JR9303 Guide by Sherman Knight

JR9303 Guide by Sherman Knight
THE NEW JR-9303 COMPUTER RADIO
By: Sherman L. Knight
Kirkland, Washington
Version 1.0 April 2005
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction ................................................................................................................................................. 4
Channel Assignments ................................................................................................................................ 6
Programming Review ................................................................................................................................. 7
Recommended Changes to the Manual.................................................................................................... 7
Switch Assignments................................................................................................................................... 8
More Recommended Manual Changes. .................................................................................................... 9
System Setup Mode. ................................................................................................................................. 11
Model SEL.............................................................................................................................................. 11
COPY...................................................................................................................................................... 11
MDL Reset ............................................................................................................................................. 11
MDL Name ............................................................................................................................................. 11
Type SEL................................................................................................................................................ 11
MODULAT. ............................................................................................................................................. 11
TRIM STEP............................................................................................................................................. 12
Wing TYPE............................................................................................................................................. 12
Device SEL ............................................................................................................................................ 12
The Types of Sailplanes Discussed in Detail in this Manual................................................................ 12
RES (Rudder, Elevator, Spoiler) .............................................................................................................. 14
Return to System Mode........................................................................................................................ 14
Servo Reversing.................................................................................................................................... 14
Sub Trim. ............................................................................................................................................... 14
Dual Rates. ............................................................................................................................................ 15
Travel Adjustment. ...............................................................................................................................15
Mixing Rudder on the Left Stick.......................................................................................................... 16
FOUR SERVO AIRCRAFT......................................................................................................................... 17
Return to System Mode........................................................................................................................ 17
Servo Reversing.................................................................................................................................... 17
Sub Trim. ............................................................................................................................................... 17
Dual Rates. ............................................................................................................................................ 18
Travel Adjustment. ...............................................................................................................................18
Aileron Differential................................................................................................................................19
Mixing Rudder to the Right Stick. ....................................................................................................... 19
ADDITIONAL FOUR SERVO AIRCRAFT OPTIONS. ............................................................................... 21
Camber Adjusting Full Span Ailerons ................................................................................................ 21
Turning Full Span Ailerons into Spoilers or Flaps............................................................................ 21
Adding a Motor ..................................................................................................................................... 21
SIX SERVO AIRCRAFT SIMPLE SETUP. ONLY ONE SWITCH AT THE TOP OF LAUNCH. .............. 22
Return to System Mode........................................................................................................................ 22
Function Mode. ..................................................................................................................................... 22
Servo Reversing.................................................................................................................................... 23
Sub Trim. ............................................................................................................................................... 23
-1-
Dual Rates. ............................................................................................................................................ 23
Travel Adjustment. ...............................................................................................................................24
Aileron Differential................................................................................................................................25
Mixing the Rudder to the Right Stick.................................................................................................. 25
Flaps and Landing Mode...................................................................................................................... 25
Flaps and Their Connection. ............................................................................................................... 25
Flap Control on the Left Stick ............................................................................................................. 26
Launch Flap Preset............................................................................................................................... 27
Full Span Camber Adjustment. ........................................................................................................... 27
Only Camber Adjustment on the Left Side Slide............................................................................... 28
Reflex on the Side Slide Using the Upper Half of the Side Slide Movement. ................................. 28
Multi-Point Programmable Mixing. ..................................................................................................... 29
Increasing Aileron to Rudder Mix During Launch............................................................................. 30
SIX SERVO AIRCRAFT WITH FULL TRAILING EDGE CAMBER, REFLEX ON A SWITCH WITH ALL
FIVE FLIGHT MODES TURNED ON. ........................................................................................................ 32
Return to System Mode........................................................................................................................ 32
Return to Function Mode. .................................................................................................................... 33
Servo Reversing.................................................................................................................................... 33
Sub Trim. ............................................................................................................................................... 33
Dual Rates. ............................................................................................................................................ 33
Travel Adjustment. ...............................................................................................................................34
Back to Dual Rates ...............................................................................................................................34
Aileron Differential................................................................................................................................36
Mixing the Rudder to the Right Stick.................................................................................................. 36
Landing Flaps and Landing Mode. ..................................................................................................... 36
Landing Flaps and Their Connection. ................................................................................................ 37
Landing Flaps on the Left Stick .......................................................................................................... 37
Launch Flap Preset............................................................................................................................... 38
Full Span Camber Adjustment. ........................................................................................................... 38
Reflex ..................................................................................................................................................... 39
Multi-Point Programmable Mixing. ..................................................................................................... 39
Increasing Aileron to Rudder Mix During Different Flight Modes. .................................................. 41
How to Use This Programming. .......................................................................................................... 41
Other Things You Might Want to Try With This Programming. ....................................................... 41
SIX SERVO AIRCRAFT WITH FULL TRAILING EDGE CAMBER, TURNING ON THE LAUNCH,
CRUISE, CAMBER FLIGHT MODE AND A MOTOR................................................................................ 43
Return to System Mode........................................................................................................................ 43
Return to Function Mode. .................................................................................................................... 44
Servo Reversing.................................................................................................................................... 44
Sub Trim. ............................................................................................................................................... 44
Dual Rates. ............................................................................................................................................ 45
Travel Adjustment. ...............................................................................................................................45
Back to Dual Rates ...............................................................................................................................46
Aileron Differential................................................................................................................................47
Mixing the Rudder to the Right Stick.................................................................................................. 47
Landing Flaps and Landing Mode. ..................................................................................................... 48
Landing Flaps and Their Connection. ................................................................................................ 48
Landing Flaps on the Left Stick .......................................................................................................... 48
Motor Active with a Launch Flap and Elevator Preset...................................................................... 49
Full Span Camber Adjustment. ........................................................................................................... 50
Reflex ..................................................................................................................................................... 50
Multi-Point Programmable Mixing. ..................................................................................................... 51
Increasing (or Decreasing) Aileron to Rudder Mix During Different Flight Modes........................ 52
Programming the Motor. ...................................................................................................................... 53
Return to System Mode ................................................................................................................... 53
-2-
Placing the Motor Control on the Right Side Slider. .................................................................... 53
Placing the Motor Control on a Switch. ......................................................................................... 53
Placing the Motor Control on the Spoiler Stick when in Launch and Still Using the Spoiler
Stick for Landing Flaps in Landing Mode...................................................................................... 54
How to Use This Programming. .......................................................................................................... 55
Other Things You Might Want to Try With This Programming. ....................................................... 55
V-tail Mixing. .............................................................................................................................................. 57
Control Throw Adjustments. ............................................................................................................... 57
Travel Adjustment. ...............................................................................................................................57
Placing both the rudder and elevator controls in the right transmitter stick................................. 58
V-tail Differential........................................................................................................................................ 58
-3-
Introduction
The evolution of JR’s computerized radios continues with the introduction of the new XP9303. This new
radio adds some exciting features. The most interesting software upgrades are:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
The multipoint programmable mixing has increased from 5 points to 7.
Many of the functions are now switch selectable.
The sailplane mode has 5 selectable flight modes that can be changed during flight.
The radio now has side slides on both sides of the radio.
Motor functions can be controlled from several different switches, buttons or the throttle stick.
Differential now includes plus or minus functions.
Ailerons are now plugged into location 1 and 2, making any four cannel receiver work with a
two aileron setup.
The XP 8103 added ground breaking multi-point programmable mixing which completely eliminates that
annoying bump the model takes when you first pull the flap stick down. Landing approaches become
soooo smoooooth. The XP9303 increases the mix from 5 points to 7 making the approach even
smoother. If you don’t have this feature on your current radio, this feature alone is well worth the
investment.
If you own either the JR347, the 388, or the XP 8103 you will find some similarity in the programming, but
the layout and location are quite a bit different.. The switches are generally in the same place but the
knobs have been replaced with digital trim switches and the Butterfly Switch replaced with a push button.
If you own a 10x you are going to feel rather comfortable with the programming. The XP9303 takes the
flexibility of the 10x, adds a couple of new features and combines it with the more user friendly” template
driven programming of the XP8103.
There are three versions of the XP 9303. Helicopter, airplane and sailplane. The switches are in the
same place, but you only get one of the manuals, where you used to get all three. Fortunately, all three
manuals are available on line at horizonhobby.com for you to download. In the box, you will receive a
postage prepaid request form for ordering the other two manuals from JR free of charge.
The XP9303 also sports a new and much larger screen. The new screen is nearly three times larger than
that found on the XP8103 and has been moved from the top to the bottom of the radio. The screen is
nearly identical in size to the 10x, but without the push screen activation. The screen is pixilated, allowing
the computer to place a significant amount of information on the screen at one time. The larger screen
also contains an X\Y axis graph that is designed to visually represent dual rates, exponential rates, and
the multi-point programmable mixing.
The new XP9303 supports a case significantly different than prior radios. The new radio still fits my
hands better than any radio I have ever held. Some of the additional changes to the case (when
compared to the XP8103) include:
1.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Only four buttons instead of eight. A new scroll wheel has been added to make scrolling through
all the possible selections even easier. When you find the correct selection, just push to click the
scroll wheel.
Side slides on both sides of the radio have been added.
Rubber grips on the sides and a much deeper recess on the back for your fingers for a much
more relaxed fit in your hands.
The transmitter module is much easier to remove and prior transmitter modules are still usable.
The front knobs have been replaced with a digital trim switches,
The butterfly switch has been replaced with a push button toggle switch.
Newly molded stick ends that my fingers will not slip off of.
-4-
The XP9303’s transmitter modules are interchangeable with all other JR radio modules.
Flash memory is used for saving all the settings. No more internal battery to be replaced every few years
or so.
The sailplane version comes with three digital 386 servos (I have been using these servos for about a
year and they are hot!) and the new slim line seven channel receiver. The new R770 receiver is a high
performance PCM single conversion receiver with the new 10KHz narrow band ABC&W circuitry. This
new receiver is half the size and weight of the previous credit card style receiver.
Digital trims were introduced with the 8103 and when you have a radio with multiple model memory, it is
the only way to go. You no longer have to save your trim settings before you switch to a different model
in the radio. As you switch from model to model, the radio remembers the last location of each models
trim settings. If you fly two classes in your local competitions, you no longer swear at yourself for
forgetting to save your last trim locations. No more sub-par launches when you forget to reset the trim
lever to neutral before launching a different model.
To change the trims, you simply bump the trim lever. Each time you bump the trim lever there is a
corresponding change in the position of the control surface on the aircraft. A black dot moves along the
graphic bar on the display screen and the radio makes a beep each time you bump the lever. If you
bump the lever and hold it down, the trim will make rapid advancement in the direction the lever is held.
As the trim is changed to the top or to the right, the beeps become come higher in pitch. As the trim is
changed to the left or bottom, the beeps become lower in pitch. As the trim passes through the center
position, a louder and easily recognizable beep occurs.
On the surface, digital trims do not sound like much of an improvement. Boy, what a surprise! The
resolution of the digital trims is adjustable in the TRIM STEP mode. In its default mode, one click of the
digital trim is approximately the same as the old style trims. The default can be changed so that it takes 3
or 4 clicks of the digital trim to equal one click with the old style trims. With the digital trims finer
resolution, the elevator "sweet spot" was much easier to find. Whether the resolution is fine or course,
the total amount of trim adjustment remains the same (approximately 15 degrees each way from center).
Over the last ten years or so, there has been a significant amount of discussion concerning elevator
"dead band". "Dead band" may appear in several forms or any combination of forms. The most common
is lack of pitch change with small stick changes near center. Another is a plane that cannot hunt. In
other words, upon moving to level flight, the aircraft feels like its mushing along (nose high). The next
time the aircraft moves to level flight, it feels like it will not slow down (nose down). It seems to occur
most often on aircraft with full flying stabs.
There are many items that can contribute to "dead band". The ones most often discussed are sloppy
linkages, poor choice of stabilizer airfoil cross section and worn out servo pots. Add a new "dead band"
contributor to the discussion. Lack of trim resolution in the radio. With a trim step resolution of only 1 or
2, dead band has all but disappeared.
Another new feature to the XP9303 is assignable switches, slides and sticks. JR has brought flexibility to
a new level. For all you guys that have been demanding assignable switch locations, I hope we don’t
hear you complaining about the added complexity of radio programming.
Flight Modes are the newest wrinkle in computer radios. Another manufacture had a radio that allowed
an alternative setup that can be changed in flight. The XP9303 has five Flight Modes that can be
changed in flight with the simple flip of a switch.
Cruise is the is the default flight mode. The other flight modes are inhibited when the radio is first turned
on. The XP9303 in this form has more power (side slides) than the XP 8103, but not much. It is the
power of the Flight Modes that make this radio really something. The radio contains 5 flight modes.
Launch, Cruise, Land, Speed and Thermal. Flight modes can be easily selected in flight. Each Flight
-5-
Mode allows you to program separately the following mixes; Dual Rate and Expo, Elevator to Flap,
Aileron to Flap, Differential, FM Delay, Flaprn Mx, Aileron to Rudder mix, Butterfly, Flap Rate, and each of
the non-dedicated mixes.
In addition, you can set the radio so that each trim (Aileron, Elevator, Rudder, Flap and Flaperon) is the
same for each Flight Mode or separate for each Flight Mode. As an example, elevator trim can be set so
changing the trim in one Flight Mode will change it in all the remaining modes also. Alternatively, you can
set the radio so that the trim settings for each flight mode have no effect on other flight modes.
A practical application would be for different elevator trims in different flight modes. Start by flying and
trimming the plane in COM (common) mode. Now elevator trim for all five flight modes has a common
starting point. Once accomplished, switch to FM (Flight Mode) mode. Cruise mode is your base line trim
setting. You might need a couple click of up trim in launch and thermal mode, and a couple of clicks of
down trim in speed and landing. When you switch from Flight Mode to Flight Mode the trims change
automatically. Pretty cool.
In addition, the radio can be set to transition slowly from one mode to another to reduce the suddenness
of changing from one flight mode to another if there are significant trim differences.
The trainer function instructions are now written right into the radio screen. The trainer function allows
you to select the servos in the airplane that the trainee has control of. In other words, you can selectively
allow them to learn elevator first, then add rudder second, etc.
One feature that you are not going to discover is an adjustable screen contrast. Although available on
the XP 8103, it is not present on the XP9303.
The XP 9303 allows you to transfer all the trim settings directly into another XP9303 through a trainer
cord. You may not transfer trim settings any radio other than another XP9303. Several mix values
changed in the radio making them incompatible for transfer through the trainer cord. A good description
of how to make this function work can be found in the airplane manual.
Over the years, I have heard a lot of complaints about a lack of an “OFF” setting in computer radios.
Most all computer radios do not contain a setting called "OFF". Why? Because every function is "ON" all
the time. As long as the mix value is set to -0-, nothing will happen. In other words, "OFF" and "-0-" are
the same thing.
The sailplane channel assignments with the 9303 have changed from prior radios. These new
assignments are for all receivers (prior JR and other brands). The new servo assignments are:
Channel Assignments
Channel #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Receiver
(Most JR)
Thro
Aileron
Elevator
Rudder
Gear
Aux 1
Aux 2
6 Servo TD
(Dual flap active)
Left Aileron
Right Aileron
Elevator
Rudder
Right Flap
Left Flap
Motor
4 Servo w/ Motor
(Dual flap inhibited)
Left Aileron
Right Aileron
Elevator
Rudder
Motor
V-Tail
Right Ruddervator
Left Ruddervator
JR claims this new channel assignment allows for better communication between the radio and the
sailplane. What it really means is that a six channel receiver will now work with a six servo sailplane. All
prior JR setups radios would have required a seven channel receiver.
-6-
The motor assignment for a four servo setup is defaulted to channel #5 and when dual flaps are
activated, the motor assignment defaults to channel #7 (AUX2). However, these defaults are easily
changed.
The battery may be plugged into any empty slot on the receiver or y-harnessed if necessary. The new
770 receiver packaged with the radio is a seven channel receiver with an 8th dedicated battery slot.
Programming Review
Flexibility is a wonderful thing. However, programming the JR is complicated by the fact that the radio’s
flexibility may provide more than one way in which to accomplish the same result. Although more than
one means may be available, it is important to select and use only one method to accomplish your
objective. Otherwise, programming functions may be in conflict and actually cancel themselves out.
This article is only one of the many methods to accomplish the objectives below. If you disagree with my
methods, or have found one that is better, please let me know what they are for use in a future article.
This article also assumes that you own an XP9303, have the manual handy and are familiar with the four
programming buttons across the face of the radio and the selector wheel. The page numbers referenced
in the article are the page numbers found in the manual.
This manual provides the setup for several different types of sailplanes. The purpose is to show just how
similar the programming is for each type of sailplane. You don’t have to relearn the programming for a
different model.
The transmitter has two separate programming modes. These are the system setup mode and the
function mode. The system setup mode comes at the beginning of the instruction manual (Page S2)
and must be completed before you perform any of the function modes. (Page S15) If you program the
function settings first, and then revise the system setup settings second, it may result in wiping out your
programming and returning to the system defaults.
Recommended Changes to the Manual
Page G9 contains the image of the front of the radio. Modify or make the following additions to this page
and it will make your programming easier.
On image:
Change to:
Lever (left side)
Trainer Button
Gear Switch
Flap Switch
Flap Trim
Aux Trim
Aux 2
Lever (right side)
FLAP LV
Time SW
BTFL SW
L3P SW
FLAP TRIM
FLAPERON TRIM
R3P SW
AUX3 LV
The following receiver channels can be assigned to any one of following switches, levers or sticks. This
explains why the image of the radio seems to be missing some information:
Servo Slot
Aux 2
What switch, lever or stick will activate it.
Aux3 LV
Flap LV
Spoi ST
Aux 3
Ail D/R
Ele D/R
-7-
Rud D/R
Aux4 SW
R3P SW
L3P SW
BTFL SW
Time SW
Aux3 LV
Flap LV
AUX4
Ail D/R
Ele D/R
Rud D/R
Aux4 SW
R3P SW
L3P SW
BTFL SW
Time SW
Switch Assignments
The following actions can be assigned to any one of the following switches, levers or sticks.
Timer can be assigned to any of the following:
Ail D/r
Ele D/R
Rud D/R
Aux4 SW
Time SW
BTFL SW
Tim Key
Launch, Cruise, and Land Flight Mode can be assigned to any of the following switches. To put Launch,
Cruise and Land on one switch would require a three position switch. There are only two, three position
switches and they are labeled R3P SW and L3P SW. (right and left three position switch). If you choose
to assign a flight mode to a two position switch, the radio automatically selects the middle and upper
positions and discards the lower position. As an example, if you choose the AIL D/R for you Launch,
Cruise, Land Flight Mode, only Launch and Cruise are available as Flight Modes. The radio will
automatically recognize this and when ever you come to a screen showing the available Flight Modes for
mixing, Land will be missing.
INH
AIL D/R
ELE D/R
RUD D/R
AUX4 SW
R3P SW
L3P SW
BTFL SW
Speed, Thermal Flight Mode can be assigned to any of the following:
INH
R3P SW
L3P SW
The non-dedicated mixes can be turned on or off by selecting a flight mode or switch on the radio. Also,
a non-dedicated mix can be activated by more than one switch or any combination of switches. This may
-8-
look simple, but it can become complicated. AX4 and BTF are fixed switches. However, CRU, LAU,
LAN, SPD and THM are Flight Modes that can be assigned to any switch identified above.
Non-dedicated mixes 3 through 6 are activated by the following switches.
CRU
LAU
LAN
SPD
THM
AX4
BTF
Non-dedicated mixes 1 and 2 are activated by the following switches.
ON
CRU
SPD
THM
LAU
LND
AX4
BTF
More Recommended Manual Changes.
Now that you have all the flexibility figured out, the following modifications to the manual are still
recommended:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Page S2. On the diagram for [Device. SEL] insert the following under SPEED INH
“TRIM:COM”. TRIM:COM only appears on the screen when either or both of the flight
modes are activated. COM (Common) can be changed to FM (Flight Mode). This same
change should be made on page S9, S11, S12, S13 and page S46. This allows trim to
remain unchanged from Flight Mode to Flight Mode. Switching to FM means that each Flight
Mode has its own trim settings. If TRIM: is set to FM mode be especially careful during the
first flight an aircraft to remember that the aircraft will need to be trimmed using the digital
trims for Aileron, Elevator and Rudder for each Flight Mode selected during flight. If the
aircraft is badly out of trim in one Flight Mode, it will probably be badly out of trim for each
Flight Mode selected. Leave this condition set to COM for the first flight so trims are set for
each Flight Mode. Only after trimming the aircraft, then go back into Device. SEL and
change COM to FM. Now you can change trims for each Flight Mode with each Flight Mode
starting from the same base line.
Page S15. Delete CAMBER ADJ and replace it with FM Delay.(also page S55, S60 & S66)
Delete CAMBER MIX and replace it with FLAPRN MX.(also page S55, S61 & S67) The
function list also contains MOTO.HOLD. MOTO.HOLD is only visible on FUNC. LIST if
MOTO is ACT on the DeviceSEL menu.
Page S17. There is a missing screen. On the MONITOR screen, scroll the curser over
MONI and click the rolling selector. You will see the screen on page S39 and S51 entitled
CAMB.
Page S18. There should be another screen here. If you continue to scroll the curser to the
right the X-Y graph will disappear to be replaced with any flight modes that have been
activated. You can change the D/R and EXP for each flight mode by assigning a flight mode
to one of the three rates. These assignable values only appear if flight modes are activated.
Page S18. The F.M.O on the D/R & EXP should be replaced with Pos-0. The same with
F.M.1 and F.M. 2.
Page S24. Change the title of the page and the screen name from CAMBER ADJ to FM
Delay.
-9-
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Page S25. Change the title of the page and screen name from CAMBER MIX to Flaprn MX.
Page S28. The phrase “camber mix” is used in the first sentence. Unfortunately, DeviceSEL
in the service menu does not contain a “camber mix.” The DeviceSEL screen uses the word
“FLAP”. Confusing, but they mean the same thing.
Page S29. This function is only available when MOTO is ACT on the DeviceSEL menu.
Page S31. On the far right of the screen image, the words TIM KEY appear. I still have not
been able to identify what the TIM KEY is.
On several screens the instructions are discussing a setup in launch mode, but the screen
fails to include a launch Flight Mode.
By now you are probably wondering what you have gotten your self into. Don’t worry you are gonna love
it.
- 10 -
System Setup Mode.
You enter the system setup mode by pressing and holding down the ENT button on the face of the
transmitter while turning the transmitter on. You will then be confronted with the screen entitled System
M. (Page S2).
Model SEL
On the left hand side of the display you will see Model SEL surrounded in dark. This dark area will be
referred to throughout the article as the cursor. The cursor can be moved around the screen by scrolling
the ROLLING SELECTOR. After you have selected the area you wish to enter, press ROLLING
SELECTOR until it clicks.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Start the programming by scrolling the cursor over Model SEL. (page S3) Press the
ROLLING SELECTOR.
Move the cursor over MODEL and press the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll through the 30 possible selections or find a blank location and press the ROLLING
SELECTOR to start your programming.
When done, scroll the cursor to LST on the screen and press the ROLLING SELECTOR. Or,
just press the LIST button. From here on out, this process of returning to the main menu will
just be called Exit.
COPY
Although not discussed in the manual, if you place the cursor over SELECT and press the ROLLING
SELECTOR, COPY will appear. This allows you to copy a model from one of the 30 possible selections
to another. If you select an already full location, the original programming will be lost. Once you get the
from and to models selected press the CLR button right next to where it says COPY on the screen.
Pushing this button is what actual performs the copying. Exit.
MDL Reset
If you are setting up a plane in a template that has already been used YOU MUST DELETE ALL THE
PROGRAMMING IN THAT TEMPLATE FIRST. Scroll the cursor over MDL Reset and press the
ROLLING SELECTOR. Press the CLR button. Exit.
MDL Name
Scroll the cursor over MDL Name and press the ROLLING SELECTOR. (page S3) Scroll the ROLLING
SELECTOR until an up-pointer appears under the <
> brackets. Press the ROLLING SELECTOR. A
screen appears with all the possible letters and characters. Scroll the cursor over the selected letter and
press the ROLLING SELECTOR. Just repeat until the name is filled in. Unfortunately, you only get eight
characters. Exit.
Type SEL
Scroll to Type SEL and press the ROLLING SELECTOR. Scroll to GLID and press the ROLLING
SELECTOR. Exit (Page S4)
MODULAT.
Scroll the cursor over MODULAT. and press the ROLLING SELECTOR (page S5). The cursor will be
over Modulation. Press the ROLLING SELECTOR. Scroll the cursor over the type of receiver you have.
The R770S receiver that comes with the radio is SPCM. Most of JR’s older credit card receivers are
SPCM. Some old JR ZPCM receivers will not work with this radio. Exit.
- 11 -
TRIM STEP
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Scroll the cursor over TRIM STEP and press the ROLLING SELECTOR. (page S8)
Scroll the cursor over SPOI and press the ROLLING SELECTOR. Reduce this trim setting to
0%. This effectively inhibits the throttle trim lever.
Push the ROLLING SELECTOR again to return and then scroll over AILE and press the
ROLLING SELECTOR again. Trim values are from 0 to 10. Setting the trim value to 0
inhibits the electronic trim switches. (inhibit is available for all six trims. (Motor, elevator,
rudder, aileron, flap and Flareron) One is very little trim change per beep. Ten is quite a bit
of trim change per beep. A setting of 4 or 5 just about equals one click on the old analog
trims. I like to change the Aile, Elev and Rudd trims to one. The resolution, especially on the
elevator is just fantastic. The total amount of trim change available is the same no matter
what trim step you choose.
The FLAP and FPRN trim steps are just 0, 4 and 8. A setting of 0 inhibits the two electronic
trim switches just above the sticks labeled TRIM FLAP and TRIM FLAPERON. Leave these
settings on 4.
Exit.
Wing TYPE
Scroll the cursor over Wing TYPE and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. If you have a V-tail or DUAL
FLAP scroll the cursor over INH and push the ROLLING SELECTOR to change it to ACT. If DUAL
FLAP is INH, an ESC may be plugged into servo slot number 5 and the radio will default to the throttle
stick working at this location. If DUAL FLAP is selected, an ESC may be plugged into servo slot number
7 and the radio will default to the throttle stick working at this location. Some RC Forum groups have
alleged that “This means that no matter where you assign the MOTO function menu, the motor will be
effected by the spoiler stick. For a 6 servo plane, this isn’t workable.” Fortunately, this belief is incorrect.
In the DeviceSEL menu, if AUX2 is inhibited, the spoiler stick no longer effects this channel and AUX2
may become a slave to any Mix. This option is discussed in more detail in the chapter on a Six servo
sailplane with a motor.
Device SEL
Scroll the cursor over DeviceSEL and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. This is the screen where magic
happens. Below are setups for various types of sailplanes. For each of the sections identified below, go
to the appropriate chapter. Each chapter picks up with DeviceSEL and then go from there.
The Types of Sailplanes Discussed in Detail in this Manual.
RUDDER, ELEVATOR AND SPOILER SETUP.
If you have a RES sailplane (rudder, elevator and spoiler):
FOUR SERVO AIRCRAFT
If you have a four servo sailplane (two ailerons, elevator and rudder):
FOUR SERVO AIRCRAFT WITH FULL SPAN AILERONS FOR CAMBER CHANGE.
1.
Scroll the cursor over DeviceSEL and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
2.
Scroll the cursor over to SPEED and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Select INH and push
the ROLLING SELECTOR.
3.
Scroll over to LAUN push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Select INH and push the ROLLING
SELECTOR.
4.
If your ailerons are full span and you want to adjust camber in flight scroll the cursor over
FLAP and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
- 12 -
5.
6.
7.
8.
Scroll the cursor over FLAP LV to activate the slide on the left of the transmitter case and
press the ROLLING SELECTOR. In the alternative, choose AUX3 LV to activate the slide
found on the right side of the transmitter case and press the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll to the bottom of the FLAP column and press the ROLLING SELECTOR until you see
ACT. Select INH for the rest.
Exit.
Go on to any of the sections concerning a six servo plane for Camber Adjustment.
FOUR SERVO AIRCRAFT WITH A MOTOR.
1.
If you have a four servo sailplane with a motor, make sure that DUAL FLAP is INH in the
system menu.
2.
Scroll the cursor over DeviceSEL and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
3.
Scroll the cursor over to SPEED and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Select INH and push
the ROLLING SELECTOR.
4.
Scroll over to LAUN push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Select INH and push the ROLLING
SELECTOR.
5.
Scroll over to MOTO and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. As you can see, there are a
bunch of options to select from. Typically select SPOI ST and push the ROLLING
SELECTOR. This places the motor control on the throttle stick.
6.
Scroll down to the OUT: line under MOTO and push the ROLLING SELECTOR until it says
ACT.
7.
Plug the speed controller into slot #5 on the receiver.
8.
Exit.
SIX SERVO AIRCRAFT WITH FULL TRAILAING EDGE CAMBER AND REFLEX ON THE SIDE SLIDE,
ONLY ONE SWITCH TO FLIP AT THE TOP OF THE LAUNCH AND LAUNCH FLAPS ON ALL THE
TIME EXCEPT WHEN IN THE LAUNCH MODE.
SIX SERVO AIRCRAFT WITH FULL TRAILING EDGE CAMBER, REFLEX ON A SWITCH WITH ALL
FIVE FLIGHT MODES TURNED ON.
SIX SERVO AIRCRAFT WITH FULL TRAILING EDGE CAMBER, TURNING ON THE LAUNCH,
CRUISE, CAMBER FLIGHT MODE AND A MOTOR.
- 13 -
RES (Rudder, Elevator, Spoiler)
The goal here is to put the elevator and rudder on the right stick and put the spoiler on the left stick. You
don’t need to worry about switch locations, because you are not going to use any of them. If you have a
V-tail, perform the V-tail mixing found at the end of this article first.
Plug the elevator in to slot 3, the rudder into slot 4 and the spoiler into slot 5.
This section assumes that you have read the beginning of the article concerning System Mode and have
performed the setup described. The setup instructions below continue with DeviceSEL found in the
System Mode.
Return to System Mode
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Scroll the cursor over DeviceSEL and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over to SPEED and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Select INH and push
the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll over to LAUN push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Select INH and push the ROLLING
SELECTOR.
Scroll over to MOTO and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. As you can see, there are a
bunch of options to select from. Typically select SPOI ST and push the ROLLING
SELECTOR. This places the spoiler control on the throttle stick.
Scroll down to the OUT: line under MOTO and push the ROLLING SELECTOR until it says
ACT.
Plug the spoiler servo into slot #5 on the receiver.
It does not matter what you select for FLAP, AUX2, AUX3 and AUX4. You are gong to turn
them off, just scroll to the bottom line and INH each of the columns.
Exit.
After turning the radio on you will see the general information display. To enter the function mode simply
touch the LIST button.
Servo Reversing.
Scroll the cursor over REV.SW and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Slowly operate the rudder (left
hand stick), the elevator (right hand stick) and the spoiler (identified on the REV.SW careen as MOT)
Make sure that all of the control surfaces move in the correct direction. To reverse a servo, Scroll the
cursor over the correct servo and push the ROLLING SELECTOR to change the servo from normal to
reverse. Exit.
Sub Trim.
Sub trim allows you to electronically center all of your control surfaces. Now that the servo direction is
correct, (the primary control surfaces all move in the right direction), it is time to align all of the control
surfaces.
All of the control surfaces must be aligned mechanically first. It’s important to perform this function with
the transmitter and receiver turned on. Adjust the linkages and servo arms for the elevator and the
rudder so that they are as close to neutral as possible. A computer radio will not make up for sloppy
building.
Scroll the cursor over Sub Trim and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. All of your sub trim values should
read 0%.
- 14 -
Scroll the cursor over the servo you need to align and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Scroll the
ROLLING SELECTOR left or right until the control surface centered. (elevator and rudder). You should
not need to do this for the spoiler.
Dual Rates.
Dual Rate functions are available for elevator and rudder.
1.
Scroll the cursor over D/R & EXP and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
2.
Scroll the cursor over AILE or ELEV or RUDD and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
3.
Scroll the cursor down to ELEV and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
4.
Select position 1 on the Elevator D/R switch.
5.
In this format, only D/R or EXP is available for Pos-0 or Pos-1. Ignore Pos-2. Scroll the
cursor over the Pos-1 D/R column
6.
Move the elevator stick slowly, until it stops and hold it in that position. If the actual elevator
throw is greater than that recommended in the plans, Roll the ROLLING SELECTOR while
holding the elevator stick against the stop. The amount of elevator deflection will slowly
increase or decrease depending on which way you are rolling the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Stop when the amount of elevator throw is correct when the stick is fully deflected.
Now move the elevator stick in the other direction. As you can see, the dual rate function should have
effected both the up and down elevator. (However, if your mechanical linkages are not symmetrical you
still have more deflection in one direction than the other.)
Perform the same function for rudder throw by fully deflecting the rudder stick (left stick) and adjusting the
rudder dual rate appropriately.
These instructions will only get you in the general area for the particular type, style and trim of your
airplane. Use the dual rate function to modify the pitch (elevator) or roll (rudder) sensitivity of the aircraft
to satisfy your personal taste. I highly recommend, that once you have determined the optimum
setting, that you program both switch positions for dual rate and exponential to be exactly the
same. This alleviates you from accidentally bumping a switch in flight and suddenly having an aircraft
with different flying characteristics.
Exit.
Travel Adjustment.
Now that you have the two basic control surfaces (elevator and rudder) adjusted to appropriate amount of
control throw, it is now time for the final control throw adjustments. (The final adjustment of these control
surfaces should be done at home on your work bench and not in the field.) The goal is to obtain equal
travel adjustment for each of the servos.
Unless you are an expert builder or awful darn lucky the control surfaces will not move equally. The
elevator will move further up than it does down. The fine tuning of these control throws is now done using
travel adjustment.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Scroll the cursor over TRVL ADJ. and push down the ROLLING SELECTOR.
On the next screen, all nine servo appear at one time.
Scroll the cursor over to ELEV push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Measure the elevator deflection each way. Put in another 25% down throw to help push the
plane over at the top of the zoom, right before the aircraft loses airspeed and the control
surface becomes unusable. Some times the push over needs to be fairly abrupt and
additional down elevator is helpful.
The same travel adjustments should be made to make sure that the rudder deflects the same both left
and right.
- 15 -
Move the spoiler stick to the top. Connect the spoiler linkage so the spoiler is closed. Slowly pull the
spoiler stick down. Change the TRVL ADJ of the MOTO section so that you obtain full open spoiler at full
down spoiler stick.
Exit.
Mixing Rudder on the Left Stick.
The goal for this type of airplane setup is to place ALL the directional controls on one stick. Elevator (up
and down) and rudder (left and right) also on the right stick.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Scroll the cursor over Ail to Rud M.
Scroll over to Left and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Hold the aileron stick all the way over to the left.
Roll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the Rudder moves in the correct direction and the
correct amount and then push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over to Right and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Hold the aileron stick all the way over to the right.
Roll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the Rudder moves in the correct direction and the
correct amount and then push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Exit.
Yep, you are done.
- 16 -
FOUR SERVO AIRCRAFT
If you have a four servo sailplane (two ailerons, elevator and rudder).
The goal here is to put the aileron and elevator on the right stick and mix some rudder to the aileron stick
also. Aircraft with roll controlled by ailerons may experience “adverse yaw.” This occurs when there is
insufficient differential in the ailerons. This adverse yaw is countered with rudder or differential in the
ailerons. Some of that adverse yaw can be countered by mixing some aileron to the rudder. You don’t
need to worry about switch locations, because you are not going to use any of them. If you have a V-tail,
perform the V-tail mixing found at the end of this article first.
Plug the left aileron in to slot 1, the right aileron into slot 2, the elevator in to slot 3, and the rudder into
slot 4.
This section assumes that you have read the beginning of the article concerning System Mode and have
performed the setup described. The setup instructions below continue with DeviceSEL found in the
System Mode.
Return to System Mode
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Scroll the cursor over DeviceSEL and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over to SPEED and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Select INH and push
the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll over to LAUN push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Select INH and push the ROLLING
SELECTOR.
It does not matter what you select for MOTO, FLAP, AUX2, AUX3 and AUX4. You are going
to turn them all off by scrolling to the bottom and selecting INH for each of the columns.
Exit.
Go on to page
After turning the radio on you will see the general information display. To enter the function mode simply
touch the LIST button.
Servo Reversing.
Slowly operate the rudder (left hand stick), the elevator (right hand stick) and the ailerons (right hand
stick) Make sure that all of the control surfaces move in the correct direction.
1.
2.
3.
Scroll the cursor over REV.SW and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
To reverse a servo, Scroll the cursor over the correct servo and push the ROLLING
SELECTOR to change the servo from normal to reverse.
Exit.
Sub Trim.
Sub trim allows you to electronically center all of your control surfaces. Now that the servos are all
moving in the correct direction, it is time to align all of the control surfaces.
All of the control surfaces must be aligned mechanically first. It’s important to perform this function with
the transmitter and receiver turned on. Adjust the linkages and servo arms for the ailerons, elevator and
the rudder so that they are as close to neutral as possible. A computer radio will not make up for sloppy
building.
1.
Scroll the cursor over Sub Trim and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. All of your sub trim
values should read 0%.
- 17 -
2.
3.
Scroll the cursor over the servo you need to align and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR left or right until the control surface centered. (aileron,
elevator and rudder).
Exit.
Dual Rates.
Dual Rate functions are available for ailerons, elevator and rudder.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Scroll the cursor over D/R & EXP and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over AILE or ELEV or RUDD and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor down to AILE and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Select position 1 on the Aileron D/R switch.
In this format, only D/R or EXP is available for Pos-0 or Pos-1. Ignore Pos-2. Scroll the
cursor over the Pos-1 D/R column and press the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Move the aileron stick slowly. The aileron may bind, especially on the bottom of the wing.
DON’T MOVE THE AIELRON STICK ANY FURTHER! Roll the ROLLING SELECTOR while
holding the aileron stick. The amount of aileron deflection will slowly increase or decrease
depending on which way you are rolling the ROLLING SELECTOR. Your goal is to have the
UP aileron move the recommended control throw for you aircraft at full stick deflection. Stop
adjusting when the amount of aileron throw is correct when the stick is fully deflected.
Now move the aileron stick in the other direction. As you can see, the dual rate function
should have affected both the up and down aileron. (However, if your mechanical linkages
are not symmetrical you still have more deflection in one direction than the other.)
Perform the same function for rudder throw by fully deflecting the rudder stick (left stick) and
adjusting the rudder dual rate appropriately. Don’t be surprised if the deflection is different.
Perform the same function for elevator throw by fully deflecting the elevator stick (right stick)
and adjusting the elevator dual rate appropriately. Don’t be surprised if the deflection is
different.
These instructions will only get you in the general area for the particular type, style and trim of your
airplane. Use the dual rate function to modify the pitch (elevator) or roll (aileron) sensitivity of the aircraft
to satisfy your personal taste. I highly recommend, that once you have determined the optimum
setting, that you program both switch positions (Pos-0 and Pos-1) for dual rate and exponential to
be exactly the same. This alleviates you from accidentally bumping a switch in flight and suddenly
having an aircraft with different flying characteristics.
Exponential rates are another way to adjust sensitivity of the sticks on your radio. The servos are a rotary
output device. Although the line on the EXP screen may start out as what appears to be a linear output, it
is rather misleading. Because the servos are a rotary output device, there is a built in negative
exponential rate in you servos to begin with. In other words, the stick is naturally more sensitive near the
center than it is at the extremes. A servo that uses full servo arm deflection each way from center has a
negative exponential of a little more than 30 percent. Obviously, if the D/R is reduced so that the servo
arm deflection is less than full deflection, the amount of negative EXP is reduced.
If this is your first chance to EXP, you might want to try a EXP rate of around positive 20 to 25 percent.
This will give you a more linear output at the servo.
This is a personal choice issue. There is no right or wrong amount of EXP.
Exit.
Travel Adjustment.
Now that you have four basic control surfaces (aileron, elevator and rudder) adjusted to appropriate
amount of control throw, it is now time for the final control throw adjustments. (The final adjustment of
- 18 -
these control surfaces should be done at home on your work bench and not in the field.) The goal is to
obtain equal travel of each of the four servos.
Unless you are an expert builder or awful darn lucky the control surfaces will not move equally. As an
example, the elevator will move further up than it does down. The fine tuning of these control throws is
now done using travel adjustment.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Scroll the cursor over TRVL ADJ. and push down the ROLLING SELECTOR.
On the next screen, all nine servo appear at one time.
Scroll the cursor over to ELEV push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Measure the elevator deflection each way. Put in another 25% down throw to help push the
plane over at the top of the zoom, right before the aircraft loses airspeed and the control
surface becomes unusable. Some times the push over needs to be fairly abrupt and
additional down elevator is helpful.
The same travel adjustments should be made to make sure that the rudder deflects the same
both left and right.
Ailerons are a different animal. Ailerons will always have more up than down. You don’t
want to make the up and down throw the same on ailerons. The idea is to make the two
ailerons the same. Adjust the two ailerons until they both have the same amount of up. Then
Adjust the ailerons until they have the same amount of down. Don’t worry if the up and down
on the same aileron is different.
Exit.
Aileron Differential.
Aileron Differential is a critical component of trimming a sailplane with ailerons. If the ailerons travel the
same amount both up and down, the aircraft is likely to develop “adverse yaw.” In other words, when you
roll the aircraft left (with aileron) the nose of the aircraft wants to go right.
Lift creates drag so an aileron moving down creates more lift and more drag at the same time. An aileron
moving up creates less lift and at the same time less drag. So, for a sailplane to roll to the left and have
the nose of the aircraft go straight or left requires aileron differential. Less down than up.
An aileron that goes up ¾ inch and only ¼ inch down has a 3 to 1 ratio. Slow flying, under cambered
airfoils may require a ratio as high as 5 to 1. A faster flying, symmetrical airfoil may require a 1 to 1 ratio.
To get the correct amount of aileron differential depends on the aircraft, the type of flying you line to do,
pilot preference and how much rudder you use to coordinate your turn.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Scroll the cursor over DIFFEREN and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over 0% under AILE and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Hold the Aileron Stick all the way over to the stop.
Roll the ROLLING SELECTOR back and forth until the lower of the two ailerons starts to
come up. Use this to set the amount of differential according to the aircrafts set up
instructions. Move the aileron stick to the opposite stop and notice that the differential setting
works for both ailerons.
Exit.
Mixing Rudder to the Right Stick.
Another way to combat “adverse yaw” is to “coordinate” the turn with rudder input. You can still fly the
rudder with your left stick. You can also use the Aileron to Rudder Mix so that the rudder is input with
your right stick.
1.
2.
3.
Scroll the cursor over Ail to Rud M. and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll over to Left and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Hold the aileron stick all the way over to the left.
- 19 -
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Roll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the Rudder moves in the correct direction and the
correct amount and then push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over to Right and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Hold the aileron stick all the way over to the right.
Roll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the Rudder moves in the correct direction and the
correct amount and then push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Exit.
Yep, you are done
- 20 -
ADDITIONAL FOUR SERVO AIRCRAFT OPTIONS.
Camber Adjusting Full Span Ailerons
Please read the section on adding camber to a six servo sailplane. The programming is the same even if
DUAL FLAP is inhibited in the System Menu. You must still adjust FLAP RATE even if there are no
flaps. You may have to experiment, but start with a FLAP RATE setting of around 50% DN.
Make the same offset changes in Flaprn MX and input a percentage under FPRN DN until you get the
amount of camber you want when the Left Side Slide is full down.
Turning Full Span Ailerons into Spoilers or Flaps
Please read the section on adding landing flaps to a six servo sailplane. You use the same Butterfly
programming. Instead of mixing SPOI to FLAP, you simply mix SPOI to FPRN instead.
Adding a Motor
Please read the section on adding a motor to a six servo sailplane. If you have a 7 channel receiver all
the programming will work here also. If SPOI ST is selected in the DeviceSEL/MOTO menu, even the
MOTO HOLD function is available. If you only have a six channel receiver, simply mix MOTO to any
available channel (5 or 6).
The Right Side Slider is only available as a direct mix to channel 7 in the DeviceSEL menu under AUX2.
If you want to put the motor on the Right Side Slider, you will have to mix AUX2 to Channel 5 (gear) or
Channel 6 (AUX1).
- 21 -
SIX SERVO AIRCRAFT SIMPLE SETUP. ONLY ONE SWITCH AT THE TOP OF LAUNCH.
The goal here is to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Put the aileron and elevator on the right stick and mix some rudder to the aileron stick.
Flaps will be controlled with the spoiler stick, with some crow and elevator comp using the 7point mix.
In flight camber will be controlled with the Left Side Slide.
Reflex will be controlled with the Left Side Slide.
In this simple version, only one switch needs to flipped in flight. At the top of the launch, just
before the zoom. Landing flaps will remain on in all modes except launch.
Before you begin, make sure the servos in the wings are inserted so that the arm side of the servo faces
the wing tip and closest to the leading edge of the wing. I further recommend, that during normal flight
mode, you set up your radio so that all of the switches are in the same direction. I prefer starting at the
top back of the radio and pulling my hand forward and down and move all the switches in that direction.
This further simplifies flying and allows you to quickly check your radio without looking down at it by
simply passing your hands over all the switches.
Plug the left aileron in to slot 1, the right aileron into slot 2, the elevator in to slot 3, and the rudder into
slot 4, right flap into slot 5 and left flap into slot 6.
This section assumes that you have read the beginning of the article concerning System Mode and have
performed the setup described. The setup instructions below continue with DeviceSEL found in the
System Mode.
Return to System Mode
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
You enter the system setup mode by pressing and holding down the ENT button on the face
of the transmitter while turning the transmitter on. You will then be confronted with the
screen entitled [System M]. (Page S2).
Scroll the cursor over Wing TYPE and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over to DUAL FLAP push the ROLLING SELECTOR until ACT is selected.
Exit.
Scroll the cursor over DeviceSEL and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over to SPEED and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Select INH and push
the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll over to LAUN push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Select L3P SW and push the
ROLLING SELECTOR. (this turns on Flight Modes for Launch, Cruise and Land and assigns
it to the Left Three Position Switch)
Scroll over to FLAP and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Choose FLAP LV to activate the
slide on the left of the transmitter case and press the ROLLING SELECTOR. In the
alternative, choose AUX3 LV to activate the slide found on the right side of the transmitter
case and press the ROLLING SELECTOR. All this does is identify the slider to be used for
camber adjustment.
Scroll to the bottom of the FLAP column and press the ROLLING SELECTOR until you see
ACT. If you move the side slide lever now, nothing will happen with the trialing edge. Both
flaps and ailerons will be activated and adjusted later.
Exit.
Function Mode.
After turning the radio on you will see the general information display. To enter the function mode simply
touch the LIST button.
- 22 -
If you have a V-tail, perform the V-tail mixing found at the end of this article first.
Servo Reversing.
Slowly operate the rudder (left hand stick), the elevator (right hand stick) and the ailerons (right hand
stick) Make sure that all of the control surfaces move in the correct direction.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Scroll the cursor over REV.SW and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
To reverse a servo, Scroll the cursor over the correct servo and push the ROLLING
SELECTOR to change the servo from normal to reverse.
Do not worry about flaps at this time.
Exit.
Sub Trim.
Sub trim allows you to electronically center all of your control surfaces. Now that the servos are all
moving in the correct direction, it is time to align all of the control surfaces.
All of the control surfaces must be aligned mechanically first. It’s important to perform this function with
the transmitter and receiver turned on. Adjust the linkages and servo arms for the ailerons, elevator and
the rudder so that they are as close to neutral as possible. A computer radio will not make up for sloppy
building.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Scroll the cursor over Sub Trim and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. All of your sub trim
values should read 0%.
Scroll the cursor over the servo you need to align and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR left or right until the control surface centered. (aileron,
elevator and rudder).
Do not worry about the flaps at this time.
Exit.
Dual Rates.
Dual Rate functions are available for ailerons, elevator and rudder.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Scroll the cursor over D/R & EXP and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over AILE or ELEV or RUDD and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor down to AILE and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Select position 1 on the Aileron D/R switch.
In this format, D/R or EXP is available for Pos-0, Pos-1 or Position 2. Scroll the cursor over
the Pos-1 D/R column and press the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Move the aileron stick slowly. The aileron may bind, especially on the bottom of the wing.
DON’T MOVE THE AIELRON STICK ANY FURTHER! Roll the ROLLING SELECTOR while
holding the aileron stick. The amount of aileron deflection will slowly increase or decrease
depending on which way you are rolling the ROLLING SELECTOR. Your goal is to have the
UP aileron move the recommended control throw for you aircraft at full stick deflection. Stop
adjusting when the amount of aileron throw is correct when the stick is fully deflected.
For now enter a dual rate in all three switch locations. We can discuss this more later
Now move the aileron stick in the other direction. As you can see, the dual rate function
should have affected both the up and down aileron. (However, if your mechanical linkages
are not symmetrical you still have more deflection in one direction than the other.)
Perform the same function for rudder throw by fully deflecting the rudder stick (left stick) and
adjusting the rudder dual rate appropriately. Don’t be surprised if the deflection is different.
Perform the same function for elevator throw by fully deflecting the elevator stick (right stick)
and adjusting the elevator dual rate appropriately. Don’t be surprised if the deflection is
different.
- 23 -
11.
Exit.
These instructions will only get you in the general area for the particular type, style and trim of your
airplane. Use the dual rate function to modify the pitch or roll sensitivity of the aircraft to satisfy your
personal taste. I highly recommend, that once you have determined the optimum setting, that you
program both switch positions (Pos-0 and Pos-1) for dual rate and exponential to be exactly the
same. This alleviates you from accidentally bumping a switch in flight and suddenly having an aircraft
with different flying characteristics.
Exponential rates are another way to adjust sensitivity of the sticks on your radio. The servos are a rotary
output device. Although the line on the EXP screen may start out as what appears to be a linear output, it
is rather misleading. Because the servos are a rotary output device, there is a built in negative
exponential rate in you servos to begin with. In other words, the stick is naturally more sensitive near the
center than it is at the extremes. A servo that uses full servo arm deflection each way from center has a
negative exponential of a little more than 30 percent. Obviously, if the D/R is reduced so that the servo
arm deflection is less than full deflection, the amount of negative EXP is reduced.
If this is your first chance to EXP, you might want to try a EXP rate of around positive 20 to 25 percent.
This will give you a more linear output at the servo.
This is a personal choice issue. There is no right or wrong amount of EXP.
Exit.
Travel Adjustment.
Now that you have four basic control surfaces (aileron, elevator and rudder) adjusted to appropriate
amount of control throw, it is now time for the final adjustments. (The final adjustment of these control
surfaces should be done at home on your work bench and not in the field.) The goal is to obtain travel
adjustment as close to 100% as possible for the four servos.
Unless you are an expert builder or awful darn lucky the control surfaces will not move equally. As an
example, the elevator will move further up than it does down. The fine tuning of these control throws is
now done using travel adjustment.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Scroll the cursor over TRVL ADJ. and push down the ROLLING SELECTOR.
On the next screen, all nine servo appear at one time.
Scroll the cursor over to ELEV push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Measure the elevator deflection each way. Put in another 25% down throw to help push the
plane over at the top of the zoom, right before the aircraft loses airspeed and the control
surface becomes unusable. Some times the push over needs to be fairly abrupt and
additional down elevator is helpful.
The same travel adjustments should be made to make sure that the rudder deflects the same
both left and right.
Ailerons are a different animal. Ailerons will always have more up than down. You don’t
want to make the up and down throw the same on ailerons. The idea is to make the two
ailerons the same. Adjust the two ailerons until they both have the same amount of up. Then
Adjust the ailerons until they have the same amount of down. Don’t worry if the up and down
on the same aileron is different.
Exit.
- 24 -
Aileron Differential.
Aileron Differential is a critical component of trimming a sailplane with ailerons. If the ailerons travel the
same amount both up and down, the aircraft is likely to develop “adverse yaw.” In other words, when you
roll the aircraft left (with aileron) the nose of the aircraft wants to go right.
Lift creates drag so an aileron moving down creates more lift and more drag at the same time. An aileron
moving up creates less lift and at the same time less drag. So, for a sailplane to roll to the left and have
the nose of the aircraft go straight or left requires aileron differential. Less down than up.
An aileron that goes up ¾ inch and only ¼ inch down has a 3 to 1 ratio. Slow flying, under cambered
airfoils may require a ratio as high as 5 to 1. A faster flying, symmetrical airfoil may require a 1 to 1 ratio.
To get the correct amount of aileron differential depends on the aircraft, the type of flying you line to do,
pilot preference and how much rudder you use to coordinate your turn.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Scroll the cursor over DIFFEREN and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over 0% under AILE and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Hold the Aileron Stick all the way over to the stop.
Roll the ROLLING SELECTOR back and forth until the lower of the two ailerons starts to
come up. Use this to set the amount of differential according to the aircrafts set up
instructions. Move the aileron stick to the opposite stop and notice that the differential setting
works for both ailerons.
Exit.
Mixing the Rudder to the Right Stick.
Another way to combat “adverse yaw” is to “coordinate” the turn with rudder input. You can fly the rudder
with your right stick. You can also use the Aileron to Rudder Mix so that the rudder is input with your right
stick.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Scroll the cursor over Ail to Rud M. and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll over to Left and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Hold the aileron stick all the way over to the left.
Roll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the Rudder moves in the correct direction and the
correct amount and then push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over to Right and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Hold the aileron stick all the way over to the right.
Roll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the Rudder moves in the correct direction and the
correct amount and then push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Exit.
You now have control sufficient for the flying of the aircraft. You just don’t have any landing or lift control
devises yet.
Flaps and Landing Mode.
Now that the basic control surfaces of the aircraft have been completed, the remainder of this section will
focus on various flight modes which involve the use of flaps. These will include launch, cruise and land
Flight Modes as will as full span camber changing.
Flaps and Their Connection.
View page S48 of the manual. The setting of the servo arm and the correct Sub Trim is critical to the
operation of the flaps. Because the flap move through as much a 90 degrees, the Sub Trim of the flap
servos requires a large offset.
- 25 -
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Remove the Flap control rods from either the servo arm or the flap horn.
Move the L3P SW to the Cruise position. (center)
Scroll the cursor until it covers Sub Trim and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
You will be confronted the Sub Trim page showing all the Sub Trims for all servos. Scroll the
cursor over RFLP and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR so that it moves in the direction that would raise the flap if it
was connected. Keep rolling until the value reaches 200.
Remove the servo arm from the servo and reattach it so that it is at the angle shown on page
S48. Failure to perform this function will reduce flap movement in landing mode to
less than 45°.
Reattach the control linkage to the flap and adjust it so that the flap is in neutral. Push the
ROLLING SELECTOR to Exit.
Scroll the cursor over LFLP and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR so that it moves in the direction that would raise the flap if it
was connected. Keep rolling until the value reaches 200.
Remove the servo arm from the servo and reattach it so that it matches the angle of the other
servo arm. Failure to perform this function will reduce flap movement in landing mode
to less than 45°.
Reattach the control linkage to the flap and adjust it so that the flap is in neutral. Push the
ROLLING SELECTOR to Exit.
Fine tune both flaps using the Sub Trim so they are the same. A note of caution. Build a
airfoil template of the top of the wing and use it to set the neutral point for the flap. Using the
aileron or a fixed portion of the wing will almost always result in a flap position that is not
neutral.
Exit.
Flap Control on the Left Stick
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Scroll the cursor over Butterfly and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over offset and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
I recommend changing the default from 170 to 160. A offset of 170 starts the flaps coming
down with the first click of downward movement of the spoiler stick. With a offset of 160, the
first three or four click have no impact on flap movement. That way, if you use the rudder
stick, you are much less likely to pull the flaps down accidentally. Push the ROLLING
SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over SPOI to FLAP 1: and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Pull the spoiler stick all the way to the bottom.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the flaps move in the correct direction (down) and keep
scrolling until the flaps reach the desired angle. You should be able to obtain 90° flaps quite
easily. If you can't obtain 90 degrees of flap there is probably a mechanical linkage problem.
Try shortening the flap control horn or lengthen the servo arm. Push the ROLLING
SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over SPOI to FPRN 1: and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Pull the spoiler stick all the way to the bottom.
The flaps should be at the desired location. Scrolling the ROLLING SELECTOR will move
the ailerons together. This is what is referred to as “CROW”. With the spoiler stick all the
way down, scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the ailerons stop in the desired location.
Push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over SPOI to ELEV 1: and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. With the
spoiler stick all the way to the bottom, scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until you achieve
approximately 35% down elevator. When flaps are lowered, the airplane will pitch up altering
the aircrafts flight path. Every airplane is different and the amount that you ultimately use will
depend on your aircraft and your flying style. A recommended starting point is approximately
35%. Remember, the proper compensation is down elevator with full flaps. You must fly and
experiment with the mix percentage, 35% is only a starting point.
- 26 -
11.
Exit.
The XP9303 also provides for a specialized mix function which will completely eliminate that annoying
bump that the airplane makes when you first pull the flaps down. That specialized mixing function is
discussed later under Multi-Point Programmable Mixing.
Launch Flap Preset.
This is the first time you will use flight modes. Earlier we activated the Launch, Cruise, Land mode and
placed it on the L3P SW. There are three flight modes on this switch. Although they are labeled Launch,
Cruise and Land, you can actually use them for anything you want.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Move the L3P SW to the launch position. (up on the radio.)
On the top of the radio, click the TRIM FLAP until the flaps go in the correct direction and the
appropriate amount for launch. The appropriate amount can only be determined by
experimenting. Tow hook location, size of flaps, taper of the wing and several others all will
effect the best flap setting.
On the top of the radio, click the TRIM FLAPERON the ailerons go in the correct direction
and the appropriate amount for launch.
Move the L3P SW to Cruise (middle position) and the flaps and ailerons should move to
neutral.
Some like to input up elevator trim in launch. With the L3P SW in the launch position, click
the up elevator trim until you obtain the appropriate amount.
Move the L3P SW to cruise and the flaps, ailerons and elevators all return to neutral.
Exit.
Full Span Camber Adjustment.
Full span camber changing allows you to change the shape of the wing during flight. This function allows
you to change the entire trailing edge of the wing. There is quite a current discussion concerning trailing
edge camber and how it should be employed. Some argue that camber should be adjustable, from none
to as much a ¼ inch. Others argue that there is only one setting for each airfoil that provides the greatest
lift and that camber should just be on a switch. Simply on or off.
This section will show you how to put camber changing on the left side slide.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Scroll the cursor over FLAP RATE and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
The next screen will show all the Flight Modes that have been activated.
Make sure the L3P SW is in Cruise mode.
Move the Left Side slide to the down position.
Scroll the cursor over CRUISE DN.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until you see the flap move in the correct direction and the
appropriate amount.
Move the Left Side slide to the center position. The Flaps should return to neutral.
Exit.
So far we have flaps moving down from the center position of the Left Side Slide. Now we have to make
a decision. That decision is about reflex.
Reflex is lowering the drag of the wing by raising the trailing edge. It does not take much. Put a straight
edge across the bottom the wing. The straight edge should contact the bottom of the wing at the thickest
portion and at the trailing edge. Start raising the trailing edge. As soon as the straight edge touches the
wing in three locations, (at the hinge line) you have all the reflex you need. Reflex is for going fast.
- 27 -
The question is, do you want to deploy reflex or not? Recall, the goal of this version of the programming
is to perform the entire flight mode and only flip one switch, at the top of the zoom. The only real option
with this programming restriction is to use the upper half of the side slide for Reflex. In a later
programming version, with more than one switch to be thrown in flight, we put reflex on a switch. You
can do one or the other, YOU CANNOT DO BOTH.
Only Camber Adjustment on the Left Side Slide
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Scroll the cursor over FLAP RATE and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Make sure the L3P SW is in Cruise mode.
Scroll the cursor over Offset right under FLAP LV and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the offset value is +200. This operation makes the
entire side slide move camber only in a down direction, no reflex.
Exit.
Scroll the cursor over Flaprn MX and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Move the Left Side Slide all the way to the bottom.
Scroll the cursor over CRUI DN and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Scroll the ROLLING
SELECTOR until the Ailerons droop to match the Flaps. Make sure to scroll the ROLLING
SELECTOR all the way to the stops each way. Compare to the Flap adjustment, this one will
take a lot of change. My sailplane took the full 125% that was available.
If the Ailerons do not move, try the same under CRUI UP. If your flaps are installed
differently than the servo output towards the wing tip and the leading edge, you may have to
use CRUI UP to get CRUI DN.
Move the Left Side Slide to the top position and the entire trailing edge should return to
neutral.
Exit.
Reflex on the Side Slide Using the Upper Half of the Side Slide Movement.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Scroll the cursor over FLAP RATE and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Make sure the L3P SW is in Cruise mode.
Move the Left Side slide to the up position.
Scroll the cursor over CRUISE UP and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the Aileron goes in the correct direction and the
appropriate amount.
Return the side slide to neutral and the flaps should return to neutral also.
Exit.
Scroll the cursor over Flaprn MX and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Move the Left Side Slide all the way to the bottom.
Scroll the cursor over CRUI DN and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Scroll the ROLLING
SELECTOR until the Ailerons droop to match the Flaps. Make sure to scroll the ROLLING
SELECTOR all the way to the stops each way. Compare to the Flap adjustment, this one will
take a lot of change. My sailplane took the full 125% that was available.
If the Ailerons do not move, try the same under CRUI UP. If your flaps are installed
differently than the servo output towards the wing tip and the leading edge, you may have to
use CRUI UP to get CRUI DN.
Move the Left Side Slide to the neutral position and the entire trailing edge should return to
neutral.
Exit.
So here are the things you do in a flight with this programming.
1.
If you have reflex on the Left Side Slide, move the slide all the way to the top.
- 28 -
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Move the L3P SW to the Launch position. Your Flaps and Ailerons should drop into launch
position. If you want to change the flap position, do it now by trimming with the TRIM FLAP
and TRIM FLAPERON trim switches.
Input any elevator trim you may need.
Launch the aircraft, right before the dip and the zoom, move the L3P SW to Cruise mode
(middle position)
At the top of the zoom, during the push over to level flight, move the Left Side Slide to the
middle position.
As long as the L3P SW is in Cruise or Land mode, the landing flaps are always on.
This is the simplest programming mode for a six servo sailplane setup.
Multi-Point Programmable Mixing.
(or how to get rid of that annoying bump as you begin to pull the flaps down)
Traditionally, mixing functions in computer radios only allow a linear mix between the master and the
slave channels. As an example, when the aileron to rudder mix is activated, and you push the aileron
stick all the way to the stop, it mixes in a pre-programmed amount of rudder deflection. With multi-point
programmable mixing, the XP9303 radio allows you to insert up to seven different mix points anywhere
on the curve. In other words, as you slowly push the aileron stick all the way to the stop, you could
literally make the rudder waggle back and forth.
In the case of model sailplanes, this allows you to mix a larger percentage of elevator compensation
during the initial part of flap movement and less elevator compensation as flaps approach 90°. This
completely eliminates that bump your airplane takes on approach as you pull the flap stick down.
The XP9303 radio provides six extra programming functions that allow you to assign any slave to any
master channel. The first of these additional mix functions allow the multi-point programmable mixing
and is defaulted to mix Flap to Elevator. The remaining four provide the ability to do things like add
additional aileron/rudder mix during launch, and automatically eliminate the aileron/rudder mix in reflex
mode.
To eliminate that annoying bump on approach when you pull down the flap stick, there is a very
deliberate sequence of steps that you should follow. First, program the radio as indicated above for flap
and elevator compensation on approach. Launch the airplane and adjust the elevator compensation until
you achieve the proper glide path at full flap. Ignore the bump for now. Some individuals want the
airplane, at full flap to continue on the same flight path before the flaps were lowered. Other individuals
like the airplane to take a decidedly strong downward pitch when the flaps are lowered. This insures that
you don’t lose flying speed and stall your airplane. However, there is no situation where after pulling the
flaps all the way down, the plane should pitch upward. This situation is unacceptable and should be
avoided.
The steps below will be used to determine the amount of Elevator compensation at full flap using the
Butterfly Mix. At mid Flap stick, the sailplane will want to float up. Full Elevator compensation at full flap
needs to be determined and marked on the fin/Rudder. Once the fin is marked, the elevator
compensation in the Butterfly mode is reduced to zero and PROG. Mix1 will be used instead.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Scroll the curser over Butterfly in the program mode and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over SPOI to ELEV 1: and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. With the flap
stick in the full down position, scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the Elevator moves
approximately 35% in the correct direction. (down elevator)
Launch and fly the sailplane. When the flight path is perpendicular to you, several mistakes
high pull the flap stick down. Add or subtract Elevator compensation until the flight path of
the sailplane is the same at full flap as it is at no flap. At this time what happens at mid flap
stick is not important.
Land the aircraft and mark on the fin or rudder, both neutral Elevator and Elevator
compensation at full flap stick.
- 29 -
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
Return to SPOI to ELEV 1: in the Butterfly section like you did above.
Scroll SPOI to ELEV 1: to 0%.
Exit.
Scroll the cursor over PROG.Mix1and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
As you can see, the master, slave is already set to SPOI to ELEV.
Scroll the cursor over SW SELECT and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
You will be presented with all the possible switches that will turn this mix on and off.
The default is ON all the time for all mixes. This is OK, but I prefer to only turn on mixes
when they are actually going to be used.
Scroll the cursor over CRU and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over LND and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Landing flaps now work in
Cruise and Land mode. The Flap stick will not move the flaps in Launch mode.
Scroll the cursor over Point-0 and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Pull the Flap stick all the way down.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the elevator moves to and matches the mark made on
the fin/rudder earlier. Push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over Point-3 and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor until the line is slightly high than a straight line between Point-0 and Point6.
After all of that work, you have now accomplished exactly what the elevator compensation section in the
butterfly mixing was able to perform with a single button. Now, let the magic begin.
Launch your aircraft and verify, at least three or four mistakes high, that the elevator compensation is
correct at full flap. If it is not, land and adjust Point-0 until you have achieved the proper amount of
elevator compensation with full flaps.
Launch the aircraft again. Three or four mistakes high pull the flap stick down to mid flap and add or
subtract Elevator Compensation until the flight path at mid Flap stick (Point-3) is also neutral. It takes a
while to get this right. You are not going to get it on your first try. You may have to increase or decrease
the mixing at POINT-3 until it is perfect. You may also need to adjust Point-5 and Point-4. Variations in
the size of flaps and effectiveness of different elevators will require experimentation. Two meter aircraft
respond well to a single but strong bump on the curve at POINT-4 and 5. Unlimited aircraft respond to a
more gentle curve by adding additional compensation at POINT-2 and 1. When it is perfect, its sweet.
Worth the price of admission.
I recommend having a buddy pull the flap stick down while you are flying. By setting up the radio so that
it is in PROG.Mix1 before launch, your buddy can pull the stick down until the vertical line on the graph is
right above point 1 through 5. Because the mixing only works on one of these points, your adjustments
upon landing will be MUCH more appropriate and you will nail this portion of the programming just that
much quicker.
Increasing Aileron to Rudder Mix During Launch.
I trim my models to fly with little aileron/rudder mixing during normal flight modes. However, this means
at launch, I have little if any rudder to recover from a bad throw. (Recall aileron controls roll, making it
virtually worthless in this situation. Rudder controls yaw, like a rudder in the back of a boat, and is MUCH
more important on launch) It’s easy to increase the aileron/rudder mix during launch with the Launch
Mode Switch.
1. Scroll the cursor over Ail to Rud M. and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
2. Scroll over to Left column and scroll down to Launch and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
3. Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the number after Launch is larger than the number after
Cruise.
4. Do the same thing in the Right column.
- 30 -
5. The additional rudder mix is easily verified. Hold the aileron stick all the way to the stop. Move
the L3P SW from Launch to Cruise Mode. The rudder should move back and forth as the switch
is moved.
6. Exit
- 31 -
SIX SERVO AIRCRAFT WITH FULL TRAILING EDGE CAMBER, REFLEX ON A SWITCH WITH ALL
FIVE FLIGHT MODES TURNED ON.
The goal here is to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Put the aileron and elevator on the right stick and mix some rudder to the aileron stick.
Flaps will be controlled with the spoiler stick, with some crow and elevator comp using the 7
point mix.
In flight camber will be controlled with the left side slide.
All five flight modes will be activated. Landing flaps will remain on in all modes except
launch.
Launch on a switch.
Reflex on a switch.
Before you begin, make sure the servos in the wings are inserted so that the arm side of the servo faces
the wing tip and is closest to the leading edge of the wing. I further recommend, that during normal flight
mode, you set up your radio so that most of the switches are in the same direction. I prefer starting at the
top back of the radio and pulling my hand forward and down and move all the switches in that direction.
This further simplifies flying and allows you to quickly check your radio without looking down at it by
simply passing your hands over all the switches.
Plug the left aileron in to slot 1, the right aileron into slot 2, the elevator in to slot 3, and the rudder into
slot 4, right flap into slot 5 and left flap into slot 6.
This section assumes that you have read the beginning of the article concerning System Mode and have
performed the setup described. The setup instructions below continue with DeviceSEL found in the
System Mode.
Return to System Mode
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
You enter the system setup mode by pressing and holding down the ENT button on the face
of the transmitter while turning the transmitter on. You will then be confronted with the
screen entitled System M. (Page S2).
Scroll the cursor over Wing TYPE and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over to DUAL FLAP push the ROLLING SELECTOR until ACT is selected.
Exit.
While still in System M, scroll the cursor over DeviceSEL and push the ROLLING
SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over to SPEED and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Select R3P SW and
push the ROLLING SELECTOR. (this turns the Flight Modes for Speed and Thermal on the
Right Three Position Switch)
Scroll over to LAUN push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Select L3P SW and push the
ROLLING SELECTOR. (this turns on Flight Modes for Launch, Cruise and Land and assigns
it to the Left Three Position Switch)
Scroll over to FLAP and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Choose FLAP LV to activate the
side slide on the left of the transmitter case and press the ROLLING SELECTOR. In the
alternative, choose AUX3 LV to activate the slide found on the right side of the transmitter
case and press the ROLLING SELECTOR. All this does is identify the slider to be used for
camber adjustment.
Scroll to the bottom of the FLAP column and press the ROLLING SELECTOR until you see
ACT. If you move the side slide lever now, nothing will happen with the trialing edge. Both
flaps and ailerons will be activated and adjusted later.
All the remaining activities (MOTO, AUX2, AUX3, AUX4) should be inhibited. (INH)
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR over TRIM:COM. This function can be switched from
common (COM) to Flight Mode (FM). In COM, a trim changed in any flight mode, changes
- 32 -
12.
that trim setting in all flight modes. We recommend leaving this in COM for now. After the
trim flights are completed, change this back to FM and trim changes made in one Flight Mode
DO NOT change trims in other Flight Modes.
Exit.
The Flight Mode Switches have a series of default positions. If Launch or Land are selected, either will
override Speed or Thermal. For Speed or Thermal to work, the Left Three Position Switch must be in the
middle position. (Cruise)
Return to Function Mode.
After turning the radio on you will see the general information display. To enter the function mode simply
touch the LIST button.
If you have a V-tail, perform the V-tail mixing found at the end of this article first.
Servo Reversing.
Slowly operate the rudder (left hand stick), the elevator (right hand stick) and the ailerons (right hand
stick) Make sure that all of the control surfaces move in the correct direction.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Scroll the cursor over REV.SW and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
To reverse a servo, Scroll the cursor over the correct servo and push the ROLLING
SELECTOR to change the servo from normal to reverse.
Do not worry about flaps at this time.
Exit.
Sub Trim.
Sub trim allows you to electronically center all of your control surfaces. Now that the servos are all
moving in the correct direction, it is time to align all of the control surfaces.
All of the control surfaces must be aligned mechanically first. It’s important to perform this function with
the transmitter and receiver turned on. Adjust the linkages and servo arms for the ailerons, elevator and
the rudder so that they are as close to neutral as possible. A computer radio will not make up for sloppy
building.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Scroll the cursor over Sub Trim and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. All of your sub trim
values should read 0%.
Scroll the cursor over the servo you need to align and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR left or right until the control surface centered. (aileron,
elevator and rudder).
Do not worry about the flaps at this time.
Exit.
Dual Rates.
You are about to experience the power of flight modes.
Dual Rate functions are available for ailerons, elevator and rudder. The first portion of this section is to
obtain a D/R setting that is close to the rates specified for the particular aircraft. The second portion will
then discuss how to assign particular D/R to a particular flight mode.
1.
2.
Scroll the cursor over D/R & EXP and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over AILE or ELEV or RUDD and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
- 33 -
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Scroll the cursor down to AILE and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Select position 1 on the Aileron D/R switch.
In this format, D/R or EXP is available for Pos-0, Pos-1 or Position 2. Scroll the cursor over
the Pos-1 D/R column and press the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Move the aileron stick slowly. The aileron may bind, especially on the bottom of the wing.
DON’T MOVE THE AIELRON STICK ANY FURTHER! Roll the ROLLING SELECTOR while
holding the aileron stick. The amount of aileron deflection will slowly increase or decrease
depending on which way you are rolling the ROLLING SELECTOR. Your goal is to have the
UP aileron move the recommended control throw for you aircraft at full stick deflection. Stop
adjusting when the amount of aileron throw is correct when the stick is fully deflected.
For now enter a dual rate in all three switch locations. We can discuss this more later
Now move the aileron stick in the other direction. As you can see, the dual rate function
should have affected both the up and down aileron. (However, if your mechanical linkages
are not symmetrical you still have more deflection in one direction than the other.)
Perform the same function for rudder throw by fully deflecting the rudder stick (left stick) and
adjusting the rudder dual rate appropriately. Don’t be surprised if the deflection is different.
Perform the same function for elevator throw by fully deflecting the elevator stick (right stick)
and adjusting the elevator dual rate appropriately. Don’t be surprised if the deflection is
different.
Exit.
Travel Adjustment.
Now that you have four basic control surfaces (aileron, elevator and rudder) adjusted to appropriate
amount of control throw, it is now time for the final adjustments. (The final adjustment of these control
surfaces should be done at home on your work bench and not in the field.) The goal is to obtain travel
adjustment as close to 100% as possible for the four servos.
Unless you are an expert builder or awful darn lucky the control surfaces will not move equally. As an
example, the elevator will move further up than it does down. The fine tuning of these control throws is
now done using travel adjustment.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Scroll the cursor over TRVL ADJ. and push down the ROLLING SELECTOR.
On the next screen, all nine servo appear at one time.
Scroll the cursor over to ELEV push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Measure the elevator deflection each way. Put in another 25% down throw to help push the
plane over at the top of the zoom, right before the aircraft loses airspeed and the control surface
becomes unusable. Some times the push over needs to be fairly abrupt and additional down
elevator is helpful.
5. The same travel adjustments should be made to make sure that the rudder deflects the same
both left and right.
6. Ailerons are a different animal. Ailerons will always have more up than down. You don’t want to
make the up and down throw the same on ailerons. The idea is to make the two ailerons the
same. Adjust the two ailerons until they both have the same amount of up. Then Adjust the
ailerons until they have the same amount of down. Don’t worry if the up and down on the same
aileron is different.
7. Exit.
Back to Dual Rates
The power of flight modes is here!
1.
2.
3.
4.
Scroll the cursor over D/R & EXP and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
The new screen contains a lot of information. There are really two screens here.
The default screen uses the D/R switches to change between the two available rates.
Scroll the curser over ELEV, AILE or RUDD and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
- 34 -
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
Select ELEV and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
If you flip the ELEV D/R switch on the face of the radio, a 0 will change to a 1 just to the right
D/R & EXP at the top of the screen. This means you are in the mode that uses the D/R
Switches. In this setup, only the Pos-0 and Pos-1 are available. Pos-2 does nothing.
Scroll the curser over to the far right. If there is a graph there, it will be replaced with a
column entitled AUTO at the top with the activated Flight Modes below. (This column only
appears if one or both of the flight modes are activated) After each Flight Mode is the
designation :SW.
As long as ALL the Flight Modes in the AUTO column are set to :SW, the two position
switches around the radio are still functional.
The remainder of this section will show you how to assign D/R’s to a Flight Mode.
Lets assume that you want to have less elevator during the “on tow” portions of launch and
even less in Thermal mode.
You set Pos-1 earlier. Scroll the cursor over to D/R next to Pos-0 and push the ROLLING
SELECTOR. Make the value less than Pos-1. Push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over to D/R next to Pos-2 and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Make it
even less than Pos-1.
Scroll the cursor over to the AUTO column, scroll down to LAUN:SW and push the ROLLING
SELECTOR.
Select Pos-0 and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over THRM:SW and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Select Pos-2 and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
You can actually watch the overrides working. Remember Launch and Land override Speed
and Thermal. With the Left and Right Three Position Switch in the middle position (Cruise
Mode), the number 1 appears just to the right of D/R & EXP on the screen. Flip the Right
Three Position Switch down into Thermal Mode and the number changes to 2. Even with the
Thermal Mode left on, If you flip the Left Three Position Switch to Launch the number still
changes to 0.
Exit.
It is up to you and your airplane to determine how best to use Dual Rates. Some other areas where it
might come in useful:
1.
2.
3.
Rudder: Launch – more, Land – more, Speed – less
Aileron: Launch - ?, Land – more, Speed – less, Thermal – less.
Elevator: Launch – less, land - ?, Speed – less, Thermal – less.
Exponential rates are another way to adjust sensitivity of the sticks on your radio. The servos are a rotary
output device. Although the line on the EXP screen may start out as what appears to be a linear output, it
is rather misleading. Because the servos are a rotary output device, there is a built in negative
exponential rate in you servos to begin with. In other words, the stick is naturally more sensitive near the
center than it is at the extremes. A servo that uses full servo arm deflection each way from center has a
negative exponential of a little more than 30 percent. Obviously, if the D/R is reduced so that the servo
arm deflection is less than full deflection, the amount of negative EXP is reduced.
If this is your first chance to EXP, you might want to try a EXP rate of around positive 20 to 25 percent.
This will give you a more linear output at the servo.
This is a personal choice issue. There is no right or wrong amount of EXP.
Exit.
- 35 -
Aileron Differential.
Aileron Differential is a critical component of trimming a sailplane with ailerons. If the ailerons travel the
same amount both up and down, the aircraft is likely to develop “adverse yaw.” In other words, when you
roll the aircraft left (with aileron) the nose of the aircraft wants to go right.
Lift creates drag so an aileron moving down creates more lift and more drag at the same time. An aileron
moving up creates less lift and at the same time less drag. So, for a sailplane to roll to the left and have
the nose of the aircraft go the same way requires aileron differential. Less down than up.
An aileron that goes up ¾ inch and only ¼ inch down has a 3 to 1 ratio. Slow flying, under cambered
airfoils may require a ratio as high as 6 to 1. A faster flying, symmetrical airfoil may require a 1 to 1 ratio.
To get the correct amount of aileron differential depends on the aircraft, the type of flying you like to do,
pilot preference and how much rudder you use to coordinate your turn.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Scroll the cursor over DIFFEREN and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over 0% under AILE and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Hold the Aileron Stick all the way over to the stop.
Roll the ROLLING SELECTOR back and forth until the lower of the two ailerons starts to
come up. Use this to set the amount of differential according to the aircrafts set up
instructions. Move the aileron stick to the opposite stop and notice that the differential setting
works for both ailerons.
Set the differential to that in the instructions for your aircraft. If unknown start with a 3 to 1
ratio.
Exit.
Mixing the Rudder to the Right Stick.
Another way to combat “adverse yaw” is to “coordinate” the turn with rudder input. You can fly the rudder
with your right stick. You can also use the Aileron to Rudder Mix so that the rudder is input with your right
stick.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Scroll the cursor over Ail to Rud M. and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Each of the activated Flight Modes will appear on the screen.
If you move the Aileron Stick now, the rudder remains motionless.
Scroll over to Cruise and just below Left and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Hold the aileron stick all the way over to the left.
Roll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the Rudder moves in the correct direction and the
correct amount and then push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over to Right and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Hold the aileron stick all the way over to the right.
Roll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the Rudder moves in the correct direction and the
correct amount and then push the ROLLING SELECTOR. If you equalized rudder throw in
both directions by using TRVL ADJ. discussed earlier, the left and right amount in AIL to
RUD M should be the same.
Exit.
Now go back and mix Aileron to Rudder in the other Flight Modes you have activated. In general,
Launch, Land and Thermal may require more mix. Speed usually takes less. Aileron to Rudder Mix is a
personal thing and depends on your ability to fly the Rudder Stick on the radio.
So far, you have programmed the radio so that you can make the sailplane pitch up or down, yaw let or
right and roll like a cork screw. Cool, but can you land on a dime?
Landing Flaps and Landing Mode.
- 36 -
Now that the basic control surfaces of the aircraft have been completed, the remainder of this section will
focus on various flight modes which involve the use of flaps. These will include launch, cruise and land
Flight Modes as will as full span camber changing.
Landing Flaps and Their Connection.
View page S48 of the manual. The setting of the servo arm and the correct Sub Trim is critical to the
operation of the flaps. Because the flaps move through as much a 90 degrees, the Sub Trim of the flap
servos requires a large offset.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Remove the Flap control rods from either the servo arm or the flap horn.
Move the L3P SW to the Cruise position. (center)
Scroll the cursor until it covers Sub Trim and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
You will be confronted the Sub Trim page showing all the Sub Trims for all servos. Scroll the
cursor over RFLP and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR so that it moves in the direction that would raise the flap if it
was connected. Keep rolling until the value reaches 200.
Remove the servo arm from the servo and reattach it so that it is at the angle shown on page
S48. Failure to perform this function will reduce flap movement in landing mode to
less than 45°.
Reattach the control linkage to the flap and adjust it so that the flap is in neutral. Push the
ROLLING SELECTOR to Exit.
Scroll the cursor over LFLP and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR so that it moves in the direction that would raise the flap if it
was connected. Keep rolling until the value reaches 200.
Remove the servo arm from the servo and reattach it so that it matches the angle of the other
servo arm. Failure to perform this function will reduce flap movement in landing mode
to less than 45°.
Reattach the control linkage to the flap and adjust it so that the flap is in neutral. Push the
ROLLING SELECTOR to Exit.
Fine tune both flaps using the Sub Trim so they are the same. A note of caution. Build a
airfoil template of the top of the wing and use it to set the neutral point for the flap. Using the
aileron or a fixed portion of the wing will almost always result in a flap position that is not
neutral.
Exit.
Landing Flaps on the Left Stick
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Scroll the cursor over Butterfly and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over offset and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
I recommend changing the default from 170 to 160. A offset of 170 starts the flaps coming
down with the first click of downward movement of the spoiler stick. With an offset of 160,
the first three or four click have no impact on flap movement. That way, if you use the rudder
stick, you are much less likely to pull the flaps down accidentally. Push the ROLLING
SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over SPOI to FLAP 1: and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Pull the spoiler stick all the way to the bottom.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the flaps move in the correct direction (down) and keep
scrolling until the flaps reach the desired angle. You should be able to obtain 90° flaps quite
easily. If you can't obtain 90 degrees of flap there is probably a mechanical linkage problem.
Try shortening the flap control horn or lengthen the servo arm. Push the ROLLING
SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over SPOI to FPRN 1: and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Pull the spoiler stick all the way to the bottom.
- 37 -
9.
10.
11.
The flaps should be at the desired location. Scrolling the ROLLING SELECTOR will move
the ailerons together. This is what is referred to as “CROW”. With the spoiler stick all the
way down, scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the ailerons stop in the desired location.
Push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over SPOI to ELEV 1: and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. With the
spoiler stick all the way to the bottom, scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until you achieve
approximately 35% down elevator. When flaps are lowered, the airplane will pitch up altering
the aircrafts flight path. Every airplane is different and the amount that you ultimately use will
depend on your aircraft and your flying style. A recommended starting point is approximately
35%. Remember, the proper compensation is down elevator with full flaps. You must fly and
experiment with the mix percentage, 35% is only a starting point.
Exit.
The XP9303 also provides for a specialized mix function which will completely eliminate that annoying
bump that the airplane makes when you first pull the flaps down. That specialized mixing function is
discussed later under Multi-Point Programmable Mixing.
Launch Flap Preset.
Flight Modes, here we go again. Earlier we activated the Launch, Cruise, Land mode and placed it on
the L3P SW. There are three flight modes on this switch. Although they are labeled Launch, Cruise and
Land, you can actually use them for anything you want.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Move the L3P SW to the launch position. (up on the radio.)
On the top of the radio, click the TRIM FLAP until the flaps go in the correct direction and the
appropriate amount for launch. The appropriate amount can only be determined by
experimenting. Tow hook location, size of flaps, taper of the wing and several others all will
effect the best flap setting.
On the top of the radio, click the TRIM FLAPERON the ailerons go in the correct direction
and the appropriate amount for launch.
Move the L3P SW to Cruise (middle position) and the flaps and ailerons should move to
neutral.
Some like to input up elevator trim in launch. With the L3P SW in the launch position, click
the up elevator trim until you obtain the appropriate amount.
Move the L3P SW to cruise and the flaps, ailerons and elevators all return to neutral.
Exit.
Full Span Camber Adjustment.
Full span camber changing allows you to change the shape of the wing during flight. This function allows
you to change the entire trailing edge of the wing. There is quite a current discussion concerning trailing
edge camber and how it should be employed. Some argue that camber should be adjustable, from none
to as much a ¼ inch. Others argue that there is only one setting for each airfoil that provides the greatest
lift and that camber should just be on a switch. Simply on or off.
This section will show you how to put camber changing on the left side slide.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Scroll the cursor over FLAP RATE and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
The next screen will show all the Flight Modes that have been activated.
Make sure the L3P SW is in Cruise mode.
Move the Left Side Slide to the down position.
Scroll the cursor over CRUISE DN.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until you see the flap move in the correct direction and the
appropriate amount.
Move the Left Side slide to the center position. The Flaps should return to neutral.
- 38 -
8.
Exit.
This section will mix the Ailerons to the Flap on the Left Side Slide and use the entire side slide (top to
bottom) for Camber changing.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Move the Left Side Slide all the way to the top.
Scroll the cursor over Flaprn MX and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Make sure the L3P SW is in Cruise mode.
Scroll the cursor over Offset right under FLAP LV and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the offset value is +200. This operation makes the
entire side slide move camber only in a down direction.
Move the Left Side Slide all the way to the bottom.
Scroll the cursor over CRUI DN and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Scroll the ROLLING
SELECTOR until the Ailerons droop to match the Flaps. Make sure to scroll the ROLLING
SELECTOR all the way to the stops each way. Compare to the Flap adjustment, this one will
take a lot of change. My sailplane took the full 125% that was available.
If the Ailerons do not move, try the same under CRUI UP. If your flaps are installed
differently than the servo output towards the wing tip and the leading edge, you may have to
use CRUI UP to get the ailerons to droop and match the flap.
Move the Left Side Slide to the top position and the entire trailing edge should return to
neutral.
You will probably want to perform the same mixing for the Thermal Mode. Whether or not
you do something similar for SPEE, LAUN and LAND is up to you.
Exit.
Reflex
Reflex is Latin for “go fast, go very fast.” And there is a way to help you sailplane move across the sky.
Reflex is lowering the drag of the wing by raising the trailing edge. It does not take much. Put a straight
edge across the bottom the wing. The straight edge should contact the bottom of the wing at the thickest
portion and at the trailing edge. Start raising the trailing edge. As soon as the straight edge touches the
wing in three locations, (at the hinge line) you have all the reflex you need. Reflex is for going fast.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Place the L3P SW in Cruise Mode (Middle position).
Place the R3P SW in Speed Mode (top position).
On the top of the radio, click the TRIM FLAP until the flaps go in the correct direction (up)
and the appropriate amount (not much) for Speed.
On the top of the radio, click the TRIM FLAPERON the ailerons go in the correct direction
(up) and the appropriate amount (not much) for launch.
Move the R3P SW to Cruise (middle position) and the flaps and ailerons should move to
neutral.
Some like to input down elevator trim in launch. With the R3P SW in the Speed position,
click the down elevator trim until you obtain the appropriate amount.
Move the R3P SW to cruise, the flaps, ailerons and elevators all return to neutral.
Exit.
Multi-Point Programmable Mixing.
(or how to get rid of that annoying bump as you begin to pull the flaps down)
Traditionally, mixing functions in computer radios only allow a linear mix between the master and the
slave channels. As an example, when the aileron to rudder mix is activated, and you push the aileron
stick all the way to the stop, it mixes in a pre-programmed amount of rudder deflection. With multi-point
programmable mixing, the XP8103 radio allows you to insert up to seven different mix points anywhere
on the curve. In other words, as you slowly push the aileron stick all the way to the stop, you could
literally make the rudder waggle back and forth.
- 39 -
In the case of model sailplanes, this allows you to mix a larger percentage of elevator compensation
during the initial part of flap movement and less elevator compensation as flaps approach 90°. This
completely eliminates that bump your airplane takes on approach as you pull the flap stick down.
The XP9303 radio provides six extra programming functions that allow you to assign any slave to any
master channel. The first of these additional mix functions allow the multi-point programmable mixing
and is defaulted to mix Flap to Elevator. The remaining four provide the ability to do things like add
additional aileron/rudder mix during launch, and automatically eliminate the aileron/rudder mix in reflex
mode.
To eliminate that annoying bump on approach when you pull down the flap stick, there is a very
deliberate sequence of steps that you should follow. First, program the radio as indicated above for flap
and elevator compensation on approach. Launch the airplane and adjust the elevator compensation until
you achieve the proper glide path at full flap. Ignore the bump for now. Some individuals want the
airplane, at full flap to continue on the same flight path before the flaps were lowered. Other individuals
like the airplane to take a decidedly strong downward pitch when the flaps are lowered. This insures that
you don’t lose flying speed and stall your airplane. However, there is no situation where after pulling the
flaps all the way down, the plane should pitch upward. This situation is unacceptable and should be
avoided.
The steps below will be used to determine the amount of Elevator compensation at full flap using the
Butterfly Mix. At mid Flap stick, the sailplane will want to float up. Full Elevator compensation at full flap
needs to be determined and marked on the fin/Rudder. Once the fin is marked, the elevator
compensation in the Butterfly mode is reduced to zero and PROG. Mix1 will be used instead.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
Scroll the curser over Butterfly in the program mode and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over SPOI to ELEV 1: and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. With the flap
stick in the full down position, scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the Elevator moves
approximately 35% in the correct direction. (down elevator)
Launch and fly the sailplane. When the flight path is perpendicular to you, several mistakes
high pull the flap stick down. Add or subtract Elevator compensation until the flight path of
the sailplane is the same at full flap as it is at no flap. At this time what happens at mid flap
stick is not important.
Land the aircraft and mark on the fin or rudder, both neutral Elevator and Elevator
compensation at full flap stick.
Return to SPOI to ELEV 1: in the Butterfly section like you did above.
Scroll SPOI to ELEV 1: to 0%.
Exit.
Scroll the cursor over PROG.Mix1and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
As you can see, the master, slave is already set to SPOI to ELEV.
Scroll the cursor over SW SELECT and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
You will be presented with all the possible switches that will turn this mix on and off.
The default is ON all the time for all mixes. This is OK, but I prefer to only turn on mixes
when they are actually going to be used.
Scroll the cursor over CRU and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over LND and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Landing flaps now work in
Cruise and Land mode. The Flap stick will not move the flaps in Launch mode.
Scroll the cursor over Point-0 and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Pull the Flap stick all the way down.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the elevator moves to and matches the mark made on
the fin/rudder earlier. Push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over Point-3 and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor until the line is slightly high than a straight line between Point-0 and Point6.
- 40 -
Launch your aircraft and verify, at least three or four mistakes high, that the elevator compensation is
correct at full flap. If it is not, land and adjust Point-0 until you have achieved the proper amount of
elevator compensation with full flaps.
Launch the aircraft again. Three or four mistakes high pull the flap stick down to mid flap and add or
subtract Elevator Compensation until the flight path at mid Flap stick (Point-3) is also neutral. It takes a
while to get this right. You are not going to get it on your first try. You may have to increase or decrease
the mixing at POINT-3 until it is perfect. You may also need to adjust Point-5 and Point-4. Variations in
the size of flaps and effectiveness of different elevators will require experimentation. Two meter aircraft
respond well to a single but strong bump on the curve at POINT-4 and 5. Unlimited aircraft respond to a
more gentle curve by adding additional compensation at POINT-2 and 1. When it is perfect, its sweet.
Worth the price of admission.
I recommend having a buddy pull the flap stick down while you are flying. By setting up the radio so that
it is in PROG.Mix1 before launch, your buddy can pull the stick down until the vertical line on the graph is
right above point 1 through 5. Because the mixing only works on one of these points, your adjustments
upon landing will be MUCH more appropriate and you will nail this portion of the programming just that
much quicker.
Increasing Aileron to Rudder Mix During Different Flight Modes.
I trim my models to fly with little aileron/rudder mixing during normal flight modes. However, this means
at launch, I have little if any rudder to recover from a bad throw. (Recall aileron controls roll, making it
virtually worthless in this situation. Rudder controls yaw, like a rudder in the back of a boat, and is MUCH
more important on launch) Its easy to increase the aileron/rudder mix during launch with the Launch
Mode Switch. On the other hand, Aileron to Rudder Mix may need to be reduced in the Speed Mode.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Scroll the cursor over Ail to Rud M. and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll over to Left column and scroll down to Launch and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the number after Launch is larger than the number
after Cruise.
Do the same thing in the Right column.
The additional rudder mix is easily verified. Hold the aileron stick all the way to the stop.
Move the L3P SW from Launch to Cruise Mode. The rudder should move back and forth as
the switch is moved.
Do the same for any other mode. Check you work using step 5.
Exit
How to Use This Programming.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Flip the R3P SW to SPEED. (switch up)
Move the L3P SW to the Launch position. Your Flaps and Ailerons should drop into launch
position. If you want to change the flap position, do it now by trimming with the TRIM FLAP
and TRIM FLAPERON trim switches.
Input any elevator trim you may need.
Launch the aircraft, right before the dip and the zoom, move the L3P SW to Cruise mode
(middle position)
At the top of the zoom, during the push over to level flight, move the R3P SW to Cruise.
As long as the L3P SW is in Cruise, Land, Speed or Thermal mode, the landing flaps are
always on.
This programming is more complex than before. It helps to figure out before hand what you
want to use all the functions for.
Other Things You Might Want to Try With This Programming.
- 41 -
In Cruise Mode:
1.
Set up you plane in this mode and use it as your baseline.
In Launch Mode:
1.
Launch Flaps.
2.
Less elevator throw.
3.
More rudder to Aileron mix.
In Speed Mode:
1.
Reflex the trailing edge.
2.
Much less Rudder to Aileron Mix.
3.
Either less elevator throw or more positive exponential.
4.
Less Aileron throw or more positive exponential.
5.
Possible less aileron differential.
In Thermal Mode:
1.
More Aileron to Rudder Mix.
2.
Less Aileron throw.
3.
Less Elevator throw.
In Landing Mode:
1.
More Aileron to Rudder Mix.
2.
Less Elevator Throw.
3.
Reverse Aileron Differential.
- 42 -
SIX SERVO AIRCRAFT WITH FULL TRAILING EDGE CAMBER, TURNING ON THE LAUNCH,
CRUISE, CAMBER FLIGHT MODE AND A MOTOR.
We have reached the difficult one. So far, the Throttle Stick is used for landing flaps. The Left Slider is
used for trailing edge camber. Where do we put the throttle control for the electric motor? Well, if you
have soft start on you speed control, it can use any one of many switches. If you don’t, you need
something that is adjustable. You are limited to the throttle stick or the right side slider. The throttle stick
is a problem. Motor control is usually off at the bottom and full power at the top. Flap control is usually
up flap at the top and 90 degree flap at the bottom. The use of the throttle stick for both throttle and flap
control is possible, but requires a switch to be flipped and the stick has to be in the correct place. As an
example, you are on approach, half flap, and you decide to go around. If you raise the flaps first and
when you switch the stick from flap to motor, the motor will instantly go to full throttle.
Flight modes again come to the rescue.
The goal here is to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Put the aileron and elevator on the right stick and mix some rudder to the aileron stick to help
adverse yaw.
Flaps, during landing will be controlled with the spoiler stick, with some crow and elevator
compensation using the 7 point mix. Flaps will be inhibited in all other Flight Modes.
Motor, during launch will be controlled with the spoiler stick, with some flap to help on climb
and some down elevator and left rudder to compensate for an incorrectly mounted motor.
The motor will be inhibited in all other Flight Modes
In flight camber will be controlled with the left side slide and be available in all flight modes.
All five flight modes will be activated.
Speed Mode will reflex the trailing edge, reduce the aileron to rudder mix and input two clicks
of down trim.
Before you begin, make sure the servos in the wings are inserted so that the arm side of the servo faces
the wing tip and is closest to the leading edge of the wing. I further recommend, that during normal flight
mode, you set up your radio so that most of the switches are in the same direction. I prefer starting at the
top back of the radio and pulling my hand forward and down and move all the switches in that direction.
This further simplifies flying and allows you to quickly check your radio without looking down at it by
simply passing your hands over all the switches.
Plug the left aileron in to slot 1, the right aileron into slot 2, the elevator in to slot 3, and the rudder into
slot 4, right flap into slot 5 and left flap into slot 6 and the ESC for the motor into slot 7.
This section assumes that you have read the beginning of the article concerning System Mode and have
performed the setup described. The setup instructions below continue with DeviceSEL found in the
System Mode.
Return to System Mode
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
You enter the system setup mode by pressing and holding down the ENT button on the face
of the transmitter while turning the transmitter on. You will then be confronted with the
screen entitled System M. (Page S2).
Scroll the cursor over Wing TYPE and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over to DUAL FLAP push the ROLLING SELECTOR until ACT is selected.
Exit.
While still in System M, scroll the cursor over DeviceSEL and push the ROLLING
SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over to SPEED and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Select R3P SW and
push the ROLLING SELECTOR. (this turns the Flight Modes for Speed and Thermal on the
Right Three Position Switch)
- 43 -
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Scroll over to LAUN push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Select L3P SW and push the
ROLLING SELECTOR. (this turns on Flight Modes for Launch, Cruise and Land and assigns
it to the Left Three Position Switch)
Scroll over to FLAP and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Choose FLAP LV to activate the
side slide on the left of the transmitter case and press the ROLLING SELECTOR. In the
alternative, choose AUX3 LV to activate the slide found on the right side of the transmitter
case and press the ROLLING SELECTOR. (don’t use the alternative here. Later this section
will discuss placing the motor control here) All this does is identify the slider to be used for
camber adjustment.
Scroll to the bottom of the FLAP column and press the ROLLING SELECTOR until you see
ACT. If you move the side slide lever now, nothing will happen with the trialing edge. Both
flaps and ailerons will be activated and adjusted later.
The remaining activities, AUX2, AUX3, AUX4 should be inhibited. (INH)
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR over TRIM:COM. This function can be switched from
common (COM) to Flight Mode (FM). In COM, a trim changed in any flight mode, changes
that trim setting in all flight modes. We recommend leaving this in COM for now. After the
trim flights are completed, change this back to FM and trim changes made in one Flight Mode
DO NOT change trims in other Flight Modes.
Exit.
The Flight Mode Switches have a series of default positions. If Launch or Land are selected, either will
override Speed or Thermal. For Speed or Thermal to work, the Left Three Position Switch must be in the
middle position. (Cruise)
Return to Function Mode.
After turning the radio on you will see the general information display. To enter the function mode simply
touch the LIST button.
If you have a V-tail, perform the V-tail mixing found at the end of this article first.
Servo Reversing.
Slowly operate the rudder (left hand stick), the elevator (right hand stick) and the ailerons (right hand
stick) Make sure that all of the control surfaces move in the correct direction.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Scroll the cursor over REV.SW and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
To reverse a servo, Scroll the cursor over the correct servo and push the ROLLING
SELECTOR to change the servo from normal to reverse.
Do not worry about flaps at this time.
Exit.
Sub Trim.
Sub trim allows you to electronically center all of your control surfaces. Now that the servos are all
moving in the correct direction, it is time to align all of the control surfaces.
All of the control surfaces must be aligned mechanically first. It’s important to perform this function with
the transmitter and receiver turned on. Adjust the linkages and servo arms for the ailerons, elevator and
the rudder so that they are as close to neutral as possible. A computer radio will not make up for sloppy
building.
1.
Scroll the cursor over Sub Trim and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. All of your sub trim
values should read 0%.
- 44 -
2.
3.
4.
Scroll the cursor over the servo you need to align and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR left or right until the control surface centered. (aileron,
elevator and rudder).
Do not worry about the flaps at this time.
Exit.
Dual Rates.
You are about to experience the power of flight modes.
Dual Rate functions are available for ailerons, elevator and rudder. The first portion of this section is to
obtain a D/R setting that is close to the rates specified for the particular aircraft. The second portion will
then discuss how to assign particular D/R to a particular flight mode.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Scroll the cursor over D/R & EXP and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over AILE or ELEV or RUDD and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor down to AILE and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
In this format, D/R or EXP is available for Pos-0, Pos-1 or Pos-2. Scroll the cursor over the
Pos-1 D/R column and press the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Move the aileron stick slowly. The aileron may bind, especially on the bottom of the wing.
DON’T MOVE THE AIELRON STICK ANY FURTHER! Roll the ROLLING SELECTOR while
holding the aileron stick. The amount of aileron deflection will slowly increase or decrease
depending on which way you are rolling the ROLLING SELECTOR. Your goal is to have the
UP aileron move the recommended control throw for you aircraft at full stick deflection. Stop
adjusting when the amount of aileron throw is correct when the stick is fully deflected.
For now enter the same dual rate in all three switch locations. We can discuss this more
later
Now move the aileron stick in the other direction. As you can see, the dual rate function
should have affected both the up and down aileron. (However, if your mechanical linkages
are not symmetrical you still have more deflection in one direction than the other.)
Perform the same function for rudder throw by fully deflecting the rudder stick (left stick) and
adjusting the rudder dual rate appropriately. Don’t be surprised if the deflection is different.
Perform the same function for elevator throw by fully deflecting the elevator stick (right stick)
and adjusting the elevator dual rate appropriately. Don’t be surprised if the deflection is
different.
Exit.
Travel Adjustment.
Now that you have four basic control surfaces (aileron, elevator and rudder) adjusted to appropriate
amount of control throw, it is now time for the final adjustments. (The final adjustment of these control
surfaces should be done at home on your work bench and not in the field.) The goal is to obtain travel
each way from center that is as equal as possible.
Unless you are an expert builder or awful darn lucky the control surfaces will not move equally. As an
example, the elevator will move further up than it does down. The fine tuning of these control throws is
now done using travel adjustment.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Scroll the cursor over TRVL ADJ. and push down the ROLLING SELECTOR.
On the next screen, all nine servo appear at one time.
Scroll the cursor over to ELEV push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Measure the elevator deflection each way. Measure the throw each way and reduce one of
end points as necessary. Moving the cursor from one value to the other requires the
movement of the stick. As an example, Scroll the cursor over LAIL and push the ROLLING
SELECTOR.
Moving the cursor from left to right is done by moving the Aileron Stick.
- 45 -
6.
7.
8.
The same travel adjustments should be made to make sure that the rudder deflects the same
both left and right.
Ailerons are a different animal. Ailerons will always have more up than down. You don’t
want to make the up and down throw the same on ailerons. The idea is to make the two
ailerons the same. Adjust the two ailerons until they both have the same amount of up. Then
Adjust the ailerons until they have the same amount of down. Don’t worry if the up and down
on the same aileron is different.
Exit.
Back to Dual Rates
The power of flight modes is here!
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
Scroll the cursor over D/R & EXP and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
The new screen contains a lot of information. There are really two screens here.
The default screen uses the D/R switches to change between the two available rates.
Scroll the curser over ELEV, AILE or RUDD and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Select ELEV and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
If you flip the L3P SW on the face of the radio, a 0 will change to a 1 or 2 just to the right D/R
& EXP at the top of the screen. This means you are in the mode that uses the Flight Mode
Switches. In this setup, Pos-0, Pos-1 and Pos-2 are available.
Scroll the curser over to the far right. If there is a graph there, it will be replaced with a
column entitled AUTO at the top with the activated Flight Modes below. (This column only
appears if one or both of the flight modes are activated) After each Flight Mode is the
designation :SW.
As long as ALL the Flight Modes in the AUTO column are set to :SW, the two position
switches around the radio are still functional.
The remainder of this section will show you how to assign D/R’s to a Flight Mode.
Lets assume that you want to have less elevator during the climb under power portions of
launch and even less in Thermal mode.
You set Pos-1 earlier. Scroll the cursor over to D/R next to Pos-0 and push the ROLLING
SELECTOR. Make the value less than Pos-1. Push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over to D/R next to Pos-2 and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Make it
even less than Pos-1.
Scroll the cursor over to the AUTO column, scroll down to LAUN:SW and push the ROLLING
SELECTOR.
Select Pos-0 and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over THRM:SW and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Select Pos-2 and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
You can actually watch the overrides working. Remember Launch and Land override Speed
and Thermal. With the Left and Right Three Position Switch in the middle position (Cruise
Mode), the number 1 appears just to the right of D/R & EXP on the screen. Flip the Right
Three Position Switch down into Thermal Mode and the number changes to 2. Even with the
Thermal Mode left on, If you flip the Left Three Position Switch to Launch the number still
changes to 0.
Exit.
It is up to you and your airplane to determine how best to use Dual Rates. Some other areas where it
might come in useful:
1.
2.
3.
Rudder: Launch – more, Land – more, Speed – less
Aileron: Launch - ?, Land – more, Speed – less, Thermal – less.
Elevator: Launch – less, land - ?, Speed – less, Thermal – less.
- 46 -
Exponential rates are another way to adjust sensitivity of the sticks on your radio. The servos are a rotary
output device. Although the line on the EXP screen may start out as what appears to be a linear output, it
is rather misleading. Because the servos are a rotary output device, there is a built in negative
exponential rate in you servos to begin with. In other words, the stick is naturally more sensitive near the
center than it is at the extremes. A servo that uses full servo arm deflection each way from center has a
negative exponential of a little more than 30 percent. Obviously, if the D/R is reduced so that the servo
arm deflection is less than full deflection, the amount of negative EXP is reduced.
If this is your first chance to EXP, you might want to try a EXP rate of around positive 20 to 25 percent.
This will give you a more linear output at the servo.
This is a personal choice issue. There is no right or wrong amount of EXP.
Exit.
Aileron Differential.
Aileron Differential is a critical component of trimming a sailplane with ailerons. If the ailerons travel the
same amount both up and down, the aircraft is likely to develop “adverse yaw.” In other words, when you
roll the aircraft left (with aileron) the nose of the aircraft wants to go right.
Lift creates drag so an aileron moving down creates more lift and more drag at the same time. An aileron
moving up creates less lift and at the same time less drag. So, for a sailplane to roll to the left and have
the nose of the aircraft go the same way requires aileron differential. Less down than up.
An aileron that goes up ¾ inch and only ¼ inch down has a 3 to 1 ratio. Slow flying, under cambered
airfoils may require a ratio as high as 6 to 1. A faster flying, symmetrical airfoil may require a 1 to 1 ratio.
To get the correct amount of aileron differential depends on the aircraft, the type of flying you like to do,
pilot preference and how much rudder you use to coordinate your turn.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Scroll the cursor over DIFFEREN and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over 0% under AILE and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Hold the Aileron Stick all the way over to the stop.
Roll the ROLLING SELECTOR back and forth until the lower of the two ailerons starts to
come up. Use this to set the amount of differential according to the aircrafts set up
instructions. Move the aileron stick to the opposite stop and notice that the differential setting
works for both ailerons.
Set the differential to that in the instructions for your aircraft. If unknown start with a 3 to 1
ratio (three times as much up as down).
Exit.
Mixing the Rudder to the Right Stick.
Another way to combat “adverse yaw” is to “coordinate” the turn with rudder input. You can fly the rudder
with your right stick. You can also use the Aileron to Rudder Mix so that the rudder is input with your right
stick.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Scroll the cursor over Ail to Rud M. and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Each of the activated Flight Modes will appear on the screen.
If you move the Aileron Stick now, the rudder remains motionless.
Scroll over to Cruise and just below Left and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Hold the aileron stick all the way over to the left.
Roll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the Rudder moves in the correct direction and the
correct amount and then push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over to Right and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Hold the aileron stick all the way over to the right.
- 47 -
9.
10.
Roll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the Rudder moves in the correct direction and the
correct amount and then push the ROLLING SELECTOR. If you equalized rudder throw in
both directions by using TRVL ADJ. discussed earlier, the left and right amount in AIL to
RUD M should be the same.
Exit.
Now go back and mix Aileron to Rudder in the other Flight Modes you have activated. In general,
Launch, Land and Thermal may require more mix. Speed usually takes less. Aileron to Rudder Mix is a
personal thing and depends on your ability to fly the Rudder Stick on the radio.
So far, you have programmed the radio so that you can make the sailplane pitch up or down, yaw let or
right and roll like a cork screw. Cool, but can you land on a dime?
Landing Flaps and Landing Mode.
Now that the basic control surfaces of the aircraft have been completed, the remainder of this section will
focus on various flight modes which involve the use of flaps. This will include all five Flight Modes as well
as full span camber changing.
Landing Flaps and Their Connection.
View page S48 of the manual. The setting of the servo arm and the correct Sub Trim is critical to the
operation of the flaps. Because the flaps move through as much a 90 degrees, the Sub Trim of the flap
servos requires a large offset.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Remove the Flap control rods from either the servo arm or the flap horn.
Move the L3P SW to the Cruise position. (center)
Scroll the cursor until it covers Sub Trim and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
You will be confronted the Sub Trim page showing all the Sub Trims for all servos. Scroll
the cursor over RFLP and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR so that the servo arm moves in the direction that would
raise the flap if it was connected. (if you are doing this with the aircraft upside down, it is
easy to get thing moving backwards) Keep rolling until the value reaches 200.
Remove the servo arm from the servo and reattach it so that it is at the angle shown on
page S48. Failure to perform this function will reduce flap movement in landing mode
to less than 45°.
Reattach the control linkage to the flap and adjust the control linkage so that the flap is
neutral. Push the ROLLING SELECTOR to Exit.
Scroll the cursor over LFLP and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR so that the servo arm moves in the direction that would
raise the flap if it was connected. (if you are doing this with the aircraft upside down, it is
easy to get thing moving backwards) Keep rolling until the value reaches 200.
Remove the servo arm from the servo and reattach it so that it matches the angle of the
other servo arm. Failure to perform this function will reduce flap movement in landing
mode to less than 45°.
Reattach the control linkage to the flap and adjust the linkage so that the flap is neutral.
Push the ROLLING SELECTOR to Exit.
Fine tune both flaps using the Sub Trim so they are the same. A note of caution. Build a
airfoil template of the top of the wing and use it to set the neutral point for the flap. Using the
aileron or a fixed portion of the wing will almost always result in a flap position that is not
neutral.
Exit.
Landing Flaps on the Left Stick
- 48 -
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Scroll the cursor over Butterfly and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over offset and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
I recommend changing the default from 170 to 160. A offset of 170 starts the flaps coming
down with the first click of downward movement of the spoiler stick. With an offset of 160,
the first three or four click have no impact on flap movement. That way, if you use the rudder
stick, you are much less likely to pull the flaps down accidentally. (in this setup, landing flaps
will only work in Landing Mode, so this is not a real problem) Push the ROLLING
SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over SPOI to FLAP 1: and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Pull the spoiler stick all the way to the bottom.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the flaps move in the correct direction (down) and keep
scrolling until the flaps reach the desired angle. You should be able to obtain 90° flaps quite
easily. If you can't obtain 90 degrees of flap there is probably a mechanical linkage problem.
Try shortening the flap control horn or lengthen the servo arm. Push the ROLLING
SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over SPOI to FPRN 1: and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Pull the spoiler stick all the way to the bottom.
The flaps should be at the desired location. Scrolling the ROLLING SELECTOR will move
the ailerons together. This is what is referred to as “CROW”. With the spoiler stick all the
way down, scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the ailerons stop in the desired location.
Push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over SPOI to ELEV 1: and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. With the
spoiler stick all the way to the bottom, scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until you achieve
approximately 35% down elevator. (don’t forget, if the aircraft is upside down, you might get
this backwards) When flaps are lowered, the airplane will pitch up altering the aircrafts flight
path. Every airplane is different and the amount of elevator compensation that you ultimately
use will depend on your aircraft and your flying style. A recommended starting point is
approximately 35% down elevator. Remember, the proper compensation is down elevator
with full flaps. You must fly and experiment with the mix percentage, 35% is only a starting
point.
Exit.
The XP9303 also provides for a specialized mix function which will completely eliminate that annoying
bump that the airplane makes when you first pull the flaps down. That specialized mixing function is
discussed later under Multi-Point Programmable Mixing.
Motor Active with a Launch Flap and Elevator Preset.
Flight Modes, here we go again. Earlier we activated the Launch, Cruise, Land mode and placed them
on the L3P SW. There are three flight modes on this switch. Although they are labeled Launch, Cruise
and Land, you can actually use them for anything you want.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Move the Flap/Throttle stick to the bottom.
Move the L3P SW to the launch position. (up on the radio.)
On the top of the radio, click the TRIM FLAP until the flaps go in the correct direction and the
appropriate amount for launch under power. The appropriate amount can only be
determined by experimenting.
On the top of the radio, click the TRIM FLAPERON the ailerons go in the correct direction
and the appropriate amount for launch under power.
Move the L3P SW to Cruise (middle position) and the flaps and ailerons should move to
neutral.
Some like to input down elevator trim in launch to counter act a motor without offset or a nose
heavy aircraft. With the L3P SW in the launch position, click the down elevator trim until you
obtain the appropriate amount.
Move the L3P SW to cruise and the flaps, ailerons and elevators all return to neutral.
- 49 -
8.
Exit.
Full Span Camber Adjustment.
Full span camber changing allows you to change the shape of the wing during flight. This function allows
you to change the entire trailing edge of the wing. There is quite a current discussion concerning trailing
edge camber and how it should be employed. Some argue that camber should be adjustable, from none
to as much a ¼ inch. Others argue that there is only one setting for each airfoil that provides the greatest
lift and that camber should just be on a switch. Simply on or off.
This section will show you how to put camber changing on the left side slide.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Scroll the cursor over FLAP RATE and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
The next screen will show all the Flight Modes that have been activated.
Make sure the L3P SW is in Cruise mode.
Move the Left Side Slide to the down position.
Scroll the cursor over CRUISE DN.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until you see the flap move in the correct direction and the
appropriate amount. (if you want camber adjustment in any other Flight Modes, perform step
5 for all Flight Modes you want camber adjustment in the Left Side Slide.
Move the Left Side slide to the center position. The Flaps should return to neutral.
Exit.
This section will mix the Ailerons to the Flap on the Left Side Slide and use the entire side slide (top to
bottom) for Camber changing.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Move the Left Side Slide all the way to the top.
Scroll the cursor over Flaprn MX and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Make sure the L3P SW is in Cruise mode.
Scroll the cursor over Offset right under FLAP LV and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the offset value is +200. This operation makes the
entire side slide move camber only in a down direction.
Move the Left Side Slide all the way to the bottom.
Scroll the cursor over CRUI / ELEV DN and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Scroll the
ROLLING SELECTOR until the Ailerons droop to match the Flaps. Make sure to scroll the
ROLLING SELECTOR all the way to the stops each way. Compare to the Flap adjustment,
this one will take a lot of change. My sailplane took the full 125% that was available.
If the Ailerons do not move, try the same under CRUI UP. If your flaps are installed
differently than the servo output towards the wing tip and the leading edge, you may have to
use CRUI UP to get the ailerons to droop and match the flap.
Move the Left Side Slide to the top position and the entire trailing edge should return to
neutral.
You will probably want to perform the same mixing for the Thermal Mode. Whether or not
you do something similar for SPEE, LAUN and LAND is up to you.
Exit.
Reflex
Reflex is Latin for “go fast, go very fast.” Reflex is lowering the drag of the wing by raising the trailing
edge. It does not take much. Put a straight edge across the bottom the wing. The straight edge should
contact the bottom of the wing at the thickest portion and at the trailing edge. Start raising the trailing
edge. As soon as the straight edge touches the wing in three locations, (at the hinge line) you have all
the reflex you need. Reflex is for going fast.
Under cambered wings will benefit more from this than an airfoil with under camber.
- 50 -
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Place the L3P SW in Cruise Mode (Middle position).
Place the R3P SW in Speed Mode (top position).
On the top of the radio, click the TRIM FLAP until the flaps go in the correct direction (up)
and the appropriate amount (not much) for Speed.
On the top of the radio, click the TRIM FLAPERON the ailerons go in the correct direction
(up) and the appropriate amount (not much) for launch.
Move the R3P SW to Cruise (middle position) and the flaps and ailerons should move to
neutral.
Some like to input down elevator trim in Speed/Reflex Mode. With the R3P SW in the Speed
position, click the down elevator trim until you obtain the appropriate amount.
Move the R3P SW to cruise, the flaps, ailerons and elevators all return to neutral.
Exit.
Multi-Point Programmable Mixing.
(or how to get rid of that annoying bump as you begin to pull the flaps down)
Traditionally, mixing functions in computer radios only allow a linear mix between the master and the
slave channels. As an example, when the aileron to rudder mix is activated, and you push the aileron
stick all the way to the stop, it mixes in a pre-programmed amount of rudder deflection. With multi-point
programmable mixing, the XP8103 radio allows you to insert up to seven different mix points anywhere
on the curve. In other words, as you slowly push the aileron stick all the way to the stop, you could
literally make the rudder waggle back and forth.
In the case of model sailplanes, this allows you to mix a larger percentage of elevator compensation
during the initial part of flap movement and less elevator compensation as flaps approach 90°. This
completely eliminates that bump your airplane takes on approach as you pull the flap stick down.
The XP9303 radio provides six extra programming functions that allow you to assign any slave to any
master channel. The first of these additional mix functions allow the multi-point programmable mixing
and is defaulted to mix Flap to Elevator. The remaining four provide the ability to do things like add
additional aileron/rudder mix during launch, and automatically eliminate the aileron/rudder mix in reflex
mode.
To eliminate that annoying bump on approach when you pull down the flap stick, there is a very
deliberate sequence of steps that you should follow. First, program the radio as indicated above for flap
and elevator compensation on approach. Launch the airplane and adjust the elevator compensation until
you achieve the proper glide path at full flap. Ignore the bump for now. Some individuals want the
airplane, at full flap to continue on the same flight path before the flaps were lowered. Other individuals
like the airplane to take a decidedly strong downward pitch when the flaps are lowered. This insures that
you don’t lose flying speed and stall your airplane. However, there is no situation where after pulling the
flaps all the way down, the plane should pitch upward. This situation is unacceptable and should be
avoided.
The steps below will be used to determine the amount of Elevator compensation at full flap using the
Butterfly Mix. At mid Flap stick, the sailplane will want to float up. Full Elevator compensation at full flap
needs to be determined and marked on the fin/Rudder. Once the fin is marked, the elevator
compensation in the Butterfly mode is reduced to zero and PROG. Mix1 will be used instead.
1.
2.
3.
Scroll the curser over Butterfly in the program mode and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over SPOI to ELEV 1: and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. With the flap
stick in the full down position, scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the Elevator moves
approximately 35% in the correct direction. (down elevator)
Launch and fly the sailplane. When the flight path is perpendicular to you, several mistakes
high pull the flap stick down. Add or subtract Elevator compensation until the flight path of
- 51 -
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
the sailplane is the same at full flap as it is at no flap. At this time what happens at mid flap
stick is not important.
Land the aircraft and mark on the fin or rudder, both neutral Elevator and Elevator
compensation at full flap stick.
Return to SPOI to ELEV 1: in the Butterfly section like you did above.
Scroll SPOI to ELEV 1: to 0%.
Exit.
Scroll the cursor over PROG.Mix1and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
As you can see, the master, slave is already set to SPOI to ELEV.
Scroll the cursor over SW SELECT and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
You will be presented with all the possible switches that will turn this mix on and off.
The default is ON all the time for all mixes. This is OK, but I prefer to only turn on mixes
when they are actually going to be used.
Scroll the cursor over CRU and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over LND and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Landing flaps now work in
Cruise and Land mode. The Flap stick will not move the flaps in Launch mode.
Scroll the cursor over Point-0 and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Pull the Flap stick all the way down.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the elevator moves to and matches the mark made on
the fin/rudder earlier. Push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over Point-3 and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor until the line is slightly high than a straight line between Point-0 and Point6.
Launch your aircraft and verify, at least three or four mistakes high, that the elevator compensation is
correct at full flap. If it is not, land and adjust Point-0 until you have achieved the proper amount of
elevator compensation with full flaps.
Launch the aircraft again. Three or four mistakes high pull the flap stick down to mid flap and add or
subtract Elevator Compensation until the flight path at mid Flap stick (Point-3) is also neutral. It takes a
while to get this right. You are not going to get it on your first try. You may have to increase or decrease
the mixing at POINT-3 until it is perfect. You may also need to adjust Point-5 and Point-4. Variations in
the size of flaps and effectiveness of different elevators will require experimentation. Two meter aircraft
respond well to a single but strong bump on the curve at POINT-4 and 5. Unlimited aircraft respond to a
more gentle curve by adding additional compensation at POINT-2 and 1. When it is perfect, its sweet.
Worth the price of admission.
I recommend having a buddy pull the flap stick down while you are flying. By setting up the radio so that
it is in PROG.Mix1 before launch, your buddy can pull the stick down until the vertical line on the graph is
right above point 1 through 5. Because the mixing only works on one of these points, your adjustments
upon landing will be MUCH more appropriate and you will nail this portion of the programming just that
much quicker.
Increasing (or Decreasing) Aileron to Rudder Mix During Different Flight Modes.
I trim my models to fly with little aileron/rudder mixing during normal flight modes. However, this means
at launch, I have little if any rudder to recover from a bad throw. (Recall aileron controls roll, making it
virtually worthless in this situation. Rudder controls yaw, like a rudder in the back of a boat, and is MUCH
more important on launch) Its easy to increase the aileron/rudder mix during launch with the Launch
Mode Switch. On the other hand, Aileron to Rudder Mix may need to be reduced in the Speed Mode.
1.
2.
3.
Scroll the cursor over Ail to Rud M. and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll over to Left column and scroll down to Launch and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the number after Launch is larger than the number
after Cruise.
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4.
5.
6.
7.
Do the same thing in the Right column.
The additional rudder mix is easily verified. Hold the aileron stick all the way to the stop.
Move the L3P SW from Launch to Cruise Mode. The rudder should move back and forth as
the switch is moved.
Do the same for any other mode. Check you work using step 5.
Exit
Programming the Motor.
So far, you have programmed the flight control surfaces using the Flight Modes. This next section will
add control of the motor. There are two types of control available. Adjustable speed control with the
Spoiler stick or Right Side Slider and ON/OFF speed control with a switch.
If a switch is selected for speed control, the switch will control the motor an all flight modes. The same is
true for the Right Side Slider.
On the other hand, the spoiler stick can be used to control different things in different flight modes.
Besides showing you how to program motor control on a switch or the Right Side Slide, this next section
will show you how to change the Throttle stick during launch to a Flap stick during landing.
Return to System Mode
1.
2.
3.
Turn the radio off. Hold down the ENT button and switch the radio back down.
Scroll the cursor over Device. SEL and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
You now have three options. 1. Place the motor on a on/off switch. 2. Place the motor on
the Right Side Slider, or 3. Place the motor on the Spoiler Stick.
Placing the Motor Control on the Right Side Slider.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Turn the radio off. Hold down the ENT button and switch the radio back down.
Scroll the cursor over Device. SEL and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over AUX2 and press the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over AUX3 LV and press the ROLLING SELECTOR. This places the motor
control on the Right Side Slide.
Scroll the cursor to the bottom of the AUX2 column and push the ROLLING SELECTOR until
ACT appears.
Scroll the cursor to the bottom of the MOTO column and push the ROLLING SELECTOR
until INH appears.
Exit.
Placing the Motor Control on a Switch. (In this example the Timer Button is used)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Turn the radio off. Hold down the ENT button and switch the radio back down.
Scroll the cursor over Device. SEL and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over MOTO and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over TIME SW and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. By selecting any
switch other than SPOI ST will inhibit the MOTO.HOLD function.
Scroll to the bottom of the MOTO column and push the ROLLING SELECTOR until ACT
appears.
Scroll to the bottom of the AUX2 column and push the ROLLING SELECTOR until INH
appears.
Press the LIST button to go to the FUNC.LIST.
Scroll the cursor over PROG. Mix3 through PROG. Mix6. Any one of them will work. Press
the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over FPRN (the first one) and press the ROLLING SELECTOR.
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10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
FPRN changes to Mast and a menu showing all the possible masters.
Scroll the cursor over TIMT and press the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over the second FPRN and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
FPRN changes to Slav and a menu opens with all the possible slaves.
Scroll the cursor over AUX2 and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over to Pos1 and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
There are two number’s in the box. Move the cursor up and down by pushing and releasing
the Timer Button. Increase both of these values to +100.
Scroll to the bottom of the screen and set CRU, SPD, THM, LAU and LND to POS1. Set
AX4, BTF and RUD to POS0. This turns on the motor controlled by the Timer Button in all
five Flight Modes and inhibits the three remaining switches.
Turn on the receiver. (you may want to remove the propeller from the motor) Some ESC’s
require a self setup each time you on the receiver. Push the Timer Button and push it again
in less than a second. Next time, when you push the button the motor should run at full
speed.
Scroll back to Pos1 and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Push the Timer Button until the cursor is over the bottom number and may or may not be
running. Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the motor starts or stops running, then back
off four clicks or so.
Push the Timer Button until the cursor is over the top number, scroll the ROLLING
SELECTOR until the motor starts to slow down, then back it up four clicks or so. This sets
the Spoiler Stick so that the entire movement of the stick will change the speed of the motor
rather than a small fraction of the stick movement near center stick.
Although MOTO.HOLD is unavailable, the ability to turn the motor on/off with the Timer
Switch can still be restricted to just one Flight Mode or any combination of Flight Modes.
Scroll the cursor over CRU and push the ROLLING SELECTOR until the switch changes to
POS0. Scroll the cursor over Pos0 and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. A box appears
around Pos0 and the two percentages next to it.
Move the L3P SW to Launch Mode and push the Timer Button until the motor runs.
Move the L3P SW to Cruise Mode (mid position) the motor should keep running.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the motor stops running.
Push the Timer Button again, the cursor will move the next number and the motor should
start running again.
Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR again until the motor stops running.
Any Flight Mode or Switch across the bottom of the screen that has POS0 selected will result
in inhibiting the Timer Button from activating the motor from that Flight Mode or switch.
Exit.
Placing the Motor Control on the Spoiler Stick when in Launch and Still Using the Spoiler Stick for
Landing Flaps in Landing Mode.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Turn the radio off. Hold down the ENT button and switch the radio back down.
Scroll the cursor over Device. SEL and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over MOTO and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over SPOI ST and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll to the bottom of the MOTO column and push the ROLLING SELECTOR until ACT
appears.
Scroll to the bottom of the AUX2 column and push the ROLLING SELECTOR until INH
appears.
Press the ENT button to go the main screen.
Press the LIST button to go to the FUNC.LIST.
Scroll the cursor over PROG. Mix3 through PROG. Mix6. Any one of them will work. Press
the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over FPRN (the first one) and press the ROLLING SELECTOR.
FPRN changes to Mast and a menu showing all the possible masters.
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12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
Scroll the cursor over MOTO and press the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over the second FPRN and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
FPRN changes to Slav and a menu opens with all the possible slaves.
Scroll the cursor over AUX2 and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over to Pos1 and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
There are two number’s in the box. Move the cursor up and down by moving the Spoiler
Stick up and down. Increase both of these values to +100. Pull the Spoiler Stick to the
bottom. This is similar to TRVL ADJ. that was adjusted earlier for servo output.
Scroll to the bottom of the screen and set CRU, SPD, THM, LAU and LND to POS1. Set
AX4, BTF and RUD to POS0. This turns on the motor controlled by the Spoiler Stick in all
five Flight Modes and inhibits the three remaining switches.
Turn on the receiver. (you may want to remove the propeller from the motor) Some ESC’s
require a self setup each time you on the receiver. Advance the Spoiler Stick to the top and
back down in less than a second. When you raise the stick again, the motor should start
running.
Scroll back to Pos1 and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
With the stick all the way to the bottom, scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the motor starts
running, then back off four clicks or so.
With the stick all the way to the top, scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR until the motor starts to
slow down, then back it up four clicks or so. This sets the Spoiler Stick so that the entire
movement of the stick will change the speed of the motor rather than a small fraction of the
stick movement near center stick.
Exit to the FUNC. LIST by pressing the LIST button.
Scroll over MOTO.HOLD ad press the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Leave the Motor HOLD Pos. at 0.0%.
Scroll to the bottom of the screen and set CRU, SPD, THM and LND to ON. This effectively
inhibits the motor in all Flight Modes except for Launch Mode.
Exit.
The Flap/Spoiler Stick works the motor in Launch Mode and the Flaps in Landing Mode. In all other
modes, the Flap/Spoiler Stick is inhibited.
How to Use This Programming.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Flip the R3P SW to Neutral. (middle position)
Move the L3P SW to the Launch position. Your Flaps and Ailerons should drop into launch
position. If you want to change the flap position, do it now by trimming with the TRIM FLAP
and TRIM FLAPERON trim switches. You can also add additional launch flap by using the
camber control on the Left Side Slide.
Input any elevator trim you may need.
Advance the throttle stick, Launch the aircraft, at altitude move the L3P SW to Cruise mode
(middle position) The motor will go off and the stick will be in the up position. In this Flight
Mode, the Spoiler Stick has no effect.
In this setup, moving the L3P SW to Land activates the landing flaps and flaps and elevator
compensation are active when you pull the Spoiler Stick down.
Other Things You Might Want to Try With This Programming.
In Cruise Mode:
1.
Set up you plane in this mode and use it as your baseline.
2.
Trailing edge camber is available.
3.
The Flap/Throttle stick is inactive
In Launch Mode (Motor available):
1.
Launch Flaps. Flaps and ailerons slightly down to help climb under thrust from the motor.
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2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Less elevator throw.
Down elevator trim to make up for the lack of down thrust and to keep the sailplane to climb
at a steady rate.
More rudder to Aileron mix.
Motor is activated with motor off in the down position and full throttle in the up position.
The throttle stick has no effect on flaps.
Trailing edge camber is available to increase the launch flaps.
In Speed Mode:
1.
Reflex the trailing edge.
2.
reduced Rudder to Aileron Mix.
3.
Either less elevator throw or more positive exponential.
4.
Less Aileron throw or more positive exponential.
5.
Possible less aileron differential.
6.
The Flap/Throttle stick is inactive.
In Thermal Mode:
1.
More Aileron to Rudder Mix.
2.
Less Aileron throw.
3.
Less Elevator throw.
4.
The Flap/Throttle stick is inactive.
In Landing Mode:
1.
More Aileron to Rudder Mix.
2.
Less Elevator Throw.
3.
Reverse Aileron Differential.
4.
The Flap/Throttle stick activates the flaps with Flaps neutral with the stick in the up position
and flaps down, with elevator compensation, in the down position.
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V-tail Mixing.
V-Tail Mixing is no more difficult that a standard tail setup as far as the radio is concerned. In both
setup’s, you have to program and mix two control systems. The Rudder stick on both setups is the same.
The Elevator stick on both setups is the same. The mixing of Aileron to Rudder is accomplished the
same way. There is no magic here, but it does help to think in terms of controls systems instead of left
and right ruddervator.
What usually causes a poorly flying V-Tail is one that has been built out of square, a twist in the fuselage,
or construction of control linkages that are not identical. The magic of a programmable radio is the ability
to compensate for many of these type of construction deficiencies.
The two tail servos are connected to the receiver as follows: elevator servo to left ruddervator and the
rudder servo to the right ruddervator. (Check to make sure that each servo is operating in the correct
direction.)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Return to the System Setup Mode by turning the radio off, pressing the ENT button, while
simultaneously turning the radio back on.
Scroll the cursor over Wing TYPE and press the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor under V-tail: and press the ROLLING SELECTOR until it reads ACT.
Press the ENT button to get back to the main screen.
Press the LIST button
At this stage, the rudder stick (left) on your transmitter should move both ruddervators as rudders. The
elevator stick (right) on your transmitter should move both rudder ruddervators as elevators.
Make sure both control surfaces are moving in the proper direction in relationship to the transmitter sticks.
If they are not, scroll the cursor over REV.SW and push the ROLLING SELECTOR. Reverse whatever
servos are necessary to make sure that they move in the proper direction. (that would be limited to
Rudder on the right and Elevator on the left.
Control Throw Adjustments.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Scroll the cursor over D/R & EXP and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor over AILE or ELEV or RUDD and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Scroll the cursor down to ELEV and push the ROLLING SELECTOR.
In this format, D/R or EXP is available for Pos-0, Pos-1 or Pos-2. Scroll the cursor over the
Pos-1 D/R column and press the ROLLING SELECTOR.
Move the elevator stick up and down, both Ruddervators will move.
Slowly move the Elevator Stick all the way to a stop. If the Elevator stops moving or
mechanically binds before the Elevator stick stops, DO NOT MOVE THE STICK ANY
FURTHER. Scroll the ROLLING SELECTOR in a direction that causes 100% to become a
smaller number. Continue to increase or decrease the percentage until the proper amount of
elevator throw occurs at full Elevator stick. Don’t be surprised if the two elevators move
different amounts.
For now enter the same dual rate in all three switch locations.
Now move the Rudder stick similar to how you moved the Elevator stick above. Perform the
same adjustment for the Rudder you did before with the Elevator. Again, don’t be surprised if
the two Ruddervators move in different amounts.
Exit.
Travel Adjustment.
Now that you have the V-Tail control surfaces adjusted to appropriate amount of control throw, it is now
time for their final adjustments. (The final adjustment of these control surfaces should be done at home
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on your work bench and not in the field.) The goal is to obtain travel each way from center that is as
equal as possible.
Unless you are an expert builder or awful darn lucky the control surfaces will not move equally. As an
example, the elevator will move further up than it does down. The fine tuning of these control throws is
now done using travel adjustment. For V-Tails, this is a critical adjustment.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Scroll the cursor over TRVL ADJ. and push down the ROLLING SELECTOR.
On the next screen, all nine servos appear at one time.
Scroll the cursor over to ELEV push the ROLLING SELECTOR. This is where the system
language is confusing. Before, Elevator described both Elevators. Under TRVL ADJ.
however, ELEV only means the Elevator Servo or the Left Side Servo.
Measure the Left elevator’s deflection each way. Reduce one of end points as necessary so
that the deflection is EXACTLY the same in each direction. Moving the cursor from one
value to the other on the screen requires the movement of the stick. As an example, move
the elevator stick up and down and the Cursor on the screen will move back and forth. Push
the ROLLING SELECTOR and scroll the cursor over RUDD.
The same travel adjustments should be made to make sure that the Rudder servo on the
Right side servo deflects the same both left and right. USE THE RUDDER STICK, NOT THE
ELEVATOR STICK TO MAKE THIS HAPPEN.
Accurate adjustment of control surface deflection in both directions is critical to a good flying V-Tail.
Adjust the amount of rudder to be mixed into the aileron stick (the right stick) by using aileron rudder mix
described above.
These instructions will only get you in the general area for the particular type, style and trim of your
airplane. Use the dual rate function to modify the pitch or roll sensitivity of the aircraft to satisfy your
personal taste. I highly recommend, that once you have determined the optimum setting, that you
program both switch positions for dual rate and exponential to be exactly the same. This alleviates
you from accidentally bumping a switch in flight and suddenly having an aircraft with different flying
characteristics.
Placing both the rudder and elevator controls in the right transmitter stick.
Perform the same mixing as discussed in any of the sections concerning Aileron to Rudder Mix. .
V-tail Differential.
To enhance the turning performance of your aircraft, you can now change the difference between the UP
and DN deflection of the control servos on either side of the V-tail. This is performed by changing the end
point adjustments That we just spent so much time trying to make identical.
To determine if your aircraft will benefit from differential, launch the aircraft and in slow level flight, level
with the ground, move the left control stick (rudder only) on the transmitter. If the aircraft begins pitch up
or down, you may wish to experiment with modifying the end point adjustments to compensate for that
pitching motion. If the airplane pitches up with rudder only input both left and right, then you need to
change the end point adjustments on both sides of the ruddervator to increase the amount of down
movement of the control surface. (In the alternative, try less up movement.) The opposite is true if the
aircraft pitches down.
The need for V-tail differential is a byproduct of not understanding the exact ducalage between the V-tail
and the wing. Ducalage is the difference in angle between the tail control surfaces and the wings. Even
if the ducalage perfect, changes in the CG, area and aspect ratio of the v-tail and the angle between the
v-tails may result in an aircraft that requires differential in the tail. Rudder deflection will not only cause
the aircraft to yaw, it may also cause the aircraft to pitch up or down. This same effect may occur if your
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rudder or servo control horns are not perfectly placed over the center hinge line (creating a built in
mechanical differential) or if you have other mechanical differences between the left and right
ruddervator.
Dual Rates adjust elevator or rudder throws, and both left and right ruddervators act in unison. End point
adjustments now adjust the left and right ruddervators separately. For example with a Rudder turn only,
the nose of your aircraft may pitch up. By modifying the end point to increase the amount of down throw
of each ruddervator, up pitch can be eliminated. Different from Dual Rates, adjusting end points requires
that you adjust the throw of both the left (elevator servo) and right (rudder servo) ruddervators separately.
Re-enter the End Point adjustments discussed above. If the aircraft pitches up with a rudder turn, input
more down deflection. The most likely result is that the aircraft will pitch differently with a rudder turn in
each direction. It may pitch up in a left turn and pitch down in a right turn. If this is the case, it is relatively
easy to fix. If the aircraft pitches down in a left Rudder turn, once on the ground input left rudder and
increase the throw of the ruddervater that is in the up direction. If the aircraft pitches up in a left Rudder
turn, once on the ground input left rudder and increase the throw of the ruddervater that is in the down
direction.
When individuals complain about the flight character of their V-Tail, the majority of the time is a V-Tail that
needs some differential and different amounts of differential when turning in different directions. An
aircraft that pitches up in a rudder turn is a real handful for any pilot.
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This manual is not the final say. It is just my way of giving something back to the hobby that has given
me so much. It is just several ways to program the XP9303 for various types of sailplanes. There are
other ways and I hope someone finds simpler means to accomplish the same results. If you have
something different, please e-mail me or call me by phone. This document will be modified as something
new comes up. If you provide a new concept, you will get credit for the idea in future versions.
If you have any questions, please don’t be afraid to call
Sherman Knight
425-576-4028 Pacific std time
e-mail [email protected]
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