802 D3 - STEREO
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G E R M AN H I F I M A G A Z I NE ISSUE #1 2015
❱ High End Sensation
NEW B&W
802 D3
❱ German Legend
Dieter
Burmester
REVIEWS: FOCAL SOPRA NO. 2 +++ NAGRA JAZZ +++
ELECTROCOMPANIET ECG 1 +++ PS AUDIO DSD-DAC +++
HIFI MAN HE 1000 +++ EMT TSD75
EDITORIAL
WE JUST DO IT
I
t has now come to pass: After more than
40 successful years STEREO presses
ahead with its English-language edition
STEREO MAGAZINE, being the first and
only German Hi-Fi magazine to inspire
the worldwide Hi-Fi and High-End community with test reviews and reports on
some 50 pages in a bimonthly issue.
With test reviews and reports that are
well-founded and as well understandable
for beginners to show the people behind
the equipment and the scenes of music
production. Where beyond the information an entertaining style of writing contributes to a pleasant reading experience.
Professionally, critically and independently.
With test reviews that not only show
the equipment, but also the inspiration
of the creators.
3 STEREO MAGAZINE ISSUE 01
In short: STEREO MAGAZINE is different from others and therefore will signify for many readers around the world
an entirely new reading experience.
If you want to be there from the beginning, take your decision quickly, and contact our advertising team: Ilhami Düzgün
and Corinna Kramer to enjoy preferential
conditions.
We very much look forward to share
our common future with you.
Michael Lang
[email protected]
CONTENT
B&W 802-D3
B&W presents the next generation of the 800 series. The 802-D3 is
completely new. But is it really better?
Headphone-Contest
Checking several models from
the mid to upper price range,
and evaluated them in terms of
sound quality, workmanship, and
comfort.
Avantgarde
Acoustic Zero
Dieter Burmester
Nagra Jazz
was one of the most respected
names in the industry and a
pioneer in high-end audio, he
passed away in August. We look
back at his life’s work
Interested in jazz? We bet yes.
if you’ve read what the Swiss
manufacturer, Nagra, has achieved with their new and sonically
fascinating preamp, ‘Jazz’.
EMT
Infinity Beta
The arrow in the EMT logo
points upwards. Our thumbs do
as well. The new MC Cartridge
TSD75 sounds musically mature
and intoxicating.
A real man’s toy and a large
pinch of performance: read
what we experienced with an
Infinity IRS Beta loudspeaker
system!
Avantgarde Acoustic builds horn
loudspeakers. A portrait of the
German manufacturer and its
head, Holger Fromme.
Focal Sopra No. 2
Focal, known far beyond the borders of France, stirs up the upper
middle class with the bold Sopra 2.
Electrocompaniet
Electrocompaniet’s first turntablei is intended as a perfect match
for Norwegian electronic line. It is almost too good to play in its
own family only.
Musical Fidelity
Small but smart?
Musical Fidelity‘s V90LPS for € 180 only.
PS Audio DSD DAC
The digital world also has its charms, in this case very skillfully
presented by PS Audio‘s DSD DAC.
4 STEREO MAGAZINE 01/2015
NU-VISTA 800 AMPLIFIER
State of the art design for
reference level reproduction
The Nu-Vista series is a passionate labour of love for all of us at Musical Fidelity.
We hope that at least you get a chance to hear this combo because we
consider it the ultimate expression of our art.
Experience it for yourself at your local Musical Fidelity dealer.
www.musicalfidelity.com
+44(0)2089002866
T E S T T U R N TA B L E
DISHY DECK
Its multilayered sandwich chassis is what catches
the eye with Electrocompaniet’s first turntable, the ECG1. The company has
opted for visually attractive acrylic. A transparent maneuver?
6 STEREO MAGAZINE ISSUE 01
T E S T T U R N TA B L E
W
ith most high-end suppliers,
the issue of turntables is something of a moot question. As a
rule, nothing is produced under their own
steam. Neither by Accuphase or Burmester, MBL or Nagra. At least they provide
an honest answer to the question of why
there is no equivalent record player that
matches the design of the electronics line:
„The analog specialists can do that better
than us“. Some purchase almost complete
turntables from one of those specialists
and, like McIntosh, print their name on it.
Exceptions such as T+A, whose turntable
models are designed in-house – tonearm
and cartridge are also produced externally – are rare.
Why is this of interest here? Because the
Norwegian company, Electrocompaniet,
which is known for its electronics with a
sophisticated, powerful sound, has also
opted for developing its first turntable
fully in-house. Hardly any vinyl player in
the market visually matches its components with the thick acrylic front panels
with anthracite gray backing. Discussions
with the normal suppliers did not have the
desired result. „Then we’ll do it ourselves“,
is what the Scandinavians decided, who
also build sound-oriented Blu-ray players and are now completing their range
of source components with the ECG1.
The fact that the ECG1 turned out to
be so good-looking makes you wonder
whether the showy deck is somewhat
lacking in its audiophile substance. In fact,
this is precisely the purpose of the slick
three-layer chassis, in which an aluminum
plate is sandwiched between two 20 millimeter thick acrylic plates. Electrocompaniet points out that the strong internal
damping property of the acrylic combines
perfectly with the strength of the aluminum. This is not new. Other manufacturers
too have opted for this material mix, which
has been systematically adopted here.
What you don’t see: the handsome
frame with the four brass-colored
push-buttons for the three rotation
speeds, which even includes 78 revolutions for old shellacs, rests on three feet
made by Soundcare in which internal
spikes ensure a defined coupling to the
integrated floor protection pads. Electrocompaniet uses these successfully with
other equipment too.
and is supported by a bearing shaft made
of hardened carbon steel.
The ECG1 comes with an economical
tonearm that is nevertheless well known
for its high quality – the ten inch long
SA-750EB by the Japanese supplier, Jelco.
This S-type arm with simply replaceable
headshell can be easily adjusted in height
and, at the counterweight, features a precise scale for setting the correct stylus
pressure; it has also been tried and tested
in thousands of applications. Only its pink
original cable should be replaced by a better one, because it limits the spatiality and
reproduces the higher frequency range a
little sharply. This can have a detrimental
Good tonearm, poor cable
The three centimeter high platter also consists of acrylic. When looking at it side-on,
you can hardly detect that it rotates.
Acrylic is very similar to vinyl. The idea
is that the 750 gram-weight presses the
record on the platter under it forming a
quasi-unit with it. Its drive unit consists
of a flat belt driven by an external motor
unit, the pulley of which sticks up through
an opening at the rear left-hand corner.
The Norwegians use a smooth running,
powerful, 24-volt synchronous motor.
In order to prevent tilting moments, the
bearing of the platter has been inverted.
It „hangs“ from a stainless steel ball
inserted in the upper counter-bearing
p The Norwegians left a hole at the rear left of the sandwich chassis to accommodate the freestanding 1.3 kg „motor block“. A PC cable connects it with the speed selection buttons.
7 STEREO MAGAZINE ISSUE 01
p The transparent acrylic provides fascinating
insights. The turntable even offers a 78 rpm
speed).
pThis thick, short pivot supports the acrylic
platter. It is called an inverse bearing because
the center of rotation is at the top.
T E S T T U R N TA B L E
effect on the sound of Electrocompaniet’s
class turntable – it is a bit like fitting slender tires to a sports car.
In addition to cartridges we are familiar
with, we also listened to the ECG1 with
Gold Notes’ Machiavelli Red, a high-output MC cartridge for about EUR 1,450,
which was brought along by Matthias
Roth from Electrocompaniet’s local distributor, MRV, because it was said to fit
well with the ECG1 in terms of sound and
technical characteristics – as had been
found during a few demonstrations.
We’ve got nothing against it! We are
grateful for any tip. And, with the “Phono
Cable Plus” from the aforementioned Italian manufacturer known for the distinct
musicality of its products, we also found
a replacement for the lousy Jelco cable.
Although it costs EUR 580 on its own,
MRV will put together an “EC Sound Set”
with cartridge and cable for EUR 5,250
instead of just under EUR 5,700, so that
it is almost free-of-charge.
It is no surprise then that Roth, who has
been caringly distributing Electrocompaniet since 1992, is so keen on Gold Note,
seeing that both ECG1 and cartridge fit
so perfectly with the favored sound philosophy up there. The Norwegians’ electronics are known just as much for the
gripping dynamics and the dry, solid bass
as for the clear, unpretentious reproduction of the treble – and for a sonic performance which derives its fascination
not least from a smooth, nuanced range
of key tones.
Clean, stable and crisp
How that all comes together for the
Scandinavians, when it comes to the
TEST-COMPONENTS
TURNTABLE: Avid Diva II SP/
Dynavector DV-20X2L, Clearaudio
Ovation/Talismann V2, Transrotor
Rondino nero/Figaro
CARTRIDGE: Benz Micro ACE SL,
Clearaudio Maestro V2, Ortofon
Quintet Black/Cadenza Red
PHONO STAGES: Brinkmann Edison,
Electrocompaniet ECP2
PHONO CABLES: Furutech Silver
Arrows, HMS Gran Finale Phono
performance, was demonstrated by the
ECG1 when playing Reference Recordings’ Chadwick’s – in every respect
high-class – “Jubilee” recording.
The orchestra stood large
and extensive in the listening room, and yet still outstandingly organized. All
instruments were in their
place, both clearly defined
and placed at the correct depth.
The performance had breath but was also
disciplined, and was very finely detailed
while still keeping the whole in view.
With this mature performance, the Norwegian distinguishes itself from cheaper
record players.
With the lively titles from Diana Krall’s
“Live In Paris” album, the ECG1 demonstrated its responsiveness and ability to
differentiate down to the lowest bass lines,
so that even minute bass increments could
be heard. No doubt the elaborate feet play
a part in that. And the sandwiched deck
revealed relaxed timing without slowing
down the rhythms. It didn’t come across
as deliberately “propulsive”, nor as “measured”, but conveyed a clean and stable
impression – just what Electrocompaniet
is known for.
Thanks to the quick-lock at the Jelco
arm, we were able to change swiftly to
other cartridges. With Ortofon’s MC
Cadenza Red (around EUR 1,150) the
presentation became a touch brighter,
but not more dynamic than with the Gold
Note, which slightly dims the presence
range and therefore appears sonorous
though never subdued or flat, because
the treble is playing on it’s full.
The MCs Benz Micro ACE SL and Ortofon Quintet Black (around EUR 890/800)
cartridges with their customary top allround qualities were a convincing choice.
The Clearaudio MM Maestro V2, for just
under EUR 900, put a bit more emphasis
on the mid-range, thereby giving a little
boost to beautiful voices. So in conclusion, the marriage with the Gold Note –
though of course higher priced – turned
out to be the most harmonious, while not
lacking passionate”fire”).
For this reason, it would not be a bad
choice to go for the attractively priced
Complete Set. This will buy you a top
turntable – not just for use with Electrocompaniet’s equipment.
Matthias Bőde
8 STEREO MAGAZINE ISSUE 01
 The Jelco tonearm fits
with many high-quality cartridges
with a weight of between four and twelve
grams. We have successfully tried out a
number of different MM and MC cartridges with
it. With the Machiavelli Red from Gold Note
recommended by Electrocompaniet, the ECG1
performs perfectly within its manufacturer’s
sound philosophy.
ELECTROCOMPANIET ECG1
Around € 3650 (with tonearm/without
cartridge; as „EC Sound Set“ with
high-output MC Gold Note Machiavelli
Red and Gold Note Phono Cable Plus
around € 5,250)
Dimensions: 46.5 x 13 x 36 cm (WxHxD)
Guarantee: 3 years
Contact: ELECTROCOMPANIET AS
Tel: +47 51 74 10 33
www.electrocompaniet.com
Some way to start! Electrocompaniet’s first
turntable appeals with its unique, comprehensive concept, its high-quality parts with
a first-class finish as well as its succinctly
natural, refined sound, which justifies the
ambitious price.
MEASUREMENT RESULTS
FEATURES
Separate motor block with electronic controls, external power supply unit, three platter
speeds, platter puck, high-quality feet
SOUND QUALITY
92%
PRICE/PERFORMANCE
EXCELLENT
*For subscribers only - additional reading and material is
available for through the STEREO Club at www. stereo.de
H I F I E X C L U S I V E F L O O R S TA N D I N G L O U D S P E A K E R S
THE JOURNEY
TO UTOPIA
Is such a trip even possible? With the newly
introduced Sopra No. 2, Focal is sending a
speaker down this path - a speaker which after a
determined development effort is knocking at the
door with respect to the great Utopia Series. This
exclusive STEREO test report, however, wasn’t a
walk in the park for them.
9 STEREO MAGAZINE ISSUE 01
H I F I E X C L U S I V E F L O O R S TA N D I N G L O U D S P E A K E R S
I
t’s a safe bet that this speaker will stir
and electrify the high-end audio community. And it doesn’t even need to be
presented in its garish ‘Electric Orange’
shock color, as seen on the left. The new
Sopra No. 2, whose name means ‘superiority’, is positioned just below the sophisticated Utopia line, sharing more than the
same visual character. The ambitious task
facing the development group at Focal was
to create a floor standing loudspeaker offering the essential qualities of top-of-the
line Focal models, but in a more compact
size, and at a lower price.
 The beryllium tweeter is a Focal highlight
that the Sopras share with the great Utopias.
Not a simple task. Because in addition
to their unerring precision, the massively
large Utopias derive a large part of their
sonic fascination from the ease with which
they move air in the lowest registers.
Anyone attempting to accomplish this in
a smaller cabinet will see themselves. as
the French would frankly say, caught in a
vicious audiophile cycle. Smaller enclosures mandate small woofers. This then
requires lower efficiency, which in turn
creates a demand for more power from
the amplifier to achieve the same levels—
in and of itself a disadvantage—and leads
to longer cone excursions for the bass driver. Distortion increases, and what the
French describe as ‘blurred sound’–smeared and undifferentiated reproduction—is
the consequence.
Performance with
a high-end flair
So, in juggling these various issues, the
Sopra No. 2’s performance at the outset,
was about as far away from a razor sharp
Blu-ray image as a blurred vacation photo.
You curious readers who have already
jumped to the lab results will have seen,
however, that Focal ultimately managed
to successfully combine high sensitivity
with exemplary low frequency response,
outstandingly low distortion, and, thus,
finally break the vicious cycle.
It helped that as a vertically integrated
speaker specialist, Focal was capable of
utilizing sophisticated software simulation in the design process. In addition,
they not only build their own drivers inhouse, including the unique ultra-light
 The cabinets for Focal’s Utopia,
Sopra, and Electra Series speakers
are all assembled in France, seen here
being sanded, painted, and polished.
Then finally, drivers are inserted.
10 STEREO MAGAZINE ISSUE 01
H I F I E X C L U S I V E F L O O R S TA N D I N G L O U D S P E A K E R S
A clear view of the tweeter module from behind (right).
With ‘Infinite Horn Loading’ the rear sound components are
directed away to eliminate interference. 
TEST-COMPONENTS
TURNTABLE/PHONO-AMP: Clearaudio
Innovation Wood, Universal, Stradivari V2/
Absolute Phono
SACD PLAYER: Accuphase DP-550
INTEGRATED AMP: Symphonic Line
RG 9 MK4 Reference HD
PRE/POWER AMP: Acoustic Arts
TUBE PREAMP II/AMP II
LOUDSPEAKERS: DALI Epicon 6,
KEF Reference 5
LS-KABEL: In-Akustik LS-1608/LS-2404,
Silent Wire LS16 mk2
and ultra-hard beryllium tweeter used
in the Sopra, but they also manufacture
their own cabinets. Focal’s new production facility had also just opened, which
allowed them to immediately implement
important changes and fine adjustments
to the speakers. This turned out to be of
critical importance.
Believe it or not, but as a reviewer you
get a feeling about a loudspeaker when
setting it up. By observing whether it is
sensitive to small variances in the set-up,
or how the sound takes shape when the
channels lock into place with that final
millimeter-exact adjustment, you begin to
understand the extent to which the manufacturer has truly gotten into the tonal
structure. And, what can I say?—we felt
the new Focals, because of their precision
and response to even the smallest change,
actually tested us and our ability to get
perfect performance out of them.
Everything turned out to be optimized
when we set the Sopras up just above the
shoulders of the middle listener, with vertical alignment confirmed by a carpenter’s
level, and utilizing the integrated spikes
built into their glass bottomplate. The
team simply marveled at their beautiful
sound quality.
The ‘soundtrack’ used in positioning
the Sopras was once again Maria Phils’
‘Malvina’ from the STEREO listening test
CD VI, heard hundreds of times before.
With their mixture of spaciousness and
sharp focus, powerful but contoured bass,
and crystal clear rendering of voices, they
delivered beautiful music that came across
without an artificial touch. They balanced
all parameters, and accomplished this in
the least compromised way possible.
In the end, the performance was so elevated that the Sopras remarkably seemed
to disengage from the room, and ‘Malvina’
appeared—in all its facets, and also as a
coherent whole. All this was accomplished
with the distinguished and dominating
flair that differentiates real high-end, and
in so doing moved the Sopras closer to the
Utopias, which they formally emulate in
terms of driver complement—bass and
midrange, as well as the beryllium tweeter
placed in between.
And with the Red Norvo Quartet’s
‘Saturday Night’—another classic listening test—the Sopras were thrilling
in the way they captured the dry, highly
dynamic vibraphone bursts and attacks,
and at the same time the soft voices in the
background—the random audience noises—placing these sounds at the correct
 One pair of binding posts are sufficient for
the Sopra - and us as well. Connect to a high
quality amp, and off you go!
11 STEREO MAGAZINE ISSUE 01
distance from the band with rarely heard
clarity. Hat’s off!
Fight the eddy currents!
But the Focals can also grab. And they
did so with Monty Alexander’s ‘Moanin’,
where they delivered the taut and powerful bass with authority—and at virtually
any volume. There’s no question that besides the ability to gently reproduce sublime accents with sensitivity, the Sopra
No. 2 can deliver crisp and abrupt passages with the force of a hammer—and with
its efficiency, only moderately challenge
the amplifier. And certainly none of this
really mattered to the massive Acoustic
Arts power amp which was used for this
exercise.
Despite all the power, you have to wonder how the Sopras do it. Although their
new 18 cm bass driver offers the same
The spikes which are integrated into the glass
bottom plate are both delight and simple to
adjust. The package includes floor protectors. q
H I F I E X C L U S I V E F L O O R S TA N D I N G L O U D S P E A K E R S
The compact No. 1 is part of the Focal Sopra line.
Its price including stands is around € 8,000/pr. u
sophistication found in the midrange
transducer, and was adapted specifically
for the ‘Sandwich W’ diaphragm configuration (made up of a synthetic foam core
and a fiber glass film), its motor assembly
was redesigned during the development
process.
The manufacturer, which employs more
than 200 people, spent many years experimenting with the problem of complex
interactions involving multiple factors in a
dynamic driver‘s electromagnetic system.
These interactions manifest themselves in
many different ways and are affected by
the location of the voice coil in relation
to the magnetic field. An important part
of what Focal did over this period was to
run elaborate computer simulations and
practical tests to gain an understanding
of electromagnetic eddy currents, their
harmful effects, the mechanisms by which
they impede the movement of the diaphragm, and ultimately finding a solution.
The key turned out to be a Faraday ring
 Focal manufactures Sopra’s drivers at the company
location in Saint- Étienne, France. Here, a voice coil/
cone assembly for a midrange driver is being mounted
into the magnet system and frame.
In this cut-awaywwdrawing of the woofer you’ll
see the Faraday ring (highlighted in red), which is
used to counter disturbing eddy currents. It’s position
is the result of extensive computer simulation and
practical testing. 
 The two rib thicknesses in the mid-range
driver’s gasket define
the points of inflection.
12 STEREO 8/2015
12 STEREO MAGAZINE ISSUE 01
in the magnet assembly. This, isn’t in and
of iteself actually an innovation, however, and is used by other manufacturers
to counter phenomena described long
ago. But in diving deeper, Focal found
that the ring should sit very specifically
at the bottom of the pole piece, without
any physical contact with the pole piece
itself or the magnet.
Is this ultimately why the Sopras’ sound
so lifelike and relaxed? After all, these qualities have long distinguished Focal, but
they may now be even slightly improved.
Ultimately, at this high level, the
French fight for every ounce of
improvement.
As a consequence of this kind
of commitment, Focal also pursued
and came up with a solution for the
braking compression effects behind the
dome tweeter, and the reflections they
generate. The remedy was an innovation
called Infinite Horn Loading, IHL for
short.
There may be a question about the
H I F I E X C L U S I V E F L O O R S TA N D I N G L O U D S P E A K E R S
distinctive silvery lattice on the Sopra’s
back panel. It‘s not a cover for a bass reflex
port, as you might suspect. (The port itself
is actually located on the speaker’s underside and integrated into the glass base.)
This particular opening allows the dome’s
rear radiation to escape into the open air
and dissipate—eliminating any possibility
of interference. As part of its design, the
manufacturer built a complete module,
isolating and separating it from the bass
and midrange chambers.
Incidentally, I can’t help but offer this
thought regarding midrange—‘in the land
of charming language you love beautiful
voices’. So not surprisingly, with the Sopra,
Focal also introduced a new feature called
the Tuned Mass Damper (TMD), an innovation implemented in its 16.5 cm midrange driver. It consists of two carefully
calculated rib thicknesses in the driver‘s
gasket to assist in the precise deflection of
the membrane. Not worth talking about?
Well, Focal reports that they went through
more than 100 iterations before settling on
the right combination.
 He should certainly be proud. Focal-grand
seigneur Gérard Chrétien, who guided the
Sopra-project.
Unity & resolution
These are the most important elements of the technical description
as it relates to the Sopra series (there
is still a compact model in the line
called the No. 1). But before totally
losing ourselves in the no. 2’s technical innovations, we preferred to listen to music. For our evaluations,
we decided to remove the guard over
the extremely fragile beryllium tweeter,
which was held in place by two tiny socket
screws. Admittedly, this step only provided a touch more transparency and naturalness, but what the heck!
The fact that the No. 2 is outfitted with
only one pair of speaker terminals didn’t
really bother us. This avoids the issue of
a discontinuity—a loss of sound—when
using a single cable for dual terminal
bi-wire connection, misaligned jumpers, or entirely unsuitable sheet metal
bridges. As for the cable, while the Sopra
clearly revealed differences between cables, it showed no preference nor dislikes.
Depending on the amp, room acoustics,
and listening preferences, the listener
should be able to adequately choose
cables for his particular situation. With
these things in mind, his choice should
be just fine.
Even though the Sopras can easily work
with and motivate playing partners, including smaller amplifiers, they really appreciate perfection. The Sopras were in top
form as described above, when we used
them with our best reference components.
They were never overstated; and they presented themselves as honest, extremely
transparent portals for virtually every
kind of music. Sol Gabetta’s lively interpretation of Baroque cello concertos, for
instance, radiated from their membranes
with delicacy and softness, while the low
frequency pulses at the beginning of Carolin No’s ‘Still Waters Run Deep (Listening
Test-CD VIII) were convincingly succinct
and uninhibited.
Two advantages in particular should
be pointed out from among this speaker’s
strengths—its ability to create credible
sonic images and present them as a tightly
knit whole; and then its radical openness,
which reveals itself in the most delicate
ways. Listening to the Sopra no. 2 was
pure pleasure—and a journey right up to
the sonic cosmos of the Utopias.
Matthias Böde
13 STEREO MAGAZINE ISSUE 01
FOCAL SOPRA No 2
Price € 12,000 /pr (four lacquers and
one veneer)
Size: 36x119x54 cm (WxHxD)
Warranty: 10 years
Contact: Focal
Tel: + 33 477 435 700
www.focal.com
The new Sopra is imbued with technical highlights such ‘Sandwich W’ composite
cones, alongside the company’s famous
beryllium tweeter. Smart design details and
extremely careful coordination make the
Sopra an absolutely top tier product.
MEASUREMENT RESULTS
4Ω
Nominal Impedance minimum Impedance3.4 Ω at 90 Hertz
maximum Impedance 14.2 Ω at 1800 Hertz
90 dB SPL
Sound Pressure (2.83 V/1m) Power for 94 dB (1m) 4.7 W
Low frequency extreme (-3 dB) Distortion at 63 / 3k / 10k Hz
33 Hertz
0.3 | 0.1 | 0.1 %
LAB COMMENTS
Excellent linear on-axis frequency response
(red line), with a very gentile drop towards
the low frequency range. The small narrow
band intrusion between two and three kilohertz is irrelevant in practice, since it disappears at an angle (blue line). High efficiency,
and a non-critical impedance curve. The
minimum at 90 Hz will not scare any amp.
Excellent step response. Drivers reaction
is almost coincident with the impulse, and
ringing is nearly non-existent.
SOUND QUALITY
95%
PRICE/PERFORMANCE
EXCELLENT
* For subscribers only - additional reading and material is
available for through the STEREO Club at www. stereo.de
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