figure 176 – The Database Server Name Selection Control
This circular arrows button is called the ‘Refresh Servers’
control. When you click it, it will fill the name of the current
CardAccess server into the ‘Database Server Name’ control.
It will also fill in the name of the current default main
CardAccess database into the ‘Database Name’ control. If
you intend to restore into the CardAccess main database,
clicking the Refresh Servers control will save you from
needing to select the values.
• If your database name is not displayed in the ‘Database
Name’ control, either click the down arrow to the right of
the control and select your sever or click the green circular
arrows to the right of the control.
Figure 177 – The Database Name Control
• Once you have the server and the database names selected,
click the ‘Detach Database’ button.
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Figure 178 – The Detach Database Button
• When you get the completion message box, click the OK
button
Figure 179 – Completion Success Message Box
• Click the Restore Button – You will see a confirmation box
immediately after you click the Restore button. Click OK to
proceed, Cancel to stop the restore. Note that the restore is
destructive. It will overwrite all data in the target database
Figure 180 – The Restore Confirmation Box
• Click the ‘Restore Complete’ OK Button – You will get a
message box when the restore procedure is complete. Click the
OK button.
Figure 181 – The Restore Complete Message Box
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View History
Figure 182 – The View History Screen
The View History screen is a utility screen that allows you to view archive
event data. The screen has controls that allow you to connect it to any
CardAccess compatible SQL database. The typical use of this screen
would be to scan archive events from past months or years, perhaps
looking for some notable specific event or events.
The screen will only allow the review of events. You can connect to any
compatible CardAccess database, but it is not possible to review database
information such as configuration or System Settings.
There are a number of ‘filter’ controls on the View History screen. These
controls allow you to narrow your search to certain types of events or
specific date ranges. Some databases can contain huge amounts of
information that would be difficult to scan through line by line. The
filters remove any unnecessary data from the view screen making
searching chores more efficient.
The sections below describe how to operate the View History controls.
Connect to a Database
By default, each time the View History screen is opened it is connected
to the server and database names that were (previously) set in the
DBConnect utility. This means that the View History utility will be
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displaying the same data that appears in the CardAccess Events Grid.
The Events Grid and the view History utility are connected to the same
database Events table. Stated another way, the View History utility is
looking at the event data in the currently active CardAccess events
database.
Thus, if you need to locate some events from the currently active
database, no action is needed to ‘connect’ to that database. You are
already connected by default. If you want to connect to a database other
that the currently active database, or if you want to return to the currently
active database after connecting to a different database, do the following.
Note – You need to be concerned about the revision level of any
databases you wish to connect to. Backwards compatibility of the current
To
connect
to a CardAccess
compatible
database, cannot
do the following.
revision
database
tools and
legacy databases
be guaranteed.
Therefore, it is best to upgrade all archive databases to the most current
revision level before attempting to use database tools like View History
•
Enter a Server Name – Enter the name of an SQL server equipped
computer to connect to. If the name of the target computer is already
displayed, select a database name per the next step.
•
Select a Database – Note the following about the ‘Database’ field
(Figure 183).
Figure 183 – The Database Field
o Locate the Server – After you have filled a server name into the
‘Server’ field (as mentioned above), and when you click on the
Database field, the system will try to locate the server name
entered in the Server field and download a list of it’s available
database names. You will see an hourglass briefly if the
connection is successful and a list of those database names will
open in front of the Database field.
The hourglass will appear longer if the server connection attempt
is not successful. At the end of an unsuccessful connection
attempt, you will get an error message box (Figure 184)
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Figure 184 – Database Connect Error Message
If you have successfully connected to an SQL server, there will
be a list of one or more databases available in the Database field.
Click the database that you wish to connect to.
o Click Connect – Click the Connect button. You will observe
that the View history screen will blink briefly as the new events
data is loaded. If you don’t see any data in the View History
window, check the date range selection in the ‘Time Period’
controls. The date range is set to the current week by default. If
you are looking at archive events files, then the date range needs
to be set to the date range of your data set.
Figure 185 – The Connect Button
Set the Date Range
Figure 186 – The Time Period Selection Controls
The date range control is a ‘filter’. All of the data from a connected
Events table will be available to the View History utility. When a date
range is set, the View History utility will filter out any events from view
that do not fall within the date range. Note that the date range controls
default to the current week every time you reopen the View History
window.
There are two calendar controls in the time period section (Figure 186).
The left most calendar control sets the start date and the right most
control sets the end date. If both calendar controls are set with the same
date, a span of one day’s records will be displayed. To set the calendar
controls, do the following.
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• Click the button to the right side of either calendar control –or– click
inside either date control and fill in a date manually
• Select a date from the calendar control that opens
Select an Events Filter
Figure 187 – The Events Filter Section
The ‘Events Selected’ Filter allows you to select which type of events you
wish to view. This filter provides a second level of search refinement to
make the task of finding a specific set of event messages easier. In the
previous section, you learned that you could select a narrow date range
filter. The Events Filter will allow you to further select specific types of
messages to view, perhaps in addition to the date range filter.
To select a filter category (Figure 187), click on it. The selections are
‘mutually exclusive’, meaning that only one selection is permitted. You
cannot select multiple events filters. Each time you click a selection, the
screen will refresh and display the selected filtered data. Each possible
selection is explained below.
• All – Returns all event types (includes all categories listed
immediately below). This setting is the default. When you open the
View History window, the screen returns all current events, from the
active CardAccess database, by default
• Badges
Figure 188 – The Badge Search Control Surface
When you select the badges filter option, a hidden control surface is
made visible (Figure 188). This control surface allows you to select
more filter criteria to narrow your badge search if desired. If you
select no badge criteria, the search will return all badge events by
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default. The controls in the Badges filter are explained in more detail
below.
Each of the controls listed below can be used individually or together
to narrow a search.
o Badge Event Type
Figure 189 – The Badge Event Type Selection Control
There are thirteen badge event message types available from a list
in this control. If a selection is made in this control, the search
will be narrowed to only events with the selected event type. For
example, if Clock In/Out is chosen, only events types with
‘Badge Clock In’ and ‘Badge Clock Out’ in the ‘Type’ field of the
event message will be returned.
To select an event type, click the arrow to the right of the control
(Figure 189), use the scrollbar to find your selection, click the
selection
o Badge Search Fields
Figure 190 – The Search Criteria Fields
The following notes apply to all of the search fields depicted in
Figure 190.
!
Letter case is ignored. Capital or small letters may be used
!
To enter a search criteria in any field, click in the white space
and type in the name of the searched for item
!
Fields in this group can be used together, alone or in any
combination
!
If no search filter criteria is selected, the badge search will
return all badge type events
The fields are individually explained below.
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!
Badge # – If a badge number is entered, events will be
returned that were generated by the selected card number
only
!
Last Name – If a last name is entered, events will be
returned that include the selected last name in the
‘Description’ field of each event
!
First Name – If a first name is entered, events will be
returned that include the selected first name in the
‘Description’ field of each event
!
Group – If a group name is entered, events will be returned
that have card holder badges that have the selected group
assigned
!
Dept – If a department is entered, events will be returned
that have card holder badges that have the selected
Department assigned
o Run Button
Figure 191 – The Badge Search Run Button
After you have selected some badge event search criteria by using
the filter controls mentioned above, click the ‘Run’ button to
begin the search. The screen will clear if there are no records that
fit the search criteria. The screen will display the search results if
records are found matching the search parameters
• Readers – All door related messages are returned (bypass, door open
too long, door forced, etc.)
• Inputs – All input related messages are returned (normal, abnormal,
ground fault)
• Relays – All relay related messages are returned (output on/off)
• Links – All link
activate/deactivate)
relate
messages
are
returned
(link
• System – All system related messages are returned (download
started/ complete, power fail, and more)
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Print the History
Figure 192 – The Print Button
Click the Print button to print the entire filtered history.
Status Bar
Figure 193 – The View History Status Bar
The status bar shows the name of the SQL server that the View History
screen is attached to. It also displays the name of the database that is
currently being viewed.
Change the List Sort
Figure 194 – The View History Column Headings
Once you have set the View History controls to display the filtered list of
your choosing, the system brings up the filtered events list in date/time
sorted order. You may wish to sort that list differently. The View History
screen will allow you to change the sort order by clicking on the column
heading of any of the available columns (Figure 194).
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Audit Trail
Figure 195 – Audit Trail Window
The Audit Trail (Figure 161) is a utility window that allows you to view a
log of system change messages. Whenever any change is performed
inside the CardAccess, such as logging in or out, changing the
configuration, adding or deleting Personnel records, that activity is
recorded in a log table in the main database.
The Audit Trail screen is a window that allows you to attach to an Audit
Trail log table and display its contents. The 'Server' and 'Database' fields
at the top of the Audit Trail window are used to connect the utility to a
CardAccess compatible SQL database. The Audit Trail utility can be
connected to any CardAccess SQL (or MSDE) database provided that
the current version CardAccess software Audit table is compatible with
the archive Audit table version.
By default, the Audit Trial utility connects to the CardAccess main
database (as listed in the caDbUtils utility found in the Tools folder).
Thus, when you open the Audit Trail window, you will see a log of
changes that have been made to the online database system
configuration.
In the event that you wish to examine the contents of a different, archive
database, the Audit Trial utility can be made to connect to that database.
To connect to an archive database, do the following.
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• Select the Server - The default value for this field is the server name
that you entered in the caDbUtils utility when you set up the
CardAccess. If you intend to connect the Audit Trail to an SQL server
CardAccess database on a server other than the default active server,
click the down arrow on the 'Server' field and click your selection
Figure 196 - The Server Selection Control
• Select the Database - It is likely that you will create a number of
archive CardAccess databases where you may wish to store old history
records. The Audit Trail utility will allow you to select the specific
database that you wish to be connected to on the currently selected
server. Click the arrow to the right of the 'Database' field and click the
selected database. The utility will automatically query the server
mentioned in the Server field to obtain the names of the CardAccess
compatible databases
Figure 197 - The Database Selection Control
• Click the Connect Button - The Audit Trail utility does not connect
to the selected database until you click the 'Connect' button. You will
know the connection is successful if the button label changes to
'Connected' after you click it (or if you see new Audit Trail data in the
window).
Figure 198 - The Connect Button
Screen Layout
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Figure 199 – Several Detail Lines from Audit Trail
The items recorded on every change to the database are
• Date & Time
• The name of the item changed
• The type of action performed
• Who was logged on when the change was made
• Which workstation the change was made from
• The database table that was affected by the change
Every change to the database is recorded to the Audit Trail table. The
Audit Trail is not regularly purged. Audit Trail logging will continue until
the hard drive runs out of space. If you want to clear the Audit Trail
table, you must use database utilities. These utilities are typically provided
by the database software manufacturer.
Open the Audit Trail
• Go to the System Menu
• Click Audit Trail
• Use the scrollbar to locate the record or group of records that you
wish to view. Records are organized in date order with the most
recent events at the bottom of the list and the oldest records toward
the top
• If you wish to sort the Audit Trail events in an order other than the
default date order, click on the column heading of the column that
you wish to use as the sort criteria (Figure 166)
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Figure 200 – The Audit Trail Column Headings – Sorted by ‘Action’
Print the Audit Trail
• Open the Audit Trail
• Click the Print Button
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Manual Control
The CardAccess is an ‘access control’ software. Thus it is generally
designed to lock and unlock doors. All the electric door locks in the
system are ultimately controlled by relays on the Continental
Instruments designed access control panels. Relays can be activated
by any of three methods.
• Automatically – Present an access card at a door. Or, turn the relay
on or off via a time schedule
• Manually – There are manual controls in the CardAccess that
allow a user to activate relays from a manual control screen
• Links – When a Link is programmed, an association is made
between the state of an input (or more than one) and the state of
an output(s) (a relay, or more than one relay). So the ultimate goal
of a link is to fire at least one relay
So, when we are talking about manual control, we are generically
referring to the manual activation or deactivation of relays. Ultimately
all discussion about manual control, whether it refers to ‘doors’,
‘relays’ or ‘links’, actually pertains to the same subject – the firing of
relays resulting from the activation of a manual control.
The above paragraph important to the below discussion about
Manual Control. Because even though there are three different
manual control screens, they ultimately all do the same thing – they
cause relays to activate or deactivate. Let’s look more closely at the
three manual control screens.
The Manual Control Screens
Figure 201 – Toolbar Manual Controls
There are three manual controls on the main toolbar (Figure 201).
There are separate controls for
• Doors – Brings up the Manual Door Control screen
• Relay – Brings up the Manual Relay Control screen
• Links – Brings up the Manual Links Control screen
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The layout configuration of each of the manual control screens is
very similar. The following material will be broken into two sections.
The first section will explain how to use the controls that are the
same on each screen. The second section will discuss how to operate
doors, relays and links and will supply more detail on those controls
that are unique to each of those screens.
Common Controls
The Manual Door Control screen is typical of each of the other
screens so we will use it as a generic example. Note that there are
basically three sections to this screen (Figure 202), labeled ‘Top’,
‘Middle’ and ‘Bottom’.
Figure 202 – Door Manual Control Screen
The top and bottom of each of the screens is almost identical. The
middle section of each screen is unique to the type of manual control
screen. We will discuss the middle parts of each screen each in it’s
own section below. But first, we will discuss the controls that are
common to all screens.
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The top section of each manual control screen has two controls.
• Group selection control
• Execute button
Group Selection Control
All the manual control screens have a Group selection control, which
activates a filter that affects the bottom portion of the screen.
As an example, imagine a system where you had 1000 doors listed in
the Manual Door Control screen. Suppose you needed to find the
door called “T-Building Front Entrance” quickly, say it was an
emergency that you manually unlocked it. Without a name list filter,
all 1000 doors would appear in the manual control screen every time
you opened it.
Since the manual control screens are sorted in alphabetical order, you
would need to use the scroll bar and scroll from the “A’s” to the
“T’s” every time you opened the manual control screen. This could
take some time if you are in a hurry to find one specific door and
there are many doors in the list.
Instead, imagine that we have created a door group called “TBuilding”, and we have assigned all of the readers that belong to
panels in the T-Building to that group. Now we could go to the
manual door control screen, select the group called ‘T-Building’ and
the display will filter out all doors except those that have been
assigned to the T-Building group. Instead of searching through a list
of 1000 doors to find ‘T-Building Front Entrance’, we have a list of
perhaps eight or more doors. Obviously filtered manual control
screens are much easier and quicker to use.
In order to use the Group filter control, you must first create
Groups. To learn more about Groups, see the Groups section of the
manual.
To use the Group Selection control,
• Click the arrow to the right of the control
• Select a group
• Observe that the screen is now filtered for that group. Filtering
will remain on, filtering for the group you selected until you turn it
off, or close and reopen the manual control screen.
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• If you want to remove filtering, click the group selection control
again and select ‘none’ as the item choice. This will turn filtering
off
Note – There are actually two sets of items that will appear in every
manual control screen filtered list – the items that belong to the selected
group, and the items that have no group assigned (group = ‘none’). If you
want to see only the items from a particular group in the manual control
screens, then you must assign groups to every door, relay and link that you
create. Do not leave any door, relay or link with a group = ‘none’.
Execute Button
This is the button that launches the manual control event. What
actually occurs depends on what controls were set when the button
was clicked.
Selection Grid
Figure 203 – Manual Door Control - Door Selection Grid
Figure 203 is a close up picture of the lower portion of the Manual
Door Control screen from Figure 202, called the “Manual Control
Selection Grid”. You will note a number of check boxes visible in
this figure. What appears in the lower portion of every manual
control screen is a listing of all of the devices of that type that have
been created.
In Figure 48, a list of doors is displayed. If this were a Manual Relay
Control screen, you would see a listing of relays, a Manual Links
Control screen, a listing of links.
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You select a device for manual control by clicking on it (check box is
checked). You can select none, one, several or all of the devices for
manual control. When you select multiple devices and click the
Execute button, all selected devices are activated simultaneously.
Select All
When this control is clicked, all items in the manual control selection
grid are selected.
Clear All
The Clear All control unselects every selected item in the selection
grid.
Exit
The Exit button closes the manual control screen.
Alpha Sort
The default sort order for manual control screens is number entered
order. That is, the items display in ‘panel number numeric order’. Those
items on panel one appear before those on panel two. The lowest
numbered item on panel one appears before the highest numbered item,
etc.
The Alpha Sort control, allows you to re-sort the list into alpha order.
The sort order reverts back to number entered order every time the
screen is opened, so the Alpha Sort order must be selected each time
the window is opened.
Below we will discuss the controls that are unique to each type of
manual control screen (the middle part of the screen from Figure
202).
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Manually Open a Door or Disable a Reader
Note that the manual door control screen has two sets of controls
(Figure 202) that perform two different but related functions. The
controls on the left side of the Manual Door Control window, in the
‘Door Action’ section, control the locking and unlocking of doors. The
controls on the right side of the window, in the ‘Reader Action’ section,
control enabling and disabling a reader.
Each set of controls can be used individually or both can be used
together. You can open doors and turn off readers at the same time.
However, the action(s) that you choose will be performed on all selected
readers.
To manually open a door or disable a reader do the following.
• Click the ‘Doors’ button on the main toolbar
Figure 204 – Doors Manual Control Button
• Filter the manual door control screen to one ‘group’ of doors (if
desired) by clicking the arrow to the right side of the ‘Door Group’
control. Select a group by clicking on it
Figure 205 – Door Group Selection Control
• Select the doors you want to manually control from the list of doors at
the bottom of the screen. Click on each door you want to select or
select all doors by clicking the ‘Select All’ button at the bottom of the
screen. A check mark means that door is selected
Figure 206 – Door Selection Control With Four Doors Selected
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• Select the type of Door Action you want using the ‘Door Action’
control or the ‘Reader Action’ control. You can trigger a door action,
a reader action or both by selecting or unselecting the ‘Door Action’
and the ‘Reader Action’ checkboxes
Figure 207 – The Door Action Controls
The Door Action part of the control (Figure 207) can be disabled by
clicking the ‘Door Action’ checkbox and un-checking it. Make sure
that it is checked if you intend to manually open any doors. The Door
Action control has three ‘mutually exclusive’ radio buttons – Lock,
Unlock and Unlock Hold. When the Door Action checkbox is
checked, you can choose any one of the three available options. The
action of each choice is explained below.
Quick Tip – Remember that door locks are activated and deactivated by
relays on the Continental Instruments control panels. When we say ‘open a
door’ below, we are referring to the latching and unlatching of relays that
are assigned to doors. Also remember that relays can be ‘off state energized’
which means that the relay is energized until the door is unlocked, which is
the opposite of the normal state of ‘off state de-energized’.
o Lock – Locks the door. This could mean energizing or deenergizing the door relay. It depends on the ‘Off-State
Energized’ setting in the relays screen. The relay is ‘normalized’.
The locking is not ‘persistent’. That is, it is not a lock and hold
that prevents future access. The next badge or manual open
command will open the door as normal
o Unlock – Unlocks the door. The door relay is energized for the
time duration set in the ‘Door Strike Time’ control in the
Readers screen
o Unlock Hold – Unlocks the door and keeps the relay energized
(or de-energized) until you send a manual lock command to the
door
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• Choose the type of Reader Action you want. There are two choices –
Enable and Disable. Enable turns the reader ‘on’; disable turns the
reader ‘off’. ‘On’ means that the reader will read badges. ‘Off’ means
that the reader will ignore all badge reads. Once a reader is switched
off, you must manually turn it before it will read badges again
Figure 208 – Reader Action Selection Control
• Click the ‘Execute Door Action’ button
Figure 209 – Execute Door Action Button
• You will get a message box stating that the door command has been
queued. Be aware that this message box does not mean that the door
has been opened. It means that the command is queued in the
database to be sent to the panel. If communications is down between
the computer and the panel, the queued command will be dropped
after a timeout period.
Figure 210 – Door Control Queued Message Box
Manually Fire a Relay
To manually fire a relay, do the following.
• Click the ‘Relays’ button on the main toolbar
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Figure 211 – Relays Manual Control Button
• Filter the manual relay control screen to one ‘group’ of relays (if
desired) by clicking the arrow to the right side of the ‘Relay Group’
control. Select a group by clicking on it
Figure 212 – Relay Group Selection Control
• Select the relays you want to manually control from the list of relays at
the bottom of the screen. Click on each relay you want to select or
select all relays by clicking the ‘Select All’ button at the bottom of the
screen. A check mark means that relay is selected
Figure 213 – Relay Selection Control With Four Relays Selected
• Select a Relay Action. You have three choices explained below.
o Momentary On – The relay is activated for the time duration set in
the ‘Energize Time’ control, for that relay, in the Relays screen
o Hold Energized – The relay is activated and held in that state until
De-Energized. Note that if the relay is set to ‘Off State Energized’,
this control will de-energize it
o De-Energize – The relay is de-activated. Note that if the relay is set
to ‘Off State Energized’, this control will energize it
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Figure 214 – Relay Action Controls
• Click the ‘Execute Relay Action’ button
Figure 215 – Execute Relay Action Button
• You will get a message box stating that the relay command has been
queued. Be aware that this message box does not mean that the relay
has been activated. It means that the command is queued in the
database to be sent to the panel. If communications is down between
the computer and the panel, the queued command will be dropped
after a timeout period.
Figure 216 – Relay Control Queued Message Box
Manually Fire a Link
To manually fire a link, do the following.
• Click the ‘Links’ button on the main toolbar
Figure 217 – Links Manual Control Button
• Filter the manual links control screen to one ‘group’ of links (if
desired) by clicking the arrow to the right side of the ‘Link Group’
control. Select a group by clicking on it
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Figure 218 – Link Group Selection Control
• Select the Links you want to manually control from the list of links at
the bottom of the screen. Click on each link you want to select or
select all links by clicking the ‘Select All’ button at the bottom of the
screen. A check mark means that link is selected
Figure 219 – Links Selection Control With Four Links Selected
• Select a Link Action. You have three choices as explained below.
o Activate – The link is ‘fired’ (activated)
o De-Activate – The link is ‘turned off’. The link will no longer
activate. Use ‘Set to Normal’ to re-activate the link
o Set to Normal – This control must be used to re-activate a link
after the De-Activate function has been used
Figure 220 – Link Action Controls
• Click the ‘Execute Link Action’ button
Figure 221 – Execute Link Action Button
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• You will get a message box stating that the link command has been
queued. Be aware that this message box does not mean that the Link
has been activated. It means that the command is queued in the
database to be sent to the panel. If communications is down between
the computer and the panel, the queued command will be dropped
after a timeout period.
Figure 222 – Link Control Queued Message Box
Events & Alerts Grid Manual Control Buttons
Figure 223 – Events & Alerts Grids Manual Control Buttons
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There are two manual control buttons located on the Main Screen
toolbars (see Figure 223). Both of these manual control buttons allow
you to pull up a manual control screen. The Control button that
appears above the Events Grid is linked to the Events Grid. The
Control button that appears above the Alerts Grid is linked o the
Alerts Grid.
These controls allow you to click on a door, relay or link event in the
Events or Alerts grids, then click the appropriate Control button, and
pop up a manual control screen that already has the highlighted
device selected.
An example would be where we have a ‘Badge Violate Void at Panel’
message, as a result of a cardholder being rejected while trying to gain
access to a door, by presenting an unknown badge. The security
guard looks at the CCTV monitor and recognizes the cardholder as a
valid employee. The next step might be for the guard to manually
open that door to let the cardholder enter.
Opening the door can easily be accomplished by following the steps
below.
• Highlight the event or alert (rejection) message for the door in
question (click it)
• Click the appropriate Control button
• Click the ‘Execute Door Action’ button
There was no need to search the doors list for the door name in
question, because the system automatically selected the correct door.
The door identification information is contained in the event or alert
message, so the system can determine which door to select, from the
event message information.
You simply need to click on an event from a door, relay or link that
you wish to manually control, and then click the appropriate Control
button. The appropriate manual control screen comes up with the
proper device selected.
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Scheduled Changes
Figure 224 – The Scheduled Changes Utility Screen
The Scheduled Changes screen is a utility screen where you can
create schedules that can temporarily override ‘standard’ schedules
that were created using the Schedules screen (located in the
Administration menu or is available from the ‘Schedules’ button on
the Main Toolbar).
If you have had an opportunity to read the section on Schedules, you
know that Schedules can be applied to CardAccess hardware items
such as Readers, Inputs, Relays and Links. Time schedules modify
the behavior of those hardware items (for more information see
Schedules).
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Technically speaking, override schedules work identically to the
schedules discussed in the Schedules section. The main difference
between an override schedule and a standard schedule is that the
override schedule will ‘preempt’ the standard schedule if set up to do
so.
In fact, that is the main purpose of an Override Schedule, to preempt
any other schedule that has been applied to that hardware item.
A schedule created in the Scheduled Changes screen, will take effect
on the date indicated in the “Effective Date Range” section of the
Scheduled Changes screen (see Figure 224). That schedule will
remain in effect until the end date indicated. The shortest time span
available is 24 hours.
Notice that the Scheduled changes screen is divided into two halves –
‘Device to Change’ and ‘Changes to be Made’.
The left side of the screen is where you select the device that will
have its schedule modified. The right side of the screen is where you
will program in the type of modification to be done.
Create a Scheduled Change
• Click the New button
• Add a clearly worded title for your schedule in the ‘Description’
field
• Select a hardware device type from the Device list. Note that there
are four choices. Reader, Input, Relay or Link. When you select a
device type, you will notice that the listings in the three controls
directly underneath the Device control change their listings. The
item selections in those controls change depending on what type
of hardware you are applying the schedule to.
Figure 225 – Device Control
Reader
Input
Relay
Link
• Select a device using the ‘Item’ control. The menu in the Item
control is linked to the selection made in the Device control.
Notice that the title for the Item control changes depending on
what type of hardware was selected in the Device control.
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The selection menu in the Item control will be a listing of Readers,
Inputs, Relays or Links. These are hardware devices that are
programmed into the system using the screens available from the
Configuration menu. If no hardware devices have been programmed
into the system, the lists will be blank.
Figure 226 – Item Control
• Select a group from the ‘Group’ control. Like the Item control,
the list of groups available in the Group control changes
depending on which hardware type you have chosen in the
Description control. You are permitted to choose a group in
addition to the device that you chose in the Item control.
Figure 227 – Group Control
• Select a schedule to override in the Field control. As above, the
list in this control changes depending on the hardware type you
have chosen in the Description control. The Field control displays
a list of all of the types of schedules associated with the hardware
item you chose in the Description control. The question answered
in this control is, “Which schedule should be overridden?”
Figure 228 – The Field Control
• The effective date range control is where you will set the duration
of time that the change will affect. The minimum time is one full
day (24 hours). That day starts at midnight of the ‘From’ day, and
ends at midnight of the ‘To’ day. The start and stop time is not
selectable, only the day range. There is no limit on the number of
days the override schedule can span. To select a From and To
time, click the button to the right of each field. You can then
choose a date from a standard calendar control. You can also type
the date in manually.
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Figure 229 – Effective Date Range Control
• Click the Save button
Delete a Scheduled Change
There are two ways to delete a scheduled change. Which one you will
choose will depend on whether the scheduled change is in effect, or it
is not in effect. To delete a scheduled change do the following.
•
If the scheduled change is not in effect, click the Delete button
on the main toolbar of the Scheduled Changes screen. The
Delete button will not delete an active schedule.
Figure 230 – Delete Button
•
If the scheduled change is in effect, click the Cancel Active
button on the main toolbar of scheduled changes screen. The
system will not let you use the Delete button to delete an active
schedule.
Figure 231 – Cancel Active Button
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Personnel
Figure 232 – The Personnel Screen
The Personnel screen is where you will create employee and cardholder
records. In the Personnel screen, you can associate a name with a badge
number, you can set access rules for any badge holder, and you can
attach special attributes to a badge. First, let’s look at how to create a
basic badge, and then we will look at all of the special badge functions
available in this screen.
Create a Basic Badge
You will only need to add a name, badge number and an access
group to a new Personnel record to get the badge opening doors.
The other defaults needed to get the badge working are set to default
values by the system when you click the ‘New’ button. Do the
following to create a working, basic badge.
•
•
Open the Personnel screen by clicking the Personnel button on
the Main Toolbar or click the Personnel option from the Access
menu
Click the ‘New’ button
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Type a badge number in the ‘Badge Number’ field of the
Personnel Screen. You can type in a badge number of 1 to 9
digits (badge numbers must be limited to no more than 9 digits).
Quick Tip - Be sure that the number of badge digits is set correctly
in the System Settings
•
•
•
Type a first name in the ‘First Name’ field (25 characters
maximum)
Type a last name in the ‘Last Name field (25 characters
maximum)
In the field called ‘Access Group 1’, click the arrow to the right
of the control, and select an access group. If there are no access
groups visible in the list, then you must create some in the Access
Groups screen. See Access Groups for more information.
Quick Tip – When you are first setting up your system, it would
be wise to test several badges to be sure they are working with
your readers. To test that your badges are working properly, your
assigned access group should include at least one nearby reader.
•
•
Click the ‘Save’ button
Once you click the Save button, the badge you just edited is
automatically downloaded to the panel(s) that have readers in the
assigned access group.
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Personnel Screen Controls & Functions
Figure 233 – The Personnel Screen
Notice in the above Figure 233, that the screen is divided into four
major sections.
• Main Toolbar – There are buttons for major functions like; Add
a record, Delete a record, Edit a record, Search for a record,
Batch load (or batch modify existing) records and Close the
Personnel screen
• The View Window – This is where a summary list of Personnel
records can be viewed. If you want to view more records, drag
the bottom right corner of the Status Bar down. To view the
details of a specific record, use the scrollbar to the right of the
View window to scroll to the record that you want to see, and
click on that record. The details of that record will then display
in the bottom half of the screen
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The Settings Section – This is where the badge holder
information is entered and where the operating rules for that
badge holder are set. Note that this section of the Personnel
screen has a number of controls that affect the operation of
devices, which are configured in other CardAccess screens. Each
control will be discussed in detail shortly
• The Status Bar – The status bar contains historical
information. The ‘Last Edit’ area indicates the date that
the currently highlighted record was last changed. The
‘Total Badges’ count is the total number of badges stored
in the database.
Quick Tip – When a Personnel record is saved, it is
automatically downloaded to the specific panel(s) where
that badge holders is meant to have access
General Tab
General Tab Hotspots
There are several screens throughout the CardAccess that have
‘hotspots’. Hotspots are ‘hyperlinks’ on the screen that take you to
other screens or functions. The ‘General’ tab of the Personnel screen
has several hotspots discussed below.
If you place your cursor over a hotspot, you will notice that your
cursor changes from an arrow to a hand with a pointing finger. That
change of cursor is an indication that you can left or right click to
start a special associated function or open a related window.
The controls on the General tab that have hotspots are listed below
along with an explanation of what function is launched by each
hotspot.
Quick Tip – When you type a ‘search string’ into a
hotspot type control, upper and lower case are ignored
•
Badge Number – When you left click on the words ‘Badge
Number’ above the Badge Number field, the Badge Number field
turns blue. If you type a badge number in the blue area, and hit
the Enter key on your keyboard, the system will search for and
display all records that have the badge number that you typed in
(you may pull up several records with the same badge number
and different facility code numbers).
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Figure 234 - The Badge Number Field In Search Mode
Click Here
Type Search String
•
First Name - When you left click on the words “First Name”
above the First Name field, the First Name field turns blue. If
you type a first name into the blue area, and hit the Enter key on
your keyboard, the system will search for and display all records
that have the first name that you typed in.
Figure 235 – First Name Field in Search Mode
Click Here
Type Search String
•
Last Name - When you left click on the words “Last Name”
above the Last Name field, the Last Name field turns blue. If you
type a last name into the blue area, and hit the Enter key on your
keyboard, the system will search for and display all records that
have the last name that you typed in.
Figure 236 – Last Name Field in Search Mode
Click Here
Type Search String
Quick Tip – In the First and Last Name fields, you have the
option of typing in the first character only or the first several
characters of the name. In that case, the system will pull up all
records that have the partial string, as the first part of the name.
•
Activation Date – When you left click on the words “Activation
Date”, the Activation Date field turns blue. When the field turns
blue, you can type in a date to search for. The date must be in the
form 07/18/2002 or 7/18/02 (slashes are mandatory). Then
press the Enter key on your keyboard. The system will pull up all
records with the Activation Date indicated.
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Figure 237 – Activation Date Field in Search Mode
Click Here
Type Search String
•
Expiration Date – When you left click on the words
“Expiration Date”, the Expiration Date field turns blue. When
the field turns blue, you can type in a date to search for. The date
must be in the form 07/18/2002 or 7/18/02 (slashes are
mandatory). Then press the Enter key on your keyboard. The
system will pull up all records with the Expiration Date indicated.
Figure 238 – Expiration Date Field in Search Mode
Click Here
Type Search String
•
Access Group 1 & 2 – When you place your cursor over the
Access Group 1 or Access Group 2 fields, and you right click in
the white space of either one of those fields, a button appears
entitled “Show Access List” (Figure 239). If you left click this
button, a “Show Usage” utility screen appears (Figure 240). This
screen shows you a listing of readers from both access groups,
which the highlighted cardholder has access to.
Figure 239– Access Group 1 & 2 Controls & the Show Access
Hotspot
Right Click Here
Show Access List
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Figure 240 – Show usage Utility
•
Access Group 1 Expiration Date – When you left click on the
words “Expiration Date”, the Expiration Date field turns blue.
When the field turns blue, you can type in a date to search for.
The date must be in the form 07/18/2002 or 7/18/02 (slashes
are mandatory). Then press the Enter key on your keyboard. The
system will pull up all records with the Expiration Date indicated.
Figure 241 – Access Group 1 Expiration Date Field in Search Mode
Click Here
Type Search String
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Access Group 2 Expiration Date - When you left click on the
words “Expiration Date”, the Expiration Date field turns blue.
When the field turns blue, you can type in a date to search for.
The date must be in the form 07/18/2002 or 7/18/02 (slashes
are mandatory). Then press the Enter key on your keyboard. The
system will pull up all records with the Expiration Date indicated.
Figure 242 - Access Group 2 Expiration Date Field in Search
Mode
Click Here
Type Search String
•
Group - When you left click on the word “Group”, the Group
field turns blue. When the field turns blue, you can type in a
group name to search for. Then press the Enter key on your
keyboard. The system will pull up all records that have the group
name that you typed in.
Figure 243 – Group Field in Search Mode
Click Here
Type Search String
General Tab Controls
• Badge Number – Type in a number from one to nine digits.
Leading zeros are stripped off. The system will not allow more
than nine digit badge numbers. The field accepts numbers only
Figure 244 – Badge Number Field
•
First Name – Type in a name no longer than 25 characters. The
field accepts any combination of letters and numbers
Figure 245 – First Name Field
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Last Name - Type in a name no longer than 25 characters. The
field accepts any combination of letters and numbers
Figure 246 – Last Name Field
•
Facility – Type in a number from 0 – 10. You can type in that
value or use the arrow buttons on the right side of the control.
You set this number to the position of the facility code in the
facility codes screen. See the section of the manual called Facility
Codes for more information. When facility is set to zero in a
badge holder record, facility codes are ignored for that badge
holder (see Facility Codes for more on what that means).
Figure 247 – Facility Field
•
Re-Issue – When a cardholder loses a badge, you really have
only two choices - issue them a new badge number, or create a
new badge with the same badge number. Issuing a new badge
number means that the Personnel record for the user must be
recreated (a fairly ‘messy’ process).
However, if you issue a badge with the same badge number to
the user, you can’t be sure that the lost badge will not be found
by a stranger, who may elect to use it to gain unauthorized access
to your building. Even more serious is that this access will have
an authorized user’s name and badge number attached to the
access event message. You in effect, have no way to identify the
unauthorized user.
The reissue field solves this problem. A reissue field is
programmed on the badge (most often used with magnetic stripe
type cards) and that reissue field is used in addition to the badge
number to identify the badge holder.
When a cardholder loses a badge, the previous issue level number
is incremented by 1 when they are issued a new badge with the
same badge number.
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When reissue numbers are enabled in a badge format (see ‘Badge
Formats’ for more information), the CardAccess panels will
examine the card number and the issue number to determine if
the card holder will be allowed access. The reissue number must
match the number in the Re-issue field of the cardholder’s
Personnel record. If the numbers don’t match a ‘Badge Violate
Re-Issue’ error event message is generated and access is denied.
In this way, you can issue a numerous badges with the same
badge number, but only the most current issue of the badge will
gain valid access at any door.
To set the reissue level, type in a value 1-99 or use the arrow
buttons on the right side of the control
Figure 248 Reissue Field
•
Pin Code – The pin code is a 1-4 digit (personal) number used in
applications where we want card holders to present two forms of
identification to gain entry at a door. When you set the system up
to require ‘Card & Code’ access at a door, an access card must be
presented to a reader and a security code must be entered into a
keypad before the door will unlock. Pin codes can be the same
for every user or can be unique for every user. Consult the
section of this manual called Readers for information on setting
up Card & Code operation at a reader
Figure 249 – Pin Code Field
•
Embossed ID – Some brands of access cards (like Weigand
swipe) don’t have card numbers printed on the cards. Instead,
they have a serial number ‘embossed’ (printed) on the card. The
manufacturer includes a document with a cross-reference chart
that matches serial numbers to card numbers. That serial number
is the only identifier on this type of card. The Embossed ID field
is a notation field where the user cannot this serial number for
reference purposes (in case the card is lost). The Embossed ID
field is not actively used by the system, it is for notation only.
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Figure 250 – Embossed ID Field
•
Activation Date – Activation date is a means of automatically
enabling a badge based on date. You can set up a badge record,
and complete all the entries in that record, but you can leave that
badge disabled (card holder has no access). You can then set the
activation date to some date in the future, and the system will
automatically enable that badge. Once enabled, the system will
automatically download that badge record to every panel that has
doors that allow access to that cardholder. Activation happens at
00:00:00 o’clock (midnight + n seconds, at the start of the day) of
the date indicated in Activation Date. To set the date, either type
in a date in the form 07/05/2002 or 7/5/02, or click the button
to the right of the field to bring up a calendar control. Doubleclick any date in the calendar control to select it
Figure 251 – Activation Date Field
•
Expiration Date - Expiration Date is a means of
automatically disabling a badge based on date. Disabled
badges are not deleted from the database; they are
‘deactivated’ and can be reactivated at any time later.
Once a badge record has been deactivated, the system will
automatically remove that badge record from every panel
where it is stored. Deactivation happens at 24:00:00
o’clock (midnight, at the end of the day) of the date
indicated in Expiration Date. To set the date, either type
in a date in the form 07/05/2002 or 7/5/02, or click the
button to the right of the field to bring up a calendar
control. Double-click any date in the calendar control to
select it
Figure 252 – Expiration Date Field
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Quick Tip – To ‘Disable’ a badge via an Expiration Date means
that the system will remove the check mark from the Enabled
box in the Personnel record. This means that the badge will be
deleted from every panel where that cardholder has access.
•
Access Time – Access Time is the number of seconds
that a door is held unlocked after a successful badge read.
The Access Time control in the Personnel record allows
you to set ‘override’ door open times for certain users,
without affecting the door open times for the general
population. Door open times are set in the Readers
screen. Access Time values set in a badge holder’s record
preempt settings in the Readers screen for every door that
that Badge Holder has access to
Figure 253 – Access Time Field
•
Badge Use Limit - The badge use limit control sets the
maximum number of times a card can be used before it is
automatically disabled by the system. Once a card is
disabled, that card cannot be used again (system wide)
until the cardholder record is manually re-enabled by the
system administrator. To set the badge use limit, type in a
number from 1-999, or click the arrows to the right of the
badge use limit control
Figure 254 – Badge Use Limit Field
•
Dedicated Access - The Dedicated Access check box
turns the Dedicated Access function on and off. If
checked, the feature is on and if unchecked, the feature is
off. You will note that there are two access group
controls on the general tab of the personnel screen. You
have the option to select an access group from the list
that appears in either one of these two controls.
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Note that the access groups in this list are available to every
cardholder. Optionally, you can create what is called a Dedicated
Access group. A Dedicated Access group is an access group that
belongs to only one cardholder. The setup of Dedicated Access type
access groups is explained in detail in the section entitled Dedicated
Access
Figure 255 – Dedicated Access Field
•
Access Group 1 & 2 – The Access Group 1 & 2 controls
allow you to choose an access template for a cardholder.
To select an access group from either one of these
controls, go into edit mode, click the arrow on the right
side of either control, and select an access group from the
list by clicking it.
Figure 256 - Access Group 1 & 2 Fields
•
Access Group 1& 2 Expiration Date – The Access
Group 1 & 2 Expiration Date fields allow you to set a
(future) date when Access Group 1 or 2 (or both) will be
removed from a cardholder. The event takes place at
24:00:00 o’clock (midnight at the end of the day) of that
date. Unlike the badge Expiration Date explained above
which disables the card, removing an access group does
not necessarily mean that the cardholder will no longer
have access to a building. For example, if we provide a
card holder with Access Groups 1 & 2, and we set an
expiration date only on Access Group 2, Access Group 2
will be removed from the card holder on the expiration
date, but that card holder will still have access group one.
To enter an expiration, either type in a date in the form
07/05/2002 or 7/5/02, or click the button to the right of
the field to bring up a calendar control.
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Figure 257 – Access Group 1 & 2 Expiration Date Field
•
Enable – This control enables or disables the badge. If
checked, the badge is enabled. When the badge is
enabled, the cardholders badge record is automatically
sent to all panels where that cardholder has access. When
the badge is disabled, that cardholder’s record is
automatically removed from every panel where
cardholder has access. To enable or disable the badge,
click on the Enable check box.
Figure 258 – Enabled Check Box
•
Tracked – The tracked function is usually used to track a
badge holder’s movements throughout a building. When
the Tracked check box is enabled (checked), a different
priority level is assigned to that badge. Priority levels for
badge card reads are set in the Readers screen (see
Readers). Notice in Figure 260 that the default priority for
a Tracked Badge is higher than the default priority for a
valid badge. This means that even though a Tracked
badge read is still a ‘valid’ badge read per se, it will be
treated differently. There are two specific differences in
the handling of a tracked badge versus a standard valid
badge. Tracked badge reads have a special event message
“Badge Valid – Tracked”, and Tracked reads are usually
displayed in the Alerts portion of the screen (not Events)
so they can be noticed by security personnel. Click the
Tracked checkbox to enable or disable the Tracked
function for a given badge holder.
Figure 259 – Tracked Check Box
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Figure 260 – Readers Priorities Screen
•
Escorted – When Escorted is enabled for a badge, two
badge reads are required at the reader for an Escorted
cardholder to gain entry. The second badge read must be
from a non-Escorted type card. However, an Escorted
card will only require a second badge read at a reader that
is set up as an Escort reader (for more information on
setting up an Escort reader see Readers). At a non-escort
reader, a badge set to Escorted is treated the same as any
other, non-Escorted badge. To enable escorted, click the
escorted check box.
Figure 261 – Escorted Check Box
•
Stay on Panel – This control is only active when an
access panel is in Interactive Mode (to learn more about
interactive mode see Panels). When Interactive Mode is
enabled at the panel, all badge records that have the Stay
on Panel function enabled will be permanently stored in
panel memory as space allows. Those badge records that
have not been used recently, and do not have the stay on
panel function enabled can be deleted from panel
memory if memory space becomes an issue. When
Interactive Mode is turned on at a panel, set the Stay on
Panel function active for all badges that are expected at
readers on that panel regularly (that is, not occasionally),
if memory space allows.
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Figure 262 – Stay on Panel Check Box
•
Initial Download – This control is only active when an
access panel is in the Interactive Mode (to learn more
about interactive mode see Panels). When Interactive
Mode is enabled at the panel, all badge records that have
the Initial Download function enabled will be
downloaded to the panel memory on every full panel or
badge download. When Initial Download is not enabled,
each badge will only be downloaded to the panel as they
are presented to readers on that panel.
Figure 263 – Initial Download Check Box
•
Vehicle Tag – The Vehicle Tag check box changes the
type of badge holder record from cardholder to Vehicle
Tag. Technically that means that the badge belongs to an
asset and not a person. Vehicle tags are most commonly
created to track company automobiles. Setting up the
vehicle tagging function is explained in more detail in the
Readers section. Click the check box to enable vehicle
tagging.
Figure 264 – Vehicle Tag Check Box
•
Last Valid Access – The last valid access window
automatically displays the latest badge read from the
highlighted cardholder.
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Figure 265 – Last Valid Access Display
Control Tab
The control tab is divided into two sections. The left side of the
folder tab has controls that affect the Anti Passback settings for the
selected cardholder. The right side has controls that affect Alarm
Shunt settings for that cardholder.
Figure 266 – Personnel Screen Control Tab
APB Control
Generally, Anti Passback (APB) is a mode of operation that you set
at a reader (see Readers for more information). The function of Anti
Passback is to prevent a card from being presented to the same
reader twice.
An example of this might be where there are several people online
waiting to gain entry at a doorway. The first person in line presents
their card to the reader and gains entry. They then pass that card to
the second person on line (hence the term, ‘Passback’) who presents
the same card to the reader, and also gains entry. With a standard
reader set up, both cardholders would gain access through the door,
but the event messages generated would make it look like it was the
same person who opened the door twice.
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With Anti Passback set, the second badge read from the example
above would be denied and an error event message (Anti Passback
Violate) would be displayed in the CardAccess software.
So, enabling Anti Passback at a reader sets that reader to deny
multiple card reads. Part of Anti Passback is set up in the readers
screen. Those settings are applied to the reader, at that door, and
apply to all cardholders wishing to gain access at that door.
The Personnel screen also has Anti Passback settings. Those settings
are applied to each cardholder individually. This allows us to modify
the Anti Passback operation for individual cardholders without
affecting the Anti Passback settings for everyone else who uses a
given Anti Passback enabled door.
It is important to note that the Anti Passback controls in the
Personnel screen work in conjunction with the anti passback controls
in the Options tab of the Readers screen. Anti Passback processing
parameters must be set in both locations or Anti Passback will not be
enabled. We will not discuss the Readers Anti Passback controls in
detail in this section (see Readers for more information).
•
Duration Use – The Duration Use control (Figure 267) is used in
conjunction with a timer called ‘Duration Use Time’, that is set in the
Readers screen, Options tab (Figure 268). The basic operation of
Duration Use is to allow you set a window of time during which
successive reads of the same badge will be blocked, until the timer
expires.
Figure 267 – Personnel Duration Use Control
Figure 268 – The Readers Screen APB Controls
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The Duration Use control in the Personnel record has several modes of
operation. Which mode is active, depends on settings in the Readers
screen. They are discussed below.
•
Timed Re-Entry – With no Anti Passback set at the reader (reader
‘normal’ mode), the reader allows unlimited badge reads of the same
card by default. When you set a Duration Use Time in the Readers
screen, and you set the Duration Use feature to Enabled in a card
holder’s Personnel record, that card holder will be blocked from reentering the same door until the time out period has expired. Other
badge holders that do not have the Duration Use times set in their
records are not blocked from re-entering the door. Because the
reader is not in Anti Passback mode, re-entry rules are not applied to
all cardholders. This type of reader functionality is more accurately
termed ‘Timed Re-Entry’. The alert message generated for a timed
re-entry violation (Badge Violate Re-Use) is different from an Anti
Passback violation.
Figure 269 – Settings for Timed Re-Entry in Personnel
Figure 270 - Settings for Timed Re-Entry in Readers
•
Timed APB – With Timed APB reader functionality, one or more
readers are set up as Anti Passback readers. A Duration Use Time is
also set on each of those readers. You can then enable the Duration
Use feature for selected Personnel records. Those badges that have
Duration Use enabled will be able to re-enter at an Anti Passback
reader after the time out period has expired. Badge holders that do
not have Duration Use set in their badge records will be denied the
option of re-entering any APB enabled door (they cannot re-enter
until they ‘exit’).
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Figure 271 Settings for Timed APB in Personnel
Figure 272 – Settings for Timed APB in Readers
APB Setting
The APB setting is a manual method for presetting the Anti Passback
status for the highlighted cardholder. When a cardholder card is
presented to an Anti Passback IN reader, the status of that card
holder is said to be ‘IN’. When a cardholder card is presented to an
Anti Passback OUT reader, that cardholder is said to be ‘OUT’ (of
the building).
The APB setting controls offer the CardAccess administrator a way
to preset the current APB status of a cardholder. You have the
following options.
• IN – Sets the card holder status to IN the building
• OUT – Sets the card holder status to OUT of the building
• Exempt – Sets the cardholder to be ‘immune’ from Anti
Passback rules. The card acts like Anti Passback is not enabled at
any APB reader.
• Set IN/OUT Next Use – Sets the cardholder’s status to IN or
OUT based on which type of APB reader type (IN or OUT) the
next card read comes from.
Figure 273 – APB Setting Controls
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Alarm Shunt Control
An ‘Alarm Point’ by definition is (usually) a set of contacts of some
type that are connected by wires to an alarm panel ‘Input’ (ours or
someone else’s). ‘Alarm Shunting’ is a term that refers to the (old
technology) act of bridging a shorting wire across the contacts of an
Alarm Point, to prevent that Alarm Point from triggering an alert,
when an access door is opened. In effect, the system is ‘faked’ into
believing that the door is still closed so an alarm is not sounded.
Shunting is often used with burglar alarm systems so that authorized
entries and exits can be made to and from a building without the
need to disarm the alarm system. However, the explanation above
that detailed using a piece of wire to short the contacts of an alarm
point is highly over simplified. There is some specialized hardware
and software that has been created to perform these shunting
functions.
There are two types of shunting used in modern access control
systems such as the CardAccess, hardware shunting and software
shunting. Hardware shunting uses relays to accomplish ‘hardwire
bridging’ across input points. We will only be discussing software
shunting in detail below.
Every panel made by Continental is shipped with some number of
(software programmable) alarm inputs. Because those inputs are
under software control, the status of those inputs can be easily
ignored by the software. Ignoring input status messages (on purpose)
is called ‘software alarm shunting’. When software shunting is turned
enabled, the software ignores the status messages of one input or a
group of inputs.
By enabling the shunt feature in a cardholder record, that badge
holder’s card is set up as a ‘shunt card’. A shunt card opens doors just
like a standard card, but the shunt card has an additional special
feature. Once shunting is enabled in a cardholder record, that
cardholder can enable or disable shunting at a reader or group of
readers.
What we mean when we say ‘enable or disable shunting’ is, when the
shunt card is presented to a reader, the door strike is activated
(opening the door like a normal card), and shunting is activated.
When the same card is presented again to the same reader, shunting
is deactivated.
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The most understandable example of an application for alarm
shunting happens when the access control or security system includes
Programmable Infrared sensors (PIR’s). These sensors trigger every
time they see ‘moving heat’ (moving people). That means that when a
building is fully occupied during the day, these sensors will be
constantly triggering (false) alarms.
Here is a case where you may not want to disable the entire access
control system (because you want to maintain security at the doors),
but you do want to disable the PIR inputs (or perhaps, other types of
inputs that are located inside the building perimeter). The alarm
shunting function was designed for just such a case.
For example, you can set up a manager’s access card as an alarm
shunt card. When the manager arrives in the morning to open the
building and presents his or her card to a door, the door opens as
normal, but the PIR inputs are turn off as well (shunting is turned
on). The rest of the access control system remains operationally
unchanged.
Set Up a Shunt Card
Setting up alarm shunting at a door or group of doors is a two-step
process.
• You need to decide which badges will be allowed to turn the
shunting feature on and off
• You need to decide which inputs or groups of inputs will be
shunted, and by which cards
Quick Tip – Before you can shunt groups of Inputs, you must create
Input Groups in the Groups screen, available from the Administration
menu. See the manual section on Groups for more information
Quick Tip – You can create a number of different shunt cards - cards
that shunt different groups of inputs, a number of cards that shunt the
same group of inputs, cards that turn on shunting at one door only,
some cards that turn on shunting of an input group from any reader,
other cards that turn on shunting at shunt designated readers only
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Alarm shunting can be set up to operate in any one of three modes.
Which mode is active for a particular card is determined by the
shunting controls settings on the Control tab of the Personnel record
for that cardholder. There are also some companion settings that
must be made in the Readers screen for some modes as explained
below.
• Shunt a Group of Inputs From Any Reader – If you add a
Shunt Group to any card holder record, but do not enable the
‘Shunt by Designated Reader’ check box (Figure 274), that card
will turn on shunting of the selected Input group from any reader
in the system. Be sure that the ‘Alarm Shunt Reader’ check box
remains unchecked in the Readers screen.
Figure 274 – Personnel Screen Settings for Shunt a Group of Inputs
From Any Reader
•
Shunt a Group of Inputs From Shunt Designated Readers –
If you add a Shunt Group to any card holder record, and you
enable the ‘Shunt by Designated Reader’ check box (Figure 275),
that card will turn on shunting from shunt designated readers
only. There is a setting in the Readers screen to designate a reader
as a shunt reader (Figure 276)
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Figure 275 – Personnel Screen Settings for Shunt by Designated
Reader
Figure 276 – Readers Screen Settings for Shunt by Designated
Reader
•
Shunt One Door – If you enable ‘Shunt by Designated Reader’
but do not add a shunt group (Figure 277), that card will shunt
the door contact of whichever door the card is presented to. All
door contact messages will be suppressed at that door as long as
the door remains open. This means that if the door were left
open after the entry, the ‘Door Open Too Long’ event message
would not be broadcast. Input shunting for that door is disabled
when the door contact closes.
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Figure 277 - Personnel Screen Settings – Shunt One Door Only (Any
Door)
Manually Activate/Deactivate Shunting
We have been discussing ways to turn the shunting feature on and off
using an access control badge. There is also a way to manually turn
the feature on and off. To manually activate or deactivate shunting,
follow the below steps.
• Open the Personnel Screen
• Click on the Control Tab
• Click on the Personnel record that has shunting enabled
Quick Tip – The only badge records that have the ability
to manually activate shunting are those that have a shunt
group selected. If a shunt group is not selected in a given
badge record, manual shunting is not available
•
Click on the Words “Current State” (Figure 278)
Figure 278 – Manual Shunt Control
Click Here
•
Click the button marked ‘Yes’ on the warning dialog that appears
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Figure 279 – Shunt Warning Dialog
•
Note that if you close then re-open the Personnel screen, then
click the record that you used to turn shunting on or off, the
control status will have changed from ‘Inactive’ to ‘Shunting’, or
from ‘Shunting’ to ‘Inactive’ (Figure 278)
Shunt Event Messages
When you activate or deactivate shunting using a badge at a reader,
there are event messages sent from the panel to the CardAccess
software (seen below in Figure 280). Note that the name of the badge
holder who activated shunting is shown as well as the shunt group
that was activated and the door where the badge read occurred.
Figure 280 – Shunt Event Messages
Personal Tab
The Personal tab contains a number of controls that are primarily
notation fields. The fields contained in this tab are generally intended
for personal notes about the cardholder. Although these fields are
not active like those on the General tab, they are still available to
reports and to the Badge Editor software. The fields themselves are
explained below.
•
SSN – Accepts nine numeric digits only
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Company ID, Department, and Location – Each of these
fields accepts sixteen alphanumeric characters. These three fields
are also special because as you enter names in these fields, they
create a list of names already entered. After the list has been
started, you can then choose a name from the list instead of
typing in a name.
Supervisor – The supervisor fields accepts nineteen
alphanumeric characters. This field is also special because it
creates a list of names as you enter them like the above
mentioned three fields.
Hire Date – To choose a hire date, click the calendar button on
the right side of the control. Hire Date is a non-active field. The
day in this field is not connected to any program logic.
Phone/Ext. – This field is a place where you can add a contact
phone number and extension number. Phone and Extension
accept ten alphanumeric characters each.
Vehicle – The vehicle field is where you can enter a description
the badge holder’s automobile. Seventeen alphanumeric
characters maximum.
License Plate – Reserved for the license number of the badge
holder’s automobile. Eleven alphanumeric characters maximum.
Remarks – The remarks field is an area you can enter comments
about the badge holder. Two hundred and fifty five characters
maximum.
Figure 281 – Personnel Personal Tab
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Custom Fields Tab
The Custom Fields tab only appears in the Personnel screen if
Custom Fields has been enabled in the System Settings (for more
details see Custom Fields Tab). The Custom Fields tab is used in a
case where the user needs more notation type fields than are included
on the Personal tab. Custom fields are very helpful because the fields
can be titled to the user’s preference.
Figure 282 – Personnel Custom Tab
Photo Tab
The SmartImage Video Badging software is shipped as part of the
CardAccess software package. The video badging package has two
modes of operation that are selectable in the System Settings, available
from the System menu (see Video Badging Tab for setup information).
The modes are listed below.
Quick Tip – The CardAccess software is shipped with the SmartImage
Video Badging package included. However, parts of that package will not
operate unless you have purchased and installed a hardware security key.
This key attaches to the parallel printer port. Without the key, Image
Capture, Badge Design Preview and Badge Printing are disabled
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Photo ID Only – In this mode, you can import and export photo
bitmaps into and out of the CardAccess database, but you cannot o Create a badge design
o Print or preview a badge design
o Capture an image
o Capture a signature
•
Photo ID + Badging – In this mode you can o Import and export photo bitmaps
o Capture an image (with appropriate hardware)
o Capture a signature (with appropriate hardware)
o Create badge designs
o Print and Preview badge designs
The Photo ID package is disabled by default. The Photo tab in the
Personnel screen is invisible until you go into the System Settings and
enable the ‘Video Badging Package’ on the ‘Video Badging’ tab. See
Video Badging Tab for instructions.
The buttons that appear on the Photo tab change depending on which
option you have chosen in the System Settings. Both configurations
appear below.
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Figure 283 – Personnel Photo Tab With Photos Only Enabled
Note a difference in the number of available buttons in each mode.
In Photos Only mode (Figure 283), you are limited to importing
existing images that were created using another manufacturer’s
software package. Thus, you have only three function buttons
available (Import, Clear Photo, Export).
In Goddard mode (Figure 284), you can capture photos using a
camera kit. There are more buttons to activate the image and
signature capture windows, and to edit and delete images and
signatures.
Note that the buttons visible on the left side of Figure 283 are grayed
out. These buttons belong to functions that are not enabled unless
you are in Edit mode. When you click the Edit button, those buttons
(and those functions) become available. In Figure 284 below, the
form is in Edit mode, so all of the buttons on the left side of the
form are visible.
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Figure 284– Personnel Photo Tab With Photo ID + Badging Enabled In
Edit Mode
Let’s look at the function of each button in Figure 284.
• Capture Photo – When you click the Capture Photo button, a
capture window is opened (Figure 285) and the software attempts to
connect to a camera. The type of camera that the software will search
for is set in the Camera Setup control, which is explained below.
When you are happy with the image, the Capture button is clicked and
the image is transferred to the CardAccess and the badge holder’s
record. The Capture Photo button is grayed out when not in Edit
mode.
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Figure 285 – Image Capture Window
• Capture Signature – When you click the Capture Signature button,
the system searches for a signature pad device. If one is found, a
signature capture window is opened (Figure 286). After the signature
has been entered on the pad, the OK button is clicked and the image
is transferred to the CardAccess and the badge holder’s record. The
Capture Signature button is grayed out when not in Edit mode.
Note that there is no signature view window displayed in any
Personnel record until you capture a signature for that record. After
capturing a signature, a signature view window is made visible.
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Figure 286 – The Signature Capture Window
• Modify – Once you have captured or imported a photo, if you are
not happy with the quality of the image, you can edit the image by
clicking the Modify button. This brings up an image edit window
with controls that allow you to enhance the image.
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Figure 287 – The Modify Image Window
• Import – The Import button calls up a Windows Explorer type
control that allows you to search your hard drive or network drives for
a bitmap to import. The images window supports .bmp, .jpg, .wmf
and .gif type image files.
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Figure 288 – Import Image Window
• Clear Photo – The Clear Photo button clears the badge holder photo
from the current record. The system displays a warning message
before deleting the image
Figure 289 – Clear Photo Warning Dialog
• Clear Signature – The Clear Signature button deletes a signature
from a cardholder record. The system displays a warning message
before deleting the signature.
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Figure 290 – Clear Signature Warning Dialog
• Camera Setup – The Camera Setup button brings up a utility
window that allows you to select some camera operating parameters.
Each parameter is briefly discussed below.
Figure 291 – Camera Setup Utility Screen
•
Camera Type – There are four choices.
o None – No camera selected.
o Hitachi w/Flashpoint 128 – Using the Flashpoint 128 video
capture card.
o Hitachi w/Flashbus – Using the FlashBus MV Pro video
capture card.
o TWAIN – Use for digital camera with a serial or USB
interface.
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• Video In Type – Three standards are supported. The SVideo
standard is supported by the Continental SmartImage kit, but the
other camera connection methods can be supported with special
order interface cables.
o Composite – Uses one round BNC type connector
o SVideo – Uses a 7 pin round DIN type connector
o RGB – Uses five round BNC type connectors
• Standard – Always set to NTSC in the United States. PAL is a
European video standard.
• Image Buffer Size – The badge creation software must be told
what the maximum size of a captured image will be. This setting
only affects the badge printing software. If this setting is set too
small, there will be an internal software error and the image will
fail to preview or print properly. Set the Image Buffer Size to the
smallest possible value to save database space. Recommendations
follow.
o Hitachi VKC77 Camera – This camera captures images of
about 75K in size. Set the image buffer size to 100K
maximum, lower if possible
o Digital Camera – Most (if not all) digital cameras have an
image quality adjustment control built in. The default value
for that control is usually set to the highest available setting.
Reset that setting to the lowest possible setting that produces
an acceptable image that can be used in the CardAccess. That
will reduce the image size that is output from the camera.
Lower resolution images save database space. The Image
Buffer Size control will not let you set the resolution higher
than 2 Megabytes. Digital cameras in high-resolution mode
can create images that exceed 2Megabytes in size, which will
fill up the database quite fast and will fail to preview and print
properly as was explained above.
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We have successfully reduced digital camera images to 17K
with fine results. Start with the lowest resolution setting on
your camera, and increase it in small increments if the photo
does not display well in the CardAccess. The average quality
digital photo should be 50-100K in size.
When you are done setting camera parameters, click the ‘Save’
button.
• Preview – The Preview button brings up a print preview window that
allows you to see what your badge design will look like before you
commit to printing it.
• Print – The print button allows you to print your badge design
• Copies – The Copies spin control sets the number of copies that you
want to print of the currently highlighted badge.
Figure 292 – The Copies Control
• Export – The Export control allows you to export the badge holder
image to a bitmap type file. Select a destination folder and a filename
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Figure 293 – The Export Photo Window
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Batch Save Utility
Figure 294 - The Batch Save Utility Screen
The Batch Save utility is available from a button on the Personnel screen
main tool bar. The utility allows you to create or change batches of
Personnel records. For example, you can have the Batch Save utility visit
every Personnel record and change the settings of one or more fields.
You can also have the Batch Save utility create an entire range of records
(say badge numbers 1-500); all with the same preset values.
The Batch Save utility is a multi-purpose utility and can be placed in one
of several operating modes, depending on which selection you make in
the 'How to Handle a Range' control. Using the How to Handle a Range
control, you will elect to create new records, modify existing records, or
create new and modify existing records at the same time.
Note that regarding the batch modification of Personnel records; you
may commonly have any of the following four situations.
• You Have No Personnel Records and You Wish to Create a Number
of Them in a Batch
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• You Have Some Existing Personnel Records, But You Need More
Records
• You Have Existing Records and Some or All of Them Need to Have
One or More Fields Modified
• You Have Existing Records and You Wish to Create New Records
and Modify the Existing Records at the Same Time
The Batch Save utility can solve each of the problems above. Performing
badge creation operations in a batch will save you from needing to create
Personnel records individually, thereby saving considerable time.
Important Note: The Batch Save Utility must be provided with a
badge number range. The badge number range is a required field, all
other fields are optional. The Batch Save utility will use the badge
number range and create or modify all badge records in that range,
according to the settings in the ‘Controls’ section of the utility.
The Batch Save utility is quite useful if you have a range of new badge
records to create and all of those records share common settings. You
can create each badge record (in a contiguous badge number range) in
one batch operation, and then visit each record to type in the name and
other personal information. In this way, you can get an entire batch of
badges operational in one short operation, and then revisit each of those
records to add personal information as the badges are actually issued to
the cardholders.
Visit the Batch Utility Screen controls topic for more specific
information on the individual fields and controls of the Batch Save
screen. Visit the 'Run a Batch Save' topic section for more information
on how to run an example batch save operation. Click the link below for
access to those topic pages.
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Run a Batch Save
When you run a batch save operation, you will be creating or modifying a
'range' of badge records. You are required to enter a badge number range
in the 'Badge Range' fields. This badge range selection sets the Batch Save
utility up to perform the act of creating or modifying all badges in the
badge number range selected.
What the Batch Save utility will actually do to the badges that are
included in the selected range, is controlled by the selection you make in
the 'How to Handle a Range' section controls. You may have one of the
following needs.
• Create New Records - When you attempt to create new records,
you may be faced with one of two possible conditions
o Create Contiguous New Records - You may have no badge
records in the badge range that you have selected. In this case, you
will select the 'Create New Only' or the 'Create and/or Modify All'
option. In the case where there are no existing badge records in
the badge range selected, the 'Create New Only' and the 'Create
and/or Modify All' options will both perform the same function create only new records.
o Create New Interlaced Records - You may have some existing
badge records created, but the badge numbers are not contiguous
(there are gaps in the numbering sequence), and you wish to
create badge records that fill in all the missing gaps in the badge
number sequence, and/or you perhaps wish to add more records
to the beginning or the end of the badge records. However, you
wish to add these new badges without changing the settings of
any of the existing badge records. In this case, the 'Create New
Only' option is the only option that will create new badge records
in a badge range where there are existing records, and leave those
existing records untouched.
• Create New Records and Modify Existing Records - You may
have some existing records that you want to modify and at the same
time create some new records. You may wish to append more records
to the beginning, in between, or at the end of the existing badge
records. The 'Create and/or Modify All' feature will modify any
existing badge records within the badge range specified in the 'Badge
Range' fields, but it will also add new badge records for any badge
numbers missing in that range.
• Modify Existing Records Only - You may wish to scan the badge
database and only modify records that are already found there. The
'Modify Existing Only' option will change the settings of existing
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badge records, according to your selections in the Batch Save utility,
but it will not create any new badges
Run a Batch Save
• Open the Batch Save Utility - To open the Batch Save utility, first
open the Personnel screen (available from a button on the CardAccess
main toolbar). Then click the 'Batch Modify' button on the Personnel
screen toolbar
Figure 295 - The Personnel Screen Batch Modify Button
• Select the Badge Number Range - You need to tell the Batch Save
utility the range of badge numbers to work on. Type the number into
the 'Badge Range' fields. If you type the same badge number in the
'from' and 'to' fields, the batch utility will modify only 1 badge.
Warning: The Batch Save utility will visit every record in the
Personnel screen that you have included in the badge range that you
specified. Be very careful which options you set, and especially which
option you set in the ‘How to Handle a Range’ section controls. You
run the risk of altering fields in records that you did not intend to alter
Figure 296 - The Badge Range Fields
• Select the Batch Save Range - You need to select the operating
'mode' of the Batch Save utility. The Batch Save utility can create only
new badges, can create new badges and modify existing badges, or it
can modify existing badges without creating any new badges. Select
the mode you want in the 'How to Handle a Range' section
Figure 297 - The How to Handle a Range Selections
• Select the Fields - Once you have determined the mode that you
wish to have the Batch Save utility operate in (see above), you need to
tell the utility which fields in the selected Personnel records you want
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to have changed. The 'Item' column includes the name of every
Personnel screen field.
Adjacent to every field name in the Item column is a check box (in the
'Include' field). If you select any check box by clicking it (checked is
selected), the field selected will have its contents changed according to
your other selections in the 'Value to be Set' fields of the Batch Save
utility. If you leave any fields unchecked, those fields will not be
altered by the Batch Save Utility.
Figure 298 - The Item and Include Columns
• Select the Default Values - If you have selected any fields to be
altered by checking one or more check boxes in the 'Include' column,
you can then select the values that will be placed into the selected
Personnel screen field when the batch save takes place. Note that
every record that falls within the selected badge number range will be
given the value that is set in the Value to be Set column
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Figure 299 - The Value to be Set Column
There are five types of controls found in the Value to be Set column
as follows:
!
Spin Field - Usually a numeric field. Click the arrow button to
the right of the field to locate a selection
Figure 300 - A Spin Control Field
!
Text Field - You are expected to type a line of text into a text
field
Figure 301 - A Text Field
!
Combo Field - The combo field control displays a list of choices.
Click the arrow to the right of a combo field to display the list of
selections
Figure 302 - A Combo Field Control
!
Check Box Field - Click a check box field to enable an option
(checked is enabled). Check boxes represent 'Boolean' fields of the
CardAccess. Boolean fields can be either true or false. In the
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CardAccess, boolean fields are most often used to indicate
'enabled' (true) or 'disabled' (false). Thus, if you want to enable a
feature, check the check box
Figure 303 - A Check Box Field
!
Calendar Field - A calendar field is used to provide a fixed date
value to the selected field. You may manually type in a date (of the
form MM/DD/YY), or you can use the built in calendar by
clicking the button (with the number 15 on it) to the right of the
calendar field control
Figure 304 - A Calendar Field Control
• Select the Search Criteria - If you make a selection in the 'Batch
Criteria' column, the operation of the Batch Save utility will be altered.
Once you have made any selection in the batch criteria column, when
the Batch Save utility runs, it will look for Personnel badge records
that have the selected batch criteria, and it will modify the fields of
only those records.
Stated another way, the Batch Save utility will ignore any record that
does not match the search criteria. Select a Batch Criteria in a case
where you wish to search for badge records that have the specified
settings, and you want to change some settings in only those records.
The batch criteria search mode is ideal in a case where you wish to
search for a specified value in each badge record, and if that setting is
found, to replace it with a setting of your choosing. This will leave all
records that do not match that setting untouched.
The fields found in the Batch Criteria column are the same as shown
above in the 'Select the Default Values' section
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Figure 305 - The Batch Criteria Column
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Batch Save Utility Screen Controls
Figure 306 - The Batch Save Utility Screen
The Batch Save utility allows you to change or create batches of
personnel records in one, automatic operation. The individual controls of
the Batch Save screen (Figure 295) are discussed below.
Batch Save Screen Controls
• Badge Range - The 'Badge Range' (from, to) fields set the range of
badge numbers that the Batch Save utility will operate on. You may
set the range anywhere from one badge (put the same badge number
in the 'from' and 'to' fields) to as many badges as you like.
However, note the following about the Batch Save utility
o Must be supplied with a badge number range. The badge number
range is the one required key field for the utility. All other fields are
optional
o The 'from' (on the left) number must be less than the ‘to’ number
(on the right)
o The utility will visit each Personnel screen badge record in the
badge number range. Each record may or may not be affected,
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depending on the option that you select in the 'How to Handle a
Range' controls.
Warning: The Batch Save utility will visit every record in the
Personnel screen that you have included in the badge range that you
specified. Be very careful which options you set, and especially which
option you set in the ‘How to Handle a Range’ section controls. You
run the risk of altering fields in records that you did not intend to alter
To use the Badge Range Fields (Figure 296), type a number into the
'from' field (on the left), and type a number into the 'to' field (on the
right). The number in the 'from' field must be greater than or equal to
the number in the 'to' field
Figure 307 - The Badge Range Fields
• Batch Save Range - You have three options in the 'How to Handle a
Range' section as explained below.
o Create and/or Modify All - If this option is selected, the Batch
Save utility will visit each record in the badge range selected and
modify the fields selected. The selected fields of existing records
will be modified according to the selections in the Batch Modify
screen, and new records in the badge range will be created with
the selected options if they do not exist.
In a simple example, let's say that you have existing Personnel
badge records with badge numbers of 1, 3 and 5 (there are no
existing badge records with badge numbers of 2 & 4). You select
the 'Create and/or Modify All' option in the How to Handle a
Badge Range section and you also elect to enable the 'Enable'
check box in each badge record.
When you run the utility, it will visit each existing badge record
and change the 'Enabled' field to the enabled state (unless already
enabled). However, when the option is set to 'Create and or
Modify', the utility will create any badge records that are found
missing in the badge range. In the case of our example, the utility
will create badge records for badge numbers 2 & 4, and it will
modify the badge records of badge numbers 1, 3, and 5, which
already exist.
o Create New Only - If the 'Create New' option is selected, the
utility will only create new badge records with the options you
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select. The utility will 'pass over' any existing records that fall
inside the selected badge range without changing them.
In the example above, two new badges would be created (2 & 4),
and the existing badges 1, 3 & 5 would remain unchanged
o Modify Existing Only - If the 'Modify Existing Only' option is
selected, the utility will not create any new badges in the selected
badge range. The utility will only modify existing badge records
with the selected settings
Figure 308 - The Batch Save Range Selection Controls
• Column Functions
Figure 309 - The Batch Save Column Layout
o Item Column - The 'Item' column basically contains a listing of
every field found in the Personnel screen. By default no personnel
fields are included in the batch save. You must select each field
that you wish to include in the batch save by clicking the check
box adjacent to the field label (see the Include column below)
found in the Item Column field
o Include Column - The 'Include' column contains the check
boxes which are associated with the field labels in the Item
column. You may click any or all check boxes to include the
selected field in the batch save. Check is included, unchecked is
not included
o
Value to be Set Column - The 'Value to be Set' column
contains fields that you can use to set a default value for each
selected field. The value selected in the Value to be Set column
will be loaded into the selected control of each personnel record
in the selected badge range. Remember the list of fields shown in
the Batch Save utility actually represents every field found in the
Personnel screen.
As you would expect, some fields in the Personnel screen have
small drop down menu selections available, some fields require
that you type in a value, some fields require that you select a date,
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etc. The controls in the Value to be Set column allow you to set a
static value that will be loaded in to the selected fields of every
badge record visited.
If no selection is made in the Value to be Set column for a given
field, the default value as decided by the Batch Save utility will be
loaded into that field.
There are five types of controls found in the Value to be Set
column as follows
!
Spin Field - Usually a numeric field. Click the arrow button
to the right of the field to locate a selection
Figure 310 - A Spin Control Field
!
Text Field - You are expected to type a line of text into a text
field
Figure 311 - A Text Field
!
Combo Field - The combo field control displays a list of
choices. Click the arrow to the right of a combo field to
display the list of selections
Figure 312 - A Combo Field Control
!
Check Box Field - Click a check box field to enable an
option (checked is enabled). Check boxes represent 'boolean'
fields of the CardAccess. Boolean fields can be either true or
false. In the CardAccess, boolean fields are most often used to
indicate 'enabled' (true) or 'disabled' (false). Thus, if you want
to enable a feature, check the check box
Figure 313 - A Check Box Field
!
Calendar Field - A calendar field is used to provide a fixed
date value to the selected field. You may manually type in a
date (of the form MM/DD/YY), or you can use the built in
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calendar by clicking the button (with the number 15 on it) to
the right of the calendar field control
Figure 314 - A Calendar Field Control
o Batch Criteria Column - The fields found in the 'Batch Criteria'
column are used when you wish to search the personnel records
for a particular value and modify any personnel record where
that value is found. Note that all records that do not have the
selected search criteria will not be altered.
Stated another way, the Batch Modify utility will search every
personnel record for the values set in the fields of the Batch
Criteria column. If any records are found to have the searched
for values, only those records will be changed to the settings that
have been selected in the Batch Save utility 'Include' and 'Value
to be Set' columns. All records not matching the search criteria
set in the Batch Criteria column will not be touched.
There are two types of fields found in the Batch Criteria column
!
Combo Field - The combo field control displays a list of
choices. Click the arrow to the right of a combo field to
display the list of selections
Figure 315 - A Combo Field Control
!
Calendar Field - A calendar field is used to provide a fixed
date value to the selected field. You may manually type in a
date (of the form MM/DD/YY), or you can use the built in
calendar by clicking the button (with the number 15 on it) to
the right of the calendar field control
Figure 316 - A Calendar Field Control
• Send Badges to Panels Check Box - As you can well understand,
the Batch Save utility can be used to modify possibly thousands of
personnel records. Some of the changes that are made to those
records could change the access permissions of those badge holders.
This makes it vitally important to get the change information to every
hardware access control panel as soon as possible.
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However, in a large system changes to thousands of cards could cause
a massive download that could disable the system for a period of time
until the download has completed. To prevent a possible system lack
of availability due to large scale badge downloads, the system is set up
not to trigger a badge data download at the end of the batch save
operation. This means that you will need to manually download each
panel (or all panels at once) to get the changed personnel data to the
panels (it won't happen automatically). This option allows you to
decide when to download updated badges to the access control
system.
If you prefer to have all changed badge records downloaded
automatically to the panels when the Batch Save utility completes,
click the 'Send Badges to Panels' option check box (checked means
that the utility will trigger a download when completed)
Figure 317 - The Send Badges to Panels Check Box
• Execute Button - Click the 'Execute' button to start the batch
operation
Figure 318 - The Execute Button
• Cancel Button - Click the 'Cancel' button to stop the batch operation
and close the Batch Save screen. It is strongly recommended that you
do not click the Cancel button during a batch operation. Let the
operation complete to prevent unexpected consequences
Figure 319 - The Cancel Button
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Badge Holders In List
Figure 320 – The Badge Holders In List Screen
The purpose of the Badge Holders In screen, available from the Access
menu on the CardAccess main toolbar, is to display a list, commonly
called a ‘muster list’, of all badge holders that have entered a building.
This list might generally be helpful in an emergency situation where the
building would need to be evacuated. The muster list could be printed
out and used as a check list to be sure that all tenants in a given building
have been evacuated safely, and have rallied together at a ‘muster point’.
You will notice in Figure 320 that there are several badge holders listed in
the view area of the screen. It is important to note that the CardAccess
system (and the In List) needs to have some way to determine who has
passed into a given building and who has passed out of that building.
In a standard access control system, an access card is read at a door and
that door is opened, but no note is made whether that access was into or
out of the building. All that is known is that the cardholder has accessed a
door. The way to be more certain who has entered a building and who
has left that building is to adopt a more ‘disciplined’ approach to access.
In the more disciplined approach, we establish one door as an IN door,
and a second door as an OUT door. We require all entrants to a building
to enter through the IN door and to leave via the OUT door. This makes
logging who is in the building and who is not, somewhat easier.
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The CardAccess system has settings to establish a door as an ‘IN’ door or
an ‘OUT’ door. Those settings are found in the Readers screen, on the
Options tab. Readers are being discussed at this point because the Badge
Holders In screen and the Readers screen are linked. At least one IN
reader must exist before the Badge Holders In screen will begin logging
badge holder activity. Let’s look at the set up required for In List
operation in more detail.
As we have stated, the In List will not operate unless you set up at least
one reader as an ‘IN’ reader. The IN List is gathered from system event
messages that are received from all readers that have been set up as T&A
or APB readers. The messages from other types of readers are ignored by
the Badge Holder In List screen. The readers screen let’s you set up two
different types of IN & OUT readers.
Warning – You cannot set APB and T&A active on the
same reader. The reader must be set to one type or the other
•
Time & Attendance IN Reader – The Time and Attendance
function is applied to a reader if you wish to have a ‘passive’ notation
that a badge holder passed through an IN or OUT type reader. T&A
readers do not restrict the number of times you can enter or exit
through the same reader, but they do generate an event message for
every attempt that is made. When you pass through a T&A reader,
two things happen.
o A special event message is generated – “Badge Clock-IN” or
“Badge Clock-OUT”
o A database notation is made as to whether the badge holder that
passed through the reader is IN the building or OUT of the
building
IN
•
Figure 321 – The Readers Screen T&A Control – T&A Type Set to
Anti-Passback IN Reader – The Anti-Passback function is more
stringent than the T&A function. With APB, you can set the readers
up to refuse multiple card reads from the same card. You can force a
badge holder to exit through an exit reader before entering through
an entry reader. When you pass through an APB reader, several
things happen.
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o A special event message is generated – “Badge Entry” or “Badge
Exit”
o A database notation is made as to whether the badge holder that
passed through the reader is IN the building or OUT of the
building
o The badge holder is prevented from re-entering the same door
IN
Figure 322 – The Readers Screen APB Control – APB Type Set to
The choices available in the ‘Time&Attendance Type’ control and the
‘APB Type’ control are the same. You can set a T&A or an APB reader
up as an
•
IN Reader – Swipe the card, the system logs that card as IN
•
OUT Reader – Swipe the card, the system logs that card as OUT
•
IN & OUT Reader – Swipe the card once, the system logs that
card as IN. Swipe the same card again at the same reader, in the
opposite direction and the system logs that card as OUT
So now you are aware that T&A or APB must be set up on (some)
readers in order to get the Badge Holders In screen to begin logging
activity. Once you have readers designated as IN and OUT readers (T&A
or APB does not matter), the Badge Holders In list automatically begins
logging which badge holders are (technically) IN.
If a badge holder passes through an IN reader, that badge holder is
considered IN by the system. If that same badge holder subsequently
passes through an OUT reader, that badge holder is considered OUT by
the system.
If a badge holder is considered IN by the system, that badge holder’s
name will appear in the Badge Holders In list screen. When the badge
holder passes through an OUT reader, that badge holder’s name is
removed from the Badge Holders In List screen.
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The In list screen updates automatically when new badge holders are
admitted through an IN Reader. Thus, if you leave the screen open, you
will see names added or deleted from the In list dynamically.
Set Up the Badge Holders In Screen
Lets’ look at the controls on the Badge Holders In screen.
• Select Reader – Note that you can designate any number of doors as
IN doors. When you open the Badge Holders In screen, that screen
will display badge holder status messages from any and all IN readers
in the system (by default). You may wish to filter the screen to view
the badge holder IN status messages from just one reader. To filter
the Badgeholders In screen to view the messages from a single door,
do the following.
o Click the Button – Click the Select Reader button
Figure 323 – The Select Reader Button
o Click the Arrow – Click the arrow to the right of the selection
control
o Use the scroll bar – Scroll up or down to locate the reader
who’s badge holder IN status that you wish to see
o Click Your Selection – The screen is now filtered to display
badge IN status messages for card holders from your selected
reader only
• Print Report – Clicking this button prints a hard copy of the muster
list. This button is grayed out when there are no badge holders listed
in the view window
Figure 324 – Badge Holders In List Print Report Button
• Auto Refresh – If this feature is enabled (the box is checked), the
screen will update every 8 seconds and refresh the display to include
the most recent badge holder entries and exits. If this feature is not
selected, the refresh engine is turned off and the only way to refresh
the screen is to close and reopen it, or select a different reader from
the Select Reader control.
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Figure 325 – Badge Holders In List Auto Refresh Check Box
• Exit – Closes the Badge Holders In screen
Figure 326 – Badge Holders In List Exit Button
• Status Bar – Indicates the total number of badge holders that are
displayed in the Badge Holders In list. This is helpful in the case of
an emergency. You will know the total number of people to be
accounted for
Figure 327 – Badge Holders In List Status Bar
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Access Groups
What is an Access Group
The “Access Group” is an access ‘template’ that once created, is
designed to be assigned to one or more badge holders (see
Personnel). This access template contains a list of the doors that
those badge holders are allowed access to.
To illustrate the problem that is solved by the Access Group, let’s
look at the following example. Say we have three eight door panels,
for a total of 24 doors. All of these panels are in the same building
and control interior and exterior doors. Say we have 100 employees
working in this building and each of them has access to various
doors, none of them is allowed access to every door.
Thus from a technical standpoint, we are asking the access control
panels to accept or reject cardholders depending on their permission
to access a given door. For the moment, let’s call this ‘door level
access’.
Further, even if an employee is allowed at a given door, we may not
want them to be in the building during certain hours of the day. Let’s
call this ‘time schedule level access’.
So there are basically two things we want to limit for each employee.
Which doors they are permitted to use, and what times of the day
they are allowed to use those doors.
So how do we program the Continental access control panels to
accept or reject a badge holder at a certain door, at certain times? We
use a utility screen called ‘Access Groups’.
The Access Groups screen is a utility window where you will create
an ‘access template’ for a cardholder or a group of cardholders. Each
template has a listing of all of the card readers in the system, and you
selectively activate some or all of those readers by assigning time
schedules to them.
Once you have created an Access Group, that Access Group
template will ‘do nothing’ until you assign it to a badge holder. The
very reason for creating Access Groups is so that we can attach them
to badge holders.
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Once you assign an Access Group to a badge holder, that badge
holder ‘inherits’ the access control template described by the Access
Group definition.
Let’s look at the anatomy of the Access Groups screen (Figure 328).
The screen is divided into two halves. The top half of the screen
contains the main toolbar and a view window where you will see a
listing of all of the Access Groups that you create.
Figure 328 – Access Groups Utility Screen
The bottom half of the screen shows a listing of all of the readers
that have been (previously) programmed into the CardAccess
Readers screen (available from the Configuration menu). Every
reader in the system will be displayed here (Figure 329).
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Figure 329 – Example Access Groups Readers List with Schedules
Assigned
When you create an access group, you are expected to scan the list of
readers, and selectively assign schedules to some or all of those
readers.
You can create Access Groups that:
• Have no schedules assigned to any reader. This is an Access
Group that will have access to ‘no doors’ (although this is a waste
of an access group, the system will let you create it).
• Have a schedule assigned to one reader in the list. This is an
Access Group that grants access to one door only.
• Have schedules assigned to every reader. This Access Group
grants access to every door in the system.
• Have numerous, different schedules assigned to any number of
doors. This Access group will allow access to several doors, but
(perhaps) at different times of the day.
Let’s look at the details of the access group in Figure 328.
• There is a time schedule assigned to doors 2-1 and 2-2 called
“24/7/365”. The 24/7/365 time schedule from the Schedules
screen is displayed below in Figure 330. Notice that the schedule
runs from Monday to Holiday (every day of the year) and
12:00AM to 12:00AM (24 hours)
• Door 1-1 has no time schedule assigned
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Figure 330 – Time Schedules Screen – 24/7/365 Schedule
So, the access group in Figure 119 is an access template that grants
access to ‘two doors on panel two’ and ‘no doors on panel one’,
every day of the year, at all hours of the day.
Knowing what we know now, we can say that the above access group
grants access to two doors of the system and that those doors will be
available 24 hours per day, and every day of the year.
The previous paragraph is an important step toward being able to
create an access group. At some point before access groups are
created, someone, usually the CardAccess administrator, needs to sit
down and work out these access control templates.
You begin the task by listing all of the cardholders in the system and
deciding who should have access to what doors, and at what time of
the day. It is likely that some group of card holders, such as all card
holders that belong to a given department, will have similar access
needs and will be able to use the same access template.
For example, we determine that all employees, that are not managers,
from the Human Resources department need to arrive at work at
8am and leave at 5pm. Let’s agree that we have created an employee
‘Employee Entrance’ door and that these Human Resources
employees will be required to enter and leave by this door, but only
during business hours. Further, all employees are allowed access to
the company cafeteria.
The resulting Access Group will look something like figure 267
below.
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Figure 331 – Access Groups Example
Note the following.
• We have given the Access Group a clearly descriptive name,
“Human Resources"
Warning – A caution about ‘labeling’. There is no error checking on
the name you assign to something. Thus, you could create a time
schedule that includes only weekend hours (or no hours what-so-ever),
but you could call it Weekdays, Business Hours. Therefore, when you
are programming Access Groups and using schedules from the
Schedules screen, you are strongly advised to check to be sure that the
operation of a given schedule matches the name of that schedule.
•
We have given the Human Resources department access to only two
doors – the “Cafeteria” and the “Employee Entrance”
•
The access to these two doors is limited to “Weekdays, Business
Hours”
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Once you create access groups, it’s important to remember that these
access groups don’t actually do anything until they are assigned to
Personnel records. The next section describes the Personnel screen
Access Groups controls.
Personnel Access Group Controls
If you go to the Access menu and click Personnel, you will see the
Personnel utility window (see figure below). This is the control
surface that you will use to create Personnel records. We will only
examine the Access Group controls in this section. Please see the
section on Personnel for more specific information on the Personnel
screen.
Figure 332 – Personnel Screen
In the above figure, the Access Group controls are all highlighted
with square boxes. The function of these controls is explained in the
following sections.
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Remember that you must be in Edit Mode in most CardAccess screens
in order to change the settings of any control. You enter edit mode by
clicking the ‘New’ button (to create a new record) or the ‘Edit’ button
(to edit an existing record). The buttons are located on the top toolbar.
Press ‘Save’ when you are done to save the changes you have made.
Figure 333 – Access Group Controls
Access Group 1 & 2 Controls
There are two Access Group controls available in each Personnel
record. Each control will accept one access group. You are allowed to
assign a maximum of two access groups per badge holder when using
these controls.
If you elect to assign only one access group to a given badge holder,
you can assign that access group in either control, Access Group 1 or
Access Group 2. The system does not care about the order in which
you use the access group controls.
When you click the arrow to the right of the Access Group 1 or 2
controls, a list box appears that shows all of the access groups that
you (previously) created in the Access Groups utility screen. You can
choose any one of those access groups listed. Click the toolbar ‘Save’
button to store the change.
An example of how to efficiently use these two access groups
follows. Say we have a department in a corporation. The employees
of that department have access only to the entry door of their
department. The manager of their department needs access to their
department entry door and to the manager’s hallway.
One possible solution for the case above is to create two access
groups. The first access group allows the employees access to their
departmental entry door only. The second access group is set to allow
access to the manager’s hallway only.
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You assign the access group that gives departmental access to the
general employees. So they get only one access group for each
personnel record. You assign two access groups to the manager. One
access group gives access to the manager’s hallway and the other
gives access to the departmental entry.
Access Group Expiration Date
If you refer to figure 3, note that on the right side of the control
cluster, there are two ‘calendar controls’, one for Access Group 1 and
another for Access Group 2.
If you fill in an expiration date for either access group (or both), that
access group will be removed from that card holder at the end of the
day on the indicated date.
That is, the access group that is set in that control will be removed
from that cardholder after midnight at the end of the indicated day,
and that access group will revert to ‘not used’.
When an access group is taken away from a cardholder because the
expiration date has been reached, that change is automatically
downloaded to the panels where that cardholder had access. Access is
removed.
Dedicated Access
There are actually two ways to create an access group. We have
already discussed using the Access Groups screen to create an access
group. You can also create an access group from inside the Personnel
record of the cardholder that you are editing.
This type of access group is called ‘Dedicated Access’. It’s called
dedicated access because, when you create an access group from
inside a Personnel record, that access group is ‘bound’ to that
cardholder. It becomes a ‘personal’ access group. It is ‘dedicated’ to
that person.
Creating a dedicated access group is a two-step process. First you
need to check the ‘Dedicated Access’ check box in the Personnel
record that you are editing (Figure 334).
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Figure 334 – Dedicated Access Checkbox
Once you check the Dedicated Access check box, several things
happen. The Access Group 2 selector control disappears and a
Dedicated Access folder tab appears in the Personnel record that you
are currently editing (Figure 335).
Figure 335 – Dedicated Access Folder Tab
If you are using dedicated access for a given card holder, you are
allowed to create only one (dedicated) access group for that user.
That’s why the second access group selector control disappears. The
Access Group Expiration Date works the same on a dedicated access
group as it does on a standard access group.
When you click the Dedicated Access tab, you will notice that you are
presented with a list of readers, just as you were in the Access
Groups screen. This screen does work exactly like the Access Groups
screen. You scan down the list of readers and select a time schedule
for whichever reader(s) that you want to assign to this cardholder.
When you are done, save the changes.
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The primary difference between a dedicated access group and a
standard access group is that the dedicated access group belongs to
only one cardholder. The dedicated access group is created in a
cardholder’s badge record, and that dedicated access group ‘belongs’
to that cardholder alone.
Once created, dedicated access groups do not appear in the standard
access group’s utility screen. However, every dedicated access group
that is created does use up an access group number, just like a
standard access group. The CardAccess permits a maximum of 1000
access groups. Every dedicated access group and standard access
group that you create is subtracted from the total number available.
Create an Access Group
To create an access group do the following.
• Click the ‘Access’ button on the Main Toolbar or click the ‘Access
Groups’ menu item available from the Access menu
Figure 336 – Access Groups Button
•
Click the New button on the Access Groups screen toolbar
•
Create a name for your access group in the Description field
Figure 337 – Access Groups Description Field
•
Now you will need to add time schedules to selected readers. Use the
scroll bar on the lower right portion of the screen to scroll through
the list of readers. When you find a reader that you want to add a
schedule to, double click the words ‘Not Used’ under the ‘Time
Schedule’ column. A list of time schedules will appear. Scroll up and
down the list to find a selection. Click to select it. Repeat the process
for every reader that you want to include in your access group. If a
list of readers does not appear, see Readers for more information
about creating reader definitions. The cardholder that uses your
access group will be denied entry at every reader that says ‘Not Used’.
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Figure 338 – Access Groups Screen – Reader Time Schedule Section
•
When done click the Save button
•
Click the Close button
Access Group Templates
There is a button on the Access Groups screen called ‘Get Template’
(Figure 339). This button allows you to select another access group
that was previously created, as your basis for a new access group. The
template is a time saving feature that allows you to load all of the
settings from another access group into the current access group. To
use the feature do the following.
• Click the Get Template button
Figure 339 – Access Group Screen Get Template Button
•
Click the arrow to the right of the ‘Select Access Group
Template’ field to show the access groups list
Figure 340 – Select Access Group Template Utility Screen
•
•
Scroll up or down the list to locate your selection
Select an access group from the list by clicking on it
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The selection screen closes and the settings from your selection
are loaded into the current access group after you click it
Delete an Access Group
To delete an access group do the following.
• Click the ‘Access’ button on the Main Toolbar or click the ‘Access
Groups’ menu item available from the Access menu
Figure 341 – Access Groups Button
•
Select the access group that you want to delete by using the scrollbar
to scroll up or down the view window until you see the selection.
Then click on the selection that you want to delete
•
Click the Delete button on the Access Groups screen toolbar
•
Close the Access Groups screen
Edit an Access Group
To edit an access group do the following.
• Click the ‘Access’ button on the Main Toolbar or click the ‘Access
Groups’ menu item available from the Access menu
Figure 342 – Access Groups Button
•
•
Select the access group that you want to edit by using the
scrollbar to scroll up or down the view window until you see the
selection. Then click on the selection that you want to edit
Click the Edit button on the Access Groups screen toolbar
•
•
When you are done editing the record, click the Save button
Close the Access Groups screen
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Find Usage Utility
Figure 343 – The Find Usage Screen
The Find Usage screen, available from the Access menu, is a multipurpose utility that will allow you to generate a variety of system statistics.
You will note that the screen is divided into three functionally different
sections, explained below.
• Counts – You can use this section of the screen to query the
CardAccess database and display the number badges and access
groups to be stored at a give panel
• Time Schedules – You can use this section of the screen to examine
how Time Schedules are assigned in the CardAccess database. You
may wish to know which hardware devices use a particular time
schedule, or which time schedules have been created but have not yet
been assigned to any devices
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• Access Groups – You can use this section of the screen to examine
how Access Groups are assigned in the CardAccess database. You
may wish to know which badges (or how many) use a particular access
group, or which access groups have been created but have not yet
been assigned to any badge holders
We will examine the operation and use of the controls in each section in
more detail below.
Panel Statistics (Counts)
The Find Usage screen section called ‘Counts’ is used to display panel
configuration statistics. These statistics can be useful in determining if
panels in the system are storing configuration data correctly. The general
process of examining panel statistics is to verify that the data reported by
a given panel matches the database programming for that panel. In a case
where the two reports don’t match, it means that configuration data for
that panel may not have downloaded properly, a situation that would
certainly warrant immediate corrective action.
Regarding the analysis of panel statistics and panel data downloads in
general; there are three panel error conditions that the CardAccess
administrator should be aware of.
• Overflow – Panel data overflow conditions generate warning alert
messages in the CardAccess main screen, usually in the Alerts Grid.
Overflows occur when the host computer attempts to send more
configuration data than a panel’s memory can store. This problem has
most commonly occurred when panel memory size has not been
increased, and the download of an excess number of badges records is
attempted.
• Underflow – This condition occurs when the panel has not stored all
of the configuration data that the database indicates should be
downloaded to that panel. This can be typically due to a
communication error. This problem can be located by using
diagnostic tools, but there may not be an error event messages
associated with it.
• Logic Error – This condition occurs when the panel logic has been
disrupted and configuration memory gets corrupted or lost. A power
spike or dip coupled with low backup battery voltages may set the
stage for this type of problem. The panel might then possibly begin
‘misreporting’ statistical numbers, and possibly denying previously
valid cardholders.
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Thus, when it becomes necessary to examine panel configuration
memory behavior, you will find the Find Usage utility, Counts section,
useful. The Find Usage utility will only report the database programming
settings for a given panel. To read statistical counters from the actual
panel memory, you need to use the Host polling diagnostic window
(Figure 344).
Figure 344 – Host Polling Diagnostics Window – One Panel Shown
The Host diagnostic window data is obtained by directly querying the
panel (‘request for status’ messages). The Find Usage utility screen
information is obtained by querying the database (SQL query). This gives
you the ability to compare how many badges and access groups a given
panel claims are stored, against what the database says there should be.
Let’s look at how to use these two tools in conjunction with each other.
To open the host polling diagnostic window, do the following.
•
Double Click the Host Icon – Locate the Host icon in your
Windows taskbar system tray (Figure 345) and double click it.
Figure 345 – The Host System Tray Icon
•
Click the Host Icon – This will bring up a second icon in the main
Windows taskbar (Figure 346). Click that icon, and the Host
diagnostic window opens, revealing statistics on every active panel in
the system.
Figure 346 – The Host Taskbar Icon
You will notice in the above Figure 344 that there are several information
columns in the host polling status window. The meaning of each column
is briefly explained below.
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•
Panel – This is the panel number of the panel whose data is being
viewed (taken from the Panels screen, available from the
Configuration menu).
•
Version – This is the firmware version of the panel firmware.
•
State – This is the panel’s current communication status.
•
TZ Blks – This is the number of time zone blocks stored at the
panel.
• Max Cards – This is the maximum number of badge records that can
be stored by the panel memory.
• Card Cnt – This is the actual number of cards that is stored at the
panel.
• Exp Mem – This is the total number of expanded memory blocks
(each block represents 4k bytes).
• Xacts – This is the number of event transactions that are being
buffered in panel memory, waiting to be sent to the CardAccess host
polling computer.
• AG Blks – This is the total number of Access Group blocks that are
stored at the panel.
• Errors – This is the total number of times the panel was polled but
did not respond.
• Retry Fail – This is the total number of times the panel failed to
respond to a group of three successive polls. In order to compensate
for possible communications line problems, the panel is polled three
times before being considered ‘non-responsive’ (a ‘Retry Fail’).
For the purposes of this discussion about the Find Usage utility, we will
only be interested in the data found under the columns marked ‘Card
Cnt’ and ‘AG Blks,’ in the Host diagnostic window. The reason that we
are interested in these two fields particularly is because these fields are
also represented in the Find Usage utility as ‘Total Badges’ and ‘Total
Blocks’ respectively.
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Use the Counts Section
To get panel statistics using the Find Usage screen Counts section, do the
following.
Figure 347 – The Find Usage Counts Section
• Open Find Usage – Open the Find Usage utility, available from the
‘Access’ menu
• Enter a Panel Number – In the field called ‘Panel’, type in the
panel number of the panel that you want statistics on. The ‘panel
number’ refers to the number of the panel, in the ‘PnlNo’ column, in
the Panels screen, available from the Configuration menu (Figure
348)
Figure 348 – Panels Screen – Panel Number Field
• Click a Field – Click in either the ‘Total Badges’ field, the ‘Total Acc
Groups field, or the ‘total blocks’ field (Figure 349). Clicking once on
any of those fields will start a database query, which will return the
requested statistics. The system will momentarily go busy, and then
you will get results printed in each of the three fields mentioned. You
only need to click once, in any of the three ‘blue colored’ fields to
start the query.
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Figure 349 – The Find Usage Counts Section
After you have brought up the panel database settings in the Find Usage
utility, do the following.
• Open Host – Open the Host diagnostic window.
• Compare – Compare the Total Badges field in the Find Usage utility
against the Card Cnt field in the Host window. The numbers should
match.
• Compare – Compare the Total Blocks field in the Find Usage utility
against the Ag Blks field in the Host window. The numbers should
match.
•
Verify – If the numbers don’t match, you will need to re-download
data to the panel. For more information, see the section of the
manual entitled Panels.
Show Schedule Usage
Figure 350 – The Show Schedule Usage Control Set
The ‘Show Schedule Usage’ button is located in the ‘Time Schedules’
section of the Find Usage utility. You can use this function to create a list
of devices that have a given schedule assigned. The Show Scheduled
Usage button works in conjunction with the combo box above it. To use
the function, do the following.
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• Open Find Usage – Open the Find Usage utility, available from the
‘Access’ menu
• Select a Schedule – Click the arrow to the right of the box above
the Show Schedule Usage button. Select a schedule from the list
• Click Show Schedule Usage – When you click the Show Schedule
Usage button, a results window will open on the left side of the Find
Usage window with the results of your query (Figure 351).
If your schedule is used by one or more hardware devices, you will
see those devices listed in the results window (Figure 351). Note that
in the below result set, the time schedule 24/7/365 is used by seven
devices. Note also that each device type is labeled with a highlighted
listing title (e.g. <<<Readers>>>, etc.). Also note that the last item
listed is an Access Group, not a hardware device. The time schedules
Find Usage search will bring up any software or hardware item in the
CardAccess database that uses a given schedule. In this example case,
the Access Group ‘24/7/365 All Doors’ has at least one reader with
the 24/7/365 time schedule assigned.
Figure 351 – Schedules Query Result - Items Found
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If your selected schedule is not used by any devices, the results
window will open empty (Figure 352).
Figure 352 – Schedules Query Result - No Items Found
Show Unused Time Schedules
Figure 353 – The (Show) Unused Time Schedules Button
Clicking the ‘Unused Time Schedules’ button will bring up a listing of all
time schedules that have not been assigned. Any schedule that appears in
the list is not used by any hardware device or software function.
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Show Access Group Usage
Figure 354 – The Show Access Grp Usage Control Set
The ‘Show Access Grp Usage’ control set allows you to select an access
group and see which badge holders have that access group assigned. To
use the Show Access Grp Usage feature, do the following.
• Open Find Usage – Open the Find Usage utility, available from the
‘Access’ menu
• Select an Access Group– Click the arrow to the right of the box
above the ‘Show Access Grp Usage’ button. Select an access group
from the list
• Click the Show Access Grp Button – When you click the Show
Access Grp button, a results window will open on the left side of the
Find Usage window with the results of your query (Figure 355).
All badges that appear in the results window have the chosen access
group assigned in the ‘Access Group 1’ or ‘Access Group 2’ field (or
both) in the Personnel screen (see Personnel for more information).
Note that badge numbers and cardholder names are listed. Also note
that the total number of badges that use the selected access group
appears under the results window.
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Figure 355 – Show Access Group Usage Results – Items Found
Note if you select an access group that is not assigned to any badge
holder, the results window will open empty (Figure 356)
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Figure 356 – Show Access Group Usage Results – No Items Found
Show Unused Access Groups
Figure 357 – The Unused Access Groups Button
Clicking the ‘Unused Access Groups’ button will bring up a listing of all
Access Groups that have not been assigned to cardholders. Any access
group that appears in the list has not been assigned to anyone.
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Badge Formats
Badge formats are one of the more technical aspects of CardAccess
programming. The goal of this section is to simplify the subject for
the CardAccess administrator. It is important to have a firm
understanding of badge formats both for troubleshooting badge
related problems, and in being able to create custom badge formats
where necessary.
One of the most useful benefits of the CardAccess software and
hardware is its flexibility. When the panels arrive from the factory,
they have only a small amount of on board programming. Almost all
of the configuration programming for the access panels is done from
the CardAccess software. Some of this programming includes badge
formats.
Badge formats are not pre-programmed into the panels. Formats are
created in a badge format creation screen in the CardAccess software,
and then those formats are ‘downloaded’ (as serial data) to the panels.
Once the formats have been stored by the panel, the panel is then
programmed to ‘recognize’ those badge format types.
There are a number of ‘industry standard’ badge format designs that
can be used, so you don’t have to create badge formats from scratch.
In fact, there are several industry standard formats preprogrammed
into the Badge Formats screen. We will discuss those shortly.
It’s also important to note that the CardAccess system designer can
design and implement a completely unique badge format. The system
allows you to design badge formats from scratch, program those
formats onto cards, and have the access panels recognize this
‘proprietary’ format. The system is that flexible.
Let’s look at existing badge formats in some detail. This will lead us
to better understand the decision making process that one might use
to choose one format over another or to decide when to create your
own format.
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What is a Badge Format
In order to understand badge formats, we must first look at what
actually happens when the system reads a badge. You are most likely
familiar with the typical hardware configuration of an access control
system. Typically, we have some kind of card reader connected
through wires to an access control panel, and that panel is in turn,
connected through wires to a computer.
In the case of Continental Instruments designed access control
systems, the panel is programmed with local intelligence. It is the
panel locally that makes all of the decisions on who will gain access
through a given door. The PC connection mostly exists to receive
history and status messages from the panel about what access
attempts have taken place.
The ‘access scenario’ most often seen at an entry door is, a
cardholder steps up to a reader with an access card, and presents that
card to a card reader. But what is actually happening at the reader?
How does the reader get data from the badge? (For the purpose of
this discussion, we assume that the card type used is designed to
match the reader type used. That is, we get a successful read each
time.)
Every access card is ‘encoded’ with some kind of ‘data string’.
Essentially, some information is programmed into the card, and that
information is ‘dumped’ to the reader when the card is presented to
the appropriate reader type.
The reader (somehow) activates the card (the technology used to
activate the card varies with the reader and card design) and the data
content of that card is dumped to the reader memory (the card
activates, dumps its data contents, then ‘shuts off’). The reader then
forwards that data stream to the panel, which evaluates it.
The data that is actually sent from the card to the reader is an
unintelligible string of ‘data bits’ that looks like Figure 358.
Figure 358 – Typical String of Card Data Bits (36 Bit Format)
101110111000111110000111110101111111
It is the “badge format” that gives description to this meaningless
string of data bits. The badge format tells the panel how to divide the
data bits into several logical (sub) groups of bits. Each sub-group of
data bits is assigned a meaning, which is defined by the badge format.
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At this point, it’s helpful to look at the type of information that gets
conveyed from the badge to the access control panel. What things
might we want to know about a badge holder from the data stream
on his access card? The answer to that question will define a badge
format. The total number of bits needed on the badge will depend on
how many data fields are needed on that badge.
Let’s dissect the (industry standard) 36-bit format for an example.
Embedded in this format is a Facility Code (16 bits), a Badge
Number (16 bits) and an Issue Level (2 bits). These fields are
explained in greater detail elsewhere in the manual but for now, let’s
concentrate on the badge format itself.
You may have noticed that we have not accounted for two bits of the
36 total bits (16+16+2=34). The first bit and the last bit of this
format are part of a checking calculation. We discuss how this
calculation is performed later in this section.
Figure 359 – 36 Bit (Weigand) Format
P FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB I I P
In Figure 359 above, the 36-bit format graphic shown is divided into
five subsections. The system knows to ‘parse’ the bit stream into the
subsections shown above, because that information is programmed
into the Badge Formats screen (see Figure 360 below).
The 36 bit example we have been discussing is taken from the actual
badge “Format 1” that is one of the four predefined badge formats
that Continental has created for you. Figure 360 is a picture of the
definition for Format 1, from the Badge Formats screen. Let’s look at
how this format is generally constructed and that will explain the
entries in this screen.
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Figure 360 - 36 Bit Format
Let’s look at each entry you see above in each field of Figure 360.
• Format No. – This is a format number automatically assigned by
the system.
Quick Tip – A maximum of 10 badge formats are allowed
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Name – This is a descriptive text label that the user will give to
the format.
Badge Format Type – There are four badge format types to
choose from.
o ABA – ABA is a standard created by the American Banking
Association
o Non ABA – A format not adhering to the ABA standard
o Insertion – A bi-directional format designed to be used with
swipe or
o Insertion type readers
o Key - A format designed to be used with Weigand key badges
Bit/Char Length – Non-ABA badge formats are decoded as bits.
ABA formats are decoded as characters. This control selects the
total number bits or characters found in the format. Enter the
number of bits for a non-ABA format and the number of characters
for an ABA format
Badge ID – Details the string location and length of the badge
number.
Facility – Details the string location and length of the facility
code.
Issue – Details the string location and length of the issue number.
Even Parity – Details the string location and length of even parity
calculation
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• Odd Parity – Details the string location and length of the parity
calculation
Quick Tip – In the Badge ID, Facility and Issue fields, enter the Length as
number of bits for non-ABA, and as number of characters for ABA formats
Bit Position, Offset and Length
Some explanation of the engineering terms ‘Bit Position’, ‘Offset’ and
‘Length’ is needed.
Both Figure 361 and Figure 362 below depict the same 36-bit format.
Both figures are identical except for the bit position numbering
method used. Figure 67 shows the count of bits from left to right
numbered sequentially, starting with the leftmost bit as bit #1.
Figure 68 is also numbered sequentially from left to right, but the
count starts at ‘0’. The reason for this is that, in the bit offset method
of counting bits, the leftmost bit (bit ‘0’ location) is used as a
reference point to locate the rest of the bits in the string.
Each bit is counted as being so many places to the right of the first,
or ‘zero’ bit. So ‘offset’ means ‘offset to the right of the first bit in the
bit string’ (the first bit has a zero offset, the second bit is offset one
bit to the right of the first bit, the third bit is offset two bits to the
right of the first, etc.).
Figure 361 – Bit Positions – 36 Bit Format
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
Figure 362 – Bit Offsets – 36 Bit Format
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35
When you type in the ‘Offset’ and ‘Length’ in the Badge Formats
screen (Figure 360), what you are really saying to the software is,
“when you see a bit stream from a badge, count n bits to the right of
the leftmost bit. Then count off the next n bits, stop counting, and
use the bits you have just stored as the Badge Number (or the Facility
Code, etc.).
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In the specific case of the standard, Continental supplied 36-bit
format, the first bit is a parity check bit. Then you count one bit to
the right of the first bit, and you are located on the first bit of the
Facility Code. You then count 15 more bits to the right and you find
the last bit of the Facility code information. If you then count off the
next 16 bits, you will find the Badge Number. The next two bits are
the Reissue number. The last bit is another parity check bit (see
Figure 363).
Figure 363 – 36 Bit Badge Data Format with Fields Delineated and
Labeled
P
Code
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8Facility
9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21Badge
22 23Number
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33
Issue P
If we now take a close look at Figure 360 and compare what you see
in each field of Figure 360 to Figure 363, you will see that both
figures represent two different ways to describe the same data
structure. Figure 360 describes the badge data string using numeric
coordinates. Figure 363 is a graphic representation of the numeric
coordinates described in Figure 360.
The information that is filled into the Offset and Length fields of a
badge format, tells the (panel) software where in the badge data string
to look for Facility Code, Badge Number and other data items
included in the data string.
So, when we are creating badge formats (in the Badge Formats
screen), we are actually telling the system how to ‘decode’
strings of data bits from the readers. The system does this by
counting the bits as they are received and then parsing those bits into
groups of bits. What those groups of bits represent is described in
the Badge Formats screen by the titles on each of the fields (‘Badge
ID’, ‘Facility’, ‘Issue’, etc.).
When you set up your system, it is imperative that you have a badge
format in the Badge Formats screen that exactly matches the type of
badge you intend to use. If one bit is unaccounted for in your format,
the entire system may not read badges. This means that you must
know what type of badge format you intend to use for your system,
and you must be sure it is programmed correctly.
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Fortunately, the CardAccess software already has four industry
standard, time tested badge formats pre-programmed into the Badge
Formats screen. Let’s examine each of those.
Predefined Badge Formats
Figure 364 – Badge Formats Screen
Notice in Figure 364 that there are four badge formats displayed.
These are the standard four badge formats that are preprogrammed
and shipped with the CardAccess. A short explanation of each
format follows below.
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Format 1 – Insertion 36 Bit Format
Figure 365 – Format 1 - 36 Bit Insertion Format
Figure 366 – Format 1 - 36 Bit Weigand/HID Data Structure
Odd Parity Calculation
OP
Even Parity Calculation
Facility Code
Badge Number
Issue EP
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35
The specifications for this format follow.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The badge format type is set to Insertion
This data format is 36 bits long
The data string starts (read left to right) with an odd parity bit
The odd parity calculation is performed on the left most eighteen
bits
The next sixteen bits are the facility code
The next sixteen bits are the badge number
The next two bits are the issue level
The data string ends with and even parity bit
The even parity calculation is performed on the right most
eighteen bits
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This 36 bit format can be used with Weigand swipe readers, HID 36
bit proximity readers and Recognition systems 36 bit Biometric hand
and fingerprint readers. Any device using the 36 bit format will work
‘out of the box’ using this predefined format. A reader does not have
to be an ‘Insertion’ type to work with this 36 bit format. See below
for more details.
The ‘Insertion’ badge format type (historically) refers to a type of
Weigand brand reader that has a slot in it, which accepts an access
badge. This type of reader is unique because it is one of several
designs of readers that allow the bit stream from a badge to be read
forward and backward (one simply turns the card around, and inserts
it the opposite way around). Note that the (Weigand) ‘swipe’ type
reader also allows you to read a badge bit stream forward and
backward (swipe in the opposite direction, as opposed to turning the
card around).
Time and Attendance logging is a CardAccess related application
where reading a bit stream backwards would be helpful. When setting
up the system for Time and Attendance logging, you have the option
to use two separate readers, one set up as an IN reader, and one set
up as an OUT reader. However, using one reader to read both the IN
and OUT card swipes would lower the total cost of the access
control project. Using one reader for T&A IN and OUT is permitted
by the system.
So, if you were to use a swipe type reader for this application, when
clocking IN you would swipe your badge in a forward motion, when
clocking out you swipe your badge in the opposite direction.
When you create a badge format and set it as ‘Insertion’ type, the
Continental access control panels become programmed to evaluate
the badge bit stream as swiped in either direction (left to right or
right to left).
The ability to evaluate a badge when swiped backward is the primary
difference between the Insertion Badge Format Type and other
types. Other badge format types do not allow backward swiping of
badges. That is, if the badge format stored at the panel is not an
Insertion type, the panel will not attempt to read the bit stream
backward. A backward badge read will be thrown away as an error.
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Parity Calculation
In Figure 365, on the lower right side of the diagram, there are two
fields that concern parity calculations. One is called “Odd Parity “and
the other is called “Even Parity”. The entries in these fields tell the
software how to check the incoming badge data string to make sure it
has not been corrupted during transmission.
The parity check digit is an industry standard method of checking a
data string to be sure that it has not been corrupted during its journey
through wires. A parity check digit or bit is added to a data string
(usually at the end) and that digit or bit is used as a reference to check
the integrity of the rest of the data bits.
To create the parity check bits that are used for the 36-bit format, the
36-bit format is divided into two, 18-bit formats. A calculation is
made on each 18-bit format individually (Figure 366).
One bit is added as the first bit in the data string, to cause the first
half of the data string to have an odd number of ones. A second bit is
added as the last bit in the data string. This causes the second half of
the data string to have an even number of ones.
This odd and even parity is checked on every card read to be sure
that the data has not been corrupted between the reader and the
panel.
Quick Tip – Corrupted badge reads are thrown away by the panel without any
other action, and with no error messages of any kind from the panel to the PC.
Important Note – There are two alternate ways to set the parity
calculation for the 36-bit format. The above-mentioned method
suggests dividing the format into equal halves. This will work with
most 36-bit cards. However, if you are using Motorola/Indala cards,
they will not work with this parity calculation. They require the parity
settings as seen in Figure 367 below.
If you install your system and all the settings seem to be right, but the
system is not reading cards correctly, try the parity settings as seen in
Figure 73.
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Figure 367 – Alternate Weigand 36 Bit Format Parity Settings
Format 2 – ABA 19 Character Format
Figure 368 – Format 2 – 19 Character ABA Format
Figure 369 – Format 2 – 19 Character ABA Mag Stripe Format
SS Facility FS
Badge ID
B 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Not Used
ES
13 14 15 16 1718 F
The specifications for this format follow.
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• This data format has 19 total characters.
• The data string starts with a ‘Start Sentinel’, which will always be
the letter ‘B’ (capital).
• The facility code consumes the next 5 digits.
• The next character is a ‘Field Separator’, which will always be the
letter ‘D’ (capital).
• The next 6 characters are the badge number (note the maximum 6
digit badge number).
• The six characters following the badge number are not used.
• The last character is an ‘End Sentinel’. This will always be the
letter ‘F’ (capital).
• There is no check character programmed into this format.
The ABA 19-character format is generally used when encoding
magnetic stripe or barcode type cards. The ABA standard was
developed for the American Banking Association for use with ATM
and credit cards. In the access control application, some of the data
characters available in this format are not used.
In this card format, the data structure is expressed in characters
instead of number of bits (as it was above, in Format 1).
Format 3 – Non-ABA 26 Bit Format
Figure 370 – Format 3 - 26 Bit Non-ABA Format
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Figure 371 – Format 3 – 26 Bit Non-ABA
Even Parity Calculation
EP Facility Code
0
Odd Parity Calculation
Badge Number
OP
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
The specifications for this format follow.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The badge format type is set to Non ABA
This data format is 26 bits long
The data string starts (read left to right) with an even parity bit
The even parity calculation is performed on the left most thirteen
bits
The next eight bits are the facility code
The next sixteen bits are the badge number
Issue level field is not used
The data string ends with and odd parity bit
The odd parity calculation is performed on the right most thirteen
bits
The 26-bit format is a well-known industry standard format and is
identical in many ways to the 36-bit format, Format 1. This format
has parity bits at the beginning and ends of the data string and is a
Non ABA type (like Format 1).
This format is used by Motorola (Indala) readers. The Recognition
Systems hand and finger type biometric readers and HID proximity
readers are also available with 26-bit output and can use this format
with no changes.
Note that the data string is divided into two halves, and parity is
calculated separately on each half (like Format 1). Note that Even
parity is calculated on the left half of the data string and that Odd
parity is calculated on the right half of the string which is opposite of
the way it’s done in Format 1.
Note that the standard 26-bit format does not provide an Issue Level
field.
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Format 4 – Non-ABA 31 Bit Format
Figure 372 – Format 4 - 31 Non-ABA Format
Figure 373 Format 4 – 31 Bit Non-ABA
Even Parity Calculation
Odd Parity Calculation
EP
Issue
Facility Code
Badge Number
OP
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
The specifications for this format follow.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The badge format type is set to Non ABA
This data format is 31 bits long
The data string starts (read left to right) with an even parity bit
The even parity calculation is performed on the left most
seventeen bits
The next eight bits are the facility code
The next sixteen bits are the badge number
Issue level field is not used
The data string ends with an odd parity bit
The odd parity calculation is performed on the right most
seventeen bits
The 31-bit format is not an industry standard. It was created for one of
Continental’s customers. This card data format is not likely to be used by
any of our current customers. The data format is very similar to Format 1
mentioned above.
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Note though, that the parity calculation is different. Note that there are
three bits in the center of the format that are used for both parity
calculations. These three bits ‘overlap’ both the odd and the even
calculations.
Create a Badge Format
If you are creating a badge format, there are basically two things to
consider. Are you creating your own custom badge format (for use
with barcode or magnetic stripe cards), or are you creating a format
for a card type that you have purchased from a supplier (a standard
format). The approach you take will be quite different for each
method.
Essentially, there are only two kinds of access cards - those that have
preprogrammed data, and those that are programmable by the user.
Weigand cards, HID proximity cards and Motorola/Indala cards are
examples of preprogrammed access cards. The badge data string is
encoded into each card by the manufacturer. These cards are well
known in the industry and the formats for cards from these
manufacturers are already programmed into the CardAccess.
Preprogrammed Access Cards
Having preprogrammed cards
disadvantages listed below.
has
some
advantages
and
Preprogrammed Access Card Advantages
• No work to get data on the cards. The manufacturer does the
work. Saves time
• Badge formats are well known and already programmed into
the CardAccess
• Formats used are typically are ‘industry standard’ compliant
Preprogrammed Access Card Disadvantages
• Higher per unit cost
• Much harder to get cards with duplicate badge numbers and
higher issue levels
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Programmable Access Cards
Examples of programmable access cards are magnetic stripe cards
and barcode cards. Magnetic stripe cards are plain PVC plastic cards
with an electronically programmable magnetic stripe embossed on
the card. You can encode magnetic stripes with a special card printer
available from Continental Instruments. Barcode is printed on blank,
plain PVC plastic cards using a standard card printer, also available
from Continental Instruments.
Programmable Access Card Advantages
• Flexibility. You have complete control over what data gets
programmed on the card (within limits)
• Lower per unit initial cost
• Use a ‘standard’ badge data format or create your own
‘proprietary’ format
• Badges can be made to work with multiple manufacturer’s
systems (such as CardAccess and a Time and Attendance
system)
• Easy to reissue cards with the same badge number (reissue
levels)
• Print as many or as few as you need, when you need them
Programmable Access Card Disadvantages
• More time needed to program cards
• More technical complexity for the CardAccess administrator
to contend with. Must create badge programming data strings
in the badge editor software, CardAccess admin will be
responsible to be sure the badge format is entered correctly
and is working properly
Quick Tip – There are essentially two kinds of badge data types; ABA and NonABA. Both data types have the same data fields available to them – ‘Badge ID’,
‘Facility’ and ‘Issue’. If using mag stripe or a barcode, you must include Badge ID
(its a required field) in your badge format. Facility and Issue are optional.
There are two things that you should do before trying to create any
kind of badge format.
• If you have purchased access cards from a supplier, ask that
supplier to provide you with a description of the badge format.
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• Before trying to create a custom or Standard badge format in the
Badge Formats screen of the CardAccess, draw a diagram of your
badge format like the below. This will act as your guide and make
it easy to count characters or bit places as you create the format.
Remember that if you misstate even one bit of the badge format in
your description, the system will likely reject all card reads. The
format that you create in the Badge Formats screen must be exact.
Figure 374 –Diagram of a Badge Format
Odd Parity Calculation
OP
Even Parity Calculation
Facility Code
Badge Number
Issue EP
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35
Create a Standard Format
There are numerous different types of access control cards. Weigand,
HID, Motorola/Indala, 26 bit, 36 bit and more. The place to start is
to be sure what format of card you are buying, since we have to
describe that badge format to the system.
If you purchase all of your supplies from Continental Instruments,
the readers and cards will be a matched set and the badge format will
be well known to Continental technicians, who can help you set up
the system.
The 36-bit format (Format 1) and the 26-bit format (Format 3) are
the most commonly used because they are widely adopted standards.
Format 2 is most often used with magnetic stripe cards and barcode
cards.
Quick Tip – If some or all of the CardAccess predefined badge
formats are missing or corrupted you can restore them quickly by
clicking the Default button at the top of the Badge Format screen.
Let’s create an example 36-bit format. The steps follow.
•
•
Draw a diagram of your badge format (see Figure 374)
Open the Badge Formats screen, available from
Administration menu
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Click the ‘New’ button
Give your badge format a descriptive name
Select a Badge Format Type. Select ‘Insertion’ in this case
Set the Bits/Char length to 36
Click in the Offset Field for Badge ID, type in the number 17
Click in the Length field for Badge ID, type in the number 16
Click in the Offset field for Facility, type in the number 1
Click in the Length field for Facility, type in the number 16
Click in the Offset field for Issue, type in the number 33
Click in the Length field for Issue, type in the number 2
Click in the Offset field for Even Parity, type in the number 18
Click in the Length field for Even Parity, type in the number 18
Click in the Offset field for Odd Parity, type in the number 0
Click in the Length field for Odd Parity, type in the number 18
Click the ‘Save’ button
Quick Tip – When you click the ‘Save’ button on the Badge Formats
screen, the modified badge formats are automatically downloaded to the
panels by the software
WARNING – You cannot create two very similar badge formats. The
system will have a logical error trying to differentiate which format it
should use. The two formats must be uniquely different enough for the
system to recognize. As a general rule, do not create two formats with
the same number of bits or characters.
Create a Custom Format
When creating a custom format, you will be limited to using cards
that do not have a preprogrammed format on them. Barcode and
magnetic stripe cards are the only two types of cards that can be
considered.
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There will be nothing different about the badge format that you
create for magnetic stripe cards vs. barcode cards. Both will use the
ABA badge format type. Within the framework of the ABA type,
certain start and stop characters are required (not optional). Also you
must include the badge number as a required field. However, Badge
Number is the only required field. Facility Code and Issue Level are
optional.
Quick Tip – The total number of bits read from any badge cannot exceed
255. Therefore any custom non-ABA format Bit/Char length cannot exceed
255 bits, and any custom ABA format cannot exceed 53 characters (each ABA
character is 5 bits)
Here are the steps to create a custom format.
•
Make a diagram of your proposed format
Figure 375 – ABA Format – Standard Data Structure
SS Facility FS Badge ID
B 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Not Used
ES
13 14 15 16 1718 F
When creating your Data Structure diagram, bear in mind that
there are some required Items and some optional Items. You can
modify the above standard data structure for your own use, but
consult the requirements lists below before creating your format.
Custom Format Required Items
•
•
The Start Sentinel and the End Sentinel are required. The
position of those fields in the data structure must be at the
beginning and at the end of the data string. However, the
characters themselves can be any characters 0-9 or A-F (any
hexadecimal character). We will use the standard characters in
these examples
The Badge ID field is required. The position of this field in the
data string is optional, it can be placed anywhere in between the
Start and End Sentinels
Quick Tip – The system will allow a maximum of 9 badge digits.
The ‘Badge’ field in ABA formats cannot exceed 9 digits and the
Badge field in non-ABA formats cannot exceed 27 bits.
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Custom Format Optional Items
• The order of the data fields does not matter. As long as required
fields are included in the data string, which field appears in the
string first is not important, except for the Start and End
Sentinels which must be placed at the extreme ends of the string.
• The Field Separator character is optional. If you wish to adhere
to the ABA standard you will include the field separator
character. However, it can be eliminated without penalty.
• The Facility code field and the Issue level field are both optional.
They can be eliminated from the badge format with no penalty.
Figure 376 – ABA Format – Formats Screen
Quick Tip – When you set any of the data fields to Offset = 0 and Length
= 0, or if you leave them blank, it means that those fields are not used.
Let’s create two example ‘non-standard’ formats to illustrate the
process.
Custom Badge Format Example 1
The constraints for this badge design are - we will allow a 5-digit
badge number on the badge and there will be no other data encoded
on this badge. This would represent the simplest badge format the
system will allow.
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First, lets construct a data diagram.
Figure 377 – Custom 7 Character Badge Format
SS Badge ID ES
B 12345 F
Now let’s construct the above format in the badge formats screen.
Figure 378 – Custom 7 Character Badge Format Created
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Open the Badge Formats screen from the Administration menu
Click ‘New’
Copy in what you see above in Figure 378
Give the badge format a descriptive name
Notice that the total Bits/Char length is seven characters, not
five. The length calculation includes the Start and End Sentinels.
In an ABA format, the count is in number of characters, not bits.
Notice that the Start Sentinel begins at offset zero and the End
Sentinel begins at offset six. Each Sentinel is one character wide.
Sentinel characters in custom formats are not limited to ‘B’ and
‘F’. Sentinels can be any character 0-9, or A-F, but the Start and
End Sentinels cannot be the same character
Click the ‘Save’ button
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Custom Badge Format Example 2
In this format, we will allow a nine-digit badge number. We will also
allow a one-digit issue level field and an 8-character field for future
use. There will be no other data on this badge.
Again, let’s construct a data diagram first.
Figure 379 – Custom 17 Character Format
SS Badge ID
Not Used
IS ES
B 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 15 F
Figure 380 – Custom 17 Character Format Created
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Open the Badge Formats screen from the Administration menu
Click ‘New’
Give the badge format a descriptive name
Copy in what you see above in Figure 380
Notice that the total Bits/Char length is seventeen characters.
The length calculation includes the Start and End Sentinels.
Notice that the Start Sentinel begins at offset zero and the End
Sentinel begins at offset sixteen. Each Sentinel is one character
wide. Sentinel characters in custom formats are not limited to ‘B’
and ‘F’. Sentinels can be any character 0-9, or A-F, but the Start
and End Sentinels cannot be the same character.
Notice that we have added eight characters to the data string that
are not used by the CardAccess. These characters could
potentially be used by another device that can read a bar code or
magnetic stripe.
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Notice that we have limited the Issue level to 1 character. That
means that we will allow up to 9 total re-issues (1-9). In the
standard ABA 19-character format, two characters are provided
for the Issue level. Two characters would allow 99 issue levels (199). Note that when you encode a badge that has never been
reissued, the Issue level is set to 0.
Quick Tip – Mag stripe and bar code cards make it easy to replace lost
cards with cards that have the same card number. You simply create
another identical card. This is called ‘reissuing’ the card. Issue level
refers to how many times the card has been reprinted for the user.
•
Click the ‘Save’ button
Delete a Badge Format
Warning – Deleting a Badge Format could disable all badges in the system!
Only delete unused badge formats.
•
•
•
•
•
Open the Badge Formats screen from the Administration menu
Select the format that you wish to delete by clicking on it in the
top portion of the screen
Click the Delete button
Click the ‘OK’ button on the warning message box that appears
Click the ‘Close’ button
Restore Deleted Factory Formats
If you accidentally delete one or all of the factory badge formats, you
can restore them by the following method.
•
•
Open the Badge Formats screen from the Administration menu
Click the ‘Default’ button
Figure 381 – The Default Button
•
Click OK when the warning message box appears. The new
formats will automatically downloaded to all panels after the
restore.
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Figure 382 – The Restore Badge Formats Warning Message Box
Warning – Restoring badge formats will delete all existing
formats and restore the original four, factory supplied formats
•
Click ‘Close’ to close the Badge Formats screen
Download Badge Formats to Panels
If you are having problems reading badges, you may have the need to
download badge formats to one or more panels manually. Follow the
following procedure.
• Open the Panels screen from the Configuration menu
• Click the ‘Download’ button
Figure 383 – Panels Screen Download Button
• Select ‘Badge Formats’ for downloading by clicking in the check
box to the left of the words ‘Badge Formats’ (Figure 384).
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Figure 384 – The Panel Download Selection Screen
• Click the ‘Download Panel’ button (Figure 384) if you are
downloading badge formats to just one panel. Click the ‘All
Panels’ button if you are downloading badge formats to all panels
in the system.
• Click the ‘Yes’ button on the warning dialog that opens (Figure 385).
At this point, badge format downloading has begun if
communications to the panel is operating.
Figure 385 – The Download Panel Warning Dialog
• After you confirm the download in the warning dialog, the screen
reverts back to the Panels screen. Click the ‘Close’ button.
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Facility Codes
About Facility Codes
It is possible for two clients of an access badge manufacturer to buy
card lots with the same card number range. If the buildings for these
two clients happened to be next door to each other, then cardholders
from one building could gain unauthorized access to a neighboring
building. Without some second level of security, badge holders from
other companies, could gain unauthorized access to your facility.
The facility code is an additional number series that is encoded on
the badge, in addition to the badge number. The facility code and the
badge number are read together and treated as one number. When
these two numbers are combined together they form a unique
combination that is more secure than a badge number alone.
Figure 386 – Facility Codes Screen
Each Continental Instruments access control panel can store up to
ten facility codes (Figure 386). Facility codes are generally associated
with ‘batches’ of cards. When you buy a batch of access control
cards, those cards are programmed with a badge number range (say 1
– 500). They also have a facility code programmed that is the same
on every card in the batch.
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Here are some facts about facility codes.
• The facility code is generally written on a label attached to the
box that your cards were shipped in. Some card types have a spec
sheet inserted inside the box that has the facility code on it.
• Facility codes are typically quoted in 4-digit hexadecimal notation
(an example would be ‘123F’).
• The facility code is programmed in decimal notation on (or in)
the card
• When you enter the facility codes on the CardAccess Facility
Codes screen, they must be entered in hexadecimal notation.
Quick Tip – If you are using magnetic cards, then you will most likely be
programming the card’s mag track. When you program the facility code on the
badge, you must convert the hexadecimal value to decimal and encode the
decimal equivalent on the mag track, not the hexadecimal value. Using the
Windows calculator, set to scientific mode, makes the conversion process easy.
For more information on mag encoding see the ‘Photo ID’ section.
So when we say you can store ten facility codes at the panel, we also
mean that you can store identical card numbers from up to ten
different batches of cards at that panel.
The ability to use facility codes becomes especially helpful when you
have a campus of several buildings and you want to prevent
cardholders from accessing whole buildings on the campus. Each
building can be assigned it’s own facility code. This makes it easy to
prevent entry from a large block of cardholders, without needing to
make access groups to accomplish that.
Figure 387 – Facility Codes Entered
Note in Figure 387 above that the facility code in position one is the
same for each panel (as are the rest, 2-10). This is done deliberately.
See the below section titled Set Facility Codes in the Personnel
Screen for more information.
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Add Facility Codes
To add facility codes to the Facility Codes screen, do the following.
• Click Facility Codes from the ‘Administration’ menu
• If you are editing an existing record, select a panel from the
list in the upper portion of the screen
• If you are creating a new Facility Code definition, click the
‘New’ button
• Begin entering facility codes, starting in field number one in
the bottom portion of the screen. Enter the facility codes as
hexadecimal values. Use your mouse to click in the first field
and enter the facility code. Use the tab button on your
keyboard to navigate to the next facility code field, or use your
mouse to click it. All facility codes entered must be 4 digits. If
your facility code is 0001, enter all the leading zeros. When
you save the record, the leading zeros will not display, but they
are stored in the database.
• You can enter up to ten different facility codes per panel
• Click the ‘Save’ button to save the record. Once the record is
saved, it will be automatically downloaded to whichever panel
it belongs to.
Note that this is one step of a two-step process. The second step is
shown below.
Set Facility Codes in the Personnel Screen
Sending facility codes to the panels is one part of a two-part process
to get facility codes working. Each personnel record must also have
a reference to a specific facility code.
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Figure 388 – Facility Code Numbering
Notice above in Figure 388, that each facility code is assigned a
number (1-10). This is the number that is referred to in the
personnel records, not the facility code value itself. In other words,
each person’s Personnel record refers to the number of the facility
code, in the list of facility codes, stored at the panel where access is to
be granted.
Figure 389 – Personnel Facility Code Selection Control
To set the personnel facility code value do the following.
• Click Personnel from the access menu or click the Personnel
button from the main toolbar
• Click Edit if you are editing an existing record. Click New if you
are adding a new record
• Set the Facility spin control (Figure 389) to a number one through
ten. This number will correspond to the numbered field in the
facility codes screen
• Click the Save button
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Note that in the personnel records there is no place to fill in an actual
facility code, only a reference to the position of a facility code in the
facility codes screen (Figure 388).
Notice in Figure 387, that the facility code in position one is the same
for each panel. This is done so that each cardholder that has Facility
= 1, will be able to gain access at every panel.
For example, in Figure 388 the facility code in position 1 is ‘2FA1’. If
you put 2FA1 in position 1 of every panel and you set the Facility = 1
for all card holders that have 2FA1 cards, those card holders will be
permitted access at all panels that have 2FA1 as the facility code in
memory position #1. All cardholders would still need to have an
access group that permits them access to some doors on those
panels, however.
Figure 390 – Different Facility Codes in Position One
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Schedules
What is a Schedule
Figure 391 – The Schedules Screen, with Multiple Time Block Schedule
Programmed
Multiple Time Blocks Programmed Below
The schedules screen is where you will create time blocks that can be
used elsewhere in the software. These time blocks don’t do anything
until they are connected to other software components or to
hardware devices.
Technically, the schedule becomes ‘valid’ while the time block shown
is in effect, and becomes invalid outside of the time block. A
hardware device that has a schedule assigned will be activated while
the schedule is in effect and deactivated when the schedule is no
longer in effect. Stated another way, the device will be activated at the
Start Time and deactivated at the End Time, for each time block
created in the schedule.
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The Figure 391 example above shows a schedule with multiple time
blocks created. A schedule can contain up to ten time blocks. The
schedule in Figure 391 has ten time blocks programmed (6 are
visible). A hardware device with this example schedule assigned
would be activated and deactivated ten separate times, each day of
the week, every day of the year.
Typically a schedule will contain one time block as shown in Figure
392 below. A hardware device with this schedule assigned would be
activated and deactivated once per day for each day of the week
indicated in this schedule.
Figure 392– The Schedules Screen, with Single Time Block Schedule
Programmed
Single Time Block Programmed Below
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Create a Schedule
To create a schedule do the following.
Figure 393 – Schedule time Block Area
•
•
•
•
•
•
Open the Schedules screen by clicking the schedules button on
the main toolbar or by clicking Schedules from the
Administration menu
Click the New button
The Schedule Number (Schedule No.) is automatically assigned,
but can be manually overridden by the user if necessary
Add a description in the description field. It’s best to create a
clearly worded description that accurately describes what the
schedule does.
If the schedule is to belong to a group, select that group by
clicking the down arrow to the right of the group of control.
Select a group from the list.
To create a time block, do the following (consult Figure 393):
o Select a Start Day by double-clicking under the Start Day
column. This will reveal a list of days. Choose one by
clicking on it.
o Select an End Day by double clicking under the End Day
column. This will reveal a list of days. Choose one by
clicking on it.
A word about Start Days, End Days and Holidays is in order
here. The following chart shows the effects of using the most
common Start Day and End Day combinations.
Table 3 – Start Day & End Day Effects (below valid if at least
one Holiday defined)
Start Day
End Day
Effect
Mon
Mon
Hol
Mon
Sat
Mon
Hol
Sun
Hol
Fri
Sun
Mon
Every Day of the Year * (24/7/365)
Every Day of the Year Except Holidays *
Holidays Only *
Weekdays Only
Weekends Only
Mondays Only (a one day per week schedule)
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* There are no predefined holidays. Holidays are defined by the
user. For more information on creating Holidays, see the section
entitled ‘Holidays’. Table 3 above assumes that at least one
Holiday is defined.
Table 4 below assumes that no Holidays have been defined.
Table 4 - Start Day & End Day Effects (below valid if no
Holidays are defined)
•
Start Day
End Day
Mon
Mon
Hol
Mon
Sat
Mon
Hol
Sun
Hol
Fri
Sun
Mon
Effect
Every Day of the Year * (24/7/365)
Every Day of the Year * (24/7/365)
No Effect *
Weekdays Only
Weekends Only
Mondays Only (a one day per week
Select a Start Time by double clicking under the Start
Time column. This will allow you to edit the default time
of 12:00:00.
Quick Tip - 12:00:00 is actually 00:00:00 o’clock (midnight, the start of
the day). You have the option of entering the time using standard clock
notation or military time. If you use standard in clock notation, you must
include ‘PM’, if the time block you are creating is after twelve noon.
•
Select an end time by double-clicking on the End Time
column. This will allow you to edit the default time
12:00:00.
Quick Tip - Note that the default Start Time of 12:00:00 to
the default End Time of 12:00:00 means 00:00:00 o’clock to
24:00:00 o’clock (or 24 hours). If you want your schedule to
span 24 hours, then accept the default time blocks.
•
•
You have just created one time block. If the schedule is
complete, click the ‘Save’ button. If you need to enter
more time blocks, see the next step
Each schedule can contain up to ten time blocks. To
create multiple time blocks do the following
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Figure 394 – New Time Block Being Added, New Block &
Delete Block Buttons
•
•
•
Either click the ‘New Block’ button (Figure 394) or press
the down arrow key on your computer keyboard. A new
time block detail line is added to the Time Schedule
Blocks area of the screen. Each new time block has the
default value of 24/7/365. Repeat the above procedure
for every new time block line that you want to add. If you
try to exceed 10 total time blocks, you will get an error
message
When done, click the ‘Save’ button
Click the ‘Close’ button
Edit a Schedule
To edit a schedule do the following.
• Open the Schedules screen by clicking the Schedules button on
the main toolbar or by clicking Schedules from the
Administration menu
• Click the Edit button
• Make whatever changes are needed
• Click the Save button
• Click the ‘Close’ button
Warning – When you edit or delete a schedule, the behavior of all devices
that have that schedule assigned is changed. Be sure that any access group
that has the deleted schedule assigned does not deny door access to
cardholders. The operation of Free Access and schedules applied to hardware
devices (readers, inputs, relays and links) are other important considerations.
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Delete a Schedule
•
•
•
•
•
Open the Schedules screen by clicking the Schedules button on
the main toolbar or by clicking Schedules from the
Administration menu
Use the scrollbar on the right side of the screen to locate the
record that you wish to delete
Click the record
Click the Delete button on the Schedules toolbar
Click the ‘Close’ button
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Holidays
There are no predefined holidays in the CardAccess. Holidays are
created by the user in a utility window called Holidays, available from
the Administration menu. Any day of the year can be designated as a
Holiday. To create a Holiday, do the following.
Figure 395 – The Holidays Screen in ‘New’ Mode
•
•
•
•
Open the Holidays screen by going to the Administration menu
and clicking ‘Holidays’.
To create a new Holiday click the ‘New’ button. To edit an
existing holiday, click the ‘Edit’ button.
When you click the New or the Edit button, you will see the
screen as shown in Figure 395. You need to select a date and a
time range for your holiday. There is no restriction on which day
of the year you can choose, or the start and stop time of your
Holiday. A holiday can be five minutes long or span full day.
To select a day for your holiday, click the small button on the
right side of the ‘Date’ control. This will bring up a calendar
control. Select your month from the calendar control that
appears.
Quick Tip - You can create holidays for future years. However,
only holidays for the current date + the next 365 days will be
downloaded to the panel. Holidays beyond 365 days from the
date of the last holiday data download are not stored at the panel.
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As you can see from Figure 65, the default start and stop time
spans 24 hours. If this default start and stop time are acceptable,
move to the next step. If your holiday will span less than one
day, click the start time and stop time and change them to the
appropriate values. You can use clock notation or military time
Click the Save button
Click the ‘Cancel’ button at any time to exit without changes
Click the ‘Close’ button to close the screen.
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Groups
Groups are primarily used by the system to filter the display in the
CardAccess GUI and in reports. Groups are first assigned to
hardware items like doors, relays, etc. Then, a filter is set up in the
Operator Privileges screen. Each Operator Privilege type would be
assigned access to one or more groups.
After of groups are assigned to each operator type, when operators
who are assigned filtered Operator Privileges log on, hardware items
that don’t belong to that operator’s group are filtered out of the
display.
This display filtration is also known as ‘Database Partitioning’.
Groups are used as the vehicle to accomplish this Database
Partitioning. Groups are also used as a report filter. The user can run
reports filtered by a group.
Create a Group
Figure 396 – The Groups Screen
•
Click the Groups selection from the Administration menu.
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Select which type of group you want to create. Note in Figure
396, that there are eight different types of groups. You need to
select one of the folder tabs at the bottom of the screen before
you click the New button.
Click the New button.
Fill in a descriptive title for your group in the ‘Group Name’
field.
Click the ‘Save’ button.
Repeat this process for every group you need to create.
Click Cancel at any time to cancel without saving.
Click Exit to close the window.
Edit a Group
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Click the Groups selection from the Administration menu.
Select which type of group you want to create. Note in Figure
396, that there are eight different types of groups. You need to
select one of the folder tabs at the bottom of the screen before
you click the Edit button.
At the top of the screen, select which group you want to edit.
Click the Edit button.
After you are done, click the Save button.
Click Cancel at any time to cancel without saving.
Click Exit to close the window.
Delete a Group
•
•
•
•
•
Click the Groups selection from the Administration menu.
At the top of the screen, select which group you want to Delete.
Click the Delete button.
Click Cancel at any time to cancel without deleting.
Click Exit to close the window.
List Groups Alphabetically
Groups that are displayed in the top half of the screen are displayed
in the order that they were entered. If the ‘List Alphabetically’ check
box is checked, the display in the top half of the screen will be
resorted in alphabetical order instead.
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Operators
Figure 397 – The Operators Screen
The Operators screen, available from the Administration menu, is where
you will create CardAccess user login identities. This screen is associated
with the Operator Privileges screen, also available from the
Administration menu. Technically, the Operator Privileges screen is
where you create operator ‘levels’. Operator levels can also be described
as ‘operator types’.
Login names in the CardAccess are called ‘Operators’. Logging in to the
CardAccess is much like you may be used to when you have logged into
Microsoft Windows. A user name and a password are required. Those
user names and associated passwords are created in the Operators screen.
You are also required to assign an Operator Privileges template to each
operator. The system uses the Operator Privileges template to determine
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the system permission level of the user. For more information on
Operator Privileges see the section of the manual called Operator
Privileges.
Below we will examine the Operators screen, and the creation of
operator identities.
Create an Operator
To create an operator login identity, do the following.
•
Open the Operators screen – Click ‘Operators’ in the
‘Administration’ menu
•
Click the ‘New’ button – Click the ‘New’ button on the main
toolbar
Figure 398 – The Operators New Button
•
Click the General Tab – Click the General folder tab if the controls
on that tab are not visible
Figure 399 – Operators General Tab
•
Enter a Name In the Name Field – This name is the full name of
the person who will be logging in. This is not the ‘login name’, but a
notation field that denotes the operator’s actual name. 32 characters
maximum allowed
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Figure 400 – The Operators Name Field
•
Enter a Screen Name – This will be the operator’s login name. The
operator will type this name into the CardAccess login screen, in the
‘User Name’ field, when logging into the software. 12 characters
maximum allowed. Any typed character is permitted.
Figure 401 – Operators Screen Name Field
•
Enter a Password – This will be the operator’s login password. The
operator will type this password into the CardAccess login screen, in
the ‘Password’ field, when logging into the software. When you are
creating the operator profile, it is required that you enter the
password twice for verification. The Password field does not limit the
number of characters. It is suggested that you limit passwords to
manageable lengths that will be easily remembered. Any typed
character is permitted. Characters that are typed are shown as
asterisks.
Figure 402 – Operators Password Field
•
The Operator Number is Assigned Automatically – The
operator number is automatically assigned by the system but it can be
changed by the user in case you wish to create breaks in the sequence
Figure 403 – Operators Operator Number Field
•
Enter an Alert Ack Time – The Alert Ack Time is a timer that
determines how long alerts will remain in the Alerts Grid for this
Operator. When an operator logs on, that operator’s alert ack timer is
started whenever an alert appears in the Alerts Grid. When the timer
for that alert expires, the alert is automatically moved from the Alerts
Grid into the Events Grid
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If there are several alerts in the Alerts Grid, the timer is not started
on any alert until it moves to the top of the Alerts Grid. So as the top
most alert ‘times out’ and is moved from the Alerts Grid into the
Events Grid, the timer starts on the next alert immediately below it,
which is moved to the top of the list, and so on until all alerts have
been removed from the Alerts Grid
This feature is called the ‘Operator Alert Auto Ack Timeout’. The
minimum ack time is one second. If you attempt to enter a number
less than 1 second, the timer will default to 1 second. You may type a
number into the Alert Ack Time field or you can use the arrow
buttons to the right of the control to spin the number up or down
Figure 404 – Operators Alert Ack Time Control
•
Enter an Auto-Logoff Time – The Auto-Logoff Time is an
‘inactivity timer’. This timer is started when user activity in the
CardAccess GUI, like mouse clicks and keyboard entries, ceases.
When the timer expires, the Operator is automatically logged out of
the CardAccess and a new operator login is required to regain access
to the CardAccess menus. This prevents unwanted tampering in the
case where the logged in operator has walked away from the
CardAccess equipped PC. Each operator can have their own unique
timer setting, or all operators can be set to the same value
If set to 0, the Operator will be auto logged out in 10 minutes by
default. The longest allowable Auto-Logoff time is 99999 minutes
(69.44 days), the shortest is 1 minute. You may type a number into
the Auto-Logoff field or you can use the arrow buttons to the right
of the control to spin the number up or down
Figure 405 – Operators Auto-Logoff Control
•
Click the Event Viewing Tab – Click the Event Viewing folder
tab. Enter the number of events that you want to have this operator
view in the Events Grid. When set to 100, the events window will
display only the most recent one hundred events. All other events in
the events database will be filtered out. When set to ten, the most
recent ten events will be displayed. The display is constantly filtered
to remove the view of all but the n most recent events, where n
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equals the number you set in the ‘Number of Events to Retain in
View’ control.
The smallest number of viewable events possible is 10. The largest
number of viewable events is 250. You may type a number into the
field or you can use the arrow buttons to the right of the control to
spin the number up or down
Figure 406 – Operators Event Viewing Tab
•
Click the Privileges Tab
Figure 407 – Operators Privileges Tab
•
Select the Screen Privileges – Select the screen privileges template
for this operator. The screen privileges template is created in the
Operator Privileges screen, available from the Administration menu.
A screen privileges template restricts the menu access for a given
operator. To learn more about Operator Privileges see the manual
section entitled Operator Privileges.
To select a screen privilege template, click the arrow to the right of
the ‘Screen Privileges’ control, scroll up or down to your selection,
click on that selection.
Figure 408 – Operators Screen Privileges Selection Control
• Select the Device Control Privileges – The checkboxes in this
control cluster (Figure 409) all refer to the manual control of Doors,
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Relays and Links. The Device Control Privileges check boxes in the
Operators screen work in conjunction with the ‘Manual Control
Privilege’ controls in the Readers, Relays and Links screens (Figure
410).
Figure 409 – Operators Device Control Privileges Check Boxes
Figure 410 – Readers, Relays, Links Manual Control Privilege
Selection Control
Together, these controls set up a filter that is applied on a per
Operator basis. This filter is designed to hide selected doors, relays or
links from view in the manual control screens, to prevent selected
operators from having the ability to manually activate those devices.
By default, manual control filtering is disabled. That means that when
you open any manual control window (by clicking the Doors, Relays
or Links button on the Main toolbar), you will see a listing of all
doors, relays or links. That gives any logged in operator access to
manually activate any of those devices.
In theory, assigning privilege levels works very much like the
CardAccess ‘Groups’ function. All hardware devices (readers, relays,
links) that have been assigned a Priv level of 1 belong to a group,
those that have a Priv Level of 2 belong to another group, etc.
However, in this case the group that each of those devices belongs
to, is used for the purpose of manual control permissions. You only
see the results of that filtering when you open a manual control
screen.
In the Operators screen, on the Privileges tab, you check off which
privilege groups the operator will be able to see in his or her manual
control list. The check boxes are ‘additive’. That is, each additional
check box that you select, adds one more privilege group to that
operator. The hardware items from each checked privilege group will
appear in every manual control screen that the operator opens.
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When you look in the privilege settings for readers, relays and links
(Figure 410), you will see that the ‘Manual Control Privilege’ control
also has a setting called ‘All’ (in addition to Priv 1-8). When set to All,
it means that the device in question can be manually activated by an
operator with any privilege level, and also if there is no privilege level
set. Alternatively, when a hardware device has a Manual Control
Privilege setting of Priv 1-8, that device can only be manually
controlled by an operator having that specific privilege setting
enabled in his or her operator profile. That device becomes ‘invisible’
to any operator that does not have the privilege enabled.
To get manual control filtering actually working, you must first apply
manual control privileges to hardware devices. Follow the below
steps.
Apply Manual Control Privileges to Hardware Devices
•
Open the Hardware Screen – Open the Readers, Relays or
Links screen, available from the Configuration menu
Note – You will need to decide on a manual control access strategy in advance
– which operators will have access to which hardware devices – before you can
decide how to assign manual control privileges to the hardware
You have nine privilege levels to choose from; ‘Priv 1 –8’ and ‘All’
access. Manual Control access is provided to an operator under
the following rules.
o If you assign the selection ‘Manual Control Privilege = All’ to
any hardware device, that hardware device can be manually
activated by all operators, regardless of privilege level settings
in the operator’s profile.
o If you set any privilege 1-8 on a given hardware device, that
device becomes hidden from any operator who does not
have that specific numbered privilege assigned in his or her
Operator screen profile.
•
Assign a Privilege – The procedure for the Readers, Relays and
Links screens are identical except that the Manual Control
Privilege control is in a different location.
o Open the Hardware Screen – Open the Readers screen
and click the Priorities tab. Or, if opening the Relays or Links
screens, the Manual Control Privilege control is on the
General Tab.
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o Click the Edit Button – Click the edit button on the top
toolbar.
o Figure 411 – Edit Button
o
o
Select the Privilege – The Manual Control Privilege
selector is at the bottom of the screen (on each type of
screen). Select a manual control privilege by clicking the
arrow to the right of the control and clicking on your
selection.
o Figure 412 – Manual Control Privilege Control (Readers,
Relays, Links screens)
o
o Click the Save Button
o Figure 413 – Save button
o
o Repeat – Repeat the procedure for every hardware device
that you wish to filter out of the manual control default list.
•
Click the Save Button – The settings for the new operator
definition will take effect the next time the operator logs in to any
workstation.
Figure 414 – Save Button
•
Close the Operators Screen – Click the Close button on the main
toolbar
Edit an Operator Definition
To edit an existing operator definition, do the following.
•
Open the Operators screen – Open the screen available from the
Administration menu
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•
Select the operator definition – Select the operator definition you
wish to edit by using the scrollbar on the right side of the view
window to locate the definition, then click on it
•
Click the Edit Button – Go into edit mode, then change the
setting(s) needed
Figure 415 – Edit Button
•
Click the Save Button – When done, click the Save button
Figure 416 – Save Button
•
Close the Operators Screen – Click the Close button on the main
toolbar
Figure 417 – Close Button
Delete an Operator Definition
To delete an existing operator definition, do the following.
•
Open the Operators screen – Open the screen available from the
Administration menu
•
Select the operator definition – Select the operator definition you
wish to edit by using the scrollbar on the right side of the view
window to locate the definition, then click on it
•
Click the Delete Button – Click the Delete button on the main
toolbar
Figure 418 – Delete Button
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Close the Operators Screen – Click the Close button on the main
toolbar
Figure 419 – Close Button
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General Tab
Figure 420 - The Operators Screen General Tab
The Operators screen General tab has controls that allow you to set up
the log in parameters of a given operator. Note that the password can
only be set once from inside the Operators screen. Once set, you must
delete and re-create the record if you wish to change a password from
inside the Operators screen. However, you can change the password
during log in (on the Log In screen), but you must know the current
password to do so.
Each field on the Operators screen General tab is explained below.
General Tab Controls
• Name - Enter up to 32 characters that represent the given name of
the operator
• Screen Name - Enter up to 12 characters that will serve as a screen
'nickname' for the operator. This nickname will be displayed in the
status bar of the CardAccess main screen and will also be displayed in
all status screens that show the logged in operator name. In all status
screens, the Screen Name is used instead of the (given) name to refer
to the operator
• New Password - Enter an unlimited number of characters that will
act as a login password for the operator. Although there is no limit on
the number of password characters, it is suggested that you limit the
password to 10 characters. It is further suggested that you avoid
common, easy to deduce passwords. The best passwords consist of
letters, numbers and symbols that do not spell any known words.
Note that what you type into the password field is masked from view
by asterisks. Note also that once you save the record, the password
cannot be changed from inside the Operators screen. This is a
safeguard to prevent anyone with access to the Operators screen from
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changing the password and logging in under another operator's sign
in.
There are two ways to change a password after it has been saved.
o From Inside the Operators Screen - Delete the operator record
and recreate it, entering a different password. Note that you must
be logged in as an authorized operator with the correct
permissions to delete an operator record. Further, an audit trail
record will be logged with details of which operator deleted the
original record and who created the new record
o From Outside the Operators Screen - At the log in screen,
click the 'Change Password' button. This button only appears after
you have entered the correct password into the 'Password' field of
the Login screen
• Confirm - Renter the same password that you typed into the
Password field. This field is used to make sure that you did not make a
mistake typing your password into the Password field mentioned
above
• Operator Number - The Operator Number is automatically assigned
by the system, but can be overridden by the person entering the
operator record. The Operator Number merely refers to the location
of the operator record in the Operators screen listing. The operator
number is only used inside the operators screen
• Alert Ack Time - The default Alert Ack Time is 5 seconds for a new
operator record, but the time is selectable from 1 to 9999 seconds.
This timer is used by the alert acknowledgement engine. When a given
operator is logged in, the alerts acknowledgement engine uses the
Alert Ack Time timer to determine how long to leave an alert in the
Alerts Grid before automatically acknowledging that alert on behalf of
the logged in operator. Alerts that are acknowledged using the
operator's Alert Ack Time timer are time and date stamped along with
the currently logged in operator's screen name. Each operator can
have the same ack time or can have a unique ack time
• Auto Log-Off Time - Then Auto Log-Off Time is an inactivity
timer. The setting in this field determines how many minutes the
CardAccess will allow the main monitoring screen to remain open
before closing the main screen down and reverting back to the log in
screen. This feature prevents unwanted access to the CardAccess main
screen in the event that the user steps away from the console. The
selectable range is from 1 to 9999 minutes
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Operators Screen Event Viewing Tab
Figure 421 - The Operators Screen Event Viewing Tab
The Event Viewing tab determines how many events will be retained in
the Events Grid for the current operator (each operator is permitted to
have a different setting). The events that are displayed in the Events Grid
and the Alerts Grid are all taken from the events database table. The
settings of the CardAccess determine whether an event will appear in the
Alerts Grid or the Events Grid.
Further, by using the 'Number of Events to Retain in View' control, you
can select how many events will comprise the 'recent event view'. The
recent events view is obtained by clicking the 'Recent' button on the top
right side of the CardAccess main toolbar. The Recent button resets the
events view to the most recent events. The most recent events are
defined as 'the number of most recent events as described in the Number
of Events to Retain in View field'.
For example, the Number of Events to Retain in View field in Figure 1
above is set to 100. The CardAccess user interface will consider all events
that are outside of the range of the 'most recent event to 100th oldest
event' to be 'archive' events. In the aforementioned example, as you scroll
back in time in the events grid, the user interface is counting the number
of events. Once you scroll backwards to the one hundred and first event,
the interface deems that you are now viewing archive events and puts the
display into 'Browse' mode.
Thus, the Number of Events to Retain in View field determines how
many events you will scroll back in time before the display will be put
into Browse mode (which means that you are looking at 'archived'
events). In this case the archived events we are discussing are stored in
the active CardAccess database, not in an archive database. The Number
of Events to Retain in View control is merely selecting the 'conceptual
limit' as to when the user interface should consider the operator to be
browsing in 'archive mode'. You may select a minimum of 10 events, and
a maximum of 250 events. The default setting is 10.
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Operators Screen Privileges Tab
Figure 422 - The Operators Screen Privileges Tab
The Operators screen Privileges tab is where you will set the screen
permissions for the selected operator. There are two fields on the
Privileges tab as explained below.
Privileges Tab Controls
• Screen Privileges Control - The Screen Privileges field sets the overall
permission level of the selected operator. The operator privilege 'types'
are created in the 'Operator Privileges' screen. The Operator Privileges
screen allows you to add or subtract access to CardAccess menus and
fields (for more information see the manual section entitled 'Operator
Privileges'). To select a Screen Privileges type do the following.
o Enter Edit Mode - Enter edit mode by clicking the 'Edit' button
on the toolbar
o Make Your Selection - Click the arrow to the right of the Screen
Privileges field and click your selection. 'System Administrator' is
the default selection. The System Administrator is an operator
type that has access to all CardAccess menus and functions. This
operator type definition is provided
o Save the Record - Click the 'Save' button when done
• Device Control Privileges - The 'Device Control Privileges' section
determines the selected operator's access to the manual control
screens. An operator definition is created in the Operators screen and
Device Control Privileges are assigned (or not assigned) on the
Privileges tab for each operator that you create.
If you wish to implement Device Control Privileges, you will also
need to visit every Reader, Relay and Link configuration record and
apply a setting to the 'Manual Control Privilege' field found in each of
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those screens. If no value is assigned in the Manual Control Privilege
field of a given hardware device, that device is visible to all operators
who wish to manually control it.
Operator ‘Device Control Privileges’ operate under the following
rules.
o If no Device Control Privileges are assigned in the Operator
record (which is the default), privilege level settings are ignored
and the operator has access to all devices listed in any of the
manual control screens (doors, relays or links)
o If you assign a given operator only one permission level, as in the
example in Figure 1 where Priv 4 is assigned, the operator would
be allowed to see only those devices with ‘Priv 4’ or ‘All’ selected
in the Manual Control Privilege field of each manual control
screen (see Figure 412 example from the Links screen, General
tab)
Figure 423– The Links Screen Manual Control Privilege Control
!
Privilege level assignments are not ‘inclusive’. If a given
operator has Priv 4 assigned in his or her operator record (as
in Figure 412) that does not mean that they will be able to
manually control all links with Priv 1-4 assigned in the Manual
Control Privilege field of the link record. It means they have
access to Priv 4 links only.
If you require that operators have access to multiple privilege
levels, you must check off multiple Priv levels in the Privileges
tab of the Operators screen (Figure 413).
Figure 424 – The Operators Screen Priv Assignment Check
Boxes
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In Figure 413, the operator with these settings will be able to
manually activate links with the Priv levels of 1, 3, 4, 7, 8 or
‘All’. Links with a Priv level of 2, 5, or 6 will be hidden from
the view of this operator. The Links manual control screen
will open with links 2, 5, and 7 filtered out of the list.
Note that checking all of the Priv check boxes works
identically to checking none of the Priv check boxes. That is,
the operator has access to all of the links in the manual
control screen with either set up
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Operator Privileges
Figure 425 – The Operator Privileges Screen
The Operator Privileges screen and the Operators screen work in
conjunction with one another. Operator Privileges is a utility screen
where you create operator access permission templates. In the Operators
screen, you create login identities for CardAccess users. The Operator
Privileges screen creates access permission templates that can be assigned
to one or more operators. Every operator must be assigned an access
template from the Operator Privileges screen.
The access permission templates created in the Operator Privileges
screen do not belong to any one operator. An access template is created
in Operator Privileges and can then be assigned to as many operators as
needed. Until an access template is assigned to at least one operator
definition, it effectively ‘does nothing’.
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The assignment of an operator permissions template to an operator is
performed in the Operators screen, available from the Administration
menu, on the Privileges tab. The control called ‘Screen Privileges’ (Figure
426) lists all of the operator privilege templates that have been created;
you select one from the list for assignment to a given operator. It’s
important to give permissions templates descriptive names so they will be
easier to assign. For more information about the Operators screen and
the assignment of Screen Privileges, see the section of the manual entitled
Operators.
Figure 426 – The Operators Screen Privileges Control
Generally speaking, when you attempt to create a new operator privilege
template by clicking the ‘New’ button, a default template is automatically
created for you that grants access to every menu, button and screen in
the CardAccess software (deemed ‘Administrator Level Access’). If you
wish to create a limited access template, you will go about subtracting
access to selected menus, buttons and screens from this default full
access template.
So, the system creates a full access template, and you subtract what you
don’t want from that template, thereby creating a new ‘limited access’
template. There are three folder tabs on the Operator Privileges screen
(Figure 427). There are listings on each of those folder tabs that represent
all of the menus, buttons, fields and screens of the CardAccess software.
A summary of the contents of each folder tab follows; a more detailed
explanation on the use of each folder tab follows after that.
Figure 427 – Operator Privileges Folder Tabs
•
Forms Control – The Forms Control tab controls are used to
selectively disable access to CardAccess menus. You can hide
selected CardAccess menu choices by disabling them in the Forms
Control section
•
Personnel Fields Control – By default, all of the fields and controls
on the Personnel screen are visible and accessible by any operator.
You can hide access to selected Personnel screen fields using the
controls on this tab
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Database Partitions – The controls on this tab work in conjunction
with the Groups feature, available from the Administration menu. It
is possible to assign some or all hardware items to groups (readers,
relays, inputs, links). It is further possible to hide any or all of the
hardware configuration screens and any event messages from that
hardware, from a given operator.
Using Groups is the key to setting up a CardAccess ‘partitioned’
system. In a partitioned system, hardware resources are assigned to
groups. Then, those groups are selectively assigned to Operators
through the Operator Privileges templates.
Templates are created that have access to only those groups that are
required. Those templates are assigned to one or more operators.
When a partitioned operator logs into the CardAccess, all hardware
groups that are not assigned to his or her privilege template are made
invisible. Any event or status messages from that (invisible) hardware
are suppressed for the operator.
See the section entitled Database Partitions for more information.
Forms Control
Figure 428 – The Forms Control Tab – Menus are Collapsed
The Forms Control tab is used to limit access to the CardAccess menu
system. Effectively, you can disable or take menus away from users of the
CardAccess. The hierarchical listing that you see in the ‘Menu Items’
section of the Forms Control tab is actually a ‘map’ of the CardAccess
menu system. Every menu item available in the CardAccess software is
represented in the Menu Items list.
The Menu Items list is shown above in Figure 428 in ‘collapsed’ mode.
The control works much like a Windows Explorer screen. Click the +
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sign (or double click) to expand a branch; click the – sign (or double
click) to collapse a branch. The top most item in a branch has the highest
significance (much like a folder would in Explorer), the lowest item in a
branch has the lowest significance (much like a file in Explorer). Changes
made to an item at the top of a branch affect all of the items below that
item on the same branch. Changes to a single menu item of a branch
affects only that item.
On the right side of Figure 428 are four buttons. These buttons represent
four ‘states’ that you can apply to the controls represented in the Menu
Items list. Generally, you select a menu item from the list in the Menu
Items section (by clicking it), and then you click one of the buttons on
the right side of the Forms Control form. That applies the ‘state’
indicated on the button to the menu item. The states are explained
below.
•
Disable – When this function is selected, the menu item is disabled.
Once disabled, the menu item is hidden from view (removed from
the menu system). It will either be grayed out or will be removed
from the menu list entirely. This is the lowest level of access. If all
menus were disabled, the logged in operator would have access to
‘nothing’ (all menus grayed out)
•
View Only – When this function is selected, an operator can see the
menu item in the CardAccess menus, but editing privileges are
revoked. The operator can view but not change information
•
Create Only – When this function is selected, the operator can
create new items in the screens described by the menu item, but they
cannot edit existing records
•
Create/Edit – When this function is selected, the operator can
create new items in the screens described by the menu item and they
can edit existing items. This is the highest level of access. There is no
restriction with Create/Edit access
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Personnel Fields Control
Figure 429 – The Personnel Fields Control Tab – With Badges Branch
Expanded
The Personnel Fields Control tab operates identically to the Forms
Control screen, in that the menu system is the same – it is used like a
Windows Explorer tool. However, the list of fields that appear in the
‘Form Fields’ section (Figure 429) of this screen represents all of the
fields in the Personnel screen. You can apply three different states to the
Personnel fields.
•
Disable – Causes the field to become hidden from view and
invisible. This is the lowest permission on a Personnel field. The user
cannot even look at the contents of the field
•
View Only – Edit permissions are revoked on the field. The user can
only look at the field. They cannot add, edit or delete the contents of
the field
•
Edit – Users with this permission can add, view, edit and delete the
contents of the field. This is the highest permission on a Personnel
field
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Database Partitions
Figure 430 – Database Partitions Tab – No Groups Selected
The general goal of database partitioning is to allow several tenants to
share a common database while hiding the personal information of each
tenant from the view of the other, possibly unrelated tenants. The term
‘database partitioning’ is somewhat misleading. The common database is
not actually divided in any way. Filtering is used to block the view of
records by selected operators.
The Database Partitions tab of the Operator Privileges screen operates
somewhat differently from the Forms Control or the Personnel Fields
Control tabs. As you can see in Figure 430, there are two list windows.
The window on the left called ‘Available Groups’ is a list of all of the
groups that have been created in the Groups screen (for more
information on groups, see the manual section entitled Groups). The
window on the right called ‘Selected Groups’ is a listing of the groups
that have been assigned to this operator privileges template.
The button controls that are positioned between the two windows allow
you to move selected groups from one side to the other and back. The
buttons with the single arrow move whichever item you highlight in the
direction of the arrow. The buttons with the double arrows move all
items in the direction of the arrows.
Database partitioning in the CardAccess is disabled by default. If
database segregation for privacy sharing is an issue, database partitioning
can be enabled. Enabling it requires a number of steps summarized
below.
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To begin, groups must be set up in the Groups screen (see Groups).
What groups are created and how they are later assigned is
completely under the control of the CardAccess administrator. How
many and which type of groups one will choose to create, depends
on how you wish to apply the database partitioning.
Figure 431 – The Groups Screen Folder Tabs
You can see from Figure 431 above, that it is possible to create eight
different types of groups (and an unlimited number per group). If
you wish to implement the full database partitioning, you would want
to create some number of groups in each of the eight different
categories displayed above. You do also have the option of
implementing ‘partial’ database partitioning. You can elect to create
groups in only one or more categories (say, Personnel groups only).
•
Once you have created groups, database partitioning cannot be
activated unless those groups are assigned to some hardware. You
need to visit each type of screen that has the groups that you wish to
assign, and apply those groups to selected items in those screens
(readers, inputs, relays, links, access groups and time schedules).
Figure 432 is an example of the Group control that can be found on
each hardware screen and on the Access Groups and Schedules
screens. This example comes from the Readers screen.
Figure 432 – The Readers General Tab – Group Control
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Note the following rules regarding groups and database partitioning.
o If an Operator Privilege has no Groups Assigned in the
Selected Groups Field– That operator can see all screens that
have groups assigned AND all screens that have no groups
assigned
o If an Operator Privilege has Groups Assigned in the
Selected Groups Field – That operator can see all screens that
have the groups assigned that are represented in the Selected
Groups field AND that operator can see all screens that have no
groups assigned.
If you wish to be sure that there will not be a case where any
operator will see all screens, you must assign groups to every
hardware item, access group and schedule AND you must assign
every operator an operator privilege template that has all groups
assigned in the Selected Groups field of the Database Partitioning
tab.
Quick Tip – If you intend to create an Operator Privileges template that has full
access to all of the CardAccess screens and data, you only need to accept all of the
default settings. Full access is granted by default. Any changes that you make to a
given template will be for the purpose of taking away access permissions.
Create an Operator Privileges Template
To create an operator privileges template do the following.
•
Open Operator Privileges – Open the Operator Privileges screen,
available from the Administration menu
•
Click New – Click the New button
•
Click Forms Control – If the items on the Forms Control tab are
not visible, click the Forms Control tab
•
Select Menu Items – Controlling access to the menu system of the
CardAccess is accomplished by using the controls found on the
Forms Control tab. That folder tab consists of two related parts – the
‘Menu Items’ window on the left side of the form and the ‘Actions
Buttons’ on the right side of the form (Figure 433).
The ‘Menu Items’ window is a hierarchical listing of every menu and
submenu available from the CardAccess toolbars. By applying the
Action Buttons to selected Menu Items, access to those menus can
be limited or eliminated for a given operator access template.
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Because the Menu Items list is hierarchical, it is possible to apply an
action to a (top) menu that will affect that menu and all of its
submenus. The Menu Items list is a quasi-exact replica of the
CardAccess main toolbar. Thus, you will find that the menu
organization of the Menu Items list is similar to the CardAccess main
toolbar. Changes that are made to the entries in the Menu Items list
will directly affect the CardAccess main toolbar and other
CardAccess menus and controls. Every significant menu of the
CardAccess is represented in the Menu Items list.
As an example, notice in Figure 433 that the Administration menu is
disabled (red circle). That means that this operator template has
removed any access to the Administration menu, and because the
Administration menu is a ‘top’ menu, all of its submenus are also
disabled.
Figure 433 – The Menu Items List
Notice in Figure 434, that the Administration menu is grayed out for
the operator who logged in with the operator template from Figure
433. Note that the ‘Schedules’ button is also grayed out. This is
because the Schedules menu is a submenu of the Administration
menu. In fact, all submenus of the Administration menu are
unavailable in this template. That is not clearly reflected in Figure 434
because the other submenus of the Administration menu do not
have button shortcuts on the toolbar, they have shortcuts that are
only visible if you open the Administration menu (which is not
available to open at all). So if you disable the Administration (top)
menu in the Operator Privileges Menu Items area, and the
Administration menu becomes unavailable, there are ten other menu
shortcuts that also become unavailable (see Figure 435). You also
have the option of disabling any submenu individually.
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Figure 434 – The CardAccess Main Toolbar
Figure 435 – The Menu Items List – Administration Menu Branch
Disabled
There are four Actions Buttons located to the right side of the Menu
Items view area (detailed in Table 5). These buttons are used to set
the type of access allowed on menu branches and menu items. When
you create an operator privileges definition by clicking the New
button, menu access is Create/Edit (full access) on all CardAccess
menus by default.
Table 5 – The Menu Items Actions Buttons
Attribute
Result
Makes the menu item invisible
Takes away the ‘New’ and ‘Edit’ buttons but let’s the operator look at th
screen in question
Takes away the Edit button on the screen in question, allowing th
operator to create new records, but not edit existing records
Allows full access. The ‘New’ and ‘Edit’ buttons are available on the scree
If you wish to limit access to any of the CardAccess menus, you need
to select that menu item in the Menu Items area, then click the
appropriate action button. After you have clicked an action button,
you will notice that the symbol to the left of the menu item has
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changed to that of the button you clicked (see Table 5 for icons).
This is your indication of which type of access is assigned to each
menu item.
Note in Figure 433 that some menu items have plus signs to the left.
This means that there are other sub menu items underneath that
item. To open the sub menu, click the plus sign. You will know that
there are no more sub menus if there are no plus signs to the left of
that menu item. You can apply actions buttons to any top menu or
submenu.
•
Select Personnel Fields – Click the Personnel Fields Control tab.
The Personnel Fields Control menu system works identically to the
above Forms Control tab. That is, it is a hierarchical menu and it has
action buttons to change the level of access for each menu item.
The primary difference is that the Personnel Fields Control tab is a
menu of all of the fields from the Personnel screen. You can hide any
Personnel field from the view of selected operators.
A classic example is social security numbers. It may not be necessary
for every operator to see the social security numbers of all the
employees. So that field can be marked as disabled in some operator
privilege templates. When those operators open the Personnel
screen, the social security number field contents will be invisible.
Figure 436 – The Personnel Fields Control Tab
Table 6 – The Form Fields Action Buttons
Attribute
Result
Makes the menu item invisible
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Takes away the ‘New’ and ‘Edit’ buttons but let’s the operator look at th
screen in question
Allows full access. The ‘New’ and ‘Edit’ buttons are available on the scree
Note the following differences from the Forms Control tab.
• You cannot apply Actions Buttons to all fields by clicking the
‘Badges’ top menu selection. You must open the Badges menu
tree (click the plus sign) and highlight each menu item individually
in order to set it to a different status (edit, view or disable)
• There are three action buttons instead of four
All fields in the Personnel screen are fully accessible by default. To
limit that access do the following.
•
Click the Plus Sign – Click the plus sign to the left of ‘Badges’
in the Form Fields window so the menu will expand
Figure 437 – Form Fields Tab - Badges Top Menu
•
Click the Field – Use the scrollbar to locate the field that you
want to alter the access permission on, click on that field
Figure 438 – Badges Menu Expanded
•
Click the Permission – Click the button with the appropriate
permission level
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Figure 439 – Forms Field Actions Buttons
•
Move to the Next Field – Click the next field of interest and
continue
•
Click Save or Cancel – When done, click the Save button. If
desired, press the Cancel button if you don’t want to continue, all
changes will be lost.
Figure 440 – Operator Privileges Save and Cancel Buttons
•
Select Database Partitions – To select database partitions, do the
following.
o Click the Database Partitions Tab
Figure 441 – Database Partition Tab
o Select a Group to Move – Firstly, there will be no groups to
display in the ‘Available Groups’ window if no groups have been
created. The Available Groups window will be empty. If there
are groups displayed in the Available Groups window, you have
two choices.
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Figure 442 – Database Partitions Tab
!
You can move all of the groups from the Available Groups
window to the ‘Selected Groups’ window by clicking the
‘Move All’ button (with the double arrows pointing right)
OR
Figure 443 – Database Partitioning Move All Button
!
Use the scrollbar on the ‘Available Groups’ window to find a
group that you wish to assign to this operator privileges
template. Use the ‘Move Item’ button (with the single arrow
pointing right) to move the item from the Available Groups
window into the Selected Groups window
Figure 444 – Database Partitioning Move Item Button
Delete an Operator Privileges Template
To delete an operator privileges template, do the following.
•
Open Operator Privileges – Open the Operator Privileges screen,
available from the Administration menu
•
Use the Scrollbar – Use the scrollbar to select the record you wish
to delete
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Click the Delete Button
•
Click the Close Button
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Edit an Operator Privileges Template
To edit an operator privileges template, do the following.
•
Open Operator Privileges – Open the Operator Privileges screen,
available from the Administration menu
•
Use the Scrollbar – Use the scrollbar to select the record you wish
to edit
•
Click the Edit Button
•
Make Changes – Make your changes as per the instructions above
•
Click the Save Button – Click the Save button when done
•
Click the Close Button
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Operator Responses
The Operator Response screen is where you will create and store predefined operator response strings. The Event Response screen is where
you can enter ‘free-form’ operator response strings on a per event basis.
Both are further explained below.
Operator Response Screen
Figure 445 – The Operator Responses Screen
The Operator Responses screen is a utility screen where you can create
and store operator comment strings. The CardAccess system stores those
strings in the CardAccess database, for later use by an operator. The
Operator Response string list can be accessed from the Events or Alerts
Grids and a pre-defined string from the list can be attached to an event
message of your choosing.
There are no restrictions on the type of content you can include in an
operator response string. All typed characters are allowed. There is a
maximum character limit of 256 characters. To create an operator
response string, do the following.
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Create a Pre-Defined Operator Response
• Open the Operator Responses screen, available from the
Administration menu
• Click the ‘New’ button
Figure 446 – The New Button
• Fill in your response string into the ‘Response Text’ field
Figure 447 – The Operator Privileges Response Text Field
• Click the ‘Save’ button
Figure 448 – The Save Button
• Click the ‘Close’ button
Figure 449 – The Close Button
Edit a Pre-Defined Operator Response
• Open the Operator Responses screen, available from the
Administration menu
• Use the scrollbar on the right of the Response Text view area to
locate the string you wish to edit
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Figure 450 – The Response Text View Area & Scrollbar
• Click the ‘Edit’ button
Figure 451 – Edit Button
• Fill in your response string into the ‘Response Text’ field
Figure 452 – The Response Text Field
• Click the ‘Save’ button
Figure 453 – The Save Button
• Click the ‘Close’ button
Figure 454 – The Close Button
Delete a Pre-Defined Operator Response String
• Open the Operator Responses screen, available from the
Administration menu
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• Use the scrollbar on the right to locate the string you wish to delete
Figure 455 – The Response Text View Area & Scrollbar
• Click the ‘Delete’ button
Figure 456 – The Delete Button
• Click the ‘Yes’ button on the warning box that appears
Figure 457 – The Delete Warning Message Box
• Click the ‘Close’ button
Figure 458 – The Close Button
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Event Response Screen
Figure 459 – The Event Response Window – Event Tab Displayed
The Event Response screen is accessible by clicking the ‘Respond’ button
located above the Events and Alerts Grids (Figure 460). Each of those
buttons performs the same function – they bring up the Event Response
screen.
You will note that there are several folder tabs visible in Figure 459. All
the folder tabs shown in the figure are not always visible when you open
the Event Response screen. Which folder tabs are made visible is
dependant on the type of alert that was highlighted in the Events or
Alerts Grids at the time the Respond button was pressed. More
information on each folder tab appears below.
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Figure 460 – The CardAccess Main Screen – Sectional View, Respond
Buttons Highlighted
In the previous section, you learned how to pre-create operator event
responses. The Event Response window is where you actually apply
those event responses. The general reason to open the Event Response
window is so you can attach some kind of ‘note’ to a given alert or event.
Let’s look at the process of creating an operator event response.
Create an Event Response
To create an event response, do the following.
• Highlight the event or alert that you wish to attach a note to, by
clicking on it
• Click the Respond button. If the event that you wish to attach a note
to is in the Events Grid, click the Respond button that is above the
Events Grid. If the event that you wish to attach a note to is in the
Alerts Grid, click the Respond button that is above the Alerts Grid
(Figure 460, Figure 461)
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Figure 461 – The Respond Button
• When the Event Response window opens, make sure that the Event
tab is visible. If it is not, click on it
• Either –
o Type your message into the ‘Response Message’ field OR
Figure 462 – The Response Message Field
o Click the down arrow to the right of the Response Message field
and select a pre-created operator response by clicking on it. The
list will be empty if no operator responses were created using the
Operator Responses screen. See the above section called
Operator Response Screen for information on creating predefined operator responses
Figure 463 – Response Message Control with Pre-Created List
Visible
o Click the ‘Accept’ button when done
Figure 464 – The Accept Button
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Event Response Screen Folder Tabs
As stated above, there are several folder tabs that may or may not appear
in the Event Response screen. Which tabs appear, will depend on which
type of event message you highlighted before pressing the Respond
button. Below, we will look at the function and layout of each of the four
possible folder tabs.
• Event Tab – The Event folder tab is where you will find the details
on the event that is being responded to. Each section of the Event
tab is explained below. This folder tab is always visible regardless of
what type of event is selected.
o The ‘Alert’ section lists the details related to the person and/or
the location.
Figure 465 – The Event Tab, Alert Section
o The ‘Archive Information’ section lists system information.
Figure 466 – The Event Tab, Archive Information Section
o The ‘Response’ section is where you will do one of three things.
! Type a ‘free form’ response message into the Response
Message field
!
Click the arrow control at the right of the Response Message
control and select a pre-created response message
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Figure 467 – The Response Message Control
!
Click the Response History button (Figure 468) to view a
‘history’ list of operator responses that have been attached to
this event or alert message (Figure 469)
Figure 468 – The Response History Button
Figure 469 – The Response List Window
• Map Tab – The map tab is where you can view the map (if
available), which is assigned to the hardware device that is mentioned
in the event that is highlighted in the Events or Alerts screen. The
map tab is made visible only when a hardware device (panel, reader,
input, relay, link) is involved. Each of those devices is capable of
having a map assigned, so the maps tab is displayed for events that
concern those types of devices. If the map tab is visible but it is
blank, it means that no map was assigned to the device.
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Figure 470 – Event Response Map Tab
•
Photo Tab – The photo tab is where you can view a photo of a
badge holder. This folder tab is only visible when there is a badge
related event involved.
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Figure 471 – The Photo Tab
•
CCTV Tab – The CCTV tab will be used in the case where an
operator wishes to send switching commands to a CCTV controller
manually. In other screens of the CardAccess (readers, inputs),
CCTV command strings can be assigned to hardware devices. Those
CCTV command strings are sent to the CCTV controller
automatically on the change of status of one of the mentioned
hardware devices.
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Figure 472 – The CCTV Tab
However, in the case where an operator wishes to manually send CCTV
command strings, the CCTV tab has a ‘Send’ control to facilitate that. To
use that control, do the following. Which event you highlight is
immaterial as long as it involves a badge, door or input. We are only
trying to gain access to the CCTV controls.
• Open the Event Response screen by highlighting any event that
mentions a badge, door or input event (this will ensure that the
Event Response screen will open with the CCTV tab visible)
• Click the CCTV folder tab
• Use the arrow buttons adjacent to the ‘Send’ button to scroll up and
down the list of available CCTV commands.
Figure 473 – The CCTV Command Selection Control
• Click the ‘Send’ button. The command will be sent. There is no limit
to how many times you can resend the command by clicking the
Send button again
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Figure 474 – The CCTV Send Button
• Close the Event Response window by clicking the ‘Exit’ button
Figure 475 – Exit Button
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Maps
Figure 476 – The Maps Creation Screen
A ‘Map’ as defined in the CardAccess software is a static bitmap
background, with a flashing cursor icon, which indicates the relative
position of the hardware device being represented. The mapping engine
does not allow dynamic control of hardware objects from a map control
surface. Maps in the CardAccess are used for ‘visual location verification’
only.
The maps engine in the CardAccess is connected to a number of screens.
The Maps creation screen is available from the Administration menu.
This maps creation screen can also be opened from every CardAccess
hardware screen (Panels, Readers, Inputs, Relays & Links), via a button
on the ‘Maps’ tab of each of those screens, called ‘View Maps’ (Figure
477).
Figure 477 – The Hardware Screen View Maps Button
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The mapping engine is disabled by default. When the map engine is
disabled, the Maps folder tab is hidden in all of the hardware screens
(Figure 478), and the Maps option is missing from the Administration
menu. Once the mapping engine has been enabled, a Maps folder is
made visible in each of the hardware screens (Figure 479), and the Maps
shortcut is made available in the Administration menu.
Figure 478 – Panels Screen Folder Tabs - Maps Disabled
Figure 479 – Panels Screen Folder Tabs - Maps Enabled
Enable Maps
To enable the Maps engine, do the following.
• Open System Settings – Open the System Settings, available from
the System menu
• Click the General Tab – If the General tab is not visible, click it
Figure 480 – System Settings General Tab
• Click Edit – Click the ‘Edit’ button
Figure 481 – System Settings Edit Button
• Click Use Facility Map – Click the check box marked ‘Use Facility
Map’
Figure 482 – System Settings Map Engine Enable Check Box
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• Click Save – Click the ‘Save’ button
Figure 483 – System Settings Save Button
• At this point, the Maps tab has been made visible in each of the
hardware screens, and the Maps shortcut has been made visible in the
Administration menu.
Create a Map
To create a map, do the following.
• Open the Maps screen – To open the screen, use one of the
following methods
o Click the Maps shortcut in the Administration menu
o Open a hardware screen (Panels, Readers, Inputs, Relays, Links),
click the Maps tab and click the ‘View Maps’ button
• Click the ‘New’ button
• Click Import – Click the Import button to open an explorer control
(Figure 484). You are looking to find a bitmap or jpeg image to serve
as a map background. This will generally be the image of a floor plan.
Or, the image could be a digitized photograph of a doorway, a
building, or a section of a building. Any image that would assist an
operator in identifying the area of a building where a hardware device
alarm is taking place would be suitable. Some explanation of the image
importation controls is in order here.
Figure 484 – Maps Import Button
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Image Importation Controls
Explorer Tool
Figure 485 – The Maps Explorer Window
The Maps explorer window is a standard Windows type file search
tool that will allow you to search your local hard drive and network
shares for a suitable import image file. Note the following about the
explorer window.
o Although .jpg, .bmp, .ico, .emf and .wmf files are supported by the
explorer window, it is best to limit your map images to .jpg or .bmp
files. Icons and Windows Meta Files are not supported as map
images
o The explorer control allows you to preview the prospective map in
a preview window on the right side of the explorer control
o You can preview a larger view of the image you have selected
(before you finalize your selection) by clicking the ‘Preview’ button
at the top right of the explorer control (Figure 486)
Figure 486 – Maps Explorer Control Preview Button
o The size of the selected image is displayed immediately above the
image (see Figure 485)
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To import an image into the Maps creation screen, do the following.
• Click the File – Click on the file you wish to select
• Click Open – Click the ‘Open’ button to bring the image into the
map creation screen.
File Source Selector Tool
Figure 487 – The Maps File Source Selector Tool
In the previous section, we have discussed using the explorer tool to
bring image files into the map creation screen. The File Source
Selector tool has a number of buttons that offer additional methods
for the importation of image files. The buttons on the File Source
Selection tool perform the following functions.
!
Import From Scanner – This button allows you to connect
directly to a scanner for the importation of a scanned image. To
import from a scanner, do the following
o Click the Scanner Select button
Figure 488 – Scanner Select Button
o Select a Source – After you click the Scanner Select button,
a Source Selection box appears. You are expected to select
one of the sources from that list. If there are no sources
listed, you need to install TWAIN or scanner drivers for the
devices you are trying to scan from
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Figure 489 – The Select Source Box
o At this point, the CardAccess program will relinquish control
to your scanner software. The scanner software typically
starts up and performs the scan. The scanner software may
not automatically upload the scan to the CardAccess. You
may need to click an upload button in order for that to take
place.
In any case, the object is to have your scanner software ‘hand
off’ the image to the CardAccess Maps engine. The Maps
software will then display that image in the Configure Maps
screen image area.
!
Import From File – The ‘New Image (Edit)’ button (Figure
490) offers a way to open the explorer tool mentioned above,
manually. The explorer tool opens automatically when you click
the Import button on the Configure Maps screen. But if you
close the explorer tool, the New Image button offers you a way
to reopen it without having to close down the entire import
‘session’ and re-press the Import button.
Figure 490 – The New Image (Edit) Button
!
Copy & Paste Tools – (Figure 491) The Copy button is used to
copy an image from one map to a second map. The Paste tool is
used to paste that image into the second map. Open the map
that you want to use the image from. Click the copy tool. Then
open the map that you wish to paste the image to (or click the
New button to create a completely new map) and click the Paste
button
Figure 491 – The Copy and Paste Buttons
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• Select a Device – Now that we have imported a background image
to serve as a visual location identifier, the next step is to create a
linkage between the map and a hardware device (or more than one
hardware device).
Figure 492 – The Devices Control Panel
The Devices control panel is the toolbar that you will use to create
linkages between the map and hardware devices. Until some linkage
is made between the map and at least one hardware device, the map
is just a static bitmap that has little practical use.
By dragging devices from the Devices control panel and dropping
them onto the map bitmap view area, you create a ‘linkage’ between
the map and one or more hardware devices. The bitmap of that map
and the hardware device become ‘linked’ together. Let’s look at how
to create these linkages.
The Devices control panel uses ‘drag and drop’ operation. You click
on an icon button, hold down the left mouse button, drag the icon to
the desired location on the map and click where you want to drop
the hardware reference. You will note that the Devices control panel
has five icons available. The function of those icons is shown in
Table 7.
Table 7 – Devices Control Panels Buttons
Button
Function
Connected to the Readers screen. This button
will display a list of every reader in the system.
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Connected to the Inputs screen. This button
will display a list of every input in the system.
Connected to the Relays screen. This button will
display a list of every relay in the system.
Connected to the Links screen. This button will
display a list of every link in the system.
Connected to the Panels screen. This button
will display a list of every panel in the system.
To link a hardware device to a map, do the following.
• Click the Hardware Button – Click any of the hardware icon
buttons (Figure 492 or Table 7), and hold down the left mouse
button
• Drag the Icon – Drag the hardware item to the desired location
on the map
• Drop the Icon – Release the left mouse button
• Select a Device – Select a device from the ‘Select the Device’
control (Readers shown in Figure 493). Click the arrow to the
right of the hardware item field to see a list of available devices.
Click the selected device.
You are only permitted to assign a given hardware device to one
map. Once a hardware device has been assigned to a map, it
cannot be assigned to a second map unless you delete it from the
first map. If you try to assign a hardware device to more than one
map, you will get an error message informing you that the device
has previously been assigned (Figure 494)
Figure 493 – The Reader Select Device Control
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Figure 494 – Maps Device Duplicate Assignment Warning
•
Save the Map – Note that the system permits you to add more than
one icon per map. This option will allow you to create one map that
will be linked to several hardware devices. So you can click the Save
button now, or you can repeat the process of dragging and dropping
hardware devices as explained above, add as many device icons as
you require, and then click the Save button. Or, you can add one icon
per map, and dedicate each map to one hardware device.
Figure 495 – Map with Several Devices Attached
Delete a Map
To delete a map, do the following.
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•
Open the Maps Screen – Open the Maps screen available from the
Administration menu
•
Use the Select Map Control – To select the map that you wish to
delete, click the arrow to the right of the Select Map field, and use the
scrollbar that appears to scroll the list of maps. Click your selection.
•
Click the Delete Button – Click the Delete button located on the
Maps main toolbar
Edit a Map
•
Open the Maps Screen – Open the Maps screen available from the
Administration menu
•
Use the Select Map Control – To select the map that you wish to
edit, click the arrow to the right of the Select Map field, and use the
scrollbar that appears to scroll the list of maps. Click your selection.
•
Click the Edit Button – Click the Edit button located on the Maps
main toolbar
•
Make the required changes to your map
•
Click the Save button on the Maps main toolbar
Find a Map
•
Open the Maps Screen – Open the Maps screen available from the
Administration menu
•
Use the Select Map control – Select the map that you wish to find
by clicking the arrow to the right of the Select Map control -- OR -Figure 496 – The Select Map Control
•
Click the ‘Find’ button – Click the Find button located on the
lower left side of the Configure Maps screen
Figure 497 – The Find Button
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Select the Device – To select the device to locate, do the following.
o Select the device type by clicking the down arrow to the right of
the top most selection control in the ‘Select the Device’ control
that opens (Figure 498)
o Select the specific device by clicking the down arrow to the right
of the bottom most selection control in the ‘Select Device’ control
(Figure 498)
Figure 498 – Maps Find Select the Device Control
•
Click OK – Click the OK button. The map of the selected device
will be located and displayed.
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Displaying Maps
Figure 499 – The Maps Pop Up Window
Once maps have been created and linked with hardware devices, they are
ready to be utilized. The primary use for a map is to allow an operator to
bring up a map in response to some alert or event, and to be able see a
graphic representation of the alarm point. This would assist him or her in
locating an alarm in a given building or complex.
Note that the actual displayable map is primarily a static bitmap with a
flashing icon that represents an alarm point (Figure 499). Thus, this
bitmap can be anything of your choosing. It can be a floor plan, picture
of the area, or even written text instructions that have been saved as a
bitmap file. Your image options are open to whatever type of image is
useful to you and your organization.
There are two ways to display maps, manually and automatically. Manual
viewing of maps involves clicking a button and causing the Maps Pop Up
screen to open with the requested map. Automatic viewing of maps, also
called ‘Pop Up’ maps, is accomplished by setting the map controls to
display a map automatically, every time an event or alert appears that has
a map associated with it. Both methods are further explained below.
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Manual Map Display
You can manually view a map from a number of screens as listed below.
•
Events Grid or Alerts Grid, Map Buttons – There are two
buttons labeled ‘Map’ available on the CardAccess main screen. One
button is located just above the top middle of the Events Grid
(Figure 500), and the other Map button is located just above the top
middle of the Alerts Grid (Figure 501). Clicking either button will
open the Maps Pop Up window, and display the map that is
associated with the event or alert that is highlighted.
Figure 500 – The Events Toolbar
Figure 501 – The Alerts Toolbar
Note the following special properties of the Events and Alerts Grids
Map buttons.
o If you highlight an Event, click the Map button above the Events
Grid to manually bring up the map associated with that event.
o If you highlight an Alert, click the Map button above the Alerts
Grid to manually bring up the map associated with that alert.
o The Pending Alerts toolbar Map button can be grayed out when
there are no alerts in the Alerts Grid
•
Hardware Screens, View Map Button – When maps are enabled
in the System Settings, a Map tab becomes visible in each of the
hardware screens. As a convenience, you can open the Maps
Creation editing screen from inside any hardware screen. To view or
edit a map from the Panels, Readers, Inputs, Relays or Links screens,
do the following.
o Open Panels, Readers, Inputs, Relays or Links screen, available
from the Configuration menu
o Click the Map tab
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o If a map is assigned to that hardware device, there is a thumbnail
view of the assigned map attached to the Map tab (Figure 502)
Figure 502 – Readers Screen Map Tab
o Click the ‘View Maps’ button on the right side of the Maps tab to
open the Maps creation and editing screen
Figure 503 – The View Maps Button
o If there is a map associated with that hardware item, it will be the
default map displayed when the maps creation screen opens
• Administration menu, Maps shortcut – The standard way to open
the maps creations screen is – Click Administration on the
CardAccess main toolbar, click the Maps menu choice shortcut
Pop Up Maps
You can set maps to automatically display when alerts appear in the alerts
grid. It is an important point that maps will only pop up for alerts, and
not events. Once you enable the feature, you will not see any maps pop
up unless you have some alerts rolling into the Alerts Grid of the
CardAccess main screen.
If a given alert has a map and the pop up feature is enabled, once that
alert makes its way to the top of the alerts grid, the pop up map for that
alert is displayed. The maps pop up display is closed down when that
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alert is acknowledged out of the Alerts Grid and it is moved to the
Events Grid.
If there is another alert to move into the topmost position of the Alerts
Grid, and that alert too has a map, then the maps pop up screen is
reopened with the new map image belonging to the current alert. This
will happen until the alerts grid has been emptied of all alerts.
Automatic map display (Pop Up Maps) can be enabled or disabled by
right clicking on either of the buttons on the CardAccess main screen
marked ‘Map’ (mentioned above). A menu is then displayed with three
choices explained below (Figure 504).
Figure 504 – Alerts Toolbar with Map Button Right Click Menu Visible
•
Auto-Show Off – Turns Pop Up Maps OFF
•
Auto-Show All – Turns Pop Up Maps ON
•
Auto-Show This Area – Turns Pop Up Maps ON, but only for the
device mentioned in the ‘Location’ field of the currently highlighted
event or alert. Once activated, maps will only pop up if there is
activity at the specific hardware device mentioned in the event that
was highlighted at the time the feature was activated
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Hardware Screen Map Controls
Figure 505 – Readers Screen Map Tab
The controls found on the Map tab of each of the hardware screens are
identical, so we will use the Readers screen Map tab as our example. Each
of the controls seen in Figure 505 is explained in more detail below.
• Facility Map for This Device – The name in this field is taken
from the ‘New Name’ field of the Maps design screen. This is the
name of the map
Figure 506 – The Facility Map for This Device Field
• Map Description – The information in this field is taken from the
‘Description’ field of the Maps design screen. This is a note
describing the map
Figure 507 – The Map Description Field
• Size Image to Fit – This control allows you to stretch an image to
fit the thumbnail view window in the hardware screen. When
unchecked, the image window will display the image in its native size
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format, even if the fit in the image window is not exact. When the
Size Image to Fit feature is enabled, the entire view window is filled
with the image. The image is stretched to fill the window. Use this
feature if you want to eliminate white borders around the map
images.
Figure 508 – Size Image to Fit Checkbox
• View Maps – Clicking this button opens the Maps design window
Figure 509 – The View Maps Button
• Remove Map – Clicking this button deletes the map from the
CardAccess database
Figure 510 – The Remove Map Button
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Panels
The (access control) ‘panel’ could be considered the single most
important component in the CardAccess access control system. All
physical hardware mounted at doors or in a building ultimately connects
to some kind of panel arrangement. The CardAccess Host PC exists to
program and communicate with panels. CardAccess workstation PC’s
exist in large part to configure panel hardware and monitor event
messages that are broadcast from panels.
The panels themselves have onboard microprocessors and have ‘local
intelligence’. When panels are shipped from the factory, they are supplied
with a minimal start up program (in firmware). This ‘boot strap’ program
provides enough programming for the panels to start up and wait for
instructions from the PC. The PC uses serial communication to
download configuration data to panels, and to upload event and status
data from the panels.
When a panel powers up for the first time after shipment from the
factory, the configuration menu of that panel is ‘blank’. That is, none of
the onboard hardware is activated.
Activation of reader ports, inputs, relays, keypads and the like is
accomplished by using the various screens of the CardAccess software to
create a software configuration template for a given panel. That
configuration template is then downloaded to the panel via a serial
communications link (typically). Once the configuration template is
received by the panel, the panel activates the hardware specified in the
configuration template, with the attributes specified in the CardAccess
software configuration for that panel.
Thus, it is the PC and the CardAccess software that determine the
configuration and operation of the panels. Ultimately, the mode of
operation of any hardware connected to those panels is determined by
the CardAccess software configuration
Panel Specifics
It is important to note that each panel type manufactured by Continental
Instruments has a default memory size. Some panel types have
expandable memory and some do not, as shown below.
Table 8 – Panel Types and Memory Sizes
Panel Type
Memory Size
Card Capacity
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Memory
C A R D A C C E S S
SuperTerm
Smarterm
MiniTerm
MicroTerm
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256K
64K
64K
32K
20,000
2,400
3,200
1,100
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130,000 (2Mb)
130.000 (2Mb)
N/A
N/A
C A R D A C C E S S
3 0 0 0
S O F T W A R E
I N S T A L L A T I O N
M A N U A L
Quick Tip - You must be mindful not to overflow the panel memory.
Memory overflow is possible if the amount of badges exceeds the
recommended quantities above (for the amount of ram you have), or if
settings in the Panels screen do not match settings elsewhere in the
CardAccess (more on this later).
Note that there is quite a bit going on at the panel level that you need to
be aware of. Panels have data communications ports, used to pass data to
and from the PC. Panels connect to door hardware such as readers,
buttons and keypads. Panels electrically operate door strikes and sense
the state of input switches. In short, the access control panels are more or
less the ‘logical center points’ of the entire CardAccess equipped system.
All panel types require programming from the PC initially. After that, the
panel logic is designed to operate independently, without the need for a
PC (except in ‘Global’ applications - more on that later.).
It is the panel logic that evaluates badge numbers, access attempts, input
alarms and more. The ‘rules’ that a given panel will use to make those
decisions are provided by the PC, from the Card Access software
configuration.
Since panels make all local access control decisions autonomously, once a
given panel has been programmed with a configuration template, the PC
could (theoretically) be disconnected from a PC altogether. As a point of
fact, some of our customers have Continental panels running without PC
connections in smaller systems.
Note that you must connect to Com Ports in the ‘Com Ports’ screen,
available from the Configuration menu, before you attempt to create
panel definitions. This brings up a discussion about system design
construction, which we will discuss only briefly in this section (for more
information about system design, see the manuals that are included with
each panel).
As you attempt to create panel definitions, it would be helpful to have an
overview of how panels will be connected to the PC, and to each other.
Generally, the panels are interconnected using a serial ‘party line’
(sometimes called a ‘daisy chain’).
A serial cable is run from a PC serial port to the first panel. Another serial
cable is run from the first panel to a second panel. Another serial cable is
run to a third panel and so on, to the end of the panel node. Several
panels connected together in a party line configuration as described
above is referred to as a ‘panel node’ (often also referred to as a ‘panel
cluster’).
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In fact, if there were only one panel connected to a PC serial port, it
could still be referred to as a node. For the remaining discussion of
panels, we will define a node as a PC serial port, dial line or LAN
connection supporting one or more panels.
Note the following Panel installation notes.
•
Each panel connected to a common node must be assigned a unique
identification address.
•
The ‘panel address’ is set on a hardware switch block that is soldered
to the panel PC board..
•
If a panel has an address set to 0, it will not respond to any poll.
•
If a panel has an address set to 0 and the panel is reset, the
configuration of that panel will be erased.
•
The absolute maximum number of panels allowed on any node is 63.
•
The highest possible panel address that can be set on Superterm,
Smarterm or Miniterm panels is 63.
•
The highest panel address for a Microterm is 31.
•
The maximum panel count on a node is a function of the number of
switches used to set the panel address.
•
The Superterm, Smarterm and Miniterm have six switches dedicated
to the panel address and the Microterm has five.
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Figure 511 – The Panels Screen – General Tab Visible
The Panels screen (Figure 574), available from the Configuration menu,
is a configuration screen that you use to describe the panel configuration
and geographical layout to the CardAccess software.
By default, there is no hardware activated in the CardAccess software
configuration screens. You must build a configuration from scratch.
There are two primary configuration items that are needed to activate a
panel.
• Panel Address
Figure 512 – The Panel Address Control
The Panel Address is needed to identify the panel to the CardAccess
communications driver (called the ‘Host’ polling program). The Host
program uses a polling and response protocol to communicate with
the panels.
When several panels are mounted on the same Com Port, they share a
common set of wires sometimes referred to as a ‘party line’. This type
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of connection is called a party line because all Host messages are
routed to all of the panels on a pair of common wires.
A source or destination Panel Address is embedded in every data
packet sent in either direction. The destination Panel Address (in
messages sent by Host) is used by the panels to determine which
panel should act on the message.
Thus, the Panel Address must be different on all panels connected to
the same Com Port. Panel addresses can be duplicated across different
com ports without conflict (panel address 1 exists on Com1, and
panel address 1 exists on Com2 is ok. Two panels with panel address
of 1 on Com1 will cause a conflict. Both panels will attempt to ack the
same data packets).
• Com Port
Figure 513 – The Com Port Selection Control
The Com Port setting for a panel tells the CardAccess
communications driver what serial port the panel is physically
connected to.
The use of the words ‘Com Port’ in the Panels screen is somewhat of
a misnomer, because the words Com Port are used in the CardAccess
Panels screen to describe any of three types of connections, selectable
on the Com Ports screen, available from the Configuration menu (see
‘Com Ports’ for more information).
o Serial Port Connection
Figure 514 – Com Ports Screen – Cable Serial Selected
In the specific case of a serial port, a com port is usually logically
connected to the serial port so the terms ‘serial port’ and ‘Com
Port’ can be used synonymously
o Dial Up Connection
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Figure 515 – Com Ports Screen - Modem Dial Up Selected
Dial out modems are mounted on computer com ports, so the
term Com Port applies to dial connections as well
o LAN Connection
Figure 516 – Com Ports Screen – LAN Connection Selected
In the Com Ports screen, available from the Configuration menu,
LAN connections are set in a control grid that calls them ‘Com
Ports’. LAN micro serial server connections are not connected
through Com Ports at all.
Windows sockets connections are used by the CardAccess
software to connect to panels mounted on LAN networks. Thus,
the term ‘Com Ports’ in the Com Ports screen does not refer to
any type of serial connection.
However, the fact that CardAccess Com Ports can be any of three
types of connections does not affect how you will select a Com
Port in the Panels screen.
When you select a Com Port for a panel by using the Com Port
control on the General tab, you are linking that panel to a Com
Port number and a communication method. Communications is
attempted to the selected Com Port immediately after you have
clicked the ‘Save’ button on the panel record.
The communications driver will behave in one of three ways
depending on which type of Com Port connection you chose.
o Serial Port Connection – The communication driver will
immediately attempt to open the Com Port that was selected.
If the attempt fails, you will get an error event message (Figure
517). Connection attempts will occur once and will not be
repeated unless the CardAccess communications driver
(Host) is restarted.
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Figure 517 – Com Port Open Fail Message
If the attempt succeeds, you will not get any event messages,
but the communications driver will attempt to begin polling
all panels (and panel addresses) that are assigned to the given
Com Port. If polling fails on any panel, you will get a polling
related event fail message for that panel.
Figure 518 – Failure to Receive Response to Poll Event
Message
o Dial Up Connection – When you have clicked the ‘Save’
button for a panel record, the system will not attempt to dial
out to the panel automatically.
Connecting to Dial Up panels is done according to a time
schedule that is set in the ‘Modems’ screen, available from the
‘Configuration’ menu.
Figure 519 – The Modems
For more information on setting up Dial Up nodes, see the
manual section entitled ‘Dial Up’
o LAN Connection – When you have chosen a LAN
connected Com Port in the Com Port control of the Panel
record, when you click the ‘Save’ button, the communications
driver will attempt to open a Windows sockets connection
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with the IP address that you specified in the Com Ports
screen for that Com port number (Figure 520).
Figure 520 – Com Ports Screen LAN Connection Tab
The sockets connection uses the TCP protocol. TCP port
3001 is used for all Com Ports screen initiated LAN
connections
Create a Basic Panel Record
To create a basic, working panel record, most of the CardAccess default
settings can be used. There are only a few changes that you need to make
to the basic panel record to get a panel operating, as mentioned below.
• Open the Panels Screen – Open the Panels screen, available from
the Configuration menu
• Click New – Click the ‘New’ button
Figure 521 – The New Button
• Select the Com Port – Select the Com Port that the panel is to be
connected to. To select the Com Port, click the arrow button to the
right of the Com Port selection control, and choose a Com Port from
the list by clicking it.
If there are no com ports in the list, you must create some Windows
com ports using the Windows control panel.
Figure 522 – The Com Port Selection Control
• Select the Panel Address – Select the panel address for the panel
from the Panel Address control. To select the address, click the
buttons to the right of the control, or click in the white space and type
in a number.
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Figure 523 – The Panel Address Selection Control
Be aware of the following issues.
o The available panel address range is 1 to 63 if Superterm,
Smarterm or Miniterm panels are used. The available panel
address range is 1 to 31 if a Microterm panel is used
o The panel address must be unique if the panel is to be connected
on the same com port with other panels
o You cannot mount more than 63 total panels on any panel node
o If the panel is connected to a dial node, the panel that is physically
connected to the modem must be set to panel address 1
o Pressing the panel Reset button while the Panel Address is set to 0
on any panel type will clear the panel configuration memory
(called a zero reset)
o If the panel is directly connected to a modem, switch 7 (the
‘modem’ switch) must be rocked to the left (set to off) on a
Superterm, Smarterm and Miniterm. Switch 6 must be rocked to
the left for a Microterm.
• Give the Panel a Name – Enter a descriptive name in the ‘Name’
field.
Figure 524 – The Panel Name Field
• Make Sure Enabled is Checked – Make sure that the ‘Enabled’
check box is checked. The panel will not be polled unless Enabled is
selected. Click the check box to change the Enabled status.
Figure 525 – The Panel Enabled Check Box
• Click Save – Click the ‘Save’ button
Once the Save button has been clicked, polling will be started for the
selected panel.
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Figure 526 – The Save Button
Panel Screen Controls
There are three folder tabs that can be visible in the Readers screen.
Below is a general explanation of the function of each of those folder
tabs.
Figure 527 – The Panels Screen Folder Tabs
•
General Tab – The General folder tab contains controls that
connect the panel to a communications port, set the operating
parameters of the panel, and determine (some) memory buffer sizes
•
Priorities Tab – The Priorities tab has controls that set priorities for
the event messages generated from activities at the panel
•
Maps Tab – The Maps tab has controls that allow you to create or
edit a map for that panel record. The Map tab will not be visible
unless Mapping is enabled in the System Settings (see the manual
section entitled ‘System Settings’ for more information)
General Tab
Figure 528 – The Panels General Tab
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The function of each of the controls on the General folder tab are as
follows.
•
Name
Figure 529 – The Name Field
The Name field is where you will fill in a descriptive name for your
panel. It is strongly suggested that you give your panels names that
describe their location in a building or their function. The names that
you assign here will be used in all event messages for that panel (in
the ‘Location’ field of the Events and Alerts Grids).
•
Panel#
Figure 530 – The Panel Address Selection Control
The Panel Number field is often confused with the ‘Panel Address’
field. However, the Panel Number is a number that is automatically
assigned by the CardAccess software each time you create a new
panel definition. The Panel Number is simply the number of that
panel definition in the panel definitions list (Figure 531).
Figure 531 – The Panels Screen Panel Number Column
Typically, you don’t need to edit the automatically assigned Panel
Numbers unless you wish to modify the panel numbering sequence.
The system will let you override the automatic panel numbering
sequence, if preferred.
To manually change the Panel Number, click the arrow buttons to
the right of the Panel# control or click in the white space and type in
a Panel Number
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Group
Figure 532 – The Group Selection Control
The Group selection control allows you to assign the current panel to
a group. Groups are used for database partitioning and for manual
control list filtering. For more information see the manual section
entitled ‘Groups’.
To select a Group, click the arrow button to the right of the Group
control and click on the Group that you wish to select
•
Enabled
Figure 533 – The Enabled Check Box
The Enabled check box enables or disables the panel record. If the
panel record is disabled, that panel is taken out of the list of panels to
be polled and polling stops for that panel. The panel is effectively
disconnected from communications.
When the panel is enabled, it is put back in the list of panels to be
polled and communication between the PC and panel resumes.
‘Enabled’ is the default state for a newly created panel record.
To enable or disable the panel, click the Enabled check box. Checked
means enabled, unchecked means disabled
•
Interactive Badges
Figure 534 – The Interactive Badges Check Box
Interactive Mode primarily exists to support panel types with limited
memory, which are installed into sites that have large numbers of
badge records.
There is no setting in the CardAccess that tells the software what
type of panel you are connecting to. Thus it is possible to attempt to
load a database of 20,000 badges into a Microterm (that holds 1,100
badges maximum).
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When any panel’s memory capacity is exceeded (such as when you
try to download more badges than the panel can store), the panel will
refuse to store those records that exceed its memory size. This
creates a ‘memory overflow’ condition.
The key issue is that, when the panel memory is exceeded, there are
valid records that belong at the panel that the panel cannot store. In
the specific case of overflowed badge records, some badge holders
will be rejected when badge records have not been stored due to lack
of memory.
As a temporary measure to overcome a limited memory badge
overflow situation, Interactivity can be enabled. When Interactive
Mode is enabled, the panel badge rejection behavior is modified.
A panel will normally reject any badge that is not stored in local panel
memory and report a ‘violate void’ type error event message. When
Interactive mode is enabled, the panel is forced to check the
CardAccess database in addition to checking local panel memory to
validate a badge.
Once a badge is read by a reader connected to a given panel, a badge
validation procedure is applied. The ‘normal’ panel badge validation
procedure and the Interactive mode badge validation procedure are
explained in more detail below.
o Normal Badge Validation – After a badge is presented to a
reader on a given panel set to normal mode, the panel logic
checks the local panel memory for a badge record corresponding
to the badge number read. If that record does not exist, the entry
request is rejected and a denial message is sent to the CardAccess
Host computer
o Interactive Mode Badge Validation Procedure – After a
badge is presented to a reader on a given panel set to Interactive
mode, the panel logic checks the local panel memory for a badge
record corresponding to the badge number read. If that record
does not exist, a message is sent to the Host PC inquiring if the
badge has a valid record in the CardAccess database.
There are several conditions that could exist, with different
outcomes.
! There is no CardAccess database record of the badge – In this
case the badge is rejected with the error event message ‘Badge
Violate Void’
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! There is a record of the badge in the database, but the badge
does not belong at any reader on the panel – In this case the
badge is rejected with the error event message ‘Badge Violate
Void at Panel’.
! There is a record of the badge, the badge does belong at least
one reader on the panel, but the badge is not permitted at the
reader in question – In this case the badge is rejected with the
error event message ‘Badge Violate Unauthorized’.
! There is a record of the badge, the badge does belong at the
panel, and the badge is permitted at the reader, but not at the
current time of day – In this case the badge record is
downloaded to the panel but the badge is rejected with the
error event message ‘Badge Violate Time of Day’. The badge
record is stored at the panel, overwriting an existing badge
record that had remained unused for some time
! There is a record of the badge, the badge does belong at the
panel, and the badge is permitted at the reader, at the current
time of day – In this case the badge record is downloaded to
the panel and the door is unlocked. The badge record is
stored at the panel, overwriting an existing badge record that
had remained unused for some time
It is important to note that, in Interactive mode the panel will
communicate with the CardAccess Host PC to validate badge
numbers that are not locally stored in panel memory.
The panel logic will attempt to store the most frequently used badges
and overwrite badge numbers that are less frequently used in an
attempt to optimize memory usage.
Enabling Interactive mode could increase communications traffic
and slow the overall response of the system. Thus, Interactive mode
should not be considered a long-term solution for a badge overflow
condition. A memory or panel upgrade is the only long-term solution
to lack of panel memory.
Note that enabling Interactive mode will not solve other types of
memory overflow problems, such as Access Group or Time
Schedule overflows.
•
Repeat Off-Line Alert
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Figure 535 – The Repeat Off-Line Alert Check Box
When the CardAccess Host computer loses communication with a
panel, an error event message is displayed that says ‘No Response’
(Figure 536). That message is displayed once, several seconds after
the panel fails to respond to three successive polls.
If you wish to have the no response error message repeated about
every 3 minutes, set the ‘Repeat Off-Line Alert’ check box to
enabled. You will then receive an error event message that says ‘Still
No Response’ (Figure 536), repeated indefinitely until the panel
begins responding again.
Figure 536 – The Panel Response Event Messages
To enable the Repeat Off-Line Alert feature for a given panel, click
the check box. Checked is enabled, unchecked is disabled (the default
setting)
•
Using Elevator Readers
Figure 537 – The Using Elevator Readers Check Box
Elevator reader capability is disabled at all panels by default. Thus,
the option to set a reader to an elevator type reader is made
unavailable (grayed out) until you enable the ‘Using Elevator Readers’
option for the panel that the given reader is connected to.
Once the ‘Using Elevator Readers’ feature is enabled for a given
panel, all readers that are connected to that panel have the ‘Elevator
Reader’ option made available in the Readers screen (Figure 538) (for
more information see the manual section entitled ‘Readers’)
Figure 538 – The Readers Screen Reader Type Control – Elevator
Selected
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To enable the Elevator Reader option for a given panel, click the
‘Using Elevator Readers’ check box. Checked is enabled and
unchecked is disabled (the default setting)
•
Enable Password
Figure 539 – The Enable Password Check Box
Panel passwords are only used for dial up panel clusters (see the
manual section entitled ‘Dial Up’). Since dial up panel clusters are
exposed to the outside world through the public switched telephone
network, it is possible for anyone with a copy of the CardAccess
software to dial in and connect to a given panel node.
This raises the possibility that someone with the wrong database
settings could potentially dial in to a panel cluster and accidentally
change the configuration of the panels on that cluster.
To prevent unauthorized dial in access, panels that are known to be
included in dial up panel clusters can have the ‘Enable Password’
option set. Further, the actual password is entered in the Com Ports
screen (for more information see ‘Com Ports’).
Note that a password is only needed for the panel that is directly
connected to the modem. All other panels in the dial up panel cluster
do not need to have the password option set.
Note also that the panel that is physically connected to the modem
must be set to panel address 1. In a dial up configuration, panel
address 1 acts as a ‘master’ panel, which answers the incoming call,
and negotiates the password.
To enable the password feature for a given panel, click the Enable
Password check box on the General tab of the Panels screen.
Checked is enabled, unchecked is disabled (the default setting).
•
Degrade Mode On
Figure 540 – The Degrade Mode On Check Box
Degrade Mode is a feature that allows you to modify how a panel will
evaluate badge numbers. In normal mode, a panel will examine a
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badge number and a facility code to determine the identity and access
permissions of a given badge holder.
When Degrade Mode is enabled, the panel will ignore badge
numbers and time schedules. The panel will evaluate only the facility
code on a badge to determine access permission. Essentially, all
badge holders with the correct facility code will gain entry, at any
hour of the day.
This feature may prove useful if you are having problems reading
badge numbers correctly, but the badge format is being read. Setting
Degrade Mode will force the system to ignore badge numbers (while
you fix the problem), but will still allow you to require badge holders
to use an access badge to gain entry to secured areas.
To enable Degrade Mode for a given panel, click the ‘Degrade Mode
On’ check box on the General tab of the Panels screen. Checked is
enabled, unchecked is disabled (the default setting).
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Connection Section – The Connection section has settings that are
important to establishing data communications between the CardAccess
Host PC and the panel nodes.
•
Panel Address
Figure 541 – The Panel Address Selection Control
There is a hardware Panel Address switch block on every panel type.
Each panel that shares the same node with other panels must have a
unique panel address set. Stated another way, every panel that shares
the same Com Port must be set to a panel address that is different
from every other panel on that Com Port.
The Panel Address is used by the system to identify the panel. The
Panel Address setting in the Panels screen works in conjunction with
the Com Port setting below. The Com Port setting determines what
node the panels are on, and the Panel Number determines what
panel the system is communicating with.
The minimum Panel Address is 1. The maximum Panel Address is
63. If the Panel Address is set to 0, the panel will not be polled.
To set the Panel Address, click the arrow buttons to the right of the
Panel Address control, or click in the white space and type in a
number
•
Com Port
Figure 542 – The Com Port Selection Control
The Com Port control selects which communications port the panel
will be connected to. The Com Port number may not necessarily
refer to a serial port. The CardAccess uses the label ‘Com Port’ to
refer to serial ports, LAN connected panel nodes and dial nodes.
To select the Com Port, click the arrow buttons to the right of the
Com Port control, or click in the white space and type in a number
Initialization Parameters Section
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When configuration data is downloaded to a panel, part of the
downloading process is to set the sizes of some panel static memory
buffers. Some of these buffers are adjustable from inside the CardAccess
software. Three such adjustable memory buffers are detailed below.
Note that panel memory space is limited (unless you have added
expanded memory). Thus, every buffer size that you increase using the
controls below will subtract from the total memory available for badge
records. Thus, you should seek to set the below controls to their smallest
possible size where memory for badge storage is an issue.
•
Transaction Buffer Size
Figure 543 – The Transaction Buffer Size Selection Control
The Transaction Buffer Size control allocates panel memory for the
number of event transactions to be stored before a buffer full
condition occurs. The event buffer is a ‘circular’ type buffer, which
means that if the panel runs out of space for event transactions, it will
begin to overwrite the oldest transactions in memory.
When a panel is connected to a computer serial port, event
transactions are picked up every few seconds by the polling program,
so it is rare that you would need to set a large Transaction Buffer
Size.
However, when a panel is connected to a dial line and is not dialed
frequently, event buffer size could become more of an issue if the
panel sees substantial traffic. Event messages could be lost if the
panel is allowed to fill, then begin to overwrite the event buffer.
In that case, you would want to increase the Transaction Buffer Size.
The default size is 110 event transactions. The maximum is 30,000.
To change the setting, click the arrow buttons to the right of the
Transaction Buffer Size control or click in the white space and type a
number.
•
Time Schedule Blocks
Figure 544 – The Time Schedule Blocks Selection Control
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Time Schedule blocks are created in the ‘Schedules’ screen (see the
manual section entitled ‘Schedules’). A Schedule is defined as one or
more Time Blocks (Figure 545). One Time Block is composed
generally, of a ‘Start Day’ and an ‘End Day’ and a ‘Start Time’ and an
‘End Time’.
Figure 545 – Schedules Screen – Six Time Blocks Shown
The Panels screen Time Schedule Blocks control allows you to
allocate the minimum amount of memory for the storage of time
schedule blocks (which will save space for badge records if adjusted
to the minimum size).
The CardAccess software will permit a maximum of 128 schedules.
The maximum number of time blocks per schedule is 10. The
maximum setting for the Time Schedule Blocks control cannot
exceed 1280 blocks (128 schedules x 10 blocks per schedule).
The Time Schedule Blocks control can be set to the actual number of
time schedule blocks that have been created in the Schedules screen
if memory is needed for additional badge record storage. Note that
the settings in the Time Schedule Blocks control is ignored by the
panel if the panel is equipped with expanded memory. In that case
the panel automatically allocates the maximum memory space of
1280 time blocks.
To determine how many time blocks exist in your Schedules screen,
visit each schedule and count the number of lines in the ‘Time
Schedule Blocks’ area, of each schedule created in that screen. For
example, in Figure 545 above, the schedule shown has six time
blocks showing (use the scrollbar to see more schedules if they are
present).
To change the setting, click the arrow buttons to the right of the
Time Schedule Blocks control or click in the white space and type a
number.
•
Max Access Groups
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Figure 546 – The Max Access Groups Control
The Max Access Groups control should be set to a value equal to the
highest numbered access group, in the access group number field in
the Access Groups screen (Figure 547). Note that the CardAccess
will permit you to create up to 1000 access groups maximum.
As an example, if you have created access group number 1000 in the
Access Groups screen, then you must set the Max Access Groups
control in the Panels screen to 1000 for every panel. Scroll to the
highest numbered access group to check the access group number
and set that number in the Max Access Groups control in each panel
definition in the Panels screen.
Figure 547 – The Access Group Number – Access Group #1
Shown
To change the setting, click the arrow buttons to the right of the
Max Access Groups control or click in the white space and type a
number. Maximum vale = 1000.
Priorities Tab
Figure 548 – The Panels Priorities Tab
The Priorities folder tab is used to set the alert priority levels of the
various Panel event messages. Priority levels are used by the system to
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determine which part of the CardAccess main screen to use (the Events
or Alerts grids), to display the each type of event type message mentioned
in Figure 548. Every possible Panel event message is mentioned on the
Priorities tab.
The function of each of the controls on the Priorities folder tab is as
follows.
•
Panel Event Priorities – The Priority spin control allows you to set
the ‘numeric significance’ of the given alert type. How alert priority
levels are used depends on the settings of the CardAccess main
screen controls. See the manual section entitled ‘Setting Up Priorities’
for more information.
To set a Priority level for an alert type, click the arrow buttons to the
right of the Priority spin control or click in the white space and type
in a number.
•
Require Operator Response – If checked the ‘Requires Alert
Response’ feature will be enabled for the given event type. The
Requires Alert Response feature engine will force an operator to
respond to an alert by popping up an alert response window that
mandates that the operator manually click a button to move an alert
from the Alerts Grid to the Events Grid. For more information see
the manual section entitled ‘Setting Up Priorities’.
Maps Tab
Figure 549 – The Panels Maps Tab
The Map tab has controls that allow you to add or edit a map for the
current panel. The Map tab is not visible unless the ‘Use Facility Map’
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Option is enabled in the System Settings. For more detailed information
on the creation of maps see the manual section entitled ‘Maps’.
The function of each of the controls on the Map folder tab is as follows.
•
Facility Map for This Device
Figure 550 – Facility Map Name Field
Displays the name of the map that is attached to the current reader
•
Map Description
Figure 551 – The Map Description Field
An area where you can add a text description of the map
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Size Image to Fit Check Box
Figure 552 – The Size Image to Fit Check Box
Image bitmaps come in all shapes and sizes. The CardAccess Maps
image view control is set by default to stretch the image to fit the size
of the image display window.
If Size Image to Fit is disabled, the image will be displayed in its
native size format (and white space may appear on the sides, or top
and bottom). The feature is enabled by default
•
View Maps Button
Figure 553 – The View Maps Button
Click this button to open the Maps creation screen where you can
create or edit a map.
•
Remove Map Button
Figure 554 – The Remove Map Button
This button is only available while in Edit mode. Click it to delete the
map
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Download Configuration and Data to Panels
Figure 555 - The Panels Download Categories Selection Screen
There are two classes of panel data downloads.
• Automatic - Automatic configuration data downloads occur
immediately after you click the 'Save' key in any of the CardAccess
configuration screens. The CardAccess host computer clock is also
downloaded to hardwired panels once per hour. The clock is
downloaded to dial panels at the end of a dial session
• Manual - Manual configuration data downloads are initiated by the
CardAccess operator by manually clicking a 'Download' button on the
toolbar of the Panels screen (see below)
Panel data downloads are generally initiated automatically each time you
click the 'Save' button in one of the CardAccess configuration screens.
After a record has been created or changed in any configuration screen,
that changed record is immediately (and automatically) queued up by the
system for transmission to the appropriate panel. The system treats
changed configuration records with a very high priority and sends them
to the appropriate panel as soon as possible, without human intervention.
However, there may be times when you wish initiate a data download to
a panel manually. This may be true in a case where the CardAccess
administrator is bringing a new panel online, or in the rare case where a
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panel seems to be malfunctioning and a data re-download seems
appropriate.
There is a download button available on the Panels screen main toolbar
to initiate a manual download. To download a panel do the following.
• Open the Panels Screen - Open the panels screen, available from
the Configuration menu
• Select a Panel - Use the scrollbar to locate the panel you wish to
download. Click that selection
• Click the Download Button - Click the 'Download' button which is
available on the Panels screen toolbar
Figure 556 – The Download Button
• Select the Type of Download - Select the download category in the
'Download Categories' screen. The top half of the screen contains the
possible individual data categories that are available for download.
You may select one or all of the categories that appear in the top half
of the screen. The individual download categories are listed below.
o Badges - When this checkbox is selected, the system will
download all Personnel badge records that belong at the selected
panel (as seen in the Personnel screen)
Figure 557 – The Badges Check Box
o Readers - When this checkbox is selected, the system will
download all Reader records that belong at the selected panel (as
seen in the Readers screen)
Figure 558 – The Readers Check Box
o Inputs - When this checkbox is selected, the system will
download all Input records that belong at the selected panel (as
seen in the Inputs screen)
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Figure 559 – The Inputs Check Box
o Relays - When this checkbox is selected, the system will
download all Relay records that belong at the selected panel (as
seen in the Relays screen)
Figure 560 – The Relays Check Box
o Links - When this checkbox is selected, the system will download
all Link records that belong at the selected panel (as seen in the
Links screen)
Figure 561 – The Links Check Box
o Badge Formats - When this checkbox is selected, the system will
download all Badge Format records that belong at the selected
panel (as seen in the Badge Formats screen)
Figure 562 – The Badge Formats Check Box
o Access Groups - When this checkbox is selected, the system will
download all Access Group records that belong at the selected
panel (as seen in the Access Groups screen)
Figure 563 – The Access Groups Check Box
o Time Schedules - When this checkbox is selected, the system
will download all Time Schedule records that belong at the
selected panel (as seen in the Schedules screen)
Figure 564 – The Time Schedules Check Box
o Facility Codes - When this checkbox is selected, the system will
download all Facility Code records that belong at the selected
panel (as seen in the Facility Codes screen)
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Figure 565 – The Facility Codes Check Box
o Holidays - When this checkbox is selected, the system will
download all Holiday records to the selected panel (as seen in the
Holidays screen)
Figure 566 – The Holidays Check Box
o Full Download - When this checkbox is selected, the system will
download all records, from all database tables that concern the
selected panel. Selecting the 'Full Download' option is like
selecting every checkbox mentioned above (except the firmware
checkbox). Panel firmware will not be downloaded on a full (data)
download
Figure 567 – The Full Download Check Box
o Firmware Download - When this checkbox is selected, the
system will download panel firmware to the selected Superterm
panel (note that only Superterms have downloadable firmware).
The panel will be taken offline during the firmware download, but
will continue to read badges and admit any card holder having a
badge with the correct facility code (badge numbers are not
checked during a firmware download, only facility codes. The
panel is put into Degrade mode when receiving a download). You
can elect to download firmware or data but not both
simultaneously
Figure 568 – The Firmware Download Checkbox
• Select Which Panels to Download - There are two buttons that will
start a panel data or firmware download. The functions of the buttons
are explained below
o Download Panel - Clicking this button causes the
communications driver software to download the requested
configuration data to only the panel that is currently highlighted in
the Panels screen
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Figure 569 – The Download Panel Button
o All Panels - Clicking this button causes the communications
driver software to download the requested configuration data to
all panels in the panels list of the Panels screen
Figure 570 – The Download All Panels Button
• Confirm the Download - One of two download confirmation boxes
will appear. Which box you see will be determined by which type of
communications link your selected panel is on.
o Hardwire or LAN Lines - A download confirmation message
box will appear (see figure below). If you wish to proceed with the
download, click the 'Yes' button, otherwise click the 'No' button
to abort the download request
Figure 571 – The Download Confirmation Message
o Dial Up Modem Connection - In the case where the panel you
have selected for a download is on a modem, and it is not
currently connected to the CardAccess communications driver,
the download confirmation will take you through two
confirmation windows.
!
Confirm the Dial Up Request - The software informs you
that the selected panel is on a modem and requests
permission to connect to the panel. To continue, click the
'Yes' button. To exit without dialing, click the 'No' button
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Figure 572 – The Dial Up Confirm Message
!
Confirm the Download - You will then see the standard
download confirmation box. Click the 'Yes' button to begin
the data download, click the 'No' button to cancel the
download before sending any data. If you elect to abort the
download at this point, the dial line connection will be
terminated as well
Figure 573 – The Download Confirm Message
• If You Wish to Stop the Download - Once the download has
started to the selected panel(s), if you wish to stop the download
before it has completed, click the 'Abort Download' button
Warning – Do not stop a panel download until it is complete,
especially a firmware download. The panel memory is cleared
before a download, and you could leave the panel in an
unstable state unless you permit the download to complete
• Close the Download Categories Screen - Click the 'Exit' button at
any time to close the Download Categories screen
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Readers
Figure 574 – The Readers Screen – General Tab Visible
The thing to keep in mind about all of the configuration screens available
from the CardAccess Configuration menu is that all of the settings in
those screens exist to program the Panel hardware.
All the configuration type screens quite are similar, in that all screens
available from the Configuration menu create database records that are
used to configure some type of connected hardware.
Readers is a configuration screen, available from the Configuration menu
(Figure 574), whose settings are applied to Panel Door connectors. The
settings in the Readers screen activate or deactivate features that can
primarily be found connected to a given panel’s door connectors.
With all CardAccess hardware (and every hardware choice available from
the Configuration menu), you need to be aware that hardware records
must be created in ‘an order’. That is, some hardware types need to exist
in the database before other types can be created.
In the specific case of Readers, you cannot create reader records without
first creating Panel records. By definition, a Reader is a hardware device
used for reading access badges. All badge card reads are sent to the
Continental access control panels for access permissions evaluation. And
Readers are physically connected to panels, therefore you can’t have
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Readers without first having panels. To learn more about creating panel
records, see the manual section entitled ‘Panels’.
With all the CardAccess hardware configuration screens, when you create
a new record, that record is automatically configured with a minimum
default functionality necessary to insure that the hardware item will
function without any further changes to the default record settings.
When you create each new reader record, the following configuration
items are automatically loaded with default values by the system. Each
item listed will be discussed in more detail in later sections.
•
Reader Type – The Reader type is set to ‘Door’ by default
•
Enabled – The Enabled check box is checked
•
Report Bypass – The Report Bypass check box is checked
•
Bypass Unlocks – The Bypass Unlocks check box is checked
•
No Schedules – No schedules are entered in any of the schedule
controls. The reader is activated 24 hours per day, every day of the
year by default, unless an override schedule is manually selected in
one of the schedule controls
•
No Keypad – The available keypad interface is disabled by default.
You must manually activate the keypad interface if desired
•
Inputs – Door Sensor and Bypass inputs are automatically chosen
by the system based on the reader number
•
Door Strike Relay – The Door Strike Relay is automatically chosen
by the system
•
Options – Each control on the Options tab is loaded with default
values
•
Message Priorities – Event message priorities are automatically
entered for each type of reader event message
•
CCTV – CCTV is disabled
•
Maps – Maps are not assigned
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Create a Basic Reader Record
To create a basic reader record do the following.
•
Open Readers – Open the Readers screen, available from the
Configuration menu
•
Click New – Click the ‘New’ button
Figure 575 – The New Button
•
Select a Panel – To select a panel from the Panel control, click the
down arrow on the right side of the control, scroll up or down to
locate your selection, click the selection
Figure 576 – The Panel Selection Control
•
Select a Reader Number – To select a reader number, use the
control marked ‘Reader#’. Either type in a reader number or click
the up or down arrows to locate the number you want
Figure 577 – The Reader Number Selection Control
Note – The software lets you create up to eight readers per
panel. The CardAccess will not allow you to create two
readers with the same reader number, on the same panel
•
Click Save – Click the ‘Save’ button to save the record. After you
click Save, the reader record will be sent down to the appropriate
panel and will be activated automatically.
Figure 578 – The Save Button
You have just enabled a reader with the following options.
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•
Operational 24 hours per day, every day of the year
•
Is set up as a ‘Door’ reader type
•
Has a door strike relay programmed
•
Has a bypass input programmed
M A N U A L
Reader Functional Types
Because the reader hardware is controlled by software, the reader
‘function’ can be determined by settings in the CardAccess software.
Typically a badge and card reader are used to open a door. But, because
the operation of a reader is controlled principally by the CardAccess
software, the meaning of a badge read can be interpreted in whatever way
we choose.
The controls of the readers screen will let you set any reader to one of the
functional types listed below. Only one of the functions listed below can
be set per reader (they are mutually exclusive).
Standard Door Reader
This is the default setting. It is assumed that most readers will be used for
door access, and that an access badge of some type will be used to open
those doors. Thus, all items needed to operate a standard door are
enabled by default
Badge Validator
Figure 579 – The Badge Validator Control
You can set a reader up to enable and disable badges. When a specific
reader is set up as a Badge Validator reader, if you present an enabled
card to that reader, it disables that card. When you present a disabled card
to that reader, it is enabled.
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Note that the badge validator reader will not create a new badge record
for a badge. It will only enable or disable a badge record that already
exists in the CardAccess badge database.
When we say ‘enable’ or ‘disable’, we mean that the ‘Enabled’ check box
in the badge holder Personnel record will be checked or unchecked. The
badge will also either be ‘activated’ or ‘deactivated’ by the CardAccess
software by changing that badge holder’s Enabled status in the
CardAccess database. The amended badge holder record will be
downloaded to the appropriate panels (or deleted from the appropriate
panels).
The Badge Validator functionality can be useful to a department
responsible for activating badges for a company. After badge holder
records have been created, a card reader mounted on a desktop can serve
to activate and deactivate those badges. There would be no need to visit
the Personnel screen and search for those badge records.
Quick Tip – If a badge validator reader is mounted at a door, it will open that door
upon the presentation of a valid, enabled badge, but will also disable that badge. The
door will not be opened if a disabled badge is presented, but it will enable that badge.
Figure 580 – Badge Validator Reader Enable & Disable Messages
Escort Reader
Figure 581 – Personnel Screen Check Boxes – Escorted Highlighted
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In the Personnel screen, on the ‘General’ tab, there is an option check
box labeled ‘Escorted’ (Figure 581). This setting in the Personnel screen
works in conjunction with a setting in the Readers screen, on the
‘General’ tab, labeled ‘Escort Enabled’ (Figure 582) that allows you to
designate a reader as an ‘Escort Reader’.
Figure 582 – Readers Screen Check Boxes – Escort Enabled Highlighted
When the Escort option is selected in a given badge holder’s Personnel
record, that badge holder will require a second, non-Escort enabled
badge holder, to ‘escort’ them through doorways, that have readers with
the Escort option set.
The Escort enabled badge has the following properties.
• If a valid Escort enabled badge is presented to a non-Escort enabled
reader (and the badge holder has permission to enter that door), the
badge holder will be granted access
• If a valid Escort enabled badge is presented to an Escort enabled
reader (and the badge holder has permission to enter that door), the
door will not be opened unless there is a second, non-escort enabled
badge, presented to that same reader before the ‘Two-Badge’ timer
expires (Figure 583)
Figure 583 The Readers Screen Two-Badge Timer
The Two-Badge Timer can be found in the Readers screen, on the
‘Options’ tab. This control sets the time, in seconds, that the system
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will wait for the presentation of a second badge, for any two badge
type event (Escort, Two-Man and Vehicle Tag).
Alarm Shunt Reader
Figure 584 – Readers Screen Check Boxes – Alarm Shunt Highlighted
Alarm Shunting is explained in detail in the manual section entitled
‘Personnel’. To set a reader as an Alarm Shunt reader, the ‘Alarm Shunt
Reader’ check box must be checked. In addition, a Shunt enabled badge
is needed to activate shunting.
Once the Alarm Shunt feature is enabled at a given reader, that reader
will behave as a normal door type reader (see above) unless a Shunt
enabled badge is presented. In that case, shunting will be activated and
will be in the mode as described by the settings in the Personnel record
(on the ‘Control’ tab) of the shunt card badge holder (see Personnel for
more information on Shunting).
The next subsequent presentation of any shunt enabled badge at the
same Shunt enabled reader, will disable the shunting that was enabled by
the first badge read.
Card Only Reader
Figure 585 – The Card-Only Time Schedule Selection Control
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By default, when you create a new reader record, that reader is already in
‘Card-Only’ mode. Thus, if no changes have been made to the default
Reader record settings, then you will not need to apply a Card-Only Time
Schedule.
The Card-Only Time Schedule control is used to ‘override’ another
applied schedule. An example would be where you wish to have badge
holders enter the building during business hours using their badges only
(security personnel can identify valid card holders on sight). After hours
(when there are fewer security personnel), you require badge holders to
type an access PIN code into a keypad in addition to presenting a valid
access card (this may prevent someone from being able to use a stolen
card and ‘sneak in’ unnoticed after hours).
In the example above, you would create a Card-Only time schedule for
use during the day, and you would create a ‘Card & Code’ schedule for
use at night. Thus, the mode of the reader will be switched between
Card-Only and Card & Code automatically by the system.
Card & Code Reader
Figure 586 – The Card&Pin Time Schedule Selection Control
It is possible to set a reader into a mode where you will require that any
card holders that present badges to that reader also type an access PIN
code into a keypad (that keypad will be connected to the same reader
port).
When a Card&PIN schedule is selected in the Card&PIN Schedule
control, the panel reader port is set to expect a keypad entry after every
badge read. The keypad port for a given reader is not enabled by default,
so you must enable the keypad port for a given door before you select a
Card&PIN Schedule for that door.
Keypad set up is discussed later in this manual section.
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Time & Attendance Reader
Figure 587 – The Time & Attendance Type Selection Control
The Time & Attendance selection control allows you to activate the Time
& Attendance function for a given reader. The reader will behave like a
standard reader, but the CardAccess will generate special event messages
as badges are presented to T&A readers (Figure 588). Readers can be set
up as IN, OUT or IN&OUT readers (see more below).
Time & Attendance is a ‘passive’ function. That is, a T&A reader will not
generate a violation message if you wish to ‘enter’ or ‘exit’ the same
reader twice (so a card holder could clock IN or OUT more than once,
for example). A cardholder will be allowed to enter or exit as many times
as they wish, without restriction.
Figure 588 – Time&Attendance Event Messages
Anti-Passback Reader
Figure 589 – The Anti-Passback Controls
The APB control section allows you to activate the Anti-Passback
function of a given reader. An Anti-Passback reader functions much like
the Time & Attendance reader described above, except that AntiPassback readers can be set to deny re-entry to a given door.
Typically, one reader is set up to be an APB IN reader, and a second
reader is set as an APB OUT reader. After a given cardholder has
presented a badge to an APB IN reader, that badge will not be accepted
at an APB IN reader again until it has been presented to an APB OUT
reader.
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The APB function is designed to enforce strict entry and exit rules, which
will prevent card holders from ‘re-entering’ an APB IN enabled door,
until they have exited through an APB OUT enabled door. Thus, you
must enable APB on at least two readers if you wish to enforce AntiPassback.
Two-Person Reader
Figure 590 – The Two-Person Reader Type Selection Control
The Two Person Reader Type control allows you to active the ‘TwoPerson’ function at a reader. The Two-Person function operates much
like the Escort function explained earlier in this manual section.
In general, a Two-Person reader will wait to obtain badge reads from two
valid badges before allowing entry to either cardholder. The door will not
be unlocked until two valid badge reads are received.
The Two-Person function software tracks how many occupants are in a
given room or facility at one time. The software requires that at least two
badge holders enter the room together. Any two badge holders must
remain in the room at any time. And the last two occupants must leave
together.
The application for a two person reader might be in a sensitive lab area
where your firm would want a minimum of two people in that lab at all
times. An entry door and an exit door would be provided. At least two
badge holders would be required to be in the room at any time.
The above scenario brings up several optional methods of operating such
a secure room. The ‘Two Person Reader Type’ control has several option
selections, explained below.
•
In – When the Two-Person ‘IN’ function is assigned to a reader:
o If the room in question currently has no inhabitants, two badges
are required to open the door for the first time. Single card reads
are rejected with a violation event message after a timeout period
(waits for second badge read).
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o Once the room or facility has a minimum of two occupants, the
reader behaves like a standard reader and admits individual badge
holders without escort.
•
Out – When the Two-Person ‘OUT’ function is assigned to a reader:
o As badge holders leave the room or facility, the last two card
holders are required to leave together. The reader requires two
badge reads at an exit reader before the door will be unlocked.
o Single card reads will be rejected by the reader at all times, with a
violation event message (after a timeout), when set to TwoPerson Out.
•
Out with Override – When the Two-Person ‘OUT with Override’
function is assigned to a reader
o As the room is emptied, a single card read will unlock the door,
but a violation message will be generated. All Two-Person
functions require that two valid badge holders occupy the room
at any one time
Out with Override prevents a cardholder from being ‘stranded’
in a room or facility. It is possible for the last two persons in a
room to present their badges at the exit door, and let one person
leave. If the exit reader has the Two-Person Out setting, there is
no way that the final occupant can exit. Out with Override allows
the single card holder to leave, but generates a violation message
so it can be determined who was in the room without escort
•
Always – When the Two-Person ‘Always’ function is assigned to a
reader, there is no In or Out function. Two valid card reads are
required at that door at all times, at that door
Vehicle Tag Reader
Figure 591 – The Vehicle Tag Reader Selection Control
Generally, ‘Vehicle Tagging’ is a function where two readers are linked
together by software settings and employed to track which badge holder
has exited a facility in possession a given vehicle. Note that the Vehicle
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Tag function can only be enabled on a Superterm panel. The firmware of
all other panel types does not support Vehicle Tagging.
There are two readers placed at the exit point of a motor pool parking
facility. One reader is at an elevation suitable to read a badge presented by
the driver of a vehicle. The second reader is mounted in the roadway,
directly underneath the vehicle. The second reader reads a proximity
badge mounted on the vehicle chassis.
The two readers are linked by software so that badge events from both
readers can be treated as one logical event. The ‘Vehicle Tag Superterm
Reader Link’ control selects the vehicle tag reader that will be associated
with the badge holder reader. In other words, the link between the two
readers is accomplished in the Readers screen, on the ‘Options’ tab, in
the ‘Vehicle Tag Superterm Reader Link’ control. You link the badge
holder reader to the Vehicle Tag reader (not the other way around). Two
readers on a single panel are required. The panels may be Superterm type
only.
Besides linking two readers together, you will need to create badge holder
badges and Vehicle Tag badges in the Personnel screen (see the manual
section entitled Personnel for more information). The badge holder
badges for drivers of vehicles are not special badges. The same badges
that allow door access can be used.
The Vehicle Tag badge records are not special in any way either. They are
created and configured just like standard badge holder records and all of
the same rules apply. A Vehicle Tag badge record must have access
group permissions just like a standard badge. You will want to enter
names in the First and Last name fields that describe the vehicle,
however.
The only configuration requirement for identifying a badge as a Vehicle
Tag is to check the “Vehicle Tag” field in the badge record (Figure 592).
The Vehicle Tag badge type is created with all of the default settings of a
standard cardholder badge.
Figure 592 – Personnel Screen Check Boxes – Vehicle Tag Highlighted
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Note that in all functions that involve two badge reads, the ‘Two-Badge
Timer’ is used (Figure 593). The time set in the Two-Badge Timer
determines how long the system will wait for the second badge read for
all two badge type events (including Vehicle Tagging).
Figure 593 – The Two-Badge Timer
Thus, you need to set a value in the timer if you will be using Vehicle
Tags (the time is in seconds).
If the system collects one badge read (either badge may be read first), but
does not receive the second badge read before the timer expires, there
will be a violation event message generated (Figure 594).
Figure 594 – Vehicle Tag Violation Event Massage
In the specific case of a Vehicle Tag reader and it’s associated badge
reader, you need to set a Two-Badge Timeout time for both readers.
That timer will determine how long each reader will wait for the second
badge read before generating an error event message. The timers do not
need to be set to the same value.
When either a badge or tag is read, all of the standard access control
checks are performed on that badge or tag. If the badge or tag is valid,
the associated door strike is activated (if programmed) and the panel
waits for the second reader event.
When both the badge and the tag have been read successfully, only one
event message is generated that mentions both readers (Figure 595).
Figure 595 – A Valid Tag Event Message
Once two readers are linked together in a Vehicle Tag arrangement, the
badges read at those readers will report as Vehicle Tag type events by
default. Further, two badge reads (one at each reader) are then expected
on every badge event. If only one (valid) badge is read at either reader,
and the timer expires, you will get a violation event message even though
the door relay was fired in response to a valid badge.
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However, you can override the ‘Tag No Match’ error event message for
specific badges, in a case where you need to set up a situation where only
one valid badge read will be permitted at either reader, and you want a
‘Badge Valid’ event message generated instead of ‘Tag No Match’.
For each badge that you wish to have override the vehicle tag
programming, check the ‘Tracked’ checkbox in that cardholder’s
Personnel record. In the specific case of Vehicle Tag readers, the Tracked
function does not set the badge to Tracked mode. When the Tracked
enabled badge is presented to a Vehicle Tag reader, it causes the system
to ignore the Vehicle Tag linking. At all other readers, the badge reports
as ‘Tracked’.
Reader Screen Controls
There are six folder tabs that can be visible in the Readers screen. Below
is an explanation of the function of each of those folder tabs.
Figure 596 – The Readers Screen Folder Tabs
•
General Tab – The General folder tab contains controls that define
or change the reader type, link the reader to a panel, link the reader to
a group, and set the reader number
•
Door Control Tab – The Door Control folder tab contains controls
that set up reader activate/deactivate time schedules, set input and
relay numbers, and activate the keypad interface for a door
•
Options Tab – The Options tab contains controls that set various
timer values, reader IN and OUT type and Vehicle Tag linking
•
Priorities Tab – The Priorities tab has controls that set priorities for
the event messages generated from activities at the reader
•
CCTV Tab – The CCTV tab has controls that link reader activity to
CCTV control messages. The CCTV tab will not be visible in the
Readers screen unless CCTV is enabled in the System Settings (see
the manual section entitled ‘System Settings’ for more information)
•
Map Tab – The Map tab has controls that allow you to create or
edit a map for that reader. The Map tab will not be visible unless
Mapping is enabled in the System Settings (see the manual section
entitled ‘System Settings’ for more information)
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General Tab
Figure 597 – The Readers General Tab
The function of each of the controls on the General folder tab is as
follows.
Note – You must be in edit mode to make changes to any of the
controls mentioned below. You enter edit mode by clicking the
‘Edit’ button or the ‘New’ button at the top of the Readers screen.
•
Panel – Readers are ultimately always connected to panels. Each new
reader definition must be attached to a panel through CardAccess
software configuration. Selecting a panel in the Panel control attaches
this reader definition to that panel. Once the record is saved, a data
packet is downloaded to the panel and the panel software
automatically enables the reader port indicated by the reader record,
with the options selected in the below mentioned controls.
Panel definitions must be created before Reader definitions. Create
panels in the Configuration, Panels screen.
•
Reader# – This control selects the reader number. By default, all
panel reader ports are deactivated. The Reader indicates which reader
port the panel should activate, once the record is downloaded to the
panel indicated in the ‘Panel’ control
•
Name – The ‘Name’ is a descriptive text label that you wish to give
to the reader. The label should clearly describe where the reader is
located in a given building. The CardAccess software will display this
name in all events relating to the reader in question. Descriptive
names will aid users of the CardAccess in locating the proper door
when needed.
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•
Group – The Group control assigns the given reader to the selected
group. ‘Readers’ Groups must first be defined in the Groups screen,
available from the Administration menu, or you will not see any
groups in the list to select from.
•
Reader Type
Figure 598 – The Reader Type control
The ‘Reader Type’ control programs the panel reader port to behave
in one of the three ways listed below. The difference in actual
software behavior of the three reader types listed below is minimal.
The primary difference between the reader types below is how the
reader will be used.
o Door – When the Reader Type is set to Door, the reader is
configured as a standard door reader. A ‘Door’ in the
CardAccess is defined as a reader with one door strike relay, one
bypass input, one door contact input, and optionally one
shunting relay, and one keypad.
o Elevator – Elevator reader programming is treated quite
differently from door reader programming in the following ways.
!
A new folder tab appears in the reader record called
‘Elevator Access’
Figure 599 – The Readers Screen Elevator Access Tab
!
Access Group programming is extended to the Readers
screen, on the Elevator Access tab. You are given the
opportunity to attach extra relays to the door definition
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You can assign multiple relays to activate upon the
presentation of a valid access card, which is in contrast to a
standard door reader that can fire up to two relays (door
strike and a shunt relay) maximum
However, you are still provided with the standard door relays
in addition to the elevator control relays, when you create an
elevator reader definition.
You can find more detail on elevator control programming in the
section called ‘Elevator Control’ found later in this section
o Badge Validator – When a reader is set up as a Badge Validator,
badges that are presented to that reader will be toggled between
Enabled and Disabled. Thus, the Badge Validator reader is used
to activate and deactivate access cards (badges). Note the
following rules.
! Badge records are not created by the Badge Validator reader
! Only badge records that exist in the database can be activated
or deactivated
! The Badge Validator function will change the enabled status
of the badge only. When you present a badge to a Badge
Validator reader once, the badge will be enabled (if it’s
currently disabled). When you present the same badge again,
the badge will be disabled
! When an enabled, valid badge is presented to a Badge
Validator reader, the door strike is fired (if programmed) and
the badge is disabled
! When a disabled badge is presented to a Badge Validator
reader, the door strike is not fired, and the badge is enabled
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Assign to Access Group from Reader
Figure 600 – The Assign to Access Group from Reader Selection
Control
Access groups are usually created from the Access Groups screen,
available from a button on the CardAccess main toolbar. The ‘Assign
to Access Group from Reader’ control allows you to assign a reader
to an access group from the Readers screen.
The Assign to Access Group control contains a list of readers who
already belong to access groups. To assign a reader to an access
group from the readers screen, you click the arrow to the right of the
Assign to Access Group from Reader control and select a reader that
belongs to the access group you want to attach the current reader to.
The current reader will be attached to the same access group as the
reader that you selected, and the current reader will be assigned the
same time block as the reader that you selected.
•
Enabled
Figure 601 – The Enabled Check Box
The Enabled check box activates or deactivates the badge record.
When the Enabled check box is checked and the badge record is
saved, that badge record is downloaded to all panels where the given
badge has access.
When the Enabled check box is unchecked and the badge record is
saved, that badge record is removed from all panels, thereby
rendering the badge inoperative at all doors, system wide.
•
Report Bypass
Figure 602 – The Report Bypass Check Box
Report Bypass is enabled (checked) by default. Each panel door
connector is equipped with two inputs, which become enabled (on
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the panel door connector) automatically when a new Reader record is
saved in the CardAccess software.
One of those inputs is a Bypass Input, often called a ‘request to exit’
input. On each panel door connector, the Bypass input is treated as a
special input. When there is a contact closure (a ‘short’) across the
Bypass input, the door strike relay is fired, opening the door.
The typical use for this input is to mount a switch on the inside of a
door to allow badge holders to exit a building without the need to
present a badge to a reader to do so.
Because the number of employees exiting the building, at the end of
a workday in a large facility can generate literally thousands of
requests to exit event messages, some clients prefer to turn those
messages off. Some security teams are less interested in who is
leaving a building.
To turn Report Bypass off, uncheck the check box.
•
Bypass Unlocks
Figure 603 – The Bypass Unlocks Checkbox
Bypass Unlocks is enabled by default. The Bypass Unlocks check
box is related to the Report Bypass input above. The Bypass Unlocks
check box determines whether the bypass switch mentioned above
will be coupled to the door strike relay.
If Bypass Unlocks is checked, a closure on the bypass input will
unlock the associated door. If Bypass Unlocks is not checked, the
bypass switch will be ignored.
•
Report Access After Open
Figure 604 – The Report Access After Open Check Box
By default, when a valid badge is presented to any reader, the
CardAccess system generates a ‘Badge Valid’ event message
immediately (no delay). The system does not wait for the door to be
pulled open before reporting the badge access.
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Potentially, a cardholder could present a valid card and decide not to
enter the door. However, an event message would still be generated,
making it look like the badge holder entered the building.
To prevent false door access reporting by valid badge holders, the
CardAccess allows you to suppress Badge Valid event messages until
the door is actually opened. The system senses the state of the door
by using the door contact input (mentioned later).
When the Report Access After Open check box is checked, the panel
software will wait for the door contact to open before sending a
Badge Valid event message.
With the Report Access After Open checkbox unchecked, the panel
will send a Badge Valid event message immediately, every time a valid
badge is presented to a reader.
This event message suppression only works for Badge Valid
messages. Violation messages are not affected by the Report Access
After Open control, and are sent immediately.
•
Escort Enabled
Figure 605 – The Escort Enabled Check Box
The Escort Enabled function is disabled by default (unchecked).
When the Escort Enabled check box is checked, the reader becomes
an ‘Escort Reader’.
No essential functioning of the reader is changed. The only
noticeable change in reader behavior is when an Escort enabled
badge is presented to an Escort reader.
When the Escort attribute is enabled for a badge, that badge works as
a normal badge at any reader that is not set with the Escort Enabled
function activated.
When an Escort enabled badge is presented to an Escort enabled
reader, the reader will refuse to grant door access unless a second,
non-escort enabled badge is presented within a timeout period.
More information on Escort readers is found above in the section
entitled ‘Reader Functional Types’. To set the reader as an Escort
Reader, check the check box
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No Transaction for Valid
Figure 606 – The No Transaction for Valid Check Box
No Transaction for Valid is disabled on every reader by default. All
events are logged to the database unless those settings are overridden.
However there are some events that could be considered ‘less
significant’, such as Badge Valid messages.
In a standard system, the greatest majority of event messages are
Badge Valid messages. You can elect not to receive Badge Valid
event messages by enabling the No Transaction for Valid (check the
check box) feature on a reader port.
The benefits of not logging event messages are
o Not logging Badge Valid messages would save considerable hard
drive and database space
o The system would not need to pick up Badge Valid event
messages from panels and would likely gain some speed
improvement
The main pitfall of not logging event messages is that if you need to
reference an event for a later report on valid access activity, perhaps
during a selected hour or day, none of those events will be stored in
the database or any archive (the events are not sent to the computer
by the panel).
Note that the No Transaction for Valid check box only suppresses
Badge Valid messages. All other event messages are unaffected.
Check the No Transaction for Valid checkbox to suppress Badge
Valid event messages for one specific reader. The feature must be set
on each reader where you wish suppress valid event messages. You
are permitted to set the feature (or not) on any readers of your
choosing.
•
Suppress OTL Warning
Figure 607 – The Suppress OTL Warning Check Box
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When checked, ‘Door Open Too Long’ event messages will be
suppressed on whichever readers have this option set.
Door Open Too Long event messages are sent by a panel (to the
PC) when there has been a ‘valid door access’ (defined as a successful
badge read, and subsequently the door contact was broken), but the
door contact has not returned to the normal state (the door has not
closed) before the ‘Still Open Delay’ timer has elapsed.
The Still Open Delay timer is set in the ‘Doors’ section of the
‘Options’ tab, found in the Readers screen (Figure 608). The default
value for the Still Open Delay timer is 30 seconds. Thus, the system
will report that the door has been ‘held open’ (which is a violation) if
the door is not closed within 30 seconds.
Figure 608 – The Readers Still Open Delay Selection Control
The Suppress OTL Warning option is generally used when there is a
need to hold the door open for an extended period, such as when
there is a construction crew working in the building.
Door Open Too Long messages are enabled by default. To suppress
Door Open Too Long messages, click (check) the check box for
every reader that you wish to have suppressed.
•
Time Schedule Violate Override
Figure 609 – The Time Schedule Violate Override Check Box
Generally, badge holders are assigned ‘access rights’ to a given reader.
Those rights include the right to access a certain reader and selected
time schedules during which access is possible.
If a badge holder attempts to access a reader outside of a permitted
time schedule, or if access is attempted at an unauthorized reader, a
violation error is generated by the system and access is denied.
The Time Schedule Violate Override feature allows you to modify
the violation behavior of the reader. If the Time Schedule Violate
Override feature is enabled (check box is checked), and an
unauthorized access is attempted, the panel will still send a violation
message to the PC, but the cardholder will be admitted through the
door
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Alarm Shunt Reader
Figure 610 – The Alarm Shunt Reader Check Box
If the Alarm Shunt Reader check box is checked, the reader
continues to behave as a normal reader. However, the reader is
enhanced to treat badges that have the Alarm Shunt feature enabled
differently. Alarm Shunting behavior is fully explained in the
Personnel section of this manual
Door Control Tab
Figure 611 – The Readers Door Control Tab
All reader definitions are created with default settings, some of which
appear in the below list.
•
Every reader is enabled 24/7/365 by default
•
Every reader will accept access cards only by default
•
The Keypad port is disabled
•
There is no Free Access schedule
•
Degrade Mode is disabled
The ‘Door Control’ folder tab (Figure 611) contains a number of
controls to modify the default behavior of a given reader as explained
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below. You must be in Edit mode to change the selection in any of the
controls below.
•
Door Controls Section
o Card-Only Time Schedule
Figure 612 – The Card-Only Time Schedule Control
Note – If you are not planning on enabling a keypad at a
given door, you will not need a Card Only Time Schedule
The Card-Only Time Schedule control is used in conjunction
with the Keypad controls mentioned below. By default, all
readers are created with a (hidden) card only time schedule that
activates the reader 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. Also by
default, the reader keypad is disabled.
When a keypad is activated for a given reader, a ‘Card & Code’
time schedule or a ‘Code Only’ time schedule must be applied to
the keypad to make it operational. When this keypad schedule is
in effect, it overrides the default reader time schedule of ‘card
only’, 24 hours per day, every day of the year. The keypad time
schedule ‘reprograms’ the door to require keypad entries in
addition to (or instead of) card reads to allow entry.
The Card-Only time schedule control allows you to select a
schedule to return the reader to its default state, where only a
card is required to gain entry. All keypad time schedules are
disabled by the Card Only time schedule. The keypad is ignored
while the Card Only time schedule is in effect.
You must decide how you wish to set up your door. You will
select a Card-Only time schedule if you have a keypad enabled at
the current door, and it has a Code Only or Card & Code
schedule assigned to it, and you wish to have the keypad disabled
during certain hours, requiring only a card to gain entry during
those hours.
To select a Card-Only Time Schedule click the arrow to the right
of the Card-Only Time Schedule control and select a schedule
(Figure 612). The list of schedules is taken from the Schedules
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screen. If there are no schedules visible, you need to create some
in Schedules, available from the Main Toolbar
To disable the Card-Only Time Schedule, select ‘Not Used’ from
the Card-Only Time Schedule list.
o Free Access Time Schedule
Figure 613 – The Free Access Selection Control
Effectively, the door control relay is activated during a Free
Access schedule, unlocking a door for the duration of that
schedule.
Typically, Free Access schedules are used to unlock doors when
employees enter a building in the morning, during lunch or when
they leave at night. The doors are held unlocked at those times to
permit easy access.
To Set a Free Access Time Schedule, click the arrow to the right
of the Free Access Time Schedule control and select a schedule.
If no schedules are visible, you must create some in the
Schedules screen.
To disable the Free Access Time Schedule, select ‘Not Used’
from the Free Access Time Schedule list.
o Degrade Mode Time Schedule
Figure 614 The Degrade Mode Time Schedule Selection Control
When a panel is placed in Degrade mode, readers on that panel
are instructed to ignore badge numbers and admit any cardholder
that has the correct Facility Code (if Facility Codes are used).
This feature may prove useful when badge numbers are not
being read correctly by the readers. Since degrade mode ignores
badge numbers, cardholders with the correct facility code can still
gain entry to the building.
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The Degrade Mode Time Schedule control allows you to activate
degrade mode for each door individually. To activate degrade
mode, click the arrow to the right of the Degrade Mode Time
Schedule control and select a schedule from the list. If there are
no schedules in the list, you must create some in Schedules.
To deactivate degrade mode for a Reader, select ‘Not Used’ in
the Degrade Mode Time Schedule control
o Door Sensor Input
Figure 615 – The Door Sensor Input Selection Control
The Door Sensor Input (door contact) control sets the panel
input number that the ‘door’ will use as the door contact.
By default, the system assigns the next available odd numbered
input for the door contact function. Door one gets input 1; door
two gets input 3, etc.
The Door Sensor Input control is provided in case you wish to
override the system’s choice of input number for the door. When
set to 0, there is no door contact for the given door.
Note that any input number that gets assigned to door contact
duties through this control becomes a ‘special’ input. The
standard input messages ‘Input Normal’ and ‘Input Abnormal’
messages are changed to the door input event messages ‘Door
Forced Open’, ‘Door Now Closed’ respectively.
Further all door contact inputs have the settings of the controls
of the readers screen applied, whereas standard inputs have the
settings of the Inputs screen applied.
Note that each door contact is enabled with some default
‘behavior’. You can override that behavior by going to the Inputs
screen and creating an input definition with the same input
number as the door definition input number (termed a ‘duplicate
input definition’).
If you check the ‘Enabled’ check box in the duplicate input
definition, the door contact will report with input event
messages. If you do not check the Enabled check box, the
settings found on the input screen will override the default door
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contact setting behavior, but the input will report with door
contact type event messages.
To set the Door Sensor Input Number, click the arrows to the
right of the control, or click in the white space and type in the
number
o Bypass Input
Figure 616 – The Bypass Input Selection Control
Technically, the Bypass Input control works identically to the
Door Sensor Input mentioned above. However, the Bypass
Input sets the input number of the Request to Exit switch.
By default, all door input numbers are assigned by the system
automatically. The automatically assigned Bypass Input number
will be the next available even number.
The Bypass Input (request to exit) control sets the panel input
number that the door will use as the bypass input. This can be
any available input on the panel type that you are using.
The same rules apply as stated above for the Door Sensor Input.
You can override the default settings of the door Bypass Input
by creating a duplicate input definition in inputs. If you enable
the duplicate input, event messages will report as an input instead
of a door bypass.
To set the Bypass Input Number, click the arrows to the right of
the control, or click in the white space and type in the number
o Door Strike Relay
Figure 617 – The Door Strike Relay Selection Control
The Door Strike Relay control selects the panel relay that will be
used to operate the door strike. A relay selected to be a door
relay becomes a ‘special’ relay. Standard relay event reporting,
Output On, Output Off type messages are changed to Door
type access event messages.
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To set the Door Strike Relay Number, click the arrows to the
right of the control, or click in the white space and type in the
number
•
Keypad Settings Section
o Keypad Enabled
Figure 618 – The Keypad Enabled Check Box
If checked, the Keypad will become enabled. If unchecked, the
Keypad is disabled.
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o Disable Duress
Figure 619 – The Disable Duress Check Box
Duress is a feature that works in conjunction with the Card &
Code feature mentioned earlier in this section. Generally,
‘Duress’ is defined as an emergency situation where a valid
cardholder has an urgent need to attract the attention of security
personnel (the victim is under duress).
The classic access control Duress case is where a valid cardholder
approaches a reader and is about to present their access card. An
attacker approaches from the rear and forces the cardholder to
admit them both to the building.
At the typical ‘reader only’ door installation, there would be no
easy way for the victim to attract the attention of security
personnel. However, at a door with a keypad mounted, an
emergency code could be entered that would create a special
CardAccess event message. This message could then attract the
attention of security without alerting the attacker.
You need several things in place to use the Duress feature
!
The keypad must be enabled at all doors where the duress
feature is to be made available
!
Each door must also have a reader installed and enabled
!
Each badge holder must have a numeric PIN code entered
in their Personnel records (PIN codes don’t have to be
unique)
!
A Card & Code schedule must be in effect on each door
Thus, you will provide a keypad and reader at the door. Badge
holders will be required to present a badge and type in a PIN
code on every access (while the Card & Code schedule is in
effect).
The CardAccess system Duress feature recognizes the first
character of the PIN code typed four times as the Duress alarm.
Typically, if the wrong characters are typed in for the PIN code,
the door will remain locked.
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However, after a valid card is presented at the reader for a door,
if the first digit of that card holder’s PIN code is typed on the
keypad four times, the Duress feature is activated and a
‘violation’ class event message is generated (alerting security to an
issue at the door), but the door is unlocked as though the correct
PIN code was typed.
The fact that the door is unlocked even though the PIN code
was typed incorrectly allows security personnel to respond
without the attacker knowing about detection.
The Disable Duress check box shuts off the duress feature when
the Disable Duress check box is checked. It is suggested
however, that you leave Duress enabled for safety reasons.
o Common Code
Figure 620 – The Common Code Control
The Common Code control works in conjunction with the
Common Code Schedule control mentioned below. A ‘Common
Code’ in the CardAccess system is defined as a numeric code,
known to all cardholders that can be typed into a keypad to gain
admittance at a door without the need for an access badge.
Thus, when a door has been set to common code mode, all
cardholders will gain entry by typing the same numeric code into
the appropriate keypad. That ‘common’ code is entered into the
Common Code control for each reader (the common code does
not need to be the same for each reader).
It is important to note that there are actually two modes to the
common code control explained below.
!
Common Code Mode – When you fill a numeric code into
the Common Code control, the Common Code feature is
put in ‘Common Code’ mode for that reader.
Common code mode is as described above. While the
Common Code Schedule is in effect, the panel reader port
will be expecting badge holders to type in the common code
as defined in the Common Code control.
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Card Number Mode – When you fill in the hexadecimal
value FFFF into the Common Code Control, the Common
Code feature is put in ‘Card Number’ mode for that reader.
In Card Number mode, the panel reader port expects badge
holders to type in their card numbers (maximum 9 digits) as
defined in each individual Personnel record, for that reader.
Note the following operational issues regarding using keypad
entered card numbers to access a building (where Common
Code = FFFF).
o It would be wise for cardholders to press the * key before
entering the badge number. This clears the keypad
memory of any ‘unresolved’ digits that another user may
have typed in and left incomplete
o If facility codes are not used for a given panel, or if the
facility code is set to 0 for a given badge holder’s record,
the badge holder must type the badge number into the
keypad followed by the # symbol (the enter key) to gain
access
o If facility codes are being used at the panel being accessed,
then the badge holder must type the number ‘0’, then the
facility code (in decimal), then the badge number, then the
# symbol (the enter key) to gain access.
If using facility codes on panels that have reader ports set
to allow keypad badge number access, because the facility
code must be preceded by a 0, only facility numbers 0-9
can be typed in. Do not use facility numbers greater than
0009 (hex) at such panels (see ‘Facility Codes’ for more
information)
o Card & Pin Schedule
Figure 621 – The Card & PIN Schedule Selection Control
While this schedule is in effect, entry will not be granted to any
cardholders that do not present a valid badge at the door and
enter a valid PIN code into a keypad mounted at the same door.
To select a schedule, click the arrow to the right of the Card &
PIN Schedule control. Click the desired schedule.
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To disable Card & PIN mode (also known as card & code
mode), select ‘Not Used’ from the list of schedules and uncheck
the ‘Keypad Enabled’ check box
o Common Code Schedule
Figure 622 – The Common Code Schedule Selection Control
While this schedule is in effect, badge holders will be expected to
enter the common code as defined in the ‘Common Code’
control (described above) for that reader, in order to gain entry
through the door. Badges will be rejected.
To select a schedule, click the arrow to the right of the Common
Code Schedule control. Click the desired schedule.
To disable Common Code mode, select ‘Not Used’ from the list
of schedules and uncheck the ‘Keypad Enabled’ check box
Options Tab
Figure 623 – The Readers Screen Options Tab
The function of each of the controls on the Options folder tab is as
follows.
•
Doors Section
o Shunt Relay
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Figure 624 – The Shunt Relay Selection Control
The Shunt Relay control enables the hardware shunting relay for
a door. The hardware shunting relay is generally used to bypass
another manufacturer’s door contact switch to prevent that alarm
system from false triggering each time a door is opened, as a
result of valid access using the CardAccess system.
The panel software is designed to activate the shunting relay a
few milliseconds before the door strike relay.
As we stated previously in this manual chapter and others, input
and relay numbers are not pre-assigned in the CardAccess. Thus,
you can assign any relay on the panel to any door or function
(excepting the console relay, #73).
However, the system does automatically assign the odd
numbered on board relays for door functions and ‘reserves’ the
even numbered onboard relays for shunting functions. Even
though you are free to change those conventions, typically you
would select an even numbered relay to perform shunting
functions.
To select a relay for shunting, click the arrows to the right of the
Shunt Relay control, or click in the white space and type in a
number
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o Door Strike Time/Elevator Relay Duration
Figure 625 – The Door Strike Time Control
The dual function Door Strike Time/Elevator Relay Duration
control allows you to select the amount of time (in seconds) that
the door strike (or elevator relay) will energize before releasing
and returning to the relaxed state.
The control is dual function because, if the reader has been set
up as an elevator reader (see above sections) this control selects
the elevator relay energize time duration. If the reader has been
set up as a door reader, this control selects the door strike time.
The label on the control changes to reflect its function when you
set the reader to an elevator reader (Figure 626)
Figure 626 – The Elevator Reader Duration Control
o Intrusion Delay
Figure 627 – The Intrusion Delay Control
The Intrusion delay control selects the amount of time (in
seconds) that the system will wait before reporting a ‘Door
Forced’ event message. When this control is set to 0 (the default),
door forced messages are reported immediately.
When set to a number other than 0, the system will wait the
specified time before reporting the door ajar. However, if the
door is returned to closed status before the timeout period has
expired, the door forced message will not be reported.
To set the Intrusion Delay, click the arrows to the right of the
control or click in the white space and type the number
o Still Open Delay
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Figure 628 – The Still Open Delay Control
The Still Open Delay selects the amount of time (in seconds) that
the system will wait before broadcasting a ‘Door Open Too
Long’ event message.
When a door has been opened as a result of a valid badge read,
but the door was not returned to the closed position, the system
will wait the amount of time selected in the Still Open Delay
timer before reporting ‘Door Open Too Long’.
The timer is only used for the first open too long delay. If the
door remains open long term, the system will rebroadcast the
Door Open Too long event messages every three minutes.
To set the Still Open Delay, click the arrows to the right of the
control or click in the white space and type the number
o Lock Control
Figure 629 – The Lock Control Selection Control
The Lock Control selector determines when the system will
release the door strike relay. There are three options.
!
On Open – The door strike relay is released as soon as the
door contact is broken. Warning, you must use a door
contact with this setting or the system will have no way of
determining if the door has been opened
!
On Close – The door strike relay is released when the door
is closed (when door contact is closed). A door contact must
be used
!
On Timeout – The system will use the timer value found in
the ‘Door Strike Time’ control to determine how long to
hold the door strike relay activated
o Time & Attendance Type
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Figure 630 – The Time & Attendance Selection Control
There is more information on the Time & Attendance function
in the Badge Holders In List section of the manual. The Time &
Attendance setting determines:
! The type of event message generated upon a valid badge read
! The In/Out status of a given badge holder
There are three selections (and three Time & Attendance reader
types).
! In – When the Time & Attendance Type is set to ‘In’ for a
given reader, that reader will report ‘Badge Clock In’ event
messages. The In/Out status of a card holder will be changed
to ‘In’ after gaining valid access at a Time & Attendance In
reader
! Out – When the Time & Attendance Type is set to ‘Out’ for
a given reader, that reader will report ‘Badge Clock Out’ event
messages. The In/Out status of a card holder will be changed
to ‘Out’ after gaining valid access at a Time & Attendance
Out reader
! In/Out – The In/Out Time & Attendance function uses one
reader to clock a badge holder in and out. A bi-directional
capable reader (like a Weigand swipe reader) is needed, and
the badge format type must be set to ‘Insertion’ (see the
Badge Formats section of this manual).
Badge Clock In is accomplished by swiping a badge in the
forward direction. Badge Clock Out is accomplished by
swiping the same badge in the opposite direction, on the same
reader.
To select a Time & Attendance type, click the arrow to the
right of the Time & Attendance selection control and click
your selection
o Two Person Reader Type
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Figure 631 – The Two Person Reader Type Selection Control
The Two Person Reader Type is explained in detail above, in the
first part of the Readers chapter. The menu choices are as
follows.
!
In – Reader acts as a Two Person In reader
!
Out – Reader acts as a Two Person Out reader
!
Out w/Override – Reader acts as a Two Person Out reader,
but permits one remaining occupant to exit through the
reader ‘alone’ (but generates a violation message)
!
Always – Reader always requires two badge reads to permit
entry to a door
To select a Two Person reader type, click the arrow to the right
of the Two Person Reader Type control and click your selection.
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Two Badge Timer Section
Figure 632 – The Two Badge Timer Control
o Second Read Timeout – The Two Badge Timer is the timer
value used by any reader type that requires two badge reads. The
timer is started when the first badge is read. If the timer expires
before the second badge is read, a violation event message is
generated. Two badge functions are explained more completely
in the first part of the Readers section above.
To select a Two-Badge Timer value, click the arrows to the right
of the Second Read Timeout control or click in the white space
and type in a value.
•
APB Control Section
Figure 633 – The Anti Passback Controls
See the beginning of the Readers chapter for more detail on AntiPassback. Recall that a reader with the APB function enabled
requires that a badge holder present a badge to an In reader, and
subsequently to an Out reader (in that prescribed order). If the badge
is presented to either reader more than once, a violation condition
occurs and the reader refuses re-admittance to the cardholder
(termed ‘hard’ Anti-Passback).
o APB Type – APB Type can be set to one of the following.
!
In – The reader is set to be an Anti-Passback In reader
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!
Out – The reader is set to be an Anti-Passback Out reader
!
Neutral – (the default) Anti Passback is disabled at the
reader
o APB Violate Override
Figure 634 – The APB Violate Override Check Box
When the APB Violate Override check box is checked, the panel
will allow a badge holder to open a door protected by an APB In
or Out reader multiple times, but will generate a violation event
messages (termed ‘soft’ Anti-Passback) each time the same
reader is accessed by the same badge. In other words, door reentries are permitted but are seen as a violation by the system
o Duration Use Time
Figure 635 – The Readers Duration Use Time Control
Duration Use is more fully explained in the chapter called
Personnel. The Readers Duration Use Time control works in
conjunction with the Personnel check box called ‘Duration Use’
(Figure 636).
Figure 636 – The Personnel Duration Use Check Box
When a Duration Use Time value is set at an APB reader, and a
badge that has the Duration Use feature enabled is used to access
that reader, the card holder will be allowed to re-enter at that
reader after the Duration Use Time has expired (timed AntiPassback).
However, any card holders that do not have the Duration Use
feature enabled will be denied re-entry capability at every APB
enabled door regardless of the Duration Use Time value.
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To set the Duration Use Time value, click the arrow buttons to
the right of the Duration Use Time control or click in the white
space and type the value in, 1 to 2700 minutes
•
Vehicle Tag Superterm Reader Link
Figure 637 – The Vehicle Tag Superterm Reader Link
The Vehicle Superterm Reader Link selection control allows you to
logically link the current reader with a second reader (on the same
panel only) so that both readers can perform Vehicle Tag functions
in conjunction with one another.
More information is available in the beginning of this chapter. Two
readers are used to perform vehicle tag functions, a badge reader and
a vehicle tag reader. In the Vehicle Tag Superterm Reader Link
Control, you will open the ‘badge’ reader record and you will select a
reader from the list that is to act as the Vehicle Tag reader.
To select a reader, click the arrow to the right of the Vehicle Tag
Superterm Reader Link control, click on the selected reader.
Priorities Tab
Figure 638 – The Readers Screen Priorities Tab
The Priorities folder tab is used to set the alert priority levels of the
various Reader event messages. Priority levels are used by the system to
determine which part of the CardAccess main screen to display the
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various event reader type messages (the Events or Alerts grids). Every
possible Reader event message is mentioned on the Priorities tab.
The function of each of the controls on the Priorities folder tab is as
follows.
•
Priority Settings
The Priority Settings section sets the priority of each type of alert that
you would normally want to have displayed because they are (mostly)
violation type messages.
o Priority – The Priority spin control allows you to set the
‘numeric significance’ of the given alert type. How alert priority
levels are used depends on the settings of the CardAccess main
screen controls. See the manual section entitled ‘Setting Up
Priorities’ for more information.
To set a Priority level for an alert type, click the arrow buttons to
the right of the Priority spin control or click in the white space
and type in a number.
o Requires Alert Response – If checked the ‘Requires Alert
Response’ feature will be enabled for the given event type. The
Requires Alert Response feature engine will force an operator to
respond to an alert by popping up an alert response window that
mandates that the operator manually click a button to move an
alert from the Alerts Grid to the Events Grid. For more
information see the manual section entitled ‘Setting Up
Priorities’.
o Activate Console Relay – When checked, the system will fire
the Console Relay every time an alert of the type indicated is
received from the reader. Note that the Console Relay (relay 73)
must be enabled at the panel before it can be activated (see the
manual sections entitled Panels or Relays)
•
Miscellaneous Priorities
The Miscellaneous Priorities section has been endowed with ‘special
properties’. All of the event messages mentioned in this section (see
below) are programmed to be archived to the database by default
automatically (and not displayed in the CardAccess Events or Alerts
grids).
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To force display of these event messages, the ‘Enable Oper
Acknowledge’ check box must be checked beside each event type
that you prefer to have displayed.
o Enable Oper Acknowledge – Enable Oper Acknowledge is
disabled by default. When disabled, all event types mentioned in
the Miscellaneous Priorities section will be automatically
archived.
This means that operators will never see a display of alert types
mentioned in this section unless you check the Enable Oper
Acknowledge check box for that alert type.
o Priority – The Priority spin control allows you to set the
‘numeric significance’ of the given alert type. How alert priority
levels are used depends on the settings of the CardAccess main
screen controls. See the manual section entitled ‘Setting Up
Priorities’ for more information.
To set a Priority level for an alert type, click the arrow buttons to
the right of the Priority spin control or click in the white space
and type in a number.
o Requires Alert Response – If checked the ‘Requires Alert
Response’ feature will be enabled for the given event type. The
Requires Alert Response feature engine will force an operator to
respond to an alert by popping up an alert response window that
mandates that the operator manually click a button to move an
alert from the Alerts Grid to the Events Grid. For more
information see the manual section entitled ‘Setting Up
Priorities’.
o Manual Control Privilege – The manual Control Privilege
selection control sets the manual control access level of the
reader. This feature affects how the reader is displayed in the
‘Doors’ manual control screen, available from the CardAccess
main toolbar. See the manual section entitled ‘Manual Control’
for more information.
To set the Manual Control privilege level for the given reader,
click the arrow to the right of the Manual Control Privilege
selection control and click the desired privilege level.
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CCTV Tab
Figure 639 – The Readers Screen CCTV Tab
The CCTV tab (Figure 639) for a given reader contains controls that
determine when the CCTV command string mentioned in the CCTV
Command Name control will be sent.
The function of each of the controls on the CCTV folder tab is as
follows.
•
CCTV Activation Conditions – The CCTV Activation Conditions
check boxes determine which types of alerts will cause the
transmission of the CCTV string. You may select any or all of the
conditions indicated by clicking each condition (checked means
selected).
•
CCTV Command Name – This is a list of the CCTV commands
that were created in the System Settings, CCTV tab (see the manual
section entitled ‘System Settings’ for more information). You will
select a command to be ‘bound’ to the given reader. That command
will be transmitted from the CCTV serial port each time an event of
the type(s) detailed in the CCTV Activation Conditions section is
received by the CardAccess software.
To select a CCTV Command Name click to arrow to the right of the
CCTV Command Name control and click your selection.
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Elevator Access Tab
Figure 640 – The Readers Elevator Access Tab
The Elevator Access tab is not visible unless the Reader Type is set to
‘Elevator’ on the ‘General’ tab of the reader definition. The Elevator
Access tab is not visible unless the ‘Using Elevator Readers’ check box is
checked in the associated Panel definition (see ‘Panels’ for more
information).
The Elevator Access tab is divided into an upper half and a lower half.
The upper half lists the access groups that have the current reader
included. The lower half of the screen lists all of the relays that have been
defined in the Relays screen (for more information see ‘Relays’).
Generally, for a given reader you highlight a selected access group in the
top half of the screen, and you click whichever relays you wish to activate
for that access group in the bottom half of the screen.
Functionally, you are first setting the mode of a given reader to ‘Elevator’.
Then, you are using the Elevator Access tab to assign selected relays to
selected access groups for that reader only.
You have then created a situation where a card holder who belongs to a
given access group can access a reader that has relays assigned for that
access group, and fire each one of those relays simultaneously upon the
presentation of a valid badge. In this way, elevator call buttons can be
activated for selected floors. See the section entitled ‘Elevator Control’ at
the end of this chapter for more detailed information on Elevator
Control.
You can elect to assign relays to all access groups listed or none of the
access groups listed. First, select an access group on the top half of the
screen by clicking it. Then click on each relay that you wish to fire when a
card with that access group is presented (checking the check box)
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Map Tab
Figure 641 – The Readers Screen Map Tab
The Map tab has controls that allow you to add or edit a map for the
current reader. The Map tab is not visible unless the ‘Use Facility Map’
Option is enabled in the System Settings. For more detailed information
on the creation of maps see the manual section entitled ‘Maps’.
The function of each of the controls on the Map folder tab is as follows.
•
Facility Map for This Device – Displays the name of the map that
is attached to the current reader
•
Map Description – An area where you can add a text description of
the map
•
Size Image to Fit Check Box – Image bitmaps come in all shapes
and sizes. The CardAccess Maps image view control is set by default
to stretch the image
•
View Maps Button – Click this button to open the Maps creation
screen where you can create or edit a map.
•
Remove Map Button – This button is only available while in Edit
mode. Click it to delete the map
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Elevator Control
Figure 642 – The Readers Elevator Access Tab
Most of those reading this section will know that the CardAccess
software is a software interface used to program and monitor
Continental’s line of access control panels.
The generic design of the Continental Instruments access control panels
offers the flexibility to assign those panels to virtually any access control
function. Elevator Control is one such function.
When we say “Elevator Control”, we essentially mean two things.
• The ability of the Continental access control panels to limit access into
and out of the elevator ‘cab’ (call the elevator and open and close the
elevator door)
• The ability of the Continental panels to limit access to a given floor or
set of floors (enable or disable selected floor selection buttons). In
general, these limits can be assigned on a per person basis or can
permit ‘everyone’ access based on a time schedule.
Currently the Superterm and the Smarterm access controls panel are the
only Continental panels equipped with firmware capable of performing
elevator control. If you intend to use a Smarterm, you must upgrade the
memory to at least 256K. The Superterm comes with 256K standard,
enough to handle elevator control. For the examples in this discussion we
will use the Superterm panel.
As you might imagine, the best place to start when trying to
understand how to apply Continental hardware to an elevator control
situation, is to define the problems you are trying to solve first.
In the case of an elevator control application, you must decide the
following:
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Do you need to limit access to the elevator cab?
Do you need to limit access to a given floor or set of floors?
Who is to have access to the elevator cab?
Who is allowed access to each floor?
Once the problem set is defined, we can bring in Continental’s line of
sophisticated hardware to apply to each problem in turn. Let’s create
a few examples to illustrate the configuration issues.
Example 1 Summary – Full Control
In this example we want to limit access to the Elevator cab and we want
to limit which floors a given ‘rider’ on the elevator has access to.
Example 2 Summary – Limited Floor Access Only
In this example, we want to allow anyone into the elevator cab, but we
want to limit which floors a given rider on the elevator has access to.
For both examples let’s say we will have ten floor selection buttons inside
the elevator. The lower five floors will be available to anyone who enters
the elevator cab, and the top five selection buttons will remain
unavailable unless you are specially authorized. In other words, there are
a number of unrestricted floors in the building and some restricted floors
too.
Hardware Considerations
As we have discussed, the hardware chosen for the application will
depend on the problem definition. Let’s talk about some generalities first.
In the simplest CardAccess installation, our panel may be connected to a
switch, which is mounted at a door. When that switch is activated, the
panel activates a built in relay, which is connected to an electronic door
lock, which unlocks the door.
So Continental panels can be viewed as intelligent switching devices.
Activate an input; the panel activates a relay based on rules you set in the
CardAccess software.
The type of input device used to control a Continental panel is optional.
You can use a switch, a keypad or a reader. The panel is flexible enough
to accept any or all of those devices as input devices. All of those input
devices have but one mission inside the panel hardware – when an input
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device is triggered, a relay or a group of relays will be activated based on
rules that you as the CardAccess Administrator set up in the software.
Let’s look at the typical elevator. It has a push button on the outside of
the cab so you can summon the elevator. Once you enter the cab, you
usually find several floor ‘selection’ buttons.
Thus, to add security to the typical elevator you will perhaps limit who
goes into the elevator cab and/or you will limit what selection buttons
are made available to a given rider.
Example Elevator Control Implementations
Example 1 – Full Control
General Considerations
Since we want to limit access to the elevator cab in this example, we can’t
permit a push button on the wall outside of the cab. We will want to
replace the button with a card reader or a keypad. This will the require
that anyone who wishes to gain access to the elevator, present the system
with some means to identify them before being permitted to enter the
elevator cab.
Since the elevator call button is a very simple device that basically ‘shorts’
two wires together, we can replace that button with a relay that performs
the same function.
The Superterm hardware has 17 on board relays. Any of these relays can
be used to replace a call button. Some of these 17 relays are better suited
for this application than others. We will talk about that shortly.
Generally, you will disconnect and remove the elevator’s floor call
button, and bring that call button’s wires back to a relay on the
Superterm. When we activate that relay, it will short the call wires (in
place of the button). When you turn off that relay it will release the short
across the call button wires. The relay will ‘mimic’ the operation of the
call button. Except now, we have software control over the function of
that relay. The elevator call button input will ‘see’ what we want it to see,
and we will gain control over when we want it to happen.
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Input Considerations
Our goal in example 1 is to place an input device on the wall in place of
the call button. You will be required to run the appropriate wire type
from the reader to wherever the panel is mounted. Regarding input
device types, you have three options:
• Card Reader
• Keypad
• Button
A card reader or keypad are commonly used. This will force anyone
wanting to gain entry to the elevator to identify themselves to the
CardAccess system. This is very useful for creating detailed reports of
who was using the elevator, how much they used it and when.
Note that you could also connect a button to the Superterm in place of a
keypad or reader. You may think that this was exactly what we had
originally, why do it?
It is not really what we had originally. When you insert the Superterm
panel in between the call button and the elevator control circuits, it allows
you to have more control over the call button’s operation.
You can create history files of when the button was used. You can
disable the button outside of specified hours of the day. Those functions
may not be available from the elevator manufacturer, so you pick up
some rudimentary control of granting access to the elevator cab.
By far the biggest reason to insert a CardAccess system into an elevator
control application is to gain ‘identity control’ capability. You can prevent
unauthorized use of the elevator and you can identify who was in the
elevator, at what time of day. So for example 1, since we want to be able
to identify the elevator occupants, we will add a reader.
There are several types of card readers available (that we won’t discuss
here). We will choose a ‘proximity reader’ available from Continental
Instruments (with a 36 bit output, say).
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Output Considerations
The second half of the problem for this example stated that we wanted
to control the floor selection buttons inside the elevator cab. Again, a
floor selection button is simply a momentary switch.
Our goal here will be to splice a relay into one wire (the hot wire, say) of
each floor selection switch. We only need to put relays in the circuits of
the switches that we want to control. These relays will hold the line open
unless the relay is energized by the panel.
With the connection between the elevator circuits and the floor selection
switches now broken and ‘normally open’, the floor call button will be
‘dead’ to anyone entering the elevator cab. Now we have software
control over whether that switch will be active or not.
In the CardAccess software, you now have several choices of how you
want to approach control of these ‘switched’ floor selection buttons.
Regarding the Operation of Relays
• Relays can be energized on a time schedule
• Relays can be energized based on some input change of status
• Relays can be made to energize when a particular badge or group of
badges are presented at a reader.
• Relays can be made to energize on certain types of badge or door
events (see the section on virtual inputs).
Our example 1 project requires that we use a reader at the elevator door
to activate the floor selection buttons. Since we are using access cards to
gain entry to the elevator cab, let’s create a situation where we activate a
floor button or a group of buttons based on which cardholder presents
their card.
What this means inside the CardAccess software is that we will program
a card to activate a number of relays. If you present a valid card, and that
card is allowed at that elevator, at that time of day, then we will allow the
relays that are connected to (some or all of) the elevator floor selection
buttons to be energized (completing the floor button circuits).
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Example 2 – Limited Floor Access Only
General Discussion
In this example, we will allow everyone access into the elevator cab.
However, we want some buttons on the elevator control panel to be
available to everyone, and some buttons to be available to only those
riders that we authorize.
Example 2 is identical in many respects to example 1, except that we will
not add a card reader at the elevator entrance. We will leave the call
button in place so anyone may gain entry to the elevator cab.
However, we will mount a reader inside the elevator cab so that once a
rider is inside the elevator, they can present an access card to that reader.
We will then control which buttons become available for that user.
We will not discuss the similarities to example 1, just the expected
differences. The method of connecting relays, readers and inputs is
identical to what you have already read in example 1. Below are the
differences:
Example 2 Implementation
• We will leave the elevator call button in place outside the elevator
door
• We will move the reader to inside the elevator cab. The connection
for this reader is the same as example 1
• There are some floor selection buttons that will be available to every
elevator passenger. We will leave those floor selection buttons
connected to the standard elevator controls (they will not be
connected to the Superterm)
• As in the previous example, let’s assume that we have 10 total floor
selection buttons. Five of those buttons are ‘unrestricted’ and five are
‘restricted’. Further, regarding those five restricted buttons, there will
be some riders that have permission to use restricted buttons. Let’s
also say that there will be no rider who has access to every one of the
five floors
• In both examples, only the 5 restricted buttons need to be connected
to the Superterm
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Hardware General Considerations (both examples)
• The Superterm and Smarterm relays are FormC type, rated at 2Amps
@ 28Volts. Do not exceed the recommended current.
• Proper shielding must be provided on the reader and input
connections. Elevator circuits are quite noisy and transient voltages
can interfere with the card reading capability of a reader circuit.
Improperly shielded inputs can receive transient voltages, which can
cause false triggering.
• Be careful how and where you run the panel wiring. Keep relay and
power wires bundled together, keep input and reader wires bundled
separately. Never put reader and input wiring in the same conduit or
in the proximity of motor control circuits, power circuits, RF circuits
or high voltage circuits. Noise interference could cause the readers to
misread intermittently. Once wiring is already installed (incorrectly),
intermittent reader problems become very hard to diagnose.
• The hardware design of the Superterm provides 17 on-board, built-in
relays. If you find that you need more relays, up to 3 relay expansion
cards can be added for a maximum of 48 additional relays (48
expansion + 17 on board relays = total of 65 relays maximum).
Expansion relays are electrically identical to the on-board relays
• The hardware design of the Superterm provides 24 built-in hardware
inputs and 32 software ‘virtual’ inputs (see the manual section on
Virtual Inputs for more information). If you need more inputs, up to
3 input expansion cards can be added for a total of 48 additional
inputs (73 inputs maximum).
• The hardware design of the Smarterm provides 16 built in inputs and
9 built in relays.
• The Smarterm can accept up to 4 relay or input expansion cards for
up to 73 relays or 81 inputs maximum.
• You can mix input expansion cards with relay expansion cards. But,
the total number of (any type) expansion cards cannot exceed 3 on the
Superterm, 4 on the Smarterm.
• Each Relay expansion card comes equipped with 16 relays and 8
unsupervised inputs.
• Each Input expansion cards comes equipped with 16 supervised
inputs and no relays.
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• Panel mounted inputs 1 through 24 can be used as Supervised or
Unsupervised on the Superterm, programmable through the
CardAccess software. Panel mounted inputs on the Smarterm are
unsupervised.
• Read and understand the entire Superterm and Smarterm Installation
and Service manuals. All the specifications and connection
information for the panels and all of their accessories are in those
manuals.
Notes On Inputs and Relays
Doors – All Continental panel hardware was designed around the idea
that the panels would be used to secure ‘doors’. However, the panel
hardware was made flexible enough so that it does not need to be used to
secure a door specifically.
The Superterm panel was designed to support 8 doors, the Smarterm
support 4. But what are ‘doors’ to the hardware installer?
It was assumed by the hardware designers that several things might be
found at a door:
• A reader of some (standard) type
• A keypad of some (standard) type (made optional)
• A door contact switch
• A door ‘Request to Exit’ button (also called a bypass)
• A relay to activate the lock on the door
• A second relay to bridge across another manufacturer’s alarm system
(made optional)
What we provide at every door is a way to gain entry at the door (the
reader), a way to operate the lock set (the relay), a way to know when the
door opens and closes (the door contact) and a way to get back out the
door from inside (the request to exit button).
Those items listed above comprise what the designers at Continental
would call a ‘logical grouping’. Their thinking was that all of those things
that would be found at a given door should be grouped together on a
common connector.
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However, since it could not be guaranteed that our panels were going to
be used to control doors at all, the panel hardware and software needed
to be flexible enough to be able to be applied to any situation.
When you look at the physical design of the Superterm, you will notice
that there are several items grouped on each door connector. The reader,
keypad, door contact input, and bypass switch input can all be found on
the same connector. There are eight such connectors on the Superterm,
all with the same configuration.
This is somewhat misleading though. The physical layout of the board
implies that items connected to door connector one will all belong to the
same door (door 1).
That does not have to be true. All of the inputs and the relays on the
Superterm PC board are completely programmable. The panel firmware
does not make any default assignments, of any inputs, to any relays as
shipped from the factory. The logical grouping of those items is
completely under the control of the CardAccess software.
Thus, as a hardware installer and designer, you are free to use any input
on the board for any purpose. Assign any input to any door if you want.
Assign an input as an ordinary input. Or don’t program it at all. You will
decide that, while programming the CardAccess software.
So part of the CardAccess software programming will include linking
inputs and relays together such that, when there is a change in an input, a
relay will fire (typically).
To save time for the CardAccess administrator, some of the linking of
readers, inputs and relays is done for you automatically as you create
‘door’ definitions in the Configuration->Readers screen.
Whenever you go to Configuration->Readers and create a new door
definition on any panel, some automatic assignments are made for you,
to save time. When you create a door, the software automatically:
• Enables the reader port of that door
• Enables a predefined odd numbered relay to operate the electronic
door lock. Door relays are always odd numbered relays if assigned by
the CardAccess software
• Enables a predefined odd numbered input for the door contact (so
you can tell if the door is open or closed)
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• Enables a predefined even numbered input for the ‘Request to Exit’
switch (It opens the door to let you out from the inside, without the
need to present an identity card)
The software also ‘reserves’ as optional the below two hardware items.
These items are not assigned when you create the door but they are
considered as part of the door hardware if you do assign them.
• A second relay for ‘alarm shunting’. This is a special relay that activates
milliseconds before the door strike relay. It is commonly used to
prevent another manufacturer’s alarm system from triggering when
the door is opened. A predefined even numbered relay is
automatically assigned to each door by the CardAccess software for
the alarm shunt relay. The relay does not have to be used for alarm
shunting. This relay does not have to be assigned to the door at all
• A keypad. The assumption is that you will not use a keypad by default,
as this is less secure than using an access card. You can enable the
keypad from inside the readers screen
Thus, the ‘door’ is considered a special grouping of hardware
components by the CardAccess software. As we stated, the panel
hardware has no ready-made input and relay assignments. Some of those
assignments take place automatically when you create door definitions in
the Readers screen of the CardAccess software.
The primary reason why we have taken significant time to explain door
assignments in a section about elevator control is that these automatic
input and relay assignments change the event messages that these inputs
and relays generate. And if you do create door definitions, some relays
and inputs have already been allocated.
You need to keep this in mind when you start to assign relays and inputs
for your elevator application. Look in the readers screen to see what
inputs and relays have already been used before you try to assign them to
your elevator.
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Software Setup for Elevator Control
Step 1 – Program the Panel For Elevator Control
To set a panel up to support elevator readers, do the following.
• Open the Panels screen, available from the Configuration menu
• Go into Edit mode for an existing panel definition or create a new
panel definition.
• Click the ‘Using Elevator Readers’ check box (so it is checked)
Figure 643 – The Panels Screen, Using Elevator Readers Check Box
highlighted
• Click the ‘Save’ button.
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Step 2 – Program the Reader for Elevator Control
• Open the Readers screen, available from the Configuration menu
• Click the Edit mode on an existing reader, or create a New reader
definition.
• Click ‘Elevator’ in the Reader Type section. Once Elevator is selected,
the “Elevator Access” folder tab will become visible.
Figure 644 – The Readers General Tab, Elevator Selected
Step 3 – Program the Elevator Access Groups
• Open the Readers screen, available from the Configuration menu.
• Assuming that you have accomplished step 2 on at least one reader,
use the scrollbar to locate a reader that has a Reader Type set to
‘Elevator’
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• Go into Edit mode. Click the “Elevator Access” folder tab. You will
see something similar to the Figure 645.
Figure 645 – The Readers Elevator Access Tab
Notice that the Elevator Access tab is divided into an upper and lower
section. The upper section is a listing of all of the access groups that have
been programmed into the CardAccess software that include the reader
that you are currently looking at.
The object in this screen is to select one or more access groups that
already belong to cardholders, whom you wish to have access to elevator
call buttons. You select the given access group in the top part of the
screen by clicking it, and then click on each relay in the ‘Relay Call
Buttons’ section of the screen. Each relay that has a green check mark
beside it will fire whenever a badge with the selected access group is
presented to the reader you are currently editing.
If your access group section is blank, open the Access Groups screen,
available from a button on the CardAccess main toolbar and create some
access groups (if there are none).
Or, if you see access groups in the Access Groups screen but none
appear in the Elevator Access tab of the reader you are editing, you need
to include the reader you are currently editing in some of your existing
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access groups. See the manual section entitled Access Groups for more
information.
For example, in the figure above reader 1-1 is highlighted. If there were
no access groups visible in the Access Groups half of the folder tab, we
would open the Access Groups screen. We would then add a schedule to
reader 1-1 in some existing access group(s), if there were existing access
groups that we wanted to use.
Or, we would create a new access group where we would want to make
sure that reader 1-1 did have a time schedule programmed. Once reader
1-1 appears in any access group (and has a time schedule assigned), that
access group becomes visible in the Elevator Access tab of the Readers
screen.
The lower section of the Elevator Access tab is a listing of all of the
Relays that have been programmed into the CardAccess software. If the
lower half of the screen is blank, open the Relays screen, available from
the Configuration menu and create some relay definitions. See the section
entitled Relays for more information.
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Inputs
Figure 646 – The Inputs Screen
The Inputs screen is a configuration screen where you create
configuration records that activate panel hardware inputs, hardware
expansion inputs and software inputs. Firstly, there are several ‘categories’
of inputs.
• Door (Reader) Inputs – These are hardware inputs whose input
connections are mounted on the door connectors of each panel. The
panel design assumes that you will prefer to assign two inputs per
door, so those input connectors are collocated with the reader and
keypad connections
• Auxiliary Inputs – These are hardware inputs that are usually
mounted along the periphery of the panel PC board. The use for these
inputs is to connect auxiliary devices such as motion detectors, fire
detectors and the like.
• Virtual Inputs – ‘Virtual Inputs’ are software inputs. There are no
hardware connections for virtual inputs. Essentially, virtual inputs are
linked by software to door event messages. See the section below
entitled ‘Virtual Inputs’ for more information.
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• Expansion Inputs – Expansion inputs are accessory inputs
obtained by adding input or relay expansion cards to a panel. The
Superterm and Smarterm panels support expansion cards; the
Miniterm and Microterm do not.
Each input expansion card provides 16 additional supervised or
unsupervised inputs. Each relay expansion cards provides 8 expansion
inputs. You can mount 3 expansion cards of any type to a Superterm
and 4 expansion cards to a Smarterm.
A maximum of 81 total inputs is supported on any panel. Input #81 is
reserved for the ‘Tamper’ input on all panel types and may not be
used for any other purpose once enabled. See below for more details.
The typical use for the on board panel inputs for each panel type is
shown below in Table 9. However, remember that all panel input
assignments are completely programmable. This means that any input
can be assigned to any function (or any door). Below is a listing of how
the inputs are typically assigned by the system.
Table 9 – Standard Panel Input Assignments
Superterm
1-16
17-24
25-72
81
Doors
Auxiliary (on board)
Expansion Cards
Tamper Only
Smarterm
1-8
9-16
17-80
81
Doors
Auxiliary (on board)
Expansion Cards
Tamper Only
Miniterm
1-4
5-8
81
Doors
Auxiliary (on board)
Tamper Only
Microterm
1-2
81
Doors or Auxiliary (on board)
Tamper Only
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Create a Basic Input Definition
Note that when you create a new input definition the system provides the
following default settings automatically (unless you override those
settings by changing the settings in the appropriate controls):
•
Input is enabled
•
Input is active 24 hours per day, every day of the year including
holidays (default 24/7/365 enable schedule).
•
Input is set to normally closed mode
•
Input is set to unsupervised mode
•
Input is set with no Alert Delay and no Alert Reset time
•
Response Required is disabled
•
Alert Reporting is enabled. ‘Input Abnormal’ and ‘Input Normal’
event messages will be sent by the panel
•
Set to not activate the console relay
•
Set not to dial up on any condition
To create a basic input definition, do the following.
•
Open Inputs – Open the Inputs screen by clicking the Inputs
shortcut, available from the Configuration menu
•
Click New – Click the ‘New’ button
Figure 647 – The New Button
•
Select a Panel – Click the arrow button to the right of the ‘Panels’
control and scroll up or down to select a panel. If there are no panels
visible in the list, you need to create some panel definitions in the
Panels screen, available from the Configuration menu
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Figure 648 – The Panel Selection Control
•
Create a Name – Type a descriptive name for the input in the
‘Name’ field. It is advised that this name clearly describe the location
or intended use for the input
Figure 649 – The Name Test Field
•
Select an Input Number – Click the buttons to the right of the
Input Number control select an input number. See the section on the
Input Number below for detailed information
Figure 650 – The Input Number Spin Control
•
Click Save – Click the ‘Save’ button
Figure 651 – The Save Button
You have just created an Input definition with all of the default
operational settings as mentioned in the first part of this section.
A detailed view of each of the Inputs screen controls follows.
General Tab
• Panel
Figure 652 – The Panel Selection Control
You need to select the panel that the input will be associated with
before you can set the operating parameters of that input. The Panel
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selection control contains a list of all panels that were created in the
Panels screen.
To select a panel, click the arrow button to the right of the Panel
control. Scroll up or down to locate the selected panel and click on it.
If there are no panels in the Panels list, you need to open the Panels
screen, available from the Configuration menu and create some panel
definitions.
• Input #
Figure 653 – The Input Number Selection Control
The Input Number selection control allows you to select which
numbered input you wish to activate on a given panel or any attached
input expansion cards.
By default, all on board and expansion card inputs are disabled. They
must be activated by a CardAccess software configuration, which is
downloaded to the panel. The configuration instructs the panel as to
which hardware it should enable, and with what operating parameters.
Note that some input numbers may have been pre-assigned in the
Readers screen. When you create reader definitions in the Readers
screen, some inputs are automatically assigned to doors (two inputs
per door by default).
If you elect to create an input record in the Inputs screen, that has the
same input number as an input that has been assigned to a door in the
Readers screen, you have created a ‘duplicate input definition’.
When you create a duplicate input definition, the settings in the Inputs
screen will override the system defaults for the door input. See the
manual section entitled ‘Duplicate Definitions’ for more information.
To select an input number, click either of the arrow keys to the right
of the Input# field, or click in the white space and type a number.
Note the following issues.
o Each panel type has a different maximum number of inputs as
follows.
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Table 10 – Panel Onboard Input Numbers
Panel
Type
Onboard
Inputs
Reader
Inputs
Expansion
Inputs
Tamper
Input
Superterm
Smarterm
Miniterm
Microterm
1-24
1-16
1-8
1-2
1-16
1-8
1-4
1-2
25-73
17-80
None
None
81
81
81
81
Notice in Table 11 that the column marked ‘Reader Inputs’
indicates the input number range that is automatically assigned to
Reader ports if they are activated. All inputs on the panel can be
used for any purpose, but if you create a door in the Readers
screen, two inputs will be assigned to that door unless you
manually override the automatic selection.
The CardAccess software automatically assigns the next available,
lowest numbered two inputs, to the next reader record that you
create. Door 1 always gets inputs 1 & 2. Door 2 always gets inputs
3& 4, and so on.
o The system has no way of determining which type of panel you
are configuring. Thus, you must exercise caution that you do not
attempt to create input numbers that do not exist on a given panel
type
o Some input numbers are already (activated and) allocated to
reader ports on the selected panel. If you don’t not want to
override the default settings for inputs already allocated to reader
ports, do not create input definitions in the Inputs screen with the
same input numbers that were previously assigned to reader ports
inputs (see ‘Duplicate Definitions’)
o The Superterm and Smarterm panels can support input expansion
cards. The Miniterm and Microterm have no expansion capability
• Name
Figure 654 – The Name Text Field
You will use the ‘Name’ field to enter a descriptive name for the input.
Be sure to create a name that describes the location or the function of
the input. This name will be attached to all input event messages
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involving this input (Figure 689). The field will accept any
combination of letters, numbers or symbols.
Figure 655 – Input Event Messages
• Group
Figure 656 – The Group Selection Control
Use the Group selection control to assign the input to an Input
Group. Groups are used by the CardAccess software to perform
database partitioning and manual control masking. For more
information see the manual section entitled ‘Groups’.
To select a Group, click the arrow button to the right of the Group
control and click on your selection. If there are no Groups visible in
the list, you need to create some in the Groups screen, available from
the Administration menu
• Enable Schedule
Figure 657 – The Enable Schedule Selection Control
When you create an input definition and enable it, that input is
operational 24 hours per day, and every day of the year by default.
However, you can elect to have the input’s status ignored outside of a
predefined schedule. When an ‘Enable Schedule’ is selected, the input
will report change of status (normal or abnormal) only while the
selected schedule is in effect. Outside of the schedule, the panel will
ignore the input contact status and will suppress all event reporting.
To select an Enable Schedule, click the arrow button to the right of
the Enable Schedule control. Scroll up or down to locate your
schedule and click it. If no schedules appear in the Enable Schedule
control, you need to create some schedules in the Schedules screen,
available from a button on the main CardAccess toolbar.
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• Enabled
Figure 658 – The Enabled Check Box
The Enabled check box activates or deactivates the input at the panel.
When an input is disabled, the state of the input contacts is ignored by
the panel and there is no event reporting for that input.
To enable the input (the default), click the check box. Checked is
enabled and unchecked is disabled.
• Normal Open
Figure 659 – The Normal Open Check Box
Typically, input switches are ‘normally closed’ (normally shorted
together) dry contact, magnetically operated reed type switches.
However, contact switches can be purchased in a ‘normally open’
(normally not shorted) configuration as well.
The panel hardware is set by default to use normally closed type
switches for inputs, but can be set to use the normally open type as
well.
To set an input to normally open, click the ‘Normal Open’ check box
for a given input. Checked is normally open, unchecked is normally
closed type.
• Supervised
Figure 660 – The Supervised Check Box
Inputs can typically be defined as some form of dry contact switch,
connected to a pair of wires, which are ultimately brought back to two
input contacts on a Continental Instruments designed access control
panel.
A small voltage is generated by the panel on each input two-wire
circuit as a means to monitor the state of the input contacts. When the
contacts are broken, the circuit is interrupted, causing an alert violation
by the panel logic.
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The shortcoming of a simple switch at the end of a pair of wires is
that the circuit can be easily bridged by a ‘shorting’ wire strapped
across the input contacts, allowing easy intrusion.
A ‘Supervised’ input modifies the electrical connection method
between the dry contact and the panel in an attempt to prevent
tampering. This is done by inserting two 1 Kilo-ohm resistors
strategically in the circuit between the input contacts and the panel.
Inserting resistors in the circuit changes the voltage levels being
monitored by the panel and makes it harder for intruders to bridge the
circuit.
Thus, the panel needs to be notified as to which type of input circuit is
being monitored, dry contact (unsupervised) or supervised, so the
output voltages and input sensing can be modified.
Warning – You can only enable supervised inputs on panels
or input expansion cards that support supervised inputs.
Note that the Smarterm panel does not have on board
supervised input capability. If you wish to add supervised
inputs to a Smarterm, you must add one or more supervised
input expansion boards. The Superterm, Miniterm and
Microterm panels all support onboard supervised inputs.
To set the input to supervised mode, click the check box. Checked is
enabled and unchecked is disabled.
• Activate Console Relay
Figure 661 – The Activate Console Relay Check Box
When the ‘Activate Console Relay’ feature is enabled, the console
relay will be fired each time this input changes state from normal to
abnormal. However, the console relay (relay #73 on every panel type)
must be configured in the Relays screen, available from the
Configuration menu (see ‘Relays’).
The console relay is a special relay to the system and a linkage can be
made between any input and the console relay (perhaps) for the
purpose of sounding an alarm of some type, to alert operations
personnel to the input violation (fire sensor, glass break and the like).
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To enable the Activate Console Relay function for an input, click the
check box. Checked is enabled and unchecked is disabled (the
default).
• Dialup On Abnormal
Figure 662 – The Dial Up on Abnormal Check Box
The ‘Dialup On Abnormal’ function is only applied when the panel
hosting the input is connected to a dial node (see ‘Dial Up’). If Dialup
On Abnormal is enabled, and the panel is on a dial up node, when this
input changes status from Normal to Abnormal, the host computer
will be dialed by the panel and the resulting ‘Input Abnormal’ event
message will be delivered to the Alerts or Events Grid.
To enable Dialup On Abnormal, click the check box. Checked is
selected, unchecked is unselected (the default).
• Dialup On Normal
Figure 663 – The Dial Up on Normal Check Box
The ‘Dialup On Normal’ function is only applied when the panel
hosting the input is connected to a dial node (see ‘Dial Up’). If Dialup
On Normal is enabled, and the panel is on a dial up node, when the
input changes status from Abnormal to Normal, the host computer
will be dialed by the panel and the resulting ‘Input Normal’ event
message will be delivered to the Alerts or Events Grid.
To enable Dialup On Normal, click the check box. Checked is
selected, unchecked is unselected (the default).
• Remarks
Figure 664 – The Remarks Text Field
The ‘Remarks’ field is a memo field where an operator can add text
comments about the input. The ability to add comments in the
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configuration screen may prove especially useful when the input is
used to fire one or more links. The link connections can be listed in
the Remarks field.
To add comments, click in the white space and type any characters.
Alerts Section
• Alert Delay Time
Figure 665 – The Alert Delay Time Selection Control
The Alert Delay Time control will set a delay on when the input will
be reported as ‘Input Abnormal’. Typically, all event reporting as to
the change of status of an input happens immediately.
The ‘Alert Delay Time’ control allows you to apply a delay to the
change of status event message sent by the panel. The setting in this
control is applied to the transition from ‘Input Normal’ to ‘Input
Abnormal’ only.
The ability to delay input event reporting may prove useful when the
input is used to fire a link.
To set the Alert Delay Time, click the arrow buttons to the right of
the control or click in the white space and type in a number. The
minimum is 0 (no delay, the default) and the maximum is 255
seconds.
• Alert Reset Time
Figure 666 – The Alert Reset Time Selection Control
The Alert Reset Time control will set a delay on when the input will
be reported as ‘Input Normal’. Typically, all event reporting as to the
change of status of an input happens immediately.
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The ‘Alert Reset Time’ control allows you to apply a delay to the
change of status event message sent by the panel. The setting in this
control is applied to the transition from ‘Input Abnormal’ to ‘Input
Normal’ only.
The ability to delay input event reporting may prove useful when the
input is used to fire a link.
To set the Alert Reset Time, click the arrow buttons to the right of the
control or click in the white space and type in a number. The
minimum is 0 (no delay, the default) and the maximum is 255
minutes.
• Alert Priority
Figure 667 – The Alert Priority Selection Control
The ‘Alert Priority’ control sets the alert priority level for all event
messages that are received from this input. Priority levels are used by
the system as a way of sorting event messages. Typically, urgent alerts
(priority level of 1-20) are placed in the Alerts Grid portion of the
CardAccess main screen. Less urgent events (priority levels of 21-98)
are placed in the Events Grid.
Events and Alert priorities are explained in greater detail in the manual
section entitled ‘Setting Up Priorities’. Manual and Auto
Acknowledgement are explained in the manual section entitled ‘Alert
Acknowledgement’.
The default Alert Priority is 50. If you wish a higher or lower priority
for events from this input, click the arrow buttons to the right of the
Alert Priority control or click in the white space and type a number
from 1-99. 1 is the highest priority and 99 is the lowest.
Note that if an Alert Priority is set to 99 for any hardware item (in this
case, an input), alert reporting will be disabled for that hardware item.
So the usable priority range is 1-98.
• Response Required
Figure 668 – The Response Required Check Box
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The manual section entitled ‘Alert Acknowledgement’ has detailed
information on alert acknowledgement and the Response Required
function. The Response Required feature is used only when an input
event appears in the Alerts Grid portion of the CardAccess main
screen.
Briefly, when the ‘Response Required’ feature is enabled for a given
input, a pop up response window is displayed, requiring that an
operator manually do two things.
o Type a response message into a text memo field (optional). This
memo will be permanently attached to the event message.
o Manually click an Acknowledge button to move the alert from the
Alerts Grid to the Events grid of the CardAccess main screen
In normal operation, alerts are automatically moved by the system
from the Alerts Grid to the Events Grid of the CardAccess main
screen, after a timeout period.
When the Response Required feature is enabled, it overrides the
automatic acknowledgement engine for all alerts from that input. The
operator will be required to manually move the alert from the Alerts
Grid to the Events Grid.
The Response Required feature forces an operator to manually handle
alerts from a given input. This forces operators to notice (and deal
with) selected alerts.
If the Response Required check box is checked, the feature is enabled.
Unchecked is disabled (the default)
• No Alert Reporting
Figure 669 – The No Alert Reporting Check Box
Alert reporting of Input events is enabled by default. This means that
each time there is a change of input status (normal to abnormal, or
abnormal to normal), there will be an event message generated by the
associated panel that indicates the type of status change (Figure 670).
Figure 670 – Input Alert Messages
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When the ‘No Alert Reporting’ check box is checked, the panel will
be instructed to suppress all event messages for the selected input. To
disable event reporting for an input, click the check box.
CCTV Tab
When you elect to enable CCTV commands for a given input, the CCTV
tab of the Inputs window becomes linked with selected CCTV
commands that you have previously entered in the System Settings, on
the CCTV tab (see the manual sub-section entitled ‘CCTV Tab’ in the
‘System Settings’ chapter for more information).
• Enabled
Figure 671 – The Enabled Check Box
The Enabled check box works in conjunction with the ‘Abnormal
Condition’ and the ‘Return to Normal Condition’ sections mentioned
below.
Essentially, the two conditions mentioned below cause either of the
two CCTV commands mentioned in the controls to be sent when the
input state changes to Normal or Abnormal.
If the input state changes, and if there is a CCTV command entered
for that state (normal or abnormal) and the Enabled check box is
checked (CCTV output = Enabled) then the indicated CCTV
command will be sent to the CCTV switch. If any of the above
conditions is not met, then no command will be sent.
If the ‘Enabled’ check box is checked, CCTV output for the current
input is activated. If the ‘Enabled’ check box is not checked, CCTV
output for the current input is deactivated (all CCTV output is
suppressed).
If there is a CCTV command name in only one condition control
(normal or abnormal), CCTV output will occur for that input state
only, if the enabled check box is checked.
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• Abnormal Condition
Figure 672 – The Abnormal Condition Section
When you select a CCTV command in the ‘CCTV Command Name’
control in the ‘Abnormal’ section for a given input, each time that
input changes state from normal to abnormal, the CCTV command
mentioned in the CCTV Command Name control will be sent from
the CCTV designated serial port (presumably to the hardware CCTV
controller).
To select a CCTV command, click the arrow to the right of the
CCTV Command Name control, scroll up or down to locate your
selection and click it. If there are no CCTV commands visible in the
list, you must create some in the CCTV tab of the System Settings
screen.
• Return to Normal Condition
Figure 673 – The Return to Normal Section
When you select a CCTV command in the ‘CCTV Command Name’
control in the ‘Return to Normal’ section for a given input, each time
that input changes state from abnormal to normal, the CCTV
command mentioned in the CCTV Command Name control will be
sent from the CCTV designated serial port (presumably to the
hardware CCTV controller).
To select a CCTV command, click the arrow to the right of the
CCTV Command Name control, scroll up or down to locate your
selection and click it. If there are no CCTV commands visible in the
list, you must create some in the CCTV tab of the System Settings
screen.
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Map Tab
Figure 674 – The Inputs Screen Map Tab
The Map tab has controls that allow you to add or edit a map for the
current input. The Map tab is not visible unless the ‘Use Facility Map’
Option is enabled in the System Settings. For more detailed information
on the creation of maps see the manual section entitled ‘Maps’.
The function of each of the controls on the Map folder tab are as
follows.
• Facility Map for This Device
Figure 675 – The Facility Map for This Device Field
Displays the name of the map that is attached to the current input
• Map Description
Figure 676 – The Map Description Field
An area where you can add a text description of the map
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• Size Image to Fit
Figure 677 – The Size Image to Fit Check Box
Image bitmaps come in all shapes and sizes. The CardAccess Maps
image view control is set by default to stretch the image to fit the size
of the image display window.
If Size Image to Fit is disabled, the image will be displayed in its native
size format (and white space may appear on the sides, or top and
bottom). The feature is enabled by default. Checked is enabled
• View Maps
Figure 678 – The View Maps Button
Click this button to open the Maps creation screen where you can
create or edit a map
• Remove Map
Figure 679 – The Remove Map Button
This button is only available while in Edit mode. Click it to delete the
map
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Virtual Inputs
A ‘Virtual Input’ is an input that exists only in software. You would never
wire to a virtual input. A virtual input can be programmed to go
abnormal based on an event rather than on the change of state of a
hardware input (open or closed).
Essentially, the panel logic handles a virtual input in the same way as a
hardware input. When the virtual input status changes, an input event
message is generated, just like a hardware input.
The CardAccess handles the virtual input in the same way it would a
physical input. Thus, you can use virtual inputs in any of the same ways
you would think of using a hardware input. For example virtual inputs
(and inputs in general) are often used to fire links (see the manual section
entitled ‘Links’) that sound alarms or switch CCTV equipment.
The real strength and usefulness of virtual inputs is that these inputs are
attached to door event types. In other words, when a specific type of
event occurs at a door, a virtual input can be made to go abnormal. This
allows you to set up software ‘macros’ (links) that can trigger hardware
events, based on selected ‘conditions’ at the door.
There are four virtual input types. Each virtual input type can be enabled
on any reader port, for any Continental panel. All panel types support
virtual inputs. There four available virtual input types per reader port, as
listed below.
• Forced Door – The ‘Forced Door’ virtual input for given door will
go abnormal if the door is forced open. Forced open is logically
defined as breaking the door contact of a given door without a valid
badge read prior to the door opening
• Valid Tracked Card – When the ‘Tracked’ feature is enabled in the
Personnel record for a given card holder, each time that card holder
access any door, a special ‘Badge Valid Tracked’ event message is
generated (see ‘Personnel’ for more information). A reader port can
be set to trip the Valid Tracked Card virtual input, when any tracked
card successfully access a given door
An ‘Input Abnormal’ event message (for the virtual input) is generated
each time a valid tracked card is presented to a reader that has the
Valid Tracked Card virtual input enabled
• Denied Card/ Void Card – Technically, a ‘denial’ of entry can result
from a denied card or a void card access attempt. A denied card is
usually due to a CardAccess rules violation (time of day, unauthorized
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access, etc.). A void card is usually due to the fact that the card record
is ‘missing’ from the panel’s card database (the card record does not
exist in the CardAccess Personnel database, or does not belong at any
reader on the panel).
Thus, (when enabled) the Denied/Void Card virtual input will go
abnormal when a denied or void card is presented to the reader
• Door Open Too Long – Generally, the ‘Door Open Too Long’
event is triggered at a given door when the door has been opened
resulting from the presentation of a valid card, but the door was not
closed before the ‘Still Open Delay’ timer (in the Readers screen,
Options tab) has expired.
The Door Open Too Long virtual input will go abnormal when the
Still Open Delay timer expires.
The below section entitled ‘Virtual Input Mapping’ details the specific
input numbers for the virtual inputs for each panel type.
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Virtual Input Mapping
As we have stated previously, virtual inputs are available for all panel
types. You can elect to activate up to four virtual inputs for each Reader
on any panel.
With hardware inputs, a given input number always refers to the same
physical input on a given panel PC board. This is not the case with virtual
inputs on all panel types. The virtual input numbers assigned to a given
reader port may change depending on how many input or relay
expansion cards you have attached to the panel.
Virtual input numbers are fixed on the Superterm, Miniterm and
Microterm panels. Virtual inputs numbers will change on the Smarterm
panel depending on how many inputs are provided from expansion cards
(see the charts below).
Also note that if you add the maximum number of expansion cards to
the Superterm or Smarterm panels, you consume all of the software input
numbers that could potentially be allotted for virtual inputs. Thus, virtual
inputs become unavailable if you use the maximum number of expansion
cards for either panel type.
Below are the input number ‘mapping’ charts for each panel type.
All Panels Note – Input #81 is always reserved as the Tamper Input
for all panel types (this means that the Superterm, Smarterm, Miniterm
and Microterm all have an input #81). However, you must create and
enable the input definition for input #81 on a given panel to activate the
tamper input, since the tamper input is disabled by default.
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Superterm
Virtual Inputs are fixed on the Superterm starting with input 49
Reader
Number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Category
Input
Number
Forced Door
Valid Tracked Card
Denied/Void Card
Door Open Too Long
Forced Door
Valid Tracked Card
Denied/Void Card
Door Open Too Long
Forced Door
Valid Tracked Card
Denied/Void Card
Door Open Too Long
Forced Door
Valid Tracked Card
Denied/Void Card
Door Open Too Long
Forced Door
Valid Tracked Card
Denied/Void Card
Door Open Too Long
Forced Door
Valid Tracked Card
Denied/Void Card
Door Open Too Long
Forced Door
Valid Tracked Card
Denied/Void Card
Door Open Too Long
Forced Door
Valid Tracked Card
Denied/Void Card
Door Open Too Long
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
Superterm Note – Virtual inputs are lost if
more than one expansion board is added
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Smarterm
The following table shows the virtual input mapping for a Smarterm.
Recall that the Smarterm virtual input number assignments change
depending on how many expansion cards are installed as shown in the
chart below (the Smarterm supports up to four expansion cards).
Door
Number
1
2
3
4
Category
Input # with
No
Expansion
Boards
With 1
Expansion
Board
With 2
Expansion
Boards
With 3
Expansion
Boards
Forced Door
Valid Tracked
Denied/Void
Door Open
Forced Door
Valid Tracked
Denied/Void
Door Open
Forced Door
Valid Tracked
Denied/Void
Door Open
Forced Door
Valid Tracked
Denied/Void
Door Open
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
Smarterm Note – Virtual inputs are lost if a fourth expansion board is added
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Miniterm and Microterm
Virtual Inputs are fixed on both the Miniterm and the Microterm,
starting with input # 17.
Reader
Number
1
2
Category
Input
Number
Forced Door
Valid Tracked Card
Denied/Void Card
Door Open Too Long
Forced Door
Valid Tracked Card
Denied/Void Card
Door Open Too Long
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
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Relays
Figure 680 – The Relays Screen
The Relays screen is a configuration screen where you create
configuration records that activate panel on-board hardware relays and
expansion relays.
When trying to understand how the CardAccess system uses relays, it is
important to note that relays have a physical operation and a software
operation. The software operation of a relay is somewhat ‘detached’ from
the actual hardware that performs relay switching functions.
There are two software states of any CardAccess relay; ‘Output On’ and
‘Output Off’. The Output On and Output Off states are very similar to
the Input Normal and Input Abnormal states mentioned in the Inputs
section of this manual.
Output Off would logically be considered the ‘normal’ or resting state of
the relay and Output On would be considered the ‘abnormal’ or active
state of the relay. Note that when you fire a relay manually, the relay is
switched from Output Off to Output On as far as the CardAccess logic
is concerned.
There are also two physical states of any relay; energized and deenergized. The association between energized/de-energized and Output
On/Off is software selectable. By default, the logical ‘Output On’
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corresponds to the energized state of the relay and the logical Output Off
condition corresponds to the de-energized state of the relay.
The relationship between logical Output On/Off and energized/deenergized can be reversed by changing the default setting of the ‘Off
State Energized’ control mentioned later in this section.
It is important for you to note for the moment that it is the logical
Output On or Output Off state that the CardAccess uses to determine
the state of the relay, not the physical state of the relay hardware. Note
that ‘Output On’ could mean relay energized or de-energized depending
on settings in the Relays screen.
Note the following additional issues regarding relays.
• Each panel type has a fixed number of on-board relays. Relay
expansion cards can be attached to the Superterm and Smarterm
panels to increase the total number of available relays
• The lowest odd numbered (on-board) relays are automatically
assigned to reader ports in the Readers screen. You don’t need to
redefine those relays in the Relays screen
• The lowest numbered even numbered (on-board) relays are available
for ‘shunting’ functions. Actually two relays are allocated per door, a
door strike relay (odd numbered) and a shunting relay (even
numbered). The door relay is enabled by default, the shunting relay is
optional and is not enabled
Once enabled and assigned to a door, the shunting relay fires a few
milliseconds before the door strike relay. The shunting relay would
typically be used to bridge the door contacts of another
manufacturer’s alarm system to prevent it from triggering when its
door contact is broken
• Each panel has a ‘console relay’, which is relay #73 on all panel types.
The console relay is a ‘special’ relay often used to connect to a horn
alarm. There are settings to specifically activate the console relay in the
inputs screen
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Create a Basic Relay Definition
Note that when you create a new relay definition, the system provides the
following default settings automatically (unless you override those
settings by changing the settings in the appropriate controls).
•
Relay is enabled
•
Relay is ‘available’ to be activated 24 hours per day, every day of the
year
•
Relay is set to be normally de-energized
•
If there is a change in relay status, ‘Output On’ and ‘Output Off’
event messages will not be sent to the CardAccess host PC by the
panel (you must enable them, if preferred)
•
The ‘Alert Requires Response’ function is disabled
•
The ‘Dial Up on Change’ function is disabled
•
The alert priority is set to 1 by default
•
Relay is not assigned to a group
•
Relay has no Track Schedule assigned
•
The relay Energize Time is set to 0 seconds. This means that the
relay will not activate, even if it has been enabled and all other
settings are correct. You must manually set the energize time to a
value greater than 0
•
The Manual Control Privilege is set to ‘All’. This means that all
operators will have access to manually activate the relay from the
‘Relays’ button on the CardAccess main toolbar
To create a basic relay definition, do the following.
•
Open Relays – Open the Relays screen by clicking the Relays
shortcut, available from the Configuration menu
•
Click New – Click the ‘New’ button
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Figure 681 – The New Button
•
Select a Panel – Click the arrow button to the right of the ‘Panels’
control and scroll up or down to select a panel. If there are no panels
visible in the list, you need to create some panel definitions in the
Panels screen, available from the Configuration menu
Figure 682 – The Panel Selection Control
•
Create a Name – Type a descriptive name for the relay in the
‘Name’ field. It is advised that this name clearly describe the location
or intended use for the relay
Figure 683 – The Name Text Field
•
Select a Relay Number – Click the buttons to the right of the Relay
Number control to select a relay number, or click in the white space
and type a number. See the section on the Relay Number below for
detailed information
Figure 684 – The Relay Number Spin Control
•
Click Save – Click the ‘Save’ button
Figure 685 – The Save Button
You have just created a Relay definition with all of the default operational
settings as mentioned in the first part of this section.
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A detailed view of each of the Relays screen controls follows.
General Tab
• Panel
Figure 686 – The Panel Selection Control
You need to select the panel that the relay will be associated with
before you can set the operating parameters of that relay. The Panel
selection control contains a list of all panels that were created in the
Panels screen, available from the Configuration menu.
To select a panel, click the arrow button to the right of the Panel
control. Scroll up or down to locate the selected panel and click on it.
If there are no panels in the Panels list, you need to open the Panels
screen, available from the Configuration menu and create some panel
definitions
• Relay #
Figure 687 – The Relay Number Selection Control
The Relay Number selection control allows you to select which
numbered relay you wish to activate on a given panel and any attached
relay expansion cards.
By default, all on board and expansion card relays are disabled. They
must be activated by a CardAccess software configuration that is
downloaded to the panel. The configuration instructs the panel as to
which hardware it should enable, and with what operating parameters.
Note that some relay numbers may have been pre-assigned in the
Readers screen. When you create reader definitions in the Readers
screen, some relays are automatically assigned to doors (one odd
numbered on-board relay per door, by default).
If you elect to create a relay record in the Relays screen that has the
same relay number as a relay that has been assigned to a door in the
Readers screen, you have created a ‘duplicate relay definition’.
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When you create a duplicate relay definition, the settings in the Relays
screen will override the system defaults for the door relay. See the
manual section entitled ‘Duplicate Definitions’ for more information.
To select a relay number, click either of the arrow keys to the right of
the Relay# field, or click in the white space and type a number. Note
the following issues
o Each panel type has a different maximum number of onboard
relays as follows.
Table 11 – Panel Onboard Relay Numbers
Panel
Type
Onboard
Relays
Reader Relays
(odd)
Expansion
Relays
Console
Relay
Superterm
Smarterm
Miniterm
Microterm
1-16 + 73
1-8 + 73
1-4 + 73
1-2 + 73
1,3,5,7,9,11,13,15
1,3,5,7
1,3
1 (2)*
17-65
9-72
None
None
73
73
73
73
* The Microterm can be configured with two readers as an option
Notice in Table 11 that the column marked ‘Reader Relays’
indicates the relay number range that is automatically assigned to
Reader ports if they are activated. Remember though, that all
relays on the panel can be assigned to any purpose that you
choose, but if you create a door in the Readers screen, one (odd
numbered) relay will be assigned to that door unless you manually
override the automatic selection.
The CardAccess software automatically assigns the next available,
lowest numbered odd relay (on the same panel), to the next reader
record that you create. Door 1 always gets relay 1. Door 2 always
gets relay 3, and so on
o The system has no way of determining which type of panel you
are configuring. Thus, you must exercise caution that you do not
attempt to create relay numbers that do not exist on a given panel
type
o Some relay numbers may already be activated and allocated to
reader ports on the selected panel. If you don’t not want to
override the default settings for relays already allocated to reader
ports, do not create relay definitions in the Relays screen with the
same relay numbers that were previously assigned to reader ports
relays (see ‘Duplicate Definitions’ for more information)
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o The Superterm and Smarterm panels can support relay expansion
cards. The Miniterm and Microterm can not support expansion
cards
• Name
Figure 688 – The Name Text Field
You will use the ‘Name’ field to enter a descriptive name for the relay.
Be sure to create a name that describes the location or the function of
the relay. This name will be attached to all relay event messages
involving this relay (Figure 689). The field will accept any combination
of letters, numbers or symbols
Figure 689 – Relay Event Messages
• Group
Figure 690 – The Group Selection Control
Use the Group selection control to assign the relay to a Relay Group.
Groups are used by the CardAccess software to perform database
partitioning and manual control masking. For more information see
the manual section entitled ‘Groups’.
To select a Group, click the arrow button to the right of the Group
control and click on your selection. If there are no Groups visible in
the list, you need to create some in the Groups screen, available from
the Administration menu
• Track Schedule
Figure 691 – The Track Schedule Selection Control
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When you create a relay definition and enable it, that relay becomes
operational. That is, the relay is activated by the panel logic and you
now have the ability to energize the relay at some later time. The relay
can be activated from a number of sources inside the CardAccess
software (manual control button, link, time schedule, card read, etc.).
One of the available ways to activate a relay is to set a ‘Track
Schedule’. The term ‘Track Schedule’, when it refers to a relay, means
to have the action of the relay follow the action of the schedule (the
relay ‘tracks’ the schedule). When the schedule is in effect, the relay is
activated. When the schedule expires, the relay is deactivated (or the
opposite behavior can be true, depending on the setting of the ‘Off
State Energized’ control. See below).
Thus, you can use a track schedule to hold a relay in an energized or
de-energized state (output on) for some period of time, and then
release the relay (output off) when the time schedule expires. The
track schedule can be applied to any relay, regardless of what function
it is assigned to.
To assign a track schedule, click the arrow to the right of the Track
Schedule control, scroll up or down to locate your selection, and click
the selection.
If there are no selections available in the Track Schedule control, you
need to go to the ‘Schedules’ screen available from a button on the
CardAccess main toolbar
• Energize Time
Figure 692 – The Energize Time Selection Control
The Energize Time control selects the length of time that the relay will
remain energized, before returning to normal. The default time is 0
seconds. When set to 0 seconds, the relay will not activate. The
Energize Time must be set to a value greater than 0 seconds if you
wish the relay to fire. The maximum Energize Time is 10,000 seconds
(about 2.7 hours).
To set the Energize Time, click the arrow buttons to the right of the
Energize Time control or click in the white space and type a number
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• Manual Control Privilege
Figure 693 – The Manual Control Privilege Selection Control
The Relays screen ‘Manual Control Privilege’ selection control works
in conjunction with the Manual Control screen shown below in Figure
694.
Effectively, the Relays screen Manual Control Privileges control
assigns the relay to a ‘filter group’ who’s intent is to hide selected
relays from the view of selected operators. The effect is similar to
database partitioning except that the object is to hide relays from view
in the manual control screen only, to prevent unauthorized manual
activation of selected relays. More information is available below
o Relays Manual Control Screen
Figure 694 – The Relays Manual Control Screen
Manual Control Privilege settings affect which relays are displayed,
in the Relays manual control screen, for selected operators. The
object is to hide selected relays from the view of selected operators.
The Relays manual control screen allows operators to manually fire
relays from inside the CardAccess software (see the manual section
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entitled ‘Manual Control’). Hiding selected relays will prevent
unauthorized activation of those relays.
The relays manual control screen uses the settings in the Operators
screen, on the Privileges tab (Figure 695), of the currently logged in
operator, to determine which relay privilege groups to make visible
and which relays to hide, each time the manual control screen is
opened
o Operator Manual Control Privileges
Figure 695 – The Operators Screen Privileges Tab
An operator definition is created in the Operators screen and
Device Control Privileges are assigned (or not assigned) on the
Privileges tab for each operator that you create (Figure 695 above).
Operator ‘Device Control Privileges’ operate under the following
rules.
! If no Device Control Privileges are assigned in the Operator
record (which is the default), privilege level settings are ignored
and the operator has access to all relays in the Relays manual
control screen (Figure 694)
! If you assign a given operator only one permission level, as in the
example in Figure 695 where Priv 4 is assigned, the operator
would be allowed to see only those relays with ‘Priv 4’ or ‘All’
selected in the Manual Control Privilege field of each relay
record (Figure 696)
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Figure 696 – The Relays Screen Manual Control Privilege
Control
! Privilege level assignments are not ‘inclusive’. If a given operator
has Priv 4 assigned in his or her operator record (as in Figure
695) that does not mean that they will be able to manually
control all relays with Priv 1-4 assigned in the Manual Control
Privilege field of the relay record. It means they have access to
Priv 4 relays only.
If you require that operators have access to multiple privilege
levels, you must check off multiple Priv levels in the Privileges
tab of the Operators screen (Figure 697).
Figure 697 – The Operators Screen Priv Assignment Check
Boxes
In Figure 697, the operator with these settings will be able to
manually activate relays with the Priv levels of 1, 3, 4, 7, 8 and
the ‘All’ selection set in the Manual Control Privilege field.
Relays with a Priv level of 2, 5, or 6 will be hidden from the
view of this operator. The Relays manual control screen will
open with relays 2, 5, and 7 filtered out of the list.
Note that checking all of the Priv check boxes works identically
to checking none of the Priv check boxes. That is, the operator
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has access to all of the relays in the manual control screen with
either set up
• Enabled
Figure 698 – The Enabled Check Box
The Enabled check box activates or deactivates the relay at the panel.
When a relay is disabled, the relay is effectively ‘dead’. The relay
cannot be activated by any means, including a time schedule or link.
When relays are not enabled, they rest in a ‘relaxed’ (un-powered),
deactivated state.
To enable the relay (the default), click the check box. Checked is
enabled and unchecked is disabled
• Off-State Energized
Figure 699 – The Off-State Energized Check Box
Effectively, relays have two hardware states; powered and unpowered. The default state for all newly created relay definitions is unpowered. When you create a new relay definition, the relay is enabled
but no power is applied to the energizing coils of the relay by default.
Further, the CardAccess software recognizes two software states for a
relay; ‘Output On’ and ‘Output Off’. By default Output On (the ‘onstate’) correlates to the energized state of the relay, and Output Off
(the ‘off-state’) correlates to the de-energized state of the relay.
The ‘Off-State Energized’ check box allows you to reverse the resting
state of the relay from un-powered to powered. Figure 700 below
graphically shows the electrical difference between off state deenergized (the normal state is un-powered) and off-state energized
(the normal state becomes powered instead of un-powered).
Figure 700 – Relay Pin Out Connections (N.O. = Normally Open)
Common
Common
N.O. N.C.
Normal
N.O. N.C.
Off-State Energized
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Note that an ‘Output On’ event message from a relay always means
that the relay has been changed from its ‘normal’ state. If you have
enabled off-state energized, Output On means that the relay has been
de-energized. If you have not enabled off-state energized, Output On
means that the relay has been energized.
To set the relay to Off-State Energized, click the check box. Checked
is off-state energized and unchecked is off-state de-energized (the
default)
• Alert on Change
Figure 701 – The Alert on Change Check Box
By default, relay event messages are not reported. If you wish to
enable the reporting of ‘Output On’ and ‘Output Off’ event messages
for this relay, click the ‘Alert on Change’ check box. Checked is
enabled and unchecked is disabled (the default)
• Alert Requires Response
Figure 702 – The Alert Requires Response Check Box
If the ‘Alert Requires Response’ check box is checked, each relay
event message will appear in the Alerts Grid. A Pop up event
response box will appear and it will require the operator to click a
button to resolve each alert from this relay.
To enable the Alert Requires Response function for a relay, click the
check box. Checked is enabled and unchecked is disabled (the default)
• Dialup on Change
Figure 703 – The Dial Up on Change Check Box
The ‘Dialup on Change’ option is only used with dial up panels. Dial
panels save event messages in a memory buffer and wait to be dialed
(on a regular schedule). While the panel is off-line, relays could be
reporting potentially important event messages which the CardAccess
computer will not be aware of until dialing in to pick up event
messages at some time later.
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If you want the panel to dial the CardAccess PC each time this relay
reports an Output On or Output Off event message, click the Dial
Up on change check box
• Alert Priority
Figure 704 – The Alert Priority Selection Control
The ‘Alert Priority’ selection control allows you to set the default
event priority value for relay type event messages from this relay. The
alert priority is used by the system to route event messages to the
Events or Alerts Grids (see the manual section entitled ‘Setting Up
Priorities’ for more information).
To set the Alert Priority, click the arrows to the right of the Alert
Priority control or click in the white space and type a number
Warning – If you set a priority of 99 for relay alerts, no
alerts will be generated by the panel. An Alert Priority level
of 99 suppresses all alerts
• Remarks
Figure 705 – The Remarks Text Field
The ‘Remarks’ field is a memo field where an operator can add text
comments about the relay. The ability to add comments in the
configuration screen may prove especially useful when the relay is
involved in one or more links. The link connections can be listed in
the Remarks field, providing a ‘road map’ of sometimes-complicated
linkages.
To add comments, click in the white space and type any character.
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Map Tab
Figure 706
The Map tab has controls that allow you to add or edit a map for the
current relay. The Map tab is not visible unless the ‘Use Facility Map’
Option is enabled in the System Settings. For more detailed information
on the creation of maps see the manual section entitled ‘Maps’.
The function of each of the controls on the Map folder tab is as follows.
• Facility Map for This Device
Figure 707 – The Facility Map for This Device Field
Displays the name of the map that is attached to the current relay
• Map Description
Figure 708 – The Map Description Field
An area where you can add a text description of the map
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• Size Image to Fit
Figure 709 – The Size Image to Fit Check Box
Image bitmaps come in all shapes and sizes. The CardAccess Maps
image view control is set by default to stretch the image to fit the size
of the image display window
If Size Image to Fit is disabled, the image will be displayed in its native
size format (and white space may appear on the sides, or top and
bottom). The Size Image to Fit stretching feature is enabled by default
• View Maps
Figure 710 – The View Maps Button
Click this button to open the Maps creation screen where you can
create or edit a map
• Remove Map
Figure 711 – The Remove Map Button
This button is only available while in Edit mode. Click it to delete the
map from the current relay record and the Maps screen editor
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Duplicate Definitions
As you have read in the ‘Readers’ section of the manual previously, the
CardAccess software automatically assigns inputs and relays to doors by
default. Each input and relay that is assigned to a door is enabled with
certain default operational settings as seen below.
Input Default Settings
•
The input is enabled*
•
The input is active 24 hours per day, every day of the year including
holidays (default 24/7/365 enable schedule).
•
The input reports with door event messages (‘Door Forced’, ‘Door
Now Closed’, ‘Door Open Too Long’), not input event messages
(Input Abnormal, Input Normal)
•
The input is set to normally closed mode*
•
The input is set to unsupervised mode*
•
The input is set with no Alert Delay and no Alert Reset time
•
The input is set to no Response Required
•
The input is set to no Alert Reporting
•
The input is set to not activate the console relay
•
The input is set not to dial up on any condition
Relay Default Settings
•
The relay is enabled*
•
The relay is available to be activated 24 hours per day, every day of
the year
•
Relay is set to be normally de-energized*
•
The relay can be activated by a valid badge, or from the manual
control screen only
•
The ‘Alert Requires Response’ function is disabled
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•
The ‘Dial Up on Change’ function is disabled
•
The alert priorities are set by settings in the readers screen
•
Relay is not assigned to a group
•
Relay has no Track Schedule assigned
•
The door strike time is set to 5 seconds by default
•
Relay is released when the door contact input opens (set to ‘On
Open’)
•
The manual control of a relay which is associated with a reader is
possible from the ‘Doors’ manual control screen, not the ‘Relays’
manual control screen
It is important to note that the above settings for inputs and relays that
have been automatically assigned to readers by the CardAccess software
are stored in the CardAccess database. However, those automatically
assigned settings are not accessible from any configuration screen inside
the CardAccess software.
Thus, if you need to change some selected operational settings of a
reader input or relay, you must create what is termed a ‘duplicate’ input or
relay definition. A duplicate input or relay definition is created by going to
the Inputs or Relays screen and creating an input or relay that has the
same input or relay number as an input or relay that has been previously
assigned to a reader, in the Readers screen.
For example, input 1 (on panel 1, say) is typically assigned to door 1 as
the door contact. To create a duplicate definition for this input, you
would go to the Inputs screen and create an input record for the input
#1 on panel 1. This sets up a situation where the input is defined in two
places, in the Readers screen and the Inputs screen (hence the term
‘duplicate definition’). The same rules apply to duplicate relay definitions.
There are a limited number of settings that can be changed by a duplicate
input or relay definition. All of the controls in the Inputs or Relays record
for the selected input or relay record do not apply to a door input or
relay. The door input and relay settings that can be changed by a
duplicate definition are as follows.
• Inputs – You may wish to set the reader input to either of the modes
shown below. The only way to accomplish that is through the creation
of a duplicate input definition
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o Normally Open Mode – By default all inputs are created in
normally closed mode. To select normally open mode you must
create a duplicate input definition and check the ‘Normal Open’
check box
Figure 712 – The Inputs Screen Normal Open Check Box
o Supervised Input Mode – By default all inputs are created in
unsupervised mode. To select supervised input mode you must
create a duplicate input definition and check the ‘Supervised’ check
box
Figure 713 – The Inputs Screen Supervised Check Box
• Relays – By default all relays are created in the off-state de-energized
mode. The only way to set a reader relay to the off-state energized
mode, is through the creation of a duplicate relay definition
o Off-State Energized – To select off-state energized you must
create a duplicate relay definition and check the ‘Off-State
Energized’ check box
Figure 714 – The Relays Screen Off-State Energized Check Box
The above settings are the only reader input or relay settings that are
affected by the duplicate input or relay definitions. The other settings in
the Inputs or Relays screens are ignored by the reader input or relay.
Important Note – The duplicate input or relay definition should
not have the enabled box checked. Once you enable the duplicate
input or relay definition, the input or relay begins sending input or
relay event messages in addition to door related event messages.
Automatic Input and Relay Numbering
For your convenience, below in Table 12 is a review of how the
CardAccess system automatically assigns input and relay numbers to
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readers. The chart below assumes that no inputs or relays have been
previously assigned in the Inputs or Relays screens.
Note that the lowest numbered two inputs available are assigned to the
door contact and bypass switch (respectively). Regarding relays, the
lowest odd numbered relay is assigned to the door strike.
Input and relay number assignments are handled identically on every
panel type. To use the chart below for your panel, simply locate the
number of doors and ignore the remaining chart. For example, the
Miniterm has two reader ports, so you would use the ‘Door 1’ and ‘Door
2’ portion of the chart, and ignore the rest.
Table 12 – Input and Relay Automatic Numbering Assignments
Door
Number
Door 1
Door 2
Door 3
Door 4
Door 5
Door 6
Door 7
Door 8
Door
Contact
Bypass
Door
Strike
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
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Links
Figure 715 – The Links Screen
The Links screen is a configuration screen where you create
configuration records that activate software ‘links’. All links have one
main purpose – to fire one or more relays. Thus, when a link is activated,
one or more relays will typically be activated as a result. A link basically
allows you to monitor the status of inputs or a time schedule, and cause
relays to activate if any of those inputs change state, or if the time
schedule goes into effect.
There are four ways to activate a link.
• Input Abnormal – A link program can monitor the status of up to
five inputs, selectable on the ‘Input’ tab. If any of those inputs goes
abnormal, the link will be activated
• Schedule – You can select a track schedule in addition to, or instead
of, using inputs to fire a link. The link will be activated when the
schedule goes into effect, and deactivated when the schedule expires
• From Another Link – Any link can be made to activate one other
link. The ‘Remote Panel Link’ settings on the General tab allow you to
connect any link to one other link. Each time the selected link is
activated, the link mentioned in the Remote Panel Link area will also
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be activated. When two or more links are connected together in this
way they are known as ‘global’ links
• Manually – You can use the manual control screen available from a
button on the CardAccess main toolbar to activate a link
When a link activates, there are two things that could happen.
• Activate a Relay – The Output tab of the Links screen allows you to
select up to five relays for activation be the link. Any of those relays
can be placed in one of three states
o Output On – The relay will be changed from its normal state to
the ‘Output On’ state, then return to the ‘Output Off’ state (pulsed
relay)
o Output Off – The relay will be changed from the Output On state
to the ‘Output Off’ state, then return to the ‘Output On’ state
(pulsed relay)
o Tracked – The relay will remain in the ‘Output On’ state until all
inputs return to normal or the time schedule expires (tracking relay)
• Activate Another Link – Any link can be set up to trigger another
link using the settings in the ‘Remote Panel Link’ section of the
General tab. You can create a link which will fire local relays and
activate another link or you can create a link whose sole purpose is to
activate a link on another panel
Generally, there are two types of links.
• Local – Local linking means ‘local to a specific panel’. A ‘local link’
links inputs to relays on the same panel only (all inputs and relays that
are mounted on the same physical panel are said to be ‘local’ to each
other)
Note – Local links are controlled exclusively by the panel
logic. The CardAccess PC is not needed to operate a local link
• Global – ‘Global’ linking refers to links that span two or more
hardware panels. An input on a given panel can fire a link on another
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panel. What happens when that second link is activated depends on
the programming settings of that link
Note – Global links require communication with the CardAccess host
PC. When a given panel is required to fire a global link, a message is
sent to the CardAccess host PC, which forwards that message to the
subject panel. The panels do not communicate with each other on a
peer basis. The CardAccess host acts as the communications
controller for all inter-panel communications. Global links will fail if
the CardAccess PC is off-line during a remote link activation request
Links General Discussion
The ultimate object of any link is to activate one or more relays. Links
can be thought of as ‘macros’ that are stored locally at each panel. These
macros can be set up to activate relays on the panel where the link is
stored, or the link macro can send a message to the CardAccess
computer to activate a second link, perhaps on a different panel.
In the Links screen, you are exclusively creating local links. These link
macro ‘programs’ will then be stored at their respective panels. Once
activated by an input stimulus, some of these links may activate only local
relays (local link), and some links may have connections to links on other
panels (global links).
Thus, a Global Link is actually two or more local links which have been
connected together through software. If a local link has settings in the
‘Remote Panel Link’ field of the General tab, it is called a ‘Global Link’.
There are four types of Local links.
•
Input Only – If there are one or more selections on the Inputs tab,
and no selections on the Relays tab, this link will be activated when
an input goes abnormal, but no local action will take place on the
panel where this link resides (the link has no local relays
programmed, so there is nothing to activate on the local panel)
Since the link itself does ‘activate’ when one of its selected inputs
changes state, it can be used to activate another link by connecting it
as a global link. Thus, the input(s) on one panel can be used to fire
relays on another panel (one example is where an Input Only input
on one panel fires an Output Only link on another panel. See below)
•
Input/Output – The standard way to fire a link. One or more
inputs are selected on the Inputs tab and one or more relays are
selected on the Relays tab. An input is used to fire the local link, the
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link becomes activated and in turn, the selected local relays are
activated – all on the same panel
•
Schedule Triggered – When you select a ‘Track Schedule’ to fire a
link (with or without inputs configured), the relays selected in the
Relays tab will be changed to the ‘Output On’ state during the
schedule and they will be returned to the ‘Output Off’ state when the
schedule expires. You are permitted to configure inputs and a track
schedule in the same link
•
Output Only – The ‘Outputs’ tab has relays selected for activation,
but there are no inputs selected on the Inputs tab and no time
schedule selected in the Track Schedule field. The only way to fire
this type of link is from another link using the Global linking feature
Create a Basic Link Definition
Note that when you create a new link definition, the system provides the
following default settings automatically (unless you override those
settings by changing the settings in the appropriate controls).
•
Link is enabled
•
Link has no Enable Schedule assigned, but the link is ‘available’ to be
activated 24 hours per day, every day of the year (unless overridden
by the enable schedule)
•
If there is a change in link status, ‘Link Activate’ and ‘Link
Deactivate’ event messages will be sent to the CardAccess host PC
by the panel
•
The ‘Alert Requires Response’ function is disabled
•
The ‘Dial Up on Activation’ function is disabled
•
The alert priority is set to 10 by default
•
The link is not assigned to a group
•
The Manual Control Privilege is set to ‘All’. This means that all
operators will have access to manually activate the link from the
‘Links’ button on the CardAccess main toolbar
•
Remote Panel Linking is disabled
•
No inputs are assigned
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No outputs are assigned
As we stated previously, there are two kinds of links; Local and Global.
Global links are actually comprised of two or more local links (from
different panels) that have been cross-linked in the software. Thus, we
will first explore how to create a local link, and then we will explore how
to link two or more links together to create a global link.
Firstly, you need to decide what function your links will perform. There
are some questions to be answered as follows.
• Will your relays be normally energized or de-energized?
• Will your links fire local relays or only remote panel relays?
• How many relays will be fired for each link (maximum 5 permitted)?
• Should one or more relays track the input state (as opposed to being
switched on momentarily, then being switched off)
• How many inputs should be capable of firing the link (maximum 5
permitted)?
• Would a track time schedule better suit the application?
Create a Local Link
Since we are creating a local link, some of the questions above are
automatically addressed. In a local link, we will use local inputs (or a time
schedule) to fire local relays only. In this simplest example, we will use
one input to fire one relay.
To create a basic local link definition, do the following.
•
Open Links – Open the Links screen by clicking the Links shortcut,
available from the Configuration menu
•
Click New – Click the ‘New’ button
Figure 716 – The New Button
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Select a Panel – Click the arrow button to the right of the ‘Panel
Name’ field and scroll up or down to select a panel. If there are no
panels visible in the list, you need to create some panel definitions in
the Panels screen, available from the Configuration menu. The panel
selected must have inputs created in the Inputs screen and relays
created in the Relays screen (otherwise there will be nothing to link)
Figure 717 – The Panel Name Selection Control
•
Create a Name – Type a descriptive name for the link in the
‘Description’ field. It is advised that this name clearly describe the
intended use for the link
Figure 718 – The Description Text Field
•
Select a Link Program Number – Click the buttons to the right of
the ‘Prog#’ control to select a link program number, or click in the
white space and type in a number.
The link program number must be unique on the selected panel and
should be set to the next lowest available number. The Prog# is not
automatically incremented
Figure 719 – The Link Program Number Spin Control
•
Select an Input – To select an input do the following.
o Click the ‘Input’ folder tab
o Click the arrow to the right of any of the five input fields, and
select an input. You will only see inputs that have been activated
for the panel you selected on the General tab, in the ‘Panel Name’
field. In this example we will select one input. However, you can
select up to five inputs
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Figure 720 – The Links Input Selection Controls
•
Select an Output – To select a relay that will be fired by the input
change of status do the following.
o Click the ‘Output’ folder tab (Figure 721)
o Now you need to decide how the relay will respond to the
change of input status. You have three states to select from
!
On – When the input goes abnormal, the relay(s) will be
placed in the ‘Output On’ state for the period of time set in
the ‘Energize Time’ field of the relay record (in the Relays
screen). Use this setting if you want the relay activated
momentarily
!
Off – When the input goes abnormal, the relay(s) will be
placed in the ‘Output Off’ state for the period of time set in
the ‘Energize Time’ control of the relay record (in the Relays
screen). Use this setting if you want the relay de-activated
momentarily and if the relay is currently tracking a schedule
!
Track – When the input goes abnormal, the relay(s) will
track the input. As long as the input is abnormal, the relay
will remain in the ‘Output On’ state. Use this setting if you
want the relay held in the ‘Output On’ state for as long as the
input stays abnormal
Click the arrow to the right of any of the five output fields, in the
appropriate action type column, and select an output. You will only
see outputs that have been activated for the panel you have selected
on the General tab, in the ‘Panel Name’ field
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Figure 721 – The Links Screen Output Folder Tab
•
Click Save – Click the ‘Save’ button
Figure 722 – The Save Button
You have just created a basic, local Link definition with all of the default
operational settings as mentioned in the first part of this section.
Create a Global Link
Figure 723 – The Remote Panel Link Controls
Recall from the above discussion that a global link is simply a local link
that has been connected to another local link through software. You
simply take two or more local links and you ‘link’ them together using the
‘Remote Panel Link’ controls (Figure 723), found on the General tab of
the Links screen.
Note that every link that you create in the Links screen is assigned to a
specific panel. Every panel is assigned a unique panel number (in the
‘PnlNo’ field of the Panels screen). Further, every link that you create on
a specific panel is assigned a unique link program number for that panel
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(in the Prog# field of the Links screen). These unique panel and link
numbers are used when connecting links together globally (Figure 724).
Figure 724 – The Remote Panel Link Settings for Figure 725 below
Figure 725 – Global Link Schematic Diagram
Panel 1
Link 1
Panel 2
Link 1
Panel 2
Prog# 1
Panel Nbr
Link Nbr
In the above Global Link Schematic Diagram (Figure 725), Panel 1/Link
1 is globally connected to Panel 2/Link 1. When Link 1 on Panel 1 is
activated (by an abnormal input or a track schedule), if there are any local
relays programmed into Panel 1/Link 1 they will be activated. In
addition, Panel 1 will send a message to the CardAccess communications
driver that Panel 2/Link 1 needs to be activated.
The CardAccess communications driver will relay that command to
panel 2. Panel 2 will then activate Link 1. Panel 2/Link 1 will then
activate any local relays programmed into that link. If a remote panel link
is programmed into the ‘Remote Panel Link’ field of Panel 2/Link 1, a
message will be sent to the CardAccess communications driver to
activate that link. The link activations and the remote panel link activation
messages will continue until the last link in the chain is reached.
Warning – It is possible to create a ‘circular link’ that will activate
indefinitely! In Figure 725 above, if you enter ‘Panel = 1’ and ‘Prog#
= 1’ in the Remote Panel Link field of Panel 2, Panel 1/Link 1 will
activate Panel 2/Link1. Panel 2/Link 1 will in turn activate Panel
1/Link 1, which will start the process over again. This is called an
‘endless loop’ which will never stop activating these links and
consume system resources. This condition is to be avoided.
When creating a global link you have some decisions to make. First, we
need to reinforce the following points.
• Links are ‘chained’ together to form Global links
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• All links are triggered by inputs, time schedules or other links
• The goal of all links, local or global, is to (ultimately) fire relays
Local links are fairly straightforward to deal with. But, with a global link
you have a number of issues. Since the global link is created from two or
more local links, what type of links should those local links be? For
example, if you create two local links and then plan to connect those links
globally, your first decision is what each of those links should do locally,
at their respective panels. Here are some of the considerations.
• How many links will you connect together globally?
• What is the overall plan for the links? Will each link be able to operate
independently? Will one of the links act as an Input Only link (see
above) and the other act as the Output Only link?
• How many links need to be connected together globally?
Remember that each link can be triggered by up to five inputs on a given
panel. A link can also be triggered by a tracked time schedule. Any link
can activate up to five relays. Any of those relays can be placed in any of
three modes ‘On’, ‘Off’ or ‘Track’.
You can see that there are a number of variations, so a plan needs to be
created before attempting to connect your links. However, the process
can be simplified. All global links will fall into two categories.
• Links that work independently and fire other links – These will
be links that are complete with input settings and output settings. So
each of these links will operate on its own and be connected globally
in addition
• Links that exist to fire other links – The Input Only and Output
only links mentioned above are examples of links that are dependant
on other links. An input will fire an Input Only link, but that link will
not activate anything on its own. It requires a global connection to do
any meaningful work
Thus, there are two classes of links that are used to create global links –
those links that activate local relays and fire other links, and those links
that do not activate local relays but use a local input or time schedule to
activate another link, which in turn fire relays that are local to the panel
where that link resides.
To Create a Global Link do the following.
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• Create Local Links – Create at least two local links of any type
mentioned above. Decide which link will fire the remote link
• Create the Remote Link – In the Remote Panel Link area of the link
that will activate the remote panel link, select the panel number and
link number of the link that will be remotely activated
Figure 726 – The Remote Panel Link Selection Controls
• Click Save – Click the Save button
That is all that is needed to create a global link. The act of connecting
links together, using the Remote Panel Link controls, is what makes any
link global
A detailed view of each of the Links screen controls follows.
General Tab
• Panel Name
Figure 727 – The Panel Name Selection Control
You need to select the panel that the link will be associated with
before you can set the operating parameters of that link. The ‘Panel
Name’ selection control contains a list of all panels that were created
in the Panels screen.
Once a panel is selected, the fields on the Input tab and the fields on
the Output tab will have access to the inputs and relays (respectively)
that are activated for the selected panel.
To select a panel, click the arrow button to the right of the Panel
Name control. Scroll up or down to locate the selected panel and click
on it. If there are no panels in the Panels list, you need to open the
Panels screen, available from the Configuration menu and create some
panel definitions
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• Description
Figure 728 – The Description Text Field
You will use the ‘Description’ field to enter a descriptive name for the
link. Be sure to create a name that clearly describes the function of the
link. This name will be attached to all link event messages involving
this link (Figure 689). The field will accept any combination of letters,
numbers or symbols
Figure 729 – Link Event Messages
• Group
Figure 730 – The Group Selection Control
Use the Group selection control to assign the link to a Link Group.
Groups are used by the CardAccess software to perform database
partitioning and manual control screen masking. For more
information, see the manual section entitled ‘Groups’.
To select a Group, click the arrow button to the right of the Group
control and click on your selection. If there are no groups visible in
the list, you need to create some in the Groups screen, available from
the Administration menu
• Enable Schedule
Figure 731 – The Enable Schedule Selection Control
When you create a link definition and enable it, by default that link is
available to be activated by input trigger or manually 24 hours per day,
every day of the year.
If you select a schedule in the ‘Enable Schedule’ field, the selected link
cannot be activated by an abnormal input outside of the schedule.
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However, the link can still be manually activated outside of the enable
schedule.
To assign a link enable schedule, click the arrow to the right of the
Enable Schedule control, scroll up or down to locate your selection,
and click the schedule.
If there are no selections available in the Enable Schedule control, you
need to create some in the ‘Schedules’ screen available from a button
on the CardAccess main toolbar
• Prog #
Figure 732 – The Link Program Number Selection Control
The Link Program Number selection control allows you to select
which numbered link you wish to activate on a given panel. Link
program numbers are used by the system to identify the link, so link
numbers cannot be duplicated on the same panel. Each panel can
have it’s own set of link programs numbered 1-64.
The Prog# field is not automatically incremented, so you must keep
track of the numbered links that you have created for the selected
panel.
To select a link program number, click the arrow buttons to the right
of the Prog# field or click in the white space and type a number from
1 to 64
• Enabled
Figure 733 – The Enabled Check Box
The Enabled check box activates or deactivates the link at the panel.
When a link is disabled, the link is effectively ‘dead’. The link cannot
be activated by any means, including input abnormal, track schedule
or manual activation.
To enable the link (the default), click the check box. Checked is
enabled and unchecked is disabled
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• Report Activity
Figure 734 – The Report Activity Check Box
Link status event messages (Figure 735) are enabled by default. You
can elect to suppress link event messages by un-checking the ‘Report
Activity’ check box. Checked enables reporting of event messages,
unchecked disables reporting for the selected link
Figure 735 – Link Status Event Messages
• Alert Requires Response
Figure 736 – The Alert Requires Response Check Box
If the ‘Alert Requires Response’ check box is checked, each link event
message will appear in the Alerts Grid. A Pop up event response box
will appear and it will require the operator to click a button to resolve
each alert from this link.
To enable the Alert Requires Response function for a link, click the
check box. Checked is enabled and unchecked is disabled (the default)
• Dialup on Activation
Figure 737 – The Dial Up on Activation Check Box
The ‘Dialup on Activation’ option is only used with dial up panels.
Dial panels save event messages in a memory buffer and wait to be
dialed (on a regular schedule). While the panel is off-line, links could
be reporting potentially important event messages which the
CardAccess computer would not be aware of until dialing in some
time later.
If you want the panel to dial the CardAccess PC each time this link is
activated and reports an event message, click the Dial Up on
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Activation check box. Checked is enabled, unchecked is disabled (the
default)
• Alert Priority
Figure 738 – The Alert Priority Selection Control
The ‘Alert Priority’ selection control allows you to set the default
event priority value for the event messages from this link. The alert
priority is used by the system to route event messages to the Events or
Alerts Grids (see the manual section entitled ‘Setting Up Priorities’ for
more information).
The default priority is 10. If you wish to change the Alert Priority (199 is possible, 1 is most important), click the arrows to the right of the
Alert Priority control or click in the white space and type a number
Warning – If you set a priority of 99 for link alerts, no alerts
will be generated by the panel. Alert Priority level of 99
suppresses all alerts.
• Manual Control Privilege
Figure 739 – The Manual Control Privilege Selection Control
You use the Links ‘Manual Control Privilege’ selection control to
assign the current link to a privilege level. That privilege level affects
which relays will appear in the Links Manual Control screen.
The Links screen Manual Control Privilege selection control works in
conjunction with the Links Manual Control screen and the Operators
screen as explained below
o Links Manual Control Screen
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Figure 740 – The Links Manual Control Screen
Essentially, all Manual Control Privilege settings affect which links
are displayed in the Links manual control screen, for selected
operators. The object is to hide selected links from the view of
selected operators.
The Links manual control screen allows operators to manually fire
links from inside the CardAccess software (see the manual section
entitled ‘Manual Control’). Hiding selected links will prevent
unauthorized activation of those links.
The links manual control screen uses the settings in the Operators
screen, on the Privileges tab, of the currently logged in operator, to
determine which links to make visible and which links to hide, each
time the manual control screen is opened
o Operator Manual Control Privileges
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Figure 741 – The Operators Screen Privileges Tab
An operator definition is created in the Operators screen and
Device Control Privileges are assigned (or not assigned) on the
Privileges tab for each operator that you create (Figure 695 above).
Operator ‘Device Control Privileges’ operate under the following
rules
! If no Device Control Privileges are assigned in the Operator
record (which is the default), privilege level settings are ignored
and the operator has access to all links in the Links manual
control screen (Figure 694)
! If you assign a given operator only one permission level, as in
the example in Figure 695 where Priv 4 is assigned, the operator
would be allowed to see only those links with ‘Priv 4’ or ‘All’
selected in the Manual Control Privilege field of each link record
(Figure 696)
Figure 742 – The Links Screen Manual Control Privilege
Control
! Privilege level assignments are not ‘inclusive’. If a given operator
has Priv 4 assigned in his or her operator record (as in Figure
695) that does not mean that they will be able to manually
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control all links with Priv 1-4 assigned in the Manual Control
Privilege field of the link record. It means they have access to
Priv 4 links only.
If you require that operators have access to multiple privilege
levels, you must check off multiple Priv levels in the Privileges
tab of the Operators screen (Figure 697).
Figure 743 – The Operators Screen Priv Assignment Check
Boxes
In Figure 697, the operator with these settings will be able to
manually activate links with the Priv levels of 1, 3, 4, 7, 8 or ‘All’.
Links with a Priv level of 2, 5, or 6 will be hidden from the view
of this operator. The Links manual control screen will open
with links 2, 5, and 7 filtered out of the list.
Note that checking all of the Priv check boxes works identically
to checking none of the Priv check boxes. That is, the operator
has access to all of the links in the manual control screen with
either set up
• Remote Panel Link
Figure 744 – The Remote Panel Link Controls
The Remote Panel Link controls allow you to set up Global links. As
described above, there are two types of links – Local and Global. In
the Links screen, when you create new links, you are exclusively
creating local links only. That is, some number of links that reside
locally in the memory of each panel of your CardAccess system.
Once several local links have been created, it is then possible to
connect two or more local links together using the ‘Remote Panel
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Link’ controls, thereby forming global links. To connect two links do
the following
o Select a Panel Number – You will be attempting to connect the
current link to a second link, on a different panel. Select a panel
number from a panel other than the one that you are currently
editing the link from.
To locate the panel number of a given panel, go to the Panels
screen, available from the Configuration menu. The panel number
will be found in the ‘PnlNo’ column in the top of the screen
(Figure 745).
Figure 745 – The Panels Screen Panel Number Field
Return to the Links screen and use to arrow buttons to the right of
the ‘Panel’ control (Figure 746) or click in the white space and type
in a number from 1 to 512
Figure 746 – The Global Link Panel Number Selection Control
o Select a Link Program Number – Use the arrow buttons to the
right of the Prog# control (Figure 747) to select a link program
number on the target panel.
Figure 747 – The Global Link Program Number Selection Control
The link program numbers can be found in the Links screen, in the
‘Link Prog’ column (Figure 748)
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Figure 748 – The Links Screen Link Program Number Field
Input Tab
Figure 749 – The Input Tab
The Input tab of the Links screen contains the ‘triggers’ that are used to
activate a link. You can connect up to five inputs to fire the current link.
If any one of the inputs selected goes abnormal, or if the schedule goes
into effect, the link will be fired.
As you may recall from the Inputs chapter of the manual, Inputs have
two software states – normal and abnormal. The software states are
somewhat ‘disconnected’; from the hardware states – ‘open’ and ‘closed’.
An input can be set up to be normally open or normally closed
depending on the setting of the ‘Normal Open’ check box in the Inputs
screen. Thus, an input could be ‘open’ but still be ‘normal’.
Note that the panel software uses the normal and abnormal software
states to describe the condition of the input, not the hardware condition.
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This is an important distinction, because a link program uses the software
state of the input to trigger the link, not the hardware state. It is ‘Input
Abnormal’ that fires a link, not necessarily an open input, since open
could be the normal state for the selected input.
To select an input to fire a link, click the arrow to the right of any of the
five selection controls in the Input tab of the links screen. Scroll up or
down to locate the selected input and click on it.
Figure 750 – The Links Screen Inputs Selection Controls
If you elect to use more that one input to trigger the link note that it does
not matter which of the five available fields you use, they are not
‘prioritized’ in any way. If you elect to fill all five fields note that the fields
are not logical ‘and’, they are logical ‘or’. Which means that any one input
going abnormal will fire the link.
Also note that you can create a link that does not have any input
selections at all. The link can be activated by a time schedule alone. To
select a time schedule, click the arrow to the right of the ‘Time Schedule’
field (Figure 751), scroll up or down to locate the schedule and click it.
Figure 751 – The Links Screen Track Schedule Control
If you don’t see any schedules in the list you need to go to the Schedules
screen, available from the CardAccess main toolbar and create some
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Output Tab
Figure 752 – The Output Tab
The Output tab is used to select relays that will be activated by this link.
You can select up to five relays. All five relays will be activated when the
link is fired. There is no priority order for selecting a relay on this screen.
You can select a relay from any control bank; the order is ignored by the
system.
Relays can be placed in any one of three states by a link.
• Output On – When the input goes abnormal, the relay(s) will be
placed in the ‘Output On’ state for the period of time set in the
‘Energize Time’ field of the relay record (in the Relays screen). Use
this setting if you want the relay activated momentarily
• Output Off – When the input goes abnormal, the relay(s) will be
placed in the ‘Output Off’ state for the period of time set in the
‘Energize Time’ control of the relay record (in the Relays screen). Use
this setting if you want the relay de-activated momentarily and if the
relay is currently tracking a schedule
• Track – When the input goes abnormal, the relay(s) will track the
input. As long as the input is abnormal, the relay will remain in the
‘Output On’ state. Use this setting if you want the relay held in the
‘Output On’ state for as long as the input stays abnormal
To select a relay, click the arrow to the right of the selected control. Scroll
up or down to locate the selected relay. Click it. If there are no relays
appearing in the controls, you need to go to the Relays screen, available
from the Configuration menu, and create some.
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Map Tab
Figure 753 – The Maps Tab
The Map tab has controls that allow you to add or edit a map for the
current link. The Map tab is not visible unless the ‘Use Facility Map’
Option is enabled in the System Settings. For more detailed information
on the creation of maps see the manual section entitled ‘Maps’.
The function of each of the controls on the Map folder tab is as follows.
• Facility Map for This Device
Figure 754 – The Facility Map for This Device Field
Displays the name of the map that is attached to the current link
• Map Description
Figure 755 – The Map Description Field
An area where you can add a text description of the map
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• Size Image to Fit
Figure 756 – The Size Image to Fit Check Box
Image bitmaps come in all shapes and sizes. The CardAccess Maps
image view control is set by default to stretch the image to fit the size
of the image display window.
If Size Image to Fit is disabled, the image will be displayed in its native
size format (and white space may appear on the sides, or top and
bottom). The feature is enabled by default
• View Maps
Figure 757 – The View Maps Button
Click this button to open the Maps creation screen where you can
create or edit a map
• Remove Map
Figure 758 – The Remove Map Button
This button is only available while in Edit mode. Click it to delete the
map
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Com Ports
Figure 759 – The Communications Ports Screen
Continental Instruments panel hardware commonly uses serial
connections to communicate with the CardAccess (polling) computer.
Those panel serial connections can attach to the computer through any
of the several mechanical methods mentioned below.
•
Built in computer serial ports
•
Serial port expansion cards
•
An Ethernet network connection
Communication ports can be attached to or detached from the
CardAccess software by using the ‘Communication Ports’ screen (Figure
759), available from the Configuration menu. Up to 255 total
communications nodes (ports) are supported, but you must have the
hardware installed to support those ports and they must be activated in
the operating system, unless you are using ‘virtual ports’.
Virtual ports in the CardAccess are configured much like hardware ports,
but data that is sent to a virtual port is passed to the computer network
card as opposed to leaving the computer via a physical serial port.
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The data method used to make these virtual port connections is by using
TCP sockets over Ethernet. At the present time, the Continental panel
hardware does not support Ethernet connections, and the panel firmware
only supports a proprietary protocol. Thus, a mechanical adapter box is
needed to convert the serial ASCII based panel protocol to an Ethernet
TCP based protocol, to facilitate connecting panel hardware to a standard
Ethernet LAN network.
The current adapter of choice for this application is the Lantronix UDS10. The device efficiently converts serial ASCII based data into Ethernet
compatible data packets. This makes it possible to seamlessly connect
Continental access control panels to Ethernet networks.
The aforementioned discusses the panel side connection and what is
needed to support bringing Ethernet to the panel hardware. On the PC
side, a specialized software interface was needed to accomplish
supporting Ethernet based panel connections from the CardAccess
software side.
The Ethernet standard supports a number of connection protocols
including UDP, TCP and Net Bios. TCP was chosen as the Ethernet
protocol to be used to connect the CardAccess application software to
the Lantronix UDS-10 interface. TCP is more reliable than other
methods, and the TCP ‘sockets’ connection methods are supported by
the UDS-10.
If you look at Figure 759, you will notice that there are two folder tabs
visible in the figure called ‘Com Ports’ and ‘LAN Connections’. The Com
Ports tab allows you to configure the CardAccess physical serial ports.
The LAN Connections tab allows you to configure the CardAccess
virtual (TCP) ports. Both of these port types are ‘mutually exclusive’.
That is, you can configure a total of 255 ports of any type. If a port is
allocated to LAN it cannot be allocated to Com Ports and vice versa.
Let’s look at more detail on both of those connection types.
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Configure Com Ports
Figure 760 – The Com Ports Tab
The CardAccess is installed with the ‘capability’ of supporting 255 port
connections. These connections can be serial ports, LAN ports or any
combination of the two. Com1 is the only serial port that is connected to
the CardAccess software by default. All other ports are configured as
disconnected when you initially install the software.
As we stated previously, you must have the installed hardware to support
a given serial port before you attempt to connect it to the CardAccess
software. The controls as seen in Figure 760 exist for the function of
connecting the CardAccess software to a designated physical serial port.
But what do we mean when we say ‘connect’?
Computing equipment serial port connection methodologies were
established long before Windows was created. Effectively, the following
steps must be taken to configure serial ports prior to making them
available to any software application that wishes to connect to them.
•
Install the Hardware – Before any connections can occur, the
physical serial port hardware must be in place. If you intend to
connect the CardAccess software to 200 Com ports, appropriate port
expansion cards need to be installed in the CardAccess computer
first
•
Configure the Hardware – The physical ports mentioned above
must be activated in the operating system. This means that
appropriate drivers must be installed, and Windows must recognize
(and be communicating with) every port that CardAccess is expected
to connect to
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Connect to the Ports – Connect the CardAccess application to
selected ports using the controls on the Com Ports tab of the
Communication Ports screen
You will notice in Figure 760 that the Com Ports tab is showing
connection controls for serial ports Com1 through Com12. There is a
scrollbar to the right of that folder tab that will allow you to scroll down
to see more Com port connection controls. The highest numbered Com
port that the CardAccess will recognize is Com255. Let’s look at how
these controls work.
Each control on the Com Ports tab allows you to connect to one Com
port. Whichever Com port you elect to connect to, that Com port must
exist and be operational in the operating system first. Below explains how
to set the controls to connect to a com port.
Connect to a Com Port
To connect to a Com port do the following.
•
Open the Com Ports Screen – Open the Communications Ports
screen available from the Configuration menu (Com Ports shortcut)
•
Click Edit – Click the ‘Edit’ button
•
Select the Com Ports Tab – If the Com Ports tab is not visible,
click it
•
Use the Scrollbar – Use the scrollbar on the right side of the Com
ports tab to locate the Com port that you wish to connect the
CardAccess to
•
Click the Arrow – Click the down arrow to the right side of the
control under the ‘Type’ column. There are four selections explained
below (Figure 761).
Figure 761 – Com Ports Tab – Com Port Control with Type List
Visible
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o Not Used – If selected, the connection to the indicated Com
port is disabled. The port is disconnected and becomes available
to be reassigned
o Cable – ‘Cable’ refers to a physical serial port. If selected, the
CardAccess will attempt to connect to the physical serial port
indicated by the Com port number when the Save button is
clicked. The CardAccess will also attempt to connect to each
Com port that is set to ‘cable’ every time the CardAccess
software is started. If connection fails, there will be an error event
message (Figure 762). If the connection is successful, there will
be no event message
Figure 762 – Com Port Open Fail Event Message
o Modem – When a Com port control is set to ‘Modem’, it will
use Dial Up to connect to panels. However, several other items
must be set up before dial up will function.
!
At least one modem must be connected to the CardAccess
as set in the System Settings, available from the System menu
!
Dial Up will not take place unless at least one panel is
assigned to a Dial Up Com port number
!
Dial Up will not take place unless a dial schedule is set in the
‘Modems’ screen, available from the Configuration menu
To learn more about dial up, see the manual section entitled ‘Dial
Up’.
o UnAvail – You cannot select this menu item. This status is
automatically displayed in the Type control on the Com Ports tab
when you set a given port to LAN. Once a port is allocated to
the LAN function, the ‘UnAvail’ indicator is displayed in the
Com Ports area indicating that this port is already allocated to a
LAN connection and is not available to connect to a hardware
serial port
Figure 763 – Com Ports Tab View of Port Allocated to LAN
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Set the Baud Rate – Click the down arrow to the right side of the
control under the ‘BAUD’ column. There are five selections Figure
764. There are a few notes about the Baud rate below.
Figure 764 - Com Ports Tab – BAUD Control with Baud Rate List
Visible
o When set to 0 Baud, the polling is turned off for the port
o 9600 is the recommended port speed
o Setting a Baud speed is required to enable the port
o The CardAccess Baud setting overrides the operating system
setting
o The other port settings are {8, n, 1} – 8 Bits, No Parity, 1 Stop
bit (not selectable)
• Enter a Password – Passwords can only be used on dial up nodes.
Passwords are not necessary on Cable and LAN connections.
Password settings are ignored if the Type is set to Cable or LAN.
Passwords were instituted to prevent an unsolicited dial in to panels
from more than one service organization. It is possible to load the
wrong configuration into a panel and cause a node to become misprogrammed, denying access to valid users. In a case where the
panels are Cable or LAN connected, unauthorized connection to a
panel cluster is much more unlikely than with dial up, which is
exposed to the public telephone network.
If the Type field (see above) is set to ‘Modem’ and you desire a
password, enter up to six characters (numbers, letters or symbols in
any combination)
•
Click Save – When done setting the parameters for all of the Com
ports that you wish to activate, click the ‘Save’ button. When you
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have changed the settings for selected Com ports, the CardAccess
software will attempt the following after the Save button is clicked
o Cable – The CardAccess will immediately attempt to open every
port that has Type = Cable. If the connection fails, you will get
an error event message for every port that fails. If the attempt
succeeds, you will get no event messages
o LAN – The CardAccess will attempt to open a TCP sockets
connection with every port that is set to LAN. Read more detail
about LAN connections in the next section
o Modem – There will be no attempt to dial a panel node until a
dial schedule has activated dialing. To learn more about dial up,
see the manual section entitled ‘Dial Up’
Configure LAN Connections
Figure 765 – The LAN Connections Tab
The LAN Connections tab in the Communication Ports screen facilitates
connections to Lantronix brand micro serial server devices. As we stated
earlier, LAN connections to panels cannot take place until conversion
boxes (micro serial servers) are mounted to LAN connected panel nodes.
Each micro serial server adapter needs to be connected to the LAN
network, programmed and operating before the CardAccess can connect
to them.
A micro serial server device is a hardware adapter box that converts an
Ethernet connection to an RS232 connection. The Ethernet side of the
box behaves just like any network card that you may have configured for
a PC, and the same set up considerations apply. The box must have an IP
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address assigned and the serial server allows the use of any of several
common network protocols like TCP, UDP, ARP and more (consult the
product documentation).
The interface software used to connect the CardAccess to the micro
serial servers is written to use the TCP protocol. The TCP protocol uses
port numbers as the means to establish a ‘session’ connection between
two software applications (in this case, the CardAccess and a serial
server).
The port number used for the CardAccess to serial server connection is
‘3001’. The CardAccess software is hard coded to communicate with
port 3001, so each micro serial server must be set up with port 3001
assigned to the RS232 port. This is done in the set up menu of the serial
server. The manual section called ‘LAN Adapters’ has more details on
micro serial server programming.
To set up the CardAccess LAN Connections tab ports, do the following.
•
Provide an IP Address – The network administrator of the
network that you plan to install the CardAccess into must provide
one IP address for each micro serial server that you plan to use. You
will need one micro serial server (and thus, one address) per panel
node (a node is a cluster of up to 63 panels).
You will assign each panel node to one port on the LAN
Connections tab. You will then fill in the IP address of the micro
serial server for that node into the ‘IP Address’ field of the selected
port.
Note that the LAN connections engine does not communicate with
‘Com ports’ at all. Each port on the LAN Connections tab represents
a Windows ‘sockets’ connection. Even though the ports are labeled
as Com1 through Com255, every port that is assigned to LAN
connections strictly uses the LAN network interface card for all
connections.
It does not matter which port you choose for a given LAN node. But
you do need to make sure that you don’t try to assign a port to a
LAN function that has already been assigned to a Cable or Modem
function on the Com Ports tab.
•
Enable a Port – If the ‘Enable’ check box is not checked, the LAN
port will not be activated even if there is an IP address entered in the
IP Address field. Click the check box (check mark is visible) to
enable the port. Once you click Enable and save the record, IF there
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are any panels enabled on that node, the CardAccess will attempt to
communicate to the IP address indicated.
Note that if a given port has already been allocated on the Com Ports
tab, then your attempt to click the Enable check box will be ignored.
You must set the port to Type = Unused on a given Com port on
the Com Ports tab, before you will be allowed to allocate that same
port to LAN duties
•
Provide a Network Connection – In order to make it possible to
communicate to a serial server, you must have a working network
connection from the CardAccess PC, and to the micro serial server
devices. Note that the network infrastructure (routers specifically)
must not be blocking the TCP ports 3001 and 9999. TCP 3001 is the
port number of the serial port on the micro serial server devices, and
9999 is the configuration port of the UDS-10 micro serial server.
Unrestricted access to both ports must be provided along the entire
network path from the CardAccess PC to each micro serial server.
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Dial Up
The discussion of ‘Dial Up’ panel connections requires that we separate
the discussion into two subjects.
• Configuring the CardAccess Software for Dial Up Access –
Configuration of dial nodes is performed in the ‘Modems’ screen
(available from the ‘Configuration’ menu)
• Installing and Testing the Modem Hardware – The setup and
installation of modems is performed in the Windows control panel. It
is important to understand that the modem hardware is under the
control of the Windows operating system, not the CardAccess
software. When the CardAccess wishes to make a connection to a
modem, it must go through the operating system to do so. This
understanding is crucial to the proper configuration, testing and
troubleshooting of dial nodes
To create dial nodes, you use the CardAccess ‘Modems’ screen. Each
record in the Modems screen describes one Dial Node. Essentially, a Dial
Node is a ‘software macro’ that is ultimately a coupling of three things.
• Selected Panels – You select which panels will be connected to a
common panel cluster in the ‘Panels’ area of the Modems screen
(Figure 766). Note that all panels selected for a given dial node must
be physically connected together and they must be connected to one
common modem
Figure 766 – The Modems Screen Panels Selection Area
• A Modem Phone Number – You enter the phone number of the
panel side modem in the ‘Telephone No’ field of the Modems screen
General tab (Figure 767). The CardAccess communications driver will
use this phone number to dial out to the panel cluster
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Figure 767 – The Modems Screen Dial Out Phone Number Section
• A Time Schedule – You select a dialing schedule in the ‘Dial Out
Schedule’ area of the General tab (Figure 768). The communications
driver software will then dial the phone number indicated in the
‘Telephone No’ field (mentioned above) each time the selected
schedule goes into effect
Figure 768 – The Modems Screen Dial Out Schedule Section
Note that the Modems screen uses records from the ‘Schedules’ screen
(available from a button on the CardAccess main toolbar) and the
‘Panels’ screen (available from the ‘Configuration’ menu), so you must
have panels and schedules programmed before you attempt to create dial
nodes.
The reason for the existence of dial nodes is to have the CardAccess
communications driver connect to selected panel clusters periodically for
the following purposes.
• Uploading Event Messages – All models of Continental panels
store event messages in a memory buffer. When the CardAccess
communications driver polls a given panel, panel event messages are
purged from panel memory and are sent to the CardAccess host. On a
dial node, the panels will not be polled until a dial connection is
established.
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The panels will continue to store event messages until the memory
buffer is filled, then overflowed. The default size of the panel event
message buffer is set to 110 events (adjustable in the ‘Transaction
Buffer Size’ field in the Panels screen, on the General tab). When full,
the events buffer begins to overwrite itself. The oldest event messages
can be lost if the CardAccess PC does not dial a given panel cluster
frequently enough
• Downloading Configuration Changes – When configuration
changes are made in the CardAccess software, such as adding a badge
or changing an access group, those changes are sent to dial node
panels on the next available dial connection. Thus, dial panels must be
connected through dial up before they can receive configuration
changes. However, configuration changes for any dial panel cause the
system to dial the associated dial node as soon as the change is made,
automatically. The system does not wait for the next valid schedule to
send configuration changes.
Sections below will describe the functions of all of the Modems screen
controls and the process of setting up modems and dial lines. First, let’s
look at the general process of creating a basic dial node.
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Create a Basic Node Definition
To create a basic node definition do the following.
Click the General tab and do the below.
• Open Modems – Open the Modems screen, available from the
Configuration menu
• Click New – Click the ‘New’ button
Figure 769 – The New Button
• Create A Node Name – Type a descriptive name for your node into
the ‘Node Name’ field. It is strongly recommended that you create a
name that accurately describes the location or the intended use for the
node. To enter a name, click in the white space and type in a name.
Any typed character is accepted
Figure 770 – The Node Name Field
• Enter a Dial In Phone Number – There are two fields provided for
dial in phone numbers. Each field represents one of the modems that
is selected for use by the CardAccess software, as indicated in the
CardAccess System Settings.
The Dial In Phone Number fields will contain the phone numbers of
the two modems that are connected to the CardAccess host PC.
These numbers will be downloaded to the panel(s) indicated in the
current node record. The panel(s) will then store these numbers and
use them to dial in to the CardAccess PC where necessary.
The numbers in these fields are optional. If you will not need to have
any panel in the selected node dial the CardAccess host PC, you don’t
need to supply any dial in phone numbers. Also, you may elect to use
only one modem, which can be either modem 1 or modem 2.
However, whichever number you provide (modem line 1 or 2), there
must be a modem selected for that modem line in the System Settings
(see the manual section on the ‘System Settings’ for more information,
also see the below section called ‘Modems Screen Controls’ in this
chapter).
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To enter a phone number, click in the white space and type in the
number.
Figure 771 – The Dial In Telephone Numbers Fields
• Enter a Dial Out Phone Number – The Dial Out Phone Number
field is where you will type in the phone number of the panel side
modem for this panel cluster. This number will be used by the
CardAccess communications driver each time the selected panel node
is dialed
To enter a phone number, click in the white space and type in the
number.
Figure 772 – The Dial Out Telephone Number Field
• Enter Init String – If preferred, you are permitted to enter modem
initialization strings into the ‘Modem Init Strings’ field (Figure 773).
These strings will be downloaded to the panel that is connected to the
remote modem (the panel whose address is set to 1 gets the string
stored). That panel will store the initialization string in memory and
will send that string to the (panel side) modem after each connection
event is terminated (shortly after each hang up). The string will also be
sent from the panel to the panel side modem each time the panel is
manually reset.
To enter a string, click in the white space of the Modem Init Strings
field (Figure 773) and type in your string. The string must begin with
the AT command (the modem ‘attention’ command). You will not
need ‘AT’ on the second line (if you use it). The system sees both lines
of the field as one contiguous string. You may separate each
command with a space if preferred for readability. Spaces are ignored
Figure 773 – The Modem Init Strings Field
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• Select a Schedule – The schedule is a key element of the dial node
definition. The schedule determines when, and how frequently the
CardAccess communications driver will connect to the dial node
defined by this node definition. You have the following choices.
o By Schedule – The CardAccess will dial the node according to the
schedule selected in the ‘Time Schedule’ field. If you elect to use
this option, you must also select a time schedule in the Time
Schedule field
o On the Hour – The CardAccess will dial the node every hour, at
the top of the hour
o Twice Daily – The CardAccess will dial the node twice daily, once
at midnight and once at noon
o Daily – The CardAccess will dial the node once per day, at
midnight
If you are not sure which option to select, as a baseline use the ‘Twice
Daily’ option if the system is busy 24 hours per day. Use the ‘Daily’
option for systems that are moderately busy during the day, but are
quiet at night.
To select an option click on it. If a black dot is shown in the circle, the
option is selected
Figure 774 – The Dial Frequency Selection Radio Buttons
Now click on the Panels tab and do the below.
• Select Panels – You will need to add some panels to your dial node.
By default, the software shows you a list of all panels that are known
to be dial up panels, but no panels are added to your new dial node
automatically. You must select each panel that you wish to have
included in the current dial node.
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You will only select panels that you know are physically connected
together and are on the same modem. The CardAccess
communications driver will then poll the panel addresses of each
selected panel, each time the currently selected dial node is connected.
To select a panel, click the check box of the panel in question.
Checked means selected, unchecked means unselected.
Figure 775 – The Panels Tab Panel Selection Area
• Select a Dial Out Line – Since the CardAccess allows you to assign
up to two modems for use by the dial engine (in the System Settings),
the software needs to know which of the two modems you would
prefer this dial node to use for dialing out to the panel cluster
indicated by the currently selected node record.
To select a Dial Out Line, click the radio button to the left of the
‘Modem Line 1’ or ‘Modem Line 2’ labels. A black dot in the circle
means selected. It is recommended that you check the System Settings
‘General’ tab to verify which modem line is assigned to the modem
you wish to select. You are permitted to select either line but not both
Figure 776 – The Dial Out Line Radio Buttons
• Select a Dial In Line – You will only need to select one or more Dial
In Lines if you are planning on having the panels dial in to the
CardAccess PC in response to an input, relay or link activation. If you
have not set this option in any of the Inputs, Relays or Links screens,
you may skip this section.
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If you wish to have one or more panels in the currently selected dial
node dial in to the CardAccess, you need to supply those panel(s) with
the dial line phone number(s) of the CardAccess host PC modem(s).
The CardAccess host PC can support up to two modems (in the
System Settings). Each of those modems can be assigned to dial in or
dial out duties. However, when you select a modem for dial in duty,
that modem port is placed in ‘monitor’ mode. The CardAccess
software will monitor the port waiting for a ringing indication, then
will answer the call.
You can assign up to two modems to dial in duty if you prefer. The
CardAccess will monitor both modems and answer whichever line is
ringing. A modem can be assigned to dial out and dial in duty
simultaneously.
To select a Dial In Line, click the radio button to the left of ‘Modem
Line 1’, ‘Modem Line 2’ or ‘Both Modem Lines’. A black dot in the
circle means selected. You are only permitted to select one of the
three options
• Click Save – Click the Save button
Figure 777 – The Save Button
When you have saved your node record, the CardAccess will activate the
node. Once the node is activated, the CardAccess will wait for the time
schedule selected in that node to go into effect, and will then dial the
remote node’s modem as requested.
Once the CardAccess is successfully connected to a panel cluster through
a dial line, it will remain online with the panels indicated in the node
record until there are no more event messages received from those
panels. The CardAccess communications driver will then hang up the call
and dial the next dial node if it programmed to do so.
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Modems Screen Controls
The function of each of the Modem screen controls appears below.
General Tab
You will use the General tab controls to set the operating settings for the
dial node. To the software, a dial node is comprised of a phone number
for a remote modem, coupled with one or more panel assignments and a
dial out time schedule. Panel assignments are handled on the ‘Panels’ tab,
general settings for the node are found on the General tab. Each control
on the General tab is described below.
• Node Number
Figure 778 – The Node Number Selection Control
The ‘Node Number’ is incremented automatically by the system. Each
node you create must be assigned a unique number. You will get an
error message if you try to save a node with a duplicate number.
If you wish to manually set the Node Number, click the arrows to the
right of the Node Number control or click in the white space and type
in a number from 1 to 512
• Panel Dial In Phone Numbers
Figure 779 – The Dial Back Phone Numbers Section
The ‘Workstations (Incoming)’ section (Figure 779) is where you can
enter up to two phone numbers that the panels will use to dial back
the CardAccess host PC. The two phone number fields, ‘Telephone
No. Line 1’ and ‘Telephone No. Line 2’, represent the phone numbers
of the PC side modems connected to the CardAccess host PC and
software. These will be the modems that you connected to the
CardAccess in the System Settings.
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Figure 780 – The System Settings Modems Section
Note that the System Settings has fields for ‘Modem Line 1’ and
‘Modem Line 2’ (Figure 780). These fields let you connect up to two
modems for use by the CardAccess communications driver. There is
no prioritizing of the fields, so you can connect one modem to Line 2,
and no modem to Line 1 if you prefer (This not recommended
though. It is far less confusing to use Line 1 first and then Line 2 if
you need a second modem).
Note that the field called ‘Telephone No. Line 1’ in the Modems
screen is permanently linked by software to the field called ‘Line 1
Modem Name’ in the System Settings (on the ‘General’ Tab). The
field called ‘Telephone No. Line 2’ in the Modems screen is also
permanently linked to the ‘Line 2 Modem Name’ field in the System
Settings.
When you select a modem in the ‘Line 1’ field of the System Settings,
that modem becomes known to the CardAccess software as ‘Modem
Line 1’. The software does not use the modem name to refer to the
modem. It uses whatever modem is assigned in the Line 1 Modem
Name field of the System Settings and is known to the system as
‘Modem Line 1’. The same is true for the Line 2 modem. This is an
important concept in CardAccess dial node set up, because in the
CardAccess configuration screens, all references to the dial modems
are expressed as ‘Line 1’ or ‘Line 2’, not as modem name ‘xyz’.
Thus, the field called ‘Telephone No. Line 1’ in the ‘Workstations
(Incoming)’ section of the Modems screen refers to the phone
number of the phone line, that is connected to the modem, that is
referred to in the field called ‘Line 1 Modem Name’ in the System
Settings (in the Modems section, on the General tab). And,
‘Telephone No. Line 2’ refers to the telephone number of the ‘Line 2
Modem Name’ modem in the System Settings.
To enter a phone number, click in the white space of either of the
Telephone No. fields and type a phone number. Each field will hold
up to 30 digits
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• Panel Dial Out Phone Numbers
Figure 781 – The Remote Panel Modem Details Section
The CardAccess software needs to know the phone number of the
panel side modem for the currently selected dial node. You will supply
that phone number by typing it into the ‘Telephone No.’ field of the
‘Panels’ section of the Modems screen (Figure 781).
Each node record in the Modems screen represents one dial node.
That dial node could represent 1 panel or up to 63 panels. The phone
number entered into the ‘Telephone No’ field represents the phone
number of the modem that is physically connected to the first panel in
the selected cluster.
There will be one record in the Modems screen for each dial up panel
cluster that you have constructed (in this case a cluster is one or more
panels, with one of those panels connected to a modem). Each panel
node record will have a unique telephone number in the Telephone
No field, because each node record represents a different cluster of
panels, each with its own modem and phone line.
There is an additional field provided in the ‘Panels’ section called
‘Modem Init Strings’. You can fill in an initialization string that will be
sent to the panel side modem. This string will be downloaded to the
panel memory just after the CardAccess communications driver hangs
up every call. This will allow you to reprogram the remote panel
modem behavior from any CardAccess workstation, possibly saving a
trip to the remote site.
Once an initialization string has been downloaded to panel memory,
the panel will send that string to the panel side modem on either of
two occasions.
o When the panel hangs up just after a connection
o When the panel is manually reset
Note that when there is no initialization string specified in the Modem
Init Strings field of the Modems screen node record, the panel
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connected to the modem still sends a default initialization string to the
modem of ‘ATQEV’. The meaning of this string is as follows.
o AT – The ‘attention’ command. Instructs the modem to enter
command mode
o Q – (Q0) Return result codes
o E – (E0) Echo Off
o V – (V0) Return numeric result codes
This default string will ensure the minimum modem compatibility
with Continental access control panels. The panels require that
numeric result codes be returned from the modem. The panel uses
these result codes to determine the dial and answer status of the
modem. Thus, whatever custom initialization string you create for
your modem, at the minimum that string must include ‘Q0’, ‘E0’ and
‘V0’ as parameters.
Note that the default initialization string is permanently stored in panel
EPROM, so you don’t need to enter it in the Modem Init Strings
field. If you wish to expand on that string, then the Modem Init
Strings field is available
• Manual Connect
Figure 782 – The Manual Connect Button
Generally, there are two ways to request that the CardAccess connect
to a given dial node.
o Dial By Schedule – This is the standard way to have the
CardAccess connect to dial nodes. You select a schedule in the
Modems screen for each dial node that you create. The system will
then automatically dial a given node when the schedule goes into
effect
o Manual Connect – You have the option of manually connecting
to any dial node at any time by using the Manual Connect feature.
Generally, you highlight the selected node and click the ‘Manual
Connect’ button (Figure 782). This brings up a manual connection
screen (Figure 783), which provides controls that will allow you to
force the communications driver to dial the selected node
immediately.
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Figure 783 – The Manual Connect Screen
The manual connect screen controls are explained below.
! Node – Using the ‘Node’ field, you can select the name of a
node to manually dial. The Node field will be focused on the
name of the node that was highlighted when you clicked the
‘Manual Control’ button on the Modems screen. However,
once the ‘Modem Connections’ screen is open, you can select
any node that you wish to dial by selecting it in the Node
control.
To select a node, click the arrow button to the right of the
Node control and scroll up or down to locate the selection.
Click the selection to select it
Figure 784 – The Node Selection Control
! Modem – As stated above, there are two possible dial lines
available in the CardAccess software. The manual control screen
needs to know which modem line (Line 1 or Line 2) you wish
to use to dial out.
To select a modem line to dial out on, click the arrow to the
right of the ‘Modem’ field, and select ‘Modem Line 1’ or
‘Modem Line 2’
Figure 785 – The Modem Selection Control
! Dial – Click the ‘Dial’ button to force the CardAccess
communications driver to dial the selected dial node
Figure 786 – The Manual Control Screen Dial Button
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! Hang Up – The ‘Hang Up’ button has been provided as a
means to cancel a manual dial out request. After you click the
‘Dial’ button, the CardAccess communications driver will
attempt to force the selected modem off hook and dial the
selected panel cluster. You can click the Hang Up button at any
time during the connection to cancel the dial request and hang
up the line
Caution – Once a connection has been established to a dial
panel cluster, you must be careful not to hang up the connection
while panels are in the middle of a data download. The panels
clear their configuration memory prior to a data download, and
partial downloads can disable the panel. Note though, that all
dial connections do not result in data downloads
! Cancel – If you click the ‘Cancel’ button all changes will be
discarded and the manual control window will be closed. The
Cancel button will not cause the communications driver to hang
up a currently active call
Figure 787 – The Manual Control Screen Cancel Button
! Stay Connected – The ‘Stay Connected’ check box allows you
to override the default behavior of the CardAccess
communications driver. For economy, the communications
driver is set by default to hang up all dial connections (manual
or automatic), once there is no more data to transmit or receive.
When checked, the Stay Connected check box tells the
communications driver to remain connected indefinitely once a
manual dial call is connected. The Stay Connected check box
applies to the manual dialing feature and does not apply to the
dial by schedule function.
Check the Stay Connected check box to remain connected.
Uncheck the check box to always disconnect after the data
transfer is complete (the default)
Figure 788 – The Setup Dialup Screen Stay Connected Check
Box
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• Node Name
Figure 789 – The Node Name Text Field
Enter up to thirty characters to describe your dial node. It is strongly
suggested that you use names that accurately reflect the location or use
of the dial node. Any typed character is accepted in this field
• Dial On Schedule
Figure 790 – The Dial Frequency Section
Figure 791 – The Time Schedule Selection Control
The ‘Dial Frequency’ controls (Figure 790) and the ‘Time Schedule’
selection field (Figure 791) of the modems screen work in conjunction
with one another. As stated previously, dial out to panel clusters can
be set up to happen automatically based on a time schedule, or you
can force a manual dial by using the Manual Connect button on the
Modems screen.
The ‘Dial Frequency’ radio buttons set how frequently the selected
node will by automatically dialed by the CardAccess system. You have
the following choices.
o By Schedule – The selected node is dialed according to the time
schedule selected in the ‘Time Schedule’ field (Figure 791). To
select the dial by schedule option, click the ‘By Schedule’ option in
the ‘Dial Frequency’ section of the General tab.
Next, click the arrow to the right of the ‘Time Schedule’ field (also
on the General tab) and scroll up or down to select a schedule. If
there are no schedules visible in the list, you need to go to the
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Schedules screen (available from a button on the CardAccess main
toolbar) and create some
o On the Hour – The selected node is dialed every hour, at the top
of the hour. To select the dial on the hour option, click the ‘On the
Hour’ option in the ‘Dial Frequency’ section of the General tab.
Make sure the selection in the ‘Time Schedule’ control is blank or
says ‘Not Used’. The Time Schedule control is only used in the
Dial by Schedule setting
o Twice Daily – The selected node is dialed twice daily. Once at
noon and once again at midnight. To select the dial on the hour
option, click the ‘Twice Daily’ option in the ‘Dial Frequency’
section of the General tab.
Make sure the selection in the ‘Time Schedule’ control is blank or
says ‘Not Used’. The Time Schedule control is only used in the
Dial by Schedule setting
o Daily – The selected node is dialed once per day, at midnight only.
To select the dial on the hour option, click the ‘Daily’ option in the
‘Dial Frequency’ section of the General tab.
Make sure the selection in the ‘Time Schedule’ control is blank or
says ‘Not Used’. The Time Schedule control is only used in the
Dial by Schedule setting
Important Note – Panel event buffers have limited capacity. You will
want to select a dial schedule for a panel cluster that picks up buffered
event messages before panel event buffers overflow. If overflow
occurs, the oldest event messages will be overwritten with newer
events. You could lose event messages if a panel’s event buffer is
allowed to overflow. Busier panels require more frequent dialing
Panels Tab
Each record saved in the Modems screen, is called a ‘Dial Node’.
Conceptually, a dial node could be considered a software ‘macro’. In the
Modems screen, a dial node record joins phone numbers, time schedules
and panels (some of which were created in other CardAccess screens)
together to form an action macro that the software will later execute. The
dial node macro begins to perform ‘activities’ once you create, enable and
save it.
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Once activated, a dial node macro will wait for the time schedule to go
into effect. The CardAccess communications driver will then dial the
phone number stored in the ‘Telephone No.’ field of the node record.
The communications driver will then attempt to establish a data
communications link with the panels selected in the node record. Thus,
the goal of a dial node macro is to establish communications with the
panels selected on the Panels tab of the dial node record.
The ‘Panels’ tab is where you will tell the CardAccess which panels will
belong to the current dial node. The list of panels that appears in the
Panels tab contains only panels that are known to be dial up panels. You
select the panels that you wish to have belong to a given dial node by
clicking the check boxes.
When you click the Panels tab in the Modems screen for a given dial
node record, you will not see any panels represented there unless you
have created some dial panels first.
To begin the process of creating dial panels, you must start by going to
the Com Ports screen. You need to create at least one Com port that has
the ‘Type’ set to ‘Modem’ (Figure 792).
Figure 792 – The Com Ports Screen Type Field Set to Modem
After you have created a modem enabled Com port, you can then assign
that Com port to one or more panels in the ‘Com Port’ field of each
selected panel record (Figure 793) in the Panels screen.
Figure 793 – The Panels Screen Com Port Selection Control
Once a given panel has been assigned to a modem enabled Com port, it
becomes a ‘dial up’ panel. Only dial up enabled panels are shown on the
Panels tab of the Modems screen (Figure 794). Therefore, if you have not
assigned a ‘Modem’ type Com port to any panels, the list will be empty.
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Figure 794 – The Modems Screen Panels Tab
Note that the Panels tab of the Modems screen lists all panels that are
assigned to modem enabled Com ports. The list is simply a listing of all
panels that have been assigned to dial up Com ports. None of those
panels have been assigned to any dial nodes, until you assign them by
clicking the check boxes.
So, when you create a dial node, you are telling the CardAccess software
which panels in the list of all dial enabled panels, you have connected
together on the same remote panel modem.
The controls on the Panels tab of the Modems screen allow you to select
the panels that will belong to a given dial node. You can also select which
of the two CardAccess modem lines will be used for dialing out by the
CardAccess host PC, or which modem lines will be used by the selected
panels for dialing in from the currently selected dial node.
Note that all selections in a given node record affect only that node.
There are no ‘global’ settings available from the Modems screen that will
affect all dial nodes.
The Panels tab controls are explained below.
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• Panel Selection
Figure 795 – The Panels Tab Panel Selection Area
The ‘Panels’ selection area (Figure 795) is where you will select panels
that will belong to the current dial node. You simply click the check
box of each panel that you wish to have belong to a given node. All of
those panels that don’t have checks in the check boxes will not be
polled when the currently selected node is connected.
Note that in the modems screen, we are creating a macro that will dial
a given cluster and poll the panel addresses of the panels that we have
selected on the Panels tab. It is important to be sure that all of the
panels selected in the Panels area of a given node are in fact, actually
physically connected together, and are connected to the modem
whose phone number is specified in the ‘Telephone No.’ field of the
selected node.
Since the panels list is a list of all dial up panels, it would be easy to
mistakenly include a panel that belongs to a different node by
checking the wrong box.
To select a panel for inclusion with the selected node, click the check
box for that panel. Checked means the panel is included, unchecked
means excluded
• Dial Out Modem Line
Figure 796 – The Dial Out Modem Radio Buttons
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The ‘Dial Out Line’ radio buttons are used to select which modem the
currently selected dial node will use to dial out from the PC to the
panels. You are telling the CardAccess which modem listed in the
System Settings (Figure 780 above) it should use for dialing out to
panels when this node is contacted. Click the modem you wish to
select (the system will only let you select one of the modems)
• Dial In Modem Line
Figure 797 – The Dial In Modem Radio Buttons
The ‘Dial-In Line’ radio buttons enable two things.
o Dial In Phone Numbers – The ‘Dial-In Line’ radio buttons are
used to select which dial in phone numbers will be sent to the
currently selected panel cluster. If you select ‘Modem Line 1’, only
the phone number from the ‘Telephone No Line 1’ field (on the
General Tab) will be sent to the panels in the selected cluster. Thus,
they will only be aware of the one dial back phone line and will use
that phone number exclusively for dial back. Similarly, if you select
‘Modem Line 2’, only the phone number from the ‘Telephone No
Line 2’ field will be sent to the panels.
If you select ‘Both Modem Lines’, both of the phone numbers
from the ‘Workstations (incoming) section of the General tab will
be sent to all panels in the selected cluster. A panel wishing to
connect to the CardAccess host PC will dial Modem Line 1 first. If
that line is busy, the panel will dial Modem Line 2. The panel will
continue to cycle between Modem Line 1 and 2 indefinitely until it
achieves a connection.
o Modem Monitoring – Your selection in the Dial-In Line area of
the Panels tab also enables CardAccess monitoring of the modem
lines selected, waiting for incoming calls. Once you make a Dial-In
Line selection, the CardAccess connects to the selected modem(s)
to monitor for incoming connection requests. The CardAccess
may still dial out from the selected modems, but those modems
will not be available to any other Windows programs.
To make a selection, click ‘Modem Line 1’, ‘Modem Line 2’ or ‘Both
Modem Lines’ (the system will only allow one selection)
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• Alpha Sort
Figure 798 – The Alpha Sort Check Box
By default, the list of panels in the list on the Panels tab is sorted in
panel number order (taken from the ‘PnlNo’ field of the Panels
configuration screen). If you wish to sort the panels list in alphabetical
order instead, click the ‘Alpha Sort’ check box. Checked means sorted
in alpha order, unchecked means sorted in panel number order. You
don’t need to be in edit mode to use this feature
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General Modem Setup
Generally, you will need at least one dial modem for the CardAccess host
PC (up to two are permitted). An external modem is recommended, as
there have been cases where a modem has ‘locked up’, preventing dial
out. The only way to reset an internal modem is to reboot the host
computer, which will also take the entire CardAccess system down.
You will also need to provide an additional modem for every dial node
(panel cluster) that you wish to construct. A dial node will consist of a
modem with one or more panels serially connected attached to each
other, and ultimately one panel in the cluster is attached to the modem.
Important Note – The panel that is directly attached to the
modem must have the ‘modem switch’ set to Off (switch #7 on a
Superterm, Smarterm and Miniterm, switch #6 on a Microterm).
This switch enables panel control of the modem through AT
commands. The modem to panel link will not work correctly if
the modem switch is set to On (the default).
The various CardAccess system dial modems do not have to be the same
brand or model. That is, you can mix modem brands in the same system,
but it is not recommended. Because modems are designed to industry
standards, theoretically you should be able to make any modem talk to
another modem. In practice, this will only be true if the modem installer
is highly skilled at setting up modems and in telecommunications in
general. It makes more sense to use the same modem brand and model
for every connection point to permit ease of setup and insure 100%
compatibility.
All modems, regardless of brand have programmable parameters that are
accessible by sending configuration command codes through the modem
serial port. These command codes are generally referred to as the ‘Hayes
AT Command Set’ due to the fact that the modem command language
was first used by the Hayes modem company, and due to the fact that
every command string must begin with the letters ‘AT’. ‘AT’ is the
‘attention’ command for a modem, and puts all modems into
configuration mode.
The modem expects that some number of recognizable command codes
will follow the AT command. Every modem has a specific list of AT
commands that the modem will respond to. Any commands that are
outside of that list are ignored by the modem.
Unfortunately, the Hayes command set was not officially adopted as a
fixed standard. Manufacturers are free to reassign modem control codes
to any modem function as they see fit. Thus, you will find that each
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modem comes with a chart of command assignments, which is unique to
that brand or model of modem.
However, modem manufacturers do attempt adhere to the Hayes
command set for the most part. You will find that most modem
command mnemonics are the same from brand to brand, with only
minor variations. But it is important to be forewarned that a command
string that works for one modem may not work for another modem,
even if that modem is a different model made by the same manufacturer.
The general setup guidelines for modems that will be used with the
CardAccess system are the same for all modem brands. The Host PC
side modem requires no special setup and the panel side modem will
require some compensation for the fact that the panels do not provide
any hardware handshaking signals on the RS232 interface.
The below are the general features that you will want to set up on any
modem (regardless of brand or model) that you intend to use with the
CardAccess system.
Host PC Side Modem
• Use Factory Defaults – There is no set up necessary for the PC side
modem. Set the modem to the factory default settings and connect
the modem to the PC using the standard modem cable. The factory
setup works because modems are designed to be connected to PC’s,
so the optimal settings for that type of connection have been stored in
the modem’s memory in advance by the manufacturer.
Panel Side Modem
You will need to enable the following features on any modem that you
intend to connect to a Continental designed access control panel.
Table 13 – Required Modem Features for Panel Side Modems
Modem Feature Name
DTR Normal/Override Option
RTS Override
Carrier Detect Override Option
Echo Off/On Option
Result Codes On/Off Option
Verbal/Numeric Result Codes
Auto Answer On/Off Option
Answer On One Ring
Fix Modem DTE Speed
Select This Option
DTR Always On
Ignore RTS
Carrier Detect Normal
Echo Off
Display Result Codes
Numeric Result Codes
Auto Answer Enable
S0 = 1
9.6K or 19.2K Baud
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AT Commands Accept/Ignore
I N S T A L L A T I O N
M A N U A L
Load From NV Ram
Accept AT Commands*
*Important Note – If you find that the panel side modem is
picking up the line then hanging up right away, set the AT
Command option on the panel side modem to ‘Ignore AT
Commands’ (or ‘Dumb Mode’ depending on the modem
model). However, be warned that disabling AT commands on
the panel side modem means that the panel will no longer be
able to dial back the CardAccess PC (if set up to do so)
Each option listed in Table 13 can be set on a given modem by sending
an AT command string, or in some cases by setting dipswitches. Note
that it is strongly recommended that you use only modems that have
been tested with the CardAccess software. Continental Instruments tech
support will be limited on modem brands that have not been approved
for use with the CardAccess system.
Note the below modem connection issues:
• Modem Cables
o PC Side – The PC side cable will be a standard RS232 modem
cable
o Panel Side – Continental has designed a modem cable that
provides the correct pin outs and jumpers needed to support the
panel side modem.
As we stated previously, the panel provides connections for RD,
TD and GND (receive, transmit data and ground) but the panel
does not provide any hardware handshake signals (DTR, RTS) to
the modem. However, the modem requires these RS232
handshake signals to control carrier and dialing.
Inputs like ‘Request to Send’ and ‘Data Terminal Ready’ are
commonly sent by computer equipment to the modem. When a
Continental Instruments panel is connected to a modem, these
signals are not available. Since these signals must be provided, we
must find a way to do so.
There are two methods available to provide handshake signals to a
modem.
! Software Jumpers – Modem manufacturers have provided a
means to use initialization strings to set the software of the
modem to ignore the electrical states of some hardware inputs
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like RTS and DTR. When the modem is set to ignore selected
RS232 inputs, this is commonly referred to as the ‘software
jumpering’ of those inputs.
If you are not providing hardware jumpers (see below), then
you must provide software jumpers for RTS and DTR. If
DTR is not provided, the modem may not answer an incoming
call. If RTS is not provided, the modem may not raise transmit
carrier once the call has been answered.
The initialization codes used to set the above options can vary
from manufacturer to manufacturer. Consult the
manufacturer’s documentation for more information
! Hardware Jumpers – Hardware jumpers have been the
traditional method of providing missing RS232 signals for the
decades since the modem was first invented. A hardware
jumper (also known as a ‘hardwire’ jumper) is nothing more
than a piece of wire used to short two or more pins of the
RS232 interface together, for the purpose of ‘fooling’ the
modem into thinking that the proper voltage level is supplied
to selected pins (using jumper wires to short pins on the RS232
interface is also known as ‘faking out’ the signals).
Essentially, you find a pin on the interface that has a voltage
level that you need to provide for another pin, and you short
one pin to the other. You bridge the pin that has the voltage
with a pin that needs a voltage.
It is important to be sure that the pin that you have selected to
feed the voltage to other pins does not change state
unexpectedly (go from high to low, say). You must be sure that
the pins that you select for hardware jumpers provide a
constant voltage to pins that you wish to fake.
There are a number of tried and true RS232 jumper
configurations that have proven their worth over years of trials,
and those will be the ones we will tend to recommend. Other
jumper configurations are possible, but require knowledge of
the RS232 interface to successfully implement.
For example, the recommended method for the hardware
jumper faking of RTS and DTR are as follows:
Table 14 – Standard RS232 RTS and DTR Faking Jumpers
Signal
Pin
Pin
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DTR
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4
20
TO
TO
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5
6
M A N U A L
CTS
DSR
In the specific case of Continental Instruments panels, you
would employ these jumpers on the modem side of the panel
to modem cable.
The Request To Send and Data Terminal Ready pins are
expected to be +12 volts at the modem if a DTE device
(computer or panel in this case) is connected.
The modem signal CTS (clear to send) is held high (+12vdc)
when the modem has receive carrier. Thus, if you jumper RTS
and CTS, when the panel side modem connects to the
CardAccess host PC side modem, CTS will go high (+12Vdc)
and CTS will drive RTS high as well. Thus, the modem creates
the needed RTS signal by deriving it from its own CTS signal.
The modem signal DSR (data set ready) held high once the
modem power is turned on and the modem has passed its selftest. Thus if you short DSR to DTR, then DTR will always be
held high as long as the power to the modem is on. Again, we
use DSR to derive DTR.
Warning – Beware of connecting too many pins together as
you create your hardware jumpers. If you attempt to drive
too many input signals from only one output pin, the output
pin’s voltage will drop and that output may be stressed to the
point of failure. Thus, it is strongly recommended that you
bridge no more than two pins together as suggested above.
It is recommended that you consider software jumpers to be somewhat
‘unreliable’. The reasoning for this is that software jumpers relies on
settings stored in programmable areas of modem memory, areas which
have the potential of being corrupted if the modem is hit by a power
spike.
Therefore, to insure absolute reliability, you will want to add hardware
jumpers either in addition to software jumpers, or instead of software
jumpers. If the modem is hit by a spike, the potential exists (and it has
happened) that the modem will revert to its factory programming (stored
in non-programmable EPROM). The factory settings of most modems
set the RTS and DTR functions to the normal, non-jumpered state.
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In the case where the modem has reverted to factory defaults and the
hardware jumpers have not been provided, the modem may stop
answering incoming calls and may require a site visit to restore the
software jumpers to modem memory. Hardware jumpers become cheap
insurance of continued operation in that case.
Continental Instruments Systems offers a modem cable that comes
equipped with the correct hardware jumpers for connections between
Continental panels and all brands of dial modems. This cable is strongly
recommended for all panels to dial modem connections.
Hardware AT Switches
Earlier in this section we discussed the fact that modem settings can be
modified by sending AT commands to the modem through the serial
port. Some modem models also provide a switch block that allows you to
preset some AT functions by using hardware switches.
Each time the modem powers up, the switch block is read and the
appropriate initialization parameters are loaded from modem EPROM. It
is important to note that the power on switch settings will always override
any contrary software initialization strings that are stored in modem
configuration memory.
For example, in the case of the US Robotics V.Everything modem, if you
set switch 5 to ‘Off’, the modem will auto-answer on one ring regardless
of the setting in the S0=n parameter (which is interpreted by the modem
as ‘pick up on ‘n’ rings’).
Also note that you can use AT commands to temporarily override the
settings of hardware switches if required. If you power up the modem
and wait for it to fully initialize, then send AT commands that concern
parameters that are handled by the switch block, those AT commands
will override the modem switch settings. However, these modified
settings will only remain in effect as long as the power is applied to the
modem. When you remove the power, all temporary initialization
parameters are lost.
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Continental Approved Modems
The US Robotics V.Everything and the US Robotics Sportster modems
have been tested and have been approved for use with the Continental
Instruments access control system. The V.Everything modem offers high
performance at somewhat higher cost. The Sportster modem is bargain
priced and offers reasonable performance for access control applications.
Other brand modems can be used to provide dial up access for the
CardAccess system, but since they have not been officially tested and
approved by Continental Instruments Systems, support and in-house
knowledge of your specific modem will tend to be limited.
The primary difference between the V.Everything and the Sportster
modems lies in the error correction capability of the modem on
questionable phone lines. In our experience, the business class
V.Everything modem has succeeded to connect on questionable phone
lines where other lesser quality modems have failed with regularity
(including the Sportster). Generally, the performance of the V.Everything
will tend to be more predictable than the Sportster, but it costs
considerably more.
So, where price is an issue, you will want to select the Sportster modem.
Where reliability is an issue, the additional cost of the V.Everything
modem is offset by the fact that it is more adaptable and stable than its
lower priced cousin.
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US Robotics Courier V.Everything Modem
The superior error correction circuitry of the Courier V.Everything
modem makes it ideal for use as a general-purpose dial modem for access
control applications involving Continental Instruments equipment. The
additional cost of the V.Everything modem is offset by the fact that the
modem has superior performance on marginal quality phone lines. The
properly configured V.Everything modem has been proven to have
fewer support issues on sub-par phone lines, as compared to standard
modems.
The approach to setting up the V.Everything modem is no different than
any other modem that one would consider using for a CardAccess dial
application. The Host PC side modem can generally be used with the
factory default settings, but the panel side modem will require special set
up due to the fact that Continental panels do not provide any hardware
handshake signals to the modem.
Note that the V.Everything modem has a switch block located on the
underside of the modem (Figure 799).
Figure 799 – V.Everything Modem Switch Block
The ten switches on the switch block correspond to ten AT
configuration parameters that are stored in the modem’s configuration
memory. Those parameters can be changed by switch or by software AT
command. However, the switch settings will override the software
settings except as noted above in the above section entitled ‘Hardware
AT Switches’.
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The recommended switch settings and AT command setup for the US
Robotics Courier V.Everything modem follow below. Note the separate
sections for the PC side modem setup and the panel side setup.
PC Side Modem
The recommended switch settings for the PC side modem are seen in
Table 15 below.
Table 15 – The Recommended PC Side V.Everything Modem Switch
Settings
Switch
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Setting
Off = DTR Normal
Off = Verbal Result Codes
On = Display Result Codes
Off
=
Echo
Offline
Off = Auto Answer Enable*
Off = Carrier Detect Normal
Off = Display Result Codes
On = Accept AT Commands
On = Disconnect With +++
On = Load Factory Settings
Modem Option
DTR Normal/Override
Verbal/Numeric Result Codes
Result Codes On/Off
Echo Off/On
Auto Answer On/Off
Carrier Detect Override
Result Codes
Ignore AT Commands
Disconnect Mode
Load from NV Ram or Factory
* Set Auto-Answer to Off (sw 4 to On) if panels will not be dialing in to the host PC
No additional initialization strings are needed for the PC side modem.
Use the factory settings.
Panel Side Modem
The switch settings for the Panel Side modem are found below in
Table 16. As mentioned above, you will need to provide a DTR and an
RTS signal to the modem.
Table 16 shows the settings for software jumpering of the modem.
However it is strongly suggested that you add hardware jumpers in
addition to software jumpers (see the manual section entitled Continental
Approved Modems for more information).
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Table 16 – The Recommended Panel Side USR V.Everything Switch
Settings
Switch
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Setting
On = DTR Always On
On = Numeric Result Codes
On = Display Result Codes
On = Echo Off
Off = Auto Answer Enable
On = Carrier Detect Always On
Off = Display Result Codes
On = Accept AT Commands*
On = Disconnect With +++
Off = Load From NV Ram
Modem Option
DTR Normal/Override
Verbal/Numeric Result Codes
Result Codes On/Off
Echo Off/On
Auto Answer On/Off
Carrier Detect Override
Result Codes
Ignore AT Commands
Disconnect Mode
Load from NV Ram or
* If the panel is picking up then hanging up set to ‘Ignore AT Commands’, but only if
the panel is not set to dial back to the host PC
On the panel side modem, in addition to the switch settings above you
will need to modify the factory initialization strings settings by sending
the following initialization string to the modem.
AT&N6&R1S0=1&W
The meaning of the above string follows.
Table 17 – The USR V.Everything Panel Side Modem Additional
Command Strings
Command
AT
&N6
&R1
S0 = 1
&W
Description
The Modem ‘Attention’ Command
Connect Speed Maximum = 9600
Ignore the RTS Signal
Answer On 1 Ring
Store Profile in NV Ram Location ‘W0’
You can use the Windows HyperTerminal utility (available from the
Accessories program group) to send the initialization strings to the
modem. More information on using Hyper term is available below in the
Configuring Modems and Dial Nodes section.
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US Robotics Sportster Modem
The US Robotics Sportster modem provides reasonable performance for
access control applications at an affordable price. The Sportster will
perform very well in all applications that do not include marginal phone
lines (where you will select the Courier modem instead).
The configuration of the Sportster is very similar to the Courier
mentioned in the previous section. The Sportster provides a switch block
on its rear panel that allows you to program some initialization
parameters, much like the Courier. However, the Sportster has fewer
initialization parameters available from switches.
The recommended PC side and panel side modem switch settings and
initialization strings appear below.
PC Side Modem
The recommended switch settings for the PC side modem are seen in
Table 18 below.
Table 18 – The Recommended PC Side Sportster Modem Switch
Settings
Switch
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Setting
Up = DTR Normal
Up = Verbal Result Codes
Down = Display Result Codes
Up = Echo Offline Commands
Up = Auto Answer Enable*
Up = Carrier Detect Normal
Down = Load Factory Settings
Down = Accept AT Commands
Modem Option
DTR Normal/Override
Verbal/Numeric Result Codes
Result Codes On/Off
Echo Off/On
Auto Answer On/Off
Carrier Detect Override
Load from NV Ram or Factory
Ignore AT Commands
* Set Auto Answer to Off (sw 4 to On) if panels will not be dialing in to the host PC
No additional initialization strings are needed for the PC side modem.
Use the factory settings.
Panel Side Modem
The switch settings for the Panel Side modem are found below in Table
19. As mentioned above, you will need to provide a DTR and an RTS
signal to the modem. Table 19 shows the settings for the software
jumpering of the modem. However it is strongly suggested that you add
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hardware jumpers in addition to software jumpers (see the manual
section entitled Continental Approved Modems for more information).
Table 19 – The Recommended Panel Side USR Sportster Switch
Settings
Switch
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Setting
Down = Override
Down = Numeric
Down = Yes
Down = Off
Up = On
Down = CD Override
Up = Load NV Ram
Down = Smart Mode*
Modem Option
DTR Normal/Override
Verbal/Numeric Result Codes
Result Codes Yes/No
Echo Off/On
Auto Answer On/Off
Carrier Detect Override
Load from NV Ram or Factory
Ignore AT Commands
* If the panel is picking up then hanging up set to ‘Dumb Mode’, but only if
the panel is not set to dial back to the host PC
On the panel side modem, in addition to the switch settings above
you will need to modify the factory initialization strings settings by
sending the following string to the modem.
AT&F&B1&H&N6&U6S0=1S28=255Y&W&W1
The meaning of the above string follows.
Table 20 – The Recommended USR Sportster Initialization Strings
Command
AT
&F
&B1
&H
&N6
&U6
S0 = 1
S28 = 255
Y0
&W0
&W1
Description
The Modem ‘Attention’ Command
Load Generic Template (No Flow Control)
Fixed Serial Port Rate
Flow Control Disabled
Connect Speed Maximum = 9600
Connect Speed Minimum = 9600
Answer On 1 Ring
Answer Only at 9600, V.32
Default Profile = W0
Store Profile in W0
Store Profile in W1
You can type the command string as one contiguous string as seen
above or you can enter the commands individually as below.
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AT&F (hit enter), AT&B1 (hit enter), AT&H (hit enter), etc.
You can use the Windows HyperTerminal utility (available from
the Accessories program group) to send the initialization strings to
the modem. More information on using HyperTerm is available
below in the Configuring Modems and Dial Nodes section.
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Dial Node Setup and Testing
The goal of this section is to provide you with the tools necessary to set
up and troubleshoot dial nodes. Let’s begin by looking at an overview of
the typical dial node.
Modem
Dial Node A
Panel
Telco
Modem
Host PC
Modem
Figure 800 – Two Typical Dial Nodes
Dial Node B
Panel
As we stated earlier in this chapter, you can connect up to two modems
to the CardAccess host PC (only one shown in Figure 800). Those host
PC modems can be used for dial out to panels or dial in from panels,
programmable in the CardAccess software. As we also stated earlier, you
will also need to supply one additional remote modem per panel cluster
(Figure 800 depicts two panel clusters, each with one panel).
Figure 800 depicts a standard configuration of a PC serially connected to
one modem, which is connected to a telephone line, which goes through
the telephone company or in house telephone switch (pbx), and out to
two panel node modems which are then serially connected to panels. The
modems are set to dial up, and there is no ‘persistent’ data connection.
It is assumed that most readers of this manual will be generally familiar
with modems and the RS232 signaling method. A modem is employed in
any system because serial port RS232 signals have a maximum traveling
distance of fifty feet. To drive RS232 signals longer than 50 feet, a
‘signaling conversion’ is needed. The modem’s main function is to
convert serial data signals into an electrical format that can be transported
longer distances.
The telephone line side of modem uses a modulated carrier wave to
transmit data signals longer distances than would be possible otherwise.
The ‘tones’ that are transmitted on the telephone line side of the modem
are ‘repeated’ along the signal path by telephone company equipment so
no level is lost as the signal travels perhaps, around the world.
The fact that you can use modems to connect to CardAccess panel
clusters anywhere around the world makes the system immensely flexible,
but it also adds a layer of complication to the communications link
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between panel and host PC (which may otherwise be a simple piece of
wire, which everyone has no problem understanding).
The fact that the telephone company is involved with transporting data
packets typically causes some confusion when communication problems
arise, because it becomes harder to determine if a problem is caused by
phone company equipment, modem equipment, panel equipment or PC
equipment.
The simple solution to dial node testing and troubleshooting is to focus
on what you are trying to accomplish, not the hardware that does the job.
There are essentially two phases of operation of any dial system.
• Dial Up and Connection – Before any data exchange can take place,
the local and remote side modems must connect. You must know
what is normal modem behavior before you can determine if your
system is operating properly. A connection is made in ‘steps’ as
described below in the section entitled ‘Modem Behavior’.
Note that you can manually control any modem using the Windows
‘HyperTerminal’ program. You can send commands to any modem
that cause the modem to go off hook, dial or hang up. The use of this
program is explained below in the section entitled ‘Testing and
Troubleshooting’. The Testing and Troubleshooting section should be
considered essential reading
• Transportation of Data Packets – Once a connection has been
established between two modems, data packets can be exchanged by
the customer equipment. Getting to the point of data packet transfer
is the ‘real business’ of any dial system.
In a case where the data transfer is not operating properly, the
HyperTerminal program can be used as a data monitor. See the
section below entitled ‘Testing and Troubleshooting’ for more
information
Modem Behavior
To be sure that a given modem connection is working correctly, it is
crucial that you know how a connection is actually made from the
CardAccess application to the local modem, through the phone lines to a
remote modem, and ultimately to panel. However, note that the steps
described below apply to any Windows application that wishes to dial out
to a remote modem.
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The following steps are performed each time any Windows application
(including the CardAccess) wishes to dial out.
• Dial Request – The application software sends a modem connection
request to the Windows operating system Transmission Application
Programming Interface software (the ‘TAPI’)
• Tapi Request – The Windows TAPI software queries the modem. If
the modem is operational, the dial request with phone number is sent
to the modem. If the modem does not respond to the query, an error
message is sent back to the application that requested the modem
connection (in this case, the CardAccess software)
Note that Windows sends AT commands to the modem to control it.
These commands are sent out the modem serial port (for an external
modem) in plain ASCII. Thus, the ‘conversation’ between the modem
and Windows can be monitored using a data scope (or the Windows
HyperTerminal utility)
• Off Hook – If the modem passed the query test above, the ‘ATDT’
(go off hook) command is sent to the modem. If all is well, the
modem goes off hook and dial tone indication is received by the
TAPI from the modem. The off hook status is passed back to the
dialing application from the TAPI.
If dial tone fails, an error message is sent back to the application that
requested the dial out
• Dialing – If the dial tone is present, the ATDT command plus phone
number is sent to the modem. The modem dials the number
• Ringing – Like any other ordinary phone call, the line receives ring
tone once the line is connected to the destination phone number. The
modem monitors the ringing and passes codes back to the Windows
TAPI indicating each ring. The TAPI forwards these ringing messages
back to the calling application.
Note that CardAccess panel side modems should be set to pick up a
call after one ring
• Answer – Once the remote modem picks up the line, the modem
passes a success message back to the Windows TAPI. The TAPI
forwards that message to the calling application. Both the local and
remote modems also start a ‘training sequence’ on the telephone line
side of the connection
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• Training Tones – After a connection has been established between
the two modems, the modems send tones (with embedded test data)
back and fourth. The modems exchange information about the
telephone line quality and the connection settings of each modem.
This phase is called ‘line negotiation’, and is exclusively controlled by
the modem software
• Connection – If line negotiation is successful, then the modems are
officially ‘connected’ and a success message is sent from the PC side
modem to the Windows TAPI. This success message is passed to the
software application that originated the call (in this case, the
CardAccess). The CardAccess now knows that data can be exchanged
and polling begins
• Data Exchange – This phase of the modem connection is why the
connection was made in the first place. The PC application can
exchange data with the remote device.
The data exchange is described generically in the previous paragraph
with a purpose. It is irrelevant what application initiated the call. It is
also irrelevant which modem initiated the call. The steps to make the
connection are exactly identical in every case. And the goal of making
the connection is the same in every case.
The purpose for making a dial connection is to get to the data
exchange phase. The CardAccess will now pass polling messages
through the modems and out to the connected panel(s). The panels
will respond in the other direction.
The CardAccess will continue to poll the panels for the dialed up
node until there is no more data to exchange. The CardAccess will
then send a disconnect request to the TAPI
• Hangup – When a disconnect request is received from the
application, the TAPI will send a disconnect request (ATH) to the PC
side modem. The CardAccess host modem will disconnect the call
and both modems will disconnect from their respective telephone
lines
Knowing the steps in the above modem behavior explanation is crucial
to the testing and troubleshooting of modems. The steps taken to make a
dial connection as described above are the same for all modems, and they
occur without variation on every connection attempt.
One modem will always initiate a call; the other modem will answer the
call. A modem uses one behavior when initiating a call and another
behavior when answering a call.
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It does not matter if the CardAccess host PC is trying to dial the PC
modem, or the panel is attempting to dial the panel side modem, the
steps as described above are the same. The device wishing to start a dial
connection passes through the phases of connection as shown above.
The phases of connection for the answering modem are as follows.
• Ringing – The remote (panel side) modem will see ringing on the
phone line. The modem will pass ringing messages out the RS232 port
to the connected device.
The object is for the remote modem to answer the call, but two
possibilities exist.
o The Modem Answers the Call – Every modem has settings that
can instruct the modem to pick up an incoming call after a
specified number of rings. On the Continental approved modems
there are two settings of interest.
! Memory Location S0 – The modem memory location ‘S0’
contains a numeric value that tells most modems how many
rings they should wait before answering a call. For use by the
CardAccess system, S0 should always equal 1.
The only valid reason to set the number of rings to answer
higher than one is where you have a hardware telephone
attached to the modem phone port, you are using the line for
voice and modem, and you wish to have the option to pick up
the phone receiver before the modem picks up.
! Hardware Switch – Both of the Continental recommended
modems have a switch that sets a feature called ‘Auto Answer’.
When this switch is set, the modem is forced to pick up on one
ring and ignores the setting in the modem S0 parameter
o The Connected Device Answers the Call – You have the
option of letting the modem control the answer of incoming calls,
or letting the device connected to the modem control picking up
the incoming call. We discussed the settings to let the modem pick
up the call in the section immediately above.
The connected device can send the ‘ATA’ command to a modem
to cause it to go off hook. This option is available if the application
running on the device connected to the modem supports it.
The modem sends a message on the RS232 TX line each time the
line rings. The application running on the device connected to the
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modem must be set up to monitor the RS232 port status messages
and respond to them. If you are not sure, always set the modem up
to do the answering as shown above. If using Continental panels,
set the modem up to answer the call on one ring. The switch
settings is preferred over the S0 memory setting, but set S0=1 and
set the Auto Answer switch to enabled.
• Off Hook – After the required number of rings has elapsed as stated
above, the ‘ATDT’ (go off hook) command is sent to the modem.
The answering modem sends training tones to the calling modem
• Training Tones – After a connection has been established between
the two modems, the modems send tones (with embedded test data)
back and fourth. The modems exchange information about the
telephone line quality and the connection settings of each modem.
This phase is called ‘line negotiation’, and is exclusively controlled by
the modem software
• Connection – If line negotiation is successful, then the modems are
officially ‘connected’ and a success message is sent from the panel side
modem to the panel. This success message includes information about
the line speed and connection mode. The panel ignores this data and
waits for a valid poll message
• Data Exchange – The PC begins polling the panel. If the polling
data is received without corruption then the panel will reply
• Hangup – The host PC will initiate the hang up. When the line is
disconnected at the PC side, the remote panel modem will hang up as
well
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Modem Setup and Testing
Before you use any modem with the CardAccess system, it must be
connected to a PC to have its settings programmed using a Windows
utility called ‘HyperTerminal’. The HyperTerminal program is invaluable
if you wish to test or program any modem. HyperTerm offers you a way
to connect to a modem and manually control its functions. There are text
commands that you can send to the modem that can make a modem go
off hook, dial, change its settings or connect to a remote modem.
Before you use HyperTerminal to implement custom settings changes or
actually use the modem, it is wise to restore all modem settings to the
factory defaults. Restoring the factory settings first as a rule, saves you
from having to check over every modem parameter to verify its settings.
The Continental recommended modem settings assume that the modem
started with factory default parameters. As a recommendation, do not
assume that any modem has factory settings unless you have set it that
way yourself.
The Continental approved modems each have a switch that is available
externally, that can be set to restore the factory default settings. You need
to set the switch with the power off. Then turn the power on. Once the
power has been applied, the factory settings have been loaded into the
operating memory of the modem. Then you can return the switch to the
‘Load from NvRam’ position (the ‘Continental Approved Modems’
section of this chapter has more details).
Once you have restored the factory settings of a given modem, you must
then be sure that these settings are stored in the modem’s NvRam
area(s). These ‘Non Volatile Ram’ areas are generally used to store
custom ‘initialization strings’ for the modem. These strings are loaded on
power up of the modem (if set to do so) to set the modem to operating
rules that you supply.
For most modems, you are given the option of loading the factory
default settings when the modem powers up, or using the custom
settings that are stored in NvRam. Continental modems should always be
set to load NvRam values. This is because we want to have our own
custom initialization strings loaded when any of our modems powers up.
To recap, the process to program any CardAccess modem is
• Load the factory defaults
• Send custom initialization strings to the modem using HyperTerm (or
other terminal emulation program)
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• Store the modified settings in every NvRam area of the modem (some
modems have one NvRam area, some have more than one – usually
two. If the modem has two NvRam areas, store the custom
initialization string in both areas. Consult the modem documentation
for details)
The same procedure below is used to program a modem or to test a
modem and dial lines. Only the command syntax is changed. In both
cases, you will attach a PC to a modem serial port, open a HyperTerminal
window on the PC and send commands to the local modem.
If you are simply setting up a modem using HyperTerminal, you will send
commands that change the settings of the modem. If you intend to test
the modem and dial lines, you will send commands that cause the
modem to go off hook and dial. Some of the details follow below.
There is not room in this chapter to discuss every possible AT command.
If the reader requires more information on the Hayes AT command set,
it is suggested that you consult the modem manufacturer’s web site or
you use a world wide web search engine to search for ‘Hayes AT
Command Set’.
To program or test any modem or dial lines, do the following.
• Connect the PC – Connect a PC to the modem RS232 port (use
Com1 where available). Make sure that the CardAccess software is not
running on the PC that is connected to the modem. The CardAccess
communications driver will open all Com ports that are enabled in the
Com Ports screen. No other applications (like HyperTerm) will be
able to open Com ports that the CardAccess has already opened
• Open HyperTerm – Power up the PC and open the HyperTerminal
program. HyperTerminal is usually available from the ‘Accessories’
Windows program group
• Connect to the Com Port – To connect HyperTerminal to your
modem Com port, do the following
o Give the Connection a Name – When HyperTerm opens, you
get a screen that requests that you create a name for the connection
(Figure 801). It is suggested that you name the connection ‘Com n’,
where ‘n’ is the number of the Com port that you are attempting to
open. However, you can type in any name of your own choosing
for your HyperTerm configuration file.
This name will be used as a file name when you save the
HyperTerm settings template. Saving the template will allow you to
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recall the settings of this HyperTerm template without the need for
selecting the settings again.
After you have completed entering the connection name, click the
‘OK’ button
Warning – Windows will not allow you to create a HyperTerm file
named ‘Comx’, where ‘x’ is the Com port number. Com1 becomes
a Windows reserved word when the Com1 port exists. The same is
true of any other numbered Com port that you have created in
Windows. You must put one or more spaces between ‘Com’ and
the number for HyperTerm names that use ‘Com’ in the name
Figure 801 – The HyperTerm Connection Name Screen
o Select the Com Port – Click the arrow button to the right of the
‘Connect Using’ field of the ‘Connect To’ screen (Figure 802),
select the Com port (not the modem name) that your modem is
connected to.
When done, click the ‘OK’ button
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Figure 802 – The HyperTerm Connection Type Selection Screen –
Com1 selected
o Choose the Com Port Settings – The standard settings for any
modem that is to be connected to a Continental system are 9600, 8,
n, 1 as shown in Figure 803. Set flow control to ‘Hardware’. These
settings are not for the modem, they affect the computer serial port
that is connected to the modem
When done, click the ‘OK’ button
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Figure 803 – The HyperTerm Com Port Settings
o Verify Connection – The HyperTerminal main screen will open.
If connection to your Com port was successful, you will see a
wording in the HyperTerm status bar that says ‘Connected…’. If
connection was unsuccessful, you will get an error message box
stating ‘Unable to open Comx’ (where x = your Com port number)
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Figure 804 – The HyperTerminal Main Screen – Successful
Connection (no messages, blinking cursor only)
To test the connection to your modem, type the letters AT on your
computer keyboard, then hit the ‘Enter’ key. If you see the word
‘OK’ in the white space of the screen (Figure 805), you are
properly connected to the modem, the modem has responded and
you are ready to test or program the modem.
Note – If you have your modem set to respond with numeric
result codes, you will receive the number 2 in place of the
‘OK’. ‘OK’ and ‘2’ both mean that the modem command was
received successfully. If testing the modem with HyperTerm, it
is far easier to set the modem to display verbal result codes.
However, you must set all panel side modems to numeric
result codes before connecting them to panels. PC side
modems can always be set to verbal result codes. Consult the
modem documentation for more information on result codes.
Note that what you type on your computer keyboard may not
appear in the HyperTerm screen. This is normal. It is because the
‘echo’ of typed characters is disabled in HyperTerm by default.
Consult the HyperTerm help file for more information on
character echo.
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Figure 805 – The Modem Normal Response to the AT Command
Now that you have a connection to the modem, what you do next
depends on what you are attempting to accomplish. If you are attempting
to program the modem settings, you will send a command string that
reflects the new modem settings (see the sections entitled ‘General
Modem Setup’ and ‘Continental Approved Modems’ for modem setup
specifics).
If you are attempting to test a modem or dial connection, you will send
strings to the modem that are designed to command the modem to
respond, go off hook, dial and connect to a remote modem. The next
paragraph describes commands that can be used to test any modem
• Send Test Strings – It should be considered mandatory to test all
modems and phone lines before allowing the CardAccess software
access to them. The dial sequence collects valuable event data from
panels and the pre-testing of dial lines will help to insure that there will
be no abnormalities in dial connections.
Once HyperTerm is connected to a modem in the system, you will
want to check the following
• Response Test – To test if the locally connected modem is
responding to commands, type ‘AT’ (without the quotes) and hit the
‘Enter’ key on your keyboard. The modem should respond with ‘OK’
(or ‘2’ if the modem is set for numeric result codes). If the modem
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responds, it is operational and is in command mode, so you can
proceed to the dial test.
If the modem does not respond to the AT command, then the
HyperTerm program is not connected to the correct modem or the
modem is defective. Without doing anything else, power the modem
off then on and try again.
• Dial Test – If the modem responds to AT commands, then you can
attempt to dial out to any remote modem. The command to dial out is
‘ATDTxxxxxxxxxx’ (without the quotes), where xxxxxxxxxx is a
phone number.
Enter the command ATL3 and hit the Enter key. This will turn the
modem speaker volume all the way up so we can hear the dialing
sequence take place.
The command ATDT causes the modem to go off hook.
ATDT5165551212 causes the modem to go off hook and dial the
number ‘516 555 1212’.
To hang up type ‘ATH’ (without the quotes) or click the Hang Up
button on the HyperTerm toolbar (Figure 806)
Figure 806 – The HyperTerm Hang Up Button
After you type ATDTPhoneNumber, the modem will go off hook,
you will hear dial tone, the local modem will dial, you will hear ringing,
then the remote modem will pick up the line (if all is well).
After the remote modem picks up the line, the two modems will swap
‘training tones’. These are tones that have embedded data that allows
the modems to test the line quality and agree on a connect speed. If
training fails, the modems will hang up the line. If training succeeds,
the modems will then be able to pass data.
Figure 807 – HyperTerm Modem Successful Connect Message
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If the connection to the remote modem cannot be established, you
will get local modem generated error messages of the type shown in
Figure 808 below
Figure 808 – HyperTerm Modem Unsuccessful Connection Attempt
Messages
• Data Test – If you have achieved a successful connection between
two modems over a phone line, those modems are now ready to swap
data. The modems and phone line can now be considered
‘transparent’. The modem equipment will simply take whatever
characters are sent in at one modem RS232 port and pass them out
the other modem RS232 port.
Since we know that the modems will pass any data that we feed into
them, we can exploit that fact for testing purposes. There are several
data tests that can be performed on connected modems.
o PC to PC – To test a modem-to-modem connection, you can
connect a PC to the local modem and a second PC to the remote
modem. You can open a HyperTerminal window on each PC and
connect them to the Com ports that host the modems.
You then initiate a call from one of the modems. Once the line is
open, you type characters at each side and make sure that the
characters are received on both sides. Of course, you will need two
people to perform this test
o PC to Loopback – A second possibility is to create a ‘loopback’
on the RS232 port of one of the connected modems (Figure 809).
This loopback will route all characters that are received on the
RS232 port back out to the telephone line and ultimately, back to
the originating modem.
Telco
544
Modem
Host PC
Modem
Figure 809 – Remote Modem Loopback Schematic
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This testing method only requires one PC and one person to
operate the PC once the loopback has been established at the
remote modem. There are two types of modem loop backs as
shown below
!
Shorted Wires – You can create a test connector that plugs
into the 25-pin RS232 port of a modem. This test connector
has one jumper wire on it that shorts pins 2 and 3 together
(Receive Data and Transmit Data). This will loop any received
data back through the phone line to the modem that originally
sent the data
!
Analog & Digital Loopbacks – Many modems have two
built in software features called ‘Analog Loopback’ and ‘Digital
Loopback’. The software of a modem can be set up to loop
received characters back to the originating modem.
Analog Loopback is performed internally by the modem by
looping the circuitry on the phone line side of the modem. The
loopback bypasses all of the RS232 components of the
modem, so it is a good test of the phone line side of a modem.
The Digital Loopback is also performed internally by a
modem, but uses the RS232 chipset to perform the loop. This
test tests more of the internal modem circuitry than the Analog
Loopback.
The real usefulness of these ‘software’ loop backs is that you
can force a modem into loopback remotely, without the need
to visit a remote site, by sending AT commands to it. Consult
the manufacturer’s documentation to see if your modem
supports remote activated software loop backs
• Close HyperTerm – If all the above tests were passed, you can close
the HyperTerminal window. When you attempt to close the window,
the program asks you if you want to save the current session (Figure
810). Answer ‘Yes’ and your connection configuration for this modem
will be saved in an ‘.htm’ file. You can reopen it from the file menu
next time you open HyperTerminal
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Figure 810 – The HyperTerm File Save Warning
• Polling Test – Now that you have established that you can connect
to your remote modems successfully, you can connect the panels to
their respective modems and connect the CardAccess host to its
modem.
You can then start the CardAccess and manually dial each node to be
sure it connects and the remote panels all answer to poll. See the
section entitled ‘Modem Screen Controls’ earlier in this chapter for
manual dialing instructions.
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LAN Adapters
Figure 811 – The LAN Adapter External Connection Schematic
RS232
LAN
Adapter
Ethernet
LAN Adapters, also known as ‘Micro Serial Servers’, are used in the
CardAccess system where there is a need to convert the security panel
RS232 serial communication format to the Ethernet LAN format.
Generally, we employ LAN adapters where we wish to connect
Continental Instruments panels directly to an Ethernet network.
However, LAN adapters can be used anywhere that you need to connect
any device that has an RS232, RS422 or RS485 serial interface to an
Ethernet network.
The LAN adapter has a simple job. It converts all of the serial data
entering the RS232 port into Ethernet packets for transport on a
network. In the reverse, the serial server strips off Ethernet packets
received on the network side of the box, and presents serial ASCII data
to the RS232 serial port.
In this way, any serial interface equipped device can be connected to an
Ethernet network without the need for creating a custom integrated
hardware interface to accomplish the task. The serial servers simply pass
the characters that are received at the serial port on to the Ethernet port
and the reverse.
This type of device is ideal for connecting Continental Instruments
access panels to an Ethernet network. Continental panels communicate
using a numeric ASCII protocol, which is handled with relative
transparency once the LAN adapter has been installed and configured
correctly.
Further, the network utilization of each serial server is quite low at about
100K per serial server while passing peak traffic. Since there are many lull
periods between polls, the sustained data transfer is intermittent on most
moderately busy systems.
In terms of hardware connectivity, one panel in a given cluster of panels
will connect to the RS232 port of the LAN adapter. The Ethernet port of
the LAN adapter will in turn connect to the subject network.
On the PC side of the connection, only a standard network card is
necessary. You do not need a serial server at the PC side of the
connection. The CardAccess software has built in handling for
communications to LAN adapters and uses the PC network card. See the
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manual section entitled ‘Com Ports’ for more information on setting up
LAN addresses for LAN adapters.
This section will address the setup and testing of the LAN adapter
hardware.
General LAN Adapter Setup
The LAN adapters that are used by Continental Instruments are
manufactured by the Lantronix Corporation. Lantronix manufacturers a
number of different models, but the model that has been tested and
certified for use with the CardAccess software is the Lantronix UDS-10.
The design of the UDS-10 is ideal for use with Continental Instruments
panels mainly because the 25-pin connector on the device can be
configured by software to provide RS232 or RS422 signaling. Note that
when using RS422, the physical LAN adapter module can be located up
to four thousand feet away from the first panel in the cluster where
necessary. The typical connection involves setting up the LAN adapter
for RS232 operation and mounting it within fifty feet of the first panel.
The setup of the LAN adapter for use with a Continental panel system
includes the following general procedures.
• Custom Cable – The Continental panels do not provide handshaking
signals to the LAN adapter so a special cable is needed to provide the
missing signals. The cables are available pre-made through
Continental. The pin outs for the cable appear later in this chapter.
• Set Up of Serial Port Parameters – The serial port of the LAN
adapter has several parameters that the user must set up as follows
o Serial Port Parameters – Continental panels use 9600, 8, n, 1
serial port settings
o Serial Port TCP Address – The LAN adapter devices allow the
user to assign a TCP port address to the LAN adapter serial port
by the user. The CardAccess software sends polling data to TCP
port 3001, so any LAN adapters that are to be used with the
CardAccess must have the serial port TCP address set to 3001. See
below in this chapter, in the section entitled ‘UDS-10 Setup’ for
more information
• Setup of Ethernet Port – The setup of the Ethernet port of a serial
server proceeds much like a network card. In fact, the Ethernet
interface of the serial server behaves identically to a PC network
interface card. Thus, you will need to assign an IP address, subnet
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mask and a default gateway address (if needed) to the LAN interface
of the serial server
Now that we have looked at the general requirements of mounting a
serial server on a network, let’s look at the specific setup of the preferred
serial server, the Lantronix UDS-10.
UDS-10 Setup
The Lantronix UDS-10 is the only LAN adapter that has been tested and
approved for use with the CardAccess system. There are other serial
server products that can be used with the system, but Continental is not
currently supporting those devices for new installations so technical
support will tend be limited on non-approved models or manufacturers.
The UDS-10 is a programmable device, much like a modem. You must
set up operating parameters for the RS232 port and the Ethernet
interface. The Lantronix UDS-10 manual describes each of the possible
settings for these ports. This section will describe the specific setup used
for supporting CardAccess panel nodes. Consult the UDS-10 manual for
additional information (you can download the manual from the
manufacturers web site at www.Lantronix.com)
The LAN interface of the UDS-10 supports 10Mb operation only. The
25-pin connector supports RS232, RS422 and RS485 (RS485 is not used
by the CardAccess system).
The options for the UDS-10 are set through the use of an ASCII based
software interface that is accessible through the 25 pin connector, by
using a standard ‘terminal’ program (like Windows HyperTerminal)
connected to a standard PC serial port. The setup screens of the UDS-10
can also be accessed through the Ethernet connector and LAN network
by using a network terminal emulator program such as Telnet.
However, the initial setup and testing of the box should be performed
‘on the bench’ using the 25 pin connector and the RS232 connection
method. The UDS-10 is set by default to activate RS232 as the signaling
method, so a PC RS232 connection to the UDS-10 connected to a
HyperTerminal window on the PC desktop will be the easiest way to set
up the device initially.
The UDS-10 does not have an IP address programmed initially, but does
have a MAC level address (like all network enabled devices). Thus, the
initial setup of the box can be performed by connecting it to a network
and using the ARP protocol to send an IP to the box (consult the
Lantronix manual). Once the IP is stored through this method, you can
then use a Telnet application on the PC to connect to the IP ad further
configure the box.
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Although the ARP method of connecting to the UDS-10 is spelled out in
the manufacturer’s documentation, Continental does not recommend
using the ARP method to connect to the device when setting it up for
the first time.
The best method for setting up any network enabled device is to set it up
and make it work on a ‘bench’ first, verify that it is programmed and
working, then deploy it in the field. Deploying new serial servers in this
way will reduce the possibility of mounting a non-operational box at a
remote location.
The manufacturer also provides an easy to use utility called ‘EZWebCon’
that can be used to connect to the UDS-10 and configure the operating
parameters using a convenient interface. Consult the manufacturer’s
documentation on the use of the EZWebCon utility.
The HyperTerminal method of setting up the operating parameters of
the UDS-10 will be discussed in this section.
Routers and Gateways
Note that the UDS-10 does not behave any differently from other
network enabled devices. Specifically, when the UDS-10 is mounted on a
small local network there is no need to supply a setting for the default
gateway address if the network traffic is not expected to pass through a
router or gateway to get to its destination.
However, if the UDS-10 will be connected to a panel cluster in a typical
large network configuration, where the panel cluster is mounted one or
more router hops from the CardAccess host PC, a gateway address must
be supplied to the UDS-10. The gateway address will be the router or
gateway that is connected to the subnet where the subject UDS-10 is
mounted.
Programming the UDS-10
To set up the operating parameters of the UDS-10 serial and Ethernet
ports do the following.
• Connect a PC to the UDS-10 – Remove the power connection from
the UDS-10. Connect a 9 pin to 25 pin, standard, serial cable between
the UDS-10 and the computer serial port (use Com1 where available)
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• Open HyperTerminal – Start up the HyperTerminal program that is
included with all Microsoft Windows operating systems and proceed
as below
o Open HyperTerm – Open the HyperTerminal program, usually
available from the Windows ‘Accessories’ menu
o Give the Connection a Name – When HyperTerm opens, you
get a screen that requests that you create a name for the connection
(Figure 812). You can type in any name of your own choosing for
your HyperTerm configuration file.
After you have completed entering the connection name, click the
‘OK’ button
Figure 812 – The HyperTerm Connection Name Screen
o Select the Com Port – Click the arrow button to the right of the
‘Connect Using’ field of the ‘Connect To’ screen (Figure 813),
select the Com port (not a modem name) that your UDS-10 is
connected to.
When done, click the ‘OK’ button
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Figure 813 – The HyperTerm Connection Type Selection Screen –
Com1 selected
o Choose the Com Port Settings – The standard settings for any
device that is to be connected to a Continental system are 9600, 8,
n, 1 as shown in Figure 814. Set flow control to ‘Hardware’. These
settings are not for the UDS-10, they affect the computer serial
port that is connected to the UDS-10
When done, click the ‘OK’ button
Figure 814 – The HyperTerm Com Port Settings
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o Verify Connection – The HyperTerminal main screen will open.
If connection to your Com port was successful, you will see a
wording in the HyperTerm status bar that says ‘Connected…’. If
connection was unsuccessful, you will get an error message box
stating ‘Unable to open Comx’ (where x = your Com port number)
Figure 815 – The HyperTerminal Main Screen – Successful
Connection
Note that what you type on your computer keyboard may not
appear in the HyperTerm screen. This is normal. It is because the
‘echo’ of typed characters is disabled in HyperTerm by default.
Consult the HyperTerm help file for more information on
character echo.
• Start Up the UDS-10 and Enter Setup Mode
o Put the UDS-10 into Diagnostic Mode – While in the
HyperTerminal window, hold down the ‘x’ key on the computer
keyboard while applying power to the UDS-10. If the connection
between the computer HyperTerm window and the UDS-10 is
working correctly, you will see the type of information you see in
Figure 816.
Figure 816 – The UDS-10 Boot Up Screen
o Enter Setup Mode – If the step above was successful, press the
‘Enter’ key on your keyboard to put the UDS-10 into edit mode.
You should see the setup menu as it appears in Figure 817 below
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Figure 817 – The UDS-10 Diagnostic Menu
• Select the Correct Setup Options
Select the following menus and options for use with the CardAccess
system
o Factory Defaults (7) – This selection restores the factory default
settings to the UDS-10 (note that resetting to factory settings does
not delete the IP address, subnet mask and gateway information)
It is strongly recommended that you restore the factory settings
before you attempt to program any UDS-10. All of the
recommended settings below assume that all settings not
mentioned are in the factory state
o Server Configuration (0) – This selection allows you to enter the
Ethernet connector configuration menu. Select the below options
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Figure 818 – Configuration Menu Example Ethernet (Server)
Settings
To set up the network interface section of the UDS-10 do the
following
! Select Option ‘0’ – To select option 0, type the number 0, then
press the enter key
Note – If you don’t want to change any settings, but you
are stuck in the configuration menu, keep pressing your
keyboard Enter key until you exit the setup menu branch
and return to the main setup menu.
! Enter an IP Address – You will need an IP address that is
valid on the subnet where the UDS-10 will be mounted (be
warned that you should test the UDS-10 on the bench, using an
IP that is valid on the local network before changing the IP to
the final end user value. Don’t attempt to set the UDS-10 up at
the installed location. If it is not functioning correctly, you have
wasted a trip to the customer location).
The UDS-10 requires that you enter the first three characters of
the IP, then press the enter key, enter the next three characters,
etc. You enter the IP address from the leftmost octet to the
rightmost. Press the Enter key after each entry
! Enter a Gateway – You will require a gateway address when
the UDS-10 is mounted on a network where messages must
pass through a router or gateway to reach the CardAccess host
PC. The Gateway address is entered in the same manner as the
IP address mentioned above
! Enter a Subnet Mask – The subnet mask on the UDS-10 is
set by indicating the number of bits that is consumed by PC
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addresses on the target sub-network, not by entering the value
literally.
Observe the line in Figure 818 that says ‘Netmask:…(09)’. This
means that the subnet mask in the example above is
1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1110 0000 0000 or 255.255.254.0
You will generally obtain the IP address, gateway and subnet mask
from the I.S. administrator of the network where the UDS-10 will
be installed
o Channel 1 Configuration (1) – This selection allows you to enter
the Serial Port configuration menu
Figure 819 – Configuration Menu Example Serial Port Settings
To set up the serial port of the UDS-10 do the following
! Select Option ‘1’ – From the diagnostic main menu type the
number 1 on your keyboard, then press the Enter key
! Baud Rate – Set to 9600
! Interface Mode – The serial interface of the UDS-10 can be
set to a number of different modes. Refer to the table below for
the mode settings that are appropriate for use with the
CardAccess system. You are expected to supply a hexadecimal
value (consult the UDS-10 manual for more information).
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Table 21 – The CardAccess Interface Modes
Interface Type
Mode Setting
RS232
RS422
4C
4D
Consult the UDS-10 manual for the cable pin outs for the
RS232 and RS422 interfaces or see the below section entitled
‘Physical Connections’
! Flow – Make sure flow control is set to ‘00’ (none)
! Port Number – Set the port number to 3001 for use with the
CardAccess 3000 system
All serial port settings not mentioned in this section should be left
at their default values. Consult the UDS-10 manual for more
information
o Save and Exit (9) – Use this option to exit and save all of your
changes and exit the setup mode
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Physical Connections
You will need to connect to the appropriate pins on the 25-pin connector
as detailed in the manual and stated below. The UDS RS232 port is a
DCE connection (with pinouts like a modem serial port)
Table 22 – UDS-10 RS232 Cable Pin Outs
Interface Mode 4C
UDS-10 Pin Out
1
2
3
7
UDS Signal
Shield
Rx Data
Tx Data
Signal Ground
Panel Signal
Panel Pin Out
Tx Data
Rx Data
Signal Ground
No Connection
4
5
6
Table 23 – UDS-10 RS422 Cable Pin Outs
Interface Mode 4D
UDS-10 Pin Out
14
15
21
22
UDS Signal
Panel Signal
Panel Pin Out
Tx+
TxRx+
Rx-
Rx+
RxTx+
Tx-
13
14
11
12
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CardAccess Utilities
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CaClientConnect Utility
Figure 820 - The CaClientConnect Utility
The CaClientConnect utility is used when setting up a CardAccess station
to connect a workstation or communications server to the CicData
Server. The CicData Server is responsible for distributing event and alert
messages to all of the CardAccess workstations. The CaClientConnect
utility provides the details of the data connection between the CicData
Server and the client workstation. The connection of each workstation to
the CicData Server is essential to the proper operation of each
workstation.
The CaClientConnect utility sets the following parameters.
• IP Address - This is the IP address of the CIC data server. Ask your
network administrator for the IP address of the CardAccess host
computer and type it into the Server IP Address field
• Server Port - The server port is always set to 9000. This is the CIC
data server TCP port for incoming workstation connections. The
value is fixed at the present time and should not be changed
• Workstation Number - You will select a workstation number for
your CardAccess workstation. This workstation number must be
unique, workstation numbers may not be duplicated in the
CardAccess system
Connect a Workstation to the Events Server
• Enter the IP - Manually enter the IP address of the CardAccess
database server in the 'Server IP Address' field (Figure 2). If there are
no workstations in the system (the host computer is the only
CardAccess equipped PC in the system), set the IP address to
127.0.0.1 (the 'loopback' IP address)
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Figure 821 - The Server IP Address Field
• Select the Workstation Number - Set the 'Workstation' field to the
workstation number setting that is appropriate for the workstation
that you are configuring. If you are setting up the database server,
select the 'Host PC' setting. If you are setting up a workstation, pick a
workstation number that is unique in the system. Workstation
number duplication is not allowed. Click the arrow to the right of the
'Workstation' field (Figure 734) and click on your selection
Figure 822 - The Workstation Field
CaClientConnect Utility Controls
• Server IP Address - You can set the server IP address by typing in
the value. This IP address is the address of the server that has the
CardAccess database installed. The format of the IP address must be
XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX
Figure 823 - The Server IP Address Field
• Server Port - You can click the spin buttons to the right of the 'Server
Port' field to change the port number, or you can type in a value
manually. However, the CIC Data Server currently only connects to
CardAccess workstations through port 9000. Thus you must leave the
default setting of 9000 unchanged unless you are instructed to change
it by Continental technical support
Figure 824 - The Server Port Field
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• Workstation - Click the arrow to the right of the 'Workstation' field
(Figure 737) and scroll up or down to locate a suitable workstation
number for your workstation. Use caution not to select a workstation
number that is already in use. Click on your selection to accept it
Figure 825 - The Workstation Field
• Save Settings - Click the 'Save Settings' button (Figure 7) to register
the changes that you have made to the server IP address and the
server port number
Figure 826 - The Save Settings Button
• Exit - Clicking the 'Exit' button (Figure 8) will close the
CaClientConnect utility without saving any changes
Figure 827 - The Exit Button
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CaDbUtils Utility
Figure 828 - The CaDbUtils Utility Screen, Database Connection Tab
Selected
The CaDbUtils utility is used to perform database maintenance tasks on
the CardAccess database. There are seven folder tabs. Each folder tab
has controls that perform a specific function as follows.
•
Database Connection Tab - The 'Database Connection' tab
contains controls that connect the CardAccess host software to the
selected database. The main CardAccess database is selected here
• Create Database Tab - The 'Create Database' folder tab has controls
that allow you to create a new, blank (no data), CardAccess
compatible database
• Attach Database Tab - Before you can perform any maintenance on
an SQL compatible database, you must first attach the database to the
SQL server. The 'Attach Database' tab has controls that allow you to
attach a database to the local server
• Detach Database Tab - The opposite of the Attach Database tab
explained above, the 'Detach Database' tab has controls that you can
use to select and detach a given database from the local SQL server
• Update Database Tab - The 'Update Database' tab has controls that
allow you to select a CardAccess database and upgrade that database
to the latest CardAccess version. From time to time, the database
structure is changed. Fields are added or deleted, tables are changed
and so on. In most cases, you cannot run a newer version CardAccess
program on an older version database (the program may eventually
crash). Each time you update the CardAccess version, you should also
use the Update Database tab to update all your active and archived
CardAccess databases. Database update does not work on nonCardAccess databases
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• Link Servers Tab - The Link Servers tab has controls that allow you
to link servers to the main CardAccess server for the purpose of
creating control and archive spans across several servers.
•
Drop Server Tab - The Drop Server tab of the DbUtils utility has
controls that allow you to unlink archive servers from the CardAccess
main server.
The CaDbUtils utility is actually several utilities housed on the same
screen, each utility is located on its own folder. Each folder is dedicated
to a different database utility function. Generally, all utilities in the
CaDbUtils utility perform some kind of database related function. One
of the important functions of the CaDbUtils utility is to set the
workstation number for the CardAccess workstation or host
communications driver (done on the Database Connection tab, as
explained below).
Each folder tab and set of controls for that folder tab are explained
below.
Start the CaDbUtils Utility
Figure 829 - The CaDbUtils Program in the Tools Folder
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• Launch the Program - The CaDbUtils program 'CaDbUtils.exe', is
stored in the \CardAccess\Utils folder. There are two ways to launch
the utility.
o CardAccess Program Group - When you install the CardAccess
software by using the CardAccess CD, a 'CardAccess3000'
program group is created. Along with shortcuts to files that start
the CardAccess, a 'Tools' program group is also created. There is a
shortcut called 'Database Utilities' in the Tools folder that starts the
CaDbUtils utility
o Double Click the File - An alternate way to start the CaDbUtils
utility is to open the \CardAccess\Tools folder (Figure 2) and
double click the file called CaDbUtils.exe
• Log In - When the program starts, you are presented with a login
screen that requires a password to continue (Figure 3). The login
password is 'PR1532' (without the quotes)
Figure 830 - - The CaDbUtils Login Screen
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Database Connection Tab
Figure 831 - The Database Connection Tab
The Database connection tab is where you will tell the CardAccess
software where to find the main CardAccess database. Firstly note that,
before the CardAccess can connect to any SQL database, that database
must have been previously attached to a working server that is accessible
to the CardAccess software. Further, the CardAccess must know name
of the server where CardAccess database is stored and the name of the
database that the CardAccess will use on that server.
When the CardAccess starts up, the software consults settings in the
Windows registry to determine the name of the CardAccess database
server, the specific database on that server that will serve as the
CardAccess main database, and the workstation name and number.
These settings are placed in the registry by the CaDbUtils 'Database
Connection' utility during initial set up of the CardAccess. There are three
controls on the Database Connection tab of the CaDbUtils utility that
concern workstation and database identification as follows.
Connect a Database
• Database Server Name - The 'Database Server Name' field displays
the names of all SQL servers that the local server is aware of. Click the
arrow to the right of the Database Server Name field and click a
server to select it. Alternatively, you can type the name of your server
into the Database Server Name field.
Note that you are selecting the CardAccess main database server in
the Database Server Name field and the UNC name of this server will
be written to the Windows registry (of the computer that you are
currently working on) when you click the 'Save Settings' button. Once
the name of this server has been written to the registry, the
CardAccess software will search for the selected server and attempt to
connect to the database named in the 'Database Name' field (see
below) upon each start up of the software
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Figure 832 - The Database Server Name Field
• Database Name - The 'Database Name' field displays the names of
all of the databases that have been created on the server named in the
Database Server Name field. The Database Name field only displays
databases on the selected server that have been previously attached to
the server (perhaps using the 'Attach Database' tab in the CaDbUtils
utility). As we have previously stated, you must first attach a database
to the target CardAccess SQL server before you can designate that
database as available for use by the CardAccess software.
Click the arrow to the right of the Database Name field, and select a
database by clicking on it. This database name will be written to the
Windows registry when you click the 'Save Settings' button. The
database selected in the Database Name field will be used as the
CardAccess main database
Figure 833 - The Database Name Field
• Network Station ID - The 'Network Station ID' is where you will tell
the CardAccess instance on the current computer if it is a workstation
or a communications server (host). The Network Station ID control
contains a fixed list which includes
o Host PC - If the computer you are setting up is the CardAccess
server, click 'Host PC'. Clicking the 'Save Settings' button (see
below) will load the Host PC value into the Windows registry and
the CardAccess will start the communications driver upon start up
of the software henceforth
o Workstation 1 - 100 - If the computer that you are setting up is to
be a CardAccess workstation, select a workstation number from 1
to 100. Note that you are not permitted to duplicate workstation
numbers in any CardAccess system
Figure 834 - The Network Station Id Field
• Save the Settings - Click the 'Save Settings' button to store the settings
in the Windows registry
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Figure 835 - The Save Settings Button
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Attach Database Tab
Figure 836 - The CaDbUtils Attach Database Tab
The 'Attach Db' utility is used to connect a database to an SQL server.
All SQL databases must be attached before they can be managed by the
SQL server.
Attach a Database
To attach a database to an SQL server, do the following.
• Select the Database Server - You must tell the Attach Database
utility the server name of the target server. Type in the name of that
server (the UNC name of the target machine)
Figure 837 - The Select a Server for the Database Field
• Select the Database Name - The utility requires you to type in a
unique name for your new database into the 'Select a name for your
new database' field. Be cautious not to duplicate the name of an
existing SQL database on the same server
Figure 838 - The Select a Name for the Database Field
• Select the Directory - The 'Select the directory that your database
should be stored in' field requires you to enter the fully qualified path
where the utility will store the newly created database files. The default
path is taken from the existing path of the CardAccess main database.
You may fill in a different path if required. However, it is strongly
recommended that you house all CardAccess database files in the
\CardAccess3000\Database folder
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Figure 839 - The Select the Directory That Your Database Files are in
Field
• Click Attach Database - Click the 'Attach Database' Button
Figure 840 - The Attach Database Button
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Detach Database Tab
Figure 841 - The Detach Database Tab
The 'Detach Database' tab performs a function that is the opposite of the
'Attach Database' tab; a database is disconnected from the SQL selected
server. Once a database has been disconnected, it becomes unavailable
for use by the CardAccess. You may consider disconnecting older,
archive databases that are no longer used, to save server space and
maintenance overhead.
Detach a Database
To detach a database do the following.
• Select the Server - You need to tell the Update Database utility the
name of the server that contains the database to be detached. Click
the arrow to the right of the 'Database Server Name' field and select a
server. You may optionally manually type the name of a known
server. Note that you do not need slashes. Simple type in the UNC
(NetBios) name of the target computer. Also note that the Windows
log in profile on the current computer must have change permissions
on the target machine or the connection request may be rejected by
the target computer
Figure 842 - The Database Server Name Field
If you do not have access to the server whose name you selected in
the Database Server Name field, you will get an error message similar
to the below Figure 3.
Figure 843 - The Server Connection Error Message
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• Select the Database - The Update Database utility needs to know
which database on the target computer you wish to detach. Once you
have selected a server name in the previously mentioned Database
Server Name field, the CaDbUtils utility will query that server and
compile a list of CardAccess compatible databases. That list will be
displayed when you click the arrow to the right of the 'Database
Name' field. You also have the option of manually typing in the
database name, if you know it.
Figure 844 - The Database Name Field
• Click Detach Database - Click the 'Detach Database' button to
begin the update
Figure 845 - The Detach Database Button
• Completion Message - Once the update utility has completed, you
will see a completion message box (Figure 758). Click the 'Ok' button
to continue Figure 6
Figure 846 - The Detach Database Completion Message Box
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Update Database Tab
Figure 847 - The Update Database Tab
The 'Update Database' tab allows you to connect to a CardAccess
compatible database and upgrade it to the newest CardAccess version.
Note that you need to be cautious when using this utility due to the
following issues.
• Always make a safe copy of any database that you wish to update
before running the Update Database utility. This will provide you with
a fallback database in case the upgrade does not go as well as planned.
The safe database copy can be deleted once you are sure the update
was successful
• You must be sure that you are using a version of the CaDbUtils utility
that is compatible with the CardAccess version that you plan to
deploy. Never attempt to use a version of the CaDbUtils utility that
was not installed with your software. You might accidentally corrupt
your database and prevent the software from starting up. The
database upgrade utility may change tables and table fields as part of
the upgrade. This could render the database version incompatible
with the CardAccess build version.
Update a Database
To update a database do the following.
• Select the Server - You need to tell the Update Database utility the
name of the server that contains the database to be upgraded. Click
the arrow to the right of the 'Database Server Name' field and select a
server. You may optionally manually type the name of a known server.
Note that you do not need slashes. Simple type in the UNC (NetBios)
name of the target computer. Also note that the Windows log in
profile on the current computer must have change permissions on the
target machine or the connection request may be rejected by the target
computer
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Figure 848 - The Database Server Name Field
If you do not have access to the server whose name you selected in the
Database Server Name field, you will get an error message similar to the
below Figure 761.
Figure 849 - The Server Connection Error Message
• Select the Database - The Update Database utility needs to know
which database on the target computer you wish to upgrade. Once
you have selected a server name in the previously mentioned Database
Server Name field, the CaDbUtils utility will query that server and
compile a list of CardAccess compatible databases. That list will be
displayed when you click the arrow to the right of the 'Database
Name' field. You also have the option of manually typing in the
database name, if you know it.
Figure 850 - The Database Name Field
• Click Update Database - Click the 'Update Database' button to
begin the update
Figure 851 - The Update Database Button
• Completion Message - Once the update utility has completed, you
will see a completion message box (Figure 764). Click the 'Ok' button
to continue
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Figure 852 - The Database Update Completion Message Box
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Link Servers Tab
Figure 853 - The Link Servers Tab
The Link Servers tab has controls that allow you to link servers to the
main CardAccess server for the purpose of creating control and archive
spans across several servers.
Link a Server
To link a server do the following.
• Select the Master Server - Click the arrow to the right of the 'Master
Server Name' field. Click on the name of your main CardAccess
server to select it. You may optionally type in the name of your main
CardAccess server
• Select the Linked Server - Click the arrow to the right of the 'Linked
Server Name' field. Click on a server name to select it. You may
optionally type in the name of the linked server
• Click the Link Servers Button - Click the 'Link Servers' button to
begin the linking process
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Drop Server Tab
Figure 854 - The Drop Server Tab
The Drop Server tab of the DbUtils utility has controls that allow you to
unlink archive servers from the CardAccess main server.
Unlink a Server
To unlink a linked server, do the following.
• Select the Master Server - Type in the name of the main CardAccess
server or click the arrow to the right of the 'Master Server Name' field
and click on the name of the main CardAccess server
• Select the Linked Server - Click the arrow to the right of the 'Linked
Server Name' field. Select a linked server from the list by clicking it.
You may also optionally type the linked server name in manually.
• Click the Drop Server Button - Click the 'Drop Server' button to
commence the unlinking
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DbUpdate Utility
Figure 855- The DbUpdate Utility
The DbUpdate utility (found in the \CardAccess\Tools folder) is used to
update Paradox version (not SQL) database tables to the Current
CardAccess 495 version (which is version number 3.0.2 and build 466).
The DbUpdate utility does not operate on any CardAccess 3000 database
files. The CardAccess 3000 uses an SQL type database, and the
DbUpdate utility will only recognize Paradox type tables, as used in all of
the CardAccess versions prior to the CardAccess 3000 version.
Thus you can use the DbUpdate utility to upgrade CardAccess 195, 295,
495 and 2000 archive databases to the most recent CardAccess database
revision of 3.0.2.466. If you intend to bring any archive data from older
versions into the CardAccess 3000 (which is SQL only), you must first
upgrade the Paradox versions of those databases to the 3.0.2.466
revision, using the DbUpdate utility. You can then use the PdxSQL
utility (also found in the \CardAccess\Tools folder) to actually bring
those updated Paradox files into an SQL database.
Warning – It is strongly recommended that you run the
CardAccess utility called ‘DbRebuild’ on each Paradox database
that you plan to upgrade, before you begin the upgrade with
DbUpdate. DbRebuild repairs damaged database tables that
would otherwise cause a database upgrade attempt to fail
Upgrade a Paradox Database
To perform a Paradox database upgrade to the latest CardAccess 195,
295, 495 or 2000 database version, do the following.
• Start the Utility - The utility does not have a shortcut on any menu
of the CardAccess or in the CardAccess program group. This is to
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prevent you from accidentally starting the utility and causing database
damage. To start the DbUpdate utility, do the following.
o Open Windows Explorer - Open Windows Explorer and locate
the \Program Files\CardAccess3000\Tools folder
o Double Click the File - In the \CardAccess\Tools folder,
double click the file 'DbUpdate.exe' (you may not see the .exe
extension)
Figure 856 - The CardAccess 3000 Tools Folder - DbUpdate Utility
Highlighted
• Select the Database - The default path in the 'Target Directory' field
is 'BW_Data'. This target path is taken from the Borland Database
Engine configuration file. In that file, a database alias (a unique name
for your database) is created. That database alias is then associated
with a network or local hard drive path in the same file. Because the
name alias is linked in the configuration file to the actual hard drive
path to the physical location of the database, using the name to point
to the database becomes the same as using the literal hard drive path
By default, the BW_Data alias actually points to the c:\program
files\cardaccess3000\data folder. The Data folder of legacy
CardAccess software versions contains about 160 database files that
are recognized by the Borland Database Engine to be Borland
compatible files.
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The key point to remember is that the database alias 'BW_Data'
actually points to some hard drive path that can be ascertained by
opening the Borland BDEAdmin utility and checking the settings for
the database path. If you intend to select the alias BW_Data in the
Target Directory field, check the path in the BDEAdmin utility to be
sure that it points to the correct path (call Continental technical
support for assistance with the BDEAdmin program, if needed).
The DbUpdate utility can also be pointed to a specific hard drive path.
Thus, if you have an archive database that you wish to have upgraded
to the latest Paradox version, you can click the folder browse button
to the right of the Target Directory field to locate the folder where the
database table will be found. Note that you will need to upgrade every
Paradox version data archive prior to using the PdxSQL program to
import those archives into the CardAccess 3000 database
Figure 857 - The Target Directory Field
• Select the Events Option - The DbUpdate utility updates all of the
database tables found in your legacy CardAccess database. However,
the events option concerns only the events table of that database.
By default, the DbUpdate utility creates one events table and moves
all of the events found in the upgraded database into that events table.
Note that in older versions of the CardAccess software there were
three ways that events were handled, as follows.
o One Events Table - In the earliest CardAccess versions, all
events were stored in one main Events table. This table could
grow to enormous size in busy systems. Note that if you have a
table with a lot of data, the upgrade process could take more than
an hour to complete. Do not reset the computer during this time;
you will damage the database irreparably!
o One Main Events Table and Monthly Backup Tables Intermediate versions implemented a monthly event archive
folder schema. Events were off loaded from the main events
folder to monthly back up folders. This enhanced the speed of the
system by keeping the online events database small. However, to
update such a database, you will need to first update the main
database (BW_Data), and then update each monthly backup
events archive separately.
o One Main Events Table and Weekly Backup Tables - The
latest versions of the CardAccess seen before the implementation
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of the CardAccess 3000 used a weekly back up folder schema.
Events were regularly off loaded from the main events database
into an events archive folder that bears the name of the week
number of the year (week 1, week 2, etc.). As above, you will need
to update each weekly folder individually.
As we stated, by default the DbUpdate utility assumes that you wish
to have all events found in the events table that you are currently
updating moved into one common, updated events table. In the case
where you wish to have the utility move older events into individual
monthly archive folders, click the 'Move events to default folders'
check box. This sets the option to create monthly back up folders and
move events from the main events database table into those folders,
based on the date of occurrence of each event.
If the Move events to default folders option is not set, the utility will
move all events found in the archive database into one updated events
table. Click the checkbox to set the option (checked means the option
is set). Once you have selected the Move events to default folders
option, you are required to set a date value in the 'Events Newer
Than' field (Figure 770)
Figure 858 - The Move Events to Default Folders Field
• Run the Utility - Click the 'Run' button to start the update process
Figure 859 - The Run Button
DbUpdate Utility Controls
• General Tab
The General tab has controls that allow you to select the path of the
database to be upgraded and to select the destination of the converted
data. While the folder path of the converted data is fixed, the
distribution of the data is selectable. More details on each control are
available below.
o Target Directory Field - The 'Target Directory' field selects the
database to be converted. The default path is set to the
CardAccess main database path as set in the Borland BDEAdmin
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utility. You can change the path by clicking on the file browse
button, located on the right side of the Target Directory field
(Figure 772). Figure 773 shows the file browse window that will
open
Figure 860 - The Target Directory Field
Figure 861 - The File Browse Window
o Move Events to Default Folders Field - The 'Move events to
default folders' field sets the option to create monthly back up
folders (and separate events tables in each folder) when
converting one large events database. Click the check box to
create the folders, unchecked creates on contiguous events
database (see above for more information)
Figure 862 - The Move Events to Default Folders Field
o Events Newer Than - Use the 'Events Newer Than' field to
select a date range for the upgrade
Figure 863 - The Events Newer Than Field
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o Run Button - Click the 'Run' button to begin the database
upgrade
Figure 864 - The Run Button
o Exit Button - Click the 'Exit' button to exit the program at any
time
Figure 865 - The Exit Button
o Week of the Year Calendar - There is only one way to find out
the current week number of the year from inside the CardAccess.
That is to run the DbUpdate utility and click on the bottom
button bar (Figure 778)
Figure 866 - The DbUpdate Button Bar
When you click anywhere on the bottom button bar, the week
number calendar appears (Figure 779). This calendar shows the
current date circled in red, and the number of the week of the year
is shown along the left side of the window.
Figure 867 - The Week Number Calendar
• Log Tab
The log tab displays error messages when errors have been found in
updating database tables. You can click the Log tab after the utility has
completed and examine errors that were generated and which tables
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they occurred in. If there are no errors displayed, then the utility
performed the upgrade without incident.
If there are errors displayed, you may be able to correct the errors by
running a program called DbRebuild on the original source database,
then running DbUpdate again. If the errors were not corrected by
running DbRebuild, then the database upgrade was a success.
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EventTransfer Utility
Figure 868 - The EventTransfer Utility
The Event Transfer utility is used to transfer legacy CardAccess 195, 295,
495 and 2000 events database files from a Paradox version database, to
the latest CardAccess 3000 SQL version database. The Events Transfer
utility is programmed to only recognize and move events data. If you
need other database tables moved, use the PdxSQL utility instead. This
utility is useful to convert your monthly or weekly events backup folders
and bring those archive events records into the CardAccess 3000 SQL
database.
Firstly, let's look at some background about the Paradox version
CardAccess. The events handling strategy of the early CardAccess
versions changed several times over the evolution of the product. Over
time, there were three events handling methods used in the CardAccess
software versions, which used the Paradox database, as follows.
o One Events Table - In the earliest CardAccess versions, all events
were stored in one main Events table. This table could grow to
enormous size in busy systems. Note that if you have a table with a
lot of data, the events transfer process could take a significant
amount of time to complete. Do not reset the computer during this
time.
o One Main Events Table and Monthly Backup Events Tables Intermediate versions implemented a monthly event archive folder
schema. Events were off loaded from the main events folder (at
regular intervals) to monthly back up folders. This enhanced the
speed of the system by keeping the online events database small.
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However, to transfer events to the SQL server from monthly events
archives of this type, you must visit each monthly backup folder and
transfer the events from that folder separately.
o One Main Events Table and Weekly Backup Events Tables The latest versions of the Paradox based CardAccess, seen before the
implementation of the CardAccess 3000, used a weekly back up
folder schema. Events were regularly off loaded from the main
events database into an events archive folder that bears the name of
the week number of the year (week 1, week 2, etc.). As above, you
will need to visit each weekly folder individually, and transfer the
events found in that folder to the CardAccess 3000 database.
Thus, in your search of the hard drive for CardAccess events back up
files, you may find the following.
• All events in one folder (most typically, the CardAccess\Data folder)
• All archive events in stored in monthly folders, the main events
database stored in the CardAccess\Data folder, all stored under the
\CardAccess main program folder
• All archive events stored in weekly folders, and the CardAccess main
database stored in the \CardAccess\Data folder and all stored under
the \CardAccess main program folder
The current CardAccess 3000 SQL version database uses one main
events table and one archive events table. The amount of events that are
stored in the main events table is determined by the setting in the
'Number of Viewable Events' field on the Alerts tab, of the CardAccess
System Settings. The CardAccess 3000 will archive any events (on an
hourly basis) that exceed the amount set in the Number of Viewable
Events field.
The EventTransfer utility is hard coded to take Paradox events from the
source path you select, and place them in the CardAccess 3000 main
events table. Further, the EventTransfer utility is designed to append
those events to the existing CA3000 events database, so existing events
will not be destroyed (note that the PdxSQL utility overwrites the target
SQL database).
Thus, you will use the EventTransfer utility when you wish to transfer
events (and only events) from a legacy Paradox version database to a
CardAccess 3000 SQL version main database. You are expected to tell
the utility where to find the Paradox source file (the utility must have an
events table from a Paradox database as the source, a file called
'Events.Db' is what you will search for, usually found in the
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\CardAccess\Data folder). You are given two options of how to inform
the utility as to the path of the source events table.
• Use the Path That is Known to the Borland BDEAdmin
program - You can select a 'database alias' using the 'Select BDE
Name' field. A database alias is simply a name that is attached to a
given set of database files. The database alias becomes a name that we
can use to refer to a group of database files (this prevents us from
needing to look at the hard drive path as a reference, we use a
convenient name instead). The database alias that is assigned to the
Paradox versions of the CardAccess database is always 'BW_Data'.
Thus, when you use the Select BDE Name field, always select
BW_Data as the file source
• Use a Path of Your Own Choosing - If you prefer, you may
manually point the utility to the CardAccess\Data folder or any other
folder of your choosing by using the Explorer search tool in the
'Select Event Table' field. You will be searching for files called
'Event.Db, Event.Mb, and Event.Px, which always occur as a set
wherever there are Paradox events database files (the Events.Db file is
the source file that the utility will use). Select the folder where you find
the Event.Db file that you wish to convert.
Transfer Events
• Select the Source Database - The EventTransfer utility must know
the name and storage path of the source Paradox events database.
You will select that source database by using the 'Select BDE Name'
field or the 'Select Event Table' field. These two fields are 'mutually
exclusive'. You will select one or the other.
You are given two options.
o Use the Alias - You can instruct the EventTransfer utility to use
the database path that is found in the BDE Administrator
program configuration file. Do the following
!
Click the check box to the left of the 'Select BDE Name' field
!
Select the database alias called BW_Data from the list that
appears in the Select BDE Name field
Figure 869 - The Select BDE Name Field
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o Use the Path - As an alternative to using the database alias to
point to the source database, you may do the following
!
Click the check box to the left of the 'Select Event Table'
Field
!
Click the folder browse button to the right of the 'Select
Event Table' field to open the Explorer file browser, search
for your folder and select it. The path to your selected folder
will be automatically loaded in the Select Event Table field
Figure 870 - The Select Event Table
• Begin the Transfer - Click the 'Transfer Data Button to begin the
transfer
Figure 871 - The Transfer Data Button
Events Transfer Utility Controls
The Events Transfer utility controls are detailed below. Note that the
‘Select BDE Name' and the 'Select Event Table' fields are mutually
exclusive, you may only select one of the fields.
• Select BDE Name - Use the Select BDE Name field to select the
source database by using the database alias. Click the check box to the
left of the Select BDE Name field. Then click the arrow to the right of
that field and select BW_Data from the list
Figure 872 - The Select BDE Name Field
• Select Event Table - Use the Select BDE Name field to select the
source database by using the hard drive path instead of the database
alias as above. Click the check box to the left of the Select Event
Table field. Then click the explorer button to the right of that field
and locate the folder where your events table is located. The file you
seek is 'Events.Db'
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Figure 873 - The Select Event Table Field
• Transfer Data Button - Click the 'Transfer Data' button to begin the
events transfer
Figure 874 - The Transfer Data Button
• About Button - Click the 'About' button (Figure 787) to open the
About window (Figure 788) that lists the version details of the
EventTransfer utility
Figure 875 - The About Button
Figure 876 - The About Box
• Status Bar - The Status Bar (Figure 789) indicates the file copy
progress. The blue bar moves from left to right during the file copy
process. When the process is complete, the blue bar moves all the way
to the right and you are presented with a completion message box that
indicates how many records were actually moved (Figure 790)
Figure 877 - The Status Bar - With Complete Indicator Showing
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Figure 878 - The Event Transfer Completion Message Box
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Find Records Utility
Figure 879 - The Find Records Utility
The Find Records utility screen is available from a button, usually marked
'Search', that is available on the toolbar of most CardAccess screens. The
search utility is a generic utility that allows you to select one or more
fields from the CardAccess configuration screen that you currently have
open, and create a search command to search the CardAccess database
for configuration records that match your search criteria. The Find
Records utility does not search the Events database; it searches the
configuration records of the screen that is currently open. Generally, the
Find Records utility is only available from the toolbar of CardAccess
configuration screens.
To use the Find Records screen, you must construct one or more search
strings. The generic search string construction is:
Field -> Condition -> Value
Generally, you are saying to the utility - 'Search every record of the screen
that I am currently in and find each record that matches the criteria I
selected'. Note that you can create multiple search strings. You would
then be saying; 'Search every record of the screen that I am currently in
and find every record that matches the criteria I selected and matches the
second criteria and matches the third (and so on)'.
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The Find Records screen will be easier to understand if you have had
previous experience with 'logical mathematical operators'. Even if you
have not seen logical operations before, the concept is fairly simple to
grasp. We can use words to describe what we are looking for. 'Find me a
record that has this and that or that and is less than this...'. Creating
statements like the preceding is what you are doing in the Find Records
'Expression' section (the Expression section consists of the Field,
Condition and Value fields).
The general steps you would use to start a search would be:
• Define an Expression - You need to define an expression using the
three controls in the Expression section to tell the utility what you are
looking for
• Store the Expression - You click the 'Accept' button to move the
expression into the 'Conditions' area of the Find Records utility. When
you run Find Records, the utility uses all search strings found in the
Conditions area as the search criteria. If you have five search strings,
the utility will use all five strings in the search
• Define More Expressions - You can define as many search strings
as you need before you run the utility
• Start the Search - Once you have created your search criteria, you
can run the Find Records utility by clicking the 'OK' or 'Apply'
buttons
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Create a Basic Find Records Search
To create a basic find records search, do the following.
• Open the Find Records Utility - To open the Find Records utility,
click the 'Search' button on the toolbar of the CardAccess
configuration screen where you wish to perform the search
• Select a Field - Click the arrow to the right of the 'Field' control and
select the field that you will be searching in this expression
• Select a Condition - Select the logical condition that you will be
searching for (equals, greater than, less than, not equal, etc.)
• Fill in a Value - Type in the value that you are looking for from the
field that you selected earlier in the Field control
• Commit the Expression - If you are satisfied with the search
expression that you have created, click the 'Accept' button to commit
the search expression to the Conditions window. Once you click the
Accept button, you will see your search string in the Conditions
window and can review it for accuracy. If you find an error, you can
delete it by first clicking on the expression that you wish to delete in
the Conditions window, then clicking the 'Delete' button
• Narrow the Search - Now that you have created one search
expression, you can create several more if desired, to narrow the
search. More information is available on creating multiple expressions
in the help topic entitled 'Find Records Screen Controls'
• Run the Search - Once you have stored at least one expression in the
Conditions window, you can click the 'Ok' or 'Apply' button to run
the search
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Find Records Screen Controls
Figure 880
The Find Records screen is divided into two halves (Figure 792). The top
half of the screen is where you will create search strings. The bottom half
of the screen is where those strings are saved and where the controls to
run the search are located. Each field and control is explained in detail
below.
Expression Section
Figure 881 - The Find Records Utility Expression Section Controls
The Expression section (Figure 793) is where you will define search
expressions that will later be used by the utility conduct the actual search.
Each field in the Expression section is explained below.
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• Field - The Field control displays a list of every searchable field of the
configuration screen that was open at the time you opened the Find
Records utility. The list in this field changes depending on which
CardAccess configuration screen you are in. The Find Records utility
is available from every CardAccess configuration screen. When you
open the utility while inside a given configuration screen, the Field
control is connected to a list of fields that is unique to the specific
configuration screen that you are currently in. Thus, you will find an
identical Find Records utility screen available in every CardAccess
configuration screen, but the field choices in the Field control will
change based on the screen you are in at the time you opened the
utility
Figure 882 - The Field Selection Control
• Condition - The Condition field contains a listing of logical operators
as explained below
o = (Equals) - Use this expression when you want to say 'if A is
equal to B'
o >= (Greater Than or Equal To) - Use this expression when you
want to say 'if A is greater than or equal to B'
o < (Less Than) - Use this expression when you want to say 'if A is
less than B'
o (Greater Than) - Use this expression when you want to say 'if A is
greater than B'
o <= (Less Than or Equal To) - Use this expression when you want
to say 'if A is less than or equal to B'
o (Not Equal) - Use this expression when you want to say 'if A is
not equal to B’ Figure 795 - The Condition Selection Control
Figure 883
• Value - You are expected to type in the value that the Find Utility will
search for. The 'data type' of this value will change depending on the
selection you have made in the 'Field' control. Note that a hint will
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appear just below the Value field that will indicate what type of entry
you are required to make. You will be expected to enter any of the
following data types.
o Name - If you have selected a text field, like the Name field of
the Personnel screen that requires text entry, you will be asked to
enter text just below the Value field (Figure 796)
Figure 884 - The Value Field with Text Hint
o Number - If you have selected a numeric field, like the Facility
field of the Personnel screen that requires a numeric entry, you
will be asked to enter an integer (a whole number) just below the
Value field (Figure 797)
Figure 885 - The Value Field with Number Hint
o Boolean Value - If you have selected a boolean (true/false) field
like the Escort field of the Personnel screen (it's a check box) that
requires 'True' or 'False' entry, you will be asked to enter the
words 'True' or 'False' (upper or lower case is ignored) just below
the Value field (Figure 798)
Figure 886 - The Value Field with Boolean Hint
o Date - If you have selected a date field, like the 'Expiration Date'
field of the Personnel screen that requires a date entry, you will
be asked to enter a date formatted string just below the Value
field (Figure 799). The date needs to be entered in the format;
mm/dd/yyyy
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Figure 887 - The Value Field with Date Hint
• Logical Operation Section - The Logical Operation section (Figure
800) is only used when you intend to combine more than one logical
expression into an expression 'statement'. We can define an expression
statement as the joining of two or more logical statements.
As described above, each expression is created in the Expression
section of the Find Records screen. When you click the 'Accept'
button (mentioned below), each expression that you created is then
moved to the 'Conditions' display window (Figure 801). When two or
more expressions have been created, there needs to be a logical
operator placed between them, so the Find Records utility knows how
to logically join several expressions.
As you recall from the above information on the Expression section, a
logical operator is placed between the 'Field' and the 'Value' in every
single expression. An example from the Personnel screen is:
Find -> Last Name = Smith
But, what if we wanted to find
Find -> Last Name = Smith AND First Name = John
This would allow us to narrow our search and prevent the utility from
displaying the badge records of every 'Smith' in the database. We
would only see records that have the last name = 'Smith', and the first
name = 'John'. The operator that we want to focus on in the above
example is the AND operator between the first expression 'Find Last
Name = Smith' and the second expression 'Find First Name = John'.
The Logical Operation section controls provide the logical operator
that gets inserted between expressions, when you elect to use more
than one expression to conduct your search. The logical operator
selections are the same as mentioned previously in the 'Conditions'
section explanation (And, Or, Not, etc.). Please see that section for
more details.
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Figure 888 - The Find Records Utility Logical Operations Section
Controls
• The Accept Button - When you create a logical expression, that
expression will not be used by the utility unless it has been stored in
the 'Conditions' section (Figure 801 below). To accept the expression
that you have created, and commit it to the Conditions area, click the
'Accept' button
Figure 889 - The Accept Button
Conditions Section
Figure 890 - The Find Records Utility Conditions Section Controls
The 'Conditions' section is used to store your expressions and statements
to give you the opportunity to final review the logic in your statements to
verify that the verbiage of your expressions make logical sense. Each
control of the Conditions section is explained in more detail below
• Search String Window - The Search String window is where your
expression must be stored prior to running the Find Records utility. If
there are no statements in the search string window, no search will be
conducted. The 'Accept' button in the 'Expression' section moves an
expression from the Expression area into the search string window
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Figure 891 - The Search String Window
• Delete Button - You may delete any expression from a statement in
the search string window, at any time, by clicking on the expression
that you want to have removed and clicking the 'Delete' button (found
in the Conditions section)
Figure 892 - The Delete Button
• Clear All Button - Clicking the 'Clear All' button clears all the
expressions from the search string window
Figure 893 - The Clear All Button
• Restore Button - The 'Restore' button currently works like a 'restart'
button. All expressions are cleared from the string window and the
Find Records utility resets all fields
Figure 894 - The Restore Button
Program Control Buttons
The Program Control Buttons either run or close the Find Records
utility. The available buttons are as follows.
• Ok Button - Clicking the Ok button, runs the search and closes the
utility
Figure 895 - The Ok Button
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• Cancel Button - Clicking the Cancel button closes the utility without
running a search
Figure 896 – The Cancel Button
• Apply Button - Clicking the Apply button runs the search and closes
the Find Records utility (identical to the Ok button)
Figure 897 – The Apply Button
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Batch Save Utility
Figure 898 - The Batch Save Utility Screen
The Batch Save utility is available from a button on the Personnel screen
main tool bar. The utility allows you to create or change batches of
Personnel records. For example, you can have the Batch Save utility visit
every Personnel record and change the settings of one or more fields.
You can also have the Batch Save utility create an entire range of records
(say badge numbers 1-500); all with the same preset values.
The Batch Save utility is a multi-purpose utility and can be placed in one
of several operating modes, depending on which selection you make in
the 'How to Handle a Range' control. Using the How to Handle a Range
control, you will elect to create new records, modify existing records, or
create new and modify existing records at the same time.
Note that regarding the batch modification of Personnel records; you
may commonly have any of the following four situations.
• You Have No Personnel Records and You Wish to Create a Number
of Them in a Batch
• You Have Some Existing Personnel Records, But You Need More
Records
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• You Have Existing Records and Some or All of Them Need to Have
One or More Fields Modified
• You Have Existing Records and You Wish to Create New Records
and Modify the Existing Records at the Same Time
The Batch Save utility can solve each of the problems above. Performing
badge creation operations in a batch will save you from needing to create
Personnel records individually, thereby saving considerable time.
Important Note: The Batch Save utility must be provided with a
badge number range. The badge number range is a required field, all
other fields are optional. The Batch Save utility will use the badge
number range and create or modify all badge records in that range,
according to the settings in the controls section of the utility.
The Batch Save utility is quite useful if you have a range of new badge
records to create and all of those records share common settings. You
can create each badge record (in a contiguous badge number range) in
one batch operation, and then visit each record to type in the name and
other personal information. In this way, you can get an entire batch of
badges operational in one short operation, and then revisit each of those
records to add personal information as the badges are actually issued to
the cardholders.
Visit the Batch Utility Screen controls topic for more specific
information on the individual fields and controls of the Batch Save
screen. Visit the 'Run a Batch Save' topic section for more information
on how to run an example batch save operation. Click the link below for
access to those topic pages.
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Run a Batch Save
Figure 899 - The Batch Save Utility Screen
When you run a batch save operation, you will be creating or modifying a
'range' of badge records. You are required to enter a badge number range
in the 'Badge Range' fields. This badge range selection sets the Batch Save
utility up to perform the act of creating or modifying all badges in the
badge number range selected.
What the Batch Save utility will actually do to the badges that are
included in the selected range, is controlled by the selection you make in
the 'How to Handle a Range' section controls. You may have one of the
following needs.
• Create New Records - When you attempt to create new records,
you may be faced with one of two possible conditions
o Create Contiguous New Records - You may have no badge
records in the badge range that you have selected. In this case, you
will select the 'Create New Only' or the 'Create and/or Modify All'
option. In the case where there are no existing badge records in
the badge range selected, the 'Create New Only' and the 'Create
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and/or Modify All' options will both perform the same function create only new records.
o Create New Interlaced Records - You may have some existing
badge records created, but the badge numbers are not contiguous
(there are gaps in the numbering sequence), and you wish to
create badge records that fill in all the missing gaps in the badge
number sequence, and/or you perhaps wish to add more records
to the beginning or the end of the badge records. However, you
wish to add these new badges without changing the settings of
any of the existing badge records. In this case, the 'Create New
Only' option is the only option that will create new badge records
in a badge range where there are existing records, and leave those
existing records untouched.
• Create New Records and Modify Existing Records - You may
have some existing records that you want to modify and at the same
time create some new records. You may wish to append more records
to the beginning, in between, or at the end of the existing badge
records. The 'Create and/or Modify All' feature will modify any
existing badge records within the badge range specified in the 'Badge
Range' fields, but it will also add new badge records for any badge
numbers missing in that range.
• Modify Existing Records Only - You may wish to scan the badge
database and only modify records that are already found there. The
'Modify Existing Only' option will change the settings of existing
badge records, according to your selections in the Batch Save utility,
but it will not create any new badges
Run the Batch Save
• Open the Batch Save Utility - To open the Batch Save utility, first
open the Personnel screen (available from a button on the CardAccess
main toolbar). Then click the 'Batch Modify' button on the Personnel
screen toolbar
Figure 900 - The Personnel Screen Batch Modify Button
• Select the Badge Number Range - You need to tell the Batch Save
utility the range of badge numbers to work on. Type the number into
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the 'Badge Range' fields. If you type the same badge number in the
'from' and 'to' fields, the batch utility will modify only 1 badge.
Warning: The Batch Save utility will visit every record in
the Personnel screen that you have included in the badge
range that you specified. Be very careful which options
you set, and especially which option you select in the
‘How to Handle a Range’ section controls. You run the
risk of altering fields that you did not intend to alter.
Figure 901 - The Badge Range Fields
• Select the Batch Save Range - You need to select the operating
'mode' of the Batch Save utility. The Batch Save utility can create only
new badges, can create new badges and modify existing badges, or it
can modify existing badges without creating any new badges. Select
the mode you want in the 'How to Handle a Range' section
Figure 902 - The How to Handle a Range Selections
• Select the Fields - Once you have determined the mode that you
wish to have the Batch Save utility operate in (see above), you need to
tell the utility which fields in the selected Personnel records you want
to have changed. The 'Item' column includes the name of every
Personnel screen field.
Adjacent to every field name in the Item column is a check box (in the
'Include' field). If you select any check box by clicking it (checked is
selected), the field selected will have its contents changed according to
your other selections in the 'Value to be Set' fields of the Batch Save
utility. If you leave any fields unchecked, those fields will not be
altered by the Batch Save Utility
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Figure 903 - The Item and Include Columns
• Select the Default Values - If you have selected any fields to be
altered by checking one or more check boxes in the 'Include' column,
you can then select the values that will be placed into the selected
Personnel screen field when the batch save takes place. Note that
every record that falls within the selected badge number range will be
given the value that is set in the Value to be Set column
Figure 904 - The Value to be Set Column
There are five types of controls found in the Value to be Set column
as follows
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• Spin Field - Usually a numeric field. Click the arrow button to the
right of the field to locate a selection
Figure 905 - A Spin Control Field
• Text Field - You are expected to type a line of text into a text field
Figure 906 - A Text Field
• Combo Field - The combo field control displays a list of choices.
Click the arrow to the right of a combo field to display the list of
selections
Figure 907 - A Combo Field Control
• Check Box Field - Click a check box field to enable an option
(checked is enabled). Check boxes represent 'boolean' fields of the
CardAccess. Boolean fields can be either true or false. In the
CardAccess, boolean fields are most often used to indicate 'enabled'
(true) or 'disabled' (false). Thus, if you want to enable a feature, check
the check box
Figure 908 - A Check Box Field
• Calendar Field - A calendar field is used to provide a fixed date value
to the selected field. You may manually type in a date (of the form
MM/DD/YY), or you can use the built in calendar by clicking the
button (with the number 15 on it) to the right of the calendar field
control
Figure 909 - A Calendar Field Control
• Select the Search Criteria - If you make a selection in the 'Batch
Criteria' column, the operation of the Batch Save utility will be altered.
Once you have made any selection in the batch criteria column, when
the Batch Save utility runs, it will look for Personnel badge records
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that have the selected batch criteria, and it will modify the fields of
only those records.
Stated another way, the Batch Save utility will ignore any record that
does not match the search criteria. Select a Batch Criteria in a case
where you wish to search for badge records that have the specified
settings, and you want to change some settings in only those records.
The batch criteria search mode is ideal in a case where you wish to
search for a specified value in each badge record, and if that setting is
found, to replace it with a setting of your choosing. This will leave all
records that do not match that setting untouched.
The fields found in the Batch Criteria column are the same as shown
above in the 'Select the Default Values' section
Figure 910 - The Batch Criteria Column
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Batch Save Utility Screen Controls
Figure 911 - The Batch Save Utility Screen
The Batch Save utility allows you to change or create batches of
personnel records in one, automatic operation. The individual controls of
the Batch Save screen (Figure 823) are discussed below.
Batch Save Screen Controls
• Badge Range - The 'Badge Range' (from, to) fields set the range of
badge numbers that the Batch Save utility will operate on. You may
set the range anywhere from one badge (put the same badge number
in the 'from' and 'to' fields) to as many badges as you like.
However, note the following about the Batch Save utility
o Must be supplied with a badge number range. The badge number
range is the one required key field for the utility. All other fields
are optional
o The 'from' (on the left) number must be less than the ‘to’ number
(on the right)
o The utility will visit each Personnel screen badge record in the
badge number range. Each record may or may not be affected,
depending on the option that you select in the 'How to Handle a
Range' controls.
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Warning: The Batch Save utility will visit every record in
the Personnel screen that you have included in the badge
range that you specified. Be very careful which options
you set, and especially which option you select in the
‘How to Handle a Range’ section controls. You run the
risk of altering fields that you did not intend to alter.
To use the Badge Range Fields (Figure 824), type a number into the
'from' field (on the left), and type a number into the 'to' field (on the
right). The number in the 'from' field must be greater than or equal to
the number in the 'to' field
Figure 912 - The Badge Range Fields
• Batch Save Range - You have three options in the 'How to Handle a
Range' section as explained below.
o Create and/or Modify All - If this option is selected, the Batch
Save utility will visit each record in the badge range selected and
modify the fields selected. The selected fields of existing records
will be modified according to the selections in the Batch Modify
screen, and new records in the badge range will be created with
the selected options if they do not exist.
In a simple example, let's say that you have existing Personnel
badge records with badge numbers of 1, 3 and 5 (there are no
existing badge records with badge numbers of 2 & 4). You select
the 'Create and/or Modify All' option in the How to Handle a
Badge Range section and you also elect to enable the 'Enable'
check box in each badge record.
When you run the utility, it will visit each existing badge record
and change the 'Enabled' field to the enabled state (unless already
enabled). However, when the option is set to 'Create and or
Modify', the utility will create any badge records that are found
missing in the badge range. In the case of our example, the utility
will create badge records for badge numbers 2 & 4, and it will
modify the badge records of badge numbers 1, 3, and 5, which
already exist.
o Create New Only - If the 'Create New' option is selected, the
utility will only create new badge records with the options you
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select. The utility will 'pass over' any existing records that fall
inside the selected badge range without changing them.
In the example above, two new badges would be created (2 & 4),
and the existing badges 1, 3 & 5 would remain unchanged
o Modify Existing Only - If the 'Modify Existing Only' option is
selected, the utility will not create any new badges in the selected
badge range. The utility will only modify existing badge records
with the selected settings
Figure 913 - The Batch Save Range Selection Controls
• Column Functions
Figure 914 - The Batch Save Column Layout
o Item Column - The 'Item' column basically contains a listing of
every field found in the Personnel screen. By default no personnel
fields are included in the batch save. You must select each field
that you wish to include in the batch save by clicking the check
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box adjacent to the field label (see the Include column below)
found in the Item Column field
o Include Column - The 'Include' column contains the check
boxes which are associated with the field labels in the Item
column. You may click any or all check boxes to include the
selected field in the batch save. Check is included, unchecked is
not included
o Value to be Set Column - The 'Value to be Set' column contains
fields that you can use to set a default value for each selected field.
The value selected in the Value to be Set column will be loaded
into the selected control of each personnel record in the selected
badge range. Remember the list of fields shown in the Batch Save
utility actually represents every field found in the Personnel
screen.
As you would expect, some fields in the Personnel screen have
small drop down menu selections available, some fields require
that you type in a value, some fields require that you select a date,
etc. The controls in the Value to be Set column allow you to set a
static value that will be loaded in to the selected fields of every
badge record visited.
If no selection is made in the Value to be Set column for a given
field, the default value as decided by the Batch Save utility will be
loaded into that field.
There are five types of controls found in the Value to be Set
column as follows
!
Spin Field - Usually a numeric field. Click the arrow button
to the right of the field to locate a selection
Figure 915 - A Spin Control Field
!
Text Field - You are expected to type a line of text into a text
field
Figure 916 - A Text Field
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Combo Field - The combo field control displays a list of
choices. Click the arrow to the right of a combo field to
display the list of selections
Figure 917 - A Combo Field Control
!
Check Box Field - Click a check box field to enable an
option (checked is enabled). Check boxes represent 'boolean'
fields of the CardAccess. Boolean fields can be either true or
false. In the CardAccess, boolean fields are most often used to
indicate 'enabled' (true) or 'disabled' (false). Thus, if you want
to enable a feature, check the check box
Figure 918 - A Check Box Field
!
Calendar Field - A calendar field is used to provide a fixed
date value to the selected field. You may manually type in a
date (of the form MM/DD/YY), or you can use the built in
calendar by clicking the button (with the number 15 on it) to
the right of the calendar field control
Figure 919 - A Calendar Field Control
o Batch Criteria Column - The fields found in the 'Batch Criteria'
column are used when you wish to search the personnel records
for a particular value and modify any personnel record where that
value is found. Note that all records that do not have the selected
search criteria will not be altered.
Stated another way, the Batch Modify utility will search every
personnel record for the values set in the fields of the Batch
Criteria column. If any records are found to have the searched for
values, only those records will be changed to the settings that have
been selected in the Batch Save utility 'Include' and 'Value to be
Set' columns. All records not matching the search criteria set in
the Batch Criteria column will not be touched.
There are two types of fields found in the Batch Criteria column
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Combo Field - The combo field control displays a list of
choices. Click the arrow to the right of a combo field to
display the list of selections
Figure 920 – A Combo Field Control
!
Calendar Field - A calendar field is used to provide a fixed
date value to the selected field. You may manually type in a
date (of the form MM/DD/YY), or you can use the built in
calendar by clicking the button (with the number 15 on it) to
the right of the calendar field control
Figure 921 - A Calendar Field Control
• Send Badges to Panels Check Box - As you can well understand,
the Batch Save utility can be used to modify possibly thousands of
personnel records. Some of the changes that are made to those
records could change the access permissions of those badge holders.
This makes it vitally important to get the change information to every
hardware access control panel as soon as possible.
However, in a large system changes to thousands of cards could cause
a massive download that could disable the system for a period of time
until the download has completed. To prevent a possible system lack
of availability due to large scale badge downloads, the system is set up
not to trigger a badge data download at the end of the batch save
operation. This means that you will need to manually download each
panel (or all panels at once) to get the changed personnel data to the
panels (it won't happen automatically). This option allows you to
decide when to download updated badges to the access control
system.
If you prefer to have all changed badge records downloaded
automatically to the panels when the Batch Save utility completes,
click the 'Send Badges to Panels' option check box (checked means
that the utility will trigger a download when completed)
Figure 922 - The Send Badges to Panels Check Box
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• Execute Button - Click the 'Execute' button to start the batch
operation
Figure 923 - The Execute Button
• Cancel Button - Click the 'Cancel' button to stop the batch operation
and close the Batch Save screen. It is strongly recommended that you
do not click the Cancel button during a batch operation. Let the
operation complete to prevent unexpected consequences Figure 14 Figure 924 - The Cancel Button
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PdxSql Utility
Figure 925 - The PdxSQL Utility
The PdxSQL utility is used to transfer database configuration and events
data from legacy CardAccess Paradox version databases, to the current
version CardAccess 3000SQL database. The data is copied from the
Paradox version database and transferred to the SQL database. The
utility is most useful for transferring data from an existing CardAccess
Paradox version to a new CardAccess 3000 software installation.
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Transfer Events from a Paradox Database
To transfer events from a Paradox database, do the following.
• Open the PdxSQL Utility - To open the PdxSQL utility, use
Windows Explorer to open the \CardAccess\Tools folder. Then,
double click the file 'PdxSQL.exe' (you may not see the .exe
extension)
Figure 926 - The CardAccess Tools Folder
• Upgrade the Database - When the PdxSQL utility starts, a message
box is displayed asking you if you wish run DbUpdate first (to
upgrade the database). Note that you must upgrade any Paradox
database that you intend to bring into the CardAccess 3000 SQL
database (if it is not already at version 3.0.2 build 466). Click the OK
button to open the DbUpdate utility. See the manual section entitled
DbUpdate Utility for more information on the operation of the
DbUpdate utility.
Figure 927 - The DbUpdate Warning Box
• Select the Directory - After the DbUpdate utility has been closed,
and control is returned to the PdxSQL utility, select the directory
where the Paradox version source files are located by clicking the
folder icon button on the right side of the 'Directory' field. Locate
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your directory in the browser window that opens. You may also type
in the path to your Paradox database if you prefer.
Figure 928 - The Directory Selection Field
Warning: The default target destination directory for the files copied
by the PdxSQL utility is the CardAccess main database. Be warned
that the destination database cannot be changed in the PdxSQL utility,
and the data in the destination database will be replaced.
• Bring in the Files - Once you have selected the source directory, the
'Get Paradox' button will become available (Figure 817). Click the
button to open the Paradox database. You will note that after you
click the Get Paradox button, a listing of the Paradox database tables
found in the source directory is displayed (Figure 818).
Figure 929 - The Get Paradox Button
Figure 930 - The Table View Window
• Select the Files - You have two options.
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o Transfer One Table - This is the default setting of the utility. If
you click any database table listed in the left side table view
window (and highlight that file name), you can then transfer the
contents of that one table to the SQL database by clicking the
'Transfer Data to SQL' button. The contents of the selected table
will be transferred only, and the data found in the source database
table will overwrite the data in the target table in the CardAccess
3000 main database (use with caution, there is no undo feature)
o Transfer All Tables - There may be approximately 38 tables in
the source Paradox database. Since transferring them to the SQL
database one at a time would be tedious, the 'Select All' check box
is provided as a means of selecting all of the files that are visible in
the Table View Window for transfer in one operation (as opposed
to individually, as above). To set the option to transfer all database
tables, click the 'Select All' check box (Figure 819)
Figure 931- The Select All Check Box
• Click Transfer - Click the 'Transfer Data to SQL' button (Figure
820) to begin the data transfer. You will get a warning message box
(Figure 821) that you are about to overwrite the data in the target
database (which is the CardAccess 3000 main SQL database). Click
the 'Yes' button to continue, click the 'No' button to cancel the
request without starting the copy operation
• Figure 932 - The Transfer Data to SQL Button
Figure 933 - The Data Transfer Warning Message Box
• Observe the Result - When the transfer operation has completed,
you will get a 'Transfer Complete' message box (Figure 822). Click the
'Ok' button on that box to close it and observe that the PdxSQL
utility has posted the status of the data transfer attempt for each table
encountered (Figure 823).
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Figure 934- The Transfer Complete Message Box
Figure 935- The Table Transfer Window - Select All Results Shown
PdxSQL Controls
• Table View Window - When you select a database to view in the
'Directory' field (see below), and you click the 'Get Paradox' button
(see below), a listing of the database tables found in the source
Paradox database is displayed in the left side 'Table View Window'
(Figure 824)
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Figure 936 - The Table View Window
• Transfer Status Window - When you run the PdxSQL utility (by
clicking the 'Transfer Data to SQL' button), the utility posts the results
of the data transfer in the right side 'Table Status Window' (Figure
825)
Figure 937 - The Table Status Window
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• Info Button - Clicking the 'Info' button (Figure 826) brings up the
utility information window (Figure 827), which displays information
about the utility version and general database information. Note that
the target database is shown in this information window
Figure 938 - The Info Button
Figure 939 - The PdxSQL Information Screen
• Select All Check Box - Click the 'Select All' check box (Figure 828)
to select all of the data files listed in the Table View Window. By
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default, no tables are selected unless you click on them. When you run
the utility with one table selected, only the contents of that table are
moved. To move the contents of all the tables shown in the Table
View Window in one operation, click the Select All check box
Figure 940 - The Select All Check Box
• Directory Field - The Directory field (Figure 829) is where you will
select the source directory. This is the directory where the Paradox
source database is located. Click the picture of the folder to the right
of the Directory field to open a file browser, or type in the fully
qualified path
Figure 941 - The Directory Field
• Get Paradox Button - Click the get Paradox button (Figure 830)
after you have selected a source database in the Directory field
(mentioned above) to have the PdxSQL utility connect to the source
directory, open the source Paradox database and list the tables found
in that database
Figure 942- The Get Paradox Button
• Transfer Data to SQL Button - Click the 'Transfer Data to SQL'
button (Figure 831) to begin the data transfer from the source
Paradox database to the target SQL database. Note that the data from
the source database will overwrite the data in the target database
Figure 943 - The Transfer to SQL Button
• Close Button - Clicking the 'Close' button (Figure 832) will close the
PdxSQL utility. Do not click the Close button while a file transfer is in
progress, database corruption can result
Figure 944 - The Close Button
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• Progress Bar - The Progress Bar indicates the progress of the file
copy procedure. When complete, the progress bar will indicate 100
percent (Figure 833)
Figure 945 - The PdxSQL Progress Bar - Showing Completion
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SqlDbExplorer Utility
Figure 946 - The SqlDbExplorer Utility - Not Connected to Any
Database
The SqlDbExplorer utility allows you to view the contents of the
CardAccess SQL database tables outside of the CardAccess software. For
those of you familiar with the older Paradox version of the original
CardAccess software, the SqlDbExplorer utility operates very much like
the Borland utility 'DbExplorer32'.
Run the SqlDbExplorer Utility
Essentially, to use the SqlDbExplorer utility the steps are as follows.
• Select a Server - You need to select a server in the 'Server Name'
field (Figure 811). By default, the name of the CardAccess main
database server will be loaded into the Server Name field. If you wish
to view the database tables of a different server, type in the UNC
name of that server (without slashes)
Figure 947 - The Server Name field
• Select a Database - You need to type a database name into the
'Database Name' field (Figure 812). You will select a CardAccess
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compatible database known to be active and on the target server
mentioned in the Server Name field mentioned above. The database
must have been 'attached' to the SQL server previously
Figure 948 - The Database Name Field
• Connect to the Database - Now that you have selected a server and
a database on that server, you need to connect the utility to that server.
Click the 'Connect' button to connect to the target database (Figure
813). If all was successful, you will see the left side panel of the screen
fill up with database table names (Figure 814).
Figure 949 - The Connect Button
Figure 950 - The SqlDbExplorer Utility Successfully Connected to a
Database
• Select a Table to View - Once you have successfully connected to a
server SQL database, click any file in the left windowpane. The
contents of the selected database table will appear in the right side
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window (on the 'Table' tab). See Figure 815. You can now view and
edit the table contents outside of the CardAccess software
Figure 951 - The SqlDbExplorer Utility Table Selected - Table
Contents Displayed
SQLDbExplorer Controls
Each of the SqlDbExplorer controls is explained below.
• Server Name - The 'Server Name' field is where you will type in the
name of the server that you wish to have the SqlDbExplorer utility
connect to
Figure 952 - The Server Name Field
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• Database Name - The 'Database Name' field is where you will type
in the name of the database that you wish to have the SqlDbExplorer
utility connect to
Figure 953 - The Database Name Field
• Connect - Clicking the 'Connect' button causes the SqlDbExplorer
utility to attempt to connect to the server and database named in the
'Server Name' and 'Database Name' fields
Figure 954 - The Connect Button
• Database Table List Window Pane - After you click the 'Connect'
button, the SqlDbExplorer utility attempts to connect to the server
database named in the 'Database Name' field. If that connection is
successful, a list of database table names is displayed in the Database
Table List Window Pane (the left window pane, Figure 819)
Figure 955 - The Database Table List Window Pane
• Table Tab - The 'Table' tab displays the records that are stored in the
selected table. When you click a table name in the left windowpane,
the SqlDbExplorer utility sends an SQL 'select * from [selected table]'
query to the SQL server. The results of that query are displayed in the
Table tab. If no records are returned, it means that the table has no
records
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Figure 956 - The Table Tab
• SQL Tab - The SQL tab of the SqlDbExplorer utility allows you to
type in an SQL query and retrieve a set of records based on your
search string. Any Transact SQL statement is accepted
Figure 957 - The SqlDbExplorer SQL Tab - With Query and
Returned Records
To run an SQL query, do the following.
o Click the SQL Tab - Click the SQL tab to reach the SQL
statement entry area
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Figure 958 - The SQL Tab
o Type in a Query Statement - In the white space below the SQL
tab, type in an SQL query statement. Any Transact SQL
command is accepted. Be especially careful with 'Delete' and
'Update' statements!
o Click the Query Run Button - Clicking the 'Query Run' button
(Figure 823) will cause the utility to send the SQL statement you
typed to the SQL server for processing. When the query is
completed, you will see a completion message box (Figure 824).
Click the 'Ok' button in the message box and you will see the
query results displayed in the white space under the SQL
statement (on the SQL tab)
Figure 959 - The Query Run Button
Figure 960 - The Query Completion Message Box
o Navigation Bar - The records Navigation Bar is used to locate or
edit records in the records view window on the Table tab. There
are ten buttons whose functions are explained below
Figure 961 - The SqlDbExplorer Navigation Bar
o Top Button - Click the 'Top' button to zoom to the first record
in the records view window (Table tab)
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Figure 962 - The Top Button
o Up Button - Each click of the 'Up' button will scroll the highlight
bar up exactly one record in the records view window (Table Tab)
Figure 963 - The Up Button
o Down Button - Each click of the 'Down' button will scroll the
highlight bar down exactly one record in the records view window
(Table Tab)
Figure 964 - The Down Button
o Bottom Button - Click the 'Bottom' button to zoom to the last
record in the records view window (Table tab)
Figure 965 - The Bottom Button
o Add Button - Clicking the 'Add' button will create a new blank
record in the currently selected space in the table. The utility will
also be put into edit mode so you can enter values into the fields
of the new record. You must click the 'Save' button as mentioned
below to commit the new record addition to the online database
Figure 966 - The Add Button
o Delete Button - Clicking the 'Delete' button will delete the
currently highlighted record in the right hand records view
window
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Figure 967 - The Delete Button
o Edit Button - Click the 'Edit' button if you wish to edit individual
database records. First you must highlight the database table that
you wish to edit by clicking on it in the left hand database table list
window. Next you must locate the record that you wish to edit
and click on it. Then you can click the Edit button to put the
utility into edit mode. Once you are in edit mode, you can edit any
records that you wish. Note that because you are working on an
off line copy of the database, any changes that you make to
individual records will not be committed to the online database
until you click the 'Save' button mentioned below
Figure 968 - The Edit Button
o Save Button - The 'Save' button commits the changes to records
that you have made since clicking the Edit button. The data that is
viewed in the SqlDbExplorer window is a static off line 'snapshot'
of the database. Changes to individual records are not committed
to the online database until you click the Save button
Figure 969 - The Save Button
o Cancel Button - If you have entered edit mode by clicking the
Edit button as mentioned above, you may exit without
committing changes by clicking the 'Cancel' button
Figure 970 - The Cancel Button
o Refresh Button - The 'Refresh' button causes the SqlDbExplorer
utility to access the database and refresh the contents of the
SqlDbExplorer view window. When you open the
SqlDbExplorer window and connect to a given database, the
SqlDbExplorer window take a 'snapshot' of the data from the
selected database. Since you are viewing a static off line snapshot
of the database, changes that occur to the database are not
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reflected in the SqlDbExplorer view windows unless you 'refresh'
the view. The Refresh button forces the utility to reload the data
from the selected database, providing a more current view
Figure 971 - The Refresh Button
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Reports
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Print Preview Screen
Figure 1 - The Print Preview Screen
Figure 972
The Print Preview screen is available from a button, usually marked
'Preview' that is available in all of the CardAccess report screens. The
print preview allows you to see what a report will look like before
printing (or look at it on the screen instead of printing it). Generally, you
select your report filtering criteria then click the Preview button. The
reports engine will query the CardAccess database for records that match
your search criteria, then a preview window will open that displays the
data found (if any).
Once the preview screen has opened, you have a control toolbar with the
following functions available.
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Zoom Controls
Figure 973 - The Print Preview Navigation Controls - Zoom to Width
Selected
Note that the aspect ratio (ratio of width to height) of the report image is
always maintained in the view window. The dimensions and orientation
in the printer setup determine the print preview orientation and
dimensions. However, you do have some control over the relative size of
the document as it appears in the view window. There are three 'zoom'
controls as explained below
• Zoom to Fit - The preview image page is resized to fit equally within
the width and height of the current window size. The document
aspect ratio will be maintained, so the preview document will be made
to fit the smallest dimension (width or height)
• 100 % - Zooms the preview image to a full 8.5 x 11 size. This button
allows you to read the document by making it full size. Note that 8.5 x
11 is the default size, but if you have another size set in your printer
setup, this zoom will zoom to the size of your current page setting in
the printer settings of the printer selected in the CardAccess System
Settings 'Report Printer' field
• Zoom to Width - This button links the report display size to the size
of width of the display window. As you stretch the report display
window wider, the page display also follows with the width increase.
The report display aspect ratio is maintained so as you stretch wider,
the height of the report can exceed the height of the display window
and bring up a scroll bar. The Zoom to Width setting is the default
when you first open the preview window
Navigation Controls
Figure 974 - The Print Preview Screen Navigation Controls
The navigation controls allow you to page through a report when the
report has returned more than one page. There are several buttons on to
toolbar as follows.
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• First Page - Zooms to the fist page of the report
• Previous Page - Zooms to the previous page number (zooms
'left')
• Next Page - Zooms to the next page number (zooms 'right')
• Last Page - Zooms to the last page of the report
• Go to Page - Allows you to zoom to a specific page of the report.
Click the 'Go to Page' button and fill the page number in to the
message box that appears (Figure 888)
Figure 975 -The Go to Page Message Box
Printing Controls
Figure 976 - The Print Preview Screen Printing Controls
• Printer Setup - Clicking the 'Printer Setup' button brings up the
configuration settings page for the CardAccess report printer. You can
change the operational setting before printing from this control
• Print - Clicking the 'Print' button sends the report to the printer. This
is the printer that was selected as the report printer in the CardAccess
System Settings
File Controls
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Figure 977 - The Print Preview Screen File Controls
You can save the results of a report search as a file and recall it again in a
preview window. The controls that perform those functions are
explained below.
• Save as Report - If you wish to save the results of the report search
as a file, click the 'Save as Report' button and give the file a descriptive
name
• Load Report - If you have saved any report files, this button will
allow you to open a report file and view it in the print preview
window
Status Bar
Figure 978 - The Print Preview Status Bar
The status bar displays the total number of pages returned from the
database based on your search criteria (this will be the actual number of
printed pages). Also displayed is the page number of the page that is
currently being viewed
Close the Report Preview
Figure 979 - The Print Preview Close Button
• Close - Click the Close button to close the print preview window.
Alternately, you may also click the close button at the top right of the
print preview window (the button with the 'x')
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Access Group Report
Figure 980 – Access Group Report Screen
The Access Group Report is used whenever it is necessary to review or
print the readers and schedules associated with each Access Group.
Create a Basic Access Group Report
• Open AccessGroups3000.exe – Open the Report screen by clicking
the AccessGroups3000.exe shortcut available in the Reports/Other
Reports menu
• All Groups – Put a check in the checkbox next to “All Groups”
• Access Group Range – Leave the default setting of 1-thru 1000
• Report Title – Enter a Report Title for your report in the textbox
next to “Report Title”
• Start New Page for each Access Group – Leave unchecked
• Click Preview or Print – If you wish to preview your report before
printing, click Preview. Otherwise, go right to Print
You have just created a basic Access Groups report for all groups.
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Access Group Report Screen Controls
A detailed explanation of the Access Groups screen follows.
• All Groups
Figure 981 – The All Groups Section
This checkbox gives the user the ability to include all Access Groups
in the report. Placing a checkmark in the All Access Group checkbox
will automatically set the “Access Group” dropdown box to “No
Filter”.
• Access Group
Figure 982– The Access Group screen section
The Access Group drop down box gives the user the ability to select a
single Access Group to report on. Clicking the down arrow in the
“Access Group” drop down box will give you a list of all Access
Groups for your selection
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• Acc Group Range
Figure 983 – The Acc Group Range screen section
The Acc Group Range gives the user the ability to enter a range of
Access Groups to report on. You enter the range by directly entering
the value into the text box or by using the arrows to select a value.
The maximum Access Groups the system can have is 1000.
• Report Title
Figure 984 – The Report Title Box Screen Section
The Report Title textbox gives the user the ability to enter a custom
name for a report
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• Start New Page for Each Access Group
Figure 985 – The Start New Page for Each Access Group checkbox
screen section
.
This checkbox gives the user the ability to print a new page for each
Access Group in the report. Placing a checkmark in the checkbox will
enable this feature
• Preview
Figure 986 – The Preview Report screen
The preview button gives the user the ability to preview the report
before printing it. To preview the report, click on the Preview button.
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• Print
The print button gives the user the ability to print the report to the
currently selected Report printer. To print the report, click on the
Print button.
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Alert Response Report
The Alert Response report is used to preview or create a hard copy print
out of the Operator Alert Responses that have been attached to events
and have been archived in the CardAccess database.
Create a Basic Alert Response Report
To create an Alert Response report, do the following:
• Open the Alerts Response Report – Open the Alert Response
report screen by clicking the AlertResponse3000.exe shortcut available
in the Reports/Other Reports menu. This action will display the
screen displayed in Figure 987
Figure 987 – Alert Response Preview/Print screen
• Preview – If you wish to see a preview before printing, click the
Preview button. A report will display listing of all of the alert
responses stored in the CardAccess database
Figure 988 – The Preview Button
• Print – Click the Print button to get a hard copy of the report. The
report will print out on the printer selected in the System Settings
screen, in the Report Printer field (see the manual section entitled
‘System Settings’ for more information)
Figure 989 – The Print Button
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Badges Report
Figure 990 – The Badges.exe Report Personnel screen
The Badges.exe Report allows the user to generate a report on any
information regarding a badge holder that has been entered in the
Personnel section of the CardAccess software.
Note: This is not an activity report.
The Badges.exe report consists of two sections separated by two tabs on
the top-left hand side of the screen.
The Personnel section (See Figure 990) is comprised of a series of filter
options, which the user may utilize to narrow the report when looking
for specific information about a badge holder or badge holders. As in
other reports, if no filters are selected, the report will display all
information related to the all badge holders contained in the CardAccess
database.
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Figure 991 – The Badges.exe Report Access List screen
The Access List function is to show the relationship of badge holders and readers in the
system. In other words, this report shows when and where a badge holder may enter the
building or buildings. By using the filters (See Figure 991) the user may filter the report to
retrieve only the information that is needed.
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Create a Basic Badges (Personnel) Report
To create a basic Badges report using the Personnel section, do the
following.
Note: In this example, we will not be utilizing any filters to create this
report.
• Open the Badges Report – Open the Badges report by clicking the
Badges.exe shortcut, available under the Reports/Other Reports
menu.
• Personnel – Select the Personnel section by clicking the tab labeled
Personnel in the upper left-hand side of the Report screen
• Select Preview or Print – The default settings will yield a report
which will include all badge holders and all their information that has
been entered in the General section of the Personnel screen
• Access List – Select the Access List section by clicking the tab labeled
‘Access List’ in the upper left-hand side of the Report screen.
Complete one (1) of the following bulleted steps below to create a
report.
o Personnel Access List for a Reader
! Click the Checkbox – Click the arrow adjacent to the Reader
Description field. Select a Reader by clicking on it. The selected
Reader should appear in the Reader Description field and a
check will appear in the Access List checkbox. See the section
on Personnel Access List for a Reader below for detailed
information.
Figure 992 – The Personnel Access List for a Reader screen
! Click Preview or Print – The report should yield a list of badge
holders that have access to the reader that was previously
selected.
o Access List for Badgeholder
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! Click the arrow adjacent to the Badgeholder Name field. Select
a badgeholder by clicking on it. The selected Badgeholder
should appear in the Badgeholder Name field and a check will
appear in the Reader List checkbox. See the section on Access
List for Badgeholder below for detailed information.
Figure 993 – The Access List for Badgeholder screen
! Click Preview or Print. The report should yield a list of readers
that the selected badgeholder has access to.
o Personnel Access Group List
! Click the checkbox adjacent to the Access Group field. Select an access group
by clicking on it. The selected access Group should appear in the Access Group
field and a check will appear in the Access Group List checkbox. See the section
on Personnel Access Group List below for detailed information.
Figure 994 – The Personnel Access Group List screen
! Click Preview or Print. The report should yield a list of badge holders that
have the selected Access Group assigned to them.
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Badges Report Screen Controls
A detailed view of each of the Badges report screen controls follows
Note: The filters below may be used alone or in conjunction with other filters on this
screen.
• Badge Numbers
Figure 995 – The Badge Numbers range selection screen
The Badge Numbers selection field allows the user to select a range of badge numbers
in which to report on. By default this option is de-selected. To activate this feature,
click the checkbox adjacent to the Badge Numbers text. Then enter the numeric value
for the badge range you are interested in.
• Access Group
Figure 996 – The Access Group filter
The Access Group field is used whenever the user needs to report on
badge holders in a particular Access Group and filter out all badge
holders from other Access Groups. Click the arrow adjacent to the
Access Group window. Select the Access Group you wish to report
on by clicking on it. The selected Access Group should appear in the
Access Group window.
• Groups
Figure 997 – The Groups filter
The Groups field is used whenever the user needs to report on badge
holders from a particular personnel Group and filter out all badge
holders from other personnel Groups. Click the arrow adjacent to the
Group window. Select the Group you wish to report on by clicking
on it. The selected Group should appear in the Group window.
Note: Since Groups are not a required programming element
necessary for system operation; there may be no Groups in this list to
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choose from. See the manual chapter entitled ‘Personnel’ for more
information.
• Department
Figure 998 – The Department filter
The Department field is used whenever the user needs to report on
badge holders from a particular Department and filter out all badge
holders from other Departments. Click the arrow adjacent to the
Department window. Select the Department you wish to report on by
clicking on it. The selected Department should appear in the
Department window.
Note: Since Departments are not a required programming element
necessary for system operation; there may be no Departments in this
list to choose from. See the manual chapter entitled ‘Personnel’ for
more information.
• Location
Figure 999 – The Location filter
The Location field is used whenever the user needs to report on badge holders from a
particular Location and filter out all badge holders from other Locations. Click the
arrow adjacent to the Location window. Select the Location you wish to report on by
clicking on it. The selected Location should appear in the Location window.
Note: Since Locations are not a required programming element necessary for system
operation; there may be no Locations in this list to choose from. See the section on
Personnel for detailed information.
• Alarm Shunt Group
Figure 1000 – The Alarm Shunt Group filter
The Alarm Shunt Group field is used whenever the user needs to report on badge
holders from a particular Alarm Shunt Group and filter out all badge holders from
other Alarm Shunt Groups. Click the arrow adjacent to the Alarm Shunt Grp window.
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Select the Alarm Shunt Group you wish to report on by clicking on it. The selected
Alarm Shunt Group should appear in the Location window.
Note: Since Alarm Shunt Groups are not a required programming element necessary
for system operation; there may be no Alarm Shunt Groups in this list to choose from.
See the section on Personnel for detailed information.
• Selection Filters
Figure 1001 – The Selection Filters screen
The Selection Filters section of the badges report is comprised of a list
options pertaining to badgeholder programming. Once a filter is
chosen with a checkmark, only that filter will be used to create the
report.
Example: If Enabled is checked, only those badge holder’s with active
enabled cards will appear on the report.
A description of each filter follows
o Enabled/Disabled – Refers to whether or not a badgeholder is
active in the system.
o Resident/NonResident – Refers to whether or not the
badgeholder is stored at the panel level. See Stay on Panel portion
of the Personnel section for detailed information.
o Escorted – Refers to whether or not a badge holder’s card is
programmed as escorted. See the Escorted portion of the
Personnel section for detailed information.
o Door Shunting – Refers to whether or not a badgeholder is
assigned to a Door Shunting Group. See the Alarm Shunt Control
portion of the Personnel section for detailed information.
• Date Ranges
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Figure 1002 – The Date Ranges screen
The Date Ranges screen allows the user to report on badge holders by using specific
dates for certain options. Simply check the option you with to report on and then
enter a start date and an end date in the windows provided.
o Activation – With this option checked the user has the ability to find badge holders
that had their cards activated (Enabled) within the time frame specified in the date
screen. See the Personnel section for detailed information.
o Deactivation – With this option checked the user has the ability to find badge
holders that had their cards deactivated (Disabled) within the timeframe specified in
the date screen. See the Personnel section for detailed information.
o Hire – With this option checked the user has the ability to find badge holders that
were hired within the timeframe specified in the date screen. See the Personnel
section for detailed information.
o Last Edited – With this option checked the user has the ability to find badge
holders that had their personnel information edited within the timeframe specified
in the date screen. See the Personnel section for detailed information.
o Unused – With this option checked the user has the ability to find badge holders
that have no presented their cards to any reader in the system within the timeframe
specified in the date screen. See the Personnel section for detailed information.
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• Output
Figure 1003 – The Output screen
The Output screen allows the user to customize how the report is
printed by specifying how it will be sorted. It also allows the user to
assign a custom Report Title.
Figure 1004 – The Primary and Secondary Sort window drop down
list
o Primary Sort – Click the arrow adjacent to the Primary Sort
window. A drop-down list will appear (See Figure 15). Select the
item you wish to use as the primary sort item by clicking on it. The
selected item should appear highlighted in the Primary Sort
window. When the report is run, this item will appear in the first
column.
o Secondary Sort – Click the arrow adjacent to the Secondary Sort
window. A drop-down list will appear (See Figure 15). Select the
time you wish to use as the secondary sort item by clicking on it.
The selected item should appear highlighted in the Secondary Sort
window. When the report is run, this item will appear in the second
column.
o Report Title – Enter the text you wish to use for the title of the
report. The title can be as long or as short as necessary.
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• Report Content
Figure 1005 – The Report Content Screen
The Report Content Screen allows the user to select how much information will be
included when a report is run.
o Minimal – When this option is selected the report will contain only the
information that has been entered in the General portion of the Personnel screen.
See the Personnel section for detailed Information
o With Personal Data – When this option is selected the report will contain the
Minimal data as well as any data that has been entered in the Personal portion of
the Personnel screen. See the Personnel section for detailed information
o All Data – When this option is selected the report will contain the Minimal and
Personal data as well as all the information entered in the custom portion of the
Personnel screen. See the System Settings and Personnel sections for detailed
information
• Other Search Criteria
Figure 1006 – The Other Search Criteria screen
The Other Search Criteria screen allows the user to narrow the report
even further by using personnel fields from the database. Depending
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on the report requirements, the user can setup one or multiple
operations for this feature to yield the proper results. To start, click
the arrow adjacent to the Field window. A drop-down list will appear
with all options related to Personnel (See Figure 18).
Figure 1007 – The Field option drop-down list
To select the field you would like to use to filter your report, click on
it. The selected field will be displayed in the Field window. Next, click
the arrow adjacent to the Condition window. A drop-down list will
appear with the following options. (See Figure 19)
Figure 1008 – The Condition window
The Condition window is used to determine the relationship between
the Field setting we are using and the value setting of the condition
o Equal (=) – Using this symbol yields results that are equal to the
setting in the Value field.
Example 1 – Using Badge as the Field and 125 as the value, the
resulting report will only contain information for Badgeholder
number 125
o Greater Than or Equal To (>=) – Using this symbol yields results that are
greater than or equal to the setting in the Value field.
Example 2 – Using example 1 above, the resulting report will contain information
for badge holders 125 and higher
o Less Than (<) – Using this symbol yields results that are less than the setting in
the Value field.
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Example 3 – Using example 1 above, the resulting report will contain information
for badge holders 124 and lower
o Greater Than (>)– Using this symbol yields results that are greater than the setting
in the Value field.
Example 4 – Using example 1 above, the resulting report will contain information
for badge holders 126 and higher
o Less Than or Equal To (<=) – Using this symbol yields results that are less than
or equal to the setting in the value field.
Example – Using example 1 above, the resulting report will contain information for
badge holders 125 and lower
o Not Equal To (<>) -Using this symbol yields results that are less than and greater
than but not equal to the setting in the value field.
Example – Using example 1 above, the resulting report will contain information for
badge holders 124 and lower and 126 and higher
o Like and Containing– Using these symbols yields results that are
similar to the setting in the value field. This is commonly used
when searching for a name field but you are not sure exactly how
the name is spelled.
Example – We are looking for a badgeholder named John Smith.
Using Last Name as the Field and Like as the Condition we can
enter SM for the value. The resulting report will yield all badge
holders with last names starting with SM
• Logical Operation
Figure 1009 – The Logical Operation screen
The Logical Operation field allows the user to create interaction
between each expression that is created. By using the settings above
properly, the resulting report should contain only the information the
user was looking for. These settings will only become highlighted and
selectable after the first expression is accepted by the report. This is
done by creating the first expression and clicking the Accept button
(See Figure 1009).
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o And – When an expression is prefaced with this setting it requires
the system to include information from the expression before it
and after it. In other words, the system must match the badge
holders information to both expressions A and B and include it in
the report
o Or – When an expression is prefaced with this setting it requires
the system to include information from either expression. The
system must match the badge holders information to either
expression A or B in order for that badgeholder to be included in
the report
o And Not – When an expression is prefaced with this setting it
requires the system to leave out any badgeholder that has
information matching that of the expression that follows. The
system will try to match information from expression A and B. If it
matches both, it will exclude the badgeholder from the report. If it
only matches A the badgeholder will be included in the report
o Or Not – When an expression is prefaced with this setting it
requires the system to include information from either expression
with one exception. If the system matches the badge holder’s
information from expression A, it will not look to expression B.
However, if the system matches no information from expression
A, it will look for a match for expression B.
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Event Report
Figure 1010 – The Events Report Screen
The events report is used to create a hard copy history report of event
activity. Archived event data that has been saved either to the online
database or to an archive database can be accessed by the Events report
engine.
Note that the CardAccess software has an events archive engine that
regularly purges the online database of older events. This enhances
system performance by off-loading excess data that could degrade the
database system performance.
The fact that event history data is regularly being off-loaded from the
online database means that archive data for a report may be found in the
online database or it may be found in an archive database. The event
report does allow you to connect to any SQL server or MSDE database
engine (as long as they are registered with the local SQL server) and
attach the report to any valid online or archive CardAccess database for
the purposes of running a report.
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Create a Basic Event Report
To create a basic Event report, do the following
• Open the Events Report – Open the Events report by clicking the
‘Reports’ button on the CardAccess main toolbar. Once the reports
screen is open, click the ‘Other Reports’ tab, and double click the
‘Events3000.exe’ report executable file visible in the list of files in the
window
Figure 1011 – The Other Reports Folder Tab – Events Report
Highlighted
• Select a Database – The report is defaulted to generate the Events
report using the currently active online events database. If you are
running a report on recent events that are likely to be included in the
online Events database, you do not need to set a database path.
However, if you intend to run a report on older archived events, you
will need to ‘point’ the Events report engine to the archive database
that you need to run the history report from.
To change the report database, do the following.
o Click the Setup Tab – Click the Setup tab on the lower left
corner of the report.
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Figure 1012 – The Event Report Setup Tab
o Click the Check Box – Click the Use Alternate Database check
box
Figure 1013 – The Use Alternate Database Checkbox
o Select Server Name – Note that by default, the report engine is
connected to the CardAccess main database server. Thus, when
you open the report, the ‘Archive Server Name’ field will display
the name of the current CardAccess database server.
Click the arrow to the right of the ‘Archive Server Name’ control
to display the names of all of the servers that have databases
connected to the local SQL server
Figure 1014 – The Server Name Selection Control
o Select Database Name – Once you have successfully connected
to the server selected in the ‘Archive Server Name’ field, the
Events report engine will fill the ‘Database Name’ field with the
names of all of the databases found on that server.
You can click the arrow to the right of the Database Name
selection control to display the list of databases found. You must
be careful to select a CardAccess compatible database. The list of
databases shown contains all the active SQL databases on the
server, not the CardAccess compatible databases alone
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Figure 1015 – The Database Name Selection Control
o Confirm Connection – After you select a database in the
‘Database Name’ field, the Event report engine will automatically
attempt to connect to the server and database that you have
selected.
If the database connection attempt is successful, you will get a
flashing green indicator (Figure 1016) to the right of the Database
Name field. The words ‘Connected to Event’ will also be displayed
to the right of the indicator.
Figure 1016 – The Successful Connection Indicator
If the database connection attempt is unsuccessful, you will get a
flashing red indicator (Figure 1017) to the right of the Database
Name field. The words ‘Not Connected’ will also be displayed to
the right of the indicator.
Figure 1017 – The Unsuccessful Connection Indicator
• Create a Report Title – You can give your report a descriptive title
in the ‘Report Title Field’. Click in the white space and add your title
Figure 1018 – The Report Title Field
•
Select the Report Type – There are two folder tabs that allow
you to select the report type.
o General Tab – The ‘General’ tab contains selections that allow
you to generate a report that returns events that have been
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generated by CardAccess hardware like, door messages, input
messages, panel messages, etc.
o Personnel Tab – The ‘Personnel’ tab contains selections that
allow you to generate a report on various type of valid or violation
badge messages
If you make no filter selections on the General or Personnel tabs, the
report will return all events found in the target events database. In a
case where there are many events in the database it is wiser to narrow
the data search to create a smaller report.
First you must decide what type of events you are searching for a
report on. If you are searching for information on a badge holder,
click the Personnel tab. If you seek a report on hardware status
messages such as panel downloads, input abnormals and the like,
select the General tab
• Select the Filters – If you select no filters, by default the report
engine will return all events. If you wish to narrow your search to
create a smaller and more succinct report, you must select ‘filters’.
All of the check boxes on the General and Personnel folder tabs exist
for one reason – to allow you to focus your report on certain key data.
Generally, to select a filter, click on the check box for that filter item.
You are allowed to combine as many or few of those filter items as
you prefer. Each checked item will be treated with a logical ‘AND’
operator (if it’s this AND that And that, etc)
• Select a Date Range – If you do not select a date range, by default
the report engine will return results from every day that is included the
database.
To select a date range that will limit the results returned by the report
to the date range selected, click the button to the right of the ‘Date’
fields and select a date from the calendar controls that open
Figure 1019 – The Date Range Selection Controls
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• Select the Sort Criteria – When the default printed report displays
on the screen or is printed to a printer, it is printed in date occurrence
order. You can elect to sort the report in an order that is different
from the default by using the ‘Sort Criteria’ controls available on the
General and Personnel Tabs
Figure 1020 – The General Tab Sort Criteria Section
Figure 1021 – The Personnel Tab Sort Criteria Section
• Preview the Report – To save paper printing a report that possibly
contains the wrong data, it is suggested that elect to view a preview of
the report.
You can view a preview by clicking the ‘Preview’ button.
Figure 1022 – The Preview Button
• Print the Report – To print the report click the Print button
Figure 1023 – The Print Button
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Events Report Screen Controls
A detailed view of each of the Events report screen controls follows
Setup Tab
The ‘Setup’ tab is where you will tell the Events report the name of the
database you intend to search. The Events report engine will connect to
the requested database and search the events table of that database to
create your report.
• Use Alternate Database
Figure 1024 – The Setup Tab Use Alternate Database Check Box
• Archive Server Name
Figure 1025 – The Setup Tab Archive Server Name Field
If you wish to connect to a different server to run a report on an
archive CardAccess database, type the name of the server in the
‘Archive Server Name’ control. The selection in this field defaults to
the server name set up in the CardAccess utility ‘DbConnect’ (the
CardAccess main database)
• Database Name
Figure 1026 – The Setup Tab Database Name Selection Field
If there is server name supplied in the ‘Archive Server Name’ field, the
‘Database Name’ field will allow you to connect to a database on that
server. The Database name field is automatically populated with the
names of all databases that are registered with the SQL server
mounted on the server defined in the Archive Server Name field
mentioned above.
Warning – The list displayed in this control includes all the
SQL databases registered with the target server. You must be
careful to select a CardAccess compatible database.
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When you make a selection in the Database Name control, the Events
report engine will attempt to connect to that database immediately. A
flashing indicator will appear to the right of the Database Name field
to indicate the success or failure of the connection attempt (as seen in
Figure 1027 and Figure 1028). The report will not run unless you have
connection success.
Figure 1027 – The Connection Success Indicator
Figure 1028 – The Connection Failure Indicator
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Common Tab
• Date Range Section
Figure 1029 – The Common Tab Date Range Section
The ‘Date Range’ section is where you will set the time and date limits
for the event report engine. When no time or date is supplied, the
report engine will return all events that match the other filter criteria
(if supplied) and ignore the date.
If a date is supplied and no time range is supplied, all events from the
selected days will be returned. If a date range is supplied and a time
range is supplied, the report will return the date range requested and
the report will be limited to those hours requested. See below for
more details
o Date
Figure 1030 – The Common Tab Date Range Selection Controls
The ‘Date’ selection controls are used to select the date range of
the search. The field on the left is the start date and the field on the
right is the end date.
If you select the same date for the start date and the end date, the
report will span one day only (midnight to midnight unless you
select a time range in the ‘Between Hours’ controls. See below).
To select a date, click the button to the right of each field or click
in the white space and type a date in the format mm/dd/yyyy
o Between Hours
Figure 1031 – The Common Tab Between Hours Time Selection
Controls
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The ‘Between Hours’ selection controls work in conjunction with
the ‘Contiguous Time Range’ control mentioned below. The
Between Hours fields set the start and end time end points that the
events report engine will use when searching the database for
events that match the report filter criteria.
If no selection is made in the Between Hours controls, the report
o Contiguous Time Range
Figure 1032 – The Common Tab Contiguous Time Range Check
Box
When you select a time range for your report using the ‘Between
Hours’ selection controls, the Events report engine assumes that
you wish to print out all events that occurred between the hours
indicated, on the dates indicated in the ‘Date’ field.
For example, if you select 9am as the start time and 5pm as the end
time, the standard report will return all events that occurred
between the hours of 9 and 5 on each of the days included in the
data range selected. Any events that occur before 9am and after
5pm on any day are excluded from the report.
If you select the ‘Contiguous Time Range’ option, the Events
report engine will return all of the events that occurred between the
hours of 9am on the first day, all the way through to 5pm on the
last day. All events that occurred each hour of the day between the
date and time end points are included.
To enable the Contiguous Time Range, click the check box.
Checked is enabled, unchecked is disabled (the default)
• Show Alert Response Messages
Figure 1033 – The Common Tab Show Alert Response Messages
Field
Normally, alert responses are suppressed in all reports. Alert
Responses are saved in the database when an operator manually
acknowledges an alert and enters a text message describing an alert.
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If you select the ‘Show Alert Response Messages’ option, each event
that has an associated alert response message will have that message
printed on the same page as the event.
Click on the Show Alert Response Messages check box to enable the
feature. Checked is enabled, unchecked is disabled
• Report Title
Figure 1034 – The Common Tab Report Title Field
The Report Title field is where you can create a title for your report
that will appear on the top of the report when printed. To enter a title,
click in the white space and type your title
• Select Device Section
o Dev Type
Figure 1035 – The Common Tab Device Type Selection Field
The ‘Dev Type’ field of the ‘Select Device’ section is used to select
a hardware filter for your event report. By default, the event report
will return all events for all devices unless you limit the result set by
selecting filters.
The Dev Type field offers you a list of the hardware device types
so you can select one of those device types to narrow your search.
To select a device, click the arrow to the right of the Dev Type
field and click on your selection
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o Name
Figure 1036 – The Common Tab Select Device Section – All
Devices Selected
The ‘Name’ field will display a list of whatever is selected in the
‘Dev Type’ field directly above the Name field. For example, in
Figure 1037, ‘Readers’ has been selected as the device type in the
Dev Type field. A list of all readers created in the database is
displayed in the Name field, and you are expected to select which
readers you wish to have the report return events for.
To select an item in the Name field, click on it. Checked means
selected, unchecked means unselected
Figure 1037 – The Common Tab Select Device Section – Reader
Devices Selected
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General Tab
• Event Types Section
o Doors Section
Figure 1038 – The General Tab Doors Section
The ‘Doors’ section allows you to select report filters that limit the
returned report to only events that have the selected reader related
event messages.
To select an event type, click the check box. Checked is selected,
unchecked is unselected. You may select any or all of the items
listed in this section and use them together to further narrow your
search
If you select the ‘All’ check box, all of the event types listed in the
section will be included in the report. You may select the ‘All’
feature or you may select individual items in the section. The report
engine will not allow you to select both.
o Inputs Section
Figure 1039 – The General Tab Inputs Section
The ‘Inputs’ section allows you to select report filters that limit the
returned report to only events that have the selected input related
event messages.
To select an event type, click the check box. Checked is selected,
unchecked is unselected. You may select any or all of the items
listed in this section and use them together to further narrow your
search
If you select the ‘All’ check box, all of the event types listed in the
section will be included in the report. You may select the ‘All’
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feature or you may select individual items in the section. The report
engine will not allow you to select both.
o Outputs/Links Section
Figure 1040 – The General Tab Outputs/Links Section
The ‘Outputs/Links’ section allows you to select report filters that
limit the returned report to only events that have the selected
output or link related event messages.
To select an event type, click the check box. Checked is selected,
unchecked is unselected. You may select any or all of the items
listed in this section and use them together to further narrow your
search
If you select the ‘All’ check box, all of the event types listed in the
section will be included in the report. You may select the ‘All’
feature or you may select individual items in the section. The report
engine will not allow you to select both.
o Panels Section
Figure 1041 – The General Tab Panels Section
The ‘Panels’ section allows you to select report filters that limit the
returned report to only events that have the selected panel related
event messages.
To select an event type, click the check box. Checked is selected,
unchecked is unselected. You may select any or all of the items
listed in this section and use them together to further narrow your
search
If you select the ‘All’ check box, all of the event types listed in the
section will be included in the report. You may select the ‘All’
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feature or you may select individual items in the section. The report
engine will not allow you to select both.
• Sort Criteria Section
Figure 1042 – The General Tab Sort Criteria Section
You may select one menu item from the list presented in the ‘Sort
Criteria’ section of the General tab. You selection will determine how
the data printed in the report will be sorted (by date, name, badge
number, vehicle tag number or group number). The default report is
printed in Date sorted order.
Personnel Tab
• Event Types Section
o All Badge Events
Figure 1043 – The Personnel Tab All Badge Events Check Box
If the ‘All Badge Events’ check box is checked, all badge type
events will be returned in the report. The event types returned
include all those listed in the ‘Access Events’ and ‘Violations’
sections discussed below.
You may select All Badge Events or you may select individual
events in the ‘Access Events’ and ‘Violations’ sections. They are
‘mutually exclusive’
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o Access Events Section
Figure 1044 – The Personnel Tab Access Events Section
The ‘Access Events’ section allows you to select report filters that
limit the returned report to only events that have the selected valid
access event messages. These are event messages that indicate
successful accesses.
To select an event type, click the check box. Checked is selected,
unchecked is unselected. You may select any or all of the items
listed in this section and use them together to further narrow your
search
o Violations Section
Figure 1045 – The Personnel Tab Violations Section Check Boxes
The violations section of the Events report allows you to select
report filters that limit the returned report to only events that have
the selected badge violation messages. These are event messages
that indicate unsuccessful attempted accesses.
To select a violation type, click the check box. Checked is selected,
unchecked is unselected. You may select any or all of the items
listed in this section and use them together to further narrow your
search
! Vehicle No Match
Figure 1046 – The Personnel Tab Vehicle No Match Check
Box
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When this options is selected (click the check box) the event
report returns all events with the event ‘type’ set to ‘Badge
Violate, Tag No Match’.
Checked is enabled, unchecked is disabled
o Show Tracked Only
Figure 1047 – The Personnel Tab Show Tracked Check Box
The ‘Show Tracked Only’ check box enables a filter that will return
only badge events that have ‘Badge Valid Tracked’ event messages
in addition to the other search criteria that you have selected in
other sections of the Events report screen.
To enable the feature, click the check box. Checked is enabled,
unchecked is disabled
• Badge Selections Section
Figure 1048 – The Personnel Tab Badges Selection Section
The Badges Selection Section controls refer to settings in the
Personnel screen. The fields in this section allow you to set up report
filters that retrieve events that match the Personnel record criteria
selected.
You may select a Badge Range or a Name. In addition, you may select
any or all of the remaining fields in this section to further narrow your
search.
o Badge Range
Figure 1049 – The Personnel Tab Badge Range Selection Control
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The ‘Badge Range’ selection allows you to create an event report
that contains only events from a selected badge number or badge
number range. To select a badge number range, do the following.
! Click the Check Box – To enable the badge number range
feature, click the ‘Badge Range’ check box. Checked is enabled,
unchecked is disabled
! Select a Range – Next, select a badge number range to limit
the report to specific badge numbers.
Put the same badge number in both fields if you wish to limit
the report to one specific badge number. Declare a range of
badge numbers if you wish to have the report retrieve events
from all of the badge numbers in that range (inclusive).
To enter a value, click the arrows or click in the white space and
type in a number
o Name
Figure 1050 – The Personnel Tab Name Selection Control
You can elect to create an event report that returns only events
generated by a specific badge holder name. If you wish to create
such a report do the following.
! Click the Check Box – Click the ‘Name’ check box. When the
Name check box is checked, a listing of all of the badges created
in the Personnel screen will appear in the combo box to the
right of the check box.
! Select a Name – Select the badge whose events you wish to
create a report on by clicking the arrow to the right of the
selection control, scroll up or down to locate the name and click
on it
! Match Name from Event Record – The ‘Match Name from
Event Record’ check box modifies the behavior of the Events
report search engine.
By default, when you supply a name to search for in the ‘Name’
combo box, the Events report will look up the badge number
for that cardholder in the CardAccess database. The Events
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report will then use that badge number in search for events
matching the selected criteria.
In a case where a cardholder has several cards issued to the
same name, the default search will return events for only one of
those card numbers.
The Match Name from Event Record check box forces the
Events report to search the ‘Description’ field of the Events
table for the actual name of the cardholder. This will tend to
return any events that have the cardholder name associated with
them, regardless of card number.
Though this method of searching the database may prove
slightly slower to return report results, it is a more thorough
search, which returns events that have every card number
associated with the badge holder name
Figure 1051 – The Match Name from Event Record Check Box
o Facility No.
Figure 1052 – The Personnel Tab Facility Number Selection Field
The ‘Facility No.’ selection control allows you to create a report
only of events that include badges that have the selected Facility
Number assigned.
The Facility No. refers to the ‘Facility’ field of the Personnel
screen. Thus, the facility number in this field is the position
number of a particular facility code in the ‘Codes’ section of the
Facility Codes screen (available from the ‘Administration’ menu).
See the manual sections entitled ‘Personnel’ and ‘Facility Codes’ for
more information
To select a group, click the arrow to the right of the Group field
and click your selection
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o Group
Figure 1053 – The Personnel Tab Group Selection Control
The ‘Group’ selection control allows you to create a report only of
events that include badges that have the selected group assigned.
To select a group, click the arrow to the right of the Group field
and click your selection
o Personnel Search Criteria
Figure 1054 – The Personnel Tab Personnel Search Criteria Button
Click the ‘Personnel Search Criteria’ button to bring up the
standard CardAccess ‘Search Criteria’ selection box.
Figure 1055 – The Personnel Search Criteria Selection Screen
The search Criteria selection box allows you to define additional
search filters that may include any field of the Personnel screen
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• Vehicle Selection Section
Figure 1056 – The Personnel Tab Vehicle Selections Section
The ‘Vehicle Selections’ section of the Event report is used if you wish
to run a report on a specific vehicle badge holder. When you activate
this section by checking the ‘Vehicle Tag Report’ check box, the
report results are limited to the badge selected in the ‘Vehicle
Description’ field
o Vehicle Tag Report – The Vehicle Tag Report check box
activates the ‘Vehicle Description’ control below. Checked is
enabled, unchecked is disabled (the default)
o Vehicle Description – When you enable the ‘Vehicle Tag Report’
check box, a list of badges that have the ‘Vehicle Tag’ option set in
the Personnel screen will appear in the Vehicle Description
control. Your selection will cause the report engine to return only
events with the selected vehicle badge included.
To select a specific vehicle badge to run a report on, click the arrow
to the right of the Vehicle Description field, scroll up or down to
locate your selection, click the selection
• Sort Criteria Section
Figure 1057 – Personnel Tab Sort Criteria Section
You may select one menu item from the list presented in the ‘Sort
Criteria’ section of the Personnel tab. You selection will determine
how the data printed in the report will be sorted (by date, by name,
badge number, vehicle tag number or group number). The default
report is printed in date-sorted order.
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Templates Tab
The ‘Templates’ tab is where you can create an Event report template
file that can be recalled later. The template file allows you to recall the
settings of a given report for the purpose of running a specific report
on a regular basis, without the need to select all of the report options
each time.
You create a report template by doing the following.
• Visit the ‘General’ or ‘Personal’ folder tab of the report and select
the report options
• Visit the ‘Templates’ folder tab of the report and select the ‘Report
Type’ and the ‘Date Range’ of the report (see below).
Save Template Section
Figure 1058 – The Templates Tab Save Template Section
The ‘Save Template’ section of the ‘Templates’ tab is used if you wish
to automatically set a date range for a report template. The controls in
the Save Template section work in conjunction with the controls in
the ‘Date Range’ section of the Templates tab. A selection in the Save
Template section will automatically change the date range selected in
the ‘Date’ fields of the Date Range section
• Report Type Section
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Figure 1059 – The Templates Tab Report Type Section
The ‘Report Type’ section allows you to automatically select the
report type for the current report template. The settings in this
section correspond to the ‘General’ and ‘Personnel’ folder tabs
available at the top of the Event report screen.
You are expected to select your report options on the General tab
or the Personnel tab, and then move to the ‘Templates’ tab to
select the time interval that the report will cover
• Reporting Interval Section
Figure 1060 – The Templates Tab Reporting Interval Section
The reporting interval section offers you a way to automatically
select a Date Range for your report template. When you make a
selection, the Date Range control is loaded with the appropriate
date range
• Which Interval Section
Figure 1061 – The Templates Tab Which Interval Section
The ‘Which Interval’ controls work in conjunction with the ‘Date
Range’ controls on the ‘Common Tab’ at the bottom of the Event
report screen and the ‘Reporting Interval’ controls mentioned in
the section above. The details follow.
o Current – When selected, the report will automatically change
the data range selection to the current day, week, or month
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o Previous – When selected, the report will automatically change
the data range to the previous day (yesterday’s date), week (last
week from Sunday to Saturday), or month (last month from the
first day of the month to the last day of the month)
Retrieve Template
Figure 1062 – The Templates Tab Retrieve Template Selection
Control
Report Templates are stored in the CardAccess database. If there are
any Event report templates in the current database, the names of
those templates will appear in the drop down list in the ‘Retrieve
Template’ field.
To select a template, click the arrow to the right of the ‘Retrieve
Template’ field, scroll up or down to find your selection, click it to
select it.
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Facility Code Report
The Facility Code report is used to preview or create a hard copy print
out of the Facility Codes that you have created in the Facility Codes
screen, available from the Administration menu.
Create a Basic Facility Code Report
To create a Facility Code report, do the following:
• Open the Facility Code Report – Open the Facility Code report
screen by clicking the Facility3000.exe shortcut available in the
Reports/Other Reports menu. This action will display the screen
displayed in Figure 1.
Figure 1063– Facility Code Preview/Print screen
• Preview – If you wish to preview the report before printing, click the
Preview button. The report will display on your monitor screen, listing
all the Facility Codes programmed into your card access software
Figure 1064 – The Preview Button
• Print – Click the Print button to get a printed hard copy of the report
Figure 1065 – The Print Button
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Groups Report
The Groups report is used to preview or create a printed hard copy of
the User Groups that were created in the ‘Groups’ screen, available from
the Administration menu.
Create a Basic User Group Report
To create a User Group report, do the following:
• Open the User Group Report – Open the User Group report
screen by double clicking the Groups3000.exe shortcut available in the
Reports/Other Reports menu. This action will display the screen
displayed in Figure 1066
Figure 1066 – User Group Preview/Print screen
• Preview – Click the Preview button. A report will display listing all
the User Groups programmed into your card access software.
Figure 1067 – The Preview Button
• Print – Click the Print button to get a hard copy of the report.
Figure 1068 – The Print Button
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Hardware Report
Figure 1069 – The Hardware Report Main Screen
The 'Hardware' report is used to create a hard copy print out which
details the hardware that has been programmed into the various
CardAccess configuration screens. There are five folder tabs in the
Hardware report main screen. Each folder tab allows you to create a
report on the following specific hardware types.
• Panels - The 'Panels' tab allows you to create a report that lists the
panels that have been created in the CardAccess Panels screen
• Readers - The 'Readers' tab allows you to create a report that lists the
doors that have been created in the CardAccess Readers screen
• Inputs - The 'Inputs' tab allows you to create a report that lists the
input definitions that have been created in the CardAccess Inputs
screen
• Relays - The 'Relays' tab allows you to create a report that lists the
relay definitions that have been created in the CardAccess Relays
screen
• Composite - A report that is run from the 'Composite' tab will
produce a hard copy listing of all the hardware listed above (panels,
readers, inputs, and relays)
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The hardware report can be very useful when you run it after creating a
new CardAccess system. You can get a hard copy listing of the hardware
configuration and file it. Should you need to rebuild the configuration at a
later time, this hard copy hardware configuration report will provide
reconfiguration guidance. The hardware report can also be run after the
completion of the programming of a new system, and can later be used
as evidence in the event that someone who is unauthorized has changed
the configuration and you need to prove that.
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Create a Basic Hardware Report
To create a basic Hardware report, do the following
• Open the Hardware Report - Open the Hardware report by double
clicking the Hardware3000.exe shortcut available in the
Configuration/Reports/Other reports menu
• Report Title – The Panels tab will be highlighted by default. Click the
Report title field and type in a title for your report if desired (not
mandatory)
Figure 1070 – The Report title screen
• Select a Folder Tab - There are five folder tabs to select from. Click
the folder tab for the type of report you wish to run
o Panels - Use this report to print out the panels hardware
configuration
o Readers - Use this report to print out the readers hardware
configuration
o Inputs - Use this report to print out the inputs hardware
configuration
o Relays - Use this report to print out the relays hardware
configuration
o Composite - Use this report to print out the hardware
configuration of all the hardware in the other four categories
mentioned above
• Enter Filter Criteria - In each of the fields of the selected folder tab,
enter filter criteria to narrow the report result. If no criteria are
entered, the report will return all records found. See the help topic
section specific to the folder tab that you have selected for more
information on activating search filtering
• Preview or Print – If you wish to review the report before printing,
click the Preview button. If you wish to Print the report without
previewing, click Print.
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Hardware Report Panels Tab
Figure 1071 - The Hardware Report Panels Tab
You can use the Hardware Report 'Panels' tab to created a printed listing
of any or all of the panels that have been created in the CardAccess
'Panels' configuration screen. The report will include information on
which Com port the panels are connected to, and the setting of each
control and field of each panel included in the report.
Panels Tab Controls
• Panels Section - When you check the 'Panels' check box, the
Hardware Report utility allows you to select either a panel number
range to search for, or a specific panel name to search for. The
Hardware Report will then filter the report to include only those
panels that you selected. See a specific explanation of each field below.
Figure 1072 - The Panels Selection Section
o Panels Check Box - When you select the 'Panels' check box, you
signal your intention to supply a range of panel numbers in the
'Start' and 'End' fields (mentioned below) or to supply a specific
panel name to search for. By default, the Hardware Panels report
will print the configuration details of all panels, unless you limit
the result by providing a panel number range in the Start and End
fields. When you select the Panels check box and provide the
panel number range, the report is filtered to include only those
panels that you have selected. Click the Panels check box to select
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the option to tell the Hardware Report which panels that you wish
to view a report on. Checked is selected (and filtered), unchecked
means that all panels will appear in the report
Figure 1073 - The Panels Check Box
o Start and End Fields - If you have clicked the 'Panels' check box
mentioned above, you are permitted to filter the Panels Report to
include only those panel numbers that you select in the 'Start' and
'End' fields. Type in a start number and an end number to
establish the end points of the report search. If you use the same
number in the Start and End fields, the report will return only one
panel.
The Start and End fields expect you to type in the panel number.
The panel number of a given panel is found in the 'PnlNo' field of
the CardAccess Panels configuration screen
Figure 1074 - The Start and End Fields
o Selected Field - You will use the 'Selected' field if you have
checked the Panels check box mentioned above, and you wish to
select a specific panel by name. Click the arrow to the right of the
Selected field and click on your chosen panel name to selected it.
The names of all panels that have been created in the Panels
screen will be listed. Note that if you select a panel name, the
report will return the results from one panel only
Figure 1075 - The Selected Field
• Group Field - Make a selection in the 'Group' field if you wish to
limit the report results to only those panels that belong to a selected
group. In the case where you select a panel number range and a group,
the report engine will return only the panels that match both criteria.
If no selection is made in the Group field, all groups will be included
in the report result
• Com Port Field - Make a selection in the 'Com Port' field if you wish
to limit the report results to only those panels that have the selected
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Com port assigned. In the case where you select a panel number range
and other search criteria such as the Com Port field, the report engine
will return only the panels that match all the selected criteria. If no
selection is made in the Com Port field, all Com ports will be included
in the report result
• Dial Up Node Field - Make a selection in the 'Dial Up Node' field if
you wish to limit the report results to only those panels that are
assigned to the selected dial node. In the case where you select a panel
number range and other search criteria such as the Dial Up Node
field, the report engine will return only the panels that match all the
selected criteria. If no selection is made in the Dial Up Node field, all
Dial Up Nodes will be included in the report result
Note that you may select any or all of the fields as you see fit. Each field
filter that you add to the Hardware Report search will narrow the report
result.
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Hardware Report Readers Tab
Figure 1076 - The Hardware Report Readers Tab
You can use the Hardware Report 'Readers' tab to created a printed
listing of any or all of the readers that have been created in the
CardAccess 'Readers' configuration screen. The report will include
information on which panel the readers are connected to, and the setting
of each control and field of each reader included in the report.
Readers Tab Controls
• Panels Section - When you check the 'Panels' check box, the
Hardware Report utility allows you to select either a panel number
range to search for, or a specific panel name to search for. The
Hardware Report will then filter the report to include readers from
only those panels that you selected. See a specific explanation of each
field below
Figure 1077 - The Panels Selection Section
o Panels Check Box - When you select the 'Panels' check box, you
signal your intention to supply a range of panel numbers in the
'Start' and 'End' fields (mentioned below) or to supply a specific
panel name to search for. By default, the Hardware Panels report
will print the configuration details of readers found on all panels,
unless you limit the result by providing a panel number range in
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the Start and End fields. When you select the Panels check box
and provide the panel number range, the report is filtered to
include readers that are configured on only those panels that you
have selected. Click the Panels check box to select the option to
tell the Hardware Report which panels that you wish to view a
report on. Checked is selected (and filtered), unchecked means
that all panels will appear in the report
Figure 1078 - The Panels Check Box
o Start and End Fields - If you have clicked the 'Panels' check
box mentioned above, you are permitted to filter the Panels
Report to include only those readers that are connected to the
panel numbers that you select in the 'Start' and 'End' fields. Type
in a start number and an end number to establish the end points
of the report search. If you use the same number in the Start and
End fields, the report will return a listing of the readers on only
one panel.
The Start and End fields expect you to type in the panel number.
The panel number of a given panel is found in the 'PnlNo' field
of the CardAccess Panels configuration screen
Figure 1079 - The Start and End Fields
o Selected Field - You will use the 'Selected' field if you have
checked the Panels check box mentioned above and you wish to
see a report on readers for one specific panel, by providing the
panel name instead of the panel number. Click the arrow to the
right of the Selected field and click on your chosen panel name
to selected it. The names of all panels that have been created in
the Panels screen will be listed. Note that if you select a panel
name, the report will return the results from one panel only
Figure 1080 - The Selected Field
• Reader Group Field - Make a selection in the 'Reader Group' field if
you wish to limit the report results to only those readers that belong to
a selected group. In the case where you select a panel number range
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and a group, the report engine will return only the readers that match
both criteria
Figure 1081 - The Reader Group Field
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Hardware Report Inputs Tab
Figure 1082 - The Hardware Report Inputs Tab
You can use the Hardware Report Inputs tab to created a printed listing
of any or all of the inputs that have been created in the CardAccess
'Inputs' configuration screen. The report will include information on
which panels the inputs are connected to, and the setting of every control
and field of each input included in the report.
Inputs Tab Controls
• Panels Section - When you check the 'Panels' check box, the
Hardware Report utility allows you to select either a panel number
range to search for, or a specific panel name to search for. The
Hardware Report will then filter the report to include only those
inputs that belong on the panels that you selected. See a specific
explanation of each field below
Figure 1083 - The Panels Selection Section
o Panels Check Box - When you select the 'Panels' check box, you
signal your intention to supply a range of panel numbers in the
'Start' and 'End' fields (mentioned below) or to supply a specific
panel name to search for. By default, the Hardware Panels report
will print the input configuration details of all panels, unless you
limit the result by providing a panel number range in the Start and
End fields. When you select the Panels check box and provide the
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panel number range, the report is filtered to include only those
inputs that are activated on the panels that you have selected.
Click the Panels check box to select the option to tell the
Hardware Report which panels that you wish to view a report on.
Checked is selected (and filtered), unchecked means that all panels
will appear in the report
Figure 1084 - The Panels Check Box
o Start and End Fields - If you have clicked the 'Panels' check box
mentioned above, you are permitted to filter the Panels Report to
include only those inputs that belong to the panel numbers that
you select in the 'Start' and 'End' fields. Type in a start number
and an end number to establish the end points of the report
search. If you use the same number in the Start and End fields,
the report will return only one panel.
The Start and End fields expect you to type in the panel number.
The panel number of a given panel is found in the 'PnlNo' field of
the CardAccess Panels configuration screen
Figure 1085 - The Start and End Fields
o Selected Field - You will use the 'Selected' field if you have
checked the Panels check box mentioned above, and you wish to
select a specific panel by name. Click the arrow to the right of the
Selected field and click on your chosen panel name to selected it.
The names of all panels that have been created in the Panels
screen will be listed. Note that if you select a panel name, the
report will return the results from that one panel only
Figure 1086 - The Selected Field
• Input Group Field - Make a selection in the 'Input Group' field if
you wish to limit the report results to only those panels that belong to
a selected group. In the case where you select a panel number range
and a group, the report engine will return only the panels that match
both criteria
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Figure 1087 - The Input Group Field
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Hardware Report Relays Tab
Figure 1088 - The Hardware Report Relays Tab
You can use the Hardware Report 'Relays' tab to created a printed listing
of any or all of the readers that have been created in the CardAccess
'Relays' configuration screen. The report will include information on
which panel the relays are connected to, and the setting of each control
and field of the relay(s) included in the report.
Relays Tab Controls
• Panels Section - When you check the 'Panels' check box, the
Hardware Report utility allows you to select either a panel number
range to search for, or a specific panel name to search for. The
Hardware Report will then filter the report to include only relays from
those panels that you selected. See a specific explanation of each field
below
Figure 1089 - The Panels Selection Section
o Panels Check Box - When you select the 'Panels' check box, you
signal your intention to supply a range of panel numbers in the
'Start' and 'End' fields (mentioned below) or to supply a specific
panel name to search for. By default, the Hardware Panels report
will print the relay configuration details of all panels, unless you
limit the result by providing a panel number range in the Start and
End fields. When you select the Panels check box and provide the
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panel number range, the report is filtered to include only those
panels that you have selected. Click the Panels check box to select
the option to tell the Hardware Report which panels that you wish
to view a report on. Checked is selected (and filtered), unchecked
means that all panels will appear in the report
Figure 1090 - The Panels Check Box
o Start and End Fields - If you have clicked the 'Panels' check box
mentioned above, you are permitted to filter the Panels Report to
include relays from only those panel numbers that you select, in
the 'Start' and 'End' fields. Type in a start number and an end
number to establish the end points of the report search. If you use
the same number in the Start and End fields, the report will return
only one panel.
The Start and End fields expect you to type in the panel number.
The panel number of a given panel is found in the 'PnlNo' field of
the CardAccess Panels configuration screen
Figure 1091 - The Start and End Fields
o Selected Field - You will use the 'Selected' field if you have
checked the Panels check box mentioned above, and you wish to
select a specific panel by name. Click the arrow to the right of the
Selected field and click on your chosen panel name to selected it.
The names of all panels that have been created in the Panels
screen will be listed. Note that if you select a panel name, the
report will return the results from that one panel only
Figure 1092 - The Selected Field
• Relay Group Field - Make a selection in the 'Relay Group' field if
you wish to limit the report results to only those panels that belong to
a selected group. In the case where you select a panel number range
and a group, the report engine will return only the panels that match
both criteria
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Figure 1093 - The Relay Group Field
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Hardware Report Composite Tab
Figure 1094 - The Hardware Report Composite Tab
The 'Composite' report will return a report that includes a listing of all
panels, readers, inputs and relays. This is a summary report, which
includes all hardware mentioned in each of the other individual reports.
The controls of the Composite tab are explained below.
Composite Tab Controls
• Panels Section - When you check the 'Panels' check box, the
Hardware Report utility allows you to select either a panel number
range to search for, or a specific panel name to search for. The
Hardware Report will then filter the report to include hardware from
only those panels that you selected. See a specific explanation of each
field below
Figure 1095 - The Panels Selection Section
o Panels Check Box - When you select the 'Panels' check box, you
signal your intention to supply a range of panel numbers in the
'Start' and 'End' fields (mentioned below) or to supply a specific
panel name to search for. By default, the Hardware Panels report
will print the configuration details of all panels, unless you limit
the result by providing a panel number range in the Start and End
fields. When you select the Panels check box and provide the
panel number range, the report is filtered to include hardware
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from only those panels that you have selected. Click the Panels
check box to select the option to tell the Hardware Report which
panels that you wish to view a report on. Checked is selected (and
filtered), unchecked means that all panels will appear in the report
Figure 1096- The Panels Check Box
o Start and End Fields - If you have clicked the 'Panels' check box
mentioned above, you are permitted to filter the Panels Report to
include only those panel numbers that you select in the 'Start' and
'End' fields. Type in a start number and an end number to
establish the end points of the report search. If you use the same
number in the Start and End fields, the report will return only one
panel.
The Start and End fields expect you to type in the panel number.
The panel number of a given panel is found in the 'PnlNo' field of
the CardAccess Panels configuration screen
Figure 1097 - The Start and End Fields
o Selected Field - You will use the 'Selected' field if you have
checked the Panels check box mentioned above, and you wish to
select a specific panel by name. Click the arrow to the right of the
Selected field and click on your chosen panel name to selected it.
The names of all panels that have been created in the Panels
screen will be listed. Note that if you select a panel name, the
report will return the results from one panel only
Figure 1098 - The Selected Field
• Group Field - Make a selection in the 'Group' field if you wish to
limit the report results to only the hardware that belongs to the panels
in the selected group. In the case where you select a panel number
range and a group, the report engine will return only the panels that
match both criteria. If no selection is made in the Group field, all
groups will be included in the report result
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• Com Port Field - Make a selection in the 'Com Port' field if you wish
to limit the report results to only those panels that have the selected
Com port assigned. In the case where you select a panel number range
and other search criteria such as the Com Port field, the report engine
will return only the panels that match all the selected criteria. If no
selection is made in the Com Port field, all Com ports will be included
in the report result
• Dial Up Node Field - Make a selection in the 'Dial Up Node' field if
you wish to limit the report results to only those panels that are
assigned to the selected dial node. In the case where you select a panel
number range and other search criteria such as the Dial Up Node
field, the report engine will return only the panels that match all the
selected criteria. If no selection is made in the Dial Up Node field, all
Dial Up Nodes will be included in the report result.
Note that you may select any or all of the fields as you see fit. Each
field filter that you add to the Hardware Report search will narrow the
report result.
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Holiday Report
The Holiday report is used to preview or print a hard copy of the
Holidays that were created in the Holidays screen, available from the
Administration menu.
Create a Basic Holiday Report
To create a Holiday report, do the following:
• Open the Holiday Report – Open the Holiday report screen by
clicking the Holidays3000.exe shortcut available in the Reports/Other
Reports menu. This action will display the screen displayed in Figure
1099
Figure 1099 – Holidays Preview/Print screen
• Preview – If you wish to see a preview of the report before printing,
click the ‘Preview’ button. The preview will display a listing of all the
Holidays that were created in the Holidays utility screen
Figure 1100 – The Preview Button
• Print – Click the Print button to print a hard copy of the report to the
report printer selected in the System Settings
Figure 1101 – The Print Button
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Import Utility
Figure 1102 – The Import Badges screen
The Import/Export utility has three selectable functions.
• Import Personnel Information – Personnel records can be created
or updated by setting the Import/Export utility to import records
from a text file. The type of file typically used as a source file is a
‘comma separated value’ (.csv) file.
The comma separated value file is an industry standard text file
organization scheme that is recognized by most file import capable
database programs.
However, the CardAccess Import/Export utility can also read files
with field separators other than commas. Using another
manufacturer’s program, you are free to create an import source file
that uses almost any typed symbol as a field separator. The symbol
used in the source file is selectable in the Import/Export utility screen
‘Field Separator Char’ field on the ‘Import Badges’ folder tab. See
more below
• Batch Load Personnel Records – You can use the Import/Export
utility to create batches of badge records without using a source file
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(‘Batch Mode’). You can set default values for selected fields and
create as many contiguously numbered badges as you desire. Note
that all badges will be created in the Personnel screen with the same
default values that you selected in the Import Badges folder tab
‘Default Value’ column
• Export Event Records – The ‘Export Events’ folder tab contains
controls which allow you to select the type of event messages you
wish to export from the CardAccess main database to a ‘character
separated file’ (again, you are allowed to select the separator character).
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Perform a Basic Badges Import from File
To create a basic badges import, do the following
Warning – The Import utility will overwrite any fields that you
select in the ‘Column’ column if there is any data in the source file
for that field. Therefore you must be sure that the source file
contains approved changes or that the source file contains badge
numbers that do not currently exist in the database (new records
will be created in that case), existing records will remain untouched
Note: You must have a text source file already saved on your system that
meets the requirements stated above for import.
• Open the Import.exe Utility – Open the Import utility by clicking
the Import.exe shortcut available in the Configuration-> Reports ->
Other Reports menu.
• Import Badges – The import badges tab should be selected by
default. If it is not, click the import badges tab to activate it.
Figure 1103 – The Import badges tab
• File Name – Select the file name of the text file you wish to use for
badge import. Click the folder icon adjacent to the File Name field.
This will open a Microsoft browser window. Navigate to the location
of the file and click the file name to select it. Click ‘Open’. The
selected file name will appear in the File Name window.
Figure 1104 – The File Name screen
• Field Separator Char. – Select the separator character that is being
used in the text file. Click in the window adjacent to the Field
Separator Char text. Enter the character by hitting the appropriate
character on your keyboard. The default character will be a comma.
Figure 1105 – The Field Separator Character screen
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• Column – Enter a number in the Import/Export program ‘Column’
field that corresponds with the position of the data field in your
source character separated field text file.
Figure 1106 is a graphic of a typical comma separated value file with
the column numbers indicated. Figure 1107 depicts the column fields
in the Import/Export report where you are expected to fill in the
relative column number of the filed that you want the Import function
to use when it looks for data for the indicated field.
For example, in Figure 1106 below, in every record in the source file,
the last name is contained in column 1. You would therefore put the
number 1 in the white space to the right of the ‘Last Name’ field in
the Import utility (in the ‘Column’ column). Since the first name is in
column 2 of the source file, you would type a 2 in the white space to
the right of the ‘First Name’ field of the Import utility, etc.
You can select as many or as few fields as you prefer. You may choose
to ignore fields in the import file. That is, you can elect to import only
one field from each record of the file, or all the fields in that file at
your option.
You are telling the utility what CardAccess Personnel screen field to
store each field of the source file by using numeric pointers. The
Import utility uses the commas as markers to locate the individual
fields and it uses the new line character at the end of each line to
locate the end of each record.
Note – The source file you construct must contain a badge number field.
There must be a unique number field included for each record in the file.
Figure 1106 – The Text File Column Numbers
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Figure 1107 – Import badges field and column screen
Note: In this basic example, we are not using any fields that require a
‘Default Value’ to be set. We will cover that option later in this
section.
o Run – Click the Run button to run the utility and import your in information.
Figure 1108 – The run button
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Import Utility Screen Controls
A detailed view of each of the Import badges and Export events utility
screen controls follows
• Import Badges Tab – The Import Badges section of the import
utility allows the user to populate fields in the Personnel screen by
importing information from an outside source. This is meant to be a
timesaving utility. By utilizing pre-existing text documents that contain
important personnel information the user no longer needs to enter
this information manually.
Figure 1109 – The Import Badges Tab Screen
• Field – The ‘Field’ column is a list of all available importable fields
located in the Personnel section of the CardAccess software. (See
Figure 1109) There is nothing interactive regarding this column. This
is a reference to insure that the imported information gets to the
proper location.
• Column – The ‘Column’ column is used in conjunction with the text
file that we will be importing information from.
To use this feature, click the column window adjacent to the field you
wish to import and enter the column number that corresponds to that
field’s placement in the text document. (See Figure 1110)
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Figure 1110 – Text document example
• Default Value – The default value column is used to set a ‘global’
value for any or all features in the Personnel screen. In other words,
once a value is entered in one of these fields, the value will hold true
for all badges imported that contain a ‘Y’ in the appropriate column of
the text file.
Example: If the user wishes to ‘Enable’ all the cards that are being
imported then the user would create a column in the text document
that would contain a ‘Y’. Then the user would place a check in the
‘Yes’ checkbox adjacent to the ‘Enabled’ field and put the column
number in column window.
Some of the default values can be enabled with a checkbox while
others require the user to select a value that has already been
programmed in the personnel screen while still others allow you to
enter custom text in the default value field. The section below will
describe each feature in more detail.
• Facility – The facility field allows the user to select an existing facility
code number that can be set during import. To use, select the code
number (1-10) by clicking the up or down arrows adjacent to the
facility default value window or by clicking in the same window and
entering the value with the keyboard. Then click the column window
and enter the column designation number for facility associated with
your text document. When imported, this number will appear under
the ‘Facility’ field in the Configuration>Personnel>General screen.
Figure 1111 – The Facility Code Screen
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• Badge Number – The badge number field allows the user to enter a
custom badge number that can be set during import. To use, click the
default value window adjacent to the badge number field. Enter the
number you wish to use. Then click the column window and enter the
column designation number for badge number associated with your
text document. When imported, this number will appear under the
‘Badge Number’ field in the Configuration>Personnel>General
screen
Figure 1112 – The Badge Number Screen
• Last Name – The last name field allows the user to enter a custom
last name that can be set during import. To use, click the default
window adjacent to the last name field. Enter the text you wish to use.
Then click the column window and enter the column designation
number for last number associated with your text document. When
imported, this text will appear under the ‘Last Name’ field in the
Configuration>Personnel>General screen.
Figure 1113 – The Last Name Screen
• First Name – The first name field allows the user to enter a custom
last name that can be set during import. To use, click the default
window adjacent to the first name field. Enter the text you wish to
use. Then click the column window and enter the column designation
number for first name associated with your text document. When
imported, this text will appear under the ‘First Name’ field in the
Configuration>Personnel>General screen.
Figure 1114 – The First Name Screen
• Access Grp 1 / Access Grp 2 – The access group fields allow the
user to select from a list, the access group they wish to assign to the
badges that are imported. To use, click the arrow adjacent in the
default value window next to the Access Grp 1 or 2 fields. A list of
existing access groups will appear. Click on the access group you wish
to use. The selected access group will appear highlighted in the access
grp window. Then click the column window and enter the column
designation number for Access grp 1 or 2 associated with your text
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document. When imported, this selection will appear under the
Access Group 1 or Access Group 2 field in the Configuration->
Personnel-> General screen.
Figure 1115 – The Access Group Rows
• PIN – The pin field allows the user to enter a custom pin code that
can be set during import. To use, click the default value window
adjacent to the PIN field. Enter the number you wish to use. Then
click the column window and enter the column designation number
for the pin column associated with your text document.
Figure 1116 – The PIN Code Screen
• Issue Level – The issue level field allow the user to select an existing
issue level that can be set during import. To use, select the level
number (1-99) by clicking the up or down arrows adjacent to the issue
level default value window or by clicking in the same window and
entering the value with the keyboard. Then click the column window
and enter the column designation number for issue level associated
with your text document. When imported, this number will appear
under the ‘Re-Issue’ field in the Configuration>Personnel>General
screen.
Figure 1117 – The Issue Level Screen
• Fields with checkboxes – The fields in Figure 1117 and Figure 1118
allow the user to select a feature to activate during import. To use,
place a check in the checkbox adjacent to the feature you wish to
activate. Then click the column window and enter the column
designation number for that feature associated with your text
document. When imported, a checkmark will appear next to activated
feature in the Configuration-> Personnel-> General screen.
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Figure 1118 – Fields with Checkboxes Screen
Figure 1119 – The Vehicle Tag Checkbox Screen
• APB (Anti-passback) Setting – The APB field allows the user to
select from a list, the Anti-passback setting they can be activated
during import. To use, click the arrow adjacent to the default value
window next to the APB Setting feature. Click the APB setting you
wish to use. The selected setting will appear highlighted in the APB
setting window. Then click the column window and enter the column
designation number for APB Setting associated with your text
document. When imported, this selection will appear under the ‘APB
Control field in the Configuration-> Personnel-> Control screen.
Figure 1120 – The APB Setting Screen
• Access Time – The access time field allows the user to select a
custom access time (1-90) in seconds that can be set during import.
To use, select the amount of time by clicking the up or down arrows
adjacent to the access time default value window or by clicking in the
same window and entering the value with the keyboard. Then click
the column window and enter the column designation number for
access time associated with your text document. When imported, this
number will appear under the ‘Access Time’ field in the
Configuration-> Personnel-> General screen.
Figure 1121 – The Access Time Screen
• Activation/Deactivation Date – The Activation and Deactivation
date field allows the user to select a custom date that can be set during
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import. To use, select the date by clicking the date icon
. This will
display a calendar date selection screen. Click on the date you wish to
use. The selected date will appear in either the Activation or
Deactivation date field depending on which one you are working at
the time. Then click the column window and enter the column
designation number for activation or deactivation date associated with
your text document. When imported, the Activation Date will appear
in the ‘Activation Date’ field and the Deactivate Date will appear in
the ‘Expiration Date’ field in the Configuration-> Personnel->
General screen.
Figure 1122 – The Activation and Deactivation Date Screen
• Group – The group field allow the user to set from a list of preprogrammed Personnel groups. To use, click the arrow adjacent to the
default value window in the Group field. Click on the group you wish
to use. The selected group will appear highlighted in the default value
window. Then click the column window and enter the column
designation number for group associated with your text document.
When imported, this number will appear under the ‘Group’ field in
the Configuration-> Personnel-> General screen.
Figure 1123 – The Group Screen
• Personal Information Fields – The fields in Figure 1123 allow the
user to enter custom information that can be entered during import. .
To use, click the default window adjacent to the field you wish to
import. Enter the text you wish to use. Then click the column window
and enter the column designation number for select field associated
with your text document. When imported, this text will appear under
the proper field in the Configuration-> Personnel-> Personal screen.
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Figure 1124 – The Personal Information Section Screen
• Hire Date – The hire date field allows the user to select a custom
date that can be set during import. To use, select the date by clicking
the date icon
. This will display a calendar date selection screen.
Click on the date you wish to use. The selected date will appear in the
date field. Then click the column window and enter the column
designation number for hire date associated with your text document.
When imported, the Hire date will appear in the ‘Hire Date’ field in
the Configuration-> Personnel-> Personal screen.
Figure 1125 – The Hire Date Screen
o User Fields – The fields in Figure 1125 allow the user to enter
custom information that can be entered during import. . To use, click
the default window adjacent to the field you wish to import. Enter the
text you wish to use. Then click the column window and enter the
column designation number for select field associated with your text
document. When imported, this text will appear under the proper field
in the Configuration-> Personnel-> Custom* screen.
*Note: The custom field within the System-> System Settings menu
must be configured before these fields can be imported. See the
System Settings section for detailed information.
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Figure 1126 – The User Fields Screen
o Photo Path Name – This field allows the user to select a path to a
picture file that can be set during import. To use, click the default
window adjacent to the photo path name field. Enter the path to the
file you wish to use. Then click the column window and enter the
column designation number for Photo Path associated with your text
document. When imported, this photo will appear under the photo
window in the Configuration-> Personnel-> Photo screen.
Figure 1127 – The Photo Path Name Field
o Batch Mode – The batch mode feature allows the user to import a
badge range of cards. Also, the user may set certain default criteria to
be inserted at time of importing. Example: You just purchased one
hundred new cards and that have consecutive numbers from 1 to 100.
Click the checkbox adjacent to the Batch Mode field. This will activate
this feature.
Notice that the File Name folder icon is grayed out. Click the window
adjacent to the First Badge text. Enter the number 1 on your
keyboard. Then, click the window adjacent to the Last Badge text.
Enter 100 on your keyboard. We want to have the cards enabled
when they are imported so we click the checkbox next to Enabled.
Click Run. If you go to Access->Personnel there should be new
badges inserted with card numbers of 1 to 100 and they should be
Enabled.
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Figure 1128 – The Batch Mode Screen
o Export Events Tab – The Export Events section of the Import.exe
utility allows the user to export events from the database to a text file.
By using the filters contained on this screen, only those events that are
crucial will be exported out of the CardAccess software and into the
text file. Once the text file is created it may be imported by other
third-party software packages. For example, the text file may be
imported into Microsoft Excel, which will allow the user to view the
events in spreadsheet form.
Figure 1129 – The Export Events Screen
o Event Types – This Events Types feature group allows the user to
filter the file by event type. By default, there are no items selected. In
order for the export file to have any content you must check all items
that you wish to include. There are two ways to accomplish this task.
1. Place a check in the ‘All’ checkbox adjacent to each section header
in green. This will include all events for that section.
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Example: If you put a check in the checkbox adjacent to the ‘Doors’
field, the file will include all events listed below it. They include
‘Forced’, ‘Bypass’, ‘Free Access’, ‘Lock/Unlock’ and ‘Open Too
Long’.
2. Check only those events needed under each section header in
green.
Example: You may only need to include the forced and bypass events
in the file. Therefore, just check the box next to “Forced’ and
“Bypass’.
Figure 1130 – The Event Types Screen
o Badge Events – The Badge Events feature group allows the user to
filter the file by badge events. By default, there are no items selected.
In order for the export file to have any content you must check all
items that apply. There are two ways to accomplish this task.
1. Place a check in the checkbox adjacent to ‘All Badge Events’. This
will include all events listed under ‘Access Events’ and ‘Violations’.
2. Check only those events needed under each section labeled Access
Events and Violations.
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Figure 1131 – The Badge Events Screen
o Retrieval Dates – This feature allows the user to specify a date range
for when the events occurred. When the dates are set, only the events
that occurred within that timeframe will be included in the file. The
‘Between Hours’ feature allows the user to specify, by time of day,
what events to include in the file.
Example: We will use the dates that are set in Figure 1130 as the
example. If we set the hours of 8 to 17 (military time) than all those
events that occurred between 12/9 and 12/16 from eight in the
morning to five in the afternoon will be included in the file
Figure 1132 – The Retrieval Dates Screen
o Sort Criteria – This feature allows the user to specify a custom sort
order. By clicking the button next to the appropriate option the
output file will be sorted by the selected criteria.
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Figure 1133 – The Sort Order Screen
o Output Fields – This feature allows the user to specify, by column,
where the information will be located in the file. Example: If we use
commas as the field separator for the output fields below the output
file columns would be sorted like this:
Badge Number, Type, Description, Location, Date
Figure 1134 – The Output Fields Screen
o View Report – This feature allows the user to preview the file exactly
as it will look when it is exported. This allows the user to verify the
sort order and make sure all the information needed is included in the
output file. Click the View Report button to review the report.
Figure 1135 – The View Report Button
o View SQL – This feature allows the user to preview the SQL
statement being used to create the report. Click the View SQL button
to view the statement
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o Field Separator – This feature allows the user to specify the character
that will be used to separate the information. Click the window
adjacent to the field separator text. Enter the character you wish to
use. Remember, no spaces or tabs. By default, a comma will be
entered in this field.
Figure 1136 – The Field Separator Screen
• File Name – This field allows the user to assign a custom name to
the output file also let the user choose the folder the file will be sent
to. To use, click the folder icon adjacent to the file name field. A
Windows browse window will appear. Select the folder you wish to
use by browsing to it and clicking on it. Then enter the name you wish
to use for the file in the File Name window of the Windows browser.
Click the Open button. The selected path for the file should appear in
the file name window.
Figure 1137 – The File Name Field
• Run – After all of the fields needed are selected and a file name and
path are created, click the Run button to create the file.
Figure 1138 – The Run Button
• Export Finished – The following screen should appear. The amount
of records exported depends on the amount of events that matched
your criteria.
Figure 1139 – The Export Finished Screen
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InList /BadgeHolders In Report
Figure 1140- The Badgeholders IN Report screen
The Badgeholders In report is used whenever it is necessary to determine
who is inside a building at a given time. The report will display the Name
of the Badgeholder and the exact Location and Time that the
badgeholder entered. The report will also display the total number of
badges at the bottom of the screen.
This report can be invaluable in an emergency situation. With a single
click, the user can determine not only how many people need to be
evacuated from the facility but also who the people are.
Note: This report is known as the badge holders in report as well as the
Inlist report.
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Create a Basic Badgeholders IN Report
To create a basic Badgeholders IN report, do the following
• Open the Badgeholders IN report. This can be done in one of two
ways.
1. Click on the Access text in the top portion of the CardAccess
taskbar (See Figure 2). Next, click on Badgeholders IN.
2. Click on InList.exe in the Report/Other Reports menu
Figure 1141 – The CardAccess taskbar
Unlike other reports in CardAccess this report will display all the
badgeholder information that is required.
The only other options that is selectable for this report is Select
Reader and Print.
Badgeholders IN Report Controls
• Select Reader
The Select Reader option allows the user to filter this report in two
ways. By Reader and by Reader Group
Figure 1142 – The select reader and print screen
Click the Select Reader button to display the select reader screen
Figure 1143 – The Select Reader screen
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Click the arrow adjacent to the select reader window to display all
the readers and reader groups that have been programmed in the
system. To select a reader or reader group, click on it. The selected
reader or reader group will appear highlighted in the window.
To filter the report by the selected reader or reader group, click OK.
The report will be displayed
• Print
To print out a hard copy of the report, click the Print Button. (See
Figure 3)
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Links Report
Figure 1144 – Links Report screen.
The Links report is used whenever it is necessary to preview or create a
hard copy of the Links programmed into your Card Access software.
This utility gives the user the ability to select the panels you want to
report on. Also it gives you the ability to report on a range of Link
program numbers.
Create a Basic Link Report
To create a basic Link report, do the following. NOTE: You must verify
you have at least 1 panel programmed into the system with at least 1 link
programmed into the panel. Refer to Figure 1 for the following steps.
• Open the Links Report – Open the Links report by clicking the
Links3000.exe shortcut available in the Reports/Other Reports menu.
This action will display the screen displayed in figure 1.
• Panels – Put a checkmark in the checkbox “Panels”. If you put a
check mark in Panels, but do not supply any additional criteria, the
report will return the links that have been programmed for all panels.
If you wish to narrow the search, you will add additional parameters in
the Panels and Links sections as follows.
o Start – Enter a value of 1.
o End – Enter a value of 2.
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o Name – Leave the default, “no filter”.
• Links– Put a checkmark into the checkbox. ”Links”.
o Start – Enter a value of 1.
o End – Enter a value of 100.
o Name – Leave the default, “no filter”.
• Group – Leave the default, “no filter”.
• Report Title – Enter “Links Report” into the Report Title textbox.
• Preview – Click the Preview button to Preview report.
• Print - Click the Print button to Print report
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Links Report Screen Controls
A detailed view of each of the controls on the Links report screen
follows.
• Panels
The Panels checkbox gives the user the ability to create reports based on
certain panel criteria.
• Start
The Start textbox gives the user the option of putting in a Start Panel
number to report on.
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• End
The End textbox gives the user the option of putting
in an End Panel number to report on.
o Name
The Name drop down box gives the user the ability to
select a particular panel to report on.
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• Links
The Links checkbox gives the user the ability to create reports based on
certain link criteria.
• Start
The Start textbox gives the user the option of putting in a Start Link
number to report on.
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• End
The End textbox gives the user the option of putting
in the End Link program number to report on.
• Name
The Name dropdown box gives the user the ability to
select a link by name to report on.
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• Group
The Group dropdown box gives the user the ability to select a specific
group to report on.
• Report Title
The Report Title textbox gives the user the ability to enter a custom
name for the report.
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! Preview – The Preview button gives the user the
ability to preview the report before printing.
! Print – The Print button gives the user the ability to
print a hard copy of the report.
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Modem Report
Figure 1145 – The Modem Report screen
The Modems report is used to create a hard copy modems report of all
modems installed and programmed in the CardAccess system. The report
content will consist of information consisting of, but no limited to, phone
numbers, node numbers, dial-up frequency and initialization strings. All of
this information has been previously entered in the Configuration->
Modems section of the CardAccess software. See the Modem section for
detailed information.
The Modems report may be useful as a reference or can be a valuable tool
for system troubleshooting.
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Create a Basic Modems Report
To create a basic Modem report, do the following.
• Open the Modems Report – Open the Modems report by clicking the Modems.exe
shortcut available under the Configuration-> Reports-> Other reports menu
• Enter a Report Title – Click in the Report Title window and enter the text you wish
to use for the report
Figure 1146 – The Report Title screen
• Preview or Print – If you wish to review the report before printing click the Preview
button. If you wish to Print the report without previewing, click Print
Figure 1147 – The Modems Report Preview and Print Buttons
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Modems Report Screen Controls
A detailed view of each of the Modems report screen controls follows.
• Cluster Name – Select the Cluster Name field by clicking the arrow
adjacent to the ‘Cluster Name’ field. You will be presented with a list
of all ‘Nodes’ programmed in the system. The report will be filtered
by the node you select. Select the node by clicking it. The selected
node will appear highlighted in the Cluster Name window. If you wish
to include all clusters, click the ‘All Cluster's’ option
Figure 1148 – The Cluster Name screen
• Report Title – Select the Report Title field by clicking in the window
labeled Report Title. Enter the text you wish to use in this window.
This Report title text will appear at the top of the report
Figure 1149 – The Report title screen
• Preview, Print and Exit – Click the Preview button if you wish to
preview the report before you print. Click the Print button to print a
hard copy of the report. Click the Exit button to exit the modems
report
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Operators Report
The Operators report is used to preview or create a hard copy of the
Operators programmed into the Card Access software.
Create a Basic Operators Report
To create an Operators report, do the following:
• Open the Operators Report – Open the Operators report screen by
clicking the Operators3000.exe shortcut available in the
Reports/Other Reports menu. This action will display the screen
displayed in Figure 1150.
Figure 1150 – Operators Preview/Print screen
• Report Title – Enter a report name into the “Report Title” textbox
Figure 1151 – Report Title entry screen
• Preview – Click the Preview button. A report will display listing all
the Operators programmed into your card access software and also
information about the operators
• Print – Click the Print button to get a hard copy of the report
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Personnel Report
Figure 1152 – The Personnel Report screen
The Personnel Report is used to create a hard copy of Personnel
information. This report allows the user to select up to eight (8) database
fields to include in the report depending on the report requirements.
Create a Basic Personnel Report
To create a basic Personnel report, do the following
• Open the Personnel Report – To open the Personnel report, click
the Reports icon in the CardAccess taskbar or click on Reports in the
Configuration menu. (See Figures 2&3)
Figure 1153 – The CardAccess Main Toolbar Reports Button
Figure 1154 – The Configuration Menu Reports Shortcut
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• Select the Report Content – The report content feature allows the
user to select up to eight (8) database fields in which to use in the
report. (See Figure 4)
To add a field to the report, click on the desired field in the box on the
left. Then, click the top arrow that points to the right. The database
field should appear in the box on the right. The box on the right will
display all fields you have chosen for the report. If you wish to remove
a field from the box on the right that you previously selected, highlight
the field you wish to remove and click the arrow that points to the left.
This will return the field to its original location on the left.
Once all your fields are selected you may choose one of the fields to
be the sort-by field. This field will be the first field displayed in the left
column when the report is run. To select the sort-by field simply click
on the desired field in the box on the right. This will highlight it and
instruct the report to sort by this field
Figure 1155 – The Report Content screen
• The Print Badge Photo Check Box – The Print Badge Photos
feature also allows the user to print badge photos with the report. This
feature allows the user to refer to the report when attempting to
identify personnel that the user may not be familiar with. Another
scenario would be the training of a new guard. The guard would have
the ability to study the report with the photos to familiarize him with
the personnel at a particular facility without having to sit in front of a
PC running the CardAccess software
• Badgeholder Search Criteria – Refer to the Badges report for
detailed information on this feature
• Report Title – Enter the text you wish to use for naming each report.
This feature is useful when referring back to a report that has been
printed and filed
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• Preview or Print – The user may preview the report before printing
to verify the report is configured properly. Click the Preview button to
preview a copy of the report. If the user wishes to print the report,
click the Print button.
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System Settings Report
The System Settings report is used to preview or create a hard copy of
the System settings programmed into the Card Access software.
Create a Basic System Settings Report
To create a System Settings report, do the following:
• Open the System Settings Report – Open the System Settings
report screen by clicking the SysSettings3000.exe shortcut available in
the Reports/Other Reports menu. This action will display the screen
displayed in Figure 1156.
Figure 1156 – System Settings Preview/Print screen
• Preview – Click the Preview button. A report will display listing all
the System Settings programmed into your card access software. This
information includes stations, badges, CCTV, Modems, Alert Sounds,
Alerts, Archive information, Video Badging, Customized Personnel
information and printer information.
• Print – Click the Print button to get a hard copy of the report.
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Time and Attendance Report
Figure 1157 – The Time & Attendance Report Screen
The Time & Attendance report is used to create a hard copy report on
the use of readers that have been configured as Time & Attendance
readers or have been configured as Anti-Passback readers.
The Time & Attendance report scans the events database and searches
for Time & Attendance or APB events that match your selected search
option criteria.
If you intend to use the Time & Attendance report for tracking employee
hours, please check your local government code for detailed information
regarding Time and Attendance reporting requirements.
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Create a Basic Time and Attendance Report
When the T&A Report screen opens it gives you a choice of Readers to
choose from. Select the Readers you wish to report on by putting a check
in the check box adjacent to the appropriate reader. In order to run the
report properly, at least one In and one Out Reader must be selected.
• Open TimeAttend3000.exe – Open the Report screen by double
clicking the TimeAttend3000.exe shortcut available in the
Reports/Other Reports menu available from the ‘Reports’ button on
the CardAccess main toolbar.
• Report Title – Enter a title for your report at the bottom of the
Report screen with the General tab highlighted on the left. (See Figure
1158)
Figure 1158 – The Report Title screen
• Selected T&A Readers – Click the checkbox adjacent to the
Readers you wish to include in the Report. (See Figure 1159)
Figure 1159 – The T&A Reader selection screen
• Time Span – Select the Period you wish to use along with the Start
Day and End Day. A report can be run for the ‘Current’ or ‘Last’
week by clicking the button adjacent to the timeframe you wish to use
(See Figure 1160). Otherwise click the button adjacent to the ‘Other’
selection to run a report fro a different period. Then enter a start date
and end date by clicking the calendar icon next to each window. (See
Figure 1161)
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Figure 1160 – The Time Span selection screen
Figure 1161 – The Time Span Other screen
• Click Preview or Print – If you wish to preview your report before
printing, click the Preview button. Otherwise, click the Print button.
You have just created a basic T&A report with no filtering and the
default Sort order.
Note – You must have at least one IN reader and one OUT
reader programmed in the CardAccess system. If no T&A readers
are programmed in the system the T&A report cannot run. See
the manual section entitled ‘Readers’ for more information.
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Time and Attendance Report Screen Controls
A detailed view of each of the T&A Report screen controls follows.
• Select T&A Readers
Figure 1162 – Selected T&A Readers screen section
If necessary, you have the option to Report on activity generated by
Readers programmed in the CardAccess system for Anti-passback.
When the option ‘Include APB Readers’ is checked, all Readers
programmed for Anti-passback will appear in the Reader selection
screen and become selectable. See the Readers section for detailed
instructions.
The user may also wish to include the Reader Description in the
report. Click the checkbox adjacent to the ‘Include Reader
Description in Report’ option to accomplish this.
Figure 1163 – The T&A reader checkbox screen section
Select the Readers you wish to include in your Report by clicking the
checkbox adjacent to the appropriate Reader.
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• Selected Personnel Groups
Figure 1164 – Selected Personnel Groups screen section
If necessary, you have the ability to filter the T&A report by Personnel
Group. When selected the report will only display activity generated
by Badgeholders that have been assigned to that selected Group.
The user may select as many or as few Groups as necessary or may
select all Groups by checking the “All Groups: checkbox.
• Selection Criteria
Figure 1165 – The Selection Criteria Screen Section
Figure 1166 – The Field Drop -Down List Screen
The Selection Criteria feature gives the user the ability to filter the
Report by Database Fields using the Selection-Criteria-Fields dropdown list. Click on the arrow to the right of the Field window. Select
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the Field you wish to use, and then provide the values necessary in the
Field Value box.
Example: If you wish to run a report on a single badgeholder and you
know the badge number, select Badge Number as the Field and then
enter the badge number in Field Value. This will generate a T&A
report for that badge number only.
• Time Span
Figure 1167 – The Time Span screen
This Feature gives the user has the ability to select a time span
necessary to generate a T&A Report.
The “Current Week” feature may include all activity for the current
week up until the day the Report is generated. In other words, if we
run a report on a Thursday, we have the ability to gather information
from Sunday until Thursday. Click the Current week feature. Then
enter a Start day and End day by clicking the arrow adjacent to the
appropriate window. Select the day by clicking it. The selected day
should appear highlighted in the window.
The “Last Week” feature may include all activity generate