Maxford USA Bristol Fighter F2B Instruction

Maxford USA Bristol Fighter F2B Instruction
F.2B BRISTOL FIGHTER
SPORT-SCALE ARF R/C MODEL AIRPLANE
INSTRUCTION MANUAL
Shown with optional simulated WWI pilot, windshield, pilot’s gun sight,
bombs with mounts, electric motor, wood propeller and servos.
The F.2B ‘Bristol Fighter’ was a British World War I fighter and reconnaissance biplane designed in
1916 by Frank Barnwell. Although a two-seater, the F.2B proved fast and maneuverable enough to be
flown in combat like a single-seat fighter – and it more than held its own against the opposing singleseat German fighters.
The pilot's fixed forward-firing .303 inch Vickers machine gun was the F.2B’s principal weapon; the
observer's flexible .303 inch Lewis Gun provided an additional "sting in the tail" while the pilot went
after the target. The F.2B could also carry up to 240 pounds of bombs.
The most successful F.2B pilot was Canadian Andrew Edward McKeever, who won all 30 of his
victories in this aircraft.
After the war, many surplus F.2Bs were modified for civilian use. Some were fitted with a canopy to
cover one or two passenger seats in the rear cockpit and renamed the ‘Bristol Tourer,’ which had a
maximum speed of 128 mph.
The Bristol project was first recommend by Mr. Gart Hansford from Dubai UA, one of Maxford USA’s
valued customers. With a 70-inch wingspan, this RC version is approximately 1/6 scale and is
designed to use an electric or glow-power system. It is constructed mainly of laser-cut balsa and light
ply and is finished with a Mylar film covering. To enhance its true-to-scale appearance, this model
includes an articulated tail skid and the rudder and elevators are operated by stranded wire control
cables.
We invite you to enjoy the pride of ownership and the joy of flying this
beautiful ARF sport-scale model of the famous F.2B Bristol Fighter.
Copyright 2014 Maxford USA
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TABLE OF CONTENTS:
I.
II.
III.
IV.
Important safety precautions ...………….................
Warranty, liability waiver & return policy ..........
Specifications ..……………………………………...........
Parts List .….…………………………………………………
2
3
4
4
V.
VI.
VII.
VIII.
Special features .……………………….................
Assembly instructions ..……….......................
Setup & adjustments .. ..…………………………
Storage, field setup & preflight checks .....
5
5
22
23
I. SAFETY PRECAUTIONS & ASSEMBLY TIPS
(IMPORTANT – READ THIS SECTION BEFORE YOU BEGIN ASSEMBLY)
1. This product should not be considered a toy, but rather a sophisticated, working model that
functions much like a full-scale airplane. Because of its performance capabilities, this product, if
not assembled and operated correctly, could cause injury to you or spectators and damage to
property. Maxford USA provides you with a high-quality, thoroughly tested model airplane kit with
assembly instructions. However, the quality and capabilities of your finished model airplane
depend on how you assemble it, and your safety depends on how you use and fly it. Any testing or
flying of this model airplane is done entirely at your own risk.
2. Assemble this model airplane according to these instructions. Do not alter or modify the model
beyond the assembly and power-system options covered in these instructions, as doing so may
result in an unsafe or unworkable model. If the instructions differ from the photos, the written
instructions should be considered correct. If you have any question or concern about these
instructions, before you proceed with assembly of this product, contact your dealer or speak to a
Maxford USA customer service representative at 562-529-3988 (Monday through Friday, except
national holidays, 9 AM to 5 PM Pacific Time).
3. While this kit has been flight-tested to meet or exceed our rigid performance and reliability
standards in normal use, if you elect to perform any extremely high-stress flying, such as racing or
advanced aerobatics, or if you install a much larger power system than specified, you (the buyer or
user of this product) are solely responsible for taking any and all necessary steps to reinforce the
high-stress points and/or substitute hardware that is more suitable for such increased stresses.
4. Throughout the lifetime of this model, use only the Maxford USA-recommended power system and
a new or well-maintained radio-control system.
5. It is your responsibility to install the receiver and connect the R/C components in such a way that
this model airplane passes all applicable safety/range tests and that the power system and
controls operate correctly and smoothly.
6. Recheck the operation of this model airplane before every flight to ensure that all equipment is
still operating correctly and that the model has remained structurally sound. Also before every
flight, check all electrical, control and structural connections; do not fly without replacing any that
you find damaged or worn.
7. Before you begin assembly of this model airplane, read all instructions and test-fit each part to
ensure you fully understand the instructions and that no parts are missing, damaged or
unsatisfactory. Temperature and/or humidity differences between the factory, our warehouse and
your home or workshop may dictate the need for slight adjustments to the wings, struts and/or
the vertical or horizontal stabilizer’s mounting surfaces to ensure proper alignment; however, we
recommend you contact us before you attempt any such adjustments.
8. To help ensure the security of your servo connections, we recommend use of optional
Maxford USA servo-extension safety clips.
9. If you are not an experienced R/C pilot or have not flown this type of model before,
we strongly urge you to get assistance from an experienced R/C pilot.
10. You may use 30-minute epoxy to attach critical parts permanently (such as where the horizontal
and vertical stabilizers attach at the end of the fuselage) and apply a threadlock compound to
secure all airframe components from vibration.
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11. If you have concern about the security of any factory fabrication procedure(s), you may apply 30minute epoxy around the perimeter of such part(s) as an extra safety precaution.
12. After adjusting each clevis, secure the clevis to its threaded rod
with thread-lock compound or CA adhesive.
For additional safety, hold the clevis closed by adding a small
piece of tubing (not supplied) as shown at the right.
13. For your safety, do NOT leave any strands of wire poking out
from the end of any crimp tube. Exposed small steel strands can be
sharp enough to cut or abrade skin!
14. This model may include some plastic, fiberglass and/or carbon-fiberreinforced parts. If you drill, grind or sand any such part, always wear
safety goggles, a particle mask and rubber gloves to guard yourself from eye, skin and respiratorytract irritation; never blow into the part as the dust may blow back into your face.
15. Minor production details (such as Mylar or paint colors) may vary. Check the Mylar covering
material’s joints and surfaces; if necessary, carefully use an iron (do NOT set the iron’s
temperature too high) to secure the edges and to tighten any loosened areas. Recheck and
retighten from time to time.
16. If you use an electric power system, read all instructions included with your battery and charger.
Failure to follow all instructions could result in permanent damage to the battery, its surroundings,
and bodily harm! If you crash this model airplane, check whether the battery is damaged. Do NOT
attempt to use or recharge a damaged battery.
II. LIMITED WARRANTY, LIABILITY WAIVER & RETURN POLICY
Maxford USA guarantees this kit to be free from defects in material and workmanship at the time
of purchase. All our products have been inspected in our factory and are checked again when
shipped from our warehouse. However, Maxford USA cannot directly control the materials you
may use or your final assembly process. Therefore, Maxford USA cannot in any way guarantee the
performance of your finished model airplane. Furthermore, in purchasing this product, you (the
buyer or user of this product) exempt, waive, and relieve Maxford USA from all current or future
liability for any personal injury, property damage, or wrongful death, and if you (the buyer or user
of this product) are involved in any claim or suit, you will not sue Maxford USA or any of its
representatives.
If you do not fully accept the above liability and waiver, you may request a return-merchandise
authorization number (RMA#) as explained below in item 2. If you think there is a missing,
damaged or unsatisfactory part, please read our after-sales service and return policy:
1. Inspect your order upon delivery for any missing, damaged or unsatisfactory part(s). If you
believe there is a problem, you must call us at 562-529-3988 (Monday through Friday except
holidays, between the hours of 9 AM and 5 PM Pacific time) before you begin assembly and
within 10 days from receipt of your purchase. During this telephone conversation, and with
your support, we will determine how to resolve your concern.
2. To request a return-merchandise authorization number (RMA#), call 562-529-3988 (Monday
through Friday except holidays, between the hours of 9 AM to 5 PM Pacific Time). If we elect to
issue you an RMA#, you must clearly mark this RMA# on the outside of the package. (No return
or exchange will be authorized after 10 days from the date of your receipt of the product; any
package delivered to us without a Maxford USA RMA# is subject to being returned to the sender,
as received, with return postage payable upon delivery.) Returned merchandise must be in its
original condition as received from Maxford USA, with no assembly or modification, in the
product’s original packing materials, complete with all manuals and accessories. Return
shipping and insurance charges must be prepaid by you, the buyer.
3. Returned merchandise that is accepted by Maxford USA for credit is subject to a 10% to 20%
restocking fee (the final amount will be determined by Maxford USA upon receipt and
examination of the returned merchandise).
Copyright 2014 Maxford USA
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Return address:
Maxford USA
15939 Illinois Avenue, #B-C
Paramount, CA 90723
IMPORTANT: Print the RMA# issued by Maxford USA
on your package near our address.
III. SPECIFICATIONS *
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
Wingspan ......................................................................................................................................................... 70 inches
Wing area ................................................................................................................................... 1,279 square inches
Length ................................................................................................................................................................ 49 inches
ARF weight ..................................................................................................................................................... 7 pounds
Ready-to-fly weight ....................................................... 12 to 14 pounds (depending on power system)
Power system .................................... .90 to 1.20 2-cycle glow engine; U638109 motor, or equivalent
Propeller ... Glow 16x8/10; EP 18x8 or 19x6; or as recommended by the power system’s maker
Radio ..................................................................................................................................... Minimum of 4 channels
Servos ............................................... 3 standard-sized servos (2 for the elevators & 1 for rudder) plus
2, 3, 4 or 5 mini servos as follows: Customer may use 1 mini servo on each of the 4 ailerons, or
customer may use 1 mini servo on each of only 2 of the ailerons; also, 1 additional mini servo
is needed for throttle control if a glow power system is used.
* (Dimensions and weights are approximate.)
IV. PARTS LIST
1. Included items
 Radiator-grill hatch secured with magnets.
 Prepainted fiberglass cowl.
 Prebuilt and covered fuselage, horizontal
 Scale stick-on markings.
stabilizer, elevators, vertical stabilizer,
 Hardware package.
rudder wings and ailrons, wing center
 Adjustable electric motor mounting box.
sectons & interplane struts.
(Note: Mounting box for a glow engine
 Simulated full-length exhaust pipes.
is optional.)
 Scale-looking landing-gear struts, wheels and articulated tail skid.
2. Items you must supply to complete this ARF
 Epoxy and cyanoacrylate (CA) adhesives and threadlock compound.
 Low-tack masking tape and common tools (screwdriver, pliers, etc.).
 A four- (or more) channel radio system; and, if customer uses all 4 ailerons, use four 12-inch
servo extensions; two 10-inch servo extensions; two 12-inch Y harnesses; one 6-inch Y harness;
4 mini servos for ailerons, 3 standard-sized servos for rudder and elevators; an electronic speed
control (ESC) for an electric power system or one additional mini-servo plus one 10-inch servo
extension for throttle control of a glow-engine.
 Range of 0.90 to 1.20 cubic inch glow engine and compatible fuel tank, or a 1,200-Watt or
greater outer rotor motor with a compatible electronic speed control and battery.
 16-inch diameter x 8- or 10-inch pitch propeller, or as specified for your engine or motor.
3. Optional detail-upgrade items you may choose to add
 Adjustable engine box for a
glow-engine power system.
 Simulated pilot, observer
and 1 or 2 Lewis Guns.
 Pilot’s windshield and
gunsight.
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V. SPECIAL FEATURES
 95% preassembled ARF constructed mainly of jigassembled, laser-cut balsa and light plywood, with a
realistic-looking fiberglass cowl and full-length twin
simulated exhaust manifolds.
 Steel cables for the wing wires and for the rudder’s
and elevator’s pull-pull cables.
 Adjustable-depth motor mounting box, able to
accept a wide range of power system options.
 Scale-looking landing gear struts, wheels, articulated tail skid and stick-on scale markings.
 Observer’s hatch cover secured by magnets.
 Metal skids for wing tip protection.
 4 aileron design, but customer can decide to use 2 ailerons on top or bottom set up for only
scale-looking flights (simply tape-over the other 2 ailerons).
 Replacement parts and optional upgrade parts are available.
 Owner’s choice of electric- or glow-power system.
VI. ASSEMBLY INSTRUCTIONS
A. WING CENTER SECTIONS & LANDING GEAR
NOTE: This model was designed and test-flown with the top and bottom wings set at 0-0 degrees
to each other and to the horizontal stabilizer. If you decide to build in any different incidence
angles (not recommended), you may find it easiest to modify step 20 on page 8, steps 20, 29
and/or 30 on pages 13 and 14 according to your desires.
1. Locate and cut
through any
Mylar covering
the openings
in the top of
the lower
wing’s center
section for the
lower wing’s
4 metal
mounting tabs.
2. Locate the 10 metal mounting tabs shown at the right.
3. Test-fit (DO NOT GLUE at this time) 4 of the metal mounting tabs into the top
of the lower wing’s center section.
4. Mount the landing gear’s main strut using a
3mm hex wrench and threadlock to securely
drive 3 cap head bolts into the preinstalled
blind nuts at the bottom front of the fuselage.
5. Guide the diagonal strut braces
through the openings in the lower wing’s
center section and into their openings in the
bottom of the fuselage.
6. Center the axle through the struts with
4 wheel collars.
7. Leave approx. 2¾ inches (the width of
the wheel plus 2 wheel collars) of axle
outside the struts. Tighten the wheel
collars with a 1.5mm hex wrench.
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8. Position the wheels on the axle. Secure the wheels onto the axle with 2 additional wheel collars
and a 1.5mm hex wrench.
9. Secure the diagonal strut braces into their openings in the fuselage
with screws as shown at the right.
10. Test-fit (DO NOT GLUE at this time) 6 mounting tabs into the fuselage.
Fuselage
11. As shown below, test-fit and loosely attach the lower wing’s mounting brackets, cable anchors,
hex-head bolts and self-locking nuts to the fuselage’s mounting tabs. (NOTE: DO NOT TIGHTEN the
nuts on the bolts and DO NOT GLUE the 4 mounting tabs into the lower wing’s center section.)
Nose
Fuselage
Cable anchors
12. If you wish to install the optional windshield, cut through
the Mylar covering the slotted opening in front of the
pilot’s cockpit. Slide the windshield’s mounting base
down into its slot.
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13. Apply epoxy from inside the nose to
secure the windshield in position.
Base of windshield as viewed
from inside the nose
14. Locate the 4 cabane struts and 8
1 cm (5/16-inch) long wood screws.
Front cabane strut
Cabane struts
Rear cabane strut
15. As shown at the right, test-fit the cabane struts into
their openings in the upper wing’s center section.
16. Test-fit the cabane struts into their openings on each
side of the fuselage.
Bottom of
upper wing’s
center section
Cut and remove the
Mylar covering the
rectangular openings
for the cabane struts.
(NOTE: These optional
openings are to secure the
cabanes to the fuselage with
screws instead of epoxy.)
(
17. Insert and center a wing rod through the upper wing’s center section.
18. Test-fit the
Position the upper wing at the same angle as the horizontal stabilizer
horizontal
stabilizer into its
slot. Ensure the
horizontal
stabilizer is
centered and at
90 degrees to
the centerline
of the fuselage.
19. As pictured above, visually compare the upper wing’s center section to the horizontal stabilizer. If
either side of the upper wing’s center section looks higher or lower than the horizontal stabilizer,
adjust the depth of the upper wing’s cabane struts in their openings so the upper wing’s center
section aligns with the horizontal stabilizer.
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20. Use epoxy to permanently secure the cabane struts into their openings
in the bottom of the upper wing’s center section and into their pockets in
the fuselage. Before the epoxy has fully cured, the angle of attack of the
upper wing’s center section may be fine-tuned to 0 degrees relative to
the horizontal stabilizer by adjusting the depth of the cabane struts in
their openings. (NOTE: If you prefer, you may drill 1/8-inch holes in the
lower ends of the cabane struts and attach them to the fuselage with
wood screws instead of epoxy.)
21. As shown above, position a 10-inch extension between the root ribs of
the upper wing’s center section. Guide its servo-type lead into the
fuselage through
one of the
cabane-struts’
openings.
22. As shown at the
right, cut the
Mylar covering
the opening for
the tail-skid’s
main post at the
bottom center of
the fuselage.
23. Cut the Mylar
Approx. 7 5/8 inches (193mm)
covering the two
small
Approx. 12 inches (307mm)
openings
for the
tail-skid’s supports on each side of the fuselage.
24. Insert the tail skid’s main post into its opening in the fuselage. Look into the fuselage through the
opening in the nose and guide the post all the way to the top of the fuselage as shown below.
25. Insert the tail skid’s 4 wire braces into their
openings on the sides of the fuselage. Apply
a drop of CA adhesive to secure each wire
brace into its opening.
26. Attach the tail skid to its post with a 2mm
bolt and nut. Secure the front of the skid to
the post with a cable tie, rubber bands or a
shoelace (not included). If you will fly from
blacktop or cement, you may protect the skid
by using epoxy to attach a piece of 3/8-inch
wide scrap metal or plastic (not included) to
the bottom surface of the tail skid.
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B. TAIL SECTION:
1. Cut the Mylar on each side of the fuselage covering the
openings for the dual elevator servos.
(NOTE: Before performing step 2, take a moment now
to “preview” step 27 on page 10 and step 34 on page 11
to understand setup options for your F.2B Bristol
Fighter’s dual elevators.)
2. Use hardware provided with your servos to install two
standard-sized elevator servos in their openings.
Tail
(NOTE: Position both elevator servos with their output
shafts toward the tail.)
3. Test-fit and secure the elevator servo cover plates with your choice
of glue or wood screws. (NOTE: Grommet thicknesses may vary. If
necessary, install your servos without grommets or custom-fit the cover
plates to your servos by sanding the cover plates’ inner surfaces.)
4. Lift the rear edge of the observer’s hatch and remove the hatch for access
into the rear cockpit.
5. Use the hardware provided with your servo to install a standard-sized
servo for the rudder in the center opening of the servo tray.
6. Use your radio or a servo tester to center the rudder servo.
(NOTE: You may be interested to learn about servo testers at
http://www.maxfordusa.com/servo.aspx.)
7. Use the tip of a hot soldering iron to cut and remove the Mylar
from where the horizontal stabilizer will be glued into its slot
in the fuselage to ensure a good wood-to-wood glue joint.
8. Test-fit the vertical stabilizers into their slots. Sight down
the rudder-hinge line. Position the vertical stabilizers to
provide a straight hinge line for the rudder.
9. Use the tip of a hot soldering iron to cut and remove the Mylar
from where the stabilizers will be glued into their slots in the
fuselage to ensure good wood-to-wood glue joints.
10. Use 5-minute epoxy to secure the horizontal and vertical
stabilizers into their slots. Use masking tape to hold the
horizontal stabilizer in alignment with the wing rod and the
fuselage and to hold the vertical stabilizers at 90 degrees to
the horizontal stabilizer. Remove the tape after the epoxy has
fully cured.
11. If necessary, cut through any excess Mylar covering the CA
hinge slots and test fit 3 CA hinges for each elevator and 3
CA hinges for the rudder.
12. Apply thin CA adhesive to the CA hinges to attach the
elevators to the horizontal stabilizer and the rudder to the
From
vertical stabilizers.
From
bottom
13. As pictured on the following page, if necessary slice through
top
surface
the Mylar in the top of the fuselage on each side of the upper
surface
vertical stabilizer covering the slots for the rudder’s pull-pull
cables.
14. Select a control arm for your rudder-servo with approx. 1 3/16 inches (3 cm) between the
attachment holes for the rudder’s pull-pull cables.
15. With the rudder’s control arm NOT mounted on its servo, use crimp tubes to attach an approx.
30-inch long (77cm) rudder pull-pull cable to each side of the rudder servo’s control arm.
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16. Position the rudder servo’s control arm on the rudder
servo at 90 degrees to the fuselage’s center line. Use
the hardware provided with your servo to secure the
rudder-servo’s control arm to the rudder servo’s
output shaft.
1 3/16-inches
17. Using a length of wire coat hanger or similar stiff
(3 cm)
wire, pull the end of each steel cable out through each
of the slots in the tail from the area beneath the
observer’s cockpit opening.
18. Gently pull the free ends of the rudder’s pull-pull
cables toward the back of the airplane and position
the rudder’s pull-pull cables against the rudder so each cable is centered in its slot in the fuselage;
mark this spot on the rudder where the rudder’s control arm needs to be mounted.
19. Drill a 1/8-inch (3 mm) hole in the rudder for the pull-pull control arm at the marked location.
Slot in the top-rear of the fuselage
20. As shown at the right, use the control-horn’s
hardware to center and secure the control-horn
assembly (complete with clevises, threaded rods
and locking nuts) at both sides of the rudder.
21. Use scrap wood such as popsicle sticks and
masking tape to hold the rudder in a ‘straight-ahead’
position, aligned with the vertical stabilizers.
22. Slide a crimp tube onto either of the two rudder
cables. Guide the cable through the hole in the
threaded rod and pull it ‘snug’ – be careful to not
pull so hard on the cable that the servo’s control arm
gets moved from its centered position.
23. Guide the end of the cable back through the crimp
tube, adjust the size of the resultant loop of cable,
and use pliers to crimp the tube onto the cable.
24. Pull the remaining rudder cable ‘snug’ on the other
2 3/4-inches
side of the upper vertical stabilizer. Use pliers and a
(7 cm)
crimp tube to attach the cable to its threaded rod.
25. Snip off the rudder cable’s excess ends with a pair of
cutting pliers and discard the excess cable. If necessary, adjust the threaded rods within their clevises to
‘fine-tune’ the tension on the cables and to center the rudder, then tighten the locking nuts on
each of the rudder’s threaded rods against their clevises and permanently anchor each threaded
rod in its clevis and locking nut with a few drops CA adhesive. Remove
the masking tape and scrap wood from the rudder.
26. Drill 1/8-inch (3 mm) holes in each elevator at approx. 2 3/4 inches (7 cm) to the left and right
sides of the rudder. Mount a pull-pull control horn on each half of the elevator.
27. Connect your elevator servos to your receiver. Setup your transmitter for “dual elevators.”
(NOTE: If your transmitter does not offer a mix for dual elevators, connect your elevator servos to
a 6-inch Y-harness and connect the Y-harness to the elevator channel on your receiver. If
available, use a reversed servo for either one of the elevator servos. Step 34 on the following page
explains what to do if a reversed servo is not available.)
28. Use your receiver to center both of the elevator servos.
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29. As shown at the right, cut to size and, if
“Heavy-duty”
desired, paint two heavy-duty control arms
control arm
(supplied with your servos).
1 3/16-inches
30. Using pliers and crimp tubes, attach 2
(3 cm)
approx. 25-inch (64 cm) long cables to each
control arm approx. 1 3/16 inches (3 cm)
apart. Use the hardware supplied with your
servos to attach these control arms to the
elevator servos.
31. Attach a clevis, threaded rod and locking nut Crimp
Cut
to each of the 4 elevator control horns.
tubes
32. Using scrap wood (such as popsicle sticks)
and masking tape, hold each half of the elevator in a “level” position.
33. Slide a crimp tube onto each of the 4 elevator cables.
34. If your transmitter has “dual
elevator” mixing OR if your
elevator servos are connected
to a Y-harness and one of your
elevator servos is reversed,
guide the loose end of the
cable from the UPPER end of
(NOTE: Please contact your radio’s manufacturer if the
the elevator’s LEFT-side servo
settings for dual elevator mixing are not covered in your
to and through the holes in
radio’s instruction manual or if you have any question about
the clevis attached to the
how to setup your radio for use with dual elevators. )
control horn on the elevator’s
LOWER side. However, if your transmitter does NOT provide “dual elevator” mixing AND your
elevator servos are connected to a Y-harness WITHOUT a reversed servo, guide the loose end of the
cable from the UPPER end of the LEFT-side elevator servo’s output arm to and through the hole in
the threaded rod in the clevis attached to the control horn on the elevator’s UPPER-LEFT side.
Also guide the loose end of the cable from the LOWER end of the LEFT-side elevator servo’s
output arm to and through the hole in the threaded rod in the clevis attached to the control horn
on the elevator’s remaining control horn.
35. Route the right-side pull-pull cables from upper to lower and lower to upper as shown above.
36. Pull the cables “snug” between the servo arm and the elevator’s control horns – but do not pull so
hard on the cable to move the elevator servo’s control arm or to pull the elevator from its “level”
position.
37. Guide the free end of each cable back through its crimp tube, adjust the size of the resultant loop,
and use pliers to crimp each tube onto its cable. Snip off the excess elevator cable’s ends with a
pair of cutting pliers and discard the excess cable.
38. Use your radio to confirm (or, if necessary, adjust): If you fly mode 2, pull the right stick toward
you and both sides of the elevator should deflect upwards.
39. Adjust the threaded rods within their clevises to ‘fine-tune’ the tension on the cables and the
alignment of each half of the elevator as necessary. Tighten the locking nut onto each of the
elevator’s threaded rods against its clevis. Permanently anchor each threaded rod in its clevis and
locking nut with CA adhesive. Remove the masking tape and scrap wood from the elevators.
C. AILERONS
NOTE: Although this aircraft is designed for 4 ailerons, the customer may decide to use 2 ailerons
on top or bottom wing for ‘scale-looking flights.’ At least the upper or lower wing’s pair of
ailerons must be used. Use tape to secure any unused ailerons to their adjacent wing panels.
1. If you wish to use the upper wing’s ailerons, test-fit the ailerons, CA hinges, servo arms, control
horns and pushrods to the upper wing panels. Each aileron uses 3 CA hinges. (NOTE: If necessary,
cut through any excess Mylar covering the CA hinge slots.)
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2. Center the CA hinges in their slots. Attach the ailerons to the wing panels with thin CA adhesive.
3. Using your radio or a servo tester, center the
aileron servos. Test-fit your aileron servos and
the two wooden servo mounting pedestals to
each servo-hatch cover.
4. Use epoxy to attach the pedestals to the servo
hatch covers. Use the hardware provided with
your servos to mount the aileron servos on the
pedestals.
5. Locate the servo bays in the bottoms of the upper
wing panels. If necessary, cut and remove the
Mylar covering the servo hatches. As shown at
the right, use pliers to break loose and lift out any
transport bracing material inside the servo
hatches, if necessary. Test-fit the servo-hatch
covers with their servo-arm slots toward the
wingtips and toward the leading edges.
6. Attach a 12-inch extension to each aileron servo.
(NOTE: We recommend using optional Maxford USA servo-extension
safety clips to secure all servo/extension/Y-cable connections.)
7. Use a length of coat hanger or heavier wire to guide the aileron extensions from each servo bay out through the root rib of each wing panel.
8. Secure the aileron servo hatch covers to the wing panels with 5/16-inch
wood screws.
9. Test-fit the aileron control horns directly behind and in line with your
aileron-servo’s output arms.
10. Attach the aileron control horns to the ailerons as pictured below.
11. Hold the ailerons aligned with their wing panels with masking tape.
12. Attach the aileron
Aileron
pushrods between
control
the aileron control
horn
horns and aileron
shown on
servos with the
1/4-inch
supplied pushrods.
squares
13. Remove the masking tape from
the ailerons and wing panels.
14. If you wish to use the lower wing’s ailerons, repeat steps 1 through 13 for the lower wing,
substituting ‘lower’ for ‘upper’ as required.
(NOTE: Each of the LOWER wing panels has 2 small pieces of wood under the Mylar
for attachment of wing skids at 1/2-inch and 5 1/2-inches behind the leading edge
and at approx. 23 5/8-inches from their root ribs.)
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15. If you are using the upper wing’s ailerons, position a 6-inch Y-harness
inside the fuselage and connect its twin connectors to the upper wing’s
two servo-like aileron-extension connectors.
Looking from the nose
16. If using the lower wing’s ailerons, position a
12-inch Y-harness for the lower wing inside
the fuselage. Guide its two identical connectors
out through the two openings in the bottom of
the fuselage and down into the lower wing’s
center section.
Looking down into the cockpit
17. Connect the identical
ends of another 6-inch
Y-harness to the servolike connectors of the
6-inch and 12-inch Yharnesses installed in
steps 15 and 16.
18. Connect the 6-inch Yharness’ remaining
servo-like connector
to your receiver’s
aileron port.
19. Insert and center the
wing rod in the lower wing’s center section. (NOTE: The distance between wing rods from centerto-center is typically approx. 27 cm.)
20. Test-fit the wings onto
their wing rods. As
shown at the right,
adjust the depth of the
mounting tabs to align
the upper and lower
wing center sections
with their wing panels.
Mark each mounting tab to indicate
its position (how
deep it needs to
be in its ‘pocket’)
Tab
to align the center sections and wing panels.
21. Slide each set of upper and lower wing panels off from their wing rods.
22. As shown at the right, lock each tab into its opening by filling the hole with epoxy.
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Epoxy
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(NOTE: If necessary, use a Q-tip dipped in acetone or polish remover to clean excess epoxy from
the bottom of the fuselage. Read and follow all health and safety warnings associated with
these chemicals.)
23. Slide the wings back onto their wing rods. As the wing panels near the center sections, connect
the aileron extensions to the ends of the Y-harnesses. (NOTE: We recommend using optional
servo safety clips to secure all servo, servo extension and Y-harness connections.)
24. Push the excess aileron servo extension and Y-harness wires back inside the wing panels and
gently press the wing panels against their wing center sections as shown below.
25. Temporarily secure the wing panels to their center sections by applying 1 inch of 3/4-inch wide
transparent tape to cover the area where each wing panel touches its center section.
NOTE: Since disassembly is optional, instead of using tape, a conservatively minded customer
may apply epoxy to the wing rods to permanently secure the wing panels to their center sections.
26. Locate the interplane strut-mounting ‘pockets’ in the bottom of each top wing panel and in the top
of the bottom wing panels by pushing gently on the Mylar covering with your fingernail.
(NOTE: The strut mounting ‘pockets’ are located at the 5th and 11th full-chord wing rib counting
from each wing panel’s root rib, approx. 1 1/2 and 5 1/4 inches behind the leading edge of the
lower wing, and at approx. 1 3/4 and 5 9/16 inches behind the leading edge in the upper wing.)
27. Cut through the Mylar covering each of the strut-mounting ‘pockets.’
28. Locate and open the plastic bag containing the 8 identical wing struts.
29. Apply 5-minute epoxy to both ends
of the mounting tabs on each strut.
Carefully insert each strut into its
set of ‘pockets’ in the top and
bottom wing panels.
(NOTE: Lock each tab into its opening by filling the hole with epoxy.
Depending on the position of the
center sections, it is possible that not every strut will need to be fully seated into its
opening.)
30. With the struts positioned in their ‘pockets,’ use masking tape between the top and
bottom wing panels to hold them in position as the epoxy cures. When the epoxy is
cured fully, remove the masking tape.
D. POWER SYSTEM INSTALLATION
NOTE: Since there are no ‘industry standards’ for motor or engine mounting, radio-system features, or
the personal preferences of RC pilots, the majority of the following power-system-installation
instructions are generalized. Adjust the following steps to meet the requirements
of your particular choice of engine or motor, radio system and flying style.
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a) ELECTRIC POWER POWER SYSTEM (If you are installing a glow-engine power system, proceed
to “b) GLOW ENGINE POWER SYSTEM” on page 17.)
1. Test-fit your motor and its mounting hardware to the motor box.
NOTE: This ARF comes with an EP motor box measuring approx.
2 3/4 inches (70 mm) wide by 2 3/16 inches (5.5 cm) high and more than
6 inches (15 cm) deep. Depending on the size and capacity of your
batteries, this space space can be used to hold multiple LiPo batteries in series. It may be
necessary to insert and remove these batteries one-by-one through the narrow battery hatch.
2. Position the propeller approx. 1/2-inch in front of the cowl by sliding the motor mounting box
forward or backward within the fuselage.
3. When satisfied with the fit of your motor and cowl, drill holes for
the motor’s wires and use
the hardware supplied with
your motor to attach the
motor to the motor
mounting box. Secure the
motor’s mounting bolts
with threadlock compound.
NOTE: The Maxford USA 638109
outer-rotor motor is a special design that is not only powerful, but is heavy enough to help achieve
the correct CG for large WWI ARFs. A reasonable-size motor such as this is much better than simply
adding nose weight. For these reasons, the following detailed instructions apply mainly to installing
a Maxford USA motor and 100A high-voltage electronic speed control (ESC).
a) As shown at the right, hold the motor’s X-mount against
the front of the motor box and use the X-mount as a
guide to drill 4 mounting holes in the front of the motor
box. Also, use the large hole in the center of the X-mount
as a guide to enlarge the predrilled hole in the front of
the motor mounting box to fit the rear shaft of the motor.
b) Drill holes for the motor’s wires.
c) As shown at the far right,
position the X-mount from inside
the motor-mounting box and
attach the motor to the outside
front of the motor mounting box
by driving the 4 bolts provided
with the motor through the back
of the X-mount, through the
holes drilled in step “a)” and into
the threaded holes in the motor.
d) Apply threadlock compound and
tighten these 4 mounting bolts securely into the motor.
e) Depending on how much prop. clearance you want, you
may trim the back edges of the EP motor box
up to approx. 1/2-inch to slide the motormounting box further into the fuselage.
f) Fit the bottom of the battery hatch to the top
of the motor
by trimming
the bottom
slat of the
battery
hatch’s grill.
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g) You could use two 4S/4000mAh or above LiPo batteries in series (equal to 8S battery 29.6V)
with our 638109 motor, 100A ESC and an 18x8 or 19x6 propeller for scale-like flying. These
batteries are easy to insert and remove one-by-one through the hatch.
h) If you want a little more power, you could use a 10S/3900mAh or above LiPo battery, but
you will need to modify the battery compartment and hatch by trimming the ribs (or removing
them altogether) as shown below:
If you increase the width of the battery compartment, also increase the width of the battery
hatch opening as follows:
New slots
Barbecue-skewer hinges
Enlarge
opening
Remove wood from sides.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Cut new slots.
Add a barbecue-skewer ‘hinge’ at each side.
i) As shown above, make an opening in the front of the motor
Widened
mounting box for the ESC’s battery leads. (NOTE: If you
battery
include the added margin of safety described below in
hatch
step 9, we recommend you add the extra wire between the
ESC and the ESC’s spark-prevention connectors to relocate
the anti-spark connectors to the observer’s cockpit.)
Use one of the following two options to secure the motor
mounting box to the fuselage.
Option 1: Secure supplied pieces of metal L-channel to the
motor mounting box and to the fuselage with wood screws.
(Advantage: Easy removal for possible future repairs.
Disadvantage: Installation is more complicated and is not as
strong nor as permanent as gluing the motor box into the
fuselage.)
Option 2: Carefully position and permanently secure the motor box into the fuselage with epoxy.
(Advantage: Safe, strong and easy to install. Disadvantage: Once glued into the fuselage, the
motor mounting box cannot be removed for any possible future adjustments or repairs.)
Depending on your battery’s length, you may add some optional foam rubber (not included) as a
spacer/cushion behind the battery.
Carefully and securely solder all required connectors between your motor, ESC and battery. Use
heat-shrink tubing (not included) to safely insulate all electrical connections.
Use double-sided tape (not included) to secure the ESC behind the motor on an inside wall of the
motor mounting box. Guide the ESC’s servo-type connector straight back and into the cockpit.
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8. With the 100A ESC you will need to use a separate radio-system battery
or UBEC (not included). Use double-sided tape (not included) to secure
the radio-system battery or the UBEC on the remaining inside wall of
the the motor mounting box. As shown at the right, the precut opening
in the cockpit’s dashboard may be used to mount your radio system’s
power switch.
9. As shown at the right, add wire (not included) to extend the
battery’s positive lead (the red wire between the battery and the
ESC) to the observer’s cockpit – to be left disconnected for extra
safety while removing and replacing the batteries and to be
connected only immediately before flight.
10. Follow the instructions given by your radio-receiver’s
manufacturer to secure your receiver within the cockpit and
make any remaining radio system connections.
11. Test your motor’s direction of rotation: Set your transmitter’s throttle and throttle-trim controls
to minimum and switch ON your transmitter. Switch ON your radio’s power and connect your
LiPo flight battery to the ESC. After you hear a series of initialization sounds, carefully and slowly
raise the transmitter’s throttle to no more than 25% of maximum and observe the propeller’s
direction of rotation – the propeller should be rotating clockwise as viewed from the rear of the
airplane.
12. If the motor powered up in the wrong direction, swap either two of the three ESC-to-motor wires
and repeat the above test to ensure the motor rotates in the correct direction. (NOTE: The F.2B’s
grill is held in place by wooden hinges and powerful magnets and serves as the ‘battery hatch’ for
access to the shelf above and behind your electric power system’s motor. For your safety, pay
extra attention whenever the motor’s battery is connected and the motor may come ON!)
b) GLOW-ENGINE POWER SYSTEM
NOTE: The optional engine mounting box is shown at the right.
If you install a glow engine, fuel-proof all exposed wood.
1. Using the intersecting lines on the front of the engine-mounting-box firewall as a guide, temporarily position on the engine
mounting box’ firewall. Test-fit the cowl over the engine and
slide the engine mounting box forward or backward as
necessary to place the propeller approx. 1/2-inch forward of
the front edge of the cowl. Adjust your engine’s position as
necessary to center its prop. shaft in the cowl’s opening. Mark
the cowl for the engine location and for any openings required
for your engine’s throttle control, etc..
2. When you are satisfied with the fit of the engine and cowl, make
all required openings for throttle control, fuel lines, etc. and mount your engine to the firewall.
(NOTE: Secure all mounting hardware with threadlock compound.)
3. Make all necessary openings in the fiberglass cowl. (NOTE: As shown on the following page, it
may be necessary to remove a portion of the simulated exhaust pipe to accommodate your
engine’s exhaust pipe. When drilling, grinding or sanding fiberglass, always wear safety goggles, a
particle mask and rubber gloves to guard yourself from eye, skin and respiratory-tract irritation;
never blow into fiberglass parts – the dust may blow back into your face.)
4. Test-fit and install your throttle servo behind the engine. Connect your throttle pushrod (not
supplied) between the throttle servo and engine. Connect the servo to your receiver’s throttle
channel.
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5. Install your fuel tank (not supplied) behind the engine.
Route the tank’s “clunk” line to the carburetor and
guide the tank-refill line forward, behind and below the
engine.
6. Test-fit and install your engine’s muffler. Guide and
connect your tank’s vent line to the pressure fitting on
the muffler. Install any additional linkages or
connections your engine may require for a glow-plug
driver, choke, etc.
7. Secure the engine mounting box to the nose of your F.2B
by choosing one of the two options explained in step 4
on page 16.
c) BOTH GLOW AND ELECTRIC POWER
1. Use 5-minute epoxy to attach 2 exhaust pipe mounts to their
rectangular openings on each side of the cockpit.
2. Test-fit the fiberglass exhaust pipes into their openings on each side
of the cowl. Align the exhaust pipes with their mounts on the sides of
the fuselage
while test-fitting
the cowl to the
fuselage.
REMINDER: When grinding, drilling or
sanding fiberglass parts, wear safety goggles,
a particle mask and rubber gloves to guard
yourself from eye, skin and respiratory-tract
irritation. If you blow into a fiberglass part,
the dust may blow back into your face.
3. When satisfied with the fit of the exhaust
pipes between the cowl and mounts, apply
epoxy inside the cowl to secure the ends of
the exhaust pipes to the cowl.
4. Trim off any excess length from the portions
of the exhaust pipes inside the cowl. This is
also a good time to open any of the cowl’s
vents you may wish to make functional.
5. Before the epoxy is fully cured, place the cowl on the nose and “fine-tune” the position of the
exhaust pipes to ensure their correct alignment.
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6. With the cowl positioned firmly against the front edge of the fuselage, drill
four 1/16-inch guide-holes through the cowl and into the cowlmounting blocks at approx. 1/4-inch forward of the back edge of
the cowl as shown at the right (pictured without exhaust pipes
for clarity). Attach the cowl using 4 approx. 3/8-inch (1cm)
wood screws. Back out the wood screws and apply CA adhesive
to the cowl-mounting blocks to help protect against vibration.
5 1/2-inches
Reinstall the cowl after the CA is set thoroughly.
7. Balance and mount your propeller on your motor or engine.
8. Position the ‘hatch’
above the prop.
shaft and secure it
in position with its
wooden hinges and
magnets.


IMPORTANT:
After forming threads with
the wood screws, ‘harden’ all
four of the cowl mounting
blocks with thin CA adhesive.
(Use the round “finger hole” to
open the hatch for access to
your EP system’s batteries.)
9. As shown below, secure the simulated exhaust pipes to their mounts with wire ties: draw each
wire tie snug, then cut off and discard the excess length of each wire tie.
E. UPPER & LOWER WING SETS
1. As shown at the right, use a bolt and self-locking nut to
attach a wing-wire anchor to both ends of each of the
8 interplane struts and to the top of each of the
4 cabane struts.
2. Install an approx. 65-inch (165cm) long steel cable
between the left-hand set of wing panels as follows:
a. Use a clevis, threaded rod with locking nut, and
crimp tube to attach the end of an approx. 65inch long steel cable to the cable anchor nearest
the leading edge of the lower wing’s center
section (point A) as shown.
Clevis, threaded rod with nut
and crimp tube
A
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b. Guide the free end of the cable from anchor point A outward, up to the top of the nearest
interplane strut, and guide it through the opening in point B as shown below.
c. From B, continue to guide the end of the cable to and through points C, then to and through
points D and E.
D
I
K
L
B
G
H
A
F
J
E
C
d. After the wire exits point E, slide a crimp tube onto the free end of the cable.
B
e. As shown at the right, guide the free end of the cable to and through anchor
point B, then guide the end of the wire back through the crimp tube.
f. Check and adjust the tension on each segment of the wire to create equal
tension between all points. Form a sharp bend in the wire as it passes
through each point. (NOTE: These wing wires are only “cosmetic.” If the
Crimp
wires are pulled unevenly or too tight, the wings may get warped – and
tube
warped wings might not be easily controllable in flight.)
g. With tension adjusted equally on each segment and a sharp bend formed in the wire at each
anchor point, position the crimp tube approx. 1/4-inch below point B and secure the end of the
wire by using pliers to firmly crimp the tube. Cut off and discard the excess wire.
3. Install a second approx. 65-inch (165cm) long steel cable
to the left pair of wing panels as follows:
F
a. Use a clevis, threaded rod with locking nut and
crimp tube to attach the end of a second approx.
Clevis, threaded rod with
65-inch-long steel cable to the cable anchor nearest the
nut and crimp tube
trailing edge of the lower wing’s center section
(point F).
b. Guide the free end of the cable from anchor point F
outward, up to the top of the nearest interplane strut, and guide it through the opening in point
G.
c. From G, continue to guide the end of the cable to and through points H, then to and through
points I and J.
G
d. After the wire exits point J, slide a crimp tube onto the free end of the cable.
e. Guide the free end of the cable to and through anchor point G, then guide
the end of the wire back through the crimp tube.
f. Check and adjust the tension on each segment of the wire to create equal
tension between all points. Form a sharp bend in the wire as it passes
through each point.
Crimp
g. With tension adjusted equally on each segment and sharp bends formed in
tube
the wire at each anchor point, position the crimp tube approx. 1/4-inch
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below point G and secure the end of the wire by using pliers to firmly
crimp the tube as shown above. Cut off and discard the excess wire.
4. Install an approx. 15-inch (38cm) long steel cable between the left pair of wing panels as follows:
a. Use a clevis, threaded rod with locking nut and crimp tube to attach the end of an approx. 15inch-long steel cable to the cable anchor at the top of the front cabane strut (point K).
b. Slide a crimp tube onto the free end of the cable.
c. Guide the free end of the cable from anchor point K outward and down to the bottom of the
nearest interplane strut and through the opening in point J.
d. Guide the end of the wire back through the crimp tube and adjust the tension between K and J
to be approx. the same as all other wire segments.
e. As shown at the right, position the crimp tube approx.
1/4-inch from point J and secure the end of the wire
by using pliers to firmly crimp the tube. Cut off and
J
discard the excess wire.
5. Install a second approx. 15-inch (38cm) long steel cable
between the left pair of wing panels as follows:
a. Use a clevis, threaded rod with locking nut and crimp
tube to attach the end of an approx. 15-inch-long
steel cable to the cable anchor at the top of the rear
cabane strut (point L).
b. Slide a crimp tube onto the free end of the cable.
c. Guide the free end of the cable from anchor point L outward and down to the bottom of the
nearest interplane strut and through the opening in point E.
d. Guide the end of the wire back through the crimp tube and adjust the tension between L and E
to be approx. the same as all other wire segments.
e. As shown at the right, position the crimp tube approx.
1/4-inch from point J and secure the end of the wire by
using pliers to firmly crimp the tube. Cut off and discard
the excess wire.
E
6. Repeat steps 1 through 6 to install additional 65-inch and
15-inch long steel cables between the right-hand set of wing panels.
F. FINISHING TOUCHES
NOTE: Since the items listed on the following page are ‘cosmetic’ (designed primarily for
appearance), you may install all, any, or none, as you choose.
1. Supplied stick-on markings: Trim as necessary, then
peel and apply as shown in the ‘beauty shot’ on page
one and in the assembly photos throughout this
manual.
2. Wing-tip skids: As shown at the right, use epoxy to
secure both ends of each wire skid into the openings
beneath the outboard interplane struts.
3. Optional machine Gun(s): Use the mounting ring to attach the Parabellum gun(s) as shown below.
4. Optional 1/5 WWI
pilot and observer:
Use epoxy to attach
Twin
Single
the Maxford USA
machine
machine
pilot figures to scrap
guns
gun
wood and use wood
screws to attach the
wood across the
cockpits’ hatch frames as shown above.
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5. Compass: Attach to top wing’s center section with 5-minute epoxy.
6. Optional windshield and pilot’s gunsight:
a. Use epoxy to attach the windshield as explained and pictured on page 7.
b. Form an approx. 1/4-inch
deep by 1/8-inch- wide
opening at the center under
the leading edge of the
upper wing’s center section.
Use epoxy to attach the
gunsight as shown at the
right and below.
7. Optional bomb rack and simulated bombs: As shown at the
right, use CA adhesive to attach two sides to each rack. Use
epoxy to secure the bombs to the racks and the rack’s tabs
into the slotted openings under each side of the bottom wing.
Congra tulations! Assembly is finished!
VII. SETUP & ADJUSTMENTS
1. Center of gravity (CG): For your initial flight we recommend your F.2B should balance when lifted
at a point approx. 2 5/8-inches (67mm) behind the leading edge of the top wing; when correctly
balanced, it will hang level, neither nose up nor nose down. (NOTE: Since we did not spoil the
classic proportions of this WWI biplane by modifying the length of the nose or the tail, some nose
weight will be needed. We recommend the ‘functional’ payload of a larger-capacity battery than
you might normally use, with the benefit of increased flight times. Most of our electric-powered
prototypes were flown with two 4S Lipos connected in series or a single 10S. If stick-on lead
weights are used, position them as far forward as possible to maximize their effectiveness.)
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2. Servo centering and direction: If you fly mode 2, when you pull the right stick toward you, the
elevator should deflect upwards; push the right stick to the right and the right aileron(s) should
deflect upwards and the left aileron(s) should deflect downwards; push the left stick left and the
rudder should deflect to the left as viewed from the rear of the fuselage.
3. Servo end-point adjustments: If you are using a Computer Radio, for initial flights set the elevator,
rudder and aileron linkages for near-maximum-possible deflections and use your transmitter to
add some ‘exponential’ to soften the control throws around center. Initial settings if you are using
a Non-computer Radio:
Recommended Deflections
Elevator ................................................................ 25 degrees (2 3/4 inches) up and down from center
Rudder .................................................................. 30 degrees (3 inches) left and right from center
Ailerons ................................................................ 20 degrees (1 1/4-inch) up and down from center
4. Check the Mylar covering material’s joints and surfaces. If necessary, carefully use an iron on
medium heat to secure the edges and to tighten any loosened areas. Recheck and retighten from
time to time; be careful to not apply too much heat as you secure edges or tighten the Mylar. If
any trim becomes loosened, press it down and/or apply clear tape. Never apply heat to any trim,
insignia, marking or plastic part.
5. Ensure the propeller is securely attached to your motor or engine and remains undamaged and
correctly balanced.
6. As with all radio-controlled model airplanes, your F.2B must pass the radio-range ground check
recommended by your radio’s manufacturer or you may not fly safely.
VIII. STORAGE, FIELD SETUP & PREFLIGHT CHECKS
1. Preparation for Transport & Field Setup:
a) Disconnect the 4 clevises that secure each set upper and lower wing panels to the fuselage.
Gently slide the left- and right side pairs of wing panels approx. 1 to 2 inches away from their
center sections, disconnect the aileron servo extensions from the Y-cables, and pull the wing
panels from their wing rods.
b) To reattach the wings, reverse the above procedure. Be careful to align and slide the upper
and lower sets of wing panels evenly onto their joiner tubes. Reattach the aileron servo
connections and reattach the 4 clevises to their anchor points.
2. Preflight checks:
a) Double-check the security of the motor- or engine-mounting box. Make certain all screws,
clevises and other connections throughout the air frame are secure.
b) Double-check the control directions and amount of control throw of the ailerons, elevator,
rudder and throttle.
c) As with all radio-controlled model airplanes, this model must pass the radio range ground
check recommended by your radio’s manufacturer or you may not fly safely.
d) Make certain your transmitter’s throttle is safely set to minimum before turning ON your
transmitter. Carefully operate your radio-control and power system according to the
manufacturer’s instructions.
Reminder …

This product is NOT a toy.

The quality and capabilities of your finished model airplane depend on how you
assemble it.

Your safety depends on how you use and fly it.

Any testing, flying and use of this model airplane is done entirely at your own risk.
Copyright 2014 Maxford USA
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#S140627
PLEASE ENJOY YOUR HOBBY AND FLY SAFELY!
Manufactured by:
Maxford USA RC Model Mfg, Inc.
Distributed by:
Maxford USA RC Model Distribution, Inc.
Telephone (voice) .......................... (562) 529-3988
15939 Illinois Avenue, #B-C
Paramount, CA 90723
Fax ................................................. (562) 562-6988
Toll free (orders only) .................. (866) 706-8288
Website ........................ www.maxfordusa.com
Order replacement parts, optional accessories, servos, brushless motors,
electronic speed controls, and a wide variety of other high-quality RC hobby
items online at www.maxfordusa.com.
Copyright 2014 Maxford USA
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