Assuming
View Your World Anywhere……Anytime!
Camera Installation for PC Only
Note: Proceed to the Quick Guide for iPhone, iPad iOS device and Android OS Smartphone, Tablet.
For advanced features, proceed to the User manual for PC only
1
Introduction ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------3
Pre-requisites and Initial Connection--------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 5
PC Quickstart-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 6
Install “Camera Setup” and “Camera Live” Utilities on a PC------------------------------------------------------7
Install “Camera Live” Utilities & View Multiple Cameras on a PC---------------------------------------------10
Wi-Fi Wireless Setup ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 11
Wi-Fi Troubleshooting--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 15
Is the Remote Access Setup already done? ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 16
Enabling UPNP for Automatic Remote Access Setup ------------------------------------------------------------ 17
Overview of Manual IP address setup (Without UPNP) -------------------------------------------------------- 18
Manual Setup step 1 (Without UPNP) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 19
Manual Setup step2 (Without UPNP) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 21
Choosing a Name for your Camera on the Internet-------------------------------------------------------------- 22
Automatic Updating of your Camera’s Internet IP address----------------------------------------------------- 23
Positioning and Mounting---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 25
I see Pink and Purple ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 26
Night Vision Settings ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------28
Motion Detection ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------30
Task Management-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------32
1. Email Alarm Sending/Email Periodic Sending ----------------------------------------------------------------33
2. FTP Alarm Sending/FTP Periodic Sending------------ --------------------------------------------------------35
3. Snapshot to Storage on Alarm/ Snapshot to Storage Periodically---------------------------------------37
4. Record to Storage on Alarm/ Record to Storage Continuously------------------------------------------41
5. Send files in storage to FTP Sever-------------------------------------------------------------------------42
Audio/Video Stream Summary----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------43
Resetting the Camera back to Factory Settings-------------------------------------------------------------------48
Glossary: A quick review of networking Terminology------------------------------------------------------------49
Appendix A: Wireless setup instructions without Cat5----------------------------------------------------------50
Appendix B: Setup instructions for ATT (2Wire) Router------------------------------------------------------51
Appendix C: Recording on a Mac using VLC Media Player-------------------------------------------------------52
Appendix D: Motion Detection Adjustment------------------------------------------------------------------------53
Appendix E: Known issues-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------54
Burglar Alarm system integration with digital I/O-----------------------------------------------------------------55
Specification --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------56
Contact us -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------57
2
Introduction
Congratulations! You have just purchased one of the finest IP network cameras currently available, and this new
version can record to Micro-SD card.
Using a Mac or PC you can view very high quality live streaming video direct from the camera. It is excellent for
applications such as a baby monitor, nanny cam, pet cam, party cam, security & surveillance, remote observation,
elder and patient care as well as limited video conferencing or event broadcasting.
An exciting new feature is the ability to turn your iPhone, iPad iOS device and Android OS smartphone, Tablet
into a baby monitor without professional installer, Extra wires, IP address setting, DDNS address setting or
router setting needed, just plug and play. (For detail, Please check the Quick Guide).
With Trivision P2P enabled cameras, the whole camera installation doesn't take more than 5 minutes for a
tech-slavery people. It’s completely different with traditional ip camera.
After you are familiar with the basic functionality of the camera you can enjoy many additional advanced features,
just follow up our instruction step by step.
For instance, you can enable the automatic sending of motion detection email alerts or automatic uploading of
pictures to online servers using the FTP protocol.
Setup of the camera is mostly automatic if you have a current, industry standard router with the “Universal Plug
and Play” feature (UPNP). Older routers and some models provided by internet service providers may require a
few manual setup steps to enable remote viewing. Apple Airport routers are fully supported by TriVision with our
detailed, step by step setup instructions.
3
Another exciting new feature is the ability to turn the camera into a DVR (Digital Video Recorder) by recording
video or pictures to a Micro SD memory card.
After you are familiar with the basic functionality of the camera you can enjoy many additional advanced features.
For instance, you can enable the automatic sending of motion detection email alerts or automatic uploading of
pictures to online servers using the FTP protocol.
An exciting new feature is the ability to turn the camera into a DVR (Digital Video Recorder) by recording video or
pictures to a Micro SD memory card.
You can also turn the camera into a standalone NVR (Network Video Recorder) by enabling functionality to save
recorded video files to a network server.
This could be a commercial server on the internet or your own standalone NAS (Network attached Storage) hard
drive with built-in FTP server. These features do not require a computer. If you wish to use a PC for recording video,
we also include free windows software for recording multiple cameras at once.
In our experience, we find that our customers get comfortable with advanced features quickly and then start using
the camera on a daily basis to keep in touch with their home or loved ones.
This requires reliable internet service. If you have an older router that is not up to the task, we highly recommend
upgrading to one of the current models before you proceed with the camera setup.
It is important to note that you do not need an expensive router. Even current $40-$60 units from NetGear ,
LInkSys or Dlink are perfectly fine as long as your router is upgraded with the latest firmware available from the
manufacturer. In fact, expensive routers that have too many nonstandard enhancements can often be less
desirable than the basic 802.11b/g/n models.
With an up to date router you’ll enjoy faster overall performance, better wireless transmission range, and
improved network security.
4
Pre-requisites and Initial Connection
1. TriVision indoor models, bullets and Dome cameras
2. PC or Linux computer with internet browser
Computer is only required for initial setup, later the camera can work by itself without any computer present
at the camera location
3. A local area network with a router / gateway and an available Cat5 wired network jack on your router (not
on your computer)
The wired network connection is only needed for initial setup, later the camera can be used wireless with
802.11b/g/n. If no Cat5 jack is available, please see Appendix B for alternative setup procedure.
You can start using the camera on your own network almost as soon as you plug it in. Just connect the included
blue Cat5 cable to the network jack on the camera and connection the other end to one of the LAN jacks of your
router, then connect the power supply to the camera and to a wall plug. If your camera has a removable antenna,
you may want to attach it now.
IMPORTANT: Make sure camera is plugged into your router, not the computer, even if your computer has an
available Cat5 LAN jack.
On the NC-217W, NC-218W, NC-217WF, NC-218WF you may want to remove the clear plastic film that is
protecting the lens cover. For clearest video be careful not to touch the lens.
On indoor models the power light will come on within a few seconds. Later you should also see it blinking red
occasionally. This means your camera is ready to use. To get started, you need to know the IP address that your
router assigned to the camera. By adding http:// in front of the IP address you get a web link to the camera’s
built-in web server.
Until you setup a name for your camera as shown in later sections of this manual, you typically access the camera
by typing the numbers into your browser or by using a bookmark.
Proceed to PC Quickstart if you have a PC running Windows XP, Vista, or Windows 7
5
PC Quickstart
This Quickstart section applies to the most common configuration for PC users: You have a current generation
router such as NetGear, LinkSys, or Dlink connected to a standard, non-routing DSL or cable modem, or you have a
combination modem and router which has all functions in one box.
Some of our customers have more complicated networks because they have added a wireless router to a wired
router, or have business firewalls or VoIP routers in front of the main router. In those situations we recommend
that you consult an expert to simplify your network by eliminating redundant routers or placing all but one router
into bridge mode.
With your camera powered up and connected to the router, some PCs will automatically discover the camera and
show a pop up window or icon to let you know that a new device has been found. The popup window shows the
complete local IP address for the camera. Or, it could be that your camera is automatically discovered by your
computer and is shown in the list of attached network devices. On Windows XP this list is called “My network
places”. On Vista and Windows 7 it is just called “Network”
However, some PCs and routers do not have the “UPnP” Universal Plug-and-Play feature enabled. In following we
will show alternate ways to find the address that your router has assigned to the camera.
If you are familiar with your router’s menus you can log in to your router and see the IP address for the IP network
camera in one of your router’s LAN status screens. By the way, in this document we’re using the words “router”
and “gateway” interchangeably.
6
Install “Camera Setup” and “Camera Live” Utilities on a PC
For PC users, we also supply a program on the CD called “Camera Setup” utility. If you install this program on your
PC with Windows7, XP or Vista, it will tell you the addresses of all current generation IP cameras on your network.
If this is the first time you are running the program you may need to click “Refresh” several times.
Insert provided Software CD into computer’s CD-ROM drive. If the software installation program does not
start automatically, open CD-ROM Drive and double click on “Auto Run”.
Install “Camera Setup” applications on your computer using “Install Software” option.
The following icons will appear on the desktop after software installation is completed:
7
You can use this program to set up cameras but we recommend that you use this program only to find your IP
address. Then do all setup by going directly to the camera using the IP address, either by double-clicking on the
address or by typing the number into your browser(with http:// in front)
If no camera is found it could be that your Antivirus or Firewall program is blocking the “Camera Setup” program.
In that case you should either disable your Firewall program or use the alternate method of finding the IP address
by checking the menus in your router as described below.
Regardless of the method you used to find your camera’s IP address, once you’ve clicked on the icon or entered
the IP address manually into your browser” (with http:// in front), you get to the main login screen for the camera:
To see video, click on “Enter”,
The default setting:
Username: admin
Password: admin.
8
When using the camera for the first time on a PC with Internet Explorer, your PC will ask you for permission to
install the viewing software (called ActiveX). This ActiveX is needed to decode the H.264 or MPEG4 video stream
and control the camera. Click to “OK” this at the top of your screen, then again click on “OK” on the install menu
that will pop up in the middle of your screen.
If you have a popup blocker like Google Toolbar you will need to disable it. Within a few seconds you can then see
live video from the camera.
NOTE: If the camera shows video but also displays the message “connecting, waiting…”, close Internet Explorer
and wait a couple of minutes for the camera to obtain current time from a internet time server and restart
itself.
To complete the camera setup, it is easier if you close all video windows and go to the main login screen again,
then instead of clicking on “Enter” you would just click on “Setting”.
The previous Quickstart showed you how to obtain the initial IP address of the camera if you have a PC with
typical configuration.
In other cases it may be easiest to log into your router’s web based setup menu. For the exact details you may
need to refer to your router’s manual, which is usually available for download on the router manufacturer’s
support web site.
Typically you access your router’s web menu by typing the router’s IP address into a browser window. Common IP
addresses are : http://192.168.0.1, http://192.168.1.1, http://192.168.10.1, or http://192.168.1.254.
Once you’re logged into your router, you would look for a status screen or menu that mentions LAN or DHCP
client list (LAN = local area network).
Typically there is a list of attached devices, and among these it is easy to pick out the IP camera since the name
starts with IP, or there will be a 12 digital number that matches the number on the back of the camera.
Regardless of the method you used to find your camera’s IP address, once you’ve clicked on the icon or entered
the IP address manually into your browser(with http://), you get to the main login screen for the camera.
To see video, click on” Enter”, then username: admin and password: admin.
To complete the camera setup, it is easier if you close all video windows and go to the main login screen again,
then instead of clicking on “Enter” you would just click on “Setting”. Now proceed to the next section titled Wi-Fi
wireless Setup.
9
Install “Camera Live” Utilities & View Multiple Cameras on a PC
Insert provided Software CD into computer’s CD-ROM drive. If the software installation program does not
start automatically, open CD-ROM Drive and double click on “Auto Run”.
Install “Camera Live” applications on your computer using “Install Software” option.
The following icons will appear on the desktop after software installation is completed:

Double Click

Click on

Enter “Camera UID
Enter default “User Name”: admin and “Password”: admin
“Confirm” Password
Assign a “Name” to the camera to help identify this camera if more than one camera is in use.
Click on “OK” to save the Camera




Click on
icon on the desktop to start application
to add camera
to change camera settings
Click on
to delete camera from Camera List
Click on
to view saved snapshots
Click on
to view that camera.
Play and Pause
Show or Remove camera Framerate and Bitrate from the display
Take a snapshot
Mute or Listen to Voice
Go back to camera list
10
Wi-Fi Wireless Setup
In the Quick Guide we showed how to setup Wireless connection via Smartphone. If your camera wireless
connection worked, please skip ahead to “Choosing a name for your camera”.
Most likely your wireless network was set up with a password (also known as wireless key). If you don’t remember
it, you can check your router’s wireless setup menu or ask the person who set up your wireless network.
Without your password you cannot proceed with your camera’s wireless setup, so you can either continue to use
your camera in wired mode or set up a new password in your router. Another possibility is to disable passwords in
your router but an unsecured wireless network is not recommended.
After assigned the fixed ip address for your ip camera, now you can start using your camera immediately using the
IP address. Just add http:// in front of it and open it in a browser, such as http://10.0.1.3
Clicking on “setting” from the main camera login screen will get you to this:
11
Click on “Network”, then click on “Wireless setup”, and you’ll get to this screen :
Do NOT type anything in the SSID field. Instead, just clicking on the “Search” button, your camera can tell you
which networks can see:
You may see a whole list of networks in your neighborhood. Select your network from this list, then click on
“Apply” tab, and check if your network name has now been filled into the SSID field. If nothing shows up, try
“Search” again, or un-hide your network name if your router is configured as a closed system.
Do NOT change any of the settings (SSID, Mode, security mode, Encryption type)
Type in “WPA key” (password, also known as wireless key), please note that both WPA and WPA2 keys, which are
setup on the wireless router, are case sensitive
Retype the “WPA Key”
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Please remember that both WPA and WPA2 keys are case sensitive and need to be between 8 and 63 characters.
When you have entered the key, click on “Apply”, you’ll get a message about “Wireless setup accepted
successfully”, but that only means that the information was stored in the camera. Now you should use the “Test”
feature to check if you typed it correctly.
If the test reports “Success!” you can remove the network cable and it should work wireless after a short delay. If
the test reports “no wireless connection”, please double check your WPA key (password” and refer both to the
Wi-Fi troubleshooting and “Known issues” section of this User Guide.
Congratulations! At this point you should be able to use your camera wired or wireless on your local network using
the same local IP address.
If it doesn’t connect, we recommend that you temporarily remove wireless security from your router for a quick
experiment to see if the setup succeeds with no passwords. Then put the password back in and try again. Many
times this will refresh your memory about the exact spelling of your password.
Also, it could be either that the camera is too closer to or too far from your router, or that your router was set up
with the tightest possible security which allows only known devices to connect to your network. In this case, do
not forget to add the MAC address of this camera to your allowed list. In this context, MAC refers to a hardware
network address and is unrelated to Macintosh computers. The Mac address is printed on the back of the camera.
During setup it is best to have the camera at least a couple of feet away from the antenna of the wireless router.
The maximum distance is dependent on the kinds of walls and objects that are between your wireless router
antenna and your camera.
13
One easy test for determining the maximum recommended distance is by using a laptop at the camera location. If
your laptop shows at least 70% signal strength at that exact same location then the camera should be ok too. Any
less than that may be unreliable, so you may want to move your router or the camera, or adjust the angle of your
router’s antennas.
Keep in mind that the wireless signal travels easily through common building materials such as wood, glass, sheet
rock, and vinyl siding, but does not go at all through metal.
If there are any big metal objects such as a fridge, filling cabinet, or HVAC ducting in between the Wi-Fi router and
the camera, try to reposition either the camera or the router so that the metal object doesn’t block the signal.
Also, many microwave ovens and older 2.4GHz cordless phones may interfere with all Wi-Fi networking while in
operation. Using a laptop you may not notice a pause, but with a camera that transmits or records video
continuously any interruption will be much more obvious. Nearby Bluetooth devices such as cell phone headsets,
Playstation game controllers, or a wireless keyboard and mouse can also interfere with wireless networks if the
devices are too close.
The best placement for a wireless router is in an area that is higher up and free of nearby clutter, for example on
top of a wooden book shelf .
In the previous section we showed how to tell if your camera was able to automatically configure itself using
your router’s UPnP feature. If UPnP worked, please proceed to “Step 3: Choosing a name for your camera”.
14
Wi-Fi Troubleshooting
If the camera does not connect and you’ve already checked the settings mentioned on the previous page, please
log in to your router and double check the setting for wireless channel selection. On an Apple airport you would
use the Airport Utility.
If the “Search” function of the wireless setup page found your Wi-Fi network it means that the wireless
networking hardware is working. If it then doesn’t connect it means that there is a password or IP address related
issue.
You can temporarily turn off passwords on your Wi-Fi router, and if you then set “Security mode” to “off” in the
camera, it should connect unless you have set your router to reject connection attempts from unknown devices.
Assuming that you are now at least connecting without passwords, you can proceed to add wireless security to
your router and try again. We recommend WPA2 if available, otherwise WPA. The older WEP mode is obsolete and
may not work correctly on Apple Airport. If you have trouble, switch to WPA2.
Since each password type can have 2 variations, this means you could have 4 possible combinations: WPA-TKIP,
WPA-AES, WPA2-TKIP, and WPA2-AES.
Some routers like Apple Airport series do not show clearly which one of these settings is being used, so if you have
difficulty you should try all 4 possible combinations. On a laptop you typically do not need to specify the exact
password type since the laptop will try everything automatically. The camera is picky, it needs to know exactly
what type of password you are using and does not try anything other than the exact type that you entered.
Remember to “Apply” first, then “Test”. If it says “Connected!” at the end of the test, you can remove the cable.
However, as long as the cable is still attached, the camera’s “System” menu will show “No wireless connection”.
If you still have trouble, be sure to check the Appendix for known issues.
15
Is the Remote Access Setup already done?
If your computer had automatically discovered the camera earlier, this is good news because it means that the
“Universal Plug and Play” feature is available on your network and most of the setup may already be done. Your
camera would be visible from the internet to anyone who knows the exact IP address and usernames and
passwords that you choose.
Keep in mind that there is a distinction between local (intranet) IP addresses, meaning IP addresses on your own
network, and external (internet) IP addresses, which are unique in the entire world. With the UPnP feature
enabled in your router, the camera’s “System” menu can show you both:
1) The link(URL) for accessing the camera from your own network, often something like http://192.168.0.100
2) The automatically configured link(URL) for access from a remote location, often something like
http://183.37.136.55:8150
A quick comment about ports: In general, IP addresses can have many different ports associated with them. When
browsing to ordinary web sites there is usually no need to specify a port and that’s why you may have never heard
about ports at all. However, when different devices share a single IP address they are distinguished with a port.
Basically a port has a similar function for an IP address as an extension on a telephone number.
Ports are specified by including the port number in the web address with a colon and the number after the .com
or .net domain name. In the example show above the port number is 8150.
If UPnP was available on your network, the camera has already set up the correct ports for remote access. A quick
way to see the complete external IP address (URL) is to go to the System menu at the top of the Setting screen.
Scrolling down to the UPnP section you will see the Internet URL (IP address).
Then all you need to do is to type either your internal (Intranet) or external (Internet) IP address in your browser,
depending whether you’re accessing the camera locally or over the internet. If UPnP worked, you should skip the
manual IP address setup and proceed to selecting a name for your camera.
Note: if the system menu shows you an internet URL (external IP address) that starts with 192.168 or 10.0, your
DSL or Cable Modem has a built in router. In this case, contact us with the model number of your modem for
assistance.
16
Enabling UPnP for Automatic Remote Access Setup
If UPnP did not work, and if you have an up to date router other than Apple Airport, it is worth double checking if
UPnP is enabled in your router. Some Routers like the ActionTec and Westell units distributed for free with Verizon
and Qwest DSL service have the feature initially disabled.
Usually it is very simple to enable UPnP. You just need to log in to your router’s setup screen and find the UPnP
menu. Then you click on enable, save the setting and restart both the router and the camera (in that order).
Many routers may need a firmware update for UPnP to be available or work properly. You should look up your
router’s model number on your router manufacturer’s support web page to see if updates are available.
The camera comes from the factory with the UPnP enabled. You can double check by selecting the “UPnP Setup”
tab under the camera’s “Network” menu:
If UPnP works, clicking on the camera’s “system” menu at the top of the setting screen will show something like
the following in the UPnP section:
17
Overview of Manual IP address setup (without UPnP)
In the previous section we showed how to tell if your camera was able to automatically configure itself using
your router’s UPnP feature. If UPnP worked, please skip ahead to “Step 3: Choosing a name for your camera”.
In this section we provide an overview of the manual IP address setup procedure. You would only need to do this
if UPnP is not available on your network, for example if you have an older router.
Most routers come pre-configured to protect your own network devices from external access. This means that in
order to view your camera remotely over the internet your router needs to be configured to open ports and allow
access. If this sounds difficult, you may want to consider upgrading your router to a newer NetGear, LinkSys, or
DLink model as they are very inexpensive now (we’ve seen sales prices under $40). Either way our tech support
can help you.
The terminology for opening up ports can be different based on the manufacturer of the router. Typically this
setting is called “Web access”, “DMZ”, “Virtual Server”, “Virtual Service” , “User Defined Service”, “Port
Forwarding” or “ Port Mapping” . There are 2 main steps involved in port forwarding:
1. Reserving a DHCP address or assigning a permanent (static) IP address for your camera on your local network.
2. Configuring your router to allow access from the internet to the camera’s IP address on your local network.
Strictly speaking, step 1 above is optional, but some routers (especially LinkSys and Belkin models) tend to
reassign all the IP addresses on your home network after a power failure or based on the order in which you use
them. Therefore your setup is only reliable if you reserve a DHCP address or assign a permanent IP address to your
camera and then do the actual port forwarding.
Some residential internet service providers want to charge more for business service and therefore deliberately
block all internet access that looks like it might involve a web server at the standard port 80. That’s why we always
recommend using port 8150, which in our experience is never blocked.
18
Manual Setup Step 1: Assigning a permanent IP address for your camera
on your local network (Without UPnP)
Please note that if your router has UPnP, you already have an internet IP address for your camera and you
should skip over this setup step.
On your home network (LAN) all your computers, printers and other network connected devices have an IP
address. In every IP address there are 4 groups of digits that can each vary from 1 to 255. For your home network
the first 3 numbers are already determined by your router’s address, which is typically something like 192.168.0.1
or 192.168.1.1 or 10.0.1
To pick a permanent address for your camera you first need to know your router’s IP address. It is shown in your
camera’s “system” menu (at the top of the setting screen) if you scroll down to “Default Gateway”. The router’s IP
address determines the first 3 groups of digits for your camera’s IP address.
Now we need to select a valid number for the last group of digits. We don’t simply pick a random number because
we have to avoid numbers that are already taken or could be used by your router.
The router uses addresses in a range set aside for this purpose (called the DHCP range). For many routers, this
DHCP range is from 2 to 100 but you’ll have to check your specific router’s DHCP menu. Sometimes this is shown
as start and end address, or start address plus number of available addresses.
Why is this important? We want to select an address outside this range to make sure that your router would never
pick this address for another device.
For example, if your router uses the DHCP range from 192.168.0.2 to 100, You could choose 192.168.0.101 as a
permanent IP address. Conversely, if your router uses DHCP addresses from 100 to 255, you could use
192.168.0.50 to be outside the range. Never use addresses that end in .0 or .1, since that is reserved for your
router, and never use addresses that end in a number higher than 255 since that is the highest possible limit.
Now that you have picked a local IP address for your camera, you need some more information from your router.
Look in your router’s broadband (WAN) status or connection menu for a pair of IP addresses called DNS1 and
DNS2, or Primary DNS and secondary DNS. If your router has a third one, don’t worry about it.
Typically all network devices get this information direct from your router. However, many routers only supply this
info to network devices that ask for an IP address so in this case we need to copy and paste these numbers.
Once you have these pieces of information, go to the Camera Settings menu, then select “Network” and “TCP/IP
Setup” :
19
Click on “use the following IP address”. Then enter the IP address you picked that is outside your router’s DHCP
range. Do not change the subnet mask. The default setting of 255.255.255.0 is correct unless you have a very
unusual home network.
Then enter your own router’s address in the “Default Gateway” box. Note that the first 3 groups of digits should
be the same as your camera’s IP address. Usually the last digit is 1, sometimes it is 254.
Then click on “Use the following DNS server” and enter both the primary and secondary DNS addresses that you
obtained from your router menu or from your computer’s network connection menu.
Note: It is very important to add both the “Default Gateway” and at least the “Primary DNS” address when
assigning static local IP. While the camera gets this information automatically from the router when using DHCP,
the camera will not obtain this information if a local IP address is assigned manually.
The HTTP port is usually 80. The RTP port range should start at 30000 for your first camera. For all additional
cameras the start of the range increase by 2, for example your 2nd camera would have a starting RTP port of 30002,
the 3rd camera would have 30004, 4th camera at 30006 etc.
After you click on “Apply”, you need to log in to the camera at the address you just picked. Remember to add the
http:// in front of the IP address, as in http://192.168.0.101. If your port is not 80 you need to add the port too .
From now on , regardless of what computers or other devices you have on your own network and regardless of
the order that you turn them on or off, you camera’s IP address will always be the same.
On some routers, for example some older models of Leviton or NetGear, you may also need to tell your router
about the network camera’s IP address, so that it shows up as a known device on your network.
20
Manual Setup step 2: Configuring your router to allow access to your
camera from the Internet (Without UPnP)
If your camera was automatically set up with UPnP you would skip this section and proceed directly to step 3:
Choosing a name for your camera.
If you have only 1 camera, it is simplest to configure your router to use “DMZ” for the camera. This basically
means that any request from the internet is forwarded to your single camera. However many of our customers
use more than one camera so we will explain the port forwarding procedure.
Port forwarding is sometimes called “Virtual Server”, “user defined service”, or “port mapping” and is explained in
your router’s manual or online help. The manual is usually available from the manufacturer’s tech support web
site.
Typically you need to provide a “service name” for each group of ports that is forwarded. The name could be
anything that isn’t already used, for example “Trivisioncam1” or “Trivisioncam2”.
Then you typically need to enter the external (public” and internal (host) ports and select either TCP or UDP.
For browser access to the camera you need to forward public port 8150 to internal port (base port) 80.
If you have an older Linksys it may not have a distinction between public and private port. Then you’d have to
change your camera’s HTTP port to 8150 in the TCP/IP menu (shown on previous page), and then use that port
even for local access (for example http://183.37.136.55:8150 )
For cell phone access (RTP) you also need to forward UDP ports 30000 and 30001, however this time the external
and internal ports are both the same. Your 1st camera would use TCP port 8150 AND UDP ports 30000-30001, Your
2nd camera would use TCP port 8151 AND UDP ports 30002-30003, the 3rd camera would use TCP port 8152 and
UDP ports 30004-30005 etc.
After these settings, your router typically needs to be restarted and then you’re ready to use the camera over the
internet. First you need your router’s IP address on the internet (that’s NOT the local address that starts with
192.168). You can find this address by looking at your router’s WAN menu, or you can use www.checkip.org
A friend who is outside your local network should then be able to access your camera using this IP address and
port 8150, as in http://183.37.136.55:8150
21
Choosing a Name for your Camera on the Internet
So now you should have been able to have a friend see you on your camera. With typical residential internet
service your router’s IP address can change from time to time. Looking up the current IP address can be
inconvenient, and buying a static IP address is an unnecessary monthly expense.
www.no-ip.com and www.dyndns.com are the recommended companies for “Dynamic DNS” service. Also known
as DDNS, this is a totally free service that allows your own name to be assigned to your camera. This name takes
the place of the IP address. Together with software in your camera this also makes sure the name for your camera
is always updated with the correct IP address.
These companies are legitimate. They don’t spam you and there’s no catch, other than the requirement that you
log in at least once a month to keep your free account active. They also have inexpensive paid annual service.
First you create a free account with one or both of these companies. We’ll take www.no-ip.com as an example.
The “create account” function is on the top right under the Username/ Password fields. Do not register a domain
or sign up for any other paid services. You just need the free account.
Once you have an account and once you validated it by responding to their email, log in and select” Hosts/
Redirects” on the top left of the screen, then “Add Host”. For Hostname, pick anything you like as a name for your
camera, except do not use spaces. Use only lower case letters and numbers. Then click on the domain names you
can pick from, as well as some that they consider premium names worth paying for. For example, you could pick
servehttp.com as your demo cameras.
Then be sure that only “DNS Host (A)” is selected. Don’t worry about the current IP address and don’t change
anything else. Click on “Create Host” and you’re done! Please write down your complete hostname as well as the
username and password you used for logging in to No-IP.com as you’ll need it for the next step.
DynDNS.com is very similar but in their case there is an additional step of checking out a shopping cart with a zero
dollar fee.
Now proceed to the next section to make sure your name is updated correctly.
22
Automatic Updating of your Camera’s Internet IP address
In the previous step we set up a name for your camera. To make sure that this hostname always corresponds to
the correct IP address for your camera we have to make sure it is updated automatically when there is a change.
There is no need for client software. Our IP cameras have a DDNS menu that allows you to enter your hostname
information. This DDNS menu is under “Network” in the camera’s “Settings”. Be sure to select the DDNS provider,
for instance if you signed up with No-IP.com you should select No-IP in the camera’s DDNS menu.
After you enter your account and hostname information you can go to the camera’s “System” menu at the top of
the Settings screen and scroll down to the DDNS section to see if it worked.
If it says “Updating” or Unavailable” you should double check your account settings. No-IP.com uses your
complete email address as user name, and the password required in this menu is the one you created during
No-IP account setup. If successful the camera will show you the complete external URL for your reference.
Note: Only 1 single camera per network needs the DDNS setup. This enables access to the entire network.
23
Important Notes
1) If you try to access your own camera(s) from your home using the external IP address it may not work. Some
internet service providers recognize that you are trying to do something that usually doesn’t make sense.
Their routers may block requests that go from your network out to the internet and then loop back to your
own network.
Therefore we always recommend that you get in touch with a friend to help you test the remote access to
your camera from outside your own network. Or you can use an iPhone in 3G mode (Wi-Fi turned off)
2) Once your camera is live on the internet, you should change the admin password to something only you
would know. See the “User management” menu under “Tools” section of your camera’s “Settings” screen.
Only admin can change settings. If you add other user names they can only see video without changing
anything.
If you forget your password you can always reset your camera to factory settings using the reset procedure shown
at the end of this manual.
24
Positioning and Mounting
Indoor cameras: The included desktop stand can also be used for wall or ceiling mounting. For some angles you
may need to loosen the main mounting ring by turning the big flat screw on the back of the bracket with a coin, so
that the notch in the mounting ring allows the pin to point in the desired direction. You can then tighten it again
with the coin. Should any mounting position require the image to be rotated 180 degrees (inverted), there is a
setting for that in the “camera setup” menu.
Outdoor cameras: Before mounting, you should first become familiar with the camera indoors. Once installed.
Cameras cannot be returned for refund.
Loosen the set screen at the side of the bracket with the included hex wrench to allow adjustment of the angle. To
mount the camera under an overhang, you can replace one of the sunshade mounting screws with the included
special mounting nut to allow attachment of the camera bracket from above.
Please note that the sunshade can be mounted in several positions depending on your needs. If it extends forward
it can do a better job reducing glare from the sun as well as keeping the lens glass dry in light rain or snow. On the
other hand, reflections of IR light from the underside of the sunshade would make the entire picture appear foggy,
so for maximum night vision range you would either move the sun shade all the way back or remove it entirely.
The outdoor cameras are completely weatherproof including the connection box at the wire ends. If not fished
through a wall, the wire ends can be placed inside the small metal waterproof electrical box. This also helps
simplify further connections to optional equipment such as an alarm system, control relay, or amplified speakers
for the new bi-directional audio feature. See connection details towards the end of this User Guide.
Please note that after initial setup only the power cable is required for the Wi-Fi outdoor camera. The POE
outdoor camera can be either connected with power cable and Cat5, or optionally just with a Cat5 cable that is
connected to an 802.3af POE compatible switch or router. We recommend the NetGear FS108P switch.
25
I see pink and purple!
Above are side by side comparisons of the NC-216W (left) and NC-217W, NC-218W (right)
At night NC-216W can see if there is sufficient background lighting available, with an optional boost using the
“Moonlight mode” setting.
26
However, as shown in the bottom row, if you want to see in total darkness then you need the infrared capability of
the NC-213W, NC-213WF, NC-217W, NC-217WF, NC-218W, NC-218WF, NC-316W, NC-316P and NC-316PW series.
“Moonlight mode” boosts the available light by reducing the frame rate to 7.5 fps.
The NC-213WF/NC-217WF/NC-218WF, NC-316W, NC-316P, NC-316PW has truly gorgeous colors during the
daytime. On those models, an optional filter element (IR CUT Filter) in the lens removes all light (colors) that
cannot be seen by the human eye. This makes the colors look rich and natural to us because we see colors the
exact same way in the day and also be able to see in total darkness
However, in order to be able to see in total darkness, the NC-213W, NC-217W, NC-218W does not remove infrared
and in fact has a greater sensitivity to this invisible light. As a result, the NC-213W, NC-217W, NC-218W does not
always see colors the same way that human eyes do. Depending on what items you are looking at, the difference
can be very slight or quite amazing.
For instance, the black plastic mesh covering home speaker systems can appear transparent to the NC-213W,
NC-217W, NC-218W, making the guts of the speakers visible.
Natural dyed colors on cotton fabrics may look more pastel colored, with less color saturation. Other fabrics may
have strong pink and purple tones. Lawns, trees and flowers may appear gray, pink or purple instead of green at
different times of the day.
On the other hand, inanimate objects like colored glass may have no difference at all, as shown in the below
picture of a kitchen.
27
Night Vision Settings
The NC-213W, NC-213WF, NC-217W, NC-217WF, NC-218W, NC-218WF, NC-316W, NC-316WF have several settings
to adjust your preferred night vision setup.
1. The” Infrared LED control” can be set to “On”, “off”, and “Automatic” which uses the light sensor on the front
of the camera to check ambient light level to turn on the IR LEDs at night. The sensor is below the lens.
2. Similarly, “Black & White Mode” can be “On”, “Off”, or “Auto”. The default setting is “Auto” so that you have
the highest sensitivity at night. In many environments you have better picture quality as well as color night
vision with ambient light if you set this setting to “Off”, so you may want to try it.
3. “Moonlight mode” boosts the available light by reducing the frame rate to 7.5 fps. It can be set to “On”, “Off”,
and “Automatic”. This uses the light sensor to turn on moonlight mode only at night. When “Moonlight model”
is “auto” or “On”, the cameras produce gorgeous night vision, especially the outdoor serials.
With LED and Moonlight mode “OFF”
With LED and Moonlight mode “ON” or “Auto”
If you are using the cameras to look through a window, you should set the night vision mode on the NC-107W to
turn off the IR LEDs and instead turn on the automatic moonlight mode. Otherwise the IR LEDs would reflect off
the window glass and the glare would make everything almost invisible.
28
You may also want to experiment with the angle of vision through the glass to minimize other reflections. See next
page for hints about positioning.
4. “IR Cut Filter control” can be “On”, “Off” and “Automatic”. The cameras with IR Cut Filter, NC-213WF,
NC-217WF, NC-218WF, NC-316W, NC-316P, NC-316PW, have a feature that combines the excellent daytime
color of the NC-216W with the IR night vision performance of the NC-217W.
During the day, an optical “IR Cut filter” removes all IR light on the NC-316P, NC-316W, NC-316PW, NC-107WF,
NC-108WF, NC-213WF series. This makes the camera’s vision similar to a human eye which does not see IR
light, and therefore all colors appear vivid and natural to us. At night, the filter moves out of the optical path
to enable IR night vision. You can actually hear a muted click when this filter moves in or out. This happens
both during power-up and when light levels change between day & night.
For special applications there is also a setting that allows you to keep the IR filter fixed either in the on or off
position. The normal factory default is automatic and this is recommended. For best IR night vision please
refer to the next chapter about sunshade position. Clean lens cover glass also helps extend the range.
29
Motion Detection
The camera refers to motion detection as an “alarm”. You can select what you want the camera to do once the
motion is detected.
The factory default setting for motion detection is a single motion detection window covering the entire visible
area. The “Motion Detection” menu allows you to designate up to 4 separate windows with individually adjustable
sensitivity.
After selecting “Motion detection” from the main settings screen, you may need to expand the size of the display
window towards the right to see the 4 controls for individual motion detection windows. Each window can have
individually adjustable sensitivity and threshold.
Please note that this “Motion Detection” menu is entirely optional and is generally not used unless you have very
specific requirements to treat motion on some parts of the screen different from other parts.
In general, motion detection works by comparing the current video frame with the averages of the previous video
frames. Any difference is considered to be motion, and the sensitivity adjustment can be used to make the camera
more aware or less aware of small amounts of motion.
Internet Explorer can show you a live indicator for motion: When there is motion, a blue level appears between
the sensitivity and threshold slider as shown in the picture. More blue means more motion.
To trigger an alarm (and hence send out emails or upload to an FTP server etc) the detected amount of motion
30
needs to be larger than the threshold setting. If the blue level does not reach the threshold setting the motion is
ignored.
If you do not use the Internet Explorer you can adjust the settings by entering the desired coordinates for the
windows. A window covering the entire 640 x 480 screen would cover 0-639 horizontally and 479 because they
start at 0, not 1 ) an example covering just the top half of the screen would use top left of 0, 0 and bottom right
639, 239.
To reduce the chance of false alarms you would increase the threshold (move threshold slider to right) or decrease
sensitivity (move sensitivity slider to left) .
Typically, you would just observe the field of view of the camera through this motion detection menu for a while
and make adjustments to threshold, sensitivity, and placement of the motion detection windows until you are
pretty certain that you’ve turned everything exactly right.
Please note that it generally does not make sense to define windows if the camera is not mounted securely. If it is
just sitting on a desktop the slightest movement of the camera would invalidate your windows positions.
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Task Management
The camera refers to motion detection as an “alarm”. You can select what you want the camera to do once the
motion is detected.
1. One option is to set up the details of your email server account and have the camera send you JPEG
snapshots.
2. You can also set it up to send your pictures automatically every few minutes, or have the camera upload these
files to your FTP server (or a NAS hard drive with built-in FTP server)
3. Recording to built-in Micro-SD card or NAS. All series cameras can now accept Micro SD cards. Capacities up
to 32 GB are supported.
These picture files are compatible not just with computer based email clients, but now also directly compatible
with Apple iPhones and other web-enabled cell phones. So your camera can alert you on your cell phone with a
picture or series of pictures when it detects motion.
One thing to keep in mind when sending pictures to cell phones is that without an unlimited data plan you may
incur charges by your cell phone carrier for each picture, and that wrong settings for sensitivity or motion
detection area can result in lots of extra emails. So be careful and test it on a computer with free email first.
32
1. Email Alarm Sending/Email Periodic Sending
For automatic emailing you will need both an outgoing email server and one or more email receiving addresses. If
you don’t have this information handy you may want to refer to your internet service provider’s help pages or
your Microsoft Outlook or other email program account settings.
Following is an example of a proper configuration for using Gmail as the outbound server, which then can send
email to any receiving email address.
Note: Gmail requires that you go to your account settings on Gmail.com and enable the POP feature (Post Office
Protocol). If your Gmail account does not have POP enabled, the camera will not be able to send email.
1. “Snapshot from” can be “Primary stream” , “Secondary stream” and “ Mobile Stream” . For smaller pictures
you can select from “Secondary stream” or “Mobile Stream”.
2. “Snapshot Duration” and “Snapshot Frame Rate” (Frames per second) have the following meaning: When
motion detection is triggered, send pictures at the rate of “snapshot frame rate” frames per second for the
duration of “snapshot duration”. Here is an example:
If “Snapshot duration” had a value of 4 and “snapshot frame rate” had a value of 2, you would be getting 2
images each second for 4 seconds in a row, meaning 8 pictures total for each motion detection event.
33
3. The “Alarm Interval” allows you to designate a time (in seconds) during which new emails are suppressed. For
example, if you want to avoid a flood of emails, you could set this time to 3600 seconds so that after a motion
detection event you wouldn’t get any new emails for at least 1 hour.
4. Note that if you have a typo in any of this information, the camera would have no way to let you know about
that. You just won’t get emails. To summarize, Gmail requires:
 SMTP server name: smtp.gmail.com
 Port: 465
 Authentication: Yes
 Secure SSL connection: Yes
 Username must include: @gmail.com
 Other mail servers have their own unique settings and requirements. Some web mail services such
as Yahoo can typically not be used for sending unless you subscribe to optional paid subscriptions
like Yahoo PLUS.
5. “Receiver mail address”: Any email account can be used as a receiving email address, including the same as
sending email. You can also send email to several receiving email addresses, up to 3 total.
6. NOTE: It is easy to have a typo. The SMTP server name never has an @symbol. On the other hand, email
addresses must have an @ symbol.
7.
Email Periodic Sending
Instead of using motion detection you can also use the “Email Periodic sending” menu to upload pictures at
regular time intervals.
“Email Periodic Sending” menu is very similar to setting up the “Email Alarm Sending”, so it’s not explained here.
The “Period Interval” allow you to designate a time (in seconds or minutes or hours) during which new emails are
suppressed. For example, if you want to avoid a flood of emails, you could set this time to 60 minutes so that you
wouldn’t get any new emails for 1 hour.
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2. FTP Alarm Sending/FTP Periodic Sending
If you prefer, you can have the pictures uploaded to an FTP sever instead of an email address. There are many
choices for FTP servers.
For example, you could enable the built-in FTP server function on one of your computers or download free FTP
server software such as FileZilla.
Another possibility is to use an online account with FTP access, which is sometimes even available for free with a
limited amount of storage.
Yet another option for FTP server is to use a standalone NAS (Network Attached storage) hard drive such as the
MyBook World Edition.
35
Setup of the “FTP alarm sending” menu is very similar to setting up the “Email alarm Sending”, so we don't
explain the “Snapshot from”, “Snapshot duration”, Snapshot frame rate”, “Alarm interval” again here.
FTP Server: At a minimum you need the IP address (FTP server name) for your FTP server. The port is almost
always 21, and typical servers need a username and password which means “Anonymous” should be set to “No”.
The setting of “passive mode” and Keep Alive is dependent on your server. If you don’t know what to put there,
try both settings for passive mode and 3600 seconds (one hour) for keep alive.
FTP Alarm Management: Most settings are almost identical to the email alarm management. You do not need to
specify a remote path unless you want to keep the files organized into folders. In that case you’d need to make
sure the spelling of your path is identical to the name of your folder on the server.
“Remote Path” is an optional setting to specify a folder on the FTP server. If you decide to use this feature, you
have to make sure that the folder exists on the FTP server with the exact same spelling.
FTP Periodic Sending
Instead of using motion detection “FTP alarm sending”, you can also use the “FTP Periodic sending” menu to
upload pictures at regular time intervals.
“FTP Periodic Sending” menu is very similar to setting up the “FTP Alarm Sending”, so it’s not explained here.
The “Period Interval” allow you to designate a time (in seconds or minutes or hours) during which new emails are
suppressed. For example, if you want to avoid a flood of emails, you could set this time to 60 minutes so that you
wouldn’t get any new emails for 1 hour.
Note:The menu option for “HTTP alarm sending” and “ HTTP Periodic sending” are not explained here since
HTTP servers are only used by network professionals.
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3. Snapshot to Storage on Alarm/ Snapshot to Storage Periodically
The following chapters will show even more possibilities to use motion detection. For example, you can use
motion detection to initiate the snapshots to Micro SD card or NAS (Snapshot to storage on Alarm) or at regular
time intervals (Snapshot to Storage Periodically) to take snapshots and store them to MicroSD card or NAS
All series cameras can now accept Micro SD cards. Capacities up to 32 GB are supported. The card is not included
except in special bundle packages. The slot for the Micro SD card is at the right side of the indoor cameras and
behind the lens cover on outdoor cameras. (See diagram on next page)
When the camera powers up with a Micro SD present in the slot, Enable “storage” and select store to “SD card”,
“format the Micro SD”,” browse storage”.
37
The resulting video files can be viewed with the free QuickTime for Windows or Mac. You do not need QuickTime
X or Pro unless you want to compress the resulting video to iPhone/iPod format. Shorter video clips will download
much faster. If you have many video files you could also remove the Micro SD card and access it directly from your
computer (with suitable adapter if needed). This is only practical for indoor cameras due to easy accessibility of
the Micro SD card slot at the bottom.
Do no remove the Micro SD card while recording is active. If you have recording enabled, you should disable
recording and wait 1 minute before removing the card. Errors can only be fixed by reformatting the Micro SD
using the formatting tool from http://www.sdcard.org/consumers/formatter.
To access the Micro SD card slot on the outdoor camera series, please bring the camera indoors (in an area of low
humidity), then unscrew the entire front part of the camera. It is easiest to do it if you take the sunshield off first.
The Micro SD card slot is right under the reset button show below
38
Please be very careful not to touch the lens. The Micro SD slides into the slot and there is a positive “click” when it
is locked in place. If it doesn’t want to go in effortless it is probably upside down.
When done, please be careful when screwing the front part back on to make sure the threads are engaging nicely.
Do not use any tools, hand tight is good enough.
39
After finishing the setting on “Storage“ and Micro-SD card or NAS is ready. You can use motion detection to initiate
the snapshots to Micro SD card or NAS (Snapshot to storage on Alarm). Click on “snapshot to storage on alarm”
tab under “Task management” menu.
The “Alarm Interval” allows you to designate a time (in seconds) during which new pictures are suppressed. For
example, if you want to avoid a flood of pictures, you could set this time to 3600 seconds so that after a motion
detection event you wouldn’t get any new pictures for at least 1 hour.
Instead of using motion detection (Snapshot to Storage on Alarm), you can also use the “Snapshot to storage
periodically” menu to take snapshots at regular time intervals (Snapshot to Storage Periodically)
The “Period Interval” allow you to designate a time (in seconds or minutes or hours) during which new snapshots
are suppressed. For example, if you want to avoid a flood of snapshots, you could set this time to 60 minutes so
that you wouldn’t get any new snapshots for 1 hour.
40
4. Record to Storage on Alarm/ Record to Storage Continuously
With the larger Micro SD cards it is practical to use the camera as a continuously recording DVR (Digital Video
Recorder) with the right settings.
A 2 GB Micro SD card has about 1872 usable megabytes of storage space after formatting. At the very highest
settings of video quality with the highest picture size, this is only about 2 hours worth of storage.
However, if you setup the “secondary stream” in the camera’s “ stream setup” menu with 320 x 240 resolution, a
frame rate of 10 fps, and bit rate of 120K, this will be reduced to about 12Megabytes per 10 minutes clip or 75
Megabytes per hour, which allows 24 hours of total recording time. Then with 32 GB Micro SD card this can be
extended to approximately 16 days. Or you can increase video quality via increasing bit rate, which improves
image sharpness and makes motion appear smoother.
After finishing the setting on “Storage” menu, and Micro-SD card or NAS is ready.
You can use motion detection to initiate the recording of video to Micro SD card or NAS (Snapshot to storage on
Alarm). Click on “Recording to storage on alarm” tab under “Task management” menu.
Instead of using motion detection (Snapshot to Storage on Alarm), you can also use the “Snapshot to storage
periodically” menu to take snapshots at regular time intervals (Snapshot to Storage Periodically)
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5. Send files in storage to FTP sever--Using the Camera as a Network Video Recorder (NVR)
Now included in all indoor and outdoor series cameras can transfer files automatically to a standalone NAS hard
drive or any other FTP server, such as a computer with FTP software or an online server.
FTP Server: At a minimum you need the IP address (FTP server name) for your FTP server. The port is almost
always 21, and typical servers need a username and password which means “Anonymous” should be set to “No”.
The setting of “passive mode” and Keep Alive is dependent on your server. If you don’t know what to put there,
try both settings for passive mode and 3600 seconds (one hour) for keep alive.
FTP Alarm Management: Most settings are almost identical to the email alarm management. You do not need to
specify a remote path unless you want to keep the files organized into folders. In that case you’d need to make
sure the spelling of your path is identical to the name of your folder on the server.
“Remote Path” is an optional setting to specify a folder on the FTP server. If you decide to use this feature, you
have to make sure that the folder exists on the FTP server with the exact same spelling.
Note: Once successfully transferred, each original file on the Micro SD card is deleted.
For continuous video you would use settings as shown in the previous chapter to record without FTP transfer. If
the camera is multitasking and busy with recording, sending or viewing, there could be interruptions in the
recorded audio and video. For best results, enable only the feature you need.
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Audio/Video Stream Summary
On browser like Safari, the HLS stream will be automatically selected, which is Apple defined stream.
Macintosh desktop user (Mac OS X 10.8 Mountain lion, Safari 6.0, QuickTime 10.2) can directly play default HTTP
M3U8 stream: http://10.0.1.3 and RTSP h.264 stream : “ rtsp:// 10.0.1.3 with audio and video
Or through QuickTime, VLC as explained below, You will notice that some entries start with “RTSP”, instead of
“HTTP”. This is not a typo.
RTSP streams can also be opened by the “Open URL….” Menu in QuickTime 7 or later and “Open network” in VLC
player 2.0 on Macintosh OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion desktop with audio and video.
Linux enthusiasts may want to try the VideoLAN VLC Media Player.
IOS device user can directly download the free “P2PCam264” apps on “Apple Store”, then directly play default
HTTP h.264 stream with audio and video
Or on Safari browser directly play default HTTP M3U8 stream: http://10.0.1.3
Android OS smartphone and Tablet user can also download the free “ P2PCam264” apps on “Google play store” ,
then directly play default stream with audio and video.
For access to specific types of audio or video encoding, you bypass the main login screen and go directly to a link
for the camera with the desired protocol and encoding type. The full list is accessible by clicking on the blue
underlined “Primary Stream”, “Secondary Stream”, or “Mobile Stream” links in the Stream Setup page.
On a network with UPnP, clicking on “Primary Stream” will result in this list:
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You will notice that some entries start with “RTSP”, instead of “HTTP”. This is not a typo.
RTSP steams can be opened by the “Open URL…” menu in Apple QuickTime 7.0 or later and “Open Network…”
menu in VLC 2.0 version on Macintosh or Windows desktop with audio and video.
A quick summary of the different video/audio stream supported on various OS, browsers and Media players
available formats:
OS
Browser
Media Player
Safari
6.0
Chrome
Mac
QuickTime 10.2
VLC 2.0
VLC 2.0
IOS
iPhone, iPad
Safari
P2PCam264 apps
Stream type
URL
RTSP H.264 stream
(Mac OS X 10.8, safari 6.0
later)
http://192.168.1.17
HTTP MJPEG stream
(Mac OS X 10.8, safari 6.0
before)
http://192.168.1.17/live/0/mjpeg.jpg
HTTP MJPEG stream
http://192.168.1.17 (video only)
RTSP H.264 stream
rtsp://192.168.1.17/live/0/h264.sdp
RTSP MPEG4 stream
rtsp://192.168.1.17/live/0/mpeg4.sdp
RTSP MJPEG stream
rtsp://192.168.1.17/live/0/mjpeg.sdp
RTSP audio stream
rtsp://192.168.1.8/live/0/audio.sdp
(Audio only)
HTTP MJPEG stream
http://192.168.1.8/live/0/mjpeg.jpg
(Video only)
HTTP ASF stream
http://192.168.1.17/live/0/mpeg4.asf
HTTP M3U8 stream
http://192.168.1.17/live/0/h264.m3u8
Directly play with UID and password
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OS
Browser
Media Player
IE
Chrome
Safari
Firefox
QuickTime7.7.2
Windows
7/XP/Vista
VLC 2.0.3
Linux
Firefox/C
hromiu
m/Opera
VLC 2.0.3
Android OS
Smartphone
and Tablet
Stream type support
URL
Active X Plug-in
Active X Plug-in
HTTP snapshot image
http://192.168.1.8/live/0/jpeg.jpg
HTTP MJPEG stream
http://192.168.1.8 (No Audio)
RTSP H.264 stream
rtsp://192.168.1.17/live/0/h264.sdp
RTSP H.264 stream
rtsp://192.168.1.17/live/0/h264.sdp
RTSP MPEG4 stream
rtsp://192.168.1.17/live/0/mpeg4.sdp
RTSP MJPEG stream
rtsp://192.168.1.17/live/0/mjpeg.sdp
RTSP audio stream
rtsp://192.168.1.8/live/0/audio.sdp
(Audio only)
HTTP MJPEG stream
http://192.168.1.3/live/0/mjpeg.jpg
(Video only)
HTTP ASF stream:
http://192.168.1.3/live/0/mpeg4.asf
HTTP MJPEG stream
http://192.168.1.8/live/0/mjpeg.jpg
(Video only)
RTSP H.264 stream
rtsp://192.168.1.17/live/0/h264.sdp
RTSP MPEG4 stream
rtsp://192.168.1.17/live/0/mpeg4.sdp
RTSP MJPEG stream
rtsp://192.168.1.17/live/0/mjpeg.sdp
P2PCam264 apps
Directly play with UID and Password
H.264, MPEG4, MJPEG are true full motion video with audio.
Internet browsers (IE, Safari, Chrome, Firefox, Opera…) typically cannot show this without an add-on program.
On PCs with IE7/IE8 the required add-on program (also known as ActiveX) is installed and activated automatically
if you click” Enter” on the camera’s main login screen.
On Mac and IOS device with the Safari browser, the camera defaults to “ RTSP H.264 stream” and “HTTP M3U8
stream”( HLS stream, HTTP Live Streaming), so the camera can directly stream audio and video on Safari browser
with http://xxx.xxx.x.xxx camera IP address.
On Linux computers the browser defaults to “HTTP MJPEG Stream” and you can see H.264/MPEG4 streaming
video and audio with a media player such as VLC if you open the RTSP stream for H.264, MPEG4, MJPEG.
On Google Chrome and Firefox browser, the camera defaults to “HTTP MJPEG Stream” with Video only.
MJPEG is Motion JPEG, basically a very quick sequence of images that resembles full motion video. However
MJPEG has no sound and therefore on Linux computers you would use the media player (such as VLC) instead of
the browser to access your camera if you want audio. The JPEG snapshot image is handy when you don’t want
video or audio and just want a current picture.
45
Clicking on the “Secondary stream” and “Mobile steam” links will get you 2 more complete sets of URLs for your
cameras:
The reason for having multiple sets of streams is to allow simultaneous access to the camera at different
resolutions without changing configuration. For instance, you could access one of the mobile streams from your
cell phone and the Primary stream from your network computer, all without changing configuration and only be
selecting the corresponding bookmark.
3GPP is a video format that is commonly used on cell phones and media players, including the free new “Streamer”
app for the iPhone. The 3GPP stream can show video with audio, using as little as 20K bandwidth.
Note that unless you sign up for a name for your camera and enter it in the DDNS section, your list of streams will
only show numeric IP addresses. Also, if your router does not support UPnP, the external (internet) address won’t
be shown here but will are available if you have set up the port forwarding.
46
Resetting the Camera back to Factory Settings
If you ever forget your admin password or have any other reason to reset the camera to its factory settings, please
use the following procedure:
1. Make sure the camera is powered up
2. For indoor cameras insert the tip of a paper clip in the hole at the side of the camera to press the reset switch.
You’ll feel the click when the switch engages. For outdoor cameras it is easier to use the software reset
function in the “Backup or Reset” menu. If hardware reset is needed, see the Micro SD card chapter for
location of the reset switch.
3. Hold the switch down for at least 5 seconds, then let go. You’ll see the power light go off for a few seconds.
This indicates reset is in progress.
A few seconds later the camera will restart and is now at factory settings. Of course, after reset the user name and
password will both be “admin” again (Without quotes). And you may need to set current time zone as shown
below.
Setting the time and Time Zone
After a full reset you may want to make sure the correct time and time is set. This can be done automatically if the
camera has internet access and the setting is enabled as shown below:
47
Glossary: A quick review of networking Terminology
To participate in a computer network, each device needs an “Internet Protocol” address that is unique on that
network. This IP address consist 4 groups of numbers separated by periods. For example 192.168.0.2
IP addresses are assigned to a device either automatically by the router or manually by a person who is setting up
the network. The router is the device that is managing the addresses and the flow of data between those
addresses on your network. Sometimes the routing function is not provided by a separate device and is built into
your cable modem or DSL modem.
When you first plug the camera into your router with the network cable, the camera asks the router to get a valid
IP address, and the router provides the next available IP address on the local network. On the other hand, the
term WAN or Wide Area Network refers to the global internet.
Your router is sometimes also called a gateway because it is like a gateway from your own local network to the
internet. Unless you have an all-in-one combination of modem and router you’ll probably see that your router has
one network jack marked WAN which connects to the cable or DSL modem and a set of 2-4 jacks marked LAN for
your local network devices.
Your router will have 2 IP addresses, a WAN IP address that identifies it on the internet and a LAN IP address that
identifies it on your local network. The LAN IP addresses often start with 192.168 or 10.0
From any computer on your network it is easy to find the WAN IP address of your router just by opening a browser
and going to www.checkip.org
Since your own private network devices including your camera are not directly visible from the internet, for
remote access you would typically use your router’s WAN IP address together with some instructions to your
router to forward the requests from the internet to your camera.
The messages going back and forth between the camera and the router regarding the initial IP address are called
DHCP for “Dynamic Host configuration Protocol”.
Each device also has a unique hardware address that is called a MAC address. This MAC address is unrelated to
Macintosh computers. What’s special about this hardware address is that it is totally unique to the device.
48
Appendix A: Wireless setup instructions without Cat5
We have received inquiry from customers with no available wired network jack to plug the camera into for the
initial configuration. For instance, if an Airport Express is used as the only router for a network, the signal network
jack is taken by the required connection to the cable or DSL modem.
While we don’t recommend this, it is still possible to configure the camera without an initial wired connection
using the following procedure:
1. Temporarily rename your Wi-Fi network name (SSID) to: wirelessnc, and turn off all wireless security, i.e. no
passwords and no MAC filtering. It is important to have the SSID all lower case and without extra spaces. Then
connect to this Wi-Fi network with your laptop.
2. If you are using an Apple airport Express, use the Airport utility as shown on page 6 to reserve a fixed IP
address for your camera using the camera’s MAC address shown on the back of the camera.
3. Power up the camera and wait about 1 minute…the camera should connect to your Wi-Fi and you should be
able to access it using the IP address that you reserved for it. If you have a Wi-Fi router or access point other
than the Airport Express, you can connect to your router and look in the DHCP clients list to see the IP address
of the camera if it hasn’t automatically announced itself with a UPnP popup window.
4. Now go to the camera’s wireless setup menu, but don’t use the “Search” function. Type in the exact SSID that
you had before the change in step 1, and type the exact password that you wish to use. After you hit “Apply”,
you won’t be able to do further changes until the next step.
5. Now set your Wi-Fi SSID back to the exact same spelling as you entered into the camera’s SSID field, and make
sure the password and security mode are also exactly the same. Then update an restart your Wi-Fi network.
You can now proceed with the setup of the camera as you should be able to see it at the same IP address as in
step 3.
49
Appendix B: Setup instructions for ATT (2Wire) Router
On the ATT/2Wire 2701HG and similar routers we found the UPnp does not work. For access from the internet you
need to log in to the router. ATT usually has the IP address of the router configured to http://192.168.1.254, and
the password is usually on a sticker on the bottom of the router. Go to the firewall menu, which has section for
“Hosted Applications “ as shown below:
First click on the blue underlined link at the bottom” Add a new user defined application”. That’s 2wire’s
terminology for port forwarding. 2 applications need to be defined:
The first “application” should be named Cam1HTTP. The public TCP port range is 8150 to 8150 and the “map to
host port” is 80. All other settings should be unchanged. The second application should be named Cam1RTP. The
public UDP port range is 30000-30001 and the “map to host port” is 30000.
After these 2 applications are defined, you select the camera model in the drop down box titled “Choose the
computer…” and add these 2 applications so they are active for your camera. Then you save the settings and
restart your router.
For the next camera, you call the first application Cam2HTTP and use public TCP port 8151 while still using “map
to host” port 80. The second application would be Cam2RTP with UDP ports 30002-30003 and map-to-host port
30002.
50
Appendix C: Recording on a Mac using VLC Media Player
You can record video in QuickTime format on a MAC. After downloading the Macintosh version of VLC (1.01) from
VideoLAN.org, follow these steps:
-From the main menu in VLC, select “Streaming/ Exporting Wizard”
-Select Transcode/Save to file
-NEXT
-Select a stream….type the full info in the box as for example:
Rtsp://demo:demo@ipdemo.servehttp.com:8150/live_mpeg4.sdp
Note: substitute your camera’s IP address here as well as your own username: password instead of demo: demo.
Also make sure you did not select “ Digest Authentication” in the camera’s TCP/IP menu since that would require
encrypted passwords. If the camera is on your local network you would have something similar to:
rtsp://admin:admin@192.168.0.2:80/live_mpeg4.sdp
-Next(ignore the “transcode video” and transcode audio” check boxes.
Do not check them. Make sure these are unchecked before proceeding
-NEXT
-Select MOV format
-NEXT
-Select a file to save to …..for example type Monday.mov
If you want to see the video that is being recorded, check the “Local playback” checkbox, otherwise leave it blank,
Please note that for local playback you may get an error about the “S AMR audio codec” if your version of VLC did
not include this. Don’t worry, the recorded MOV file can be played by Quicktime which does include the required
AMR audio codec on both Mac and Windows.
-NEXT
-FINISH
If you selected “Local Playback”, you may need to be patient while it starts to record, as it takes about 30 seconds
for the Local Playback window to pop up.
Record for as long as you want….. Then use the stop button on the main interface to stop recording when you’re
done. You should now have a file with the name you provided….for example Monday.mov, If you don’t know
where the file is you can use Finder and use the “Search for all Movies” feature.
51
Appendix D: Motion Detection Adjustment
After selecting “Motion detection” from the main settings screen, you may need to expand the size of the display
window towards the right to see the 4 controls for individual motion detection windows.
Each window can have individually adjustable sensitivity and threshold.
In general, motion detection works by comparing the current video frame with the averages of the previous video
frames. Any difference is considered to be motion, and the sensitivity adjustment can be used to make the camera
more aware or less aware of small amounts of motion.
Internet Explorer can show you a live indicator for motion: When there is motion, a blue level appears between
the sensitivity and threshold slider as shown in the picture. More blue means more motion. To trigger an alarm
(and hence send out emails or upload to an FTP server etc) the detected amount of motion needs to be larger
than the threshold setting. If the blue level does not reach the threshold setting the motion is ignored.
If you do not use the Internet Explorer you can adjust the settings by entering the desired coordinates for the
windows. A window covering the entire 640 x 480 screen would cover 0-639 horizontally and 479 because they
start at 0, not 1 ) an example covering just the top half of the screen would use top left of 0, 0 and bottom right
639, 239.
To reduce the chance of false alarms you would increase the threshold (move threshold slider to right) or decrease
sensitivity (move sensitivity slider to left) .
Typically, you would just observe the field of view of the camera through this motion detection menu for a while
and make adjustments to threshold, sensitivity, and placement f the motion detection windows until you are
pretty certain that you’ve turned everything exactly right.
Please note that it generally does not make sense to define windows if the camera is not mounted securely. If it is
just sitting on a desktop the slightest movement of the camera would invalidate your windows positions.
52
Appendix E: Known issues
1. Do not use a wireless password with spaces or punctuation in it. For example, “Joe & Mary’s Wi-Fi #2” may
not work unless you change it to something like JoeAndMary2”. Also make sure any WPA/WPA2 password is
between 8 and 63 characters total.
2. On the Apple Airport and similar routers, the 128 bit WEP ASCII mode password may not work. In this case we
recommend using WPA2/AES.
3. If you use Gmail for motion detection and send a very large number of emails, Google may suspect that you
are using the camera to send spam and may temporarily suspend or block your account. Use the schedule
feature to get alerts only when you really want them. Or use the interval time to suppress new emails for a
given amount of time.
4. Some routers, like Linksys routers, have a factory default setting in the firewall menu called “Block or filter
anonymous internet requests”. The purpose of this setting is to prevent access to any of your network devices
therefore if you want to be able to access your camera from the internet you would have to uncheck this
option.
5. Some wireless routers /access points have a feature called “Wireless client access isolation” This is for use in
public Wi-Fi networks where it is desirable to prevent: one wireless device from accessing another wireless
device. Do not use this if you want to be able to access your camera from a laptop connected wireless to same
router.
6. D-Link DIR 655 and similar routers have to be at firmware 1.21 or later. If yours has version 1.10 firmware you
need to upgrade your router.
53
Burglar Alarm system integration with digital I/O
The outdoor cameras have additional connectors to help with integration of the cameras into a complete burglar
alarm system.
Typically this type of wiring is carried out by a professional security system installer. If you are not familiar with the
terminology used here, please do not attempt to connect anything to this terminal block. Damage caused by
improper wiring is not covered by warranty.
When the camera senses motion, and if the digital output is set to “Enable” in the camera’s “Digital I/O Setup”
menu, it activates the digital output to trigger a burglar system. With a Maximum voltage of 60V, this output has
an open collector NPN Darlington transistor with the emitter connected to the GND pin. If used with an external
relay a reverse polarity diode must be connected in parallel with the relay coil to protect against voltage transients.
You would need to select a relay that uses less than 0.4A at 12V, and the relay and the diode would connect pins 3
and 4.
Conversely, if the digital input is set to “ Enable” in the camera’s “Digital I/O Setup” menu, a contact closure from
DI to GND (pins 1 and 2) would trigger an alarm condition in the camera as if the camera’s own motion detection
had triggered. This means that emails or FTP/HTTP uploads can be triggered or recording to Micro SD card can be
initiated. Both the digital input and the camera’s motion detection can be active at the same tie. If you only want
this external input to trigger the camera’s alarms you need to set all 4 motion detection windows in the “ Motion
detection “ menu to disable (unchecked)
The round connector at the end of the wiring harness that looks similar to the power plug is for optional
attachment of an amplified speaker system. This output is at line level similar to a computer speaker system. Using
this, audio upload can be initiated from the Microphone of a computer running Internet Explorer. There is no echo
suppression, so if this is used it would make sense to turn down the camera’s own microphone.
54
SPECIFICATIONS
Subject to change without notice
Camera
Imaging Device
1/4” new generation CMOS sensor with color night vision
Pixels
310000
White Balance
Auto
Exposure Mode
Auto
Gain
Auto
Viewing Angle
Horizontal : 60 degree ; Vertical : 45 degree
Focal Length
F=3.6mm
Aperture
F2.0
Mini illumination
1.0Lux (NC-216W), NC-217WF/NC-218WF and outdoor series can see in total darkness
Infrared LEDs
12 LEDs on NC-213WF, 28 LEDS on NC-217WF/NC-218WF, 12 High power LEDs on
outdoor camera. Automatic infrared filter for excellent daytime colors
NETWORK
Image compression
H.264 (Only available on “2” serial models) ,MPEG-4, MJPEG
Image resolution
640 x 480(VGA), 320 X 240, 160 X 120,176 X 144 (3GPP only)
Max. frame rate
Full 30fps @640 x 480
Audio compression
AAC, G.726 ; AMR
Built-in microphone
Electric Condenser Microphone
Simultaneous viewers
16
Authentication
ID/Password, Administrator/General User(up to 64)
Network protocols
TCP,UDP,IP,ARP,ICMP,DHCP,DNS,HTTP,FTP,SMTP,NTP,UPnP,DDNS,RTSP,RTP
Stream types
HTTP, HLS, RTSP/RTP/RTCP, 3GPP
Network connection
Ethernet (10 BASE-TX; Outdoor POE camera: 802.11 af POE
Wireless LAN
Frequency
IEEE802.11 b/g/n
Transmission speed
2.412—2.452GHz
Security
150Mbps/100Mbps/54Mbps/22Mbps…..(Auto Switch)
General
WEP (64/128 bit); WPA-PSK(AES/TKIP),WPA2-PSK (AES/TKIP)
Power requirements
Indoor Series: 12V (international Voltage AC adaptor included)
Outdoor series: DC 12V (international voltage AC adaptor included)
Power consumption
Indoor series: 3.75W ; Outdoor series: 8W
Operating temperature
Indoor series: -5 to +45℃(+22 to + 133 ℉) ; Outdoor series: -20℃ to +60℃(-4℉ to
+140 ℉)
Dimension
Indoor series: 3.3” x 3.3” x 1.2” (85mm x 85mm x 30mm)
Weight
Indoor series: 5.5oz/150g (main body)
Supplied accessories
AC adaptor, CD-ROM, color matched desktop stand (can be used as wall or ceiling
amount), Cat 5e cable; connector box (waterproof for outdoor series)
PC system requirements
Operation system
Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7, Macintosh , Linux
Web browser
Microsoft IE version 7.0 or later, Firefox, Safari, Chrome
Memory card
MicroSD
MicroSD and MicorSDHC capacities of 1GB—32GB are supported
55
Contact US
If you encounter any problems, do not return product to the store
If you have purchased this product from an authorized retailer worldwide, you are eligible for priority email based
technical support.
We are always glad to help, however we ask that you read this short manual first.
If you still have questions send us an email:
info@trivisiontech.com
Most issues can be resolved very quickly. Even complicated issues are no problem for us. If you are totally stuck,
we can make appointments for one-on-one telephone tech support tutorial until your camera is up and running.
Please keep in mind that remote access to your camera may require a few settings changes in your router, and
that we cannot help you if you do not have your password for your own router. Also keep in mind that many
routers (especially Linksys and Dlink) have many versions of the firmware, and routers with older versions of the
firmware probably need to be updated.
Frequently this takes care of the most mysterious issues. Typically we do not schedule telephone tech support
until your router firmware is at the latest version that is available from your router manufacturer’s tech support
web site. Please note that we cannot upgrade your router firmware. Please ask your router manufacturer for help
with router firmware upgrades if needed.
We pledge that we will not let you fail. Contact us with any questions, no
matter how simple or how complicated.
56
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