Part 1 - Buchty.net
INTRODUCTION
Your new ESQ 1 is actually two powerful devices -- an eight voice, poly-timbral
Digital Synthesizer, and a flexible eight-track MIDI Sequencer -- built into one package.
Whether you plan to use the ESQ 1 by itself, or as the master controller in your MIDI
set-up, you'll find that it is a tool of enormous power and versatility for performing,
recording and composing music.
The Synthesizer
With three Digital Wave Oscillators per voice, thirty-two sampled and synthetic
Waveforms to choose from, and 15 routable Modulation sources, the ESQ 1 is capable
of producing a wida vanety of rich, complex sounds. The five-octave, velocity sensitive
keyboard can be split for different sounds on each half, layered for two sounds playing
together, or even programmed for a Split/Layer mode in which two totally different pairs of
sounds play on each keyboard half.
Forty Programs, or ‘patches’, are stored in the Internal Memory, with another eighty
available on an external, plug-in Cartridge, giving you 120 sounds to select from instantly,
In addition, the eighty-character fluorescent Display shows the names of ten programs at a
time, making it easy to quickly scrall through all the sounds, to find the one you want.
These programs can be played as is, or they can be modified to suit your taste and then
renamed and stored, either in the Internal or the Cartridge Memory.
Editing of ail programs, sequences, and ‘global’ functions {such as Tuning, Bend
Range, etc.) is handled from the informative, 'Page-driven’ Display which shows at a
glance all the parameters associated with a selected function.
Audio outputs are provided for true stereo, as well as a mono output. Programs can
be panned continuously between the left and right channels. The ESQ 1 also has an
Amplitude Modulation (AM) mode which can produce bell and ring-modulator type effects,
anda Sync mode for hard sync effects.
The Sequencer
The built-in Sequencer can record and play back 2400 notes (expandable to
10,000 with the optional Sequencer Expander Carridge). It will store 30 different
Sequences, which can be combined into 10 Songs. Sequences and Songs can be saved
to tape or via MIDI to diskette using an ENSONIQ Mirage Digital Sampling Keyboard or
Mirage Digital Multi-sampler. (You de have a Mirage, don't you”)
It is a full eight track MIDI Sequencer, capable of playing eight separate palyphanic
Tracks internally, each with it$ own sound, or sequencing eight separate MIDI devices at
once; or both. Each Track has an adjustable Output level, a MIDI channel, a Program
number, and a MIDI Status (LOCAL, MIDI or BOTH).
In addition to its own internal clock, the Sequencer can sync to the clock output of
another MIDI device (such as a Drum Machine or another Sequencer}, or record a sync
track to audio tape, and sync to that, to get the most out of any multi-track set-up.
The ESG1 1's Edit functions allow you to easily modify Songs, Sequences,
Tracks, or individual Events in a variety of ways. Quantization {or Auto-Correct} is
available to make each performance letter-perfect. The Auto-Locate controls give you
quick access to any point in a Sequence or Song, and vou can "Punch in" (or out of} а
Track, just like on a tape deck
However, each time you record over any part of a Track, the ESQ 1 gives you the
chance to listen to the new Track, and the original, before you decide which one to keep.
Try that on a tape deck,
Control
In short, the ESQ 1 employs the latest computer technology to combine a
state-of-the-art Digital Synthesizer with a powerful MIDI Sequencer in one manageable,
easy to use instrument, to give you a whole new level of control over your music.
Getting great sounds out of the ESQ 1 is simple -- just read the sections entitled
Getting Started and Getting at the Sounds plug it in and play. Learning to take full
advantage of its tremendous power and versatiliy will take a bit longer, but you'll find that
it's worth the trip.
GETTING STARTED
Power
Insert the Power Cable into the receptacle on the back of the ESQ 1, next to the
On/Off switch. Plug the other end of the cable into a grounded AC outlet. {The proper
voltage for your ESQ 1 is listed on the Serial Number Label оп the Rear Panel.) Turn on
the ESQ $ and make sure the Display lights up. If not, check your connections and power
Source.
Amplification
Make sure your Audio system is turned off (or down) when making connections. to
avoid damaging speakers or other components.
Connect the Audio Outputs of the ESQ 1 to a mixer, instrument amplifier, stereo. or
any other sound system, using 1/4 inch audio cables. If your system is stereo, connect the
Left and Right Outputs to two channels of your mixer, stereo, etc. If not, use the ESQ 1's
Left / Mong Output only.
If you're running the ESQ 1 through a mixer, in stereo, be sure to pan the Left input
fully left, and the Right input fully right.
Basic Connections
AC Power Mixer Haute Outputs
ESQ 1
Move the Volume Fader of the ESQ 1 up about half way. Switch the audio
system On, and adjust the amplifier volume for normal listening levels. If you hear no
sound while playing the keyboard, switch the audio system Off and check your
connections.
REAR PANEL CONNECTIONS
Cl
FPE MIDI Out MIDI In
Left? СУ, Tape Tape Sequencer Sustain =
Right Mone Pedal In Out Fi Sw. Ft Sw
Rear Panel Connections
(Mote: The order of the connéclors on your unit might differ from the above diagran, but thay will function exactly the same.
AUDIO OUTPUTS:
1) Right -- To operate the ESQ 1 in Stereo, connect this Output to a channel of
your Mixer and pan that channel Right. If nothing is connected to this jack, bath
channels of the ESQ 1' s Output will be combined and sent out the Left / Mono
Output.
2) Left / Mono — When operating the ESQ 1 in Stereo, connect this Output to a
channel of your Mixer and pan that channel Left. To operate the ESQ 1 in Mono,
use this jack only. Again, if nothing has been connected to the Right Cutput jack,
the Left / Mono jack will produce a Mono signal that is the sum of the two
channels of the ESQ 4's Output.
Space: (Both Audio Cutputsi: 1 KOhm output impedance, DC coupled. Line level output ints 10
K.Ohms or higher {one voica=1 Vp-p typical; all voices= 15 YE-p)
3) CY / Pedal
This jack is for connecting an optional ENSONIQ Model SW-10 Control Voltage
Foot Pedal, which is assignable as a Modulator in the Program Section of the
ESQ 1. The Pedal gives you a handy alternative Modulation source when, for
example, you would want to use the Mod Wheel but both hands are busy.
Specs: 3-conductor (Tip=control voltage input, Ring=2KOhm resistor to +12 Vols, Sleeves
ground). 500 Kohm input impedance, DC coupled. Input voltage range=0 16 10 volts DC Sean
rate=5mS (maximum recommended modulation Input= 25 Hz). For use with an external control
voltage, use a 2-conductor cable with the voltaga on the tip and the sleeve grounded.
4) Tape In
This jack can be connected to the output of an audio tape recorder and used for
ane of three purposes:
----> To Load and Verify Program or Sequencer Data which has been saved to
Tape,
“===> TO read an incoming Clock Signal {or sync track) which has been recorded to tape,
for the purpose of synchronizing the Sequencer to an audio tape recording, or
-===> To read an incoming Clock Signal from another sequencing device (a drum
machine, or other sequencer) for the purpose of synchronizing the ESQ 1
Sequencer to that device without MIDI connections. To do this simply connect the
Tape Out or Clock Out jack of the other device to the Tape In jack of the ESQ 1,
and set the ESQ 1's Clock Select for Tape Sync (see CONTROL Page).
Specs: 10 Kohm input impedánce, AC coupled. Triggers trom 500 mYp-p ue to 6 Vo-p, AC or DC
caupled. 500 Hz maximum respanss far sync.
2) Tape Qut
Connect this Jack to the Input of a Tape Recorder to:
----> Lave Program or Séquence Data to Audio Tape, or
«=== Send out a Clock Signal {or sync track) to be recorded on audio tape so that you
can synchronize the Sequencer to that track.
Or,
«<<<; Connect this Jack to the Tape In jack of another sequencing device, and set that
device for Tape Sync, to sync It to the ESQ T's clock without MIDI connections.
Specs: 22 Kohm output impedance, AC coupled. Drives 1 Vp-p into 10 KOhms {line level) and
down to 100 mYyp-p into 1 KShm mic level.
6) Sequencer Foot Switch
This ¡ack 1s for an ENSONIQ Model SW-1 Foot Switch. A Foot Switch connected
here can be used to start and step the Sequencer.
7) Sustain Foot Switch
This [ack also takes an ENSONIQ Model SW-1 Foot Switch. This switch acts as
a Sustain Pedal. Holding it down will cause notes to continue to sustain after the
key has been released.
* *** Note: The ENSONIQ Model SW-1 Foot Switch is wired with the contact
Normally Open. Some other manufacturers’ footswitches are wired this way, and
will work. with the ESQ 1. Some are wired the opposite way (Normally Closed)
and will not work properly with the ESQ 1.
8) MIDI Out
This jack sends out MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) information to other
Instruments and computers.
3) MIDI In
Receives cut MIDI information from other MIDI instruments or computers.
About the Programmer
Everything you do on the ESQ 1 -- whether it's selecting a Sound, editing that
Sound, adjusting the Master Tuning, or operating the Sequencer, -- is controlled from the
section of the Front Panel called the Programmer.
The Programmer is made up of:
«===> The 80 character flucrescent Display,
--==3 The ten grey Buttons directly above and below the Display,
«===> The Data Entry Slider to the left of the Display,
====> The two white Up and Down Arrow Buttons to the left of the Data Entry Slider,
«===> The Compare Button, and
~===3 The Write Button.
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Programmer
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The Programmer is primarily used to Select and modify ihings -- Sounds,
Program Parameters, Tuning, Sequencer Control functions, etc. -- all depending on which
Front Panel Button you press. Try pressing a few of the other buttons -- MASTER, OSC 4,
DCA 1, or FILTER, for example -- and watch the Display. Notice that for each button you
press, the Display changes to show you information related to that function. Each of these
different Display configurations is called a Page.
The ten Buttons above and below the Display have a new function each time you
salect a new Page -- that is, gach time you press one of the buttons outside the
Programmer section. Each of these ten buttons is used ta select whatever is directly
above or below it on the display. Whatever you select in this manner Is immediately
undertined, telling you that it is the current Program, Parameter, er Sequence, etc.
An in-depth description of the Programmer and its functions follows in the Section
entitled PROGRAMMING THE ESQ 1.
7
GETTING AT THE SOUNDS
Master Banks
Each of the three Master Banks, (INTERNAL, CART A and CART B)
designates a large area of memory which contains forty Programs. To play the Programs
in the Internal Memory, press the INTERNAL Button.
Ez a
Master Banks
Internal Memory
The ESQ 1 holds 40 different Sounds, or "patches” in its Internal Memory. We
reter to these Sounds as Programs. Progams can be selected using the Master Bank
Button labeled INTERNAL, the four Bank Select Buttons, and the ten Buttons located
directly above and below the Display. The Internal Memory retains its data even when
the power is Off.
Cartridge Memory
Before you can select the other two Master Banks, CART A and CART B, an
ENSONIG E? PROM Storage Cartridge must be inserted in the Cartridge slot. The
procedures for playing, editing and saving Cartridge sounds are identical to those for
Internal sounds. When a Cartridge has been inserted, all three Master Banks are
instantly available.
The E2 PROM Cartridge also retains its data when the power is Off, whether or not
it is plugged into the ESQ 1 Cartridge slot. When there is no Cartridge in the slot,
pressing CART A or CART B will have no effect.
Bank Select Buttons
The four Bank Select Buttons, located to the right of the Master Bank Buttons,
and labeled 1 through 4, are used to call up the Programs in Memory. ten at a time,
allowing you to then select the one you want to play.
Fress Bank Select Button #1, and the Display shows you the names of the ten
Programs in Bank 1. This is the Program Select Page for Bank 1. Press Bank
Select Button #2, and the Display shows you the names of the ten Programs in Bank 2.
And so on.
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Bank Select
Selecting a Program -- INTERNAL
Now that you've selected one of the four Banks, you can see the names of the ten
Programs in that Bank. Say you selectad Bank 1. The Display should look like this:
INT 1 PIANO! MRIMBA HORN3T BO STR DIGPNO
Pressing the button above or below any of the ten Program names selects that
Program as the current sound. Try selecting and playing a few different sounds. Notice
that when you select a Program, its name is underlined.
The currently selected Program is always underlined.
Notice also that in the upper-left corner of the Display you will always find the
Page Name, which corresponds to the name of the button (or buttons} you pressed to get
to that Page. (In this case, INT 1, meaning INTERNAL Memory, Bank 1.)
Press the other three Bank Select Buttons #2, 3 and 4 to get to the other 30
Pragrams in the Internal Memory, and select them in the same way. Note that displaying a
new Bank or Master Bank does not affect the selected Program. A new Program can gnly
be selected by pressing one of the ten buttons above and below the Display.
To Select an Internal Sound:
-===3 Press INTERNAL.
====› Press Bank Select #1, 2, 3, or 4.
-=-=> Select a Program by pressing the Button above or below a Program Name.
Selecting a Program -- Cartridge
First, insert an ENSONIQ EZ PROM Storage Cartridge in the Cartridge Slot as
shown below, with the label facing towards you.
Program Cartridge
Volume
Now follow the same procedure outlined above, except that instead of pressing
INTERNAL, first press CART À or CART B.
To Select a Cartridge Sound:
===> Press CART À ог САНТ В.
----> Press Bank Select #1, 2, 3.or4.
----> Select a Program by pressing the Button above or below a Program Name.
. Cartridge Insertion and Removal
Tha EZ PROM Cartridge can be inserted or removed at any time (except while
youre Writing Programs to it), even when the ESQ 1's power is On, without doing any
harm to the ESQ 1 or the Cartridge. If the Cartridge is removed while a Cartridge
Program is selected, the Display instantly switches to Internal Bank #1, and the
Cartridge Sound disappears, replaced by the first sound in Bank 1, which becomes the
selectad Program.
Battery Maintainance
The reason that the ESQ 1 "remembers" Programs and other parameters, even
when the power is OFF, is that all of its Internal HAM (Random Access Memory) is "Battery
Backed-up”. {This includes the Sequencer Memory as well as all Program and “Global”
parameters.) The Battery that keeps the ESQ 1's Memory intact is located inside the
ESQ 1, and when it becomes discharged, it must be replaced by an authorized
ENSONIQ Repair Station.
The Battery that came in your ESQ 1 is good for up to six years of lite. You will
know when it needs replacing, because the ESQ 1 will tell you so. One day you will
switch the Power ON, and instead of its usual wake-up message, the Display will read:
WARNING -- BATTERY VOLTAGE IS LOW
SAVE DATA AND CONSULT OWNERS MANUAL
When this message appears, you should make sure that all Programs and
Sequencer Data are saved to tape, Cartridge or Mirage, and then take the ESQ 1 to an
authorized ENSONIQ Repair Station as soon as possible to have the Battery replaced.
Available Options
These optional accessories are available from your ENSONIQ dealer:
==--> ENSCHNIQ Model SW 1 Foot Switch -- For Voice sustain or Starting and
Stopping the Sequancer.
----> Model STC-8 E? PROM Storage Cartridge -- For Storing the Programs you
create.
---"> Model STC-8A, STC-8B, etc. Program Cartridges -- ENSONIQ will
regularly release new versions of the E2 PROM storage cartridge, each with 80 all
new Factory- programmed Sounds.
----> Model SQX-10 SEQUENCER EXPANDER Cartridge -- To expand
Sequencer Memory from 8k to 32k of RAM, or up to 10,000 notes.
----> Model СУР-10 CV PEDAL -- A Control Voltage Foot Pedal which can be
assigned as a Modulator within the Voice section of the ESQ 1.
10
SECTION 2 -- PROGRAMMING THE ESQ 1
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12
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14
15
15
16
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18
20
25
25
22
cb
26
26
27
27
23
31
31
31
32
33
36
36
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38
39
40
41
42
44
46
45
50
53
60
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ABOUT PAGE-DRIVEN PARAMETRIC PROGAMMING
Parametric Programming
Pages
Soft” Buttons
USING THE PROGRAMMER
Changing a Parameter
*C* — Change/Compare
Edit Buffer
Bailing aul
Active and inactive Bultons
"GLOBAL" PAGES:
MASTER -- Master Tuning, Velocity Sensitivity, and Bend Range
MIDI -- MIDY Parameters
WAVEFORMS
Digital Waveform Memory
What's 3 Waveform?
Synthetic Waveforms
Sampled and Multisampled Waveforms
Names
Selecting a Wavelorm
Check Them Cut
The Waveforms
MODULATORS
About Modulation
Selecting a Modulator
Modulation Depth
Modulation Sources
USING MODULATORS
Modulating Oscillator Yolume
Negative Modulation
Modulating the Filter Cutof! Frequency
Limils of Modulation
VOICE ARCHITECTURE -- AN ESQ 1 VOICE
PROGRAMMING PAGES
OSC 4-3 -- Oscillator Pitch Page
DCA 1-3 -- Qscillator Volume Page
FILT -- Filter Page
DCA 4 -- Final Volume Page
LFD 1-3 -- Low-Frequency Oscillator Page
Understanding The Envelopes
ENV 1-4 -- Envelopa Page
MODE -- Modes Page
SplitLayer -- Splitting the keyboard and Layering Programs
PROGRAMMING CONVENTIONS
11
. ABOUT PAGE-DRIVEN PARAMETRIC PROGRAMMING
To modify or "edit" programs, the ESQ 1 employs a method known as
Page-driven parametric programming. Sounds scary, but don't worry. Once you've
mastered a few basic concepts you'll find that programming the ESQ 1 is really quite
simple, given its enormous flexibility. You'll soon appreciate the ease and clarity with
which it allows you to modify, or just keep track of, a great many variables.
Parametric programming
You may well have already encountered some form of parametric
programming on other synthesizers. What this means is that instead of having a
separate knob or Slider for each function, you have one master Data Entry Slider, and
two buttons, which adjust the value of whichever parameter vou select.
This approach has many advantages, the most obvious of which is that it greatly
reduces the amount of hardware-- knobs, switches, faders, etec.-- needed to control à wide
variety of functions. (If the ESQ 1 had a separate control for each function, it would
hterally have hundreds of knobs.) The disadvantages has often been that you were only
able ta See the value of one parameter at a time, making it hard to keep track of things.
This 15 where the Page concept comes in.
Pages
The ESQ 1's 80 character fluorescent Display makes it possible to display
information in Pages. For each function you select, the Display shows you its "Page",
which contains all the information (all the parameters) related to that function.
You can think of the ESQ 1 in relation to a book -- each time you press one of the
Programming buttons on the front panel, you ars in effect "turning to” that function's Page.
Once you have turned to the Page you want, the Display shows you which parameters are
controlled from that Page. To activate a control, simply press the button direcly above or
below its name on the Display.
"Soft" Buttons
The ten Buttons above and below the Display thus have multiple functions -- what
they select depends upon which Page is being displayed. Whenever you select a new
Page, these ten Buttons serve to select whatever parameters are displayed on that Page.
We call these "Soft" Buttons, to distinguish them from buttons which have fixed,
“Hard,” functions, such as the Bank Buttons.
Not all "Soft" buttons are active on all Pages. Only those buttons related to a
selectable parameter will be active on a given Page.
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12
“Soft” Рети
Buttons 6040 EN
USING THE PROGRAMMER
Changing a Parameter
Suppose yau want to adjust the pitch of Oscillator 1. Select the Program called
BASIC in the Internal Memory. Now press the front panel Button labeled OSC 1:
OSC1 OCT=+8 SEMI=95 FINE=88 WAVE= SAW
MODS = LEO! X +65 XDFFÉ * +60
In the top left-hand corner of the Display you will always find the Name of the Раде,
which corresponds to that of the button you pressed. To the right of that are the various
parameters which can be selected and modified from this page.
13
To raise or lower the pitch of Oscillator 1 by an octave, press the button directly
above where it says OCT= . This segment of the Display will now be underlined, telling
you that it has been selected, and can he modified.
The currently selected parameter on a Page is always underlined.
Now that you have selected a parameter to be modified (CCT=__), use the Data
Entry Slider and/or the Up and Down Arrow buttons to the left of the Display to adjust
its value. Moving the Slider will scroll quickly up and down through the available range of
values. Pressing the Up and Down Arrow buttons will increase or decrease the value
one step at a time,
To select and modify another parameter on the same Page, press the button
above or below its name. That parameter will now be underlined, and its value can be
adjusted as before, with the Data Entry Slider and the Up and Down Arrow buttons.
You'll notice that when changing Program parameters on the ESQ 1, you must
restrike a key in order to hear the change. If you are holding down a key {or keys) when
you change a parameter, you won't hear any difference until you release the key and play
it {or any other key) again.
If you select another Page {DCA 1 for instance), change some parameter on that
Page, and then return to the OSC 1 Page, the parameter you had last selected will still
be underlined. The ESQ 1 always "remembers" which parameter was last selected on à °
given Page, even when the power is turned off.
Be sure that the parameter you want to edit is selected before moving the Data
Entry Slider or the Up and Down Arrow Buttons. Some parameter is always
selected on any given Programming Page.
*С* -- Change/Compare
As soon as you change any parameter in a program, a *C* will appear in the lower
left-hand corner of the Display, below the Page Name. It will remain there until you select
another Program or save (Write) the newly edited Program into memory.
OSCI OCT=+64 SEMI=B8 FINE:B3 WAYE= SAW
ЖСЖ MODS = LEO! X +95 XOFFE Xx +89
Fai и
Change /Comparel gm
Prompt |
Once a parameter change of any kind has been made, the *C* prompt will appear
14
in the corner of every programming Page you select -- not just on the Page that has been
modified, This is à constant reminder that something in the Program has been changed.
To hear the original, unchanged, Program, press the button labeled COMPARE.
The *C* will disappear; you will hear the original sound and see the Page with its original
settings. Press COMPARE again to return to your edited sound. You can togale back
and forth between the original and the edited sound as often as you like.
Edit Buffer
You can edit a Program, while keeping the original Program intact, because the
edited version is kept in a special area of Memory called the Edit Buffer. Whenever you
change any parameter of a Program, the altered Program is put in the Edit Buffer,
replacing whatever was previously there. Only ene Program at a time can reside there --
the Edit Euffer always contains the results of your last edit.
If you like the results ot the changes you have made to à Program, you should
rename It and save the new Program permanently, to another Location, The procedure for
this is covered in Section 3.
when you press the COMPARE Button, what you are doing is alternating between
the Program in the original Memory Location and the Program in the Edit Buffer. We refer
to the Program in the Edit Buffer as the Edit Program.
You can return to the Edit Program, even after selecting another Program (as long
as you don't change any parameters there) by pressing the Compare Button. This puts
you back in the Edit Buffer, and any changes you make will affect the Edit Program.
The rule of thumb is this: Whatever Sound you hear, that's what you're editing.
Bailing Out °
should you degide, while editing a Program, that you're not happy with what
youve done, and you want to stat over with the onginal Program, just go to the proper
Program Select Page and select the Program again. Then you can start editing the
Program again from scratch. You will lose the one you were working on before,
15
Active and Inactive Buttons
As mentioned previously, not all buttons are active on a given Page. Throughout
this Manual, whenever a Page is depicted, the active buttons will be shown in grey, the
inactive ones in white. Taking the example used above, the OSC 1 Page would appear
[lke this:
cs J
USCI OCT=+8 SEMI=8O FINE=B3 WAYE= SAW
MODS = LFOI X +85 1 XOFFX X +00
Also, for consistency's sake, these buttons will always be refered to by location
number -- from upper left to lower right, 1 through 10, as shown below:
2 3 4 2
05021 QCT=+8 SEMI=fH FINE=K3 WAYE= SAW
MODS = LEO! * +05 ЖОРЕЖ X +89
50 we sep that on the OSC 1 Page, Buttons number 1, 2, 3,5, 7, 6, 9, and 10 are
active -- they can be pressed to select a parameter to be modified. Buttons 4 and 6 are
Inactive on this Page, Pressing them will have no effect.
16
"GLOBAL" PAGES
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The Parameters on the following Pages are Keyhoard-wide, or “Global. Their
settings will not change with different Programs, but will remain the same whichever |
Program is selected.
17
[MASTER] MASTER PAGE
Controls Keyboard Tuning, Velocity Sensltivity and Bend Range.
Раде Master Yelocity
name Tuning Senaitivity
Ad] ust
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MASTER TUNE= +99 VELOCITY= SOFT
BEND- RANGE= 92 MODE= ALL
—) core
Pitch Bend | Pitch Bend
| vi heel Range Mode |
(Inactive Buttons appear in White)
The parameters on this page are keyboard-wide, or "Global" The settings here will
not change with different Programs selected, but will remain in effect for whatever Program
you are playing.
Aside from Master Tuning and overall Velocity Sensitivity, this page also contains a
control tor selecting between Pitch Bend Modes -- normal operation, where the Bend
Whee! affects all notes; and a special "Held" mode in which the Bend Wheel only affects
those Keys which are being held down.
These settings, like all ESQ 1 parameters, will be "remembered" even when the
ESQ 1 is turned OFF.
Use this Page to:
1) Adjust the Master Tuning of the keyboard;
2) Adjust the overall Velocity Sensitivity of the Instrument;
3) Set the range of the Pitch Bend Wheel: and
4) Select a Pitch Bend Mode.
18
[MASTER] MASTER PAGE (contd)
ACTIVE CONTROLS:
2. TUNE
Master Tune Adjust. Tunes the Keyboard to the desired Pitch. A setting of
TUNE= +00 will yield Concert A=440 tuning. The total range of this control 15
about a half step {semitone} up or down.
Range: -31 To #31.
5. VELOCITY
= =
= = = = 5
== Ъ
Velocity Sensitivity Adjust. This parameter determines the responsiveness of
all Velocity-related parameters on the ESQ 1. You can adjust it to suit your own
touch -- that is, how hard you play.
The three available settings are:
SOFT -- This is for someone with a light touch. On this setting, a minimum of force
is required to reach the maximum level of any Velocity-controlied parameter.
MED -- Medium sensitivity. This setting should be right for the player with an
average touch.
HARD -- This setting is tor the player who really digs in. It provides the widest
possible range of velocity sensitivity.
9. BEND RANGE
Pitch Bend Wheel Range. Adjusts how far the Pitch Bend Wheel will bend a
note Up or Down. Each increment represents a Semitone.
Range: 0 To 12.
10. BEND MODE
= ==}
= эн >
Pitch Bend Wheel Mode. Selects between two modes of operation for the Pitch
Bend Wheel. There are two Modes:
ALL -- Moving the Pitch Bend Wheel will affect the pitch of all notes that are being
played. This is how most Pitch Wheels usually operate.
HELD -- In this Mode, only those keys that are being held down when you move
the Pitch Wheel will be affected by the wheel. Keys that have been released will
not bend, even if they are being sustained by holding down the Sustain Foot
Switch. This enables you to bend certain notes while others remain unchanged in
pitch. With a little practice you can simulate guitar and pedal steel-type techniques,
and many other interesting effects.
19
[MIDI] MIDI PAGE
Controls MID! Functions
Page | MID] MIDI Select
name Channel | Overflow External
\ = | Mode Controller
Pressure
(Aftertouch}
Select
SE CJ
Z
\ / \ 7
MIDI CHANz @1 OVFL=0F XCTRL=92 PRESS: OFF
ODE=OMN ENABLE = KEYS CONTROLLERS
MID
Mode
Mi DI
Enables
{Inactive Buttons appear in White)
From this Page you control the MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface)
Configuration of the ESQ 1. The MIDI implementation of the ESQ 1 is a bit more
involved than most synthesizers, because of its built-in sequencer. In many ways, each
Track of a Sequence acts like a separate little synthesizer. We need some way to
distinguish between "Normal" Synth operation (which is what this half of the Manual is
concerned with) and what happens when one of the Tracks of a sequence is selected.
Accordingly, when n n rack iS selected, we call this the "Straight
Synth™ mode. In "Straight Synth" operation, the keyboard is entirely independent of the
Sequencer. You are automatically put in this mode whenever you select a Program in the
usual way. Most of the time you are in the "Straight Synth" section of the ESQ 1 -- you
dont have to do anything special to get there. The only way to leave "Straight Synth"
operation Is 10 deliberately select one of the Tracks of a Séquence.
Use this Page to:
1) Select a MIDI Channel:
2) Turn On or Off the MID! Overflow Mode:
3) Select an External Controller to be used as a Modulator:
4) Enable Pressure (Aftertouch) as an external MIDI Controller:
5) Select a MIDI Mods: and
6) Determino which types of information will be sent and received over MIDI by
the ESQ т.
20
[MIDI]
MIDI PAGE (Cont'd)
ACTIVE CONTROLS:
1. CHAN -- Base MIDI Channel
We call this the Base Channel. lItis the MIDI Channel that the "Straight Synth”
section of ESQ 1 will send and receive MIDI information on when ng Sequencer
Track is selected. When a Track is selected, that Track will receive on the Base
Channel ¡f the ESQ 1 is in POLY Mode.
Any of the sixteen MIDI Channels may be selected. Range: 01 To 16.
The ESQ 1's "Straight Synth" section will always send MID! information on the
Base Channel, and only on this channel. Which Channel (or Channels) it receives
on depends upon this setting and which MIDI Mede 1s selected (ses #6 below),
2. OVFL -- MIDI Overflow Mode
MIDI Overflow Mode is a unique feature of the ESQ 1 that allows two units
connected together by MIDI to act like a single 16 Voice synthesizer.
When OFF: The ESQ 1 will behave normally, sending out all enabled MIDI data.
When ON: The ESQ 1 will send out no MIDI data until all eight Voices are playing,
and another key is struck. At this point, instead of "stealing" a Voice to play the new
note, it sends that note out over MIDI. lawil continue sending notes dut MIDI until
there is an internal Voice available toplay a note.
Note: Overflow Mode will work exactly the same way with any other synth sel
up to receive MIDI Data from the ESQ 1. However, the effect of a diferent synth,
with a different patch, picking up and playing whenever the ESQ 1 runs out of
voices will be unpredictable at best.
4. XCTRL -- Select External Controller
One of the Modulators that can be selected in the Programming section of the ESQ
4 is XCTAL -- External Controller. Each Controller on a Synthesizer {Breath
Controller, MOD Wheel, or Pressure, for example} has a standardized MIDI
number, which is the number you select here to make a particular Controller a
Modulator in any of your Programs.
Suppose, for example, that you are driving the ESQ 1 from a keyboard with a
Breath Controller {or want to use Breath Controller as a Modulator when playing
the ESQ 1 Keyboard). You can set up a Program on the ESQ 1 where the Filter
Cutoff Frequency, or some other Manual Level, is modulated by XCTRL. Then
assign this parameter a value of XCTRL= 02. The Breath Controller will now
modulate the Filter, ar whatever, on this Program. The chart on the next page lists
the accepted MIDI Controller numbers.
21
[MIDI] MIDI PAGE (Cont'd)
The following Controller Numbers have been agreed upon:
Number Controller Number Controller
1 Modulation Whee] 66 Sostenuto Pedal
2 Breath Controller 92 Tremelo
4 Foot Pedal Controller 93 Chorus
6 Data Entry Slider 94 Celeste
7 Volume Fedal 95 Phaser
Though the range of this Control is from 01 to 85, most of the values other than
those listed above have no accepted function, as yet They are there to
accommodate future MIDI standards.
>. PRESS -- Pressure (Aftertouch) Select
=
я = == 3
Pressure (also called Aftertouch) is available as a Modulator on many
synthesizers and Keyboard Controllers. The ESQ 1, and its Sequencer, can
receive Pressure via MIDI from those keyboards which send it. There are two types
of Pressure -- Channel Pressure and Key Pressure. This control has three
possible states:
PRESS=OFF -- Tha ESQ 1 will not receive any Pressure information. All such
information will be ignored.
PRESS=CHAN -- This enables the ESQ 1 to receive the most common type of
Pressure -- Channel Pressure. With Channel Pressure, after a note is played,
pressing down harder on the key modulates every note currently playing. Like a
MOD Wheel, Channel Pressure is "Global" -- it affects the entire keyboard when
activated.
PRESS=KEY -- This enables the ESQ 1 to receive another type of Pressure --
Key Pressure. Key Pressure (also called Polyphonic Pressure) only modulates
the note that is pressed -- all others remain unmodulated.
You should consult the Manual of the MIDI instrument you will be using in
conjunction with the ESQ 1 and its Sequencer, to see which, if any, type of
Pressure it has.
6. MODE -- Select MIDI Mode
The MIDI Mode determines how MIDI information will be received by the ESQ 1
and its Sequencer. The MIDI Mode has no effect on what is sent -- The "Straight
Synth” Section and eight Tracks of the Sequencer will always send on their
selected MIDI channels. There are four MIDI Modes that can be selected here:
22
[MIDI]
== y
==. у
MIDI PAGE (Cont'd)
OMNI -- In OMNI Mode the "Straight Synth" section of the ESQ 1 will receive on
any of tha sixteen MIDI channels, when no Track is selected, If ong of the eight
Tracks of a Sequancs is selected, then the Track will receive any enabled MIDI
data on any channel.
POLY -- In POLY Mode the "Straight Synth" section of the ESQ 1 will receive
- Only on the Base MIDI channel! (see #1 above). Midi information an all other
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2)
3)
channels will be ignored. If any of the eight Tracks of a Sequence is selected, then
the Track will receive incoming MID! data, only on the Base channel.
MULTI -- MULTI Mode is an ENSONIQ innovation which was specially
designed to make optimal use of the ESQ 1's Sequencer. In MULTI Mode the
“Straight Synth" section and each of the Saquencer's eight Tracks can send and
receive MIDI information independently on a different MIDI Channel.
The “Straight Synth” wilt send and receive on the Base Channel selected on this
Page (#1 above). Each Track of a Sequence will send and receive on its selected
Channel (selected on the Mix/ Midi Page in the Sequencer Section).
Different MIDI Channels should be selected for each Track! If the same
MIDI Channel is selected twice, priority is given first to the "Straight Synth” and then
to the lowest numbered Track that shares the Channel. For example:
1 MIDI Channel 1 is selected on this Page for the "Straight Synth”, and Channel 1
is also selected for Tracks 1 and 3, the "Straight Synth” will receive on Channel 1,
and Tracks 1 and 3 will receive nothing. Or;
IF MID) Channe! 6 15 selected for Tracks 2, 4, and 7, then Track 2 will receive on
Channel 6, and Tracks 4 and 7 will receive nothing.
MONO -- Before MULTI Mode was developed, MONO Mode was about the
only way to have a poly-timbral synthesizer. ft is particularly useful for driving the
ESQ 1 from a Guitar Controller, or any other application where having up to eight
independent, monophonic, Channels is desirable.
When MONO Mode is selected:
The "Straight Synth" section becomes Monophonic -- only one note will play at a
time. Unlike the usual Mono Mode of the ESQ 1, in this state there is no Note
Memory -- releasing one note does not retrigger another note which is being held.
The "Straight Synth" Section doses not receive any MIDI information at all.
The Base MIDI Channel selected on this Page (#1 above) will be received by
Track 1 of the Sequencer. Track 2 will receive on the next Channel, Track 3 on the
next, and so on. The Base Channel cannot have a value greater than nine.
23
. [MIDI]
MIDI PAGE (Cont'd)
The chart below shows the MIDI channels that will be received by the eight Tracks,
in MONO Mode, for the possible Base Channels:
If Base Channel - Î 2 3 я 5, 6 7 A a
Track 1 receives on 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Iracke tt 2.3.4 5 6 1 8 8% 90
Track 3 ло 3.04.5 6 1 BB 9 10 11
Track 4 4 2.6 1.8 910 11 12
Irack 5 7. 500 >…6 1.8 9 10 11 12 13
Track - oo 6 1 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
Track 7 2e Te 7... B_.9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Track 8 fi 9 10 11 17 13 14 15 16
4) The Base Channel Minus One becomes a global MIDI Channel for Controllers
(Pitch bend, Pressure, MOD Wheel, etc.). For example, if the Base Channel| is
Chan. 3, any Controllers received on Chan 2 will affect all the Tracks. If the
Base Channel is Chan. 1, Chan. 16 becomes the Global Channel for
Controllers. |
1) ENABLE -- MIDI Enables
== а = }
== |
E de чан }
ww N
= =
This parameter determines what kinds of MID! information will be sent and received
by the ESQ-1, including the receiving of MIDI Song Selects (see p. 169). There
are five possible states for this parameter:
KEY EVENTS ONLY -- In this stale the ESQ 1 will send and receive only notes thai are played on
the Keyboard, along with Sang Selects (Song Selects are abays senti. Controllers (such as MOD
Wheel, Pitch Bend, etc), Program changes, and Parameter Changes will nol be sent or received,
Song Selects will not be received.
KEYS + CONTROLLERS -- Key Evenis and Gonirallers only will be received. Parameter
Changes and Song Selects will be sent, but not received. Program changes will not be seni or
received,
KEYS + CT + PROG CHNG -- Key Events, Controllers, and Program Changes will be sent and
received in this Mode. This means that changing Programs ao the ESQ 1 will instruct a slave unit to
change to the same numbered Program; or, if the ESQ 1 is being driven by another keyboard,
Program changes made on that keyboard will cause the ESQ 1 to change lo the same-rumbered
Program. Again, Parameler Changes and Song Sélects are sent but not received.
KEYS + CT + PC + SNGSL -- Same as KEYS + CT + PROG CHNG above, with the addition
that MIDI Song Select messages will also be received. Key Events, Controllers, Program Changes
and Song Selects wili be sent and received in this Mode.
KEYS + CT + PC + 55 + 8X -- Key Evenis, Controllers, Program Changes. Song Selects and
System Exclusive messages will all be received via MIDI in this Mode. This enables the ESO 4 to
receiva System Exclusive messages, such as Parameter Changes, Program Dumps, Sequencer Data,
etc. Any Parameter {Program or Global) that is changed on the ESQ 1 will also be changed on
another ESQ 1 connected to the first by MIDI.
24
WAVEFORMS
Digital Waveform Memory
The same Digital technology that allowed the ENSONIQ Mirage to make Digital
Sampling affordable gives the ESQ 1 its ability to play complex sounds from "the real
world”. The ESQ 1's three Digital Oscillators, rather than just producing simple sawtooth
or square waves, actually "read" from memory whichever Waveforms they are instructed to
play.
The ESQ 1 has 32 different Waveforms stored in its Digital Waveform
Memory. Some of these Waveforms have been sampled (digitally recorded) from real
musical sources; others have been created synthetically.
What's a Waveform?
The Waveforms are the "raw material” of the sounds that the ESG 1 makes. A
waveform is a single cycle of a sound wave. It is Digitized, or converted into a series of
numbers, and stored in the ESQ 1's Digital Waveform Memory. When you play a
note, each of the ESQ 1's three Oscillators "reads" the proper Waveform from the
Memory, similar to the way a Compact Disc player reads the music on the disc when you
play a CD.
By rapidly repeating this single cycle over and over, the Oscillator can produce a
pitched sound which becomes a continuous Sound wave:
One Cycle
Single Cycle Waveform Played Repeatedly
Unlike the sounds generated by analog oscillators, Digital Waveforms can be very
complex, and can contain any combination of harmenics -- frequencies that are multiples
of the wave's fundamental frequency. Every Waveform has its own unique Spectrum,
which is the number and amplitude of harmonics present in the Wave, It is this Spectrum
which gives évery sound its own identifiable characteristics.
25
Synthetic Waveforms
Most of the Waveforms in ESQ 1’ Digital Waveform Memory have been generated
synthetically, using a number of different techniques, to create a variety of Waves which
contain specitic harmonics in specific amounts. By assigning different combinations of
these synthetic Waveforms to the three Oscillators, it is possible to create sounds with
almost any timbral characteristics.
Sampled and Multisampled Waveforms
Other Waveforms are sampled -- a single cycle of a sound wave from some real
musical source has been isolated and stored in Memory. By playing back these
Waveforms in the manner described above, it is possible to synthesize sounds that capture
the character of the Source instrument in a way that no ordinary synthesizer can,
some of the ESQ 1's Waveforms (such as the Piano Waveform) have been
Multisampled -- that is, different waves play in different ranges of the instrument. This is
because many sounds lose their realism if they are transposed too far from their source.
The lowest note on a piano, if transposed up three octaves, doesn't sound like a piano any
more. Neither does the highest note transposed down three octaves. Orto use another
example -- take a recording of a human voice and play it back twice as fast. Does it sound
ike a human voice? No. What does it sound like? Chipmunks.
Multisampling means that the low notes of the Piano Waveform were sampled from
a low note on the piana, the middle notes were sampled from a middle note, and so on.
50 really you get more than 32 Waveforms, since some of them are actually made up of
several Waveforms, You don't have to do anything special to use these Multisampled
Wavetorms, The ESQ 1 treats each one as a single Waveform, and they are selected
just like the others.
The Synthetic Waveforms can be combined with the Sampled ones, to add
harmonic content which enhances the sound in some way. Any combination of
Waveforms Is possible, and each will have its own unique sound.
Names
The ESQ 1's 32 Waveforms are identified by their Names. In the case of the
sampled Waveforms especially, you should neither take them too literally, nor let yourself
be limited by those Names. Dont, for example, expect the VOICE Waveform to always
sound like Vocals -- everything depends on the Program (the Envelopes, the Filter
settings, etc). On the other hand, dont let the Names alone limit what you try in terms of
being creative. For example, if you find that within a certain Program the BASS Waveform
sounds like a harpsichord, or a kazco, or whatever, go with it. Your ears are the only valid
judge of what works.
26
Selecting a Waveform
Each of the three Oscillators can play a different Waveform within a Program. The
Waveforms are selected from the Oscillator Pitch Pages [ OSC1, O5C2 and 05C3]-
Oscillator Pitch Pages : ES
To select a Waveform for Oscillator 1, press the Button labeled OSC 1. The
Display shows you Oscillator 1's Раде. 'n the upper right portion of the Page you find
the Waveform select.
Select Wavelorm
OSCI OCT=+2 SEMI=81 FINE=83 | WAVE=SQUAR
MODS= LFO1 »X +84 ENV 3 % -08
J)
Press the "Soft" Button above the WAVE NAME. Now you can use the Data
Entry Slider and the Up and Down Arrow Buttons to change the Waveform that OSG
1 will play. There are 32 available choices, each with its own Name. Follow the same
procedure to select a Waveform for OSC 2 and OSC 3. The following section details
each Waveform by Name.
Check Them Out
The best way to understand the Waveforms is not to read about them, but to hear
them. Select the Internai Program called BASIC. This Program has only one Oscillator
playing, and all the Envelopes wide open. Select the OSC 1 Page as shown above, and
select WAVE. The Sawtooth Wave is selected (WAVE= SAW).
27
While repeatedly playing a note or chord, press the Up Arrow Button to step to the
next Waveform. Press it again to hear the next one, and so on. in this way you can listen
to each Waveform in succession, compare them to each other, and compare the timbral
characteristics you hear in various ones to their text descriptions below. When you are
looking for the right Waveform for a particular application, let your ears be the guide.
The Waveforms
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CLASSIC SYNTH WAVEFORMS
These Waveforms collectively form the bases of almost all classic Analog
synthesizer sounds. Their inclusion here gives the ESQ 1 its ability to make those
sounds with the best of them.
SAW -- SAWTOOTH. The Sawtooth Wave needs no introduction. It contains all
the harmonics, and is extremely bright. The Sawtdoth is the basis for many Analog
sounds, notably Strings and Brass.
BELL The Bell Waveform contains many widely spaced harmonics, many of them
odd harmonics. It makes bright, Bell sounds.
SINE. The Sine Wave contains only the Fundamental, with no higher harmonics.
It has very pure tone, good for flutes, organs, etc.
SQUARE. The Square Wave contains the Fundamental and all its odd-numbered
harmonics at a fixed ratio. The level of the harmonics is the same as the Sawtooth
except that there are no even-numbered harmonics. The Square Wave has a
hollow sound, and is also the basis for many classic synth sounds.
PULSE. This Pulse Wave contains the Fundamental and all its integral harmonics
at equal amplitude. This is a very bright Waveform.
NOISE 1. This is a Waveform taken from filtered Noise. It works best when tuned
down low (OCT= -3). (Note that the Moise Waveforms here differ from analog
Noise generators, in that Waveforms are by definition repeating patterns, and
Noise is random.)
NOISE 2. This is very close to White Noise. It has almost no pitch, but modulating
the Oscillator playing this Waveform with a fast LFO or an Envelope, will eliminate
what pitch tracking there is.
NOISE 3. This Waveform is goed for putting random frequency components into a
sound (the attack "ping" of a mallet instrument, for example). !t has a clangorous,
metallic quality, and its pitch tends to be unpredictable.
2) SAMPLED WAVEFORMS
The Sampled Waveforms contain harmonics that simply cannot be generated
28
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by an ordinary synthesizer, since every musical source produces its own UNIQUE
waveshapes and Frequency Spectrum.
BASS. This is a bright Bass Waveform, full of interesting harmonics, which,
depending on the Program, makes a great regular or synih-type Bass. Higher up it
takes on a Clav-like character,
PIANO. A multisampled acoustic Piano wave. lts best range is OCT= -1.
EL PNO -- ELECTRIC PIANG. A Waveform taken from a popular Electric
Piano -- allows you to recreate this instrument with tremendous realism.
VOICE 1. A multisampled Vocal wave, saying "Ah".
VOICE 2. A multisampled Vocal wave, using the same waveforms as VOICE 1,
but with a higher split point for each Wave
KICK. This Waveform is optimized for one application. Tuned to OCT= -3,
properly enveloped, and played on the lowest key of the Keyboard, it reproduces a
Kick drum.
REED. One cycle from an Alto saxophone wave, With different Programs it can
sound like different Reed Instruments.
QRGAN. This Waveform contains the fundamental and four Cctaves (2nd, 4th, Sth,
16thand 32nd harmonics). Instant Pipe Organ. Also good for Bells.
ADDITIVE SYNTHESIS WAVEFORMS
These three Waveforms were created through Digital Additive Synthesis. Each
contains the Fundamental and certain specific harmonics In equal amaunts.
SYNTH 1. Contains the fundamental, and every third harmanic, starting from the
2nd, up to the 26th , 1n equal amounts:
Harmonics: 1, 2, 5, 8, 11, 14, 17, 20, 23, 26.
SYNTH 2. Contains the fundamental, and every third harmonic, starting from the
4th, up to the 25th | in equal amounts:
Harmonics: 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16, 19, 22, 25.
SYNTH 3. Contains the fundamental, and the prime-numbered harmonics, up to
the 23rd, in equal amounts:
Harmonics: 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23.
4) FORMANTS
These five Waveforms were created through a process called Tme-Domatn
Formant-YYave-Function Synthesis. Each one has a sharp peak in 15 frequency
spectrum -- like pushing one band of a graphic equalizer all the way up. These
29
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Waves are multisampled in such a way that iêhe frequency peak remains relatively
constant Up and down the keyboard, rather than tracking the pitch of the note.
Each hag its peak centered around a different frequency. They tend to have a
nasal quality, and make excellent component waveforms for Vocals, Strings etc.
FORMT 1. Has a frequency peak centered around 750 hz.
FORMT 2. Has a frequency peak centered around 1 khz,
FORMT 3. Has a frequency peak centered around 1.4 khz.
FORMT 4. Has a frequency peak centered around 1.75 khz,
FORMT 5. Has a frequency peak centered around 2.25 khz.
BAND LIMITED WAVEFORMS
These Wavetorms are Band Limited -- that is, their harmanic content has been
restricted along certain specific lines. They are good for adding controlled
harmonics 10 a sound, or for combining to achieve various timbres. Some are other
Waves with some harmonics pulled out; some were built "from scratch” to contain
only certain harmonics.
PULSE2. Originally a Pulse Wave, like the Pulse Wave above, but with only the -
first 11 harmonics left in.
SAR 2. Originally a Square Wave, but with only the first 7 harmonics left in.
4 OCTS. Contains, in equal amounts, only four harmonics — 1st, 2nd, 4th, 6ih.
Fundamental and three Cctaves; again, good for Organ sounds.
PRIME. Contains, in equal amounts, only the first five prime-numbered harmonics:
1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th, and 11th.
BASS 2. Originally the Bass Wave, but with only the first eighteen harmonics left
In.
E PNOZ. Originally an Electric Piano Wave, but with only the first nine harmenics
left in. An Electric Piano without the “ping.”
OCTAVE. Contains only the 1st and 2nd harmonics in equal amounts -- the
Fundamental and one Octave.
OCT+5. Contains only the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd harmonics in equal amounts -- the
Fundamental, one Octave and the Fifth above the octave.
30
MODULATORS
About Modulation
To modulate something is simply to cause it to change. Within the Voice
architecture of the ESQ 1 we begin by setting basic, or Manyal, tevels for Volume, Fitch,
Brightness, etc., and we then modulate those levels in various ways in order to create
movement and dynamics within the Sound.
Suppose you switch an your stereo, and turn 1he volume half way up. We can call
this the Manual Volume setting. It will stay at that level until it's changed. Now suppose
that you take the Volume knob and begin quickly turing it up and down, so the volume
gets continuously louder and softer, louder and softer. What you would be doing 15
modulating the volume of your stereo. If you were to take the Treble control, and do
the same to that knob, you would be modulating the brightness of your stereo,
In much the same way we modulate various levels within the ESQ 1 {though
generally the approach is less haphazard). There are 15 different Moduiation Sources
available, and they can each be independently assigned to vary the Manual levels for:
----3 The Pitch af each Oscillator [OSC 1, O5C 2 and OSC 3]
„==; The Volume of each Oscillator [BCA 1, DCA 2 and DCA 3]
---=> The Filter Cutoff Frequency, or the Brightness of the Program [FILTER]
----> The Depth of the Low Frequency Oscillators [LFO 1 LFO 2 and LFQ 3] -
and
«w=» Panning the Program within the stereo mix [DCA 4] Page
The Final Volume of the Program [DCA 4] is a special case -- It 15 always
controlled by Envelope 4, which is fixed as its Modulator.
Selecting a Modulator
On each of the Oscillator Pitch Pages, [OSC 1, 056 2 and OSC 3] ine
Oscillator Volume Pages, [DCA 1, DCA 2 and DCA 3], and the FILTER Page, you
can select two different Modulators. The format is similar for all these Pages -- the controls
on the bottom row of the Page are used to Modulate the Levels set on the top row. Take
for example the OSC 1 Page:
E)
OSCI OCT=-0 SEMI-9O FINE-B0 WAVE= SAW
MODS= (LFO1 3% +B4 ENV3 x -g8
[Select Modulators }- -
To select a Modulator {or Modulators) for the pitch of Oscillator 1. first press the
OSC 1 Button, then press either of the Select Modulator "Soft" Buttons on the Display,
as pictured above. Use the Data Entry Slider and the Up and Down Arrow Buttons
to select from among the 15 available Modulation Sources. Follow the same procedure to
select Modulators on the other Pages listed above.
For Modulating Program Pan [DCA 4 Page] and LFO depth [LFO 1 LFQ 2 and
LFO 3 Pages] only gne Modulator can be selected.
* * * * Helpiul Hint: Moving the Data Entry Slider all the way up selects *OFF*,
which is handy if you don't want a Modulator applied in a particular location.
Modulation Depth
Once you have selected a Modulator, use the control immediately to its right to
adjust the Modulation Depth, or the amount by which the Modulator will affect the
Manual Level.
0SC1 OCT-+9 SEMI-8O FINE-898 WAVE= SAW
MODS= LEOI X +84: ENV3I % -g8.
| Modulation Depth |
Press the appropriate "Soft" Button, as shown above, and use the Data Entry
Slider and the Up and Down Arrow Buttons to adjust the Modulation Depth.
Modulation Depth can be Positive or Negative. A Modulation Depth of +00 has the same
effect as turning the Modulator "OFF",
* * * * Helpful Hint: With Modulation Depth, as with all Parameter values that have a
center value (in this case, +00), there 15 an easy way to reach that value. With the
Modulation Depth selected, press the Down Arrow Button, and while holding it
down, press the Up Arrow Button. This automatically sets the Modutation Depth
to +00.
32
Modulation Sources
==--›
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The 15 Modulation Sources available on the ESQ 1 are as follows:
LFO 1, LFO 2 and LFO 3
The three Low Frequency Oscillators generate only very low frequency waves,
which can produce Vibrato, Tremelo, and many other effects, depending on the
ЦРО wave selected, and where it is applied as a Modulator. There are four
possible waveshapes for each LFO. The Square wave only goes in a positive
direction; the Triangle, Sawtooth and Noise Waves go positive and negative.
(Though negative Modulation depth will reverse the effect.) The Diagrams below
show the maximum levels for sach LEO waveshape.
The Triangle Wave goes from The Square Wave only goes
- 63 10 +65 Positive... DO to +63
+53 — area aaa a maa " o
The Sawionth Wave qoes
from -63 ta +63
+67 — > The Noise Wave
_— ques from -63
_ to +63. lts
A BL pattern is
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—53 —
See the LFO Page (p. 50) for a complete discussion of the LFO's,
ENV 1, ENV 2, ENV 3 and ENV 4
The ESQ 1 has four complex Envelopes which can be applied as Modulators.
Envelope Levels can be positive or negative.
Envelope Levels can go
from -63 10 +63
+63 — -
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mw mw
A comprehensive discussion of the ESQ 1 Envelopes follows in the Section
entitled Understanding the Envelopes, p. 53.
VEL -- Velocity
Velocity means how hard you strike a key. Selecting VEL as a Modulator allows
you to modulate any Manual Level with Velocity. Velocity as a Modulation Source
only goes positive (though again, assigning a negative Modulation depth will make
the net result be to decrease a Manual Level with Velocity). VEL is velocity with a
straight linear curve.
VEL 2
This is Velocity with a different Curve. Where the effect of VEL is linear, VEL 2
reaches the top end of the Modulation range quicker, with less velocity, and after
that the curve levels off. The Mustration below shows the difference between YEL
and VEL 2.
YEL is linear YEL 7 has more effect
with less > velocity
Min. Max
Vel. Vel
VEL
KYBD -- Keyboard "Control Voltage"
Uses the position of a note on the Keyboard as a Modulator. The scaling effect of
this Modulator is figured from MIDI key 0 to MIDI key 127.
..B8-note Piano Keyboard …
34
=}
we }
= = = =
0"
As the above illustration shows, the effect of KYBD is only positive-going (though a
negative Modulation depth will reverse the effect). Since scaling stants from MIDI
key O, there will always be some effect on the ESQ 1 keyboard, even on the
lowest note. Manual Levels should be adjusted accordingly.
KYBD 2
Another way to modulate any Manual Level with the position of a note on the
Keyboard, KYBD 2 employs a different curve. KYBD 2 goes negative as well as
positive and, unlike KYBD, has its full effect over the ESQ 1's Keyboard.
ESQ 1 Keyboard
As the above illustration shows, the effect of KYBD 2 is to reduce the Manual
Level on notes below the break point (E above Middle C), and increase levels
above that point. Negative Modulation depths will do the opposite.
WHEEL -- Modulation Wheel
The MOD Wheel to the left of the Keyboard is assignable wherever a Modulator 1
selected. To use the MOD Wheel for Vibrato (one common application) WHEEL
must be assigned to modulate the СРО that is modulating Oscillater Pitch. The
MOD Wheels effect is positive-going only, from 0 Wheel towards you) to +63
(Wheel away from you). Negative Modulation depths will reverse the effect.
PEDAL -- Voltage Control Foot Pedal
This selects the SW-10 Foot Pedal, which can be plugged into the CY/Pedal
Jack on the ESQ 1's rear panel, as a Modulator. lts effect will be the same as that
of the MOD Wheel. The Pedal makes an excellent alternative to to the MOD Wheel
when you wish to apply Modulation and both hands are full. It can be applied
wherever a Modulator is selected.
XCTRL -- External Controller (MIDI only}
An External Controller such as a Breath Controller, Data Entry Slider , MOD Wheel,
etc., which is received via MIDI from another synthesizer, can be assigned as a
Modulator within your ESQ 1 Programs. On the MIDI Page, you select the
number of the External Controller that will be received by the ESQ 1.
You don't have to be playing the ESQ 1 from an external instrument for this to
work. For example, if you have a Keyboard with a Breath Controller, 1) Connect
35
==="
its MID! Out to the ESQ 1's MIDI In: 2) Make sure both instruments have
Controllers Enabled (MIDI Page); 3) Select Breath Controller as the External
Controller that will be received by the ESQ 1 (XCTRL=02, also on the MIDI
Page); 4) assign XCTRL as a Modulator for Oscillator Volume, Filter Cutoff
Frequency, or some other Manual leve! within a Program, as shown in the following
section; and 5) Play the Sound from the ESQ 1 keyboard, while blowing into the
Breath Controller connected to the sending instrument. The Modulation will have
the same effect as if you were playing from the sending instrument.
PRESS -- Pressure {(Aftertouch) (MIDI only)
Pressure, also called Aftertouch, is received by the ESQ 1 and its Sequencer,
and can be Programmed as a Modulator. A Control on the MIDI Page enables
Pressure to be received, as well as determining which type will be received -- Key
or Channel Pressure. (See p. 22)
It you will be driving the ESQ 1 from a synth which sends Pressure, you can
assign Pressure as a Modulator within your ESQ 1 Programs, just as you would
the MOD Wheel, or the C.V.Pedal. Also the Sequencer will Record and Play back
Pressure, if a Track is recorded from an external instrument which sends it. In
either case, Pressure must be enabled on the MIDI Page.
USING MODULATORS
Modulating Oscillator Volume
The Volume of each of the three Oscillators within a Program depends on a
combination of two things:
1) the setting of the base, or Manual Level {the Control labeled LEVEL= on
the DCA 1, DCA 2 and DCA 3 Pages), and
2) the effect of any Modulators applied on any of those Fages.
OUTPUT = CM
Atos ENVIE оба Ti SA
Modulators
36
The Manual Level can bs thought of as a Volume Floor :
====> |f this Level is set to some value greater than Zero for a given DCA, and no
Modulators are applied, The Oscillator will play at that level as long as a key is held
dawn.
63 —
ЦЕ УЕ! = 52 , _
Lo
No E —
Modulation :
L g—
— TIME
--==> |f the Manual Level ig set to some value greater than Zero, and a Modulator {in this
case an Envelope) is selected and assigned a depth other than Zero, the effect of
the Modulator wil! be added to (or subtracted from) the Manual Level.
o 635 PRE RTE EE CEE TE TRE TEE PET TEE TE TEE EE
LEVEL=32 _
L —
Envelope E
applied as Y —
a Modulator Е о
TIME
se
r
===> |f the Manual Level is set to Zero, and a Modulator {the same Envelope) 1s selected
and assigned a depth other than Zero, the depth of the Modulator alone will
determine the Volume of the Oscillator.
63 —
LEYEL=00 —
| | —
Envelope Е
applied as Y _
a Modulator E о
TIME
r
Bear in mind that when you use an Envelope or an LFO (Low Frequency
Oscillator) as a Modulator, the final effect will depend on the Modulation Depth and the
Levels that are set for the Envelope or LEG on their respective Pages.
37
Negative Modulation
Modulation Depth can be Positive or Negative {ranging from -63 to +63), making a
great many interesting effects possible. If, for example, the Manual Level is set to 48, and
the same Envelope used in the previous examples is selected and assigned a Negative
Modulation depth, the resulting Volume curve looks like this:
ET
Lal
|
LEVEL= 48 |
Envelope +
applied as
la Modulator
with Negative
Modulation
Depth 7 TIME
u ul
Modulating the Filter Cutoff Frequency
Like Oscillator Volume, the Filter Cutotf Frequency, or the Brightness contour of _
a Program, depends on a combination of two things:
1) the setting of the base, or Manual Level (the Control labeled FREG= on
the FILTER Page), and
2) the effect of any Modulators applied on that Page.
---=> It we set the Filter Cutoff Frequency manually {by adjusting the parameter
FREQ =__ on the FILTER Page] to a level of 64, and turn all Modulators QFF,
the Fiiter will open up to that level when a key is pressed, allowing frequencies
below the Cutoff point to pass, and close down to Zero when the key is released.
127—
FREQ= 64 _
Е ——
Но E —
Modulation Q —
0 —
TIME
38
_--=> |f we select an Envelope as a Modulator on the FILTER Page and assign it a value
greater than Zero, its effect will be added to the the Manual Level.
127 — won
FREQ= 64 —
Е —
Envelope E —
applied as a —
a Modulator 5 _
TIME
----> |f, instead, we generate a Triangle-shape wave with one of the LFOs (Low
Frequency Oscillators), and apply thal LFO wave as a Modulator on the
FILTER Page, its effect will be added to the Manual Level, and the Filter Cutoff
Frequency will rise and fall with the cycles of the LFO.
127 —
FREQ= 64 —
Fr —
_ BE
LFO Applied E —
as à a TT
Modulator о —
— TIME
Of course, since two Modulators can be selected, you could apply both of these
Modulators (or any other combination) to the Filter Cutoff Frequency, and their effect
would be added together, and then added to the Manual Level,
As with Oscillator Volume, If the Manual Level on the FILTER Page is set to
FREQ= 00. the Filter Cutoff Frequency will depend entirely on the depth and settings
of any Modulators applied there.
Limits of Modulation
For ali Modulation effects there is a maximum and a minimum range that cannot be
exceeded. For example, if the Filter Cutoff Frequency Is manually set to its maximum
value [127], you will not be able to modulate the Frequency any higher, with an Envelope,
LFO or other Modulator.
vou cannot modulate an Oscillator's Output Leve! lower than Zero (silence), If a
Modulator doesn't seem ta be having any effect, check that the other Modulators and
manual settings are al appropriate levels.
39
An ESQ 1 Voice |
с e 5 TE |
E i т
Digital
Wave (Mod #2}
N
С
form
Memory |
are
ue. —
o
(Mad #2)
For each of the ES} 1's 8 Voices:
=» Lach Oscillator plays 8 Waveform from the Digital Waveform Memory;
= [he output of each Oscillator passes through the same-numbered
DCA (Digitally Controlled Amplifier);
+ The output of the 3 DCA’s passes through the Four-Pole Low-—pass Filter;
= The output of the Filter goes to the Final DCA —— DCA 4;
= The output of DCA 4 goes to the Panner, which pans the Program
between the Left and Right Audio Outputs.
> Wherever a is indicated in the above diagram, any of the 15
available Modulators may be assigned to vary the “Manual” setting.
40
PROGRAMMING PAGES
1 0SC2 DCA 2 Filter DC 4 4
asc
3) ES
LFQ 1 LFOZ [Ре MODES
: ENVI ENVZ ENVZ ENV4 Split/Layer |
i : ES ED EY ES EZ |
— Program Parameters
The Page descriptions in this Section encompass all the Program Parameters
-- those Parameters which are saved with the individual Programs stored in the Memory of
the ESQ 1.
In case you wish to make a written record of the settings for a particular Frogram
you will find à blank Program Parameter Sheet in the back of this Manual. Feal free to
photocopy this sheet and use the copies to record the Parameter settings.
11
[OSC1] OSCILLATOR PITCH PAGE
105С2]
105С31
Controls Oscillator pitch and selects the waveform to be played.
3. Fine
{detune}
5. Waveform
Page | Octev] 2 Semitone |
Ma me { halfsten)
X > / И
OSCI DCI=2 SEMI=B1 FINE=93 WAVE=SQUARE
MODS= LFO1 % +94 ENVI xXx -98
7 J N
q, Select
Modulator #2
LC]
7. Select # Mequlatar #1
10 Modulator #2
Modulator #1 depth
depth
{Inactive Buttons appear in White)
The format of the Oscillator Pitch Page is the same for [OSC 1], [OSC 2] and
{OSC 3], although each of these Pages is entirely independent.
Use these pages to:
1} Adjust the pitch of each Oscillator by octave, semitone, and fine increments;
2) Modulate the pitch of each Oscillator using any of the 15 available Modulation
sources; and
3) Select the Waveform to be played by each Oscillator.
42
[OSC] OSCILLATOR PITCH PAGE (cont'd)
ACTIVE NTROLS:
1. OCT
Adjusts the pitch of the Oscillator by octaves.
Range: -3 To +3.
2. SEMI
Adjusts the pitch of the Oscillator up by semitones ¡halfstep). Adjusting this contro
upwards beyond 11 automatically increases the OCTAVE by one.
Banga: 0 To 11.
3. FINE
Adjusts the pitch of the Oscillator up by fine steps (detunes). Each step here 1s
about 3 Cents (hundredths of a semitone}.
Range: О То 31.
5. WAVE
Solects the Waveform that the Oscillator wili play from among the 32 avaiable
Waveforms. (Sea WAVEFORMS, p. 25.)
7. MOD # 1
Selects the first source of Modulation. The Modulators selected on this page afect
only the pitch of the Oscillator.
8. MOD # 1 DEPTH
Sets the depth, or amount, by which Modulator #1 will aifect the pitch of the
Oscillator. The Modulation amount can be positive or negative.
Range: -63 To + 63.
9, MOD # 2
Selects the second source of Modulation. The effects of Modulator #1 and
Modulator #2 are added together. You can thus double the maximum Modulation
depth of a given modulator by selecting the same Source for Modulator #1 and
Modulator #2. The Modulators selected on this page affect only the_pitch of the
Oscillator.
10. MOD # 2 DEPTH
Sets the depth, or amount, by which Modulator #2 will affect the pitch of the
Oscillator. The Modulation amount can be positive or negative.
Range: -63 To + ES.
43
[DCA1] OSCILLATOR VOLUME PAGE
[DCA2]
[DCA3]
Controls The Volume of Oscillators 1 through 3.
Page Г. Manual 5 Oscillator
name Output level Mute
\ / 7
ОСА! LEVÉL-28 OUTPUT = ON
MODS= ENY 1 X +65 LEO? »X +12
И L Z
10. Modulator #2
depth
g Select
7. Select 8. Modulator #1
Modulator #2
Modulator * | depth
(Inactive Buttons appear in White)
The format of the Oscillator Yolume Page is the same for [DCA1], [DCA2] and
[DCA3], although each of these Fages is entirely independent.
Each of these three DCA's (Digitally Controlled Amplifiers) controls the Volume (or
amplitude} of the same-numbered Oscillator (OSC).
Use these pages to:
1) Setthe Manual Output levels of the three Oscillators:
2) Modulate those levels using any of the 15 available Modulation Sources; and
3) Turn each Oscillator ON or OFF,
44
[DCA] OSCILLATOR VOLUME PAGE (cont'd)
ACTIVE NTROLS:
1. LEYEL
Determines the Manual, or base, volume {amplitude} of the Oscillator. This Level
can be thought of as a "Volume floor’ -- the effect of any Modulator(s) is added to
the Level set by this parameter. So even if LEVEL = 0, the Oscillator will still
have some amplitude if there is a Modulator {an Envelope for instance,} selected
and assigned a Depth greater than Zero. Negative modulation depths bring the
volume lower that the LEVEL setting. Large amounts of negative Modulation can
silence the Oscillator, regardless of the setting of this control.
DCA's 1,2, and 3 have been set up so that it is possible to get full volume from
just one Oscillator. This means, however, that it is possible to clip (overload) the
output stage when al. three Oscillators are at full level. Different Waveforms
contain different amounts of fundamental energy, so the effect will vary. a
conservative rule of thumb for Oscillator Volume is as follows:
With 1 Qscillator playing -- set that Oscillator to 63.
With 2 Oscillators playing -- set both Oscillators to 56.
With 3 Oscillators playing -- set all three Oscillators to 52.
5. OSCILLATOR MUTE
Turns the Output of the Oscillator ON or OFF. This control is very helpful when
setting up complex Programs, as it allows you to silence any Oscillator, and listen
to the others, without disturbing your settings.
7. MOD # 1
Selects the first source of modulation. The moduiators selected on this page affect
only the amplitude of the Oscillator,
8. MOD # 1 DEPTH
Sets the depth, or amount, by which Modulator #1 will affect the amplitude of the
Oscillator. The Modulation amount can be positive or negative.
Range: -63 To +63.
9. MOD # 2
Selects the second source of modulation. Again, a Modulator's maximum depth
can be doubled, by assigning the same Modulator to MOD #1 and MOD #2 . The
Modulators selected on this page affect only the amplitude of the Oscillator.
10. MOD # 2 DEPTH
Sets the depth, or amount, by which Modulator #2 will affect the amplitude of the
Oscillator. The Modulation amount can be positive or negative.
Range: -63 To +63.
45
[FILT] FILTER PAGE
Controls the Four-Pole Low Pass Filter
1. Filter Cutoff 3. Filter 5 Keyboard
Frequency: Resonance Tracking
Manual Level
so / CC) cu / Г}
7
\ 7
FILT FREQ=_35 | RES(Q=88 KEYBD = +65
MODS= LFOZ Ж +15 ENYI * +63
7 Select & Modulator =1{ 19. Select 10. Modulator * 2
Modulator * 1 depth Modulator # 2 depth
{Inactive Buttons appear in White)
The outputs of the three Oscillators pass through the Filter before going to the
Final Volume stage, [DCA4]. The Filter settings determine what frequencies will be
allowed pass through to the output.
A Low Pass Filter allows only those frequencies below the Filter Cutoff
Frequency to pass. Higher frequencies are filtered out. The Filter Cutoff Frequency is
set lo à certain level, and then it can be conlinually varied by modulating the Filter {with an
Envelope, an LFO, Velocity, etc.)
Use this page to:
1) Setthe Manual Level for the Filter Cutoff Frequency:
2) setthe amount of Filter Resonance (ог О); and
3) Modulate the Filter Cutolf Frequency, using the Keyboard "Control
Voltage" and any of the 15 available Modulation Sources.
46
[FILT] FILTER PAGE (coitd)
ACTIVE CONTROLS;
1. FREQ
Sets the initial, or Manual Levd of the Filter Cutoff Frequency. A higher setting
will resuit in a brighter sound. This setting represents the "Filter Floor" -- the effect
of any selected Modulators wif te added to {or subtracted from) this level.
Hange: 0 To 127.
3. RES (Q)
Sets the amount of Filter Resonance, or Q. This controls the amplitude of the
resonant peak of the filter. When the Q is raised. the Filter Cutoff Frequency Is
emphasized over all other ‘requencies. By then modulating the Filter Cutoff
Frequency with an Envelope, LFO, Mod Wheel etc, you can create Filter Sweeps,
Wah and Growl effects.
Range: 0 To 31.
5. KEYBD
Keyboard Filter Tracking. It sets the amount by which the location of à note on
the keybeard will modulate the Filter Cutoff Frequency. (This is comparable io
the Keyboard Control Voltage of most Analog synths.)
Higher values of this parameter will cause the Filter to open up more {get brighter |
as you play higher up the keyboard. The maximum value (63) will raise the Filter
Cutoff Frequency roughly one ogave for each octave you go up the Keyboard.
Range: 0 To 63
7. MOD # 1
Selects the first source of Modulation for the Filter Cutoff Frequency.
8. MOD # 1 DEPTH
Sets the depth, or amount, by which Modulator #1 will affect the Filter Cutoff
Frequency. Modulation anounis can be positive or negative.
Range: -63 To + 63.
3, MOD # 2
Selects the second source sf Modulation for the Filter Cutoif Frequency.
10. MOD # 2 DEPTH
Sets the depth, or amount, by which Modulator #2 will affect the Fiiter Cutofi
Frequency. Mcdulgtion amounts can be positive or negative.
Range: -63 To + 63
47
[DCA 4] FINAL VOLUME PAGE
Controls Program Volume and Panning.
Page 4. Pen Level |
name (Manyal)
À
OCA4 FINAL VOLUME РАМ= 98
MOD= ENV 4 x 63 MOD= LEO! X +89
— \ ``
9 | J
Final Volume 7. ENY 4 9 Select Pan] 110. Pan Modulator
Modulator Modulation Modulator Depth
CAlweys ENY4) Depth —
{Inactive Buttons appear in White)
Note: The Modulation Source for [DCA 4] is always [ENV 4].
The outputs of the three Oscillators, after passing through the Filter, go to [DCA4]
This Final DCA (Digitally Controlled Amplifier), together with [ENVA4], which is fixed as its
Modulator, determines the overall volume envelopa of tha Program.
Use this page to:
1) Adjust the amplitude of the entire Program;
2} Pan the Program left, right or center; and
3) Modulate the Program Pan using any of the 15 available Modulation Sources.
48
[DCA 4] FINAL VOLUME PAGE (cont'd)
ACTIVE CONTROLS:
4, PAN -- Manual Level
Pans the Program the between the Left and Right Outputs. Possible Values range
from 00 fall the way to the Left), to 15 {ail the way Right.} A value of 08 will pan
the Program to Center. Note that the ESQ 1's audio outputs must be connected in
Stereo for this parameter to have any effect.
Range: 00 10 15.
8. ENV 4 MOD. DEPTH - Final Volume
Determines the amount by which DCA 4 will be Modulated by ENV 4, which is
fixed as its Modulator. The net-effect of this parameter is to increase or decrease
the Volume of the entire Program. This is useful for matching the levels of different
Programs, to avoid radical volume changes when switching between them. Also It
is useful for balancing the relative levels of Split and/or Layered Programs (see
SPLIT/LAYER Page, p. 66).
Range: 00 to 63.
Bear in mind that the overall Volume of the Program will depend on the setting of
this parameter and the settings on the ENY 4 Page.
9. Select PAN Modulator
This control selects a Modulator for the PAN Setting. Modulators applied here will
add to. or subtract from, the Manual Level, just as they do elsewhere. Thus an LFO
used as a Modulator here will make the Program Pan back and forth with Time.
Applying Velocity [VEL] here would make a note's placement in the stereo mix
depend on how hard you strike a key. And so on.
Or you can apply the Keyboard (KYBD 2) as a Medulator to make the low keys
play on the left side, the middle keys in the middle, and the high Keys on the right
side of the stereo mix.
10. PAN Modulator Depth
Sets the amount by which the PAN Modulator will affect the Manual Pan Setting.
Higher values will cause more dramatic Pan Modulation. Negative Modulation
Depths are particularly useful here. Any Negative value here (-32 for instance) wil!
have exactly the opposite effect of the same, Positive, value (+32) in terms of how it
affects the Pan of the Program {assuming a Manual Level of 08}.
Range: -53 10 +63.
49
[LFO 1] LOW-FREQUENCY OSCILLATOR PAGE
[LFO 2]
[LFO 3]
Controls the three Low-Frequency Oscillators (LFO's)
Page | [1. LFO
2. Reset 4. Human S. Select
name Frequency Switch (random; ze) Y aveforrm
wite
\ / N /
FO! [email protected] RESET-OFF HUMAN=OFF WAV=TRI]
L1I=5B9 DELAY=25 L2=15 MOD= WHEEL
VA L L Z
1
5, Initial 6, Final 10. Select
Level Leve] Modulation
Source
{Inactive Buttons appear in White)
The format of the LFO Page is the same for [LFO 1], [LFO 2], and [LFO 3].
although each of these Pages is independent. The Low Frequency Oscillators are
used as Modulators, and may be applied wherever a Modulation Source is to be
selected.
Note that the LFO Delay (which normally allows the effect to enter gradually) is
set using a Ramp which goes from Level 1 {L1) to Level 2(L2). Since L1 can have a
higher value than L2, the Ramp can actually be a decreasing one, causing the effect of the
LFO to diminish, or disappear, over the time the key is held down.
Use this page to:
1) Setthe LFO Frequency (speed);
2) Determine whether the LFO resets each time a key is struck;
3) Select the waveform that the LFO will play;
4) Set LFO Delay parameters; and
5) Select a Modulator from any of the 15 available Sources to modulate the
Output Leve! of the СРО.
50
[LFO] LOW-FREQUENCY OSCILLATOR PAGE (cont'd)
ACTIVE CONTROLS:
1. LFO FREG.
Determines the speed of the LFO. Range: 0 To 63.
2. RESET
Turns RESET mode on or off.
When ON: The LFO Waveform will return to the beginning of its cycle each time a
new key is struck. This is good for synchronizing LFO sweeps with key hits.
When OFF: The LFO wave will cycle continuously, without Resetting.
4. HUMAN
When ON: This control will add a random element to the СРО Frequency,
making the effect less "mechanical'sounding.
When OFF: The LFÓ Frequency will behave normally, with perfect repetition.
3. WAV
Selects the Waveform which the LFO will play. The choices are:
TRI -- Triangle wave
SAW -- Rising Sawtooth wave (Use negative modulation for a failing Sawtooth. )
SOR -- Square wave (positive-going andy)
NOISE - Random
NOTE: Controls 4 6., 7., and 8. combine to form a linear Ramp which defines
the LEO Delay. The Ramp goes from LEVEL 1, which is the starting Level, to
LEVEL 2, which is the sustain Level, and it can be an increasing or a decreasing
Ramp.
DELAT
L !
F
0
D
E
P
T
H
Example of LFO Modulation which "fades in’ over Time.
51
[LFO] LOW FREQUENCY OSCILLATOR PAGE (contd)
6. L1
This is LEVEL 1, the Level at which the LFO will play when the key is first struek.
Range: 0 To 63.
7. DELAY
Determines the Rate at which the LFO's amplitude will go from LEVEL 1 to
LEVEL 2. Range: 0 To 63.
Note that here it is the Rate of Change (or the Slope of the Ramp} which is set, not
a fixed Time. Therefore, lower values of this parameter will cause a longer
Delay; higher values will result in a shorter Delay. The amount of Time it takes
tor the LFO to reach LEVEL 2 thus depends on both the Rate and the Level.
A value of Zero will cause the LFO to remain at LEVEL 1.
8. L2
This is LEVEL 2, the Level that the СРО will reach at the end of the Ramp defined
by the DELAY. lt will remain at this Level until the key is released.
Hange: 0 To 63.
10. MOD
selects the Modulation Source for LFO depth. The effect of this Modulator is
added to the amount of LFO depth provided by the Ramp defined by Controls $ 6.,
7. and 8.
Note that the LFO itself can be used to modulate its own Output, or that ef another
LFO, producing unusual LFO wavetorms.
The final, modulated, LFO Output is then available as a Modulation Source, whose
depth can be adjusted precisely using the Modulation Depth controls on the other
Pages.
**** Note: To use the MOD Wheel for Vibrato within a Program, perhaps the
mast common application for an LFO:
1) assign WHEEL as the Modulator for an LFO,
2) set LI and DELAY to Zero for that LFO, and
3) assign that LFO to modulate the Pitch of the Oscillators (OSC Pages).
within the Factory Sounds that came with your ESQ 1, LFO 1 is always used for
Wheel Vibrato {where it is applicable).
22
UNDERSTANDING THE ENVELOPES
An Envelope is a shape, or "contour” that we apply to some signal source to
make it change through time. Naturally occurring sounds have their own Envelopes. They
don't just start and stop -- they might start loud and fade to silence, or slowly swell from
silence to a huge crescendo; they might start out very bright and grow duller; they might
have subtle variations in pitch, and so on.
In a synthesizer we imitate these effects, and create wholely new ones, by
generating Envelopes and then using them to modulate pitch, volume, brightness, ete,
The ESQ 1 has four Envelopes which can be independently assigned as modulation
sources to the various OSC's, DCA's, LFO's, PAN and the FILTER.
The ADSK Connection
Lets start by taking a look at the commoniy used ADSR (Attack, Decay, Sustain,
Release} type Envelopes found on many synthesizers, With the ADSR Envelope, the
name says it all. You have four parameters to control:
Attack -- The Time it takes to go from zero, when a key is struck, to peak level
Decay -- The Time it takes to go from the peak level to the Sustain Level
Sustain -- The Level at which the signal remains as long as the key is held down
Release -- The Time it takes to return to zero after the key is released
ADSE Envelope
ia
Decay
L Aftac Sustain
E
Y Release
E
L Tr
1 TIME 1
Key On — Key Off
Notice that an Envelope is really just à series oi Levels that change through Time.
With the four parameters oi the ADSR Envelope, we can control three Times (Attack,
Decay and Release) and one Level (Sustain). This is fine for many basic volume and
brightness Envelopes, but for more complex sounds -- for subtle pitch Envelopes and other
cool effects -- It becomes necessary to have more specific control over more Times and
Levels. Which brings us back to the ESQ 1.
53
UNDERSTANDING THE ENVELOPES (Cont'd)
Times and Levels
The four Envelopes on the ESQ 1 are defined in terms of Time and Level. For
each Envelope, you have control over four Time segments (TIME 1, TIME 2, TIME 3,
and TIME 4} and three Levels (LEVEL 1, LEVEL 2 and LEVEL 3).
When a key is struck, the Envelope level, starting at Zero, takes a fixed amount of
time, defined by TIME 1 , to reach LEVEL 1. It then takes TIME 2 to reach LEVEL 2.
Next, at the end of TIME 3 tt reaches LEVEL 3, where it will remain as long as the key is
held down. After the Key is released the signal takes TIME 4 fo return to Zero.
The four TIME parameters appear on the Envelope Page as [T1], [T2I, [TS]
and [T4], the three LEVEL parameters а$ [1-1], [1.2] and [L3]. The figure below shows
a typical Envelope as defined by the ESQ 1 Envelope parameters:
: . ‚ key
TÍ TR TS i held :; TA
* : Fa Fr FL
mm mr |
Key Qn ? Key Off
Notice that the Envelope shape depicted above resembles the ADSR Ervelope
discussed earlier, Though this is only one of many shapes that are possible with the ESQ
1 Envelopes, it is one of the most useful for modulating the Volume and Brightness of a
sound.
If we now lock at the ESQ 1 Envelope parameters as they apply lo this standard
ADSR-type Envelope, we can see that TIME 1 represents the attack time; TIME 2 and
TIME 3 a two-stage decay: and TIME 4 represents the release time, LEVEL 1 is the
peak level; LEVEL 2 is an intermedgiate decay level; and LEVEL 3 15 the sustain level.
a4
UNDERSTANDING THE ENVELOPES (Cont'd)
Time, not Rate
lt is very important to note that all of the Envelopes' Time components, [F1]. [T2],
[T3] and [T4] are expressed in terms of Time, not Rate. Thus, for example, when a key
15 struck the signal will always travel from Zero to LEVEL 1 in the fixed amount of time
defined by TIME 1. [f the value of LEVEL 1 is raised, the signai will still reach the new,
higher, LEVEL 1 in the same amount oi time.
Negative Levels
In the sample Envelope shown above, all of the Level values were positive. But
the ESQ 1 also allows you to assign a negative value to any of the Envelope Levels,
making possible a wide vanety of interesting shapes. In the Envelope below, for example,
LEVEL 2 is given a value of -32.
—
TI=10
L1=+63
TZ2=25
L2=-32
T3=20
L3=+24
T4=15 НЕ
)
A
Example of Envelope with LEVEL 2 Negative
Such an Envelope allows you to modulate a signal to levels below the Manual
settings, as well as above them. Say you apply the Envelope shown above as a
modulator to the Filter Cutoff Frequency. If the Manual setting on the FILTER Page,
(FREQ=__} is set for about 2 khz., modulating the Filter Cutoff Frequency with this
Envelope would cause the Filter to behave like this:
16khz —
gkhz —
4khz ——
Manual
Setting | 2khz
1khz
U0hz — ime
2 hz —
Filter Cutoff Frequency Modulated by a Complex Envelope
33
UNDERSTANDING THE ENVELOPES (Cont'd)
The extent of the effect in the example above would vary depending on the
Modulation depth. Bear in mind that Modulation depth can also have a negative
value. The combination of negative Envelope Levels and negative Modulation depths
makes for almost infinite possibilities for controlling Pitch, Volume, Brightness, LFO depth,
eto.
Other Envelope Shapes
There are many possibilities for creating interesting Envelopes -- here are just à
few. if LEVEL 1 is set to Zero, then TIME 1 becomes a delay, TIME 7 the attack time,
LEVEL 2 the peak level, and so on. Such an Envelope, applied to one о? Пе ОСА“,
would cause that Oscillator to "wait" before beginning to play.
и = НАД нее EE SEE EET REET TR
T1=20
11=+ 00
T2=10
L2=+6%3
T3=25
L3=+32
T4=25 —
If LEVEL 1=0, TIME 1 Acts as a Delay
Another useful shape is a simple pitch Envelope. You can, for example, imitate the
way Horns often "slide” into a note, rather than beginning right on pitch, By setting TIME 1
to Zero, LEVEL 1 to some negative value, and LEVEL 2 and LEVEL 3 to Zerg, you
now have an Envelope which, whan used to modulate Oscillator Pitch, will cause the pitch
to "side" up to the proper note in the amount of tims defined by TIME 2.
у = +53 mmm 1 1 Ft w Emme meme meee a ELA EI EEF LAE IEP EE mmm meas
E1=-50 _
T2=10 _—
| L2=+00
T3=00
L3=+00
\. /
— бен aaa беоне н но aaa Remera.
Rising Pitch Envetope
This could be a rather long, dramatic "slide", or an almost imperceptibly short one,
depending on the value you assign to T2. How much the Pitch is altered will depend on
the value of LEVEL 1 and the Modulation depth.
56
UNDERSTANDING THE ENVELOPES (Contd)
Limits of Modulation
Note that for all Modulation effects there is a maximum and a minimum range that
cannot be exceeded. For example, if the Filter Cutoff Frequency is manually set to its
maximum value [127], you will not be able to modulate the Frequency any higher with an
Envelope or other Modulator. You cannot modulate an Oscillators Output Level lower
than Zero (silence). If an Envelope or other Modulator doesnt seem to be having any
effect, check that the other Modulators and manual settings are at appropriate levels.
Velocity Control Of Envelopes
There are two parameters on the Envelope Page allow you to alter an Envelope
depending on keyboard velocity, or how hard you strike a key.
[LV] velocity Level control
The first of these, LY or Velocity Level Control , will lower all three levels (E11,
Le and L3} with a softer keystrike. This means that the settings you assign to LEVEL 1,
LEVEL 2, and LEVEL 3 are maximum Levels, the Levels that will ba reached with the
hardest keystrike., The amount of LY determines how much those Levels will be reduced
as you play softer.
Effect of LV
pt on TIME
HE y Key Off
With this parameter you can have continuous dynamic control over the three levels
by varying how hard you play. The most common uses of the Velocity Level Control
have to do with varying the volume and brightness of a Program, though in the previous
example, [LV] could be used to alter the depth of the Pitch Envelope with velocity.
37
UNDERSTANDING THE ENVELOPES (Cont'd)
[T1V] Velocity Attack control
The second velocity-related parameter is T1V - Velocity Attack Control. As
the name implies this parameter makes TIME 1, the Envelope attack time, respond to
keyboard velocity. When the value of T1V is increased, a harder keystrike will decrease
TIME 1, resulting in a faster attack.
Velocity-modulated
enveloppe
Effect of TIY
Original envelope
T
Key Off
Key On TIME
This allows for great expression on Sting sounds and the like, making it possible
to have a long, smooth Attack or a sharp, crisp Attack simply by varying how hard you play.
The greater the value of T1V, the more TIME 1 will be decreased with velocity. If TIME 1
already equals Zero, this parameter will have no effect.
[TK] Keyboard Decay Scaling
The final Envelope parameter is [TK] -- Keyboard Decay Scaling. Raising the
value of TK has the effect of decreasing TIME 2 and TIME 3 as you play higher up the
Keyboard. Higher notes will therefore decay faster than [ower ones. The higher the value
assigned to TK, the greater the difference in Decay Time between the highest and lowest
notés. This is useful for simulating the Decay patterns of many acoustic Instruments
(piano, for instance) whose lower notes tend to ring much longer than the higher anes.
Note that if TIME 2 and TIME 3 both have a value of Zero, this parameter will
have no effect.
58
UNDERSTANDING THE ENVELOPES
Envelope Times
(Cont'd)
The chart below gives the approximate amount of Time, in seconds, that
correspands to each possible value of the Time components of the Envelopes (T1, T2.
T3 and T4). The numbers in bold type are the values that can be assigned to T1, T2, T3
or T4; the numbers in plain type show how long a Time each of those values will yield.
T=: 11Timeísec.)
.00
01
01
02
02
03
03
03
04
04
10 04
11 DS
12 0B
13 LE
14 07
15 08
DAN SW E
Ts:
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Time{sec.)
09
10
1
13
14
‚16
18
20
23
25
‚28
32
36
‚40
45
5%
Ta:
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
Time
57
Gé
2
.81
E
1.02
1.14
1.28
1.44
1.61
1.61
2.03
2.28
2.56
2.87
3.23
I=:
48
49
50
51
52
23
34
95
56
97
58
59
60
61
62
63
Time{sec,
3.62
4.06
4.56
2.12
2.75
6.45
7.24
8.13
9.12
10.24
11.43
12.90
14.48
16.25
18.25
20.48
** = 7 Note: Envelope Times will be as shown above only when TK=0, and T1V=0.
These two parameters have the effect of decreasing Envelope Times (TK based a
note's position on the keyboard, and T1V based on Velocity.) If either has a value
greater than Zero, T1, T2 or T3 could be shorter than indicated by the chart,
depending on where and how hard you play.
59
[ENV 1] ENVELOPE PAGE
[ENV 2]
[ENV 3]
[ENV 4]
Controls the parameters of the four Envelopes.
Level | | Level 2 Level 3 Velocity Yelocity
— | Lewe] Attack
Control {Control |
N N / 7 7
ENVT L1=+42 12=+25 L3=+15 LV:28 T1V=10
11-20 T2=15 113=389 T4=12 Tk-1B
Lo и И И £
Time | | Time 3 Keyboard
| Decay
Scaling
The format of the Envelope Page is the same for [ENV 1]. [ENV 2], [ENV 3]
and [ENV 4], although each Page is independent. The Envelopes are used as
Modulators, and may be applied wherever a Modulation Source is selected.
All Envelope parameters are expressed in terms of TIME and LEVEL. Itis
important to note that the Time components of the Envelopes { [T1], [T2], [T3], and [T4];
each define a fixed Time , not a Rate. Thus, if you raise the value of LEVEL 1 but leave
TIME 1 the same, the Envelope will still take the same amount of Time to reach the new,
higher, LEVEL 1.
Also note that the Level parameters can be positive or negative. This allows for a
wide variety of Envelope shapes, especially useful for medulating the FILTER Frequency,
the pitch of an Oscillator, etc.
50
[ENV] ENVELOPE PAGE (cont'd)
ACTIVE CONTROLS:
1. L1 - LEVEL 1
This 15 the LEVEL that the Envelope will reach at the end of the Time defined by
TIME 1. All Envelopes start at a {evel of Zero and proceed toward LEVEL 1 when
a key ig pressed.
Hange: -63 To +63.
2. L2 - LEVEL 2
The LEVEL that the Envelope will reach at the end of TIME 2.
Range: -63 To +63.
3. L3 - LEVELS
The LEVEL that the Envelope will reach at the end of TIME 3. This is the
Sustain Level.The Envelope will remain at this level until the key is released.
After the Key is released, the Envelope will return to Zero,
Range; -63 To +63.
4. LV
Velocity Level Control. This parameter makes all three Levels, LEVEL 4,
LEVEL 2 and LEVEL 3, respond to Keyboard Velocity, or how hard you strike the
key. When the value of [LV] is raised, a softer keystrike will decrease all three
Levels. The greater the value, the more the Levels will decrease as you play softer,
Thus the Levels set by LEVEL 1, LEVEL 2 and LEVEL 3 define the maximum
Levels, and parameter [LV] subtracts from those Levels.
Range: 0 To 63.
5. T1V
Velocity Attack Control. This control makes TIME $ respond to Keyboard
Velocity. Raising its value will cause a decrease in the value of TIME 1 as a key
IS struck harder, shortening the Attack Time. The greater the value, the faster
LEVEL 1 will be reached with a hard keystrike. (This Parameter will have no
effect it TIME 1 =0)
Range; O To 63.
6. T1 - TIME 1
The amount of Time between when the key is struck and when the Envelope
reaches LEVEL 1. In most applications this 15 the Attack Time. The higher the
value the longer the TIME.
Range: 0 To 63.
61
[ENV] ENVELOPE PAGE (cont'd)
7. T2 - TIME 2
The Time tt takes the Envelope to go from LEVEL 1 to LEVEL 2. In most
applications this is the first of two Decay stages.
Range: 0 To 63.
3. T3 - TIME 3
The Time it takes the Envelope to go from LEVEL 2 to LEVEL 3. In most
applications this is second Decay stage. At the end of TIME 3, the Envelope will
remain at LEVEL 3 until the kay is released.
Range: D To 63.
3. T4 - TIME 4
Release Time. Defines the amount of Time it will take the Envelope to return to
Zero from LEVEL 3 {or from whatever it currently is, if LEVEL 3 has not yet been
reached) after the key is released.
Range: 0 To B3.
10. TK
Keyboard Decay Scaling. Raising the value of this parameter will cause the
value of both TIME 2 and TIME 3 to decrease as you go higher up the …
keyboard. Thus higher notes will decay faster than lower ones. This is true of
many accoustic instruments. The greater the value of [TK], the mare the decay
time will decrease as you play higher up the keyboard. [TK] will have no effect if
TIME 2 and TIME 3 are Zero.
Range: O To 63.
62
IMODE] MODE PAGE
Controls Glide, Sync, AM, and Mono Modes, as well as Voice, Envelope and
Oscillator Restart Modes.
Page Sync + Amplitude | Mons Glide
name] Switch Modulation Mode {Portamento)
| —
\ N и
MODE SYNC=0F AM=0F MONO=OF GLIDE=15
RESTART: VC=ON ENY=0ON OSC=0F CYC=0F
Z N N
Restert| =ф Voice Envelope Oscilletor [Envelope
Maodes Restart | Restart {waveform} Full
| Restart
Cycle
[Inactive Buttons appear in White)
All of the Parameters on this Page are part of the Program (or patch), and will apply
only to the selected Program.
ACTIVE CONTROLS:
1. SYNC
Syncs the phase of Oscillator 2 to that of Oscillator 1. In other words,
whenever OSC1 finishes playing one complete cycle of its waveform and begins
another, OSC 2 will reset to the beginning of its cycle, whether the previous cycle
IS complete or not.
This produces the popular "Hard Sync" effect, which can be similar to a Filter
sweep. The effect is most noticeable when the Frequency of Oscillator 215
varied, or modulated.
2. AM
Amplitude Modulation. When ON, the Amplitude of Oscillator 1 modulates
the Amplitude of Oscillator 2. OSC 2's Amplitude Envelope will be ignored. This
results in the creation ef "Sideband" frequencies at the sum and difference of the
frequencies being played by the two Oscillators.
63
[MODE] MODE PAGE (contd)
When OSC 1 and OSC 2 are tuned to simple intervals of each other {such as
octaves or fifths, etc), AM Mode can produce FM-like enharmonics, for bell
sounds, etc. When the Oscillators are tuned to more complex intervals, the effect is
more extreme.
Since the Amplitude of Oscillator 2 is no longer being controlled by DCA 2, you
must use DCA 4 and ENV 4 to control the volume of the Sound.
3. MONO
In MONG mode the ESQ 1 behaves like a classic one-voice Monophonic synth.
It Is useful with lead-type sounds where chords are not necessary or desirable.
With MONO mode ON, only one note can be played at a time. Priority is given to
the last note played -- even if another note is being held down, the most recent
note you play will sound. However, the envelope will not be re-triggered by striking
a key as long as any other key is held down. Mono mode on the ESQ 1 does not
stack all eight voices on one key -- only one voice plays.
5. GLIDE
Note:
Note:
Also called Portamento. This causes the pitch of the Oscillators to "glide"
between notes instead of the usual abrupt transition. The higher the value, the
longer it will take to get from the pitch of the first note played to that of the second.
Range: 0 To 63.
The GLIDE function behaves in one of two ways, depending on whether or not
MONO mode is engaged:
with MONO mode CFE: The pitch of any note played will ‘glide’ to its proper pitch
from that of the note played immediately before it, at the rate that has been set, In
this mode the GLIDE is polyphonic, and whole chords can be made to SWOOP Up
and down together. {Very dramatic.)
With MONO mode ON: You have what is called Fingered Portamento. Иа
key is pressed with no other keys held down, there is no GLIDE. If you then play a
second key while holding down the first, the note will glide from the pitch of the first
key to that of the second. Release the second key (still holding the first one down)
and it glides back. In other words, the effect is only present when a note is
played while another key is held down. You can thus play Staccato for runs
without GLIDE, and Legato for runs with GLIDE.
The next two Parameters (#7, [VC] VOICE Restart, and #8, [ENV]
ENVELOPE Restart} affect only what happens when you play the same
note twice in succession.
64
[MODE] MODE PAGE (cont'd)
7. VC «VOICE Restart
When ON: If the same key is restruck before tha note has died away, it will be
assigned the same Voice that was previously playing it. That Voice will be 'stolen’
to play the new note. This is fine fer many sounds, such as piano, but it can be
annoying with others, especially sounds with long Attack or Release times, like
strings, where you don't necessarilly want a note to abruptly disappear just
because you have played the same note again.
When OFF: If a key 15 restruck before the note has died away, a new Voice will be
assigned te it, and the first Voice will continue to play. If there are already two
Voices playing that note, the older of the two is ‘stolen’. {Two Voices will alternate
playing the note If it is struck repeatedly.) As mentioned above, for sounds with
lang Attack or Release times {such as long filter sweeps, etc.) This 15 often better.
8. ENV -ENVELOPE Restart.
When ON: If the same key 15 restruck, all four Envelopes will reset, and start their
cycles at Zero level.
When OFF: Each Envelope will start its cycle at its present level, regardless of what
that level is, when the same note is played again. It will then take TIME 1 to reach
LEVEL 1, whether the new ramp 15 in the same direction {up or down) as the
original attack segment or not. In other words, each Envelope behaves normally,
except that its Starting Level, normally Zero, becomes whatever Level it was al
when the key was restruck.
| 9. OSC --Oscillator (Waveform) Restart
| When QN: All three Oscillators are halted before the start of a sound, and are
restarted together when a key is struck, so that they will start out playing in phase
| with each other. Any phasing, or "beating” between the oscillators (due to
detuning, etc.) will be the same each time a key is struck.
When OFF: The Oscillators are not stopped before a new note is played, but
continue to play. Therefore the relative phase of the Oscillators will be
unpredictable. This will tend to randomly vary the phase shift and tonal
characteristics of the sound.
10. CYC -—Envelope Full Cyclé Mode
When ON: The Envelopes will pass through their full cycles every time a key is
struck. In this Mode the ESQ 1 pays no attention to whether you hold the key
down or let it go immediately -- each Envelope simply ‘runs’ through all its stages
(ignoring the sustain stage after TIME 3 ) with each keystrike. This can be useful
for many percussion-type sounds, bell sounds, filter sweeps and other sounds
where you want consistently repeatable Envelopes that are not dependent on
keyboard technique.
When OFF: This is the Normal Mode of operation. All Envelopes will reset and
begin their cycles from Zero whenever a new key is struck,
65
[SPLIT/LAYER] Split/Layer PAGE
Controls Splitting the Keyboard and Layering Different Sounds together
SPLIT/L AYER Select LAYER [ Select
ON / OFF SPLIT/LAYER ON / OFF | LAYER
Program { Program
ON sm
N
``
SPLIT/LAYER= OFF CHOIR 1 LAYER=ON ETHEL
SPLIT= pr ps SPLIT-KEY= B&H
LJ / CD
SPLIT | SPLIT
Select SPLIT Key
Program
(Inactive Buttons appear in white)
Programs on the ESQ 1 can be Layered (so that two Programs play at once over |
the whole keyboard), Split (so that each half of the keyboard plays a different Program},
and SplitLayered (so that the Split Program is layered with yet another Program.
It is important to note that the parameters on this Page are all pari of the
Program -- that is, any Split and/or Layer configurations you set up here must be
Saved as part of a new Program in order to be retained. For example, if you start with a
Plano Program, and then Layer that with a String Program, you can now save lhe new
Layered combination in a new Location -- the original String and Piano Sounds will
remain intact in their original locations.
Also bear in mind that wherever two Programs are Layéred, the ESQ 1 becomes a
four-voice Synthesizer -- it will start "stealing" voices after four have been played, rather
than tha usual eight.
Use this Page to:
1) Activate the Layer function;
2) Choose the Layer Program;
3) Split the Keyboard {Upper or Lower) between two different Programs:
4) Choose the Split Program;
5) Choose the Split Key;
6) Layer a second Sound with the Split Program (Split/Layer mode); and
7) Choose the Split/Layer Program.
66
[SPLIT/LAYER] Split/Layer PAGE (cont'd)
ACTIVE CONTROLS:
1. SPLIT/LAYER ON/OFF
This activates the Split'Layer mode. In order for this control to have any effect,
the Keyboard must first be Split, either Upper or Lower (see #6 below).
When ON: The Split Program will be Layered (will play simultaneously} with the
Program whose name appears to the right of this control (#3). This will result in à
reduction to four Voices only on the SPLIT/LAYERED hali of the Keyboard.
3. Select SPLIT/LAYER Program
The Program whose name appears here will be Layered with the Split Program
when an Upper or Lower Keyboard Split has been selected. It is possible to have
a Split/Layer without Layer mode being on. The Frogram shown here 15
Layered only with the Split Program.
When this control is selected (Underlined, you can choose a new SPLIT?LAYER
Program in one of two ways:
1) Use the Data Entry Slider and the Up and Down Arrow Buttons to scroll
through the various Programs in Memory until you find the one you want; or
2) Press Internal, CART A, or CART B to select a Master Bank; then press one
of the four Bank Select Buttons and, while holding it down, select the Program
you want. You will be returned to the SplitLayer Fage with the new Program
selected as the SPLIT/LAYER Program. Thers wili always be a Program name in
this Location, whether the SPLIT/LAYER mode 15 engaged or not.
4. LAYER ON/OFF
This acts as a switch to turn On or Off the Layer mode.
When OM: The Current Program (the one you are editing} will be Layered
(combined) with the Program whose name appears immediately to the nght [see
#5 below), and both Programs will play simultaneously. Activating the Layer
mode reduces the number of available Voices to four (fram eight).
5. Select LAYER Program
The Program whose name appears here will be Layered with the Current Program
when the Layer mode is switched On. When this control is selected (Underlined),
you can choose a new LAYER Program in one of two ways:
1) Use the Data Entry Slider and the Up and Down Arrow Buttons to scroll
through the various Programs in Memory until you find the one you want; or
2) Press Internal, CART A, or CART B to select a Master Bank, then press one
of the four Bank Select Buttons and, while holding it down, select the Program
67
[SPLIT/LAYER] Split’/Layer PAGE (cont'd)
you want. You will be returned to the Split/Layer Page with the new Program
selected as the LAYER Program.
There will always be a Program name in this Location, whether the Layer mode is
engaged ar not.
6. SPLIT Select
This control is used to Split the Keyboard between two Programs, as well as to
determine which Keyboard half each will occupy. There are three possible states:
=== OFF -- Normal Keyboard assignment; no Split.
----> UPPER -- When SPLIT=UPPER is selected, the Split Program {see #8) wil
play on the Upper Keyboard {that is, above the Split Key), and the Current
Program will play on the Lower Keyboard (below the Split Key).
WHEN SPEIT= UPPER :
Spht Key
al
on
Current Program split Program
"===? LOWER -- When SPLIT=LOWER is selected, the Split Program wili play on
the Lower Keyboard (that is, below the Split Key), and the Current Program will
play on the Upper Keyboard {above the Split Key).
WHEN SPLIT= LOWER:
Spht Key
a E ER ER de
© = - Sree тн oe e o ий:
LE дай dde eb E EE ACI A
— =
an A
(Sptit Program) (Current Program)
58
[SPLIT/LAYER] $Split/Layer PAGE (cont'd)
So when you select UPPER or LOWER here, you are selecting which area of the
Keyboard the Split Program will occupy. The Current Program ¿the one you
started from) will always occupy the the opposite Keyboard half.
6. Select SPLIT Program
Кох ой *
The Program whose name appears here will occupy the halt of the Keyboard as
designated above (#6), If SPLIT=UPPER or SPLIT=LOWER has been
selected.
When this control is selected (Underlined), you can choose a new SPLIT Program
in one of two ways.
1) Use the Data Entry Slider and the Up and Down Arrow Buttons to scroll
through the various Programs in Memory until you find the one you want; or
2) Press Internal, CART A, or CART B to selecta Master Bank, then press one
of the four Bank Select Buttons and, while holding it down, select the Program
vou want. You will be returned to the Split/Layer Page with the new Program
selected as the SPLIT Program.
Note: Whenever you select a Layer Program, a Split Program, or a
Split/Layer Program, the ESÔ 1 only "remembers" the Location of that Program
in Internal or Cartridge Memory -- not the Program itself. If you move à Program,
put another in its place, or transfer an entire Bank of Programs, the Layer, Split, or
Split/Layer Program on this Page might still be "pointing to" a Location that no
longer contains the sound you had in mind.
For example, if you create and save a Program where a Brass sound is Layered
with a String sound, and you then Write over the String Program (or insert a
different Cartridge in the case of Layering with a Cartridge Frogram,} a different
Layer Program will play — whatever is now in the Location originally occupied by
the String sound.
If your Layer, Split. or Split/Layer Program is a Cartridge Program, and you
remove the Cartridge, the word *CART* will appear instead of the Program name,
and the Program that will play will be the Internal Program with the same retative
Memory Location (until you replace the Cartridge).
This also means that if you transfer an entire Bank of Programs from a Cartridge to
the Internal Memory (or vice versa), any Layer, Split, and Split/Layer Programs
will still be "pointing to" their previous Locations, and may not work once the
Cartridge is removed, or you insert a different Cartridge. In this case, you should
go through the transferred Programs and edit them so that the Layer, Split, and
SplitLayer Programs are in the new Bank, and then Save (Write) the Programs
back into their current Locations
59
[SPLIT/LAYER] Split/Layer PAGE (cont'd)
Note also that if you select a Program for your Layer, Split, or Split/Layer
Program that itself contains a Layer, or Split, only the main part of that Program will
play -- not any Layers or Splits that are programmed into it. It is only possible far
one Layer, Split, or Split/Layer to be active at any time. So you cant, for
example, make a Triple Layer by selecting an already-Layered Program as the
Layer Program.
10. Select SPLIT Key
This designates the note on the keyboard at which the Programs will Split, ıf
SPLIT=UPPER or SPLIT=LOWER has been selected (#8 above)
Range: 21 To 108.
Key Numbers given here are MIDI key Numbers -- they reflect the MIDI standard
tor numbering keys, rather than just counting up from the lowest note on the
Keyboard. Thus the Low C an the ESQ 1 Keyboard is MIDI Key # 37: Middle C is
MIDI Key # 60; the High C is MIDI key #96.
The available range of values {21 To 108) corresponds to the the as key range of
à grand piano. This allows the Split Key to actually be out of the range of the ESQ
T keyboard -- but such splits will only be effective if the ESQ 1 is played via MIDI
from an instrument with more than a 61-note keyboard. The Split Key itself
always plays whichever Program is on the Upper half.
MIDI Key Numbers |
De ET AE
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70
PROGRAMMING CONVENTIONS
There are a number of Programming conventions that have been followed within
the ESQ 1 factory Programs. They will help vou to know where to begin when editing
factory Programs. You may also find them to be handy rules of thumb to follow when
creating your own Programs.
LFO's
= LFO 1 is used for Wheel Vibrato, when it is part of the Program.
-==> LFO ? and LFO 3 are avallable for other purposes.
Envelopes
-—..> ENY 1 is used tor Pitch Envelopes (medulating OSC 1,2 or 3.)
----> ЕМУ 218 used for individual volume Envelopes (modulating DCA 1, 2 or 3.)
----» ENV 3 is used for Filter Envelopes {modulating the Filter Cutoff Frequency)
==--> ENV 4 is always fixed as the overall volume Envelope { DCA 4.)
Of course these do not all apply for every Program. Any Envelope can be routed
anywhere you want it to go (except to DCA 4), and some Programs will call for different
applications. But where applicable, the factory Programs follow these conventions.
Program Names
«===> (1) Where a Program is Layered, a sfash (/) Is incorporated into the Name.
===> (+) Where a Program contains a Split, a plus sign (+) 18 incorporated into thé
Name.
7
SECTION 3 -- Saving and Storage of Programs
74
74
77
18
78
79
73
60
80
81
81
az
83
64
84
34
85
WRITE PROGRAM Page
Saving a New Program lo Memory
Copying an Existing Program to Another Location
STORAGE Page
Cartridge -- Bank Copy
Transfering Internal Programs lo Cartridge
Translering Cartridge Programs to Internal Memory
Tape Storage
A"Decent” Tage Deck
Tape Connections
Saving all Intemal Programs 12 Tape
Venfying Internal Programs Saved to Tape
Loading all Programs iram Tape
MIDI Transfer of Programs
MIDI Connections
Sending All Internal Programs via MIDI to Anolher ESQ |
Sending One Program via MIDI te Another ESQ 1
73
[WRITE] WRITE PROGRAM PAGE
To Save a New or Edited Program into Memory, or Copy an Existing Program
to another Location.
Page Program Name
¡ name to be Edited
(J CO) cr =/a
f
WRITE PROGRAM NEW NAME= 2¿-LOUD
# EXIT Æ MOVE CURSOR- LEFT RIGHT
Z _ ave
Exit Move Curso r
| Button Left or Right
(Inactive Buttons appear in White)
Saving a New Program Into Memory
Once you have modified an existing Program, or created an entirely new one, vou
can Write, or save, that Program to any Internal or Cartridge Memory Location using the
WRITE PROGRAM Page. This Page is also used to Rename the Program with the
name of your choice.
When you are ready to Write a Program into Memory, first decide on a Name of up
to six letters for your new Program. Then:
1. Select the WRITE Page by pressing the button labeled WRITE on the front
Panel. The Page will come up as shown above, with the current Program Name showing.
YOU will see a Cursor, or underling, beneath the first letter of that Name.
2. Edit the Program Name using the Data Entry Slider and the two Move
Cursor buttons on the Display, labeled LEFT and RIGHT. You can move the Data
Entry Slider up and down to scroll through the available characters, or step through
them one at a time with the Up and Down Arrow buttons. Experiment until you find the
first letter you want. Then press the RIGHT button to move the Cursor to the next
location. Again, scroll through the characters until you find the correct one. Repeat this
procedure until the display shows the name you have chosen.
You can move the Cursor back and forth using the LEFT and RIGHT buttons.
changing letters, as often as you like, until you're satisfied. There are some pretty weird
74
[WRITE] WRITE PROGRAM PAGE (cont'd)
characters in there, along with the usual letters and numbers, to choose from. Be creative.
**** Helpful Hint: Moving the Data Entry Slider all the way down gives you a blank
space.
3. Select a Memory Location for your new Program. You can "flıp through
the various Program Select Pages in both the Internal Memory or the Cartridge to
find a Program you want to write over, (Remember that you will be replacing whatever 15
already there, so be careful! )
Press one of the Bank Select Buttons, 1-4. As long as you hold the button
down, the display will show the Program Select Page for that Bank, with two
differences:
1) None of the Program names are underlined, and 2) the word "WRITE" 15
flashing in the lower left-hand corner, below the Page Name.
INTI FLUTE BRASSY BASS2 WIERDS PIANOI
WRITE ODDYOX STLDRM NOISE! STRNGS PIPES
1 _
Flashing]
When you release the Bank Sefect Button, the Display will return to the WRITE
PROGRAM Page. Press another Bank Select Button and the Display shows you the
Programs for that Bank. To look at the Programs in a different Master Bank (CART A
or CART B for instance), simply press the Button for that Master Bank, and then press
and hold down any of the four Bank Select Buttons, as before.
4. "But Wait, | need to hear them!” You may find that it's not enough to look
at all those Program Names -- you want to audition a few before deciding which to erase.
In this case, press the button beneath the word *EXIT* on the Display. This returns you to
the Page you were on before entering the WRITE mede.
Now use the Bank Select Buttons and the Program Select Pages in the usual
way to select and listen to the Programs in memory. Your new Program is still safe in the
ESQ 1's Edit buffer.
WARNING! -- While you're doing this, DO NOT change any parameters in the Programs
you audition, as this would instantly replace your hard-earned new Frogram in the Edit
Buffar with something else entirely, and you might get upset,
75
[WRITE] WRITE PROGRAM PAGE (cont'd)
When you are through listening, return ta the Program you want to save by pressing the
COMPARE Button. The *C* prompt will appear in the lower-left corner of the Page. Now
press the WRITE Button to return to the WRITE PROGRAM Page. Your new Sound,
and its new Name should be just where you left them.
5. Write the Program in Memory. Once you have decided where you want to
save the new Program, Press the appropriate Bank Select Button, and while holding it
down, press the "Soft" Button which corresponds to the Program you wish to Write over.
This Writes the new Program, with its new Name, into that Memory Location.
The Display will show a message
E
—
¥ x WRITING NEW PROGRAM Ж X
PLEASE WAIT...
which will remain for about two seconds.
It will then return to the Program Select Page of the Bank into which the new Program
has just been saved. The new Program is underlined, and is thus selected as the Current
Program:
INT 1 FLUTE BRASSY BASS2 WIERDS PIANO!
ODDVOX STLDEM 2-LOUD STRNGS PIPES
*EXIT"
The Button beneath the word *EXIT* can be pressed at any time to exit the
WRITE Page and return to the Page you were on before entering it.
76
[WRITE] WRITE PROGRAM PAGE (cont'd)
Copying an Existing Program to Another Location
sometimes you'll want to take an existing Program, one that you haven't been
editing, and simply copy it to another Memory Location. For example, you might want to
put the ten most commonly used Programs in the same Bank, for easy access during
performance. Normally, the WRITE Page "looks" at the Edit Buffer. But you have the
option of Writing an existing, unedited Program.
First select the Program you want to copy. Then press the WRITE Button.
Pressing the WRITE Button when the *C” (Change,/Compare! is not showing in the
tower-left corner of the Display causes the ESQ 1 to ask you the following question:
iu) am E LL
REPLACE EDIT PROGRAM WITH * YES ¥
CURRENT PROGRAM BEFORE WRITING x NO x
LJ eL. CI CO)
Answering *YES*” places the Current Program ento the WRITE Page, and you
can now use the WRITE Page exactly as before to copy that Program to any other Memory
Location. Again, remember that you will erase whatever Frogram you write over -- Its not
à bad idea to save ali Internal Programs to a Cartridge or to audio tape before doing any
major Memory reshuffling, because once a Program is gone, it's gone,
Answering *NO* will return you to the Page you were on before pressing the
WRITE Button, leaving the Edit Program intact.
a?
[STORAGE] STORAGE PAGE
For Saving and Loading Programs and Sequencer Data to Cartridge, to
Audio Tape, or Over MIDL
The STORAGE Page is used to send and load Program and Sequence Data to
various media for saving and storage. Transferring Sequencer Data is covered in the
Sequencer half of this Manual. Here we are concerned with transferring Programs.
The STORAGE Page handles three basic types of Program Data transfer:
1) CARTRIDGE -- An entire Master Bank {all 40 Programs) can be transferred
from the Internal Memory to CART A or CART B. Or the 40 Programs in CART A
or CART B can be transferred to the Internal Memory.
2) TAPE -- The 40 Programs in the Internal Memory can be saved to Audio Tape,
or a Bank of 40 Programs can be loaded into the internal Memory from Tape.
3) MIDI -- All 40 Internal Programs, or any single Internal or Cartridge Program,
can be sent via MIDI to another ESQ 1, or to a Computer which has been
programmed to accept such information.
when you press STORAGE, the Fage appears like this:
CO —J
STORAGE TAPE- SAVE LOAD VERIFY
MIDI- SEND LOAD CARTRIDGE
J)
From here you choose which type of Data Transfer you want.
CARTRIDGE -- Bank Copy
When you press CARTRIDGE from the menu on the STORAGE Page, the
following Page appears:
BANK COPY CART A TO INT INT TO CART A
CART B TO INT INT TO CART 8
THANSFERRING INTERNAL PROGRAMS TO A CARTRIDGE
To Transfer all 40 INTERNAL Programs to CART A:
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=
Insert an ENSONIQ E? PROM Storage Cartridge in the Program Cartridge Slot.
Select the STORAGE Page.
Press CARTRIDGE. The BANK COPY Page appears as shown above.
Press INT TO CART À. The Display will ask COPY PROGRAMS FROM INT
TO CART A? ang give you the option of answering "YES* cr NO”.
Press *YES* to Copy the internal Programs to CART A. The Display will read
PROGRAMS BEING COPIED, PLEASE WAIT, Copying an entire Bank to
the Cartridge takes about two minutes. Or Press *NO* to cancel the procedure for
any reason.
When the PLEASE WAIT message disappears, the transfer is complete.
To Transfer all 40 INTERNAL Programs to CART B:
————
——"
----;
_——
==="
————
Insert an ENSONIQ E2 PROM Storage Cartridge in the Program Cartridge Slot.
Select the STORAGE Page.
Press CARTRIDGE. The BANK COPY Page appears as shown above.
Press INT TO CART B. The Display will ask COPY PROGRAMS FROM INT
TO CART B ? and give you the option of answering *YES”* or NO”,
Press *YES* to Copy the Internal Programs to CART B. The Display will read
PROGRAMS BEING COPIED, PLEASE WAIT. This takes about two
minutes. Or Press NO” to cancel the procedure for any reason.
When the PLEASE WAIT message disappears, the transfer is complete,
TRANSFERRING CARTRIDGE PROGRAMS TO INTERNAL MEMORY
Ta Transfer all 40 CART A Programs to the INTERNAL Memory:
-= 5
== y
==;
=
== == оч 3
we J}
Insert an ENSONIQ E? PROM Storage Cartridge in the Program Cartridge Slot
select the STORAGE Page.
Press CARTRIDGE. The BANK COPY Page appears as shown above.
Press CART A TO INT. The Display will ask COPY PROGRAMS FROM
CART A TO INT? and give you the option of answering *YES® or "NO*.
Press "YES" to Copy the 40 Programs in CART A to the Internal Memory. The
Display will read PROGRAMS BEING COPIED, PLEASE WAIT. Copying an
entire Bank from à Cartridge to the Internal Memory takes only about two seconds.
Ur Press "NO" to cancel the procedure for any reason.
When the PLEASE WAIT message disappears, the transfer is complete.
To Transfer all 40 CART B Programs to the INTERNAL Memory:
Insert an ENSONIO E? PROM Storage Cartridge in the Program Cartridge Slot.
Select the STORAGE Page.
79
----> Press CARTRIDGE. Tha BANK COPY Page appears as shown above.
----> Press CART B TO INT. The Display will ask COPY PROGRAMS FROM
CART B TO INT? and give you the option of answering *YES* or NO”.
====> Press "YES* to Copy the 40 Programs in CART B to the Interna! Memory. The
Display will read PROGRAMS BEING COPIED, PLEASE WAIT. Or Press
"NO to cancel the procedure for any reason.
----> When the PLEASE WAIT message disappears, the transfer Is complete.
TAPE STORAGE
The 40 Programs in the Internal Memory can be saved to audio Tape, cassette or
reel-to-reel, and later loaded back into the ESQ 1's Internal Memory from Tape.
A "Decent" Tape Deck
Because of tha sheer amount of information involved, the ESQ 1 sends Data to
Tape at a rate that is a good bit faster than most synthesizers. For this reason it is
recommended that you use a "decent” Tape deck to Save and Load your ESQ 1 Program
and Sequence Cata. This doesnt mean you need an audiophile unit -- any home
stereo-type cassette or reel-to-reel deck should do fine. Decks specifically designed for
use with computers should work as well.
What is dafinitaly NQT recommended is a very cheap portable-type recorder. Such
recorders cannot be relied upon to handle the ESQ 1's high speed data transfer.
Fool
ОСНО ИА | = hd
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LIS tre oo LL BEL BEELER Lr ER
The higher grade of tape you use, the more reliable the results you will get.
Definitely do not use three-for-a-dollar generic cassettes. A good quality Normal Bias
cassette should do the job; a Chrome Bias cassette is better, a Metal Blas cassette is best.
Tapes which are specifically made for computer data storage will work. These are
availabie at any Computer store.
It is generally recommended that you not use any Noise Reduction when Saving or
Loading Programs, as Noise Reduction circuits tend to "round oft” the square pulses that
the ESQ 1 uses to store information.
Small differences in record level can make a big difference when saving Data to
Tape. You may need to experiment a bit to see what works best with your equipment.
80
Tape Connections
Te Save Program Data to Tape, connect the Tape Cut Jack on the Rear Panel of
the ESQ 1 to the Input of your tape recorder. For Loading Data, or Verifying Data that
has been Saved, connect the proper Output of the tape recorder to the Tape In jack of
the ESQ 1.
When Saving Data to Tape, it's not a bad idea to use a "Y" adapter at the tape
recorder end of the cable, and to feed the signal to both channels of the deck. That way
you can record duplicate copies of the information {on the left and right channeis of the
Tape), in case a dropout or other problem causes an error on oñe of the channels. Also,
when you later Load the Data into the ESQ 1, this method allows you to monitor one
channel while sending the other to the ESQ 1.
* * * * Note: The first time you save Data to Tape, it is a good idea to go through the
procedure once without Starting the Tape Deck, just to get your Record levels
properly adjusted. Also, recording some sort of spoken "Slate" on the tape,
immediately before each batch of Programs you save, will help you keep Track of
which Bank is where on the Tape.
To SAVE All 40 Internal Programs to Audio Tape
---=> Connect the ESG 1's Tape Out Jack to the Input of one channel of your tape
recorder (or to both channels, as described above).
====› Put your Tape Deck in Record/Pause.
===") Select the STORAGE Page.
===> Press TAPE SAVE. The Display shows the following:
— () Li
TAPE SEQUENCER- ONE SEQ ALL SEC
SAVE PROGRAMS- INT BANKS
—J J
— J
-==<> Start the Tape Deck Recording.
===> Press INT BANKS. This starts the DataTransfer. The Display will read "SAVING
DATA TO TAPE* The ESQ 1 will put out an eight second "Leader" tone,
followed by the Program Data, which takes about 16 seconds. During the Leader
tone, adjust the Recorder's Input level. The YU meterís) should read between -3
and 9 de for home and semi-pro cassette decks; lower (around -10 to -6) for
professional equipment operating at +4 dBm.
====> When the Data has been transferred, the Display reads *TAPE PROCEDURE
COMPLETE", and the STORAGE Page returns.
====> Stop the Tape Deck, and Verify the Transfer, as described below.
81
To VERIFY Program Data Saved to Audio Tape
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==="
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————
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1)
2}
3)
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Connect the Output of the channel ot your tape recorder that contains the
Program Data to the ESQ 1's Tape In Jack.
Select the STORAGE Page.
Rewind the Tape Deck to the beginning of the Data to be Verified.
Press TAPE VERIFY. The Display shows the following:
J LI CJ
TAPE SEQUENCER- ONE SEQ ALL SEQ
VERIFY PROGRAMS- INT BANKS
LI CJ
— J
Start the Tape Deck Playing. Listen to the Qutput, or watch the YU meters, and want
for the Leader Tone which precedes tha Data to begin.
After the Leader Tone begins, press INT BANKS. This starts the ESQ 1
checking the Data on the Tape. The Display will read *READING DATA FROM
TAPE".
If the Data on the Tape is correct, the Display will say "TAPE PROCEDURE
COMPLETE", and then return you to the STORAGE Page. |
If the Verify is unsuccessful, you will get ane of the following messages:
*TAPE NOT STARTED ÓN LEADER TONE* -- The Leader Tone must be
actually playing when you press INT BANKS to begin Verifying. Try the
Procedure again.
*VERIFY FAILED =- INVALID TAPE DATA" -- This can result from a number
of things -- the Data was recorded at too high, or too low, a level; a serious dropout
or other Tape problem has garbled the Data; or a bad connection has resulted in a
loss of Data. In any case, when you get this message, Save the Data again, to
another part of the Tape, orto another Tape.
*INCORRECT TYPE OF DATA ON TAPE" -- This message would result if, for
example, you pressad INT BANKS and then played Sequencer Data into the
ESQ 1. Don't do that.
There is one more message you might get, which is not fatal, but requires your
attention. If after a Verify, the Display reads *DATA ERROR FROM TAPE WAS
FIXED*, that means that the ESQ 1 found one bit ot wrong information an the
Tape, but was able to correct it. This might indicate an aging Tape, or a slight
dropout, and it is a good idea to save the information to another Tape.
82
To LOAD Program Data from Audio Tape
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= Ъ
----›
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----›
1}
2)
3)
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Connect the Output of the channel of your tape recorder that contains the
Program Data to the ESQ 1's Tape In Jack.
Select the STORAGE Page.
The Tape Deck should be in Stop or Pause, at the beginning of the Data to be
Loaded.
Press TAPE LOAD. Ths Display shows the following:
Cn 2 LC
TAPE SEQUENCER- ONE SEQ ALL SEO
LOAD PROGRAMS- INT BANKS
LC) J — J
Start the Tape Deck Playing. Listen to the Output, or watch the VU meters, and wait
for the Leader Tone, which precedes the Data, to begin,
After the Leader Tone begins, press INT BANKS. This starts the ESQ 1 Loading
the Data on the Tape. The Display will read *READING DATA FROM TAPE"
If the Load is successful, the Display will say *TAPE PROCEDURE
COMPLETE", and then return you 10 the STORAGE Page.
If the Load is unsuccessful, one of the following error messages will appear:
*TAPE NOT STARTED ON LEADER TONE* -- The Leader Tone must be
actually playing when you press INT BANKS to begin Loading. Try the
Procedure again.
INCORRECT TYPE OF DATA ON TAPE* -- The Data was not Program Data.
"FATAL ERRORS DETECTED -- ALL INTERNAL PROGRAMS RESET”
This means that midway through the transfer, the ESQ 1 got some bad Data, and
had to erase and re-initialize all the Internal Bank Programs.
The Display might read *DATA ERROR FROM TAPE WAS FIXED". This
means that the ESQ 1 found ote bit of wrong information on the Tape, but was
able to correct it. Save the information to ancther Tape location.
+** * Note: Whenever you get an error message while transferring Data by Tape or via
MIDI, the message will remain on the Display until you press one of the front panel
buttons. Press any button (except a Soft Button) to continue.
83
MIDI TRANSFER OF PROGRAMS
Tha ESQ 1 can be instructed to send Program Data over MID! to another ESQ 1.
This Data could also be received by a Computer which has bean programmed {o receive
such Data. Here we are concerned with sending Programs from one ESQ 1 {the Sending
Unit} to another (the Receiving Unit}.
MIDI Connections
In the case ot Sending Program Data via MIDI, it is only necessary that the MIDI
Qut jack of the Sending ESQ 1 be connected to the MIDI In jack of the Receiving Unit.
Three other conditions must be met:
1) Both Units must be set to the same MIDI Channel. (MIDI Page) MIDI Mode
doesnt matter.)
2) The Receiving Unit must have System Exclusive messages Enabled. (Or the
MIDI Page, set MIDI Enables to ENABLE=KEYS+CT+PC+55+5X.)
3) The Receiving Unit must be on a Program Select Page when receiving the
Programs. Any Program Select Page, Internal or Cartridge, will do.
To SEND All internal Programs via MIDI to another ESQ 1
This will Send the Internal Memory of the Sending Unit to the Internal Memory of
the Receiving Unit, replacing whatever is there.
----> Connect the MIDI cable, and set up the units as described above.
===> On the Sending Unit, select the STORAGE Page, and press MIDI SEND. The
following Page appears:
J
— Cc)
MIDI SEND CURRENT PROGRAM SEQ TO MIRAGE
INT PROGS BANKS SEQ TO ESQ-
CJ)
— J
----> Press INT PROG BANKS. The Display will read *MIDI DATA BEING
TRANSFERRED* PLEASE WAIT... for about two seconds
«===> The Display will say *MIDI PROCEDURE COMPLETE*, and then return to the
STORAGE Paga. The new Pregrams are now in the Internal Memory of the
Receiving Unit,
----> |Ifthe Receiving Unit does not respond, check 1) your MIDI connections, 2) the
MIDI Channel on both units, and 3) the MIDI Enables on the Receiving Unit, and try
agan.
84
To SEND One Program via MIDI to another ESQ 1
This will Send the selected Program of the Sending Unit to the Edit Buffer of the
Receiving Unit, replacing whatever is there.
-7==> Connect the MIDI cable, and set up the units as described above.
«=== On the Sending Unit, select the STORAGE Page, and press MIDI SEND.
====3 Press CURRENT PROGRAM. The Display will flash *MIDI DATA BEING
TRANSFERRED* PLEASE WAIT... (One Program doesn't take long)
«===> The Display will say *MIDI PROCEDURE COMPLETE", and then return to the
STORAGE Page. The new Program is now on the WRITE Page of the Receiving
Unit. Edit ite Name if you wish, and then Write it into Memory as described earlier
(WRITE PROGRAM Page, p. 74).
«==> [ft the Receiving Unit does not respond, check 1) your MIDI connections, 2) the
MIDI Channel on both units, and 3) the MIDI Enables on the Receiving Unit, and try
again.
">> * Note: When you save all Sequencer Data to a Mirage Digital Sampling
Keyboard, or Mirage Digital Multi-Sampler, as described in Section 9, the 40
Internal ESQ 1 Programs are sent to the Mirage along with the Sequencer Data.
When you later Load the Sequencer Data back into the ESQ 1, you have the
choice of Loading just the Sequencer Data, or the Sequencer Data plus the 40
Programs. You cannot Load just the Programs from a Mirage. This does,
however, provide another method of storing Programs. The catch is that
Sequence Data must be Loaded at the same time, replacing whatever Sequence
Data was there before.
85
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