Station Configuration Guide - Honeywell Process Solutions

Station Configuration Guide - Honeywell Process Solutions
Experion LX
Station Configuration Guide
EXDOC-X127-en-110A
February 2014
Release 110
Document
Release
Issue
Date
EXDOC-X127-en-110A
110
0
February 2014
Disclaimer
This document contains Honeywell proprietary information. Information contained herein is to be used solely
for the purpose submitted, and no part of this document or its contents shall be reproduced, published, or
disclosed to a third party without the express permission of Honeywell International Sàrl.
While this information is presented in good faith and believed to be accurate, Honeywell disclaims the implied
warranties of merchantability and fitness for a purpose and makes no express warranties except as may be stated
in its written agreement with and for its customer.
In no event is Honeywell liable to anyone for any direct, special, or consequential damages. The information
and specifications in this document are subject to change without notice.
Copyright 2014 - Honeywell International Sàrl
2
www.honeywell.com
Contents
About this guide ....................................................................................................................................... 17
Before reading this guide ......................................................................................................................................... 18
Prerequisite skills ......................................................................................................................................... 18
How to use this guide .............................................................................................................................................. 19
Configuration overview ........................................................................................................................... 21
Configuration environment and tools ......................................................................................................................
Configuration Studio ...................................................................................................................................
Server scripting ........................................................................................................................................................
Using Experion data in other applications ...............................................................................................................
Configuration procedures ........................................................................................................................................
Checking your Experion license ..............................................................................................................................
22
22
24
25
26
28
Assets and alarm groups ........................................................................................................................ 29
Building assets ......................................................................................................................................................... 30
Asset properties reference ............................................................................................................................ 30
Assets and Quick Builder ............................................................................................................................ 31
Assets and Control Builder .......................................................................................................................... 31
Managing assets ....................................................................................................................................................... 32
Modifying assets .......................................................................................................................................... 32
Deleting assets ............................................................................................................................................. 32
Building alarm groups ............................................................................................................................................. 34
Alarm group properties reference ................................................................................................................ 34
About Alarm Group icons ........................................................................................................................... 35
Assigning points to alarm groups or assets .............................................................................................................. 36
About filtering points ................................................................................................................................... 36
Which points appear in the Points Picker? .................................................................................................. 36
Managing alarm groups ........................................................................................................................................... 38
Modifying alarm groups .............................................................................................................................. 38
Deleting alarm groups .................................................................................................................................. 38
Console Stations ..................................................................................................................................... 41
About Console Station ............................................................................................................................................. 42
Functionality available on Console Stations ................................................................................................ 42
What happens when the Experion server is unavailable ............................................................................. 43
How server wide settings relate to Console Station .................................................................................... 44
How global cache settings relate to Console Station ................................................................................... 44
About Database and File Replication .......................................................................................................... 44
Security ........................................................................................................................................................ 45
Configuring a Console Station ................................................................................................................................. 46
Configuring Console Station details ............................................................................................................ 47
Console Station configuration properties .................................................................................................... 47
Console Station options ............................................................................................................................... 48
Assigning scope of responsibility to a Console Station ............................................................................... 49
Configuring LEDs on operator keyboards for Console Stations ................................................................. 49
Console Station tuning settings ................................................................................................................... 49
Deleting a Console Station .......................................................................................................................... 49
Console Station system status .................................................................................................................................. 51
3
CONTENTS
Console Extension Stations checklist ...................................................................................................................... 52
Adding Console Extension Stations ............................................................................................................ 52
Console Extension Station configuration properties ................................................................................... 53
About Console Extension Stations .............................................................................................................. 53
Configuring the connection properties on a Console Extension Station ..................................................... 53
Configuring a Console Extension Station to access custom displays on the Console Station .................... 54
About alarm and message acknowledgement/silence synchronization ................................................................... 55
Alarm acknowledgement and shelving ........................................................................................................ 55
Sending displays to another Console Station ........................................................................................................... 56
Sending the current display to another Console Station .............................................................................. 56
Sending the next display to another Console Station .................................................................................. 57
Sending displays using aliases ..................................................................................................................... 58
About using aliases to send displays ........................................................................................................... 59
Customizing Stations ............................................................................................................................... 61
About customizing Station ...................................................................................................................................... 62
Configuring startup displays .................................................................................................................................... 63
Which startup display configuration takes precedence? ............................................................................. 64
Configuring timeouts ............................................................................................................................................... 66
What happens when there is an idle time out? ............................................................................................ 67
Turning off select timeout for faceplates ..................................................................................................... 67
Setting the fast raise/lower step ............................................................................................................................... 68
Specifying associated Stations ................................................................................................................................. 69
Customizing toolbars, menus, and keyboard shortcuts ........................................................................................... 70
Creating a new command ............................................................................................................................ 70
Editing an existing command ...................................................................................................................... 71
Adding a command to a menu ..................................................................................................................... 72
Adding a command to a toolbar ................................................................................................................... 72
Assigning a keyboard shortcut to a command ............................................................................................. 73
Creating a new menu ................................................................................................................................... 73
Creating a new toolbar ................................................................................................................................. 74
Example scenario ......................................................................................................................................... 74
Specialized keyboards ............................................................................................................................................. 77
Changing the behavior of LEDs on a specialized keyboard ........................................................................ 77
Default LED states on a specialized keyboard ............................................................................................ 77
Associating points with LEDs on a specialized keyboard ........................................................................... 78
Setting up Station Help ............................................................................................................................................ 80
Station setup files ..................................................................................................................................................... 81
Restoring .stb files ....................................................................................................................................... 82
Understanding update rates ...................................................................................................................................... 84
Accessing Experion using Internet Explorer ........................................................................................................... 85
Improving the rendering of display objects in Station ............................................................................................. 86
Connection Properties .............................................................................................................................................. 87
Connection tab, Connection properties ........................................................................................................ 87
Displays tab, Connection properties ............................................................................................................ 88
Appearance tab, Connection properties ....................................................................................................... 89
Toolbars tab, Connection properties ............................................................................................................ 89
Sounds tab, Connection properties .............................................................................................................. 89
Web access tab, Connection properties ........................................................................................................ 90
Web access ................................................................................................................................................... 90
Scripting tab, Connection properties ........................................................................................................... 90
Station scripting ........................................................................................................................................... 91
Customize dialog box .............................................................................................................................................. 92
Menus tab, Customize dialog box ............................................................................................................... 92
Toolbars tab, Customize dialog box ............................................................................................................ 92
4
www.honeywell.com
CONTENTS
Keyboard Shortcuts tab, Customize dialog box .......................................................................................... 93
Command Properties dialog box ................................................................................................................. 93
Command actions ........................................................................................................................................ 93
Server display program ................................................................................................................................ 94
Server display program parameters and action ............................................................................................ 95
Pushbutton interrupt codes ........................................................................................................................ 100
Server wide settings ............................................................................................................................................... 102
General tab, server wide settings ............................................................................................................... 102
Security tab, server wide settings .............................................................................................................. 104
Summary displays tab, server wide settings .............................................................................................. 105
IKB/OEP settings tab, server wide settings ............................................................................................... 107
Flex Station Configuration Display ....................................................................................................................... 109
General tab, flex Station configuration display ......................................................................................... 109
Assignment tab ........................................................................................................................................... 111
Station.ini ............................................................................................................................................................... 112
Environment variables ........................................................................................................................................... 116
Predefined Experion environment variables .............................................................................................. 116
Configuring multiple static Stations ..................................................................................................... 119
About multiple static Station ................................................................................................................................. 120
About master Station ................................................................................................................................. 120
Configuration tasks for multiple static Station ...................................................................................................... 121
Configuring setup files .......................................................................................................................................... 122
Specifying an auxiliary file ........................................................................................................................ 122
Starting multiple static Station ............................................................................................................................... 124
About customizing keys ........................................................................................................................................ 125
Adding manual input modules ............................................................................................................................... 126
Customizing Station for use with high screen resolutions ................................................................ 127
Changing the font size in the Station menu and toolbar ........................................................................................ 128
Changing the font size in the Station zones ........................................................................................................... 129
Changing the font size in the Summary displays (except the Trend with Events Summary) ................................ 132
Changing the default appearance of font sizes .......................................................................................... 134
Changing the font size in the Trend with Events Summary .................................................................................. 136
Changing the font size in the General and Comments tabs of the Detail pane ..................................................... 139
Changing the font size in a custom HMIWeb trend display .................................................................................. 141
Changing the font size in the plot axes in a DSP trend display ............................................................................. 143
Printers .................................................................................................................................................... 145
Configuring printers checklist ...............................................................................................................................
Building a printer in Configuration Studio ................................................................................................
Customizing how alarms are printed .........................................................................................................
Configuring a Station to print alarms and events ......................................................................................
Changing the font size of the report printer ...............................................................................................
Configuring a printer to print Station displays ..........................................................................................
146
146
146
147
147
147
Configuring faceplates .......................................................................................................................... 149
Configuring server-wide faceplate options ............................................................................................................ 150
Turning off persistent positioning for faceplates ................................................................................................... 151
Adding a button to Station's toolbar to reset faceplates to their default positions ................................................. 152
Setting the maximum number of faceplates that can be simultaneously displayed .............................................. 153
Faceplates .............................................................................................................................................................. 154
Faceplate auto-selection ......................................................................................................................................... 155
Control behavior of faceplates and custom displays ................................................................................. 158
Configuring system interfaces .............................................................................................................. 161
About system interfaces and flexible points .......................................................................................................... 162
5
CONTENTS
Considerations for flexible points and point servers ................................................................................. 162
Defining system interfaces in Station .................................................................................................................... 163
Point server configuration properties ......................................................................................................... 163
System interface tuning ......................................................................................................................................... 165
Point server tuning parameters .................................................................................................................. 165
Configuring controllers ......................................................................................................................... 167
About controllers and channels ............................................................................................................................. 168
Connecting controllers to the server .......................................................................................................... 168
Communications status .............................................................................................................................. 168
Marginal and fail limit alarms ................................................................................................................... 169
Communications redundancy .................................................................................................................... 169
Building channels .................................................................................................................................................. 170
Defining redundant communication links ................................................................................................. 170
Configuring Stallion EasyConnection Adapter channel ............................................................................ 170
Setting flow control ................................................................................................................................... 171
Software flow control (XON/XOFF) ......................................................................................................... 171
RS-232 hardware flow control (RTS/CTS) ............................................................................................... 172
RS-232 modem and radio link support ...................................................................................................... 172
RS-232 cabling requirements for Stallion EasyConnection ...................................................................... 173
RS-422 cabling requirements for Stallion EasyConnection ...................................................................... 173
RS-485 port configuration and wiring requirements ................................................................................. 173
Building controllers ............................................................................................................................................... 175
Enabling and disabling channels and controllers ................................................................................................... 176
Monitoring channel and controller communications ............................................................................................. 177
Communications tests ............................................................................................................................................ 178
Viewing channel configuration information .......................................................................................................... 179
Viewing the controller configuration summary ..................................................................................................... 180
Viewing point names on a specific controller ........................................................................................................ 181
Points ...................................................................................................................................................... 183
About points ........................................................................................................................................................... 184
Point types ............................................................................................................................................................. 185
About flexible points ............................................................................................................................................. 186
Considerations for flexible points .............................................................................................................. 186
About derived points .............................................................................................................................................. 187
Considerations for derived points .............................................................................................................. 187
Building a derived point ............................................................................................................................ 187
Naming rules for points ......................................................................................................................................... 188
Associating points with assets ............................................................................................................................... 190
Flexible point parameters ...................................................................................................................................... 191
Standard point parameters ..................................................................................................................................... 192
Summary of standard point parameters and addresses .............................................................................. 192
Status point parameters .......................................................................................................................................... 194
Status point process variable (PV) ............................................................................................................. 194
Status point output (OP) ............................................................................................................................ 195
Status point mode (MD) ............................................................................................................................ 195
Analog point parameters ........................................................................................................................................ 196
Analog point process variable (PV) ........................................................................................................... 196
About drift deadband ................................................................................................................................. 197
About the clamp point ............................................................................................................................... 198
Analog output (OP) .................................................................................................................................... 199
Analog mode (MD) .................................................................................................................................... 199
Analog set point (SP) ................................................................................................................................. 199
Analog auxiliary values (A1, A2, A3, and A4) ......................................................................................... 199
6
www.honeywell.com
CONTENTS
Accumulator point parameters ............................................................................................................................... 201
Accumulator point process variable (PV) .................................................................................................. 201
Summary of internal point parameters .................................................................................................................. 204
About internal point parameters ................................................................................................................ 210
Source and destination addresses ............................................................................................................... 211
Scanning and standard points ................................................................................................................................ 212
Periodic scanning ....................................................................................................................................... 212
Exception scanning .................................................................................................................................... 212
Demand scanning ....................................................................................................................................... 213
Scan packets ............................................................................................................................................... 213
Analyzing the scanning load with lisscn ................................................................................................... 214
Control properties for points .................................................................................................................................. 215
Control confirmation for flexible points .................................................................................................... 215
Control modes for flexible points .............................................................................................................. 215
Reverse output for standard points ............................................................................................................ 215
Control confirmation for standard points .................................................................................................. 215
Control modes for standard points ............................................................................................................. 216
Control level .............................................................................................................................................. 216
Control properties for status points ............................................................................................................ 216
Control properties for analog points .......................................................................................................... 217
About alarms and events for standard points ......................................................................................................... 219
Status point alarms ..................................................................................................................................... 220
Specifying addresses for alarm acknowledgments .................................................................................... 221
Analog point alarms ................................................................................................................................... 221
Accumulator point alarms .......................................................................................................................... 223
Station displays for points ..................................................................................................................................... 224
About changing point configuration via Station displays ...................................................................................... 226
Calling up a Point Detail display ............................................................................................................... 226
Advanced point configuration ............................................................................................................................... 227
Database addresses .................................................................................................................................... 227
About auxiliary parameters ........................................................................................................................ 227
Building points off-scan ............................................................................................................................. 228
About user-defined data formats ........................................................................................................................... 229
Creating user-defined data formats ............................................................................................................ 229
User-defined data format properties .......................................................................................................... 230
Reserved Data Format Names ................................................................................................................... 231
User-defined data format scenario: linear conversion ............................................................................... 232
User-defined data format scenario: piecewise linear conversion .............................................................. 232
Understanding internal point numbers ....................................................................................................... 233
About algorithms ................................................................................................................................................... 235
PV algorithms ............................................................................................................................................ 235
Action algorithms ...................................................................................................................................... 235
Configuring algorithms .............................................................................................................................. 236
Viewing algorithm configuration information ........................................................................................... 236
Algorithm blocks ....................................................................................................................................... 237
History collection and archiving ........................................................................................................... 239
Types of history collection ..................................................................................................................................... 240
Standard history ......................................................................................................................................... 240
Extended history ........................................................................................................................................ 240
Fast history ................................................................................................................................................. 241
Exception history ....................................................................................................................................... 241
Configuring fast history collection rates ................................................................................................................ 242
Fast history collection rate scenarios ......................................................................................................... 242
Configuring standard history collection rates ........................................................................................................ 244
7
CONTENTS
Standard history collection rate scenarios ................................................................................................. 244
Setting history collection rates for point parameters ............................................................................................. 246
Defining gating points, parameters, and states ...................................................................................................... 247
Configuring history offset groups .......................................................................................................................... 248
About history offset groups ....................................................................................................................... 248
Viewing history collection configuration .............................................................................................................. 249
History file sizes .................................................................................................................................................... 250
History collection and DSA ................................................................................................................................... 251
History archiving ................................................................................................................................................... 252
Considerations History archive folder ....................................................................................................... 252
Specifying folders for history archives ...................................................................................................... 252
Determining space requirements for a history archive .............................................................................. 254
Configuring history archives ..................................................................................................................... 255
Automatically managing history archives ................................................................................................. 255
About moving history archives .................................................................................................................. 255
Restoring history archives ......................................................................................................................... 256
Configuring alarms, alerts, and messages .......................................................................................... 257
Configuring alarms ................................................................................................................................................ 258
Configuring alarm shelving ................................................................................................................................... 259
What is alarm or alert shelving? ................................................................................................................ 259
Alarm Shelving tab .................................................................................................................................... 260
How does alarm or alert shelving work in DSA? ...................................................................................... 260
Preconfigured shelving reasons ................................................................................................................. 261
Configuring audible annunciations ........................................................................................................................ 262
Example scenario: Audible annunciations ................................................................................................. 262
Configuring audible annunciation suppression ......................................................................................... 267
About suppressing audible annunciations ................................................................................................. 268
Configuring external alarm notification ................................................................................................................ 270
Alarm Forwarding tab ................................................................................................................................ 270
Configuring unanswered alarms ............................................................................................................................ 271
Elevating the priority of unacknowledged alarms ................................................................................................. 272
Customizing alarm behavior for Process alarms ................................................................................................... 273
Configuring page acknowledgement and page clear ............................................................................................. 274
Configuring alarm settings .................................................................................................................................... 275
Alarm Processing tab ................................................................................................................................. 275
Customizing alarm colors ...................................................................................................................................... 278
Alarm Appearance tab ............................................................................................................................... 278
Configuring system alarm priorities ...................................................................................................................... 280
Disabling alarming ................................................................................................................................................. 281
Alarm Enable tab ....................................................................................................................................... 282
About the alarm list overflow ................................................................................................................................ 284
About the precedence of alarms in the alarm line ................................................................................................. 285
Configuring alerts .................................................................................................................................................. 286
Connecting Experion and the User Alert application ................................................................................ 286
About configuring messages .................................................................................................................................. 288
Defining informational messages for standard points ............................................................................... 288
Enabling automatic message acknowledgement for confirmable messages ............................................. 289
Enabling the manual clearing of messages ................................................................................................ 289
Alarm Groups and Aggregate Alarming ............................................................................................... 291
Understanding Alarm Groups and aggregate alarming .........................................................................................
Planning Alarm Groups .........................................................................................................................................
Guidelines and restrictions for Alarm Groups ...........................................................................................
Naming rules for Alarm Groups ................................................................................................................
8
www.honeywell.com
292
293
293
293
CONTENTS
Example Alarm Group ............................................................................................................................... 294
Understanding and configuring aggregate alarming on custom displays .............................................................. 296
Aggregate alarm state and most important alarm state .............................................................................. 297
Aggregate alarm and alert count parameters ............................................................................................. 298
Aggregate message count parameters ........................................................................................................ 300
Alphanumeric and alarm state options ...................................................................................................... 300
Adding aggregate alarm counts to a custom display ................................................................................. 300
Adding alarm state icons for alarm groups to a custom display ................................................................ 301
Alarm state icons ....................................................................................................................................... 301
Configuring system security ................................................................................................................. 303
System security considerations .............................................................................................................................. 305
About Station-based security ................................................................................................................................. 306
About operator-based security ............................................................................................................................... 307
Station-based security configuration checklist ...................................................................................................... 308
Operator-based security configuration checklist ................................................................................................... 309
About integrated security ....................................................................................................................................... 310
Integrated security system topology scenarios ...................................................................................................... 311
Single node system scenario ...................................................................................................................... 311
Client server system (Windows workgroup environment) scenario .......................................................... 312
Client server system (domain environment) scenario ............................................................................... 313
Redundant server system (domain environment) scenario ........................................................................ 315
User environments scenarios ................................................................................................................................. 318
Control room environment scenario .......................................................................................................... 318
Desktop environment scenario .................................................................................................................. 318
Remote user scenario ................................................................................................................................. 319
About domain environments ...................................................................................................................... 319
About the Operator Management Service ................................................................................................. 319
Choosing an appropriate account for the Operator Management Service ................................................. 320
Setting the Operator Management Service account ................................................................................... 320
Building a Flex Station for operator-based security .............................................................................................. 322
Configuring a Console Station for operator-based security .................................................................................. 323
Adding an operator account ................................................................................................................................... 324
Operator definition, General tab ................................................................................................................ 326
Operator definition, Advanced tab ............................................................................................................ 328
About security levels ............................................................................................................................................. 330
Determining the security settings for Windows group operators .............................................................. 330
Assigning scope of responsibility to operators or Windows group accounts ........................................................ 333
Configuring profiles for scope of responsibility .................................................................................................... 334
Configuring asset lists ................................................................................................................................ 334
Configuring time periods ........................................................................................................................... 335
Configuring profiles ................................................................................................................................... 335
About scope of responsibility ................................................................................................................................ 336
Scope of responsibility asset permissions .................................................................................................. 337
Assigning scope of responsibility to Flex Stations ................................................................................................ 338
Assigning scope of responsibility to Console Stations .......................................................................................... 339
Combining operator and Station scope of responsibility ....................................................................................... 340
Setting time access for an operator account .......................................................................................................... 341
Setting Station access for an operator account ...................................................................................................... 342
Deleting an operator account ................................................................................................................................. 343
Disabling an operator account ............................................................................................................................... 344
Converting traditional operator accounts to integrated accounts .......................................................................... 345
Deleting an Experion Windows group account ..................................................................................................... 346
Changing passwords for Station-based security .................................................................................................... 347
Changing passwords for traditional accounts ........................................................................................................ 348
9
CONTENTS
Changing passwords for integrated accounts ........................................................................................................ 349
Configuring password administration for traditional operator accounts ............................................................... 350
Configuring failed logon alarms ................................................................................................................ 350
Sign-On Admin tab properties ................................................................................................................... 351
Configuring Integrated Security signon policy ...................................................................................................... 352
Assigning access to system alarms ........................................................................................................................ 353
Distributed system architecture (DSA) and locations ............................................................................... 354
Actions permitted at each security level ................................................................................................................ 355
Permissions for general actions ................................................................................................................. 355
Permissions for system security management ........................................................................................... 356
Permissions for point control ..................................................................................................................... 356
Permissions for system hardware management ......................................................................................... 357
Permissions for alarm management ........................................................................................................... 357
Permissions for event management ........................................................................................................... 358
Permissions for groups and trend .............................................................................................................. 359
Permissions for report management .......................................................................................................... 359
Permissions for the IdentIPoint interface .................................................................................................. 359
Setting security levels for enabling/disabling channels and hardware .................................................................. 361
Changing the names of security levels .................................................................................................................. 362
Group and trend displays ...................................................................................................................... 363
Creating groups ...................................................................................................................................................... 364
About groups and displays ......................................................................................................................... 364
Modifying groups and points ..................................................................................................................... 365
Deleting groups and points ........................................................................................................................ 365
Navigation methods to group displays ...................................................................................................... 365
Configuring a trend ................................................................................................................................................ 367
About trend displays .................................................................................................................................. 368
Trends and history archiving ..................................................................................................................... 369
History aggregation ................................................................................................................................... 369
Trend types ................................................................................................................................................ 370
Related display types ................................................................................................................................. 370
Standard trend properties ........................................................................................................................... 370
Dual, triple and X-Y trends ....................................................................................................................... 372
Changing the scale on a trend .................................................................................................................... 372
Scaling options ........................................................................................................................................... 373
Changing the period on a trend .................................................................................................................. 373
Adding a reference line to a trend .............................................................................................................. 374
Viewing events with a trend ...................................................................................................................... 374
Zooming in on a trend ................................................................................................................................ 375
Saving your changes .................................................................................................................................. 375
Navigation methods to trend displays ........................................................................................................ 376
Template displays and container points .............................................................................................. 377
Engineering guidelines for container points .......................................................................................................... 378
Customizing summary displays ........................................................................................................... 379
About customizing the summary displays ............................................................................................................. 380
Filtering the summaries ......................................................................................................................................... 381
Filtering the Alarm Summary .................................................................................................................... 381
Filtering system alarms from the Alarm Summary ................................................................................... 382
Options for filtering the System Status display ......................................................................................... 382
Options for filtering the Alert Summary ................................................................................................... 383
Filtering the Event Summary ..................................................................................................................... 384
Options for filtering the Message Summary .............................................................................................. 385
Options for filtering the SOE Summary .................................................................................................... 386
10
www.honeywell.com
CONTENTS
Creating a custom filter ............................................................................................................................. 386
About sequence of events (SOEs) ............................................................................................................. 387
About time stamps ..................................................................................................................................... 387
Sorting the summary displays ................................................................................................................................ 388
Customizing the layout of the summary displays .................................................................................................. 389
Creating a view of a summary display .................................................................................................................. 390
Making a view read-only ........................................................................................................................... 391
Resetting the summary displays ............................................................................................................................ 392
Manually resetting the summary displays ................................................................................................. 392
Automatically resetting the summary displays .......................................................................................... 392
Enabling summary displays to be printed .............................................................................................................. 393
Preventing operators from customizing the summary ........................................................................................... 394
Reports .................................................................................................................................................... 395
Configuring reports ................................................................................................................................................ 396
Report definition properties ....................................................................................................................... 396
Report output ............................................................................................................................................. 398
Specifying time periods for reporting ........................................................................................................ 399
Using wildcard characters to specify report data ....................................................................................... 399
Changing the date format for reports ......................................................................................................... 400
Changing the font size for reports ............................................................................................................. 400
Configuring field sizes ............................................................................................................................... 401
How reports are used ............................................................................................................................................. 402
Alarm and Event reports ........................................................................................................................................ 403
Alarm and Event DSA reports ............................................................................................................................... 404
Alarm Duration reports .......................................................................................................................................... 406
Asset Alarm Count reports .................................................................................................................................... 407
Batch Report .......................................................................................................................................................... 408
Creating a points list .................................................................................................................................. 409
Batch report filenames ............................................................................................................................... 410
Starting and stopping a batch report .......................................................................................................... 411
Cross Reference reports ......................................................................................................................................... 413
Point Attribute Report ............................................................................................................................................ 414
Sequence of Events (SOE) report .......................................................................................................................... 415
Microsoft Excel reports configuration checklist .................................................................................................... 416
Creating a report definition file using Microsoft Excel Data Exchange ................................................... 416
Creating the Microsoft Excel report .......................................................................................................... 417
Security considerations .............................................................................................................................. 417
Storing the report definition file ................................................................................................................ 417
About Microsoft Excel Reports ................................................................................................................. 418
Microsoft Excel custom report tutorial: History values ............................................................................ 418
Configuring and monitoring a redundant server system ................................................................... 421
Checklist for manually configuring redundancy ................................................................................................... 423
What is redundancy? .............................................................................................................................................. 424
What is redundant arbitration? ................................................................................................................... 424
What type of network redundancy does Experion support? .................................................................................. 426
Network redundancy with FTE ................................................................................................................. 426
Editing the hosts file .............................................................................................................................................. 427
Testing the hosts file .............................................................................................................................................. 428
Example hosts file for FTE ........................................................................................................................ 428
Checking network card settings ............................................................................................................................. 429
Configuring arbitration .......................................................................................................................................... 430
Defining the data links between redundant servers ............................................................................................... 431
Configuring Station connections for server redundancy ....................................................................................... 432
11
CONTENTS
Example Station connections for FTE configuration ................................................................................ 432
Accessing displays ..................................................................................................................................... 432
Synchronizing the server databases ....................................................................................................................... 433
Synchronizing the Engineering Repository database ............................................................................................ 434
Checking the status of redundant servers .............................................................................................................. 435
Server redundancy status display reference ............................................................................................... 435
Redundant server advanced display reference ........................................................................................... 436
Points that monitor redundant servers ....................................................................................................... 437
What other files should you synchronize? ............................................................................................................. 439
What causes a failover of a redundant server system? .......................................................................................... 440
Configuring automatic failover if CDA communication fails ............................................................................... 441
Configuring the primary server to restart if it fails ................................................................................................ 442
Manually failing over a redundant server system .................................................................................................. 443
How can you make failover faster? ....................................................................................................................... 444
Tuning the time until backup server becomes primary .............................................................................. 444
Tuning the time until server disconnects Station ....................................................................................... 445
Tuning the time until Stations fail over to backup network ....................................................................... 445
Making IP address resolution faster .......................................................................................................... 446
FTE-specific failover settings .................................................................................................................... 447
Configuring Distributed System Architecture ..................................................................................... 449
DSA Overview ....................................................................................................................................................... 450
Requirements for implementing a DSA system .................................................................................................... 451
DSA data access .................................................................................................................................................... 452
How remote points are located .................................................................................................................. 452
Point IDs .................................................................................................................................................... 452
Displays in a DSA system ..................................................................................................................................... 454
Displays locations ...................................................................................................................................... 454
Consolidated Alarm Summary .................................................................................................................. 454
Associated displays .................................................................................................................................... 454
DSA and alarms, alerts, events and messages ....................................................................................................... 455
Alarms and DSA ........................................................................................................................................ 455
System alarms and DSA ............................................................................................................................ 456
What happens when you disable alarms in a DSA system? ...................................................................... 456
DSA and alarm and message acknowledgement policy ............................................................................ 456
DSA and message indexes ......................................................................................................................... 457
DSA and journaled events ......................................................................................................................... 457
DSA and journaled operator changes ........................................................................................................ 457
Trends .................................................................................................................................................................... 458
Security .................................................................................................................................................................. 459
Operational aspects of DSA ................................................................................................................................... 460
Algorithms and DSA ................................................................................................................................. 460
Hardware items and DSA .......................................................................................................................... 460
Performance considerations with DSA ...................................................................................................... 460
Multicasting and DSA ............................................................................................................................... 460
Synchronization considerations with DSA ................................................................................................ 461
Server redundancy, networks and DSA ..................................................................................................... 461
Operator keyboard support and DSA ........................................................................................................ 461
Internationalization and DSA .................................................................................................................... 462
Configuration for Distributed System Architecture .............................................................................................. 463
Adding DSA servers to a system ............................................................................................................... 463
Configuring servers to subscribe to data and alarms ................................................................................. 465
Tuning your distributed system ................................................................................................................. 466
About cache age times ............................................................................................................................... 467
Monitoring Distributed Server status ..................................................................................................................... 468
12
www.honeywell.com
CONTENTS
Distributed Server Local Status display reference ..................................................................................... 468
Resetting statistics on the Distributed Server Local Status display ........................................................... 469
Configuring eServer ............................................................................................................................... 471
eServer configuration procedures .......................................................................................................................... 472
Guidelines for tuning eServer for standard access .................................................................................... 473
eServer security considerations ............................................................................................................................. 474
Securing access to the eServer ................................................................................................................... 474
eServer Stations and operators ................................................................................................................... 474
Restricting access to assets ........................................................................................................................ 474
Considerations for Standard Access displays ........................................................................................................ 475
Considerations for Premium Access displays ........................................................................................................ 476
IIS support for EMF format images ........................................................................................................... 476
eServer home page ................................................................................................................................................. 478
File replication ........................................................................................................................................ 479
Understanding file replication ............................................................................................................................... 480
About file replication ................................................................................................................................. 480
File replication configuration checklists ................................................................................................................ 482
Checklist: File replication for DSA ........................................................................................................... 482
Checklist: File replication for redundant servers ....................................................................................... 482
Checklist: File replication for Console Stations ........................................................................................ 483
Checklist: File replication for client computers ......................................................................................... 484
Checklist: File replication for a Console Extension Station ...................................................................... 484
Creating a network share on a server or client computer ...................................................................................... 485
Configuring replications on the source Experion server ....................................................................................... 486
Preparing client computer(s) to receive replicated files ........................................................................................ 488
Running a file replication manually ...................................................................................................................... 490
Automatic file replications .................................................................................................................................... 491
Checking the status of a replication ....................................................................................................................... 492
Example file replication scenario: DSA with Console Stations ............................................................................ 493
Example file replication scenario: DSA with redundant servers ........................................................................... 495
Configuring schedules .......................................................................................................................... 497
Configuring shifts .................................................................................................................................................. 498
Configuring holidays ............................................................................................................................................. 499
About point control schedules ............................................................................................................................... 500
Considerations when adding a Point Control Schedule ............................................................................. 500
Configuring a point control schedule .................................................................................................................... 501
Point control schedule properties reference ............................................................................................... 501
Schedule actions reference ........................................................................................................................ 502
Deleting a point control schedule .............................................................................................................. 502
Updating or copying a schedule ................................................................................................................ 502
Filtering the Point Control Scheduler ........................................................................................................ 503
Recipes .................................................................................................................................................... 505
About recipe configuration ....................................................................................................................................
Considerations for configuring points for recipes .................................................................................................
Configuring recipes ...............................................................................................................................................
Recipe properties .......................................................................................................................................
Recipe ingredients properties ....................................................................................................................
Chaining recipes ........................................................................................................................................
506
507
508
508
508
509
Event Archiving ...................................................................................................................................... 511
Methods of archiving ............................................................................................................................................. 512
Performance considerations ....................................................................................................................... 512
Space requirements .................................................................................................................................... 512
13
CONTENTS
Restored events .......................................................................................................................................... 513
Configuring event tamper detection ...................................................................................................................... 514
Configuring event archiving .................................................................................................................................. 515
Event archiving configuration properties .................................................................................................. 515
Event Archiving status ............................................................................................................................... 516
Configuring OPC .................................................................................................................................... 517
Experion OPC Options .......................................................................................................................................... 518
Experion OPC Client Interface .................................................................................................................. 518
Experion OPC Advanced Client ................................................................................................................ 518
Experion OPC Display Data Client ........................................................................................................... 519
Experion OPC Server ................................................................................................................................ 519
Experion OPC Historical Data Access Server ........................................................................................... 520
Experion OPC Alarm and Event Server .................................................................................................... 520
Experion OPC Integrator ........................................................................................................................... 520
About OPC ............................................................................................................................................................ 521
About the OPC Data Access standard ....................................................................................................... 521
About OPC performance counters ............................................................................................................. 521
About Experion-to-OPC Server/Client communications ...................................................................................... 522
Recommended topologies for redundant OPC servers .......................................................................................... 524
Guidelines for developing a compatible OPC DA Server ..................................................................................... 526
Connecting to a third party OPC AE Server .......................................................................................................... 527
Configuring the Experion OPC Advanced Client ................................................................................................. 528
Configuring the OPC server connection .................................................................................................... 528
Configuration tab ....................................................................................................................................... 529
Attribute Mapping tab ................................................................................................................................ 530
Asset Mapping tab ..................................................................................................................................... 530
Tuning tab .................................................................................................................................................. 530
Status tab .................................................................................................................................................... 531
Mapping OPC alarms/events to Experion alarms/events .......................................................................... 531
Required OPC AE server behavior ............................................................................................................ 533
Mapping simple events to condition events ............................................................................................... 533
Mapping OPC Honeywell-specific attributes to source or description ..................................................... 533
Attaching displays to alarms ...................................................................................................................... 534
Live value display ...................................................................................................................................... 534
Interfaces and methods used by the Experion Advanced Client ............................................................... 534
Supported OPC event attributes ................................................................................................................. 536
Configuring the Experion OPC Display Data Client ............................................................................................. 540
Adding OPC data to a custom display ....................................................................................................... 540
Mapping OPC data types to Experion data types ...................................................................................... 541
Accessing data from the Experion OPC Server ..................................................................................................... 542
The Experion OPC Server ProgID ............................................................................................................ 542
Formats for accessing Experion data ......................................................................................................... 542
Interpreting enumerated parameters .......................................................................................................... 543
Update rates and deadbands for items ....................................................................................................... 543
Specifying the model used in the browse address space ........................................................................... 543
About the browse address space ................................................................................................................ 543
OPC-accessible status point parameters .................................................................................................... 545
OPC-accessible analog point parameters ................................................................................................... 548
OPC-accessible accumulator point parameters ......................................................................................... 552
OPC-accessible flexible point parameters ................................................................................................. 555
Error codes and qualities ........................................................................................................................... 555
Accessing data from the Experion OPC Historical Data Access Server ............................................................... 557
How the Experion HDA server returns data .............................................................................................. 557
Interfaces and methods used by the Experion OPC Historical Data Access Server ................................. 557
14
www.honeywell.com
CONTENTS
Aggregates supported by the Experion OPC Historical Data Access Server ............................................ 558
Accessing data from the Experion OPC Alarm and Event Server ........................................................................ 559
Mapping Experion Alarm and Event properties to OPC notification properties ....................................... 559
Experion OPC Integrator ....................................................................................................................................... 562
Recommendations for configuring Experion OPC Integrator ................................................................... 562
Performance considerations ....................................................................................................................... 563
Bidirectional data transfer .......................................................................................................................... 565
OPC Integrator Configuration tasks ......................................................................................................... 565
Configuring OPC Integrator alarms ........................................................................................................... 566
OPC Integrator Alarm settings tab ............................................................................................................ 566
Configuring OPC groups ........................................................................................................................... 566
OPC Integrator Group Details tab ............................................................................................................. 567
OPC Integrator Item List tab ..................................................................................................................... 568
Enabling OPC Integrator groups ............................................................................................................... 570
Checking the status of OPC Integrator groups .......................................................................................... 570
Group states ............................................................................................................................................... 570
Location of OPC Integrator files ............................................................................................................... 570
OPC Integrator alarms and events ............................................................................................................. 571
Monitoring the status of Experion OPC Integrator .................................................................................... 572
Using Redirection Manager with Experion OPC clients ....................................................................................... 574
Redirection Manager connection timeouts ................................................................................................ 574
Tuning Redirection Manager for use with OPC Advanced Client and OPC Display Data Client ............ 574
Tuning Redirection Manager for use with OPC Client Interface .............................................................. 575
Default Redirection Manager alarms ......................................................................................................... 576
Configuring Microsoft Excel Data Exchange ....................................................................................... 577
Changing the read/write permissions for Microsoft Excel Data Exchange ........................................................... 578
Using the Microsoft Excel Data Exchange wizard ................................................................................................ 579
Retrieving point parameters ....................................................................................................................... 579
Retrieving historical information ............................................................................................................... 580
Arranging data when using the Microsoft Excel Data Exchange wizard .................................................. 580
Using cell formulas ................................................................................................................................................ 582
Changing the data updating rate ............................................................................................................................ 583
Enabling Microsoft Excel Data Exchange under different user accounts ............................................................. 584
Interpreting Microsoft Excel Data Exchange errors .............................................................................................. 585
Experion parameters with Microsoft Excel Data Exchange functions .................................................................. 586
Microsoft Excel Data Exchange functions ............................................................................................................ 587
Using formula arrays ................................................................................................................................. 587
GetHistVal_Date ........................................................................................................................................ 588
GetHistVal_Offset ...................................................................................................................................... 588
GetHistValArray_Date ............................................................................................................................... 589
GetHistValArray_Offset ............................................................................................................................ 590
GetPointVal ................................................................................................................................................ 591
GetPointValArray ...................................................................................................................................... 592
PutPointVal_Number ................................................................................................................................. 592
Configuring EXSCRIPT .......................................................................................................................... 593
Configuration Procedures ......................................................................................................................................
Defining an LRN .......................................................................................................................................
Configuring the EXSCRIPT Application ..................................................................................................
Creating the Script for the Batch File ........................................................................................................
594
594
594
595
Command reference ............................................................................................................................... 597
Running Experion commands and utilities ............................................................................................................ 598
Installation commands ........................................................................................................................................... 599
installsqlobject ........................................................................................................................................... 599
15
CONTENTS
sysbld ......................................................................................................................................................... 600
Configuration commands ....................................................................................................................................... 602
alglst ........................................................................................................................................................... 602
Running alglst ............................................................................................................................................ 603
bckbld ........................................................................................................................................................ 603
dspbld ......................................................................................................................................................... 605
hdwbckbld .................................................................................................................................................. 605
hdwbld ....................................................................................................................................................... 606
hscconfig .................................................................................................................................................... 606
paswrd ........................................................................................................................................................ 606
pntbld ......................................................................................................................................................... 607
qckbld ........................................................................................................................................................ 607
rtusum ........................................................................................................................................................ 607
station ......................................................................................................................................................... 608
Experion PKS Server Configuration Panel ................................................................................................ 609
Updating server settings ............................................................................................................................ 609
Changing fast history rate using the Experion PKS Configuration Panel ................................................. 609
Diagnostic commands ............................................................................................................................................ 611
display ........................................................................................................................................................ 611
hstdiag ........................................................................................................................................................ 612
lisscn .......................................................................................................................................................... 612
listag ........................................................................................................................................................... 613
tail .............................................................................................................................................................. 613
trace ............................................................................................................................................................ 614
Administration commands ..................................................................................................................................... 615
hscserver /start ........................................................................................................................................... 615
hscserver /stop ........................................................................................................................................... 615
dspclr .......................................................................................................................................................... 615
hisint .......................................................................................................................................................... 616
usrlrn .......................................................................................................................................................... 616
tagflb .......................................................................................................................................................... 617
Database initialization commands ......................................................................................................................... 618
pntdel ......................................................................................................................................................... 618
almint ......................................................................................................................................................... 618
Notices .................................................................................................................................................... 621
Documentation feedback ....................................................................................................................................... 622
How to report a security vulnerability ................................................................................................................... 623
16
www.honeywell.com
About this guide
This guide is intended primarily for engineers and system administrators who are responsible for configuring
and supporting Experion Release 100.
How to use this guide
This guide describes:
•
•
•
The recommended order for configuring the server.
Mandatory and optional configuration procedures.
Administration procedures.
Attention
This guide describes the configuration procedures for systems that are using Honeywell and third-party controllers
such as Allen-Bradley.
It does not describe the configuration tasks for the Honeywell Experion Process Controller. For information about
configuring the Experion Process Controller, see the Control Building User's Guide.
17
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Before reading this guide
Before using this guide to configure Experion, you need to:
•
•
Understand basic Experion concepts such as point server, channel, controller, point, and Station as
explained in the Overview Guide.
Install Experion software as described in the Getting Started with Experion Software Guide.
As you follow the procedures in this guide, it is useful to have documented your site and processes (for
example, in a single-line or process and instrumentation diagram) as suggested in the Overview Guide. This will
help you to match it to the Experion database that you want to build.
Prerequisite skills
This guide assumes that you have a basic knowledge of the hardware you are using: that is, the computers,
printers, network components, and especially the field devices and controllers, such as programmable logic
controllers (PLCs).
It also assumes that you have a basic familiarity with the Microsoft Windows operating systems that you are
using.
18
www.honeywell.com
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
How to use this guide
The configuration overview introduces you to the main configuration tasks and tools, and shows you where they
are described.
While server configuration is described in this guide, this guide does not provide controller-specific
configuration information. When configuring controllers for your system, you also need to see:
•
•
The controller-specific online reference information that comes with Quick Builder, for SCADA controllers.
The hardware documentation and third-party software documentation for the devices that you will be using
in your system.
19
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
20
www.honeywell.com
Configuration overview
This section introduces the configuration tasks and tools for Experion.
To configure Experion means to customize the Experion server database for your plant. It involves defining
communication connections, and the data acquisition and control that you want to implement at your site.
Configuration also involves setting up standard displays and reports, and a range of optional features such as
redundancy, point control scheduling, event archiving, recipes, and so on.
The configuration procedures described in this guide assume that you have already installed Experion software
as described in the Getting Started with Experion Software Guide.
21
CONFIGURATION OVERVIEW
Configuration environment and tools
A typical Experion environment features the following components:
•
•
•
•
One or more servers.
One or more Console Stations.
One or more Flex Stations and printers connected to the server. (In most basic systems, the Station software
and the server software run on the same computer.)
One or more controllers connected to the server, which depending on the interface may connect using a point
server.
You use Configuration Studio to configure your system. From Configuration Studio, the following tools are
launched:
•
•
•
•
•
Asset Builder and Alarm Group Builder (for configuring your asset model)
Quick Builder (for configuring Flex Stations, printers, channels, controllers other than the Experion Process
Controller, and points on those controllers)
Control Builder (for configuring control strategies on Experion Process Controllers)
System displays
HMIWeb Display Builder
Attention
Make sure that you are a member of the appropriate Windows group before performing a given configuration task. For
example, you need to be a member of both the Local Engineers group and the Product Administrators group for most
Experion engineering tasks. For more information, see the Network and Security Planning Guide.
Configuration Studio
Configuration Studio provides a central location from which you can configure your Experion system. The
individual tools required to configure parts of your system are launched from Configuration Studio.
In Configuration Studio, you are provided with a customized list of tasks that you are required to complete to
configure your System. When you click a task, the appropriate tool is launched so that you can complete the
task.
Asset Builder and Alarm Group Builder
Asset Builder and Alarm Group Builder are graphical tools for building your asset model and alarm groups.
Quick Builder
Quick Builder is a graphical tool for building the hardware items (Flex Stations, printers, controllers), and
standard points in your system.
After building items with Quick Builder, you download these items from Configuration Studio to the server
database.
The procedures you use to build items with Quick Builder are documented in the Quick Builder Guide.
Control Builder
Control Builder is a graphical tool for building your control strategy for Process controllers.
The procedures you use to build your control strategy are documented in the Control Building User's Guide.
System displays
System displays, called up in Configuration Studio, are used to configure items such as reports, group displays,
trends, Station settings, Console Stations, and so on.
22
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURATION OVERVIEW
The procedures you use to configure these items are documented in the Station Configuration Guide.
Display Builder
HMIWeb Display Builder allows you to create custom displays using Web-based features and save the displays
in HTML format.
HMIWeb Display Builder can run on the server or on another computer in your system.
The procedures you use to build custom displays are documented in the HMIWeb Display Building Guide.
Experion server utilities
Utilities that run on the server are available to assist you in configuration and administration tasks. Utilities that
apply to specific controllers, such as communications testing utilities, are described in the controller references.
General utilities are described in 'Command reference' section, and referred to throughout this guide.
Related topics
“Command reference” on page 597
23
CONFIGURATION OVERVIEW
Server scripting
You can extend the functionality of Experion by creating server scripts. As you configure your system, you may
want to create server scripts for:
•
•
•
Servers
Points
Reports
The type of script you want to create determines the tool you use. For example, if you want to create a script
that runs at specified times, you use Station to create the script. If you want to create a script that performs a
task when the status of a point changes, you use Quick Builder to create the script. For more information about
server scripting, see the Server Scripting Reference.
24
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURATION OVERVIEW
Using Experion data in other applications
Experion provides the following methods for accessing data:
•
•
•
The Experion OPC options enable Experion to exchange point and alarm/event data with third-party OPC
servers and clients.
The Microsoft Excel Data Exchange option enables you to capture real-time point value and history
information from Experion and display the data in an Excel spreadsheet.
The Experion Integrated Microsoft Excel reports also allow you to extract Experion data.
Related topics
“About Microsoft Excel Reports” on page 418
25
CONFIGURATION OVERVIEW
Configuration procedures
The table below shows the tasks for configuring Experion in their recommended sequence. The table also
shows:
•
•
•
Which procedures relate to licensable options.
Which procedures are optional (Optional procedure).
Where to find the information you need to complete the procedures.
Attention
While configuring Experion, it is recommended that you make regular backups (preferably daily). After configuration
is complete, make a full backup. For information on performing backups, see the Experion Backup and Restore Guide.
Table 1: Configuration procedures checklist
Tool
For details, see…
Add operators to Experion so No
that configuration engineers
can log on to Configuration
Studio.
Task
Licensable Option
Station
“Adding an operator
account” on page 324
Build your system model and No
asset model
Configuration Studio - Asset The "Enterprise Models"
Builder and Alarm Group
section of the Station
Builder
Planning Guide
Station Configuration Guide
Build Flex Station
Yes
Configuration Studio - Quick “Customizing Stations” on
Builder
page 61
Quick Builder Guide
Build printers
No
Configuration Studio - Quick “Customizing Stations” on
Builder
page 61
Quick Builder Guide
Define Station setup details,
and complete Station and
printer configuration
No
Station
“Customizing Stations” on
page 61
Configure server-wide
Station settings
No
Configuration Studio
“Customizing Stations” on
page 61
Define point servers to the
server
No
Configuration Studio
“Configuring system
interfaces” on page 161
Build flexible points and, if Yes (Flexible points)
required, create server scripts
Appropriate point server tool Device-specific
documentation
Configuration Studio - Quick
Builder
Server Scripting Reference
Station
Build your control strategy
26
Build a control strategy for
Process Controllers
Yes
Configuration Studio Control Builder
Build SCADA controllers
and the communications
paths from the controllers to
the server
Yes
Configuration Studio - Quick “Configuring controllers” on
Builder
page 167
Test communications
between the server and the
controllers
No
www.honeywell.com
Experion Process Software
documentation
Quick Builder online help
Controller-specific test
utilities
Help for your specific
controller
CONFIGURATION OVERVIEW
Task
Licensable Option
Tool
For details, see…
Build SCADA points
Yes
(analog, status, and
accumulator) on controllers
and, if required, create server
scripts
Configuration Studio - Quick “Points” on page 183
Builder
Quick Builder online help
Configure history collection
No
Configuration Studio
Configure system security
No
Configuration Studio - Quick “Configuring system
Builder
security” on page 303
Server Scripting Reference
“Viewing history collection
configuration” on page 249
Configure a redundant server Yes
system
Configuration Studio
“Configuring and monitoring
a redundant server system”
on page 421
Configure Console Station
Yes
Configuration Studio
“Console Stations ” on
page 41
Configure eServer
Yes
Station
“Configuring eServer” on
page 471
(Optional procedure)
No
Configuration Studio
“Group and trend displays”
on page 363
No
Configuration Studio
“Configuring reports” on
page 396
Configure groups and trends
(Optional procedure)
Configure pre-formatted
reports and create server
scripts to run on completion
of reports
Server Scripting Reference
Configure Point Control
Schedules
Yes
Configuration Studio
“Configuring schedules” on
page 497
Configure Recipes
Yes
Configuration Studio
“Recipes” on page 505
Configure Event Archiving
No
Configuration Studio
“Event Archiving” on
page 511
(Optional procedure)
Yes
Microsoft application
development tools
“Using Experion data in
other applications” on
page 25.
If required, create server
scripts
No
Configuration Studio
Server Scripting Reference
(Optional procedure)
No
Configuration Studio
HMIWeb Display Building
Guide
Yes
Experion Backup and
Restore
Experion Backup and
Restore Guide
Configure Microsoft Excel
Data Exchange.
Build custom displays and, if
required, create display
scripts
Perform backups
27
CONFIGURATION OVERVIEW
Checking your Experion license
The Server License Details display shows information about your Experion license. For example, it shows:
•
•
•
•
•
The number of points and Stations you have licensed. It also shows the number of points/Stations that have
already been built.
Whether you require a security key (a USB dongle that must be plugged into one of the server's USB ports).
The options you have licensed.
The interfaces you have licensed.
The engineering tools and libraries you have licensed.
To check which options are licensed
•
Choose Configure > Server License Details.
Related topics
“Configuring servers to subscribe to data and alarms” on page 465
28
www.honeywell.com
Assets and alarm groups
An enterprise model contains the asset model representing your system. An asset represents a particular physical
item, such as a piece of plant equipment, a production line or a building. For more information, see the
“Enterprise models” section of the Station Planning Guide.
Alarm groups provide a means to monitor a group of assets and/or points that are otherwise unrelated to one
another in the asset model. For more information, see “Alarm groups” topic in the “Alarms and events” section
of the Station Planning Guide.
Tip
Building and configuring assets and alarm groups are two steps within the process of implementing an enterprise
model. For more information, see the “Enterprise models” section of the Station Planning Guide.
The following topics describe how to build and modify asset models and alarm groups.
Related topics
“Building assets” on page 30
“Managing assets” on page 32
“Building alarm groups” on page 34
“Assigning points to alarm groups or assets” on page 36
“Managing alarm groups” on page 38
29
ASSETS AND ALARM GROUPS
Building assets
Prerequisites
•
•
•
You have read “Guidelines for designing asset models” topic in the “Enterprise models” section of the
Station Planning Guide.
You have launched Configuration Studio and connected to a server with a logon security level of Engineer
or greater.
If Quick Builder is running, close it.
To build assets
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Enterprise Model.
2
In the tasks window, click Build Assets.
The Asset Builder appears.
3
In the asset model tree, right-click on the parent for the new asset and choose Add Asset.
The Assets dialog appears.
4
Type the name of the asset and then click OK.
The new asset appears as a child of the parent asset. The tag name is automatically generated and is based on
the asset name that you typed.
5
Configure the properties of the asset.
6
Click Save on the Configuration Studio toolbar to save the asset model.
Next steps
•
You need to build and configure points using Quick Builder or Control Builder.
Related topics
“Assigning points to alarm groups or assets” on page 36
“Assets and Quick Builder” on page 31
“Assets and Control Builder” on page 31
“Modifying assets” on page 32
Asset properties reference
Property
Description
(Main Settings)
(Name)
The name of the asset.
This name must be unique with respect to sibling assets so that each asset can be easily
identified.
Description
A textual description of the asset.
Parent
The name of the parent asset. This name is automatically assigned according to the asset's
position in the asset tree.
Tag
The tag name of the asset. When you add an asset, the tag name is automatically generated
and is based on the asset name. You can change this tag name.
This tag name must be unique within the system. Tag names for items in the enterprise
model cannot be the same as point names or other tag names.
Displays Settings
30
www.honeywell.com
ASSETS AND ALARM GROUPS
Property
Description
Asset Detail Display
The file name of the detail display for the asset.
Associated Display
The file name of the associated display for the asset.
Parameters
Assignable
Yes or No. Determines whether the asset can be assigned or not, enabling you to control
access to the assets. Assignment could be to an operator, Station, or alarm group.
By associating points with assignable assets, you control access to those points.
Related topics
“Modifying assets” on page 32
Assets and Quick Builder
If you build a point in Quick Builder, and you enter an asset name that does not exist, when you next open Asset
Builder, this asset will appear as a new asset, which you can configure. If you download the point to the server
and the asset name does not exist, you will receive a download error message from Quick Builder that the parent
asset does not exist.
New assets appear as an asset changed icon (
is not yet saved.
). This indicates that the asset has been created or changed but
Asset Builder and Quick Builder cannot be open at the same time. Remember to save and close Quick Builder
before you start Asset Builder.
Related topics
“Assets and Control Builder” on page 31
“Building assets” on page 30
“Assigning points to alarm groups or assets” on page 36
Assets and Control Builder
If you start Asset Builder, and Control Builder is busy completing another task, you will be prompted to start
Asset Builder without retrieving points from Control Builder. If you choose to start Asset Builder, you can build
your assets, but you won't be able to see points assigned to an asset, or be able to assign points to assets.
If you build a point in Control Builder, and you enter an asset name that does not exist, when you next open
Asset Builder, this asset will appear as a new asset, which you can configure.
New assets appear as an asset changed icon (
is not yet saved.
). This indicates that the asset has been created or changed but
Related topics
“Assets and Quick Builder” on page 31
“Building assets” on page 30
“Assigning points to alarm groups or assets” on page 36
31
ASSETS AND ALARM GROUPS
Managing assets
You can modify the properties of an asset in the asset model, or delete the asset from the asset model.
You can move assets within the asset model by dragging and dropping assets items. You cannot copy assets.
The following topic describe how to manage assets.
Related topics
“Modifying assets” on page 32
“Deleting assets” on page 32
Modifying assets
Once an asset has been created, you can modify its properties.
Prerequisites
•
•
•
You have built an asset model and saved it to the server.
You have launched Configuration Studio and connected to a server with a logon security level of Engineer
or greater.
If Quick Builder is running, close it.
To modify an asset
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Enterprise Model.
2
In the tasks window, click Build Assets.
The Asset Builder appears.
3
In the asset model tree, click on the asset to be modified.
4
Modify the properties of the asset.
5
Click Save on the Configuration Studio toolbar to save the asset model.
Related topics
“Building assets” on page 30
“Asset properties reference” on page 30
Deleting assets
Deleting an asset removes it and any child assets (of the deleted asset) from the asset model.
Attention
If you delete an asset, any points that have been assigned to that asset will no longer be assigned, nor will they have
their access controlled by the asset. To control access to a point, it will need to be reassigned to an asset in the asset
) or can be found in the point picker.
model. Unassigned assets are assigned to the asset model parent node (
Prerequisites
•
•
•
32
You have built an asset model and saved it to the server.
You have launched Configuration Studio and connected to a server with a logon security level of Engineer
or greater.
If Quick Builder is running, close it.
www.honeywell.com
ASSETS AND ALARM GROUPS
To delete an asset
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Enterprise Model.
2
In the tasks window, click Build Assets.
The Asset Builder appears.
3
In the asset model tree, right-click on the asset to be removed and choose Delete.
The asset is immediately removed from the asset model.
4
Click Save on the Configuration Studio toolbar to save the asset model.
33
ASSETS AND ALARM GROUPS
Building alarm groups
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
•
You have read the “Understanding Alarm Groups and aggregate alarming” topic in the “Alarm Groups and
Aggregate Alarming” section of the Station Configuration Guide.
You have built an asset model and saved it to the server.
You have built and configured points, and downloaded them to the server.
You have launched Configuration Studio and connected to a server with a logon security level of Engineer
or greater.
If Quick Builder is running, close it.
To build alarm groups
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Enterprise Model.
2
In the tasks window, click Build Alarm Groups.
The Alarm Group Builder appears.
3
In the alarm group model tree, right-click on the parent for the new alarm group and choose Add Alarm
Group.
The Alarm Groups dialog appears.
4
Type the name of the alarm group and then click OK.
5
In the alarm group model tree, right-click on the parent alarm group, and choose Add Alarm Group.
The new alarm group appears as a child of the parent alarm group. The tag name is automatically generated
and is based on the alarm group name that you typed.
6
Configure the properties of the alarm group.
7
Click Save on the Configuration Studio toolbar to save the alarm group.
Related topics
“About Alarm Group icons” on page 35
“Deleting alarm groups” on page 38
Alarm group properties reference
Property
Description
(Main Settings)
(Name)
The name of the alarm group.
This name does not need to be unique, however, it should be unique with respect to sibling
alarm groups so that each alarm group can be easily identified.
Description
A textual description of the alarm group.
Parent
The name of the parent alarm group. This name is automatically assigned according to the
alarm group's position in the alarm group tree.
Tag
The tag name of the alarm group. When you add an alarm group, the tag name is
automatically generated and is based on the alarm group name. You can change this tag
name.
This tag name must be unique within the system. Tag names for items in the enterprise
model cannot be the same as point names or other tag names.
Displays Settings
34
www.honeywell.com
ASSETS AND ALARM GROUPS
Property
Description
Alarm Group Detail Display
The file name of the detail display for the alarm group.
Associated Display
The file name of the associated display for the alarm group.
Parameters
Associated Asset
The name of the associated asset for the alarm group.
The visibility of alarm groups within the Alarm Summary display can be controlled by
asset assignment if you associate an alarm group with an asset. If the asset is within the
operator's (or Station's) scope of responsibility, the alarm group is visible to the operator.
Related topics
“Modifying alarm groups” on page 38
About Alarm Group icons
New alarm groups appear as an alarm group changed icon (
created or changed but is not yet saved.
). This indicates that the alarm group has been
Related topics
“Building alarm groups” on page 34
35
ASSETS AND ALARM GROUPS
Assigning points to alarm groups or assets
You can assign points to assets in Asset Builder and you can assign points to alarm groups in Alarm Group
Builder.
Built and configured points are displayed in alphabetical order in the Points Picker. The currently assigned
points for a selected asset or alarm group are displayed in alphabetical order in the Associated Points pane.
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
You have built an asset model or an alarm group model, and saved it to the server.
You have built and configured points, and downloaded them to the server.
You have launched Configuration Studio and connected to a server with a logon security level of Engineer
or greater.
If Quick Builder is running, close it.
To assign points
1
In Asset Builder or Alarm Group Builder, select the asset or alarm group item to which you want to assign a
point.
The details for the selected asset or alarm group appears in the Properties and Associated Points pane.
2
Drag the point name from the Points Picker to the Associated Points pane.
The point is assigned to the selected asset or alarm group.
Tip
You can drag the point name from the Points (Engineering) Picker directly to the asset item in the asset model
tree or the alarm group item in the alarm group model tree.
3
Click Save on the Configuration Studio toolbar to save the asset model or alarm group model.
Related topics
“Building assets” on page 30
“Assets and Quick Builder” on page 31
“Assets and Control Builder” on page 31
About filtering points
The Points Picker displays a list of the point tag names. If the Include asset name in filter check box is
selected, the point tag names are grouped together by the asset name that the points are assigned to. If the
Include asset name in filter check box is cleared, only point tag names are displayed.
You can filter this list using the Filter box.
In the Filter box, you can type one or more alpha-numeric characters, including spaces. If the Include asset
name in filter check box is selected, only asset names and point tag names that contain the character sequence
that you type will appear. If the Include asset name in filter check box is cleared, only point tag names
containing the character sequence that you type will appear.
This character sequence can be anywhere within the point tag name or asset name.
To display all points, delete the contents of the Filter box.
Which points appear in the Points Picker?
The Points Picker displays a list of the point tag names.
In Asset Builder, points defined in Quick Builder and Control Builder (Engineering Points) appear in this list.
36
www.honeywell.com
ASSETS AND ALARM GROUPS
In Alarm Group Builder, points and assets that are defined on the server appear in this list. Only points that are
downloaded to the server, appear in this list.
37
ASSETS AND ALARM GROUPS
Managing alarm groups
You can modify the properties of an alarm group in the alarm group model, or delete the alarm group from the
alarm group model.
You can move alarm groups within the alarm group model by dragging and dropping alarm group items. You
cannot copy alarm groups.
The following topics describe how to manage alarm groups.
Related topics
“Modifying alarm groups” on page 38
“Deleting alarm groups” on page 38
Modifying alarm groups
Once an alarm group has been created, you can modify its properties.
Prerequisites
•
•
•
You have built an alarm group model and saved it to the server.
You have launched Configuration Studio and connected to a server with a logon security level of Engineer
or greater.
If Quick Builder is running, close it.
To modify an alarm group
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Enterprise Model.
2
In the tasks window, click Build Alarm Groups.
The Alarm Group Builder appears.
3
In the alarm group model tree, click on the alarm group to be modified.
4
Modify the alarm group properties.
5
Click Save on the Configuration Studio toolbar to save the alarm group model.
Related topics
“Alarm group properties reference” on page 34
Deleting alarm groups
Deleting an alarm group removes it and any nested alarm groups (of the deleted alarm group) from the alarm
group model.
Prerequisites
•
•
•
You have built an alarm group model and saved it to the server.
You have launched Configuration Studio and connected to a server with a logon security level of Engineer
or greater.
If Quick Builder is running, close it.
To delete an alarm group
1
38
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Enterprise Model.
www.honeywell.com
ASSETS AND ALARM GROUPS
2
In the tasks window, click Build Alarm Groups.
The Alarm Group Builder appears.
3
In the alarm group model tree, right-click on the alarm group to be removed and choose Delete.
The alarm group is removed from the alarm group model.
4
Click Save on the Configuration Studio toolbar to save the alarm group model.
Related topics
“Building alarm groups” on page 34
39
ASSETS AND ALARM GROUPS
40
www.honeywell.com
Console Stations
This section describes the tasks required to configure:
•
•
Console Stations
Console Extension Stations
Go to
Console Stations
“About Console Station” on
page 42
Configuring Console Stations
“Configuring a Console
Station” on page 46
Configuring Console Extension Stations
“Console Extension Stations
checklist” on page 52
Related topics
“About Console Station” on page 42
“Configuring a Console Station” on page 46
“Console Station system status” on page 51
“Console Extension Stations checklist” on page 52
“About alarm and message acknowledgement/silence synchronization” on page 55
“Sending displays to another Console Station” on page 56
“Configuring a Console Station for operator-based security” on page 323
“About scope of responsibility” on page 336
“About algorithms” on page 235
41
CONSOLE STATIONS
About Console Station
The Console Station provides direct access to process data and alarms and messages from Control Data Access
(CDA) sources such as Process Controllers. Each Console Station contains an Experion CDA server to
communicate directly with the CDA devices. This direct access provides a continuous view of your process,
even if the Experion server is unavailable.
After you configure the connection to the Experion server, the server database files are replicated to the Console
Station. This means that configuration of items such as process points is only done once. However, some
functionality such as reporting, history and events collection, and flexible point data are still provided by the
Experion server. Therefore whenever the Experion server is unavailable, this functionality is not available on
the Console Station.
A Console Station and Console Extension Station can operate in the following environments:
The following figure shows an example architecture including Console Stations.
Related topics
“Functionality available on Console Stations” on page 42
“Server wide settings” on page 102
Functionality available on Console Stations
The following functionality is always available on Console Stations regardless of the availability of the
Experion server:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
42
Data access from direct data sources such as Process Controllers
Notifications from direct sources
Security restrictions, for example security levels and asset assignments
Real-time trending of data from direct data sources such as Process Controllers
Event journaling of Console Station events such as operator actions, for example, acknowledging alarms and
logging on
Display printing
Backup and restore of the Console Station database
www.honeywell.com
CONSOLE STATIONS
Related topics
“About Console Station” on page 42
“What happens when the Experion server is unavailable” on page 43
“How server wide settings relate to Console Station” on page 44
“How global cache settings relate to Console Station” on page 44
“Console Station system status” on page 51
What happens when the Experion server is unavailable
When the Experion server becomes unavailable, for example during a server failover, an alarm is raised on the
Console Station to indicate that the Console Station is operating in a server unavailable mode. During this time,
the following functions on the Console Station are unavailable:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
History collection, assignment, retrieval and display
Trend configuration
Group configuration
Chart visualization (Embedded CB Charts/Forms)
Event and SOE Summary display
Alarm and event printing
Adding comments to alarms and events
Report requests or report printing
View or control of points and alarms from server connected controllers or other servers in a DSA
configuration
External alarm notification from server connected controllers
Configuration changes, for example server wide settings and asset assignment
Engineering Tools configuration load/upload and snapshot save/restore
CAUTION
To avoid synchronization issues while servers and Console Stations are offline, or while services are stopped,
avoid making Engineering changes to the system, such as adding controllers or changing tag names.
In addition, it is best practice to bring servers and Console Stations back online in the reverse order in which they
were taken offline. This also helps to reduce database-related synchronization issues.
Limitations when performing Engineering operations from a Console Station and the server is shut down
The following table shows the limitations when the server is shut down and you perform Engineering operations
from a Console Station.
Engineering operations performed when servers were running Limitations on starting up console after servers are shut down
and the Console Station was shut down
Load new points to the controller
Checkpoint files on the Console Station will not be latest.
Restoring from this checkpoint file will not include the
newly loaded point.
Rename the point
Alarms will be reported with the old point name instead of
newly renamed point.
Change Foundation Fieldbus Advanced Alarm configuration Foundation Fieldbus Advanced Alarm will be reported with
either old or empty conditions.
43
CONSOLE STATIONS
Engineering operations performed when servers were running Limitations on starting up console after servers are shut down
and the Console Station was shut down
Delete controller
Any active alarms on the deleted controller that appeared on
the console before shutting down will still appear to be in
alarm.
Once the server comes back online and the Console Station
synchronizes with the server, these active alarms from the
deleted controller will be removed from the console.
Related topics
“Functionality available on Console Stations” on page 42
How server wide settings relate to Console Station
The server wide settings that you can configure using the Server Wide Settings Station displays are applicable to
Stations. When you add a Console Station to your system, the server wide settings that have been defined on the
server to which the Console Station is connected are automatically applied to the Console Station. Server wide
settings include:
•
•
•
Startup displays
Timeouts
Alarm and event options
Related topics
“Functionality available on Console Stations” on page 42
“Server wide settings” on page 102
How global cache settings relate to Console Station
Console Station Subscription check time and Cache age time are fixed at 5 and 15 seconds respectively, and
cannot be changed.
Related topics
“Functionality available on Console Stations” on page 42
About Database and File Replication
To minimize the amount of configuration required for a system that includes Console Stations, files are
replicated from the Experion server to the Console Stations. After you configure the connection between the
Experion server and the Console Station, the server database is replicated to the Console Station. The data that
is replicated includes:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
44
Process points
Assets
Alarm groups
Asset assignment configuration
Profiles
Lists
Time Periods
Connection configuration
www.honeywell.com
CONSOLE STATIONS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Operator configuration
Trend assignment configuration
Group assignment configuration
System configuration
Acronyms
Printer configuration
Holiday configuration
Console Station configuration
Console configuration
Other files that need to be replicated to the Console Station include:
•
•
•
Custom displays
Summary views
Category and attribute mappings
You use the File Replication utility to replicate these types of files and any other custom files you want
replicated to the Console Station.
Related topics
“File replication” on page 479
Security
As with a Flex Station, you can use either Station-based or operator-based security with a Console Station and
Console Extension Station. You also use assignable assets to further limit access to your Experion system.
The type of security you choose for the Console Station applies to any connected Console Extension Stations.
Likewise, the asset assignment you apply to the Console Station also applies to any connected Console
Extension Stations.
If you are using operator-based security:
•
•
•
•
You need to define operators on the server as well as selecting the Operator signon required option when you
configure the Console Station.
You assign assets to operators.
You can assign assets to operators as well as Console Stations and configure your system so that the asset
assignment for both the operator and the Console Station or the console are checked before access is granted
to an asset.
You can also use integrated security. Integrated security allows you to combine Windows user accounts with
Experion operator accounts.
If you are using Station-based security, you assign assets to the Console Station.
If you have domain controllers you can use high security policy. High security policy enables you to use
Windows group policy to apply restrictions to particular groups of users.
Related topics
“Assigning scope of responsibility to operators or Windows group accounts” on page 333
“Combining operator and Station scope of responsibility” on page 340
“Assigning scope of responsibility to Console Stations” on page 339
45
CONSOLE STATIONS
Configuring a Console Station
To configure a Console Station you need to complete tasks on both the Experion server and the Console Station.
Prerequisites
•
•
•
You have completed all of the tasks for installing Experion Console Station. See the Getting Started with
Experion Software Guide.
You can verify hosts files are consistent among Stations and server when you use the hosts file verification
tool as documented in the section 'Verifying the hosts file'.
You have synchronized the date and time on the Console Station with the date and time on the server, as
documented in the section, 'Setting up date and time synchronization' in the Software Installation User’s
Guide.
Complete the following tasks on the server
Task
Go to
Configure Console Station details.
“Configuring Console Station
details” on page 47
Configure Console Station options
“Console Station options” on
page 48
Assign scope of responsibility to the Console Station
“Assigning scope of
responsibility to a Console
Station” on page 49
Configure File Replication so that any custom displays, summary
display views and mapping files (used for notification and category
attribute mapping) are replicated to the Console Station.
“File replication configuration
checklists” on page 482
If you have an OEP or IKB keyboard, configure LEDs.
“Configuring LEDs on operator
keyboards for Console Stations”
on page 49
If you are using operator-based security, define operators on the
Experion server.
“Adding an operator account” on
page 324
Optionally add Console Extension Stations to the Console Station
“Console Extension Stations
checklist” on page 52
If you have redundant servers, synchronize the servers so that the
Console Station configuration is replicated to the backup server.
“Synchronizing the server
databases” on page 433
Done
Complete the following tasks on the Console Station
Task
Go to
Configure the Station connection properties.
“Configuring the Station
connection properties on the
Console Station”
Create a file replication share.
“Preparing client computer(s) to
receive replicated files” on
page 488
Done
Results
•
Configuration of the Console Station is successful when:
– The server name appears in the Status Bar and there is no red LED. (A yellow LED indicates that the
Console Station is synchronizing with the server.)
46
www.honeywell.com
CONSOLE STATIONS
– The Node Status and the Station Status are set to OK on the Console Station Status Summary display.
If the configuration is not successful, see the Station Troubleshooting Guide.
Related topics
“Configuring Console Station details” on page 47
“Console Station configuration properties” on page 47
“Console Station options” on page 48
“Assigning scope of responsibility to a Console Station” on page 49
“Configuring LEDs on operator keyboards for Console Stations” on page 49
“Console Station tuning settings” on page 49
“Deleting a Console Station” on page 49
“Console Station system status” on page 51
Configuring Console Station details
This task can be done using any Station that is already connected to the same server to which the Console
Station is to be connected.
If you try to configure more Console Stations than you are licensed for, you receive an error message.
To configure Console Station details
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
2
Click the Configure Console Stations task.
The Console Station Configuration Summary display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration
Studio.
3
Click a blank row to call up the Console Station Configuration display.
4
In the Network Name box type the computer name of the Console Station.
5
If you want to specify operator-based security for this Console Station or for the Console Extension Stations
that connect to this Console Station, select Operator sign-on required.
6
Type the remaining required information as appropriate.
7
Click the Options tab and configure the options as appropriate.
Related topics
“Console Station configuration properties” on page 47
“Console Station options” on page 48
Console Station configuration properties
Property
Description
Network Name
The computer name of the Console Station computer.
Console extension stations
The number of Console Extension Stations that you want connected to
this Console Station.
Operator sign-on required
Specifies whether you want to use operator-based security for the Console
Station or Console Extension Stations that connect to this Console
Station.
Normal Update rate
The rate, in seconds, at which dynamic values on displays at this Console
Station are updated from the server database.
47
CONSOLE STATIONS
Property
Description
Fast update rate
An optional fast update rate, in seconds, that can be set by function key
for displays at this Console Station.
Station Alias
Applicable only if you are adding this Console Station to a console.
An alternative name for this Console Station that can be used to specify
the destination of a display when invoked from another Station within the
console. For more information about aliases see 'Sending displays using
aliases'.
Related topics
“Configuring Console Station details” on page 47
“Sending displays using aliases” on page 58
Console Station options
The following sections describe settings you define on the Options Tab of the Console Station display.
These options are the same as the options that can be configured for a Flex Station.
Property
Description
Start up page
Specifies the display called up on startup.
Change to start up page on idle timeout
If selected, when the idle timeout timer for the Station expires the display
specified as the startup display is called up.
Activate for LOW Alarms
Controls whether an audible alarm is sounded for low priority alarms.
Activate for HIGH Alarms
Controls whether an audible alarm is sounded for high priority alarms.
Activate for URGENT Alarms
Controls whether an audible alarm is sounded for urgent priority alarms.
Also activate when Operator is signed off
Controls whether an audible alarm is sounded when, under alarm conditions,
no operator is logged on to a Station configured for operator-based security
(that is, when the security level in the status bar is blank).
Station Failure Alarm
Controls whether an alarm is generated if communication to the Station is
lost.
Alarm/Event Printer
Specifies the printer designated to print alarms and events.
Report Printer
Specifies the printer designated to print reports.
Print LOW alarms
Enables printing of alarms for points going in and out of low priority alarm
conditions.
Print HIGH alarms
Enables printing of alarms for points going in and out of high priority alarm
conditions.
Print URGENT alarms
Enables printing of alarms for points going in and out of urgent priority alarm
conditions.
Print EVENTS
Enables printing of alarms for points going in and out of journal priority
alarm conditions and other events.
Print Operator changes
Enables printing of all changes to points an operator has made from the
Station.
Related topics
“Configuring Console Station details” on page 47
“Sending displays using aliases” on page 58
“Flex Station Configuration Display” on page 109
48
www.honeywell.com
CONSOLE STATIONS
Assigning scope of responsibility to a Console Station
To assign scope of responsibility to a Console Station
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
2
Click the Configure Console Stations task.
The Console Station Configuration Summary display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration
Studio.
3
Click the Console Station to which you want to assign assets.
4
Click the Assignment tab.
5
Select the check boxes for each asset, Network item and System Component you want to assign to this
Console Station.
Configuring LEDs on operator keyboards for Console Stations
Each LED on the IKB or OEP keyboards can be associated with a point. When the point goes into alarm, the
associated operator keyboard LED shows the highest priority alarm.
You only need to do this task if you are using either the IKB or the OEP keyboard.
Prerequisites
•
You have installed the appropriate drivers and connected the keyboard. For these instructions, see the topic
“Installing specialized hardware on a computer” in the Supplementary Installation Tasks Guide.
To configure LEDs
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
2
Click the Configure Console Stations task.
The Console Station Configuration Summary display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration
Studio.
3
Click Console Station for which you want to configure LEDs to call up the Console Station Configuration
display.
4
Click the Operator Keyboard tab.
5
For every LED you want to associate with a point, type the point ID in the corresponding LED key number
box.
Console Station tuning settings
CDA cache flush and age time values only affect server-connected flex stations. Console station flush and age
times are fixed at 5 and 15 seconds.
Deleting a Console Station
If required, you can delete the connection between the Experion server and the Console Station. For example, if
you wanted to move the Console Station and connect it to a different Experion server, you would need to delete
the connection from the original Experion server.
If the Console Station you are deleting has any Console Extension Stations, these are deleted when you delete
the Console Station.
You can delete a Console Station from any Flex Station or any Console Station other than the Console Station
you are deleting.
49
CONSOLE STATIONS
You require a security level of ENGR to delete a Console Station.
Prerequisites
•
•
Any Console Extension Stations are disconnected from the Console Station.
From another Station, verify that the Node Status of the Console Station that you are deleting is
Disconnected. To disconnect a Console Station, shutdown the Console Station node.
To delete a Console Station
1
In Station call up the Console Station Configuration Summary display.
2
Click the Console Station you want to delete.
3
Click Delete.
4
Click Yes to confirm the deletion.
To delete the Experion operational database file from the Console Station
50
1
In the Windows Control Panel large or small icon view, click Administrative Tools.
2
Double-click Services.
The Services window is displayed.
3
Right-click Experion PKS GCL Name Server, and then click Stop.
A message appears advising that other Experion PKS services will stop.
4
Click Yes.
The services are stopped.
5
In Windows Explorer, go to <data
6
Delete the Experion operational database file (EPKSOperationalDB.sdf).
www.honeywell.com
folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\SRDB.
CONSOLE STATIONS
Console Station system status
Node definition
Property
Description
Network Name
The name of the node as it appears on the network.
IP address
The IP address of the node.
Station status
Property
Description
Status
The status of the Console Station.
Keyboard type
The type of keyboard attached to the Console Station
•
•
•
12 function key keyboard
Integrated keyboard (IKB)
Operator Entry Panel (OEP)
Network name
The computer name of the Console Station computer as it appears on the
network.
IP address
The IP address of the Console Station.
Operator
The name of the operator currently logged on to the Console Station.
Node status
Property
Description
Show details/Hide details
Show and hides node status details.
Datacast
The state of datacast on this node.
File replication
The state of file replication on this node.
Point replication
The state of point replication on this node.
File redirection
The state of file redirection on this node.
Point redirection
The state of point redirection on this node.
Notification redirection
The state of notification redirection on this node.
Related topics
“Configuring a Console Station” on page 46
“Functionality available on Console Stations” on page 42
51
CONSOLE STATIONS
Console Extension Stations checklist
The tasks you need to complete to add a Console Extension Station are:
Task
Go to
Done
Add Console Extension Stations to the Console Station
Configure connection properties
“Configuring the connection
properties on a Console Extension
Station” on page 53
Provide access to custom displays by doing one of the following:
•
Configure File Replication so that any custom displays are
replicated to the Console Extension Station.
“File replication” on page 479
•
Configure the Console Extension Station to directly access custom
displays on the Console Station.
“Configuring a Console
Extension Station to access
custom displays on the Console
Station” on page 54
Related topics
“Adding Console Extension Stations” on page 52
“Console Extension Station configuration properties” on page 53
“About Console Extension Stations” on page 53
“Configuring the connection properties on a Console Extension Station” on page 53
“Configuring a Console Extension Station to access custom displays on the Console Station” on page 54
Adding Console Extension Stations
Attention
If you try to add more Console Extension Stations the you are licensed for, you receive an error message.
To add Console Extension Stations
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
2
Click the Configure Console Stations task.
The Console Station Configuration Summary display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration
Studio.
3
Click the name of the Console Station to which you want to add Console Extension Stations.
This calls up the Console Station Configuration display.
4
In the Console Extension Stations box, select the required number of Console Extension Stations to be
connected to the Console Station.
You can specify a maximum of 3 per Console Station.
5
Type the remaining required information for each Console Extension Station as appropriate.
Related topics
“About Console Extension Stations” on page 53
“Console Extension Station configuration properties” on page 53
52
www.honeywell.com
CONSOLE STATIONS
Console Extension Station configuration properties
Property
Description
Console Extension Stations
The number of Console Extension Stations to be connected to the Console
Station. The maximum is 3.
Normal Update rate
The rate, in seconds, at which dynamic values on displays at this Console
Extension Station are updated from the server database.
Fast update rate
An optional fast update rate, in seconds, that can be set by function key
for displays at this Console Extension Station.
Station Alias
Applicable only if you are adding the associated Console Station to a
console.
An alternative name for this Console Extension Station that can be used
to specify the destination of a display when invoked from another Station
within the console. For more information about aliases, see 'Sending
displays using aliases'.
Related topics
“Adding Console Extension Stations” on page 52
“About Console Extension Stations” on page 53
About Console Extension Stations
For each Console Station, you can connect up to three Console Extension Stations. Console Extension Stations
connect to a Console Station in the same way a Flex Station connects to an Experion server.
A Console Extension Station uses the configuration settings from the Console Station to which it is connected.
The configuration settings obtained from the Console Station are:
•
•
•
•
The type of security
Asset assignment
Startup page, idle timeout, alarm settings, printer settings
LED configuration for operator keyboards (IKB or OEP keyboards)
The Console Extension Station needs to have access to custom displays. There are two options for providing
access to custom displays:
•
•
Configure the Console Extension Station to access the custom displays on the Console Station
Replicate the custom displays to the Console Extension Station
Related topics
“Adding Console Extension Stations” on page 52
“Console Extension Station configuration properties” on page 53
Configuring the connection properties on a Console Extension Station
To configure connection properties on a Console Extension Station
1
Start the Console Extension Station.
2
Choose Start > All Programs > Honeywell Experion PKS > Console Station > Station.
3
Choose Station > Connect.
The Connect dialog box opens.
53
CONSOLE STATIONS
4
Select default.stn and click Edit.
The Connection Properties dialog box opens.
5
Click the Console Station connection type.
6
In the Console Station list type the name of the Console Station to which this Console Extension Station is
connecting.
7
In the Station Number box, type the connection number.
The connection number can be 2, 3, or 4.
8
Click the required window mode.
9
Click Save.
Configuring a Console Extension Station to access custom displays on the Console Station
You can map a network drive to the custom displays folder on the Console Station computer or you can use a
UNC path to specify the location of the custom displays folder on the Console Station.
You only need to perform this procedure if you are not configuring File Replication to replicate custom displays
to Console Extension Stations. (For information on configuring File Replication see “Checklist: File replication
for a Console Extension Station”.
To configure the Console Extension Station to access custom displays
1
Start the Console Extension Station.
2
Choose Start > All Programs > Honeywell Experion PKS > Console Station > Station.
3
Choose Station > Connect.
The Connect dialog box opens.
4
Select default.stn and click Edit.
The Connection Properties dialog box opens.
5
Click the Displays tab.
6
Modify the path to the custom displays as appropriate:
If:
Do this
You are using a UNC path
For Windows 7: Change C:Program Files\Honeywell\Experion
PKS\Client\Abstract to \\ ConsoleStation \c$Program Files
\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\Abstract, where
ConsoleStation is the computer name of the Console Station.
For Windows Server 2008: Change C:ProgramData\Honeywell
\Experion PKS\Client\Abstract to \\ ConsoleStation \c
$ProgramData\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\Abstract, where
ConsoleStation is the computer name of the Console Station.
You are using a mapped drive
For Windows 7: Change the drive letter in C:\Program Files
\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\Abstract to the drive letter to
which you mapped the Abstract folder.
For Windows Server 2008: Change the drive letter in C:\ProgramData
\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\Abstract to the drive letter to
which you mapped the Abstract folder.
Custom displays are stored in a folder other
than the Abstract folder
7
Add your custom displays path to the to the Search for displays in
box.
Click Save.
Related topics
“Checklist: File replication for client computers” on page 484
54
www.honeywell.com
CONSOLE STATIONS
About alarm and message acknowledgement/silence synchronization
The Alarm and Message Summaries on a Console Station are independent of the Alarm and Message
Summaries on the Experion server and any other Console Stations. This allows the Alarm Summary and
Message Summary on a Console Station to receive alarms and messages (from all points and controllers
connected directly to the Console Station node) when the Experion server is unavailable. In addition, the alarms
and messages can be acknowledged, confirmed and silenced when the Experion server is unavailable. This
ensures continuous availability regardless of the operational state of the server.
In the event that an action such as alarm or message acknowledgment occurs when the Experion server is
unavailable, synchronization of that action is maintained between available Console Stations. Synchronization
with the server occurs when the Experion server becomes available.
Alarm acknowledgement and shelving
In a system, the default alarm acknowledgement/shelving behavior is such that when an alarm is acknowledged
or shelved on a Station, either a Console Station, Console Extension Station, or a Flex Station, the alarm is
acknowledged or shelved on all Stations.
55
CONSOLE STATIONS
Sending displays to another Console Station
In a console, you can configure keyboard shortcuts, toolbar buttons or display scripts that enable an operator to
send the current display or the next display to another Station within the console.
For information about creating display scripts to send displays to other Stations within the console, see
'Example Scenarios' in the HMIWeb Display Building Guide.
You can send system displays or custom displays created with HMIWeb Display Builder or Display Builder.
You cannot send web pages or other documents.
Filtered views may not be maintained when sending a display to another station.
Related topics
“Sending the current display to another Console Station” on page 56
“Sending the next display to another Console Station” on page 57
“Sending displays using aliases” on page 58
Sending the current display to another Console Station
To send displays to another Console Station
1
Create a new command to send the current display.
2
Apply the keyboard shortcut to the new command.
3
Save these customizations in an .stb file.
4
Copying the .stb file to all Stations within the console.
Example
You have a console called ConsoleA. Within ConsoleA you have Console Stations and Console Extension
Stations, CStn01-1, CStn02-1, CStn02-2. You want operators to use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+K to send
the current display to CStn02-2.
This solution assumes:
•
The default.stb file has not been customized and is used as the basis for creating console.stb.
To implement the solution:
1. In Station choose File > Connection Properties.
The Connection Properties dialog box opens.
2. Click the Toolbars tab.
3. In the Menu, toolbar & keyboard shortcuts box, specify default.stb.
4. Click Customize.
The Customize dialog box opens.
5. Click New Command.
The Command Properties dialog box opens.
6. In the Name box, type Current display to CStn02-2.
7. Place the cursor in the Enter keyboard shortcut box and press CTRL+K.
8. From the Action list, select Current Display to.
9. In the Location box, type CStn02-2.
10. Click OK.
56
www.honeywell.com
CONSOLE STATIONS
11. Click Save As.
12. In the File Name box, type Console.stb.
Attention
Ensure you save the file to the <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\MenusAndToolbars
folder.
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data
folder> is C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only
visible if you select the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog
box. To change this setting in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options, and then
click the View tab.
13. Click Save.Console.stb is now listed in the Menu, toolbar & keyboard shortcuts box.
14. Click Save to save Console.stb in the connection properties.
Related topics
“Sending displays to another Console Station” on page 56
“Station setup files” on page 81
Sending the next display to another Console Station
To send the next display to another Console Station
1
Creating a new command to send the next display.
2
Applying the keyboard shortcut to the new command.
3
Saving these customizations in an .stb file. For the purpose of this example, console.stb is used.
4
Copying the console.stb file to all Stations within the console.
Example
You have a console called ConsoleA. Within ConsoleA you have Console Stations and Console Extension
Stations, CStn01-1, CStn02-1, CStn02-2. You want operators to use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+N to send
the next display called up to CStn02-2.
This solution assumes:
•
The default.stb file has not been customized and is used as the basis for creating console.stb.
To implement the solution:
1. In Station choose File > Connection Properties.
The Connection Properties dialog box opens.
2. Click the Toolbars tab.
3. In the Menu, toolbar & keyboard shortcuts box, specify default.stb.
4. Click Customize.
The Customize dialog box opens.
5. Click New Command.
The Command Properties dialog box opens.
6. In the Name box, type Next display to CStn02-2.
7. Place the cursor in the Enter keyboard shortcut box and press CTRL+N.
8. From the Action list, select Next Display to.
57
CONSOLE STATIONS
9. In the Location box, type CStn02-2.
10. Click OK.
11. Click Save As.
12. In the File Name box, type Console.stb.
Attention
Ensure you save the file to the <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\MenusAndToolbars
folder.
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data
folder> is C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only
visible if you select the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog
box. To change this setting in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options, and then
click the View tab.
13. Click Save.Console.stb is now listed in the Menu, toolbar & keyboard shortcuts box.
14. Click Save to save Console.stb in the connection properties.
Related topics
“Sending displays to another Console Station” on page 56
“Station setup files” on page 81
Sending displays using aliases
To send displays using aliases
1
Creating a new command to send the current display.
2
Applying the keyboard shortcut to the new command.
3
Saving these customizations in an .stb file. For the purpose of this example, console.stb is used.
4
Copying the console.stb file to all Stations within the console.
Example
You have a console called ConsoleA. Within ConsoleA you have Console Stations and Console Extension
Stations, CStn01-1, CStn02-1, CStn02-2. You want operators to use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+U to send
the current display to CStn02-2 using the alias.
This solution assumes:
•
•
The default.stb file has not been customized and is used as the basis for creating console.stb.
The alias for CStn02-2 is Right.
To implement the solution:
1. In Station choose File > Connection Properties.
The Connection Properties dialog box opens.
2. Click the Toolbars tab.
3. In the Menu, toolbar & keyboard shortcuts box, specify default.stb.
4. Click Customize.
The Customize dialog box opens.
5. Click New Command.
The Command Properties dialog box opens.
58
www.honeywell.com
CONSOLE STATIONS
6. In the Name box, type Current display to Right.
7. Place the cursor in the Enter keyboard shortcut box and press CTRL+U.
8. From the Action list, select Current Display to.
9. In the Location box, type Right.
10. Click OK.
11. Click Save As.
12. In the File Name box, type Console.stb.
Attention
Ensure you save the file to the <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\MenusAndToolbars
folder.
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data
folder> is C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only
visible if you select the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog
box. To change this setting in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options, and then
click the View tab.
13. Click Save.Console.stb is now listed in the Menu, toolbar & keyboard shortcuts box.
14. Click Save to save Console.stb in the connection properties.
Related topics
“Console Station configuration properties” on page 47
“Console Station options” on page 48
“Sending displays to another Console Station” on page 56
“About using aliases to send displays” on page 59
“Station setup files” on page 81
About using aliases to send displays
If you specified a Station alias when you configured your Console Station you can use the alias to specify the
destination when you configure shortcuts or menus to send displays to other Stations within the console.
Using the alias as the destination enables you to reuse customized shortcut keys menus or display scripts for
other consoles, assuming that the aliases are the same in all your consoles.
The following figure shows three separate consoles using the Station aliases Left, Center, Right. In this
situation you could reuse your customized .stb file in all consoles if you configure your keyboard shortcuts or
toolbar buttons using the Alias as the destination rather than the Station name.
59
CONSOLE STATIONS
ConsoleA
Left
Center
Right
CStn01-1
CStn02-1
CStn02-2
ConsoleB
Left
Center
Right
CStn03-1
CStn03-2
CStn03-3
ConsoleC
Left
Center
Right
CStn04-1
CStn05-1
CStn05-2
Related topics
“Sending displays using aliases” on page 58
60
www.honeywell.com
Customizing Stations
The following topics describe how to customize Station.
Related topics
“About customizing Station” on page 62
“Configuring startup displays” on page 63
“Configuring timeouts” on page 66
“Setting the fast raise/lower step” on page 68
“Specifying associated Stations” on page 69
“Customizing toolbars, menus, and keyboard shortcuts” on page 70
“Specialized keyboards” on page 77
“Setting up Station Help” on page 80
“Station setup files” on page 81
“Understanding update rates” on page 84
“Accessing Experion using Internet Explorer” on page 85
“Improving the rendering of display objects in Station” on page 86
“Connection Properties” on page 87
“Customize dialog box” on page 92
“Server wide settings” on page 102
“Flex Station Configuration Display” on page 109
“Station.ini” on page 112
“Environment variables” on page 116
“Configuring setup files” on page 122
“Customizing Station for use with high screen resolutions” on page 127
“Points” on page 183
“Configuring controllers” on page 167
61
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
About customizing Station
After you have built a Station and have successfully connected to the server, the Station should be operational.
Depending on your site, you may want to customize the Station so that it operates in a particular manner. For
example, you may want a specific display to appear when an operator logs on, or specify that the operator is
logged off if there is no operator interaction after a certain amount of time.
62
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Configuring startup displays
A startup display is the display shown when Station first connects to the server. Startup displays can be
configured in different ways.
•
•
If you configure a startup display in more than one way, Experion chooses one of those configurations to
take precedence over the others. For more information, see “Which startup display configuration takes
precedence? ” on page 64
If you do not explicitly configure a startup display, Experion calls up sysStartupPage.htm (the initial default
setting on the Server Wide Settings display) on startup.
Overview of configuration procedures for startup displays
The configuration procedures for startup displays are summarized below. The procedures are different for
operator-based and Station-based security, and if you are using Station-based security, the configuration
procedures also vary according to the type of Station you are configuring.
•
Operator-based security.
•
You can configure the startup display for an individual operator (or group of operators) on the Advanced tab
of the Operator configuration display (sysCfgOperAdvanced.htm).
Station-based security.
Depending on whether you are configuring a rotary or static Flex Station, or a Console Station, you can
configure a startup display from the:
– Connection Properties dialog box. This dialog box is only available for rotary Flex Stations.
– Flex Stations configuration display (sys009.dsp). This applies to Flex Stations (rotary or static) but not
Console Stations.
– Server Wide Settings display (sys008.dsp).
– Console Station configuration display (sysCfgCStnOptions.dsp). This applies to Console Stations only.
– Console configuration display (sysCfgConOptions.dsp). The settings in this display apply only to
Console Stations that are in this Console and have the Use Console settings for Station configuration
option enabled.
To configure a startup display for an individual operator or a group of operators
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click System Acess.
2
Click the Configure operators and Windows group accounts task.
The Operators Summary display appears.
3
Click the relevant operator (or operators group) to call up the General tab of the Operator/Windows Group
display for that operator (or group).
4
On the Advanced tab under Session Settings, enable the Startup display option and type the required page
name or number in the box beside the option.
To configure a system-wide default startup display
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
2
Click the Configure server wide Station settings task.
The Server Wide Settings display appears.
3
On the General tab, under Startup page, type the required page name or number in the Default system
start up page box.
To configure a startup display for a Flex Station (rotary or static) using the Station configuration display
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
63
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
2
Click the Configure Flex Stations task.
The Flex Station Configuration Summary display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration
Studio.
3
In the Flex Stations summary display, click the number or title of the Station you want to configure.
The General tab of the Flex Station configuration display appears.
4
In the Start up page box under Start up/Idle Timeout Action, type the required page name or number, and
enable the Change to start up page on idle time out setting.
To configure a startup display for a rotary Flex Station using the Connection Properties dialog box
1
On the rotary Station, choose Station > Connection Properties.
The Connection Properties dialog box opens.
2
On the Connections tab click the Advanced button.
3
In the Startup display box, type the number or name of the display that you want to use as the startup
display for this rotary Station.
4
Click Save.
To configure a startup display for a Console Station
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
2
Click the Configure Console Stations task.
The Console Stations summary display appears.
3
Click the Console Station you want to configure.
4
Click the Options tab.
5
In the Start up page box under Start up/Idle Timeout Action, type the required name or number and
enable the Change to start up page on idle time out setting.
Related topics
“Connection Properties” on page 87
“Operator definition, Advanced tab” on page 328
“Flex Station Configuration Display” on page 109
“About alarms and events for standard points” on page 219
“Determining the security settings for Windows group operators” on page 330
Which startup display configuration takes precedence?
The startup display configuration that takes precedence depends on whether your system is using operator-based
security or Station-based security.
Operator-based security
If you do not configure the startup display for an individual operator (or group of operators) on the Advanced
tab of the Operator configuration display (sysCfgOperAdvanced.htm), Experion calls up sysStartupPage.htm (or
whichever display is specified as the default startup display on the Server Wide Settings display).
•
•
•
64
A user “overrides” the operator who currently signed in.
An “override” is ended.
No “default” account is configured in Experion (either directly or via Windows Groups).
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Station-based security
The following tables list the ways in which you can configure startup displays for Flex Stations and Console
Stations under Station-based security, and show the order of precedence used when startup displays are defined
in multiple configuration displays.
If you do not explicitly define a startup display, Experion calls up sysStartupPage.htm (the initial default setting
on the Server Wide Settings display) on startup.
Table 2: Order of precedence used for startup displays on Flex Stations using Station-based security
Configuration display
Rotary
Static
Connection Properties dialog box for rotary Stations
1
Not applicable
Flex Stations configuration display (sys009.dsp)
2
1
Server Wide Settings display (sys008.dsp)
3
2
Table 3: Order of precedence used for startup displays on Console Stations using Station-based security
Configuration display
Not in a Console
In a Console and
configured to use Console
settings
In a Console but not
configured to use Console
settings
Console Station Configuration display
(sysCfgCStnOptions.dsp)
1
Not applicable
1
Console Configuration display
(sysCfgConOptions.dsp)
Not applicable
1
Not applicable
Server Wide Settings display (sys008.dsp)
2
2
2
Examples
•
•
If a Flex Station on a rotary connection has no startup display configured in the Connection Properties
dialog box or in the Flex Stations configuration display for that Station but sys011 is specified as the
startup display on the General tab of the Server Wide Settings display, then sys011 is displayed on that
Flex Station at startup.
If a Console Station is in a Console that is configured to use Console settings for Station configuration,
and sys011 has been defined as the startup display in the Console configuration display, then sys011.dsp
is the display that will be called up on startup regardless of what has been defined as the startup display in
the Server Wide Settings display.
65
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Configuring timeouts
You can configure a timeout period for:
•
Alphanumeric objects on a Station display.
•
This is known as “select timeout.” Select timeout is configured on a server-wide basis. When the select
timeout period is exceeded, any selected alphanumeric on a Station display is automatically deselected.
Operator inactivity on a Station.
This is known as “idle timeout.” You configure idle timeouts if you do not want operators to remain logged
on to a Station after a given period of inactivity.
For static Flex Stations and Console Stations, idle timeouts can be configured on either a:
– Server-wide basis, or
– Per operator basis (if you are using operator-based security)
For rotary Flex Stations, you configure the idle timeout period on the Station’s Connection Properties
dialog box.
Note that if you enable idle timeout and specify:
– A value of 0 seconds, then the system will never time out.
– A value greater than 0 seconds but less than 60 seconds, the value is rounded up to 60 seconds.
To configure a timeout period for rotary Flex Stations
1
On the rotary Flex Station choose Station > Connection Properties.
The Connection Properties dialog box opens.
2
On the Connections tab click the Advanced button.
3
In the Communications timeout box, type the required timeout period for this rotary Flex Station.
4
Click Save.
To configure an operator-based idle timeout for static Flex Stations and Console Stations
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click System Access.
2
Click the Configure operators and Windows group accounts task.
The Operators Configuration Summary display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click the relevant operator (or operators group) to call up the Operators configuration display.
4
On the Advanced tab under Session Settings, enable the Idle timeout option and specify a timeout period.
To configure server wide settings for idle timeout and select timeout
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
2
Click the Configure server wide Station settings task.
The Server Wide Settings display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
On the General tab, under Timeouts, specify the timeout period (in seconds) in the Select timeout and Idle
timeout boxes.
Related topics
“What happens when there is an idle time out?” on page 67
“Server wide settings” on page 102
66
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
What happens when there is an idle time out?
Idle timeouts work differently depending on the type of Station being used.
Rotary Flex Station
When the idle timeout period is exceeded without any operator activity on a rotary Flex Station, the Station is
disconnected and the operator is required to reconnect. This applies regardless of whether you are using Stationbased or operator-based security in your system.
The idle timeout settings configured in the Connection Properties dialog box for a rotary FlexStation override
any operator-based or server-wide idle timeout settings.
Static Flex Stations and Console Stations
When the idle timeout period is exceeded without any operator activity on a static Flex Station or Console
Station, the idle timeout action is different for Station-based security and operator-based security.
•
•
If you use Station-based security, the security level reverts to the lowest level of security and (optionally) a
pre-configured display appears.
If you use operator-based security and Change to startup page on idle time out is enabled for that operator
(or group of operators), Station displays the specified startup page and the Log in dialog box. If Change to
startup page on idle time out is not enabled, Station does not change from the current display but displays
the Log in dialog box.
Operator-based time-out settings override any server-wide idle timeout configuration when that operator (an
operator in that group) is logged on to Station.
•
If an operator is a member of more than one group, refer to “Determining the security settings for Windows
group operators” on page 330 for information on how the idle timeout period is determined.
If you use operator-based security, any server-wide and operator-based idle timeout settings are ignored, and
there is no idle timeout except on rotary Flex Stations, which time out after the idle timeout period specified
in the Connection Properties dialog box.
Related topics
“Configuring timeouts” on page 66
“Adding an operator account” on page 324
“Server wide settings” on page 102
Turning off select timeout for faceplates
The default behavior of selection on faceplates, including faceplates in detail and group displays, is to time out.
Note that you can set the time period after which this selection is removed. This is the system select timeout,
which is configured on the Server Wide Settings display.
To turn off the select timeout for faceplates
1
In Station choose Station > Connect.
The Connection Properties dialog box opens.
2
Click the Advanced button.
3
In the grid find the entry for IgnoreDeselectOnFacePlates and set its value to 1.
(To allow select timeouts on faceplates, set this value to 0.)
4
Click Save.
67
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Setting the fast raise/lower step
The fast raise/lower function key can be used to change the value of a selected object on a Station display by a
set percentage amount. This procedure describes how to set the percentage amount.
Before you set the fast raise/lower step, you should consider the following points:
•
•
If an operator uses the fast raise/lower keys to change the value of a point beyond the configured limit, the
result depends on the type of point being controlled:
– For standard points (Experion's inbuilt point types), the value is set to the configured limit.
– For Process points, if clamping has been configured, the value is set to the configured limit. If clamping
has not been configured, the command is ignored.
You need to consider the tolerance levels that can be applied to outputs and set points. The tolerance level
limits the size of changes made to the output and set point parameters so they cannot BUMP the process.
– If an operator enters a value and the controller returns an 'out of tolerance' error, the operator will be
asked to confirm the value entered. If the value is confirmed, the value will be accepted. If the value is
not confirmed, the control will be cancelled.
– If an operator enters a value and the controller returns an 'exceeds limit' error, the value is treated as an
error and the control is cancelled.
The 'out of tolerance' and 'exceeds limit' errors are automatically handled by the raise/lower step so that
you can exceed the tolerance level but the parameter value cannot be driven past at the limit.
To specify the fast raise/lower step
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
2
Click the Configure server-wide Station settings task.
The Server-wide Station settings display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
On the General tab, enter the required percentage increment/decrement in the Fast raise/lower step box.
Related topics
“General tab, server wide settings” on page 102
68
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Specifying associated Stations
You can configure a Flex Station so that particular displays are “sent” to one of three other Flex Stations. The
Station to which the display is sent is known as an “Associated Station”. You can configure keyboard shortcuts
to send the current display to the associated Stations or you can specify that Detail displays, Group displays,
Trend displays and a point’s Associated display are always sent to one of the three associated Stations. By
default, the keyboard shortcut ALT+F8 is configured to send a display to the first associated Station. You need
to configure two other keyboard shortcuts to send the current display to the second and third associated Stations.
To configure associated Stations
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
2
Click the Configure Flex Station task.
The Flex Station Configuration Summary display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration
Studio.
3
Click the Flex Station you want to configure.
4
Enter the Station numbers for the first, second and third associated Stations.
5
If appropriate, select the associated Station that you want Detail, Group, Trend and Associated displays sent
to.
6
Create a command using the action Request Task and set parameter 1 to 19 and parameter 2 to either 2 for
associated Station 2 or 3 for associated Station 3.
7
Assign a keyboard shortcut to the command.
Related topics
“Server display program parameters and action” on page 95
69
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Customizing toolbars, menus, and keyboard shortcuts
The following topics describe how to customize toolbars, menu, and keyboard shortcuts.
Related topics
“Creating a new command” on page 70
“Editing an existing command” on page 71
“Adding a command to a menu” on page 72
“Adding a command to a toolbar” on page 72
“Assigning a keyboard shortcut to a command” on page 73
“Creating a new menu” on page 73
“Creating a new toolbar” on page 74
“Example scenario” on page 74
“Station setup files” on page 81
“Toolbars tab, Connection properties” on page 89
“Changing the behavior of LEDs on a specialized keyboard” on page 77
“About customizing keys” on page 125
“Adding a button to Station's toolbar to reset faceplates to their default positions” on page 152
“Configuring faceplates” on page 149
“Navigation methods to group displays” on page 365
“How reports are used” on page 402
Creating a new command
To create a new command
1
In Station choose Station > Connection Properties.
The Connection Properties dialog box opens.
2
Click the Toolbars tab.
3
In the Menu, toolbar & keyboard shortcuts box, specify the .stb file you want to customize.
4
Click Customize.
The Customize dialog box opens.
5
Click New Command.
The Command Properties dialog box opens.
6
Type a name for the command.
7
If applicable, enter a tool tip.
8
If applicable, place the cursor in the Enter keyboard shortcut box and press the keyboard shortcut keys.
9
If applicable, click Assign Icon and select the appropriate icon.
10 Select the required action from the Action list.
11 Specify any other required information for the action you have selected.
12 Click OK.
13 Click Save As and specify a new .stb filename to save your settings.
70
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Attention
Ensure you save the file to the <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\MenusAndToolbars folder.
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder> is
C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only visible if you select
the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog box. To change this setting
in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options, and then click the View tab.
14 Click Save to save the reference to the new. stb file in the current .stn file or click Save As and specify a
new .stn filename to create a new .stn file.
Results
•
You can now add the command to a menu or to the toolbar.
Related topics
“Command Properties dialog box” on page 93
Editing an existing command
If you edit a command, all methods of invoking the command (menu, toolbar and keyboard shortcut) invoke the
edited command.
To edit a command
1
In Station choose Station > Connection Properties.
The Connection Properties dialog box opens.
2
Click the Toolbars tab.
3
In the Menu, toolbar & keyboard shortcuts box, specify the .stb file you want to customize and click
Customize.
4
In the Available commands list select the command you want to edit.
5
Click Edit.
The Edit Command dialog box opens.
6
Make the required changes.
7
Click OK.
8
Click Save As and specify a new .stb filename to save your settings.
Attention
Ensure you save the file to the <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\MenusAndToolbars folder.
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder> is
C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only visible if you select
the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog box. To change this setting
in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options, and then click the View tab.
9
Click Save to save the reference to the new .stb file in the current .stn file or click Save As and specify a
new .stn filename to create a new .stn file.
Related topics
“Command Properties dialog box” on page 93
71
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Adding a command to a menu
To add a command to an existing menu
1
In Station choose Station > Connection Properties.
The Connection Properties dialog box opens.
2
Click the Toolbars tab.
3
In Menu, toolbar & keyboard shortcuts, specify the .stb file you want to customize.
4
Click Customize.
The Customize dialog box opens.
5
Click the Menu tab.
6
Select the command you want to add from Available commands and click Insert.
7
Use the arrows to move the new menu to the appropriate position.
8
Click Save As and specify a new .stb filename to save your settings.
Attention
Ensure you save the file to the <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\MenusAndToolbars folder,
where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder> is
C:\ProgramData.
9
Click Save to save the reference to the new.
new .stn filename to create a new .stn file.
stb
file in the current .stn file or click Save As and specify a
Adding a command to a toolbar
Toolbar button icons are stored in <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\MenusAndToolbars, where
<data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder> is C:
\ProgramData. If you have custom icons that you want to assign to a command, copy the icon to this folder.
If you want to create icons or edit existing icons, you can use any drawing application, such as Microsoft Paint,
that allows you to save the icon in .bmp format.
The default size of icons on the Station toolbar is 21×15 pixels. You can set Station to use large icons, which are
32×32 pixels.
Filenames for large icons have a prefix of lrg_ and the suffix is the same as the filename for the small icons. For
example, lrg_tb015.bmp is a large icon and tb015.bmp is the equivalent small icon.
To add a toolbar button to a toolbar
72
1
In Station choose Station > Connection Properties.
The Connection Properties dialog box opens.
2
Click the Toolbars tab.
3
In Menu, toolbar & keyboard shortcuts, specify the file you want to customize.
4
Click Customize.
The Customize dialog box opens.
5
Click the Toolbars tab.
6
Select the toolbar you want to which you want to add a button.
7
In Available commands select the command you want to add.
8
If the command does not have an icon, click Edit and assign an icon.
9
Click Insert.
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
10 In the Tooltip/Label box, type in the appropriate ToolTip.
11 Use the arrows to move the toolbar button to the required position.
12 Specify the required information for the action you have selected.
13 Click Save As and specify a new .stb filename to save your settings.
Attention
Ensure you save the file to the <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\MenusAndToolbars folder,
where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder> is
C:\ProgramData.
14 Click Save to save the reference to the new. stb file in the current .stn file or click Save As and specify a
new .stn filename to create a new .stn file.
Assigning a keyboard shortcut to a command
If you have a specialized keyboard and you also want to control the LED for a key you have assigned, see the
topic 'Changing the behavior of LEDs on a specialized keyboard'.
You cannot use the same keyboard shortcut for more than one command. If you want to use a keyboard shortcut
that is already assigned, you must overwrite the current assignment.
To assign keyboard shortcuts to an existing command
1
In Station choose Station > Connect.
The Connection Properties dialog box opens.
2
Click the Toolbars tab.
3
In the Connection Properties dialog box, click the Toolbar tab.
4
Click Customize.
The Customize dialog box opens.
5
In the Available commands list select the command and click Edit.
6
Click the Keyboard Shortcut box and press the relevant keys.
7
Click Save As and specify a new .stb filename to save your settings.
Attention
Ensure you save the file to the <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\MenusAndToolbars folder,
where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder> is
C:\ProgramData.
8
Click Save to save the reference to the new.
new .stn filename to create a new .stn file.
stb
file in the current .stn file or click Save As and specify a
Related topics
“Specialized keyboards” on page 77
“Default LED states on a specialized keyboard” on page 77
Creating a new menu
To add a new menu to the Station menu bar
1
In Station choose Station > Connect.
The Connection Properties dialog box opens.
2
Click the Toolbars tab.
3
In Menu, toolbar & keyboard shortcuts, specify the .stb file you want to customize.
73
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
4
Click Customize.
The Customize dialog box opens.
5
Click the Menu tab.
6
In Available commands select Header and click Insert.
7
In the Caption box, type the menu name.
8
Use the arrows to move the new menu to the appropriate position.
9
Add menu items as required.
10 Click Save As and specify a new .stb filename to save your settings.
Attention
Ensure you save the file to the <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\MenusAndToolbars folder.
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder> is
C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only visible if you select
the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog box. To change this setting
in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options, and then click the View tab.
11 Click Save to save the reference to the new .stb file in the current .stn file. or click the Save As button and
specify a new .stn filename to create a new .stn file.
Creating a new toolbar
To add a new toolbar
1
In Station choose Station > Connect.
The Connection Properties dialog box opens.
2
Click the Toolbars tab.
3
In the Menu, toolbar & keyboard shortcuts box, specify the file you want to customize.
4
Click Customize.
The Customize dialog box opens.
5
Click the Toolbars tab.
6
Click New and type the name in the Toolbar Name box.
7
Add toolbar buttons.
8
Click Save As and specify a new .stb filename to save your settings.
Attention
Ensure you save the file to the <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\MenusAndToolbars folder.
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder> is
C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only visible if you select
the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog box. To change this setting
in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options, and then click the View tab.
9
Click Save to save the reference to the new .stb file in the current .stn file or click Save As and specify a
new .stn filename to create a new .stn file.
Example scenario
You have a custom display representing the cooling tower in your plant. The name of the display is Cooling
You want your operators to be able to call up this display using:
Tower.
•
•
74
The View menu
The toolbar with a custom icon that has been created
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
•
Shortcut key CTRL+T
You have not customized the menus or toolbars before so the default.stb file is being used to define the menus,
toolbars and shortcut keys.
You want the default.stn Station setup file to reference the custom .stb file.
To implement this you need to:
•
•
•
•
•
Edit the default.stb file and create a new file that contains your customization.
Create a new command called Callup Cooling Tower using the Callup page action.
Create a custom icon by editing an existing icon in an application such as Microsoft Paint.
Assign your custom icon and the keyboard shortcut to the command.
Add the command to the View menu and add the toolbar button to the toolbar.
Prerequisites
•
Place the custom icon in the <data
every Station.
folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\MenusAndToolbars
folder on
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder>
is C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only visible if you
select the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog box. To
change this setting in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options, and then click the
View tab.
To create the command
1
In the Connection Properties dialog box, click the Toolbars tab.
In the Menu, toolbar & keyboard shortcuts box, ensure that default.stb is specified.
2
Click Customize.
The Customize dialog box opens.
3
Click New Command.
The Command Properties dialog box opens.
4
In the Name box, type Callup
5
Place the cursor in the Enter keyboard shortcut box and press the keys CTRL and T.
6
Click the Assign Icon button and select your custom icon and click OK.
7
In the Action box select Callup Page.
8
In the Page box type Cooling
9
Click OK. The command is now added to the Available Command list.
Cooling Tower.
Tower.
To add the command to the View Menu
1
In Current Layout, select View.
2
In the Available Commands list, select your new command Callup Cooling Tower.
3
Click Insert. The Callup Cooling Tower command is added to the View menu.
4
In the Caption box type Cooling
Tower.
To add the command to the toolbar
1
Click the Toolbars tab.
2
In the Available Commands list select Callup Cooling Tower.
3
Click Insert.
4
In the Tooltip/Label box type Callup
Cooling Tower display.
75
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
5
Click Save As.
The Save As dialog box opens.
6
In the File name box type coolingtower.stb and click Save.
Attention
Ensure you save the file to the <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\MenusAndToolbars folder.
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder> is
C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only visible if you select
the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog box. To change this setting
in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options, and then click the View tab.
7
In the Connection Properties dialog box click Save to save the reference to coolingtower.stb in
default.stn.
76
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Specialized keyboards
You can use either the Integrated Keyboard (IKB) or the Operator Entry Panel keyboard (OEP) with your
Station computer to control your plant.
Attention
The IKB and the OEP keyboard are not compatible with Electronic Signatures. You cannot use either of these
keyboards if you use Electronic Signatures functionality.
Both keyboards have a set of shortcut keys with predefined actions assigned. You cannot reassign actions to
these predefined shortcut keys. For a list of shortcut keys and the assigned actions see the reference chapter in
the Operator's Guide.
Both keyboards also have a set of keys to which you can assign actions, and LEDs that you can control. For
example, you can set up a key so that the LED on a particular key is red, fast blinking when a point goes into
alarm and when the operator presses the key, the associated display is called up for the point in alarm.
Related topics
“Assigning a keyboard shortcut to a command” on page 73
“Changing the behavior of LEDs on a specialized keyboard” on page 77
“Associating points with LEDs on a specialized keyboard” on page 78
“Default LED states on a specialized keyboard” on page 77
Changing the behavior of LEDs on a specialized keyboard
Each LED on the operator keyboard can be associated with a point. When the point goes into alarm, the
associated operator keyboard LED changes state to show the highest priority alarm.
You can change this default behavior of the LEDs.
To change the behavior of LEDs
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
2
Click the Configure server-wide Stations settings task.
The Server Wide Settings display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click the IKB LED Settings tab.
4
For each alarm priority, specify the LED color and the LED action.
Related topics
“Specialized keyboards” on page 77
“Default LED states on a specialized keyboard” on page 77
“About customizing keys” on page 125
“Customizing toolbars, menus, and keyboard shortcuts” on page 70
Default LED states on a specialized keyboard
The following table shows the default LED state and the corresponding alarm priority.
LED State
Alarm Priority
Red slow blink
There is at least one unacknowledged urgent priority alarm.
Yellow slow blink
There is at least one unacknowledged high priority alarm.
77
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
LED State
Alarm Priority
Yellow slow blink
There is at least one unacknowledged low priority alarm.
Red on (static)
There is at least one acknowledged urgent priority alarm. There are no unacknowledged
urgent priority alarms.
Yellow on (static)
There is at least one acknowledged high or low priority alarm. There are no
unacknowledged high or low priority alarms.
Off
No alarm exists.
Related topics
“Assigning a keyboard shortcut to a command” on page 73
“Changing the behavior of LEDs on a specialized keyboard” on page 77
“Associating points with LEDs on a specialized keyboard” on page 78
“Specialized keyboards” on page 77
Associating points with LEDs on a specialized keyboard
Prerequisites
•
You have installed the appropriate drivers and connected the keyboard. For more information and
instructions about installing these drivers, see the Supplementary Installation Tasks Guide.
To associate points with LEDs
78
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
2
Click the Configure Flex Stations task.
The Flex Station Configuration Summary display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration
Studio.
3
Click the Flex Station you want to configure. The Flex Station Configuration display appears.
4
Click the Operator Keyboard tab.
5
For every LED you want to associate with a point, enter the point ID in the corresponding LED key number
box.
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Figure 1: Operator Keyboard tab
Related topics
“Specialized keyboards” on page 77
“Default LED states on a specialized keyboard” on page 77
79
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Setting up Station Help
There are several help options available from the Station's Help menu:
•
Help for this display—calls up the context-sensitive topic within Station Help.
•
•
(If there is no context-sensitive topic, Station Help opens at the first topic.)
Operator's Guide—calls up the Operator's Guide.
Station Help—calls up Station Help and opens it at the first topic.
The following procedure describes how to configure a keyboard shortcut to invoke context-sensitive help.
The help file that opens when a user presses the keyboard shortcut is specified by the helpOperator parameter in
station.ini.
To configure a keyboard shortcut for context-sensitive help
1
Choose Station > Connection Properties.
The Connection Properties dialog box.
2
Click the Toolbars tab and then click Customize.
The Customize dialog box opens.
3
In the list of Available commands select [Help]Page
4
Click on the Enter keyboard shortcut box and press the key (or key combination) you want to use to
invoke the Help.
5
Click OK. If the key is already assigned to another command, a warning message appears. Click Yes to
assign the key, or click No to assign another key.
6
Click Save As and specify a new filename to close the Customize dialog box.
7
Click Save to close the Connection Properties dialog box.
Related topics
“Station.ini” on page 112
80
www.honeywell.com
Help
and click Edit Command.
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Station setup files
When Station software is installed on a computer, two types of configuration files are installed, Station setup
files (.stn files) and toolbar, menu and keyboard shortcut definition files (.stb files). The .stn file references
the .stb file. These files define:
•
•
•
•
Connection properties from Station to the server
The general appearance of Station
Commands on the menus and toolbars
Function key actions
Station automatically uses default.stn and default.stb unless you select another setup file. You might have
several setup files for connections to more than one server, or setup files with specific user preferences.
After you have installed the Station software, the default settings contained in default.stn and default.stb can
be reviewed and customized.
Preconfigured .stb files
Experion has a range of preconfigured .stb files for use with different configurations. The .stb files are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
12FN.stb
12FN_server.stb
default.stb
ikb-est.stb
IKB.stb
IKB_Server.stb
multiplecommand.stb
You need to update the connection properties on each Station to reference the appropriate .stb file as follows:
If you have a 12 function keyboard:
Use:
Single window
12FN.stb, default.stb, or TouchScreen.stb
Server
12FN_server.stb
If you have an Integrated Keyboard (IKB):
Use:
Single window
IKB.stb
Server
IKB_server.stb
File locations
During a clean installation of, or a migration from an earlier version to Experion R100, copies of the
default.stn, factory.stn, and the preconfigured .stb files listed above are copied to the <install folder> and
the <data folder>.
The files in the <install folder> location serve as a factory default copy and should not be customized. (On
some operating systems, only administrators with special privileges can modify files in this folder.)
The following table shows which files are copied to each location.
Path
default.stn
factory.stn
.stb files
<install folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\System\R100
Yes
Yes
Yes
Where <install folder> is the location where Experion is installed.
81
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Path
default.stn
factory.stn
.stb files
<data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\MenusAndToolbars
Yes
No
Yes
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default
installations, <data folder> is C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder
is a system folder, which means that it is only visible if you select the Show
hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog
box. To change this setting in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and
search options, and then click the View tab.
If you want to customize existing .stn and .stb files, or create new ones, save them to:
<data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\MenusAndToolbars
If ever you need to reinstall a fresh copy of the factory default files, copy them from the <install
location.
folder>
Attention
When migrating from an earlier version of Experion, you need to perform additional steps to ensure that the .stn
and .stb files are compatible with the current version.
See the Migration User's Guide for more information.
Related topics
“Adding a button to Station's toolbar to reset faceplates to their default positions” on page 152
“Toolbars tab, Connection properties” on page 89
“Customizing toolbars, menus, and keyboard shortcuts” on page 70
“Configuring setup files” on page 122
“Sending the next display to another Console Station” on page 57
“Sending the current display to another Console Station” on page 56
“Sending displays using aliases” on page 58
Restoring .stb files
If you customized Station’s preconfigured menus and toolbars, you will have saved the .stb files in the <data
folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\MenusAndToolbars folder, where <data folder> is the location where
Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder> is C:\ProgramData.
Should you need to reinstall the default set of preconfigured .stb files, copy them from the <install folder>
\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\System\R100 folder, where <install folder> is the location where Experion
is installed.
CAUTION
Restoring .stb files overwrites the current system configuration by restoring menus and toolbars to their default
state. Proceed with caution.
To restore .stb files
82
1
In Windows Explorer, navigate to the <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\MenusAndToolbars
folder, where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data
folder> is C:\ProgramData. Make a backup copy of the .stb file you are about to overwrite.
2
Navigate to the <install folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\System\R100 folder and select the
source .stb file.
Where <install folder> is the location where Experion is installed.
3
On the Edit menu, click Copy.
4
Navigate to <data
www.honeywell.com
folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\MenusAndToolbars.
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder>
is C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only visible if you
select the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog box. To
change this setting in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options, and then click the
View tab.
5
On the Edit menu, click Paste.
The Confirm File Replace message appears, asking you to confirm your action.
6
Click Yes to replace the existing file.
83
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Understanding update rates
The update rates you specify for Stations and displays in your system determine how often dynamic values on a
display are updated. As a general guideline when configuring update rates, do not place an unnecessary load on
your controllers by setting the update rate higher than necessary.
For Stations, there is a standard update rate and a fast update rate. To use the fast update rate for a Station, you
must configure a keyboard shortcut. The action for the command you specify is Server Pushbutton and the
server pushbutton number is 89.
When you call up a display, the standard update rate is used; when you press the keyboard shortcut assigned to
the fast update rate command, the fast update rate is used. When you navigate to a different display, the Station
uses the standard update rate.
You can also specify a slower update rate for a display. This is sometimes called the “refresh” rate. If a display
is complex it is advisable to slow the update rate to reduce the load on the system. When you call up a display
that has a slower rate than is configured for the Station, the display refresh rate is used.
You specify the update rates:
•
•
•
•
•
For a static Station when you build the Station in Quick Builder (see “Main tab, static Station” in the
“Station properties” section of the Quick Builder Guide).
For a rotary Station when you specify the connection properties in Station (see “Connection Properties” in
the “Customizing Stations” section of the Station Configuration Guide).
For a Console Station on the Detail tab of the Console Station Configuration display in Station (see
“Console configuration properties” in the “Configuring a Console Station” section of the Station
Configuration Guide).
For a display when you build the display (see “Details tab” in the “Display/shape properties” section of the
HMIWeb Display Building Guide).
For a specific point parameter on the Data tab of the properties for that point parameter (see the topic “Data
binding properties” in the “Object properties” section of the HMIWeb Display Building Guide).
Actual update rate
If you define a particular update rate for a point parameter on a custom display, such as 5 seconds, the actual
update rate may be different. This is because the actual update rate is also controlled by the Station update rate
(specified when configuring Station) and the display update rate (specified on the display's Details tab).
The server selects the slowest rate, and rounds this down to a multiple of the slower of the Station and display
rates. The following table shows examples of actual update rates for common combinations (all values are in
seconds).
84
Station update rate
Display update rate
Data-bound object update
rate
Actual update rate
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
5
5
1
1
5
1
1
5
5
5
1
9
5
5
1
10
10
5
1
14
10
5
1
15
15
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Accessing Experion using Internet Explorer
If you have Station installed, and you are on the same computer as the Station computer, you can also access the
Experion server using Internet Explorer. This allows for the casual user to view Station displays from within
Internet Explorer without having to start up an instance of Station.
Tip
Alternatively, if you want to provide Station access to web clients, you should consider using eServer and 'eServer
Premium Access client'.
For example, you may want to create a 'home page' using HMIWeb Display Builder containing links to a set of
displays relating to a specific part of your plant that casual users may want to access.
When Internet Explorer loads this 'home page', a connection is made to the Experion server using connection
properties defined in the default.stn file stored with the 'home page'.
When a connection is made, Experion security works in the same manner as a Station connection. That is, if
your system is set up to use Station-based security, the user is connected to the server at the oper security level.
If operator-based security is used, the user is prompted for an operator ID and password.
Connecting to the server using Internet Explorer requires a rotary Station connection. The number of
connections to the server at any one time is determined by your license.
Setting up Experion to enable access using Internet Explorer requires the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Define a rotary Station in Configuration Studio.
Use Station to define connection properties, in the same way you would for Station, and save them in an .stn
to be stored with the displays to be accessed using Internet Explorer.
Create a separate folder to store the default.stn and the relevant HMIWeb displays.
If the Station computer only has web access to the server and does not have file share access to the server,
the system displays need to be stored on the Station computer.
Create an HMIWeb startup display or 'home page'.
Initiate a connection by navigating to 'home page' by specifying the full path as a URL. For example,
file://c:/Program Files (x86)/Honeywell/Experion PKS/client/CustomWebDisplays/homepage.htm.
85
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Improving the rendering of display objects in Station
By default, alphanumeric and text objects are rendered using standard HTML rendering. It is possible to
improve the rendering of these display objects by using custom rendering.
CAUTION
Incorrectly editing the registry may severely damage your system. Before making changes to the registry, you
must back up any valued data on your computer.
To set custom rendering in Station
1
On the Station computer open the registry editor.
2
Browse to the following key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Honeywell\Station\UseCustomRendering
86
3
Change the value to 1.
4
Close the registry editor.
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Connection Properties
You use the Connection Properties to customize some of the Station settings. The dialog box contains a series of
tabs relating to the Station settings you can customize.
Related topics
“Connection tab, Connection properties” on page 87
“Displays tab, Connection properties” on page 88
“Appearance tab, Connection properties” on page 89
“Toolbars tab, Connection properties” on page 89
“Sounds tab, Connection properties” on page 89
“Web access tab, Connection properties” on page 90
“Web access” on page 90
“Scripting tab, Connection properties” on page 90
“Station scripting” on page 91
“Configuring startup displays” on page 63
“Example Station connections for FTE configuration” on page 432
“Accessing displays” on page 432
Connection tab, Connection properties
You use the Connection tab in the Connection Properties dialog box to specify how the Station that you are
currently using is connected to the server. The options you can specify are described below.
Click the Advanced button to display all properties.
Property
Description
Connection type
Specifies if this Station is a static Station, rotary Station, or Console Station.
Server
Specifies the name of the server to which this Station is to connect.
Console Station
Specifies the name of this Console Station. Visible only if the connection
type is Console Station.
Station Number
Applicable to Flex Stations using a Static connection type. The number must
match the Station number allocated for this Station in Quick Builder.
Window Mode
Specifies whether this Station uses multi-window mode or single window
mode. For a description of these modes see the topic, 'What type of Station
are you configuring?'.
Auxiliary setup file
Specifies the auxiliary setup file that contains alternative connection
properties to be used if:
•
•
A redundant server fails over to the backup server.
The Console Station fails.
Applicable only if:
•
•
You have redundant servers and dual networks.
Console Stations
87
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Property
Description
Normal update rate
Applicable only to rotary connections. The rate, in seconds, at which
dynamic values from controllers and other devices are updated in the server
database.
If operators use the Fast Update key on an IKB/OEP keyboard (or a function
key on a standard keyboard that has been configured to work as a fast update
key), this update rate is increased to the fast update rate (as described below)
until a new display is called up.
Fast update rate
Applicable only to rotary connections. The rate, in seconds, at which
dynamic values available from the server are updated on Station displays.
This is also the rate at which dynamic values from controllers and other
devices are updated in the server when the FAST key is pressed on an
IKB/OEP keyboard.
Communications timeout
How long the Station should wait for initial communications from the server
before displaying an error message.
Startup display
Applicable only to a Flex Station using a rotary connection. The number or
name of the startup display called up on connection to the server. Type 0 to
use the System Startup display.
FunctionKeyRepeatInterval
Specifies the time during which repeat key strokes are ignored after the key
has been initially pressed.
Number of displays in pool
Applicable only if you use multi-window mode. Specifies the maximum
number of displays that can be visible simultaneously.
Related topics
“Example scenario: Audible annunciations” on page 262
Displays tab, Connection properties
Use the Displays tab to define the paths and the order Stations uses to search for displays.
Property
Description
Search for displays in
Lists the paths and the order Station uses to look for displays and the .stb file.
A search path can also be specified as an environment variable.
The paths are also contained in the factory.stn file. If you remove any
paths in default.stn (or your customized .stn file), when you start Station,
any paths that were removed are added from factory.stn. This is
intentional so that Station always has a path specified to locate displays
and .stb files.
Add
Adds a search path.
Remove
Deletes the selected search path from the list.
Up arrow
Move the selected search path up within the list. The order of the display
paths determines the search order.
Down arrow
Moves the selected search path down within the list.
Search subdirectories for shapes
Indicates if the subfolders of the specified paths are searched.
DSP page background color
Specifies the color of the background visible when you change displays.
Related topics
“Environment variables” on page 116
88
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Appearance tab, Connection properties
Property
Description
Show Station menu
Specifies whether the Station menu is shown.
Attention
If you hide the Station menu, you will need to provide an
alternative method for operators to navigate to Station displays, and
to log on and log off.
Auto hide message zone
Specifies whether the message zone is always visible or only when a
message is displayed.
Show alarm zone
Specifies whether the alarm zone is shown.
Show status zone
Specifies whether the status zone is shown.
Use Windows ToolTip color for callouts
For messages that are displayed in callouts on Station displays and
faceplates, you can choose to use the same background color that is
configured for Windows ToolTips instead of the default light gray.
Note that any changes made to callout background color are only on a per
Station basis.
Toolbars tab, Connection properties
Use the Toolbars tab to assign a different .stb file, customize the menus, toolbars, and keyboard shortcuts that
are available to Station.
Property
Description
Toolbar options
Show button labels
Specifies if the button name is displayed with the icon.
Show ToolTips
Specifies if ToolTips are shown when you move the mouse over a toolbar
button.
Use large buttons
Specifies if large buttons are used in the toolbar. The size of the large buttons
is 32 x 32 pixels.
Appearance
Menu, toolbar & keyboard shortcuts
The name of the file containing the menu, toolbar, and keyboard settings. If
you specify the filename only, Station searches the paths specified on the
displays tab.
Browse
Allows you to specify the specific file and location of the .stb file.
Customize
Allows you to customize the menu, toolbar, and keyboard settings.
Related topics
“Station setup files” on page 81
“Customizing toolbars, menus, and keyboard shortcuts” on page 70
“Customize dialog box” on page 92
Sounds tab, Connection properties
Use the Sounds tab to configure audible annunciations. These settings are used in conjunction with the audible
alarm settings on the Station configuration display.
89
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Property
Description
Use PC Speaker
Specifies if the audible annunciation is generated through the speakers on the
computer Station is running on.
Event
Lists the events for which you can specify annunciations.
Sound
Lists the sound specified for the event.
Sound for selected event
Specify the sound you want played for a particular event. Use the Browse
button to locate the sounds. Use the Play button to test the sound.
Use external contact
Specifies if the audible annunciation is generated through an external
annunciator.
Use keyboard contact
Applicable only if you have a specialized keyboard. Specifies if the audible
annunciation is generated through an IKB.
Keyboard contact for selected event
Applicable only if you have a specialized keyboard. Specify the contact you
want for a particular event.
Annunciate message zone prompts
Specifies if a sound will beep on a message zone prompt requiring user input.
Related topics
“Flex Station Configuration Display” on page 109
Web access tab, Connection properties
Use the Web Access tab to specify the Web pages an operator can navigate to using Station.
Any URL you specify must be less than 256 characters.
Click the Advanced button to display all properties.
Property
Description
No URLs
No Web pages or files can be displayed in Station.
All URLs
All Web pages or files can be displayed in Station.
The following URLs only
Only the specified Web pages or files can be displayed in Station.
Use an asterisk (*) to enable access to all pages of a website. For example
www.honeywell.com/* enables operators to access all pages at this site. If
you do not include the asterisk, operators can only access the home page.
Add
Enables you to add specific Web pages or files for display.
Remove
Removes the selected Web page or file.
Web access
You can set up Station so that operators can call up Web pages that could, for example, contain operator
procedures. You can also set appropriate security to prevent operators from calling up unauthorized Web pages
or other documents in Station. To set the security you need to specify the Web pages or documents that
operators can call up using the Web Access tab of the Connection Properties dialog box.
Scripting tab, Connection properties
Use the scripting tab to specify the scripts that run with this Station connection.
90
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Property
Description
Application Script
The filename and path of the application script.
Use the Browse button to change the script.
Use the Edit button to open the Station Script Editor.
Timeout after
The amount of time (in seconds) after which the script engine terminates the
script.
Station scripting objects
The ID of the Station scripting object.
Add
Enables you to add scripting objects.
Remove
Enables you to remove scripting objects.
Station scripting
You can implement more sophisticated Station customization by creating application scripts or Station scripting
objects that can be run on Station. For example, you might want to configure Station so that a specific display is
shown on operator changeover.
For more information on Station scripting objects and the Station object model, see the Automation Objects
section of the Application Development Guide.
91
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Customize dialog box
You access the Customize dialog box using the Customize button on the Toolbar tab, in the Connection
Properties dialog box.
Use the Customize dialog box to:
•
•
•
•
•
Create new commands to add to menus, toolbars and assign keyboard shortcuts.
Add or delete a custom toolbar
Add menu items to a menu
Customize menu items
Customize function keys and shortcut keys
Related topics
“Menus tab, Customize dialog box” on page 92
“Toolbars tab, Customize dialog box” on page 92
“Keyboard Shortcuts tab, Customize dialog box” on page 93
“Command Properties dialog box” on page 93
“Command actions” on page 93
“Server display program” on page 94
“Server display program parameters and action” on page 95
“Pushbutton interrupt codes” on page 100
“Toolbars tab, Connection properties” on page 89
Menus tab, Customize dialog box
Property
Description
Current layout
Displays the current menu structure.
Available Commands
Lists all available commands that you can add to a menu.
Insert
Allows you to add the selected command to the menu.
Caption
Allows you to name of the menu item.
Command
Displays the name of the command.
Layout
Allows you to move the selected menu item.
New Command
Allows you to create a new command.
Edit Command
Allows you to edit the selected command.
Delete Command
Deletes the selected command.
Toolbars tab, Customize dialog box
92
Property
Description
Toolbar
Specifies the toolbar to edit.
Toolbar name
Allows you to specify the name of a custom toolbar.
New Toolbar
Allows you to add a new toolbar.
Delete Toolbar
Allows you to delete a toolbar.
Current layout
Displays the current layout of the selected toolbar.
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Property
Description
Available Commands
Lists the commands or menu items available on the toolbar or menu bar
currently selected in the Categories list.
Insert
Allows you to add the selected command to the selected toolbar.
Tooltip/Label
The ToolTip that is visible when you place the mouse pointer over the toolbar
button.
Command
The name of the command.
Layout
Allows you to move or delete the selected button in the layout view.
New Command
Allows you to create a new command.
Edit Command
Allows you to edit the selected command.
Delete Command
Allows you to delete the selected command.
Keyboard Shortcuts tab, Customize dialog box
Property
Description
Current keyboard shortcuts
Lists currently assigned keyboard shortcuts and the command to which they
are assigned.
New Command
Allows you to create a new command.
Edit Command
Allows you to edit the selected command.
Delete Command
Allows you to delete the selected command.
Command Properties dialog box
The Command Properties dialog box is used to set the properties of a command you add to the toolbar, menu
list or keyboard shortcut.
Property
Description
Name
The name of the menu item, toolbar button or keyboard shortcut.
Keyboard shortcut
The keyboard shortcut assigned to the menu item or toolbar button.
Icon
Enables you to specify an icon for a toolbar button.
Action
The action assigned to the menu item, toolbar button, or keyboard shortcut.
Related topics
“Creating a new command” on page 70
“Editing an existing command” on page 71
“Environment variables” on page 116
“Server display program” on page 94
Command actions
You can specify the following actions for a menu item, toolbar button or keyboard shortcut.
Action
Description
Callup Page
The number or name of the display.
Callup Popup
The name of the popup and the position of the popup.
93
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Action
Description
Current Display to
Applicable to Stations within a console only.
The Station to which the current display is sent within the console.
Launch Application
The path of the executable file for the application to be launched. You can use
environment variables to pass contextual information to the application when
launching the application.
Launch Help file
The path of the help file to be launched.
Next Display to
Applicable to Stations within a console only.
The Station to which the next display to be called up is sent within the
console.
Request Report
The report number.
Request Task
Task number, parameters, whether the task requires input from the Command
Zone. For a list of parameters for LRN 21 see the topic 'Server Display
Program'.
Server Pushbutton
Pushbutton interrupt code.
Predefined Action
A standard command. Select the command from the list.
Related topics
“Environment variables” on page 116
“Server display program” on page 94
Server display program
The Server Display Program is an Experion system program designed to support system display functionality.
Remember that an Experion Server could have one or more Stations connected to it. You should ideally use the
Station Automation model and a Station or display script, instead of interacting directly with the Experion
Server through the use of the Server Display Program.
If you want to do something that the Station Automation model does not appear to provide, contact your
Honeywell Technical Assistance Center (TAC) for assistance.
Attention
The Server Display Program information is provided only for the purposes of maintaining legacy systems which have
made prior use of the Server Display Program in their projects.Honeywell considers the use of the Server Display
Program as only suitable for experienced system engineers with advanced programming skills. Do not use out of
context.
Do not callup the Server Display Program (LRN 21) task in the Callup Task properties of a display. It does not make
sense to call up another page on display callup.
It is possible to have the Server Display Program assigned directly to a user-definable function key, or to a
display object such as a pushbutton. However, it is better practice to call the Server Display program indirectly
through script, using the Server.RequestTask method, or through the Server Scripting Object Model passing it a
predefined ParamBlock containing the required program parameters. See the 'RequestTask method' in the Server
Scripting Reference and 'ParamBlock object' in the Server Scripting Reference.
Attention
Parameters 1 to 4 are numeric (unless indicated otherwise), and can be entered directly into the 'Request Task' Action
on the Details tab of the display object properties in HMI Web Display Builder. If you need to use a text (alpha)
parameter, such as the name of a display or the name of a point, except for the case where the first parameter = '1', you
must use script to pass the text value. See the RequestTask method in the HMIWeb Display Building Guide and
'Calling up a display on a particular Station' in the Server Scripting Reference.
94
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Related topics
“Command Properties dialog box” on page 93
“Command actions” on page 93
“Server display program parameters and action” on page 95
“Pushbutton interrupt codes” on page 100
“Defining an LRN” on page 594
“Report definition properties” on page 396
“Configuring system security” on page 303
Server display program parameters and action
The Server Display Program (LRN 21) performs a wide range of tasks on the current Server, determined by the
values of its parameters, as described in the following table.
Table 4: Server Display Program parameters and actions
Param1 Param2
Param3
Param4
Path
Action
1
Page #
Calls up the numbered DSP display
1
[page://]
pagename[.ext
]
Calls up the named display from Station.
(string only,
not enclosed
in quotes)
Attention
•
•
•
Param2 can be passed as a string in Station
only. The Server Display Program (on the
server) interprets this internally as the Path
parameter. Do not enclose the string in
quotes.
The optional 'page://' prefix string must be in
lowercase. It is only required in the situation
where you want to nominate a file location
other than one of the Windows system
environment path variables of the server
hosting Station.
The optional ext file extension ('.dsp' or
'.htm') is only required if both a DSP and an
HMIWeb display page exist with the same
file name as each other. If no file extension is
provided in this parameter, and both display
types exist with the same name, the Server
Display Program will display the HTM
version by default, unless '.dsp' is nominated.
95
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Param1 Param2
Param3
Param4
Path
1
0
0
'[page://]
Calls up the named display from script.
pagename[.ext
Attention
]'
• Can only be called using script.
(string only,
enclosed in
• When Param2 is zero, the Server Display
quotes)
Program (on the server) will look for the
page name in the Path parameter. You must
enclose the string in quotes.
• The optional 'page://' prefix string must be in
lowercase. It is only required in the situation
where you want to nominate a file location
other than one of the Windows system
environment path variables of the server
hosting Station.
• The optional ext file extension ('.dsp' or
'.htm') is only required if both a DSP and an
HMIWeb display page exist with the same
file name as each other. If no file extension is
provided in this parameter, and both display
types exist with the same name, the Server
Display Program will display the HTM
version by default, unless '.dsp' is nominated.
0
Action
2
Displays the next Page (forward)
3
Displays the previous Page (backward)
4
Record #
Displays the specified record
5
Displays the next Record (forward)
6
Displays the previous Record (backward)
7
Page #
7
0
Calls up the numbered display (with current file and
record # offset)
0
0
PageName
Calls up the named display (with current file and
record # offset)
Attention
Can only be called using script. When Param2 is
zero, the server display program (on the server)
will look for the page name in the Path
parameter.
96
8
Trend #
Calls up the numbered trend
9
Report #
Calls up the numbered report detail display
10
Report #
Calls up the numbered report
11
1
Prompts for password entry at the Station
11
2
Prompts for page # at the Station
11
3
Prompts for trend # at the Station
11
4
Prompts for group # at the Station
11
5
Prompts for group trend # at the Station
11
6
Prompts for group history # at the Station
11
7
Prompts for user event description
12
Clears the Message Pad
13
Saves the Message Pad
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Param1 Param2
Param3
14
Page #
History type
#
Param4
14
0
History type 0
#
Path
Action
Calls up the numbered history page detail of given
history type
PageName
Calls up the named history page detail of given history
type
Attention
Can only be called using script. When Param2 is
zero, the server display program (on the server)
will look for the page name in the Path
parameter.
15
0
Destination
#
Sends the current display to another Station in the
console. The destination can be an alias, the Console
Station number in the format CSt nn-n, or the Flex
Station number.
15
1
Destination
#
Sends the next display to another Station in the
console. The destination can be an alias, the Console
Station number in the format CSt nn-n, or the Flex
Station number.
16
Calls up the console status detail
17
Cancels current selection
18
RTU #
OBSOLETE (Calls up the RTU summary)
19
Associated
Flex Station #
Sends current display to the numbered associated Flex
Station
21
Calls up the previous display
22
Cancels current print job
23
Window #
Displays the current page in the numbered window (-1
for all)
24
0
Acknowledge selected alarm on current display and
silence audible warning
24
1
Acknowledge all alarms on current display
24
2
Acknowledge selected alarm on current display, callup
associated display, and silence audible warning
24
3
Confirm selected alarm on current display
24
4
Silence alarm audible warning without acknowledging
or confirming an alarm on the current display
25
OBSOLETE (print screen to the report printer)
26
Control selected point to normal mode
27
Control selected status point to OFF or lower
28
Control selected status point to ON or raise
29
Control selected point to MAN mode
30
Control selected point to AUTO mode
31
Control selected point to CASC mode
32
Control selected point to COMP mode
33
RESERVED (control point)
34
RESERVED (control point)
35
RESERVED (control point)
36
RESERVED (control point)
97
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Param1 Param2
Param3
Param4
Path
Action
37
Fast lower the selected value
38
Fast raise the selected value
39
0
Calls up the point's associated display
39
1
Calls up the Station's associated display
40
Toggle the point's in-service status
41
Select the point's OP
42
Select the point's SP
43
RTU #
OBSOLETE (Uploads to RTU)
44
RTU #
OBSOLETE (Downloads from RTU)
45
Channel #
OBSOLETE (Uploads to Channel)
46
Channel #
OBSOLETE (Downloads from Channel)
47
OBSOLETE (print screen to Station printer)
48
RESERVED (unused)
49
Group #
Calls up the group display
50
Group #
Calls up the group trend display
51
Group #
Calls up the group history display
52
x
y
OBSOLETE (Scrolls current display through
horizontal 'x' and vertical 'y' pixels)
53
OBSOLETE (Resets the trend's dfd)
54
Operator #
55
0
Invokes the password change request dialog box for the
operator
0
0
FileName
Calls up the named file
Attention
Can only be called using script. When Param2 is
zero, the server display program (on the server)
will look for the page name in the Path
parameter.
56
RESERVED
57
RESERVED
58
RESERVED
59
Response #
Responds to alarm with numbered response
60
Page #
Calls up numbered alarm response page
60
0
0
0
PageName
Calls up named alarm response page
Attention
Can only be called using script. When Param2 is
zero, the server display program (on the server)
will look for the page name in the Path
parameter.
61
62
98
Calls up the previous point detail display
n
Adds nominated value 'n' to field offset
63
Unfreezes updates
64
Freezes updates
65
OBSOLETE (Resets SRM alarm0
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Param1 Param2
Param3
Param4
Path
Action
66
OBSOLETE (Requests manual uLPM dialout)
67
RESERVED (unused)
68
RESERVED (unused)
69
Object #
Quick data entry for numbered object
70
Selects object at or near current position
71
Selects object
72
Enters data into selected object
73
0
73
0
Calls up the point details display for the selected point
Tag type #
0
(optional) or
0
PointName
Calls up the point details display for the named point
Attention
Can only be called using script. When Param2 is
zero, the server display program (on the server)
will look for the page name in the Path
parameter.
73
Point #
Calls up the point details display for the numbered
point
74
Tag #
Calls up the point details display for the numbered item
in the tag list
75
Displays the next page in the tag list (forward)
76
Displays the previous page in the tag list (backward)
77
PointType #
Calls up the point detail display for the nominated tag
type
78
RESERVED
79
RESERVED
80
RESERVED
81
0
Calls up the controller status summary display - scroll
up/down
81
1
Calls up the controller status summary display - for all
81
2
Channel #
Calls up the controller status summary display - for
numbered channel
81
3
PntSrvr #
Calls up the controller status summary display - for the
numbered point server
81
4
82
Word #
83
0
Calls up the controller configuration summary display scroll up/down
83
1
Calls up the controller configuration summary display for all
83
2
Channel #
Calls up the controller configuration summary display for numbered channel
83
3
PntSrvr #
Calls up the controller configuration summary display for the numbered point server
83
4
Calls up the controller status summary display - for
periodic update
HiErr #
LoErr #
Puts text (256 chars) of 32 bit error code (HiErr, LoErr)
into crtwrk
Calls up the controller configuration summary display for periodic update
99
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Param1 Param2
99
Param3
Param4
Path
Action
1
Log off Station
Attention
Use with caution, as this may cause the loss of
view of process.
113
255
Calls up the station request
1
Calls up the page loaded (at station)
Parameter conditions
The following conditions apply to the Server Display program parameters listed in “Table 4: Server Display
Program parameters and actions”.
•
•
•
•
•
If no parameter is required in Station, it is left blank in the table. However, when calling LRN 21 in script,
all unused parameters must be zero '0'.
If a parameter can accept more than one value, the listing is duplicated in the adjacent row. Note that some
parameters can have several values, so they are listed over several rows. For example, see where Param1 =
11.
Optional parameters have been qualified as '(optional)', otherwise they should be zero '0'.
Parameters 1 to 4 are numeric 16-bit (Int2) integer values only, except where specifically qualified
otherwise. For example, see where Param1 = 1.
The Path parameter can only be passed programatically through the use of a script method such as
RequestTask method, or in a predefined parameter block. See the HMIWeb Display Building Guide.
Related topics
“Environment variables” on page 116
“Server display program” on page 94
“Specifying associated Stations” on page 69
Pushbutton interrupt codes
100
Description
Pushbutton
Interrupt
Description
Pushbutton
Interrupt
Call up the System Status display
86
Call Up the Message Summary Display
115
Call up Station Status Display
87
Call Up the Alarm Summary Display
116
Toggle between normal update rate
and fast update rate.
89
Call up page 80
119
Cancel Server Printing
90
Set Control to Manual Mode
121
Request the Server to Print the
Display
91
Set Control to Automatic Mode
122
Call Up the System Menu Display
93
Set Control to Normal Mode
123
Enable/Disable
94
Select SP
124
Group
96
Select OP
125
Detail
97
Esc
126
Trend
99
Select
127
Page
102
Request a Server User Task
134-143
Send current page to Assoc Stn
104
Hit (select the nearest object)
144
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Description
Pushbutton
Interrupt
Description
Pushbutton
Interrupt
Prior Display
106
Raise
148
Associated Display
107
Fast Raise
150
Page Backwards
110
Lower
152
Page Forwards
111
Fast Lower
154
Enter
112
Refresh Window
160
Acknowledge/Silence
113
Related topics
“Environment variables” on page 116
“Server display program” on page 94
101
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Server wide settings
Use the tabs on the Server Wide Settings display to define:
•
•
•
General Station settings
Security level required for enabling and disabling hardware
IKB/OEP settings and associated point parameter handling with alphanumeric display objects
The following topics describe the server wide setting tabs.
Related topics
“General tab, server wide settings” on page 102
“Security tab, server wide settings” on page 104
“Summary displays tab, server wide settings” on page 105
“IKB/OEP settings tab, server wide settings” on page 107
“How server wide settings relate to Console Station” on page 44
“About Console Station” on page 42
“Configuring timeouts” on page 66
“Adding an operator account” on page 324
“What happens when there is an idle time out?” on page 67
“Configuring server-wide faceplate options” on page 150
“Faceplate auto-selection” on page 155
“Configuring faceplates” on page 149
General tab, server wide settings
Use settings on the General tab to specify the following:
Property
Description
Startup Page
Default system start up page
The default system startup display. This display is called up:
•
•
On initial connection to the server (that is, after server startup) for static
Stations with Station-based security and there is no startup display
specified for the Station.
On connection to the server for static Stations with operator-based security
if there is no startup display specified for the Station or the operator.
The default page that appears when operators connect to Experion.
Timeouts
Select timeout
The time, in seconds, an alphanumeric object on a Station display can remain
selected before being automatically deselected.
Idle timeout
The time, in seconds, a Station display remains active without any operator
activity before reverting to the lowest level of security and (optionally)
changing to a preconfigured display.
For rotary Stations, the connection is closed so that it is available to another
Station.
Apply select timeout to faceplates
If selected (the default), the Select timeout value also applies to faceplates.
If you clear this check box, the Select timeout value does not apply to
faceplates—that is, an alphanumeric object, once selected, will remain selected
until an operator selects another object or closes the faceplate.
102
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Property
Description
Operator Actions
Slow raise/lower step
The percentage amount by which the value of a selected object can be raised or
lowered in all Station displays when using the slow raise/lower function keys:
Note that the Slow Raise/Slow Lower function key cannot be used to increase
or decrease the field value of point parameters beyond their specified limits.
For standard points, if the increase or decrease is beyond the limit, then the
parameter is set to the specified limit. For process and with clamping
configured, if the increase or decrease is beyond the limit, the parameter is set
to the specified limit; if clamping is not configured, then the change is rejected.
Note also that the minimum value for Slow Raise/Slow Lower is 0.03%
regardless of whether a lower value is entered
You need to consider the tolerance levels that can be applied to outputs and set
points. For more information on tolerance levels see the topic 'Setting the fast
raise/lower step'.
Fast raise/lower step
The percentage amount by which the value of a selected object can be raised or
lowered in all Station displays when using the fast raise/lower function keys:
Note that the Fast Raise/Fast Lower function key cannot be used to increase or
decrease the field value of point parameters beyond their specified limits. For
standard points, if the increase or decrease is beyond the limit, then the
parameter is set to the specified limit. For process and with clamping
configured, if the increase or decrease is beyond the limit, the parameter is set
to the specified limit; if clamping is not configured, then the change is rejected.
You need to consider the tolerance levels that can be applied to outputs and set
points. For more information on tolerance levels see the topic 'Setting the fast
raise/lower step'.
Default Control Confirmation response is If selected, when the control confirmation message displays the default
NO
selection will be 'No'.
Point Value Error Indication
Display as question marks
If selected, when a communications failure occurs point values on displays are
replaced by question marks.
Display using inverse video
If selected, when a communications failure occurs the point value displayed
(using reverse video) is the last scanned value before the communications error
occurred.
Show message for invalid references in
displays
If selected, a message appears if there is a point value error.
Callouts
Enable callouts
If selected, messages are displayed in callouts on Station displays and
faceplates.
OPC Server Options
Use Enterprise Model hierarchy when
OPC clients browse into Server address
space
If selected, the enterprise model is presented to the OPC client in the browse
address space. Otherwise the asset-point model is presented to the OPC client
in the browse address space.
Enable device read
If selected, OPC device read is enabled.
Pass DSA alarms and messages to OPC
Server
If selected, the OPC Alarm and Event Server will serve out DSA alarms and
messages, as well as local alarms, messages and events.
Treat date/time values as local time
If selected, server date/time values (canonical type VT_DATE) will be
provided to OPC data access clients as local time instead of UTC time. Date/
time values written by OPC data access clients are taken as local time instead
of UTC time.
103
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Property
Description
Disable SCADA device read via OPC
This setting is used in conjunction with Enable device read.
If selected, device read is obeyed for CDA but not for SCADA points.
Allow PHD to access non-historized
point parameters
If selected, this setting allows PHD to collect history for Experionpoint
parameters that aren't assigned to Experion history.
Display Scripting
Perform device read after a write
If selected, the server will perform an automatic demand read from a device
after a display script write is performed.
Mode Confirmation
Enable mode change confirmation via
Keyboard
Only applicable to OEP or IKB keyboards. If selected, an operator must
confirm the change to the Mode parameter if the operator uses the keyboard to
change the mode—for example, the operator presses the MAN key on an OEP.
Faceplate Options
Automatically select most appropriate
parameter
If selected, enables faceplate auto-selection.
Show value of intermediate tick marks
Only applicable to faceplates that use indicators to show a parameter value. If
selected, tick marks appear at regular intervals along the full length of the
indictor object.
If you enable auto-selection, the faceplate automatically selects the appropriate
control parameter for the point when it is called up. This means that an operator
can, for example, immediately type a new set point, without having to first
select the set point box.
If cleared, tick marks only appear at the ends of the indicator.
Enable preferred SP
If selected, operators can set a preferred set point. (The preferred set point is
shown as a hollow green triangle in the faceplate's indicator; whereas the
current set point is shown as a solid green triangle.)
History Assignment
Allow DSA points in history assignment
If selected (the default), this setting allows DSA points to be assigned to
history.
Related topics
“Setting the fast raise/lower step” on page 68
Security tab, server wide settings
Use the Security tab to specify:
Property
Description
Enabling and Disabling Hardware
Minimum security level required
The minimum security level for enabling and disabling channels, controllers,
points and printers.
System Security Options
Check both the Operator’s AND the
Station’s asset assignment for access to a
given asset.
104
www.honeywell.com
Only applicable if the Station is configured for operator-based security.
If selected, access to an asset is granted only if the both the operator and the
Station have been assigned the asset.
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Property
Description
User name and password required for
Quick Builder, Simplified Enterprise
Model Builder and Control Builder
downloads
If selected, operators require an integrated account with a security level of
ENGR or MNGR to perform a download from Quick Builder or Control
Builder. They also need to be a member of the on the servers.
Download events in the event summary contain the full printed name of the
operator who performed the download.
The full printed name is included with operator-generated events. The Show
operators full name in the event summary option on the Alarm/Event
options tab is automatically selected when you select this option.
Point and hardware building is permitted only when the Experion server is
running.
Allow controls with modified security
levels from Station scripts
Normally, a Station script can only control points if the current operator's
security level is sufficient to change the parameter.
Selecting this option enables scripts to use the functions
SetDataValueSynchronouslyWithSecurityLevel and
SetDataValueWithSecurityLevel which allow point controls
at a different
security level.
Note that:
•
•
•
This setting only allows scripts to use a security level of OPER, SUPV,
and ENGR. If a script needs to allow the use of MNGR level, you need to
also enable Allow controls with MNGR security level from Station
scripts. This option is only visible when Allow controls with modified
security levels from Station scripts is enabled.
You need MNGR security level to change this setting.
An event is generated whenever this setting is changed.
For more information about creating and running scripts for point control, see
“Reading and writing to point parameters”.
Allow controls with "MNGR" security
level from Station scripts
This setting is only available if Allow controls with modified security levels
from Station scripts is enabled.
When enabled, Station scripts using
SetDataValueSynchronouslyWithSecurityLevel and
SetDataValueWithSecurityLevel may also use MNGR
level.
Attention
As this setting can allow the overriding of asset permissions, the
consequences of enabling it should be carefully considered.
Related topics
“Adding an operator account” on page 324
Summary displays tab, server wide settings
Use Summary displays settings to specify:
Property
Description
Alarm Summary Options
Show system alarms on Process Alarm
Summary
Enable this setting if you want system alarms (as shown on the System Status
display) to be included on the Alarm Summary display.
105
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Property
Description
Alarm line shows
Use these options to specify the kind of unacknowledged alarm to be
displayed on Station's alarm line.
You can choose different settings for the:
•
•
•
Priority (highest priority or any priority)
Age (newest or oldest)
Type of alarm (process alarm only or any alarm)
You could therefore configure the alarm line to show:
•
•
The highest priority, newest unacknowledged process alarm, or
The lowest priority, oldest unacknowledged alarm of any kind, or
•
One of the other 6 possible combinations of settings.
Event Summary Options
Log OPC server changes to the database as If selected, point parameter changes made via an OPC server are logged as
events
events.
Show operator's full name in the Event
Summary
If selected, the operator's name is displayed with operator events in the Event
Summary instead of just the operator ID.
Alarm, Alert, Event, SOE and Message Summary Restrictions
Full page acknowledgement
The minimum security level required to be able to use the Acknowledge Page
and Clear Page functions on the summary displays.
If your license includes the Pharmaceutical Compliance Restrictions option,
review and adjust this setting in accordance with site-specific good
manufacturing practices. That is, consider whether allowing operators to
acknowledge multiple alarms with a single action complies with
pharmaceutical compliance regulations and set the security level accordingly.
Pausing
The minimum security level required to use the Pause function on the
summary displays.
Filtering and sorting
The minimum security level required to be able to use the filtering and
sorting functions on the summary displays.
Saving views
The minimum security level required to be able to save a view for the
summary displays.
Organizing columns
The minimum security level required to be able to change the column layout
(including hiding and changing the order) on the summary displays.
Print preview and printing
The minimum security level required to be able to see a report in print
preview or to print a report.
Timeouts
Event Queries
The time, in seconds, an event query is allocated to run. If the time expires
before the event query is complete, the query is terminated and no event data
is returned. The default is 15 seconds.
Event queries include event reports, filtering the Event Summary or filtering
the Recent Events display.
Event archive configuration
The time, in seconds, long-running event archiving tasks are allocated to run.
If the time expires before the event archiving task is complete, the task is
terminated. The default is 300 seconds.
Event archiving tasks include, performing an event archive and restoring an
archive. If the task is terminated, an alarm is raised.
Persistence
106
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Property
Description
Enable persistence on summary displays
By default this option is selected.
If selected, any changes that operators make to the view of a summary
display are maintained if they navigate to another display and then return to
the summary display.
If this option is not selected, any changes that operators make to the view of a
summary display are lost when they navigate to another display. When
operators return to the summary display, the view is reset to the default view
for that summary display.
Date and Time Formats
Display time and date in local time format
By default this option is not selected. When this option is selected, the time
and date formats used in the following locations will be derived from the
Microsoft Windows Locale setting for your system:
•
•
•
Alarm Summary Date & Time column
Station alarm line
Station status bar
Note that the format of the date shown on the Alarm Summary will not
change as it always uses the Microsoft Windows Locale setting.
ToolTips
Enable tooltips in Location pane
By default this option is selected. If you do not want ToolTips displayed
when you hover the mouse over the Location pane, you can deselect this
option.
Related topics
“Configuring alarm settings” on page 275
IKB/OEP settings tab, server wide settings
Use the IKB/OEP Settings tab to specify:
Property
Description
IKB/OEP LED Settings
LED color
Specify the LED color for urgent, high, and low priority alarms. The colors
you can specify are red or yellow.
LED action for Unacknowledged alarms
Specify the LED action for urgent, high, low priority alarms, messages, and
system alarms. The actions you can specify are:
•
•
•
•
Off—The LED is off
Slow—The LED flashes slowly.
Fast—the LED flashes quickly.
On—the LED is constantly on.
SP/OP keys
107
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Property
Description
Disable Server handling of SP/OP keys
If selected, restricts the manipulation of any parameters other than the selected
parameter of a point being shown by an alphanumeric display object.
For example, if the PV parameter of a point is being shown, this setting
prevents the use of the SP or OP keys to access the SP or OP parameters of the
point.
Attention
This function is not associated with IKB LED settings, except that this
Server-wide setting option is displayed on the IKB/OEP LED Settings
tab instead of the General tab for space reasons.
Keyboard Raise/Lower Key Behavior
Enable key tap raise and lower
functionality
If selected, the value will be raised or lowered as many times as the user taps
the raise/lower key, irrespective of how quickly the user taps.
•
•
When the user taps the Raise/Lower key on a display object, the value will
be raised/lowered by the least decimal configured on the display. For
example, if an alphanumeric object is configured to display 2 decimals,
when the user taps the Raise/Lower key the value of that alphanumeric will
raise/lower by 0.01%.
When the user presses and holds the Raise/Lower key, the value will be
raised/lowered by 1% continuously for as long as the key is held down.
If not selected, the value will be raised or lowered as many times as the user
taps the raise/lower key, irrespective of how quickly the user taps.
•
•
When the user taps the Raise/Lower key on a display object, the value will
be raised/lowered by the least decimal configured on the display. For
example, if an alphanumeric object is configured to display 2 decimals,
when the user taps the Raise/Lower key the value of that alphanumeric will
raise/lower by 0.03%.
When the user presses and holds the Raise/Lower key, the value will be
raised/lowered by 1% continuously for as long as the key is held down.
Keyboard Fast Key Behavior
Apply fast update to all display elements
108
www.honeywell.com
If selected, all items on a faceplate, detail display and custom schematic are
updated at the fast rate when the fast key is pressed, regardless of the fast
update settings of each item.
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Flex Station Configuration Display
You use the Station Configuration Display to define settings for a particular Station.
Related topics
“General tab, flex Station configuration display” on page 109
“Assignment tab” on page 111
“Console Station options” on page 48
“Sounds tab, Connection properties” on page 89
“Configuring startup displays” on page 63
“Operator definition, Advanced tab” on page 328
General tab, flex Station configuration display
The following sections describe settings you define on the General Tab of the Station Configuration display.
Associated Stations
Use the Associated Stations controls to specify:
Property
Description
First Station
Specifies the number or name of the first associated Station.
Second Station
Specifies the number or name of the second associated Station.
Third Station
Specifies the number or name of the third associated Station.
Send Detail to
Specifies which associated Station a Detail display is sent to when requested
from the current Station.
Send Group to
Specifies which associated Station a Group display is sent to when requested
from the current Station.
Send Trend to
Specifies which associated Station a Trend is sent to when requested from the
current Station.
Send Associated to
Specifies which associated Station an Associated display is sent to when
requested from the current Station.
Audible Alarm/Station Failure Alarm
Use the Audible Alarm/Station Failure Alarm controls to specify:
Property
Description
Activate for LOW Alarms
Controls whether an audible alarm is sounded for low priority alarms. You
specify the particular sound when you configure the Station connection
properties.
Activate for HIGH Alarms
Controls whether an audible alarm is sounded for high priority alarms. You
specify the particular sound when you configure the Station connection
properties.
Activate for URGENT Alarms
Controls whether an audible alarm is sounded for urgent priority alarms. You
specify the particular sound when you configure the Station connection
properties.
Activate for messages
Controls whether an audible annunciation is sounded for messages. If set, the
sound specified for low alarms is used.
109
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Property
Description
Activate for alerts
Controls whether an audible annunciation is sounded for alerts. If set, the
sound specified for low alarms is used.
Also activate when Operator is signed off
Controls whether an audible alarm is sounded when, under alarm conditions,
no operator is logged on to a Station configured for operator-based security
(that is, when the security level in the status bar is blank).
Station Failure Alarm
Controls whether an alarm is generated if communication to the Station is
lost.
Start Up/Idle Time-out Action
Use the Start up/idle Time-out Action controls to specify:
Property
Description
Start up page
Specifies the display called up when connecting to the server with a static
connection type and:
•
•
Operator-based security if there is no startup page specified in the
operator definition.
Station-based security for an initial connection to the server (that is, after
the server has been restarted).
If you do not specify a display, the display specified as the default system
display is called up. The default system display is specified on the Server
Wide Settings display.
Change to start up page on idle time-out
If selected, when the idle time-out timer for the Station expires the display
specified as the startup display is called up.
Printer Assignment
Use the Printer Assignment controls to assign printers to specific tasks.
Attention
If you use operator-based security, the asset assignment and printer settings of the operator who is currently logged on
to a Station determine which alarms are printed and therefore override the Station printer assignment settings.
Property
Description
Alarm/Event Printer
Specifies the printer designated to print alarms and events.
Report Printer
Specifies the printer designated to print reports.
Print LOW alarms
Enables printing of alarms for points going in and out of low priority alarm
conditions.
Print HIGH alarms
Enables printing of alarms for points going in and out of high priority alarm
conditions.
Print URGENT alarms
Enables printing of alarms for points going in and out of urgent priority alarm
conditions.
Print EVENTS
Enables printing of alarms for points going in and out of journal priority
alarm conditions and other non-alarm events.
Print Operator changes
Enables printing of all changes to points an operator has made from the
Station.
Related topics
“Configuring a Station to print alarms and events” on page 147
“Configuring alarm settings” on page 275
“Configuring reports” on page 396
110
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
“Configuring field sizes” on page 401
Assignment tab
You use the controls on the Assignment tab to assign the scope of responsibility of the Station.
Property
Description
Asset
The assets defined in the system.
Network
The nodes available on the Network tree in the System Status display
System Components
The system components, such as servers, in the System Components tree in
the System Status display.
Related topics
“About scope of responsibility” on page 336
111
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Station.ini
You can customize the initialization parameters of Station by editing the station.ini file. Use a text editor to
open the file located in %windir% (where %windir% is usually C:\Windows on the Windows operating system).
AllowRightMouseClickBrowserMenus=n Controls whether the right mouse button menu is available in a
SafeBrowse window. Valid values for n are:
AllowShellExecute=n
0
Right mouse button menu is disabled. (Default)
1
Right mouse button menu is enabled.
Controls whether Station will allow access to the Shell method.
Valid values for n are:
0
Access to the Shell method is disabled. (Default)
1
Access to the Shell method is enabled.
By default, when a display script attempts to access the Shell
method, Station will display an error message in the message
zone, and a script error may also appear.
This parameter does not appear in the station.ini file; if you
want to enable access to the Shell method, you must enter the
parameter manually.
CAUTION
Enabling access to the Shell method represents a potential
security risk to your system. Use this parameter with
caution.
112
BadStateColor=#RRGGBB
Controls the color for a bad value. RR, GG, and BB are hex
values from 00 through FF. For example, to set the message font
color to red, use BadStateColor=#FF0000.
CenterDSPDrawMode=n
Changes how DSP displays are drawn and positioned in Station.
By default all displays are drawn from the top-left corner of the
drawing area. However in some instances, this causes parts of
custom DSP displays to be obscured. You can set this parameter
so that DSP displays are drawn centered in the drawing area.
HTML displays are still drawn from the top-left. Valid values for
n are:
0
All displays are drawn from the top-left. (Default)
1
DSP displays are drawn centered in the drawing area.
ConnectTimeout=n
The amount of time (in tenths of seconds) allowed for Station to
connect to the server before the connection attempt is cancelled.
The default value is 150.
DefaultFont=fontname
Controls the font used for command bar and status bar where
fontname is any font available on the computer.
DisableMaximizeButton=n
Allows or prevents users from maximizing the Station window.
Valid values for n are:
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
DisablePingRequest=n
0
Users can maximize the Station window. (Default)
1
Users cannot maximize the Station window.
Enables or disables the ping request from the Station computer to
a remote server. Ping requests are used to determine if the server
you are attempting to connect to is available. If the server is not
available, do not try to connect to it. This makes failover in a
redundant system faster. However, if your server is behind a
firewall, ping requests may be disabled across the firewall. If this
is the case, then disable the ping requests.
Valid values for n are:
DisableURLNavigationSubsystem=n
FixedWindowSize=n
FlashWindowOnAlarm=n
HelpOperator=filename
0
The ping request is enabled.
1
The ping request is disabled.
Allows or prevents the use of SafeBrowse. Valid values for n are:
0
SafeBrowse is enabled. (Default)
1
SafeBrowse is disabled.
Allows or prevents users from resizing the Station window. Valid
values for n are:
0
Users can resize the Station window. (Default)
1
Users cannot resize the Station window. This setting also
ensures that a full page is automatically shown at every zoom
level.
Causes the Station taskbar icon to flash when an alarm is raised.
Valid values for n are:
0
Off (Default)
1
On
Specifies the help filename.Experion is supplied with two help
files:
•
•
DocumentationSet.chm—Documentation Set for Experion,
which contains comprehensive configuration, reference and
operational documentation
OperatorsGuide.chm—Operator's Guide, which only contains
the operational documentation
To assign a shortcut key to invoke help for the current display,
see 'Setting up Station Help'.
HighPriority=n
Sets the priority of the Station process. Valid values for n are:
0
Normal priority.
1
High priority.
113
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
KeepAliveDouble=n
KeepAliveTimeout
Allows Station to miss a keepalive poll. Valid values for n are:
0
Off
1
On
The time interval at which Station sends a messages to the server
and waits for a reply. If the Server has not communicated with
Station before the next KeepAliveTimeout period, Station starts
the failover process.
You cannot change this without changes to the server, see 'How
can you make failover faster?' in the 'Configuring and monitoring
a redundant server system' section.
ManualFailRetry=n
The number of times to retry connection to backup on manual
failover.
MCISyncIndex
Option for MCI synchronization. Used by live video overlay.
MessageFont=fontname
Controls the font used to display messages where fontname is
any font available on the computer.
MessageFontColor=#RRGGBB
Controls the message font color. RR, GG, and BB are hex values
from 00 through FF. For example, to set the message font color
to red, use MessageFontColor=#FF0000.
MessageFontSize=nn
Controls the message font size where nn is any size applicable
for the font.
MessageFontStyle=n
Controls the message font style where valid values for n are:
0 = normal
1 = bold
2 = italic
3 = bold italic
NaNStateColor=#RRGGBB
Controls the color for the NaN (not a number) condition. RR,
GG, and BB are hex values from 00 through FF. For example, to
set the NaN state color to red, use NaNStateColor=#FF0000.
Set_handle
Enables or disables the ability to set the window handle (ID) to
the device driver.
The default value is 1 (enabled).
For FlashPoint 4XL Lite cards, this feature must be disabled (set
to 0).
Set_windowmode
Specifies size of the video frame within the available window.
For FlashPoint 3DX and Flashbus cards choose one of the
following values:
114
www.honeywell.com
0
Stretch mode (enabled) - video frame is scaled to parent
window.
2
Fixed mode (disabled) - video frame is resized to a specified
scale.
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
For FlashPoint 4XL Lite cards choose one of the following
values:
URLstoProcess
1
Stretch to a rectangle mode (enabled) - video frame is scaled to
parent window.
3
Fixed to a rectangle mode (disabled) - video frame is resized to
a specified scale.
Specifies the URLs or servers that an eServer Premium Access
client needs to access. The required format is PATHn=URL where:
•
•
is a variable representing the path number
URL is either a server name or a URL using the format
http:// or https://
n
Note that it is not necessary to include the full path: you only
need to add the path up until and including the server name.
For example:
PATH0=https://199.63.241.168 PATH1= http://r400tp60server
PATH2=r400tp80server
UseHandIconOnbutton=n
Enables the mouse pointer to be context sensitive. The mouse
pointer changes to a hand icon when moved over selectable
items. Applicable to DSP displays only. Valid values for n are:
0
Disabled
1
Enabled (Default)
Related topics
“Setting up Station Help” on page 80
“How can you make failover faster?” on page 444
115
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Environment variables
Microsoft Windows system environment variables contain system related information such as drive, path and
filename, and are often created or altered during a program installation process. Windows system environment
variables can also be user defined.
Experion environment variables contain information relevant to the currently configured Experion system, and
are available to a currently connected Station. Experion environment variables cannot be created or altered by
users or scripts.
You can use environment variables to pass contextual information when:
•
•
•
•
Launching an application using a toolbar button or script.
Specifying a page to be displayed using a toolbar button or script.
Specifying displays paths in Station connection properties.
Calling up a page using the Station command zone.
When the task, application or script is run, the environment variables are expanded.
Related topics
“Displays tab, Connection properties” on page 88
“Command Properties dialog box” on page 93
“Command actions” on page 93
“Server display program parameters and action” on page 95
“Pushbutton interrupt codes” on page 100
Predefined Experion environment variables
You can make use of the following predefined Experion environment variables:
116
Environment variable
Values called
%CLUSTERSERVERNAME%
The name of the server that the Console Station is connected to. (Only
available in a Console Station)
%CONSOLENAME%
The name of the Console to which the Console Station is configured.
(Only available in a Console Station)
%CONSOLESTATIONNAME%
The ID of the Console Station or Console Station Extension client
instance. For example "CStn01-1". (Only available in a Console Station or
Console Station Extension client)
%DISPLAYNAME%
The name of the page currently displayed.
%DISPLAYNUMBER%
The number of the page currently displayed.
%DISPLAYTITLE%
The title of the page currently displayed.
%HELPOPERATOR%
The document name of the Operator Help.
%HOSTIP%
IP address of the server you are connected to.
%HOSTNAME%
The name of the server you are connected to.
%NODE%
Node or Station number.
%POINTID%
Point ID of the selected point (only on custom displays).
%SERVERIP%
IP address of the server you are connected to.
%SERVERNAME%
The name of the server you are connected to.
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
Environment variable
Values called
%USERNAME%
For operator-based security, the operator ID of the operator logged on for
the current session.
For Station-based security, the security level of the current session.
window.external.application.messagezonetext = "%CONSOLENAME%"
117
CUSTOMIZING STATIONS
118
www.honeywell.com
Configuring multiple static Stations
This following topics describe how to configure multiple static Stations.
Related topics
“About multiple static Station” on page 120
“Configuration tasks for multiple static Station” on page 121
“Configuring setup files” on page 122
“Starting multiple static Station” on page 124
“About customizing keys” on page 125
“Adding manual input modules” on page 126
119
CONFIGURING MULTIPLE STATIC STATIONS
About multiple static Station
With multiple static Station, you can have up to four instances of Station running simultaneously on the one
computer.
About master Station
The master Station is the instance of Station that was started first. If you close the instance of Station that was
started first, the instance of Station that was started second then becomes the master Station, and so on.
In a multiple monitor environment, you have the one set of input devices to control each instance of Station.
The Station that has “focus” receives the control commands from the input devices. If none of the Stations have
focus when an operator issues one of a subset of commands, the master Station receives the command. The
subset of commands are:
•
•
•
•
CONS STATS—Console Status key
ALM SUMM—Alarm Summary key
MSG SUMM—Message Summary key
SYST MENU—System Menu key
For example, if you have three instances of Station and another application in the fourth monitor has focus, if
you press the Alarm Summary keyboard shortcut, the Alarm Summary appears in the master Station.
If the command issued is not one of the commands listed above, none of the Stations receives the command.
120
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING MULTIPLE STATIC STATIONS
Configuration tasks for multiple static Station
To configure multiple static Stations
Task
Go to
Configure Station connections for each instance of Station and if you have
redundant Experion servers and/or redundant networks configure auxiliary
connections for each instance of Station.
“Configuring setup
files” on page 122
Specify the auxiliary files in each Station connection.
“Specifying an
auxiliary file” on
page 122
Done
Provide a shortcut or other method to start multiple instances of Station.
Customize LEDs on the specialized keyboard.
“Changing the
behavior of LEDs
on a specialized
keyboard” on
page 77
Add manual input modules.
“Adding manual
input modules” on
page 126
121
CONFIGURING MULTIPLE STATIC STATIONS
Configuring setup files
After you have installed the Station software, you need to configure the Station connection properties. The
Station connection properties identify:
•
•
•
Station as a multi-Window Station or a single window Station.
For a Flex Station, the Experion server you are connecting to.
The type of keyboard you use.
If you are configuring a Flex Station and have redundant Experion servers and/or redundant networks, use this
procedure to create auxiliary setup files.
To configure the Station connection properties
1
Start Station.
2
Choose Station > Connection Properties.
The Connection Properties dialog box opens.
3
Click the appropriate connection type, either Static Station or Console Station.
4
If you are configuring a Flex Station, do the following:
a
b
In the Server box, type the name of the Experion server to which you are connecting.
In the Station number box, type the number of this Station. The number must match the Station number
allocated for this Station in Quick Builder.
5
Click the appropriate window mode; Multi-window for multi-window Station or Single window for
multiple static Stations.
6
Click Advanced to expand the options.
7
If you are configuring a multi-window Station, specify the maximum number of displays in a pool in the
Other connection properties list.
8
Click the Toolbars tab.
9
If you are configuring a multi-window Station, select the ICON_multiwindow.stb file.
10 If you are configuring a multiple static Station, select the ICON.stb file.
11 Click Open.
12 Click Save As and specify a filename.
Stop
You have completed this task. Return to the checklist that led to this task.
Related topics
“Station setup files” on page 81
“Customizing Stations” on page 61
Specifying an auxiliary file
Complete this procedure only if you have a Flex Station with redundant Experion servers and/or redundant
networks.
Prerequisites
•
122
You have configured all of your required setup files.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING MULTIPLE STATIC STATIONS
To specify the auxiliary setup file
1
Choose Station > Connect.
2
Select the appropriate .stn file and click Edit Properties.
3
If the advanced properties are not visible, click Advanced.
4
Select the Auxiliary setup file check box and specify the appropriate .stn file.
5
Click Save.
Stop
You have completed this task. Return to the checklist that led to this task.
123
CONFIGURING MULTIPLE STATIC STATIONS
Starting multiple static Station
If your operators are required to start multiple instances of Station, consider providing an easy method to start
Station in the appropriate monitor. The station command has an option -d[n] that allows you to specify in
which monitor the instance of Station appears. You can use this command option in:
•
•
Desktop shortcuts in each of the four monitors.
A batch file in the Startup folder.
To identify which monitor number relates to which physical monitor
1
In the Windows Control Panel classic view, double-click Display.
2
Double-click the Display icon.
The Display Properties dialog box opens.
3
Click the Settings tab.
4
In the Windows Control Panel large or small icon view, click Display.
5
Click Change display settings.
6
Click the Identify button to indicate monitor numbers.
To create a shortcut
1
On the desktop in the monitor in which you want to create the shortcut, right-click and choose New >
Shortcut. The Create Shortcut wizard starts.
2
Type the path and filename of Station and parameters to start Station using the appropriate .stn file, in the
appropriate monitor.
The following example starts Station in monitor 4 using the monitor4.stn file.
C:\Program Files (x86)\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\Station\station.exe C:\Program Files
(x86)\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\Station\monitor4.stn -d4
Example batch file
rem *******************************************
rem
change to station directory
rem *******************************************
cd Program Files (x86)\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\Station
rem *******************************************
rem
start first instance of Station
rem
in monitor 1 with monitor1.stn.
rem *******************************************
start station.exe monitor1.stn -d1
rem *******************************************
rem
start second instance of Station
rem
in monitor 2 with monitor2.stn.
rem *******************************************
start station.exe monitor2.stn -d2
rem *******************************************
rem
start third instance of Station
rem
in monitor 3 with monitor3.stn.
rem *******************************************
start station.exe monitor3.stn -d3
rem *******************************************
rem
start fourth instance of Station
rem
in monitor 4 with monitor4.stn.
rem *******************************************
start station.exe monitor4.stn -d4
rem *******************************************
124
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING MULTIPLE STATIC STATIONS
About customizing keys
The OEP keyboard has a set of preconfigured keys which invoke specific actions or commands. There is also a
set of keys which you can customize to invoke actions and commands, and control the LEDs, referred to as
relegendable keys.
To support mode changes using either keyboard, the server must have the default mode acronym set (MAN,
AUTO, and so on) installed. The default mode acronyms are located in <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS
\Server\Data\defmodes.src, where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default
installations, <data folder> is C:\ProgramData. This file is added during server installation by selecting Default
Acronyms, or can be added later by opening a Command Prompt window on the server computer and running
the command:
filres defmodes.src
Related topics
“Changing the behavior of LEDs on a specialized keyboard” on page 77
“Customizing toolbars, menus, and keyboard shortcuts” on page 70
125
CONFIGURING MULTIPLE STATIC STATIONS
Adding manual input modules
You can add the following modules to your console:
•
•
•
Keypad
Thumbwheel
Trackball
As you add these modules and connect them to your computer, the Windows operating system detects that you
have added new hardware and installs the appropriate drivers.
The keypad module is the same as the number keypad on a keyboard, with the addition of the operator keys:
•
•
•
•
•
•
MAN
AUTO
NORM
SP
OUT
CLR
The trackball operates in the same manner as a standard mouse. However, the operation of the buttons on the
trackball is dependant on the side of the console the trackball is installed.
Attention
If you change the configuration of your standard mouse to left-handed use, this will effect the trackball. Do not change
the configuration of your standard mouse.
If the trackball is
Use the
Installed on the left-hand side of the
console
Right button (inner button) for click and select functions.
Installed on the right-hand side of the
console
Left button (inner button) for click and select functions.
Left button (outer button) for shortcut menus.
Right button (outer button) for shortcut menus.
The thumbwheel is used for fast raise and fast lower and slow raise and slow lower functions.
126
www.honeywell.com
Customizing Station for use with high screen
resolutions
Station and the system displays are optimized for a screen resolution of 1280x1024. If you want to use a higher
resolution, you may need to adjust the font (text) size used in Station and the system displays so that operators
do not have difficulty reading the text.
If you want to change the font size, you must separately change it for each of the following:
•
•
•
•
•
Station menus and toolbar
Station zones, such as the Alarm Zone and Message Zone
Summary displays, such as the Alarm and Event Summary displays
Custom HMIWeb Trend displays
Custom DSP Trend displays
Attention
Changing the font size involves manually editing many HTML and XML files. Consequently, you should thoroughly
check your changes before releasing them in an operational environment.
Related topics
“Changing the font size in the Station menu and toolbar” on page 128
“Changing the font size in the Station zones” on page 129
“Changing the font size in the Summary displays (except the Trend with Events Summary)” on page 132
“Changing the font size in the Trend with Events Summary” on page 136
“Changing the font size in the General and Comments tabs of the Detail pane” on page 139
“Changing the font size in a custom HMIWeb trend display” on page 141
“Changing the font size in the plot axes in a DSP trend display” on page 143
“Customizing Stations” on page 61
127
CUSTOMIZING STATION FOR USE WITH HIGH SCREEN RESOLUTIONS
Changing the font size in the Station menu and toolbar
The font size used in the Station menu and toolbar is controlled by the Windows operating system.
Attention
Honeywell recommends that you only change the font size (not the font family, font color or font style). Also,
changing the menu font size affects the menus and toolbars of all applications on the computer.
To change font size
1
128
Do one of the following:
Option
Description
Windows Server 2008
•
In the Windows Control Panel classic view, double-click Fonts.
Windows 7
•
In the Windows Control Panel large or small icon view, click Fonts.
2
Click Change font size.
The User Account Control dialog box appears.
3
Type an administrator password and click OK.
The DPI Scaling window appears.
4
Select one of the available DPI options or click Custom DPI tab to display a window from which you can
choose an alternative DPI.
5
Click Apply.
6
Close Control Panel.
The changes will take effect after you restart the computer.
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATION FOR USE WITH HIGH SCREEN RESOLUTIONS
Changing the font size in the Station zones
Attention
You must have Windows administrator permissions to perform this task.
The font size used in the Station zones is separately controlled in each zone (and parts of a zone), as shown in
the following figure. In order to change the font size in these zones, you must manually edit the following
HTML files:
•
•
•
(Station Alarm Zone)
MessagePrompt.htm (Station Message Zone)
StatusBar.htm (Station Status Zone)
AlarmBar.htm
MessagePrompt.htm: MessageZone
MessagePrompt.htm: PromptZone
MessagePrompt.htm: PromptZoneButton1
MessagePrompt.htm: PromptZoneButton2
AlarmBar.htm
StatusBar.htm: .honeywell
StatusBar.htm: .blankPanel
StatusBar.htm: .clusterserver
StatusBar.htm: .cell
Figure 2: Text areas in Station zones
To change font size
1
Navigate to <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\Station.
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder>
is C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only visible if you
select the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog box. To
change this setting in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options, and then click the
View tab.
2
Right-click Station.ini and choose Open With > Notepad.
3
Check whether the MessageFontSize property exists. If it does, comment it out by inserting a semicolon (;)
at the start of the line.
129
CUSTOMIZING STATION FOR USE WITH HIGH SCREEN RESOLUTIONS
4
Save and close the file.
5
Make backup copies of the following files:
•
AlarmBar.htm
•
MessagePrompt.htm
•
StatusBar.htm
These files are located in <install folder>\Honeywell\Experion
is the location where Experion is installed.
PKS\Client\System\R100,
where <install
folder>
6
Right-click one of the files and choose Properties.
7
On the General tab clear the Read-only check box, and then click OK.
8
Right-click the file again and choose Open With > Notepad.
9
Search for the block of code shown in the following table, and change the font size(s) shown in italics. (Do
not change any other part of the file.)
We recommend that you set the font size between 8pt and 14pt, to prevent text being truncated or wrapped.
For example, in AlarmBar.htm, change FONT-SIZE:
9pt
to FONT-SIZE:
11pt.
10 Save and close the file.
11 Repeat steps 6 to 10 for the remaining files.
Code blocks to be modified
AlarmBar.htm file.
Search for the following block of code, and change the font size shown in italics.
<div id="Alarm" name="Alarm" tabIndex=0 style="BORDER: 0px none;
padding: 0px; margin:0px;TEXT-ALIGN: center; FONT-FAMILY: Arial;
FONT-SIZE:11pt; FONT-WEIGHT: 900; background-color:buttonface;
color: buttontext; width: 100%; HEIGHT: 100%; CURSOR: hand;"
onfocus="Alarm.style.backgroundColor='highlight'; Alarm.style.color='highlighttext'
"onblur="Alarm.style.backgroundColor='buttonface'; Alarm.style.color='buttontext';
document.selection.empty();">
</div>
Figure 3: AlarmBar.htm
MessagePrompt.htm file.
Search for the following block of code, and change the font sizes shown in italics.
<span ID="MessageZone" style="FONT-WEIGHT: bolder; FONT-SIZE:9pt;
FONT-FAMILY: Arial; overflow:hidden; width:95%; MARGIN: 0px; PADDING-TOP: 0px;
HEIGHT: 100%;VERTICAL-ALIGN: bottom" bordercolorlight="#ffffff"></span>
<INPUT id="PromptZone" style="BORDER-TOP-WIDTH: 1px; FONT-WEIGHT: bolder;
BORDER-LEFT-WIDTH: 1px; FONT-SIZE: 8pt; BORDER-BOTTOM-WIDTH: 1px;
MARGIN: 0px; WIDTH: 100%; BOTTOM: 0px; FONT-STYLE: normal; FONT-FAMILY: arial;
BACKGROUND-COLOR: white; BORDER-RIGHT-WIDTH: 1px; VERTICAL-ALIGN: top; width:0%;
visibility:hidden">
<INPUT id="PromptZoneButton1" name="PromptZoneButton1" style="BORDER-TOP-WIDTH: 1px;
FONT-WEIGHT: bolder; BORDER-LEFT-WIDTH: 1px; FONT-SIZE: 8pt;
BORDER-BOTTOM-WIDTH: 1px; PADDING-BOTTOM: 0px; MARGIN: 0px; WIDTH: 0%;
BOTTOM: 0px; PADDING-TOP: 0px; FONT-STYLE: normal; FONT-FAMILY: arial;
BORDER-RIGHT-WIDTH: 1px; VERTICAL-ALIGN: top; visibility:hidden" type=button>
<INPUT id="PromptZoneButton2" name="PromptZoneButton2" style="BORDER-TOP-WIDTH: 1px;
FONT-WEIGHT: bolder; BORDER-LEFT-WIDTH: 1px; FONT-SIZE: 8pt;
BORDER-BOTTOM-WIDTH: 1px; PADDING-BOTTOM: 0px; MARGIN: 0px; WIDTH: 0%;
BOTTOM: 0px; PADDING-TOP: 0px; FONT-STYLE: normal; FONT-FAMILY: arial;
BORDER-RIGHT-WIDTH: 1px; VERTICAL-ALIGN: top; visibility:hidden" type=button>
Figure 4: MessagePrompt.htm
130
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATION FOR USE WITH HIGH SCREEN RESOLUTIONS
StatusBar.htm file.
Search for the following block of code, and change the font sizes shown in italics.
.honeywell {
border: 0px;font-family: Arial;font-size: 11pt;
font-weight: bold;color: red;vertical-align: TEXT-TOP;
}
.blankPanel {
font-family: Arial;font-size: 11pt;
font-weight: normal;border: 0px;padding: 0px;MARGIN: 0px;
}
.Cell {
font-family: Arial;font-size: 11pt;font-weight: normal;
TEXT-ALIGN: center;BACKGROUND-COLOR: buttonface;
BORDER-WIDTH: 1px;BORDER-STYLE: inset;
BOTTOM: 0px;MARGIN: 0px;PADDING: 0px;
WIDTH: 100%;HEIGHT: 100%;
}
.clusterserver {font-family: Arial;font-size: 11pt;font-weight: normal;
border: 0px;padding: 0px;MARGIN:0px;BOTTOM: 0px;
PADDING: 0px;WIDTH: 100%;
}
Figure 5: StatusBar.htm
131
CUSTOMIZING STATION FOR USE WITH HIGH SCREEN RESOLUTIONS
Changing the font size in the Summary displays (except the Trend with
Events Summary)
The font size used in the Summary displays is separately controlled in each part of the display, as shown in the
following figure. In order to change the font size in the summary displays, you must manually edit the following
HTML files:
•
•
•
•
•
(Alarm Summary)
(Event Summary)
sysMessageSummary.htm (Message Summary)
sysSOESummary.htm (Sequence of Events Summary)
sysSystemSummary.htm (System Alarm Summary/System Status)
sysAlarmSummary.htm
sysEventSummary.htm
Page
ExistComments
AddComments
btnSaveDetails
divDetailsSidePanel
The font size in the “Page” text area of a summary display cannot be changed by editing the HTML files; you
can only change the font size using the Summary Displays tab of the Server Wide Settings display. If the
default font sizes in the Server Wide Settings display are not suitable, you can change their appearance.
Figure 6: Text areas in the Summary displays
Attention
You must have Windows administrator permissions to perform this task.
To change the font size
1
Make backup copies of the following files and folders, which are located in <install folder>\Honeywell
, where <install folder> is the location where Experion is installed:
\Experion PKS\Client\System\R100,
132
•
sysAlarmSummary.htm
•
sysAlarmSummary_files
•
sysEventSummary.htm
•
sysEventSummary_files
•
sysMessageSummary.htm
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATION FOR USE WITH HIGH SCREEN RESOLUTIONS
•
sysMessageSummary_files
•
sysSOESummary.htm
•
sysSOESummary_files
•
sysSystemSummary.htm
•
sysSystemSummary_files
2
Right-click a file and choose Properties.
3
On the General tab clear the Read-only check box, and then click OK.
4
Right-click the file again and choose Open With > Notepad.
5
With reference to the following figures and the above image, change the font size of each part of the display.
Honeywell recommends that you set the font size between 8pt and 12pt. Font sizes greater then 12pt may
result in text wrapping on, for example, the Acknowledge Page and Clear All Filers buttons.
6
Save and close the file.
7
Repeat steps 2 to 6 for the remaining displays.
Code blocks to be modified
“Page” code block.
Search for the following block of code, and change the font size shown in italics.
<DIV id="Page" style="font-family: 'Helvetica';
font-size: 10pt;
margin: 0px;
padding: 0px;
cursor: default;
behavior: url(#HDXPageBehavior) url(#DisplayDataRepository);
overflow: visible;
display: inline;
position: absolute;
height: 845px;
width: 1276px;
left: 0px;
top: 0px;" HelpFileName="DocumentationSet.chm" HelpFileTypeList="HTML help"
LocateHelpTopicBy="Topic number" HelpTopic="402">
Figure 7: “Page” code block
“ExistComments” code block.
Search for the following block of code, and change the font size shown in italics.
<div id="ExistComments"
contentEditable="false" style="font-family: 'Helvetica';
font-size: 9pt
padding: 2px;
border: 1px inset;
width: 100%;
height: 100%;
overflow-x: auto;
overflow-y: scroll">
</div>
Figure 8: “ExistComments” code block
133
CUSTOMIZING STATION FOR USE WITH HIGH SCREEN RESOLUTIONS
“divDetailsSidePanel” code block.
Search for the following block of code, and change the font size shown in italics.
<DIV id="divDetailsSidePanel" style="visibility: hidden;
position: relative;
top: 0px;
left: 0px;
width: 100%;
height: 100%;">
<div style="position: absolute; top: 0px;
padding-top:24px;
padding-bottom:30px;
width: 100%;
height: 100%;
font-size: 9pt;">
Figure 9: “divDetailsSidePanel” code block
“btnSaveDetails” code block.
Search for the following block of code, and change the font size shown in italics.
<div id="btnSaveDetails"
OnHDXClick="javascript:SaveComments()" title="Save comments" disabled="true"
style="position:absolute; color: buttontext; bottom: 0px; right: 18px;
width: 140px; height: 28px; behavior: url(#HDXElementsFactory#Button);
font-size: 9pt;">
<img id="ImgSaveDetails" style="position: absolute; top: 5px; left: 4px;" src="Images/
SaveDisabled.gif"/>
<span style="position: absolute; top: 5px; left: 24px; text-align: center;">Save Comments</
span>
</div>
Figure 10: “btnSaveDetails” code block
“AddComments” code block.
Search for the following block of code, and change the font size shown in italics.
<textarea id="AddComments"
disabled="true" defaultValue="" newValue="" onkeyup="OnCommentsChanged()"
style="font-family: 'Helvetica'; border: 1px inset; width: 100%; height: 100%; overflow-x:
auto; overflow-y: scroll; background-color: threedface;">
</textarea>
Figure 11: “AddComments” code block
Related topics
“Changing the font size in the Trend with Events Summary” on page 136
Changing the default appearance of font sizes
The font sizes in the Summary Displays tab of the Server Wide Settings display are:
•
•
•
Small
Medium
Large
Associated with each of these values is a specific font size. These font sizes are defined in an Experion-supplied
script, which you can edit, if required. In addition to the font size, the script also defines the associated row
height for each size. If you edit a font size, you may also need to edit the row height to correctly accommodate
the new font size.
134
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATION FOR USE WITH HIGH SCREEN RESOLUTIONS
To change the default appearance of font sizes
1
Make a backup copy of the following file, which is located in <install folder>\Honeywell\Experion
\client\System\R100\Scripts, where <install folder> is the location where Experion is installed:
PKS
SummaryScript.js
2
Right-click on the file and choose Properties.
3
On the General tab, clear the Read-only check box, and then click OK.
4
Right-click on the file and choose Open With > Notepad.
5
Within the script file, locate the required large, medium, or small font definition, and edit the value defined
by the associated Table.style.fontSize statement (indicated in italics below):
// -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------// OnFontSizeChanged()
//
//
Fired by the TDO when it first retrieves the large font setting from the server.
// -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------function OnFontSizeChanged(lFontSizeType)
{
if (g_SummaryType != SUMMARY_EVENTVIEW)
{
if (lFontSizeType == 2) // large font size
{
Table.rowHeight=30;
Table.style.fontSize=18+"pt";
}
else if (lFontSizeType == 1) // medium font size
{
Table.rowHeight=25;
Table.style.fontSize=14+"pt";
}
else //default (or lFontSizeType == 0) // small font size
{
Table.rowHeight=22;
Table.style.fontSize=10+"pt";
}
}
}
6
If you have changed the font size, you may also need to edit the row height, which is defined by the
associated Table.rowHeight statement.
7
Save and close the file.
135
CUSTOMIZING STATION FOR USE WITH HIGH SCREEN RESOLUTIONS
Changing the font size in the Trend with Events Summary
Attention
You must have Windows administrator permissions to perform this task.
The font size used in the Trend with Events Summary is separately controlled in each part of the display, as
shown in the following figure. In order to change the font size, you must manually edit the sysEventView.htm.
Page
Comments
divDetailsSidePanel
btnSaveDetails
Figure 12: Text areas in the Trend with Events Summary
To change the font size
1
Make backup copies of the following file and folder, which are located in <install folder>\Honeywell
, where <install folder> is the location where Experion is installed:
\Experion PKS\Client\System\R100,
136
•
sysEventView.htm
•
sysEventView_files
2
Right-click the file and choose Properties.
3
On the General tab clear the Read-only check box, and then click OK.
4
Right-click the file again and choose Open With > Notepad.
5
With reference to the following figures and the above figure, change the font size of each part of the display.
Honeywell recommends that you set the font size between 8pt and 12pt. Font sizes greater then 12pt may
result in text wrapping on, for example, the Acknowledge Page and Clear All Filters buttons.
6
Save and close the file.
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATION FOR USE WITH HIGH SCREEN RESOLUTIONS
Code blocks to be modified
“Page” code block.
Search for the following block of code, and change the font size shown in italics.
<DIV id=" Page" style="font-family: 'Helvetica';
font-size: 8pt;
margin: 0px;
padding: 0px;
cursor: default;
behavior: url(#HDXPageBehavior) url(#DisplayDataRepository);
overflow: visible;
display: inline;
position: absolute;
height: 845px;
width: 1276px;
left: 0px;
top: 0px;" HelpFileName="" HelpFileTypeList="" LocateHelpTopicBy="" HelpTopic="">
Figure 13: “Page” code block
“Comments” code block.
Search for the following block of code, and change the font size shown in italics.
<tr style="font-size:7pt; width: 100%; height: 22px; vertical-align: bottom;">
<td style="width: 50%;">
Existing comments:
</td>
<td style="width: 50%;">
Additional comments:
</td>
</tr>
Figure 14: “Comments” code block
“divDetailsSidePanel” code block.
Search for the following block of code, and change the font size shown in italics.
<DIV id="divDetailsSidePanel" style="visibility: hidden;
position: relative;
top: 0px;
left: 0px;
width: 100%;
height: 100%;">
<div style="position: absolute; top: 0px;
padding-top: 24px;
padding-bottom:30px;
width: 100%;
height: 100%;
font-size: 7pt;"7>
Figure 15: “divDetailsSidePanel” code block
“btnSaveDetails” code block.
Search for the following block of code, and change the font size shown in italics.
<div id="btnSaveDetails"
OnHDXClick="javascript:SaveComments()" title="Save comments" disabled="true"
style="position: absolute; color: buttontext; bottom: 0px; right: 18px;
width: 140px; height: 28px; behavior: url(#HDXElementsFactory#Button);
font-size: 7pt;">
<img id="ImgSaveDetails" style="position: absolute; top: 5px; left: 4px;" src="Images/
SaveDisabled.gif"/>
<span style="position: absolute; top: 5px; left: 24px; text-align: center;">Save Comments</
span>
</div>
Figure 16: “btnSaveDetails” code block
137
CUSTOMIZING STATION FOR USE WITH HIGH SCREEN RESOLUTIONS
Related topics
“Changing the font size in the Summary displays (except the Trend with Events Summary)” on page 132
138
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATION FOR USE WITH HIGH SCREEN RESOLUTIONS
Changing the font size in the General and Comments tabs of the Detail
pane
Attention
You must have Windows administrator permissions to perform this task.
The font size used for the text that appears in the Detail pane of a Summary display is controlled by three files:
•
•
•
The associated Summary file, such as sysAlarmSummary.htm and sysEventSummary.htm
Default.xsl
ExistComments.xsl
As shown in the following figures, default.xsl controls the font size within the General tab which is specific
to the selected event; whereas ExistComments.xsl controls the font size within the Existing comments box. The
font size in the remaining parts of the display is controlled by the associated Summary file.
Associated Summary file
Default.xsl
Figure 17: General tab of the Detail Pane
Associated Summary file
ExistingComments.xsl
Figure 18: Comments tab of the Detail Pane
To change the font size
1
Make backup copies of the following files:
•
Default.xsl
•
ExistComments.xsl
The files are located in <install folder>\Honeywell\Experion
is the location where Experion is installed.
PKS\Client\System\R400\XSL,
where
<install folder>
2
Right-click a file and choose Properties.
3
On the General tab clear the Read-only check box, and then click OK.
4
Right-click the file again and choose Open With > Notepad.
139
CUSTOMIZING STATION FOR USE WITH HIGH SCREEN RESOLUTIONS
5
Locate and change the value of the 'font-size' attribute.
Honeywell recommends that you set the font size between 8pt and 12pt.
For example, change FONT-SIZE:
140
9pt
6
Save and close the file.
7
Repeat steps 2 to 6 for the other file.
www.honeywell.com
to FONT-SIZE:
11pt.
CUSTOMIZING STATION FOR USE WITH HIGH SCREEN RESOLUTIONS
Changing the font size in a custom HMIWeb trend display
Attention
You must have Windows administrator permissions to perform this task.
The following figures show the parts of a custom HMIWeb trend display (*.htm) in which you can change the
font size.
Title Toolbar
Chart Toolbar
Plot area: Y axis
Plot area: X axis
Legend: Header
Legend: Grid
Figure 19: Customizable font sizes in a custom HMIWeb trend display
Title Toolbar
Chart Toolbar
Plot Area: Y axis
Plot Area: X axis
Tabular History: Header
Tabular History: Grid
Figure 20: Customizable font sizes in a custom HMIWeb trend display with tabular history
To change the font size
1
Make a backup copy of the display file.
2
Start HMIWeb Display Builder.
3
Choose File > Open and select the display file.
4
Right-click the Trend object and choose Edit Properties.
5
Click the Fonts tab.
6
Referring to the above figures, select a part of the trend you want to change by clicking it in the object tree
(shown in the left box).
141
CUSTOMIZING STATION FOR USE WITH HIGH SCREEN RESOLUTIONS
7
Change the font size to the desired value.
Honeywell recommends that you set the font size between 8pt and 14pt.
8
Repeat the two previous steps for the remaining parts of the display.
9
Save and close the file.
Related topics
“Changing the font size in the plot axes in a DSP trend display” on page 143
142
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING STATION FOR USE WITH HIGH SCREEN RESOLUTIONS
Changing the font size in the plot axes in a DSP trend display
Attention
You must have Windows administrator permissions to perform this task.
You can change the font size of the plot axes in a custom DSP trend display (*.dsp).
Plot Axes
Figure 21: Plot axes of a custom DSP trend display
To change the font size
1
Make a backup copy of the display file.
2
Start Display Builder (not HMIWeb Display Builder).
3
Choose File > Open and select the display file.
4
Right-click the Chart object and choose Properties.
5
Click the Font tab.
6
Change the font size to the desired value.
Honeywell recommends that you set the font size between 8pt and 14pt.
7
Save and close the file.
Related topics
“Changing the font size in a custom HMIWeb trend display” on page 141
143
CUSTOMIZING STATION FOR USE WITH HIGH SCREEN RESOLUTIONS
144
www.honeywell.com
Printers
This section describes setting up printers with so they can be accessed by the Experion server for printing
reports on a periodic basis, reports generated as a result of a status change in the system or the continuous
printing of alarms and events.
Printing ad hoc from the Station computer does not require a printer to be defined with Quick Builder. You only
need to add the local or network printer to the Station computer using the Windows Add Printer wizard.
Examples of ad hoc printing are:
•
•
•
Printing what is shown in the Alarm, Events, or Message Summary displays.
Printing reports that are displayed on the screen.
Printing Station displays.
Printers that are intended for printing reports or alarms and events are defined with . When you have defined
your printers, you assign printers to specific tasks. You can assign any printer as one of the following:
Attention
Do not configure a printer as both a report printer and an alarm/event printer. Doing this causes report and alarm/event
data to be mixed in together.
•
Alarm/event printers can be segregated to print alarms and events associated with particular assets.
Related topics
“Enabling summary displays to be printed” on page 393
145
PRINTERS
Configuring printers checklist
Task
Go to
If the printer is to be an alarm/event printer, or the default printer
for reports, build a printer item in .
“Building a printer in Configuration
Studio” on page 146
If required, customize how alarms are printed.
“Configuring a Station to print alarms and
events” on page 147
If required, configure a Station to print alarms and events.
“Configuring a Station to print alarms and
events” on page 147
If required, changing the font size for the report printer.
“Changing the font size of the report
printer” on page 147
If required, configure the printer to print Station displays.
“Configuring a printer to print Station
displays” on page 147
Done?
Related topics
“Building a printer in Configuration Studio” on page 146
“Customizing how alarms are printed” on page 146
“Configuring a Station to print alarms and events” on page 147
“Changing the font size of the report printer” on page 147
“Configuring a printer to print Station displays” on page 147
Building a printer in Configuration Studio
You only need to complete this procedure if you want to print alarms and events as they occur (on a line-by-line
printer) or you want to set a default printer for reports.
To build a printer
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Printers.
2
Click the Build printers task.
3
In the Number of items to Add box, type 1.
4
In the Use Name box, type the name of the printer as defined and configured in Windows.
If the printer is connected to a network, you must use the format \\server\printer.
5
Click OK.
6
In the Description box, type a description for the printer.
7
If the printer is to be used as an alarm and event printer, choose the required language from the Alarm/
Event printer language list.
8
Click .
The Download dialog box appears.
9
Click OK.
Customizing how alarms are printed
To customize how alarms are printed
1
146
Click the printer you want to configure.
www.honeywell.com
PRINTERS
2
Specify how you want alarms and events to be printed.
If you want alarm details to be printed over two lines, select the Split alarm/event onto two lines check
box.
b If you want to change the number of characters printed specify the number of characters for the items
listed.
a
3
Select the Enabled check box to enable the printer.
Configuring a Station to print alarms and events
To configure an alarm and event printer
1
Click the Station from which you want to print alarms and events.
2
From the Alarm/Event printer list, click the printer to be used to print alarms and events.
3
Select the required check boxes for the types of alarms and events you want to print.
Attention
If you use operator-based security, the scope of responsibility and printer settings of the operator who is currently
logged on to a Station determine which alarms are printed and therefore override the Station printer assignment
settings.
Related topics
“About scope of responsibility” on page 336
“General tab, flex Station configuration display” on page 109
Changing the font size of the report printer
To change the font size of the report printer
1
Click the printer you want to configure.
2
In the Font box, type the font size you require.
3
Select the Enabled check box to enable the printer.
Configuring a printer to print Station displays
When operators print displays, such as Trends and Point details displays (using the Action > Print menu option
in Station), the display is printed using the Windows default printer defined for the Station computer.
In order for displays to print correctly, the default printer must be configured to landscape mode.
To configure a printer to print Station displays
1
Depending on your Windows operating system, do one of the following:
Option
Description
2
Right-click on the default printer and select Printing Preferences
3
On the Layout tab, click the Landscape option button.
4
Click OK to close the Printing Preferences window.
147
PRINTERS
148
www.honeywell.com
Configuring faceplates
This section describes how to configure faceplates so that they work in a manner that is appropriate to your
needs.
Task
Go to
Configure the server-wide faceplate options, such as auto-selection and
preferred set point.
“Configuring
server-wide
faceplate options”
on page 150
If you do not want persistent positioning for faceplates, disable it.
“Turning off
persistent
positioning for
faceplates” on
page 151
If you want operators to be able to reset faceplates to their default positions,
add a button to Station's toolbar.
“Adding a button to
Station's toolbar to
reset faceplates to
their default
positions” on
page 152
Attention
Only applicable if you have not disabled persistent positioning.
If you want the maximum number of faceplates that can be simultaneously
displayed to be less or more than four (the default), specify the number.
Done?
“Setting the
maximum number
of faceplates that
can be
simultaneously
displayed” on
page 153
Related topics
“Configuring server-wide faceplate options” on page 150
“Turning off persistent positioning for faceplates” on page 151
“Adding a button to Station's toolbar to reset faceplates to their default positions” on page 152
“Setting the maximum number of faceplates that can be simultaneously displayed” on page 153
“Faceplates” on page 154
“Faceplate auto-selection” on page 155
“Faceplates” on page 154
“Faceplate auto-selection” on page 155
“Configuring server-wide faceplate options” on page 150
“Server wide settings” on page 102
“Turning off persistent positioning for faceplates” on page 151
“Adding a button to Station's toolbar to reset faceplates to their default positions” on page 152
“Customizing toolbars, menus, and keyboard shortcuts” on page 70
“Setting the maximum number of faceplates that can be simultaneously displayed” on page 153
149
CONFIGURING FACEPLATES
Configuring server-wide faceplate options
The server-wide faceplate options are located on the Server Wide Settings display.
To configure the server-wide faceplate options
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
2
Click the Configure server-wide Stations settings task.
The Server Wide Settings display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
On the General tab, select the appropriate Faceplate Options.
Property
Description
Timeouts
Apply select timeout to faceplates
If selected (the default), the Select timeout value also applies to faceplates.
If you clear this check box, the Select timeout value does not apply to
faceplates—that is, an alphanumeric object, once selected, will remain
selected until an operator selects another object or closes the faceplate.
Faceplate options
Automatically select most appropriate
parameter
If selected, enables faceplate and MODE change auto-selection.
If you enable auto-selection:
•
•
Show values of intermediate tick marks
The faceplate automatically selects the appropriate control parameter
for the point when it is called up. This means that an operator can, for
example, immediately type a new set point, without having to first
select the set point box.
When the MODE parameter is changed, the faceplate automatically
selects the appropriate control parameter. If MODE is set to AUTO, the
SP element is selected. If MODE is set to MAN, the OP element is
selected.
Only applicable to faceplates that use indicators to show a parameter value.
If selected, the EU values associated with the tick marks appear along the
full length of the indicator object.
If cleared, no EU values are displayed for the intermediate tick marks.
Enable Preferred SP
If selected, operators can set a preferred set point.
The Preferred SP is shown as a hollow green triangle in the faceplate's
indicator; whereas the Current SP is shown as a solid green triangle.
Related topics
“Faceplate auto-selection” on page 155
“Configuring faceplates” on page 149
“Server wide settings” on page 102
150
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING FACEPLATES
Turning off persistent positioning for faceplates
This task is only applicable to a single instance of Station appearing in a single monitor.
By default, Station uses 'persistent positioning' for faceplates—that is, if an operator moves a faceplate to a
particular position, the faceplate will re-open at that position when it is next called up. The first time a faceplate
is called up, it appears in the bottom-right of the window.
If you turn off persistent positioning, the faceplate will always open adjacent to the associated object.
Because this task involves editing the Windows registry, you must perform this task on every Station computer
for which you want to turn off persistent positioning.
To turn off persistent positioning
1
Log on as a Windows Administrator.
2
Choose Start > All Programs > Accessories > Run.
3
Type regedit and click OK.
The User Account Control window is displayed.
4
Enter an administrator account and password and click OK.
5
Locate the key:
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Honeywell\Station\Faceplates\PersistentPositioning
6
Double-click Enabled, set the value 0 and click OK.
7
Exit the registry.
8
Refresh the display or call up a new display.
Related topics
“Configuring faceplates” on page 149
151
CONFIGURING FACEPLATES
Adding a button to Station's toolbar to reset faceplates to their default
positions
This task is not applicable if you have disabled persistent positioning.
You can add a button to Station's toolbar that resets faceplates to their default positions (the bottom-right of the
window). Alternatively, you could add a menu item or assign a shortcut key that performed the same function.
To add the button
1
In the Connection Properties dialog box, click the Toolbars tab.
2
In Menu, toolbar & keyboard shortcuts, specify the file you want to customize.
3
Click Customize.
The Customize dialog box opens.
4
Click the Toolbars tab.
5
Select the toolbar you want to which you want to add the button.
6
From the Action list, select Predefined action.
7
From the Predefined action list, select Reset Faceplate Positions.
8
Click Edit and assign an icon.
9
Click Insert.
10 In the Tooltip/Label box, type in the appropriate ToolTip.
11 Use the arrows to move the button to the required position in the toolbar.
12 Click Save As and specify a new .stb filename to save your settings.
13 Click Save to save the reference to the new. stb file in the current .stn file or click Save As and specify a
new .stn filename to create a new .stn file.
14 If you want to add this button to other Stations, copy the. stb and .stn files you have just modified/created to
the other Station computers.
Related topics
“Station setup files” on page 81
“Configuring faceplates” on page 149
“Customizing toolbars, menus, and keyboard shortcuts” on page 70
152
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING FACEPLATES
Setting the maximum number of faceplates that can be simultaneously
displayed
This task is only applicable to a single instance of Station appearing in a single monitor.
You can specify the maximum number of faceplates that can be simultaneously displayed. By default, the
maximum is four.
Because this task involves editing the Windows registry, you must perform this task on every Station computer
for which you want to specify the maximum number.
To set the number
1
Log on as a Windows Administrator. Choose Start > All Programs > Accessories > Run.
2
Type regedit and click OK.
The User Account Control window is displayed.
3
Enter an administrator account and password and click OK.
4
Locate the key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Honeywell\Faceplates
5
Double-click MaxFaceplates, type the required number and click OK.
6
Exit the registry.
7
Refresh the display or call up a new display.
Related topics
“Configuring faceplates” on page 149
153
CONFIGURING FACEPLATES
Faceplates
A faceplate is a specialized type of popup window that shows critical information about a point, and provides a
convenient means of controlling the point. Many faceplates, such as the following example, look like the front
panels of the field devices they represent.
In a single instance of Station appearing in a single monitor, operators can move faceplates around the Station
window and outside the Station window if the Station window is not maximized.
Faceplates include a range of features, such as ToolTips, shortcut keys and shortcut menus, that make it easier
for operators to interpret point-related data and to control points.
Figure 22: A typical faceplate
Related topics
“Configuring faceplates” on page 149
154
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING FACEPLATES
Faceplate auto-selection
Auto-selection means that when a faceplate is called up, or when the MODE value changes, the faceplate
automatically selects the most appropriate control parameter for the associated point type. Each point type has
its own faceplate.
Auto-selection enables operators to quickly control points, without having to first select the appropriate control
parameter. For example, if the appropriate control parameter is the set point, the operator can type, or ramp to, a
new set point without having to first click the set point element.
Similarly, if an operator changes the MODE parameter, the faceplate automatically selects the appropriate
parameter for the selected MODE value.
If auto-selection is disabled (the default setting), operators must first click the appropriate element before they
change a value.
Defined auto-selection behavior
The default auto-selection behavior for faceplates is to select the SP or OP element based on the MODE value
(SP when the MODE is AUTO, OP when the MODE is MAN). However, for some faceplates, this behavior is
not appropriate or desirable. Some faceplates may not contain a combination of SP, OP, or MODE elements.
Other faceplates may have another element which is appropriate for auto-selection, while other faceplates may
not have an appropriate element, and therefore, should not have any auto-selection behavior.
To accommodate these different needs, each faceplate can define a specific auto-selection behavior. The choices
are:
•
Select SP or OP based on MODE (the default auto-selection behavior)
•
Auto-selection occurs when the faceplate is called up or when an operator changes the MODE parameter.
Select a specific element
Auto-selection occurs when the faceplate is called up, with the specified element selected.
The element can be identified using the element ID or by using a handling script within the faceplate at
runtime.
If the element is specified using a script, the faceplate developer must handle the
event and set the Page.MostAppropriateParameter property to identify the
element that should be selected.
None
onRequestAppropriateParameter
•
There is no auto-selection behavior for this faceplate.
The following flowchart shows the defined auto-selection behavior.
155
CONFIGURING FACEPLATES
NO
Is Auto Selection
Enabled?
YES
What is the Defined
Auto Select Behavior
Select Specified
Element
Fire Event
None
Do Nothing
Select SP or OP
based on MODE
Auto Select when:
1) Faceplate is called up
2) Operator changes the MODE
How is Element
Defined?
ID
Provided
Fire
OnRequestAppropriate
Parameter Event
ID
Provided
Get Element
From ID
Element.Focus()
Auto Select when:
1) Faceplate is called up ONLY
Figure 23: Defined auto-selection behavior
Auto-selection behavior when a faceplate is called up
The following flowchart shows the auto-selection behavior when a faceplate is called up.
156
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING FACEPLATES
NO
Is Auto Selection
Enabled?
YES
Do Nothing
MAN
No SP
Element
Fire Event
AUTO
Check the mode
value
How is OP Defined?
All Other
Modes
No SP
Element
Fire Event
How is SP Defined?
Select PAGE
Element
ID
Provided
Fire
OnRequestOP
Event
ID
Provided
ID
Provided
Get Element
From ID
Do Nothing
Fire
OnRequestSP
Event
ID
Provided
Get Element
From ID
Element.Focus()
Select OP
Element
Do Nothing
Element.Focus()
Select SP
Element
Figure 24: Auto-selection behavior when a faceplate is called up
Attention
The 'Fire Event' conditions are only applicable to specialized faceplates. When these scripts run, they dynamically
select the appropriate parameter, based on the status of the current point. For more details about the events, see the
HMIWeb Display Building Guide.
Auto-selection is enabled. An operator calls up the faceplate for an analog point whose MODE parameter is
set to AUTO. As the MODE is AUTO, the faceplate automatically selects the SP element.
Auto-selection behavior when the MODE is changed
The following flowchart shows the auto-selection behavior when an operator changes the MODE parameter.
157
CONFIGURING FACEPLATES
NO
Is Auto Selection
Enabled?
YES
Is Mode Change due
to operator action
NO
Do Nothing
YES
MAN
All Other
Modes
No SP
Element
Fire Event
How is OP Defined?
ID
Provided
Get Element
From ID
Fire Event
How is SP Defined?
Select PAGE
Element
ID
Provided
Fire
OnRequestOP
Event
AUTO
Check the mode
value
Do Nothing
No SP
Element
ID
Provided
ID
Provided
Fire
OnRequestSP
Event
Element.Focus()
Get Element
From ID
Do Nothing
Element.Focus()
Select SP
Element
Select OP
Element
Figure 25: Auto-selection behavior for MODE changes
Attention
The 'Fire Event' conditions are only applicable to specialized faceplates. When these scripts run, they dynamically
select the appropriate parameter, based on the status of the current point. For more details about the events, see the
HMIWeb Display Building Guide.
Auto-selection is enabled. An operator changes the MODE parameter to MAN, so the faceplate
automatically selects the OP element.
Related topics
“Configuring faceplates” on page 149
“Configuring server-wide faceplate options” on page 150
“Server wide settings” on page 102
Control behavior of faceplates and custom displays
The following table specifies how faceplates and custom displays behave when an operator attempts to control a
point. It also specifies whether an error/warning message appears if an operator exceeds a limit or a tolerance.
158
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING FACEPLATES
Item type
Operator
action
Faceplate/
Presses/
point detail
raises
display/ group Lower key
display
Limit
exceeded
Tolerance
exceeded1
'Apply timeout to faceplates' setting2
Yes
Yes
If the device supports clamping: If the device supports clamping:
•
•
Yes
No
No
Types a
value
Disabled
No
Yes
No
Value clamped warning.
Value clamps to limits.
Enabled
•
•
Value clamped warning.
Value clamps to limits.
If the device does not support
clamping:
If the device does not support
clamping:
•
•
•
•
Limit exceeded error.
Object reverts to previous
value.
Limit exceeded error.
Object reverts to previous
value.
Object remains selected.
Object remains selected until the
select timeout occurs (typically
60 seconds). When the select
timeout occurs the object is deselected.
No tolerance confirmation, but
set to new value.
No tolerance confirmation, but
set to new value.
Object remains selected.
Object remains selected until the
select timeout occurs (typically
60 seconds). When the select
timeout occurs the object is deselected.
Set to new value.
Set to new value.
Object remains selected.
Object remains selected until the
select timeout occurs (typically
60 seconds). When the select
timeout occurs the object is deselected.
Yes
Yes
Limit exceeded error.
Yes
No
No
Yes
Tolerance confirmation and then set to new value.
No
No
Set to new value.
Object reverts to previous value.
Object is de-selected.
Object is de-selected.
Object is de-selected.
Custom
display
Presses/
raises
Lower key
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
If the device supports clamping:
•
•
Value clamped warning.
Value clamps to limits.
If the device does not support clamping:
•
•
Limit exceeded error.
Object reverts to previous value.
Object remains selected until the select timeout occurs (typically
60 seconds). When the select timeout occurs the object is deselected.
1
Not applicable to standard (inbuilt) points.
159
CONFIGURING FACEPLATES
Item type
Operator
action
Limit
exceeded
Tolerance
exceeded1
'Apply timeout to faceplates' setting2
No
Yes
No tolerance confirmation, but set to new value.
Disabled
Enabled
Object remains selected until the select timeout occurs (typically
60 seconds). When the select timeout occurs the object is deselected.
No
No
Set to new value.
Object remains selected until the select timeout occurs (typically
60 seconds). When the select timeout occurs the object is deselected.
Types a
value
Yes
Yes
As for faceplate.
Yes
No
No
Yes
As for faceplate.
No
No
As for faceplate.
Error and warning messages
The specific wording of error and warning messages depends on the point type, as specified in the following
table.
Point type
Value clamped warning
Limit exceeded error
Process
Value clamped at maximum/minimum
Value is out of range
Standard (inbuilt)
Value clamped at maximum/minimum
Value not accepted because it is above/below the
maximum/minimum allowed
1
160
Message type
Not applicable to standard (inbuilt) points.
2
This setting has no effect on custom displays.
2
This setting has no effect on custom displays.
www.honeywell.com
Configuring system interfaces
This section describes the steps required to configure system interfaces.
Related topics
“About system interfaces and flexible points” on page 162
“Defining system interfaces in Station” on page 163
“System interface tuning” on page 165
161
CONFIGURING SYSTEM INTERFACES
About system interfaces and flexible points
A system interface is a software component that interfaces between the Experion server and devices and
channels that are represented in Experion as flexible points.
This section discusses configuration tasks in Experion that apply to any system interface. For information about
a particular system interface, see the specific interface reference for your point server.
You can run a system interface on the same computer as the Experion server, or on a separate computer.
Depending on the system interface type, you can run more than one system interface on a computer, but each
system interface communicates with only one Experion server.
A system interface reads data directly from a field when required. When a display containing the flexible point
is called up, the server creates the point if it does not already exist. The point's parameter values are read from
the field using the system interface, and then shown on the display. The value of a flexible point parameter is
stored in the Experion server while the point parameter is being accessed (for example, the point parameter is
assigned to history collection, on a display that is currently shown in Station, or being accessed through the
Experion OPC server). Parameter values are updated and cached by the Experion server for a configured period
after a point is accessed.
Flexible point parameters can be added to groups, trends, history collection, point control schedules, reports,
and displays.
Related topics
“Point types” on page 185
Considerations for flexible points and point servers
Consider the following information about flexible points and point servers:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Flexible points do not support algorithms. A derived point must be used whenever a server algorithm is
required to be configured on a flexible point parameter.
Alarms for flexible points are generated by the point server, not by the Experion servers alarm subsystem. If
you are using a system interface that does not support alarming, you must use derived points to do the
alarming. See the reference for the particular system interface for more information.
Flexible points may not have standard parameters PV, OP and SP. You need to consider this when you are
creating custom displays with flexible points or adding flexible points to trends.
Flexible point data can be accessed using the OPC Server.
You need to know the numeric representation of state descriptors if you are using gating points or
algorithms.
Not all system interfaces use channels to communicate with Experion.
The status of system interfaces controllers can be viewed on the System Status display.
Related topics
“About derived points” on page 187
162
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM INTERFACES
Defining system interfaces in Station
After you have installed the system interface software you need to define the system interface to the Experion
server.
To define a system interface
1
On the System Configuration Menu display, click System Interfaces.
The System Interfaces Summary display appears.
2
In an empty row select the Type and click the alias.
The Point Server Configuration display appears.
3
In the Network Name box, type the TCP/IP name of the computer where the point server is installed.
If the point server is installed on the Experion server computer, type localhost.
4
In the Alias box, type the required alias for the point server.
The alias appears in the alarm and event summaries. The alias must be unique, and if you have redundant
server, it must be the same on both servers.
5
Use Configuration Studio to define the required assets for the point server.
6
Complete this step if your point server does not have assets defined (assets are defined in Configuration
Studio). Return to the Point Server Configuration display, click the Asset Mapping tab, and select a default
asset for this point server.
7
On the Point Server Configuration display, click the Status tab to check that system interface is
communicating with Experion server.
Point server configuration properties
Property
Description
Point Server
Network Name
The TCP/IP name of the computer on which the point server resides. Can be
localhost or the network name of a stand-alone point server computer, but
cannot be an IP address.
When defining a local point server on a redundant system, the network name
must be localhost.
Alias
The user defined name of the point server. This name appears in the alarm
and event summaries. The alias must be unique and is case sensitive. The
alias defaults to the point server type (for example, EXCEL).
When defining a local point server on a redundant system, the alias must be
the same on both the primary and secondary servers.
Options
Allow remote servers to query for new
points
Select the Allow remote servers to query new points check box if you want to
enable the ability of DSA servers to query your point server for point
information.
Point Discovery
Allow online discovery of new points
Select this check box if you want to search and discover points from this
point server. Online discovery is not the recommended method for
discovering points; by default, this check box is cleared.
163
CONFIGURING SYSTEM INTERFACES
Property
Description
Ignore alarms from points not configured
on this server unless they are fire alarms
Select this check box if you only want to see alarms for points configured on
this point server.
Attention
This option is only effective when the Allow online discovery of new
points option is selected.
164
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM INTERFACES
System interface tuning
The Tuning tab contains Cache and Communications Settings for the system interface. These settings should
only be changed by experienced technical personnel in consultation with your local Technical Assistance
Center.
To set tuning settings
1
On the System Configuration Menu display, click System Interfaces.
The System Interfaces Summary opens.
2
Click the server alias name.
The System Interface Configuration display opens.
3
Click the Tuning tab.
Specify point server tuning parameters.
Related topics
“Point server tuning parameters” on page 165
Point server tuning parameters
The Tuning tab contains Cache and Communications Settings for the system interface. These settings should
only be changed by experienced technical personnel in consultation with your local Technical Assistance
Center.
Property
Description
Common Settings
Connection time-out
The maximum amount of time Experion waits for a response from the
point server. If this time is exceeded without a response then the
connection is broken and communication is initiated again.
Data Settings
Cache flush time
Determines how frequently the cache is checked for references to old
data.
Cache age time
The amount of time (in milliseconds) old data remains in the cache.
When point parameter information is requested, the point is added to the
cache and is time stamped. The cache is checked periodically and any
points that have been in cache longer than the cache age time are
removed from the cache.
165
CONFIGURING SYSTEM INTERFACES
Property
Description
Maximum subscription time
This time is used to determine whether point parameter values are
updated using subscription or synchronous read (polls). If the required
update rate is less than the maximum subscription time, then subscription
is used. If the update rate is greater than the maximum subscription time
then polling is used.
The update rate can be taken from the display object, the display, or
Station. The fastest update rate is used for comparison with the maximum
subscription time.
Attention
If you have DSA, this setting must be the same for the point server
and Experion servers in the DSA.
With subscription, a single request is sent from the Experion server to the
point server for updates at the specified rate. With polling, the Experion
server sends a request to the point server whenever an update is required.
List fragment size
The number of parameters that can be sent at a time.
This is tuned for optimal performance on low bandwidth links.
You should ensure that custom displays do not contain point parameter
data that exceeds this number.
Synchronization time
The time of day that time synchronization occurs between the Experion
and the system interface.
Notification Settings
Notification buffer interval
The maximum amount of time (in seconds) that the system interface
buffers notifications before sending to the Experion server.
Notification keep alive interval
The maximum amount of time (in seconds) the system interface does not
send packets to the Experion server. If Experion does not receive an
alarm or an alarm keep alive packet from the system interface within this
time the connection is broken and communication is initiated again.
Related topics
“System interface tuning” on page 165
166
www.honeywell.com
Configuring controllers
Attention
The information in this section applies to configuring controllers other than Experion Process Controllers. For
information on configuring Experion Process Controllers, see the Control Building User's Guide.
Related topics
“About controllers and channels” on page 168
“Building channels” on page 170
“Building controllers” on page 175
“Enabling and disabling channels and controllers” on page 176
“Monitoring channel and controller communications” on page 177
“Communications tests” on page 178
“Viewing channel configuration information” on page 179
“Viewing the controller configuration summary” on page 180
“Viewing point names on a specific controller” on page 181
“Points” on page 183
“Customizing Stations” on page 61
167
CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS
About controllers and channels
In Experion, the term 'controller' is the generic term for devices such as loop controllers, and so on, which are
used to monitor and control one or more processes and items of field equipment.
In an Experion system, controllers are connected to the server so that the server can coordinate the monitoring
and supervising of all your plant processes.
The communication links that connect controllers to the server are known as 'channels.' Every controller in your
system (other than the Experion Process Controllers and point servers) must be associated with a channel.
Depending on the type of controllers and the type of communications line you used to connect them to the
server, you may have more than one controller on a channel.
After installing the server software and setting up your physical controllers, you need to:
1. Build your channels.
2. Build your controllers.
3. Download the channel and controller configuration data from Configuration Studio to the Experion
database.
4. Enable each channel.
Related topics
“Enabling and disabling channels and controllers” on page 176
Connecting controllers to the server
Depending on the capability of controllers, they connect to the server in one or more of the following ways.
•
•
•
LAN (Ethernet/Honeywell proprietary network)
Serial line (RS-232, RS-422, and RS-485)
Serial line to LAN using a terminal server
Details of these connections are given in the Installation Guide and the Controller References (which are
accessed via Quick Builder's help).
Communications status
Before you start defining controllers and channels, it is useful to understand a number of concepts that are used
in Experion to flag communications failures and help you to monitor the state of your system.
After the connections between the server and the controllers have been physically set up, defined, and enabled,
the server starts to record channel and controller communications statistics. These statistics can be viewed using
the channel and controller communications displays at a Station.
The server maintains the following communications statistics for each channel. If there is more than one
controller on a channel, the channel values represent the sum of all of the controller values on that channel.
Total requests Indicates the number of requests for data that have been sent to the channel or controller.
168
Total errors
Indicates the number of times the controller did not respond or the response was incorrect (for
example, due to a bad checksum).
Barometer
Indicates the condition of the channel or controller. Every time an error occurs, the barometer
increments by 2 or more, depending on the type of error. Every time a good call is made it is
decremented by 1. If the number of errors is relatively large, the barometer value will tend to
increase. If the number of errors is relatively small, the barometer value will tend to decrease.
The minimum value of the barometer is zero.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS
Related topics
“Marginal and fail limit alarms” on page 169
“Monitoring channel and controller communications” on page 177
“Enabling and disabling channels and controllers” on page 176
Marginal and fail limit alarms
You can specify a 'marginal' and a 'fail' barometer limit for channels and controllers.
When the barometer reaches the marginal limit, an alarm is generated and the channel or controller
communication is declared to be 'marginal.' If the barometer continues to increase and the 'fail' limit is reached,
an alarm is generated, the channel or controller communication is declared to be 'failed,' and scanning of points
on that channel or controller ceases. You can specify the priority of the alarms generated using the Alarm
Enabling tab of the Alarms and Event Management display.
For most types of controllers, the server will try to reestablish communications every 60 seconds, using a
diagnostic scan.
For some types of controllers, it is necessary to disable and then re-enable the channel or controller in order to
reestablish communications after the problem has been rectified.
Related topics
“Communications status” on page 168
“Monitoring channel and controller communications” on page 177
“Enabling and disabling channels and controllers” on page 176
Communications redundancy
With some types of controllers, Experion provides the option of defining redundant communications links to
provide a safety net in the event of communications link failures.
Primary Link
Server
Backup Link
Controller
Figure 26: Communications redundancy architecture
Attention
If a single channel is later changed to a redundant configuration (or vice versa), then all controllers that are on that
channel will need to be rebuilt to ensure that the controllers will connect to the alternate link if the primary link is
disconnected or severed.
169
CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS
Building channels
Attention
For SCADA systems, downloading items from Quick Builder to the server (or when using the pntbld command) may
cause temporary bad values on any controllers that are configured to report by exception. This is because the scanning
system loads the new scanning strategy. If this occurs, values will return to normal after 1–2 seconds.
If you want to prevent the rebuilding of the new scan strategy, clear the Rebuild Scan Tables check box when
downloading from Quick Builder, or use the -ns switch in pntbld. Be aware that scanning of any new or changed
points will not occur until the new scanning strategy is loaded.
To build channels
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Control Strategy.
2
In the SCADA Control list, click the Build channels task.
Quick Builder appears.
3
Create a channel item for each channel in your system.
When you create a channel item, you need to select a controller type; for example, Allen-Bradley, LCS620,
and so on.
4
Select the channel item(s) in the item list and complete the relevant options on each tab.
The information you need to specify depends on the type of channel. For details, see Quick Builder's help.
5
Download the items to the server.
Defining redundant communication links
For devices that support communications redundancy, Quick Builder displays a Redundant Port tab, where you
can configure the redundant link if you require it.
The options in the Redundant Port tab are identical to those in the Port tab. However, when you first display the
Redundant Port tab, it shows only the Port Type and Port Name options. The appropriate additional options
are displayed after you select a port type. For details, see the Quick Builder User's Guide and the appropriate
Interface Reference for the device.
To set up redundant communications links
1
Define the redundant channels in the appropriate Quick Builder property tab for each controller.
2
On the Channel Configuration Summary display, ensure that both check boxes are selected for the
channels that use redundant communication links.
Related topics
“Enabling and disabling channels and controllers” on page 176
“Setting security levels for enabling/disabling channels and hardware” on page 361
Configuring Stallion EasyConnection Adapter channel
The Stallion EasyConnection Adapter is used to provide up to eight RS-232, RS-422, and RS-485 serial ports
for connection to appropriate controllers. In order to use these ports in channel configuration, you need to make
a note of which logical Windows ports relate to which physical ports on the Stallion EasyConnection board.
To configure a Stallion EasyConnection Adapter channel
1
170
Do one of the following:
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS
Option
Description
Windows Server 2008
•
•
In the Windows Control Panel classic view, double-click Administrative
Tools.
Double-click Computer Management.
•
The Computer Management window is displayed.
Select Device Manager in the left pane.
The Device Manager window is displayed.
Windows 7
•
In the Windows Control Panel large or small icon view, click Device
Manager.
The Device Manager window is displayed.
2
Expand the Ports tree to view a list of Stallion EasyConnection ports versus Windows COM ports.
Tip
You can obtain more information on the setting up of each port by double-clicking the required port and
viewing the properties, which you can then adjust, if required.
3
In Quick Builder, build a channel for the correct device type.
4
Configure the port for the channel using the COM port number from step above.
Setting flow control
Because of limitations on how quickly they can process serial data, some computers and other devices
implement flow control strategies to ensure that data is neither received nor transmitted at a rate faster than the
device can process. Flow control is also used by industrial devices to interface with modems or half-duplex
radio systems. Flow control strategies are also known as 'handshaking'.
For controllers, flow control is usually only required when communicating through a half-duplex radio link or a
modem connected to the device. Flow control is necessary for half-duplex radio systems to ensure that the radio
link is 'keyed' to receive or transmit data in the correct direction. Note that cabling requirements for devices that
use flow control and those that do not are different.
With the Stallion EasyConnection Serial Adapter different ports can be configured to use different flow control
strategies. Before using the Stallion EasyConnection Serial Adapter, find out what flow control strategies are
used by your devices, including any intervening modems or half-duplex radio systems.
Related topics
“RS-232 cabling requirements for Stallion EasyConnection” on page 173
Software flow control (XON/XOFF)
Software flow control uses special characters in the data stream to control the transmission and reception of
data. These characters are called 'XON' and 'XOFF'. Because they interfere with the data flow, these characters
should not appear in the normal data transmitted in the data stream. XON/XOFF flow control is therefore
normally used only to transmit ASCII characters. Transmission of ASCII characters ensures that the XON and
XOFF characters will not appear within the normal data stream. Software flow control is also called XON/
XOFF handshaking.
It is possible to use software flow control in addition to hardware flow control, but this is very uncommon.
To configure your channel to use software flow control, on the Quick Builder Port tab for serial ports, choose
either Input or Output from the XON/XOFF list:
•
•
Input uses XON/XOFF to control the flow of data on the receive line
Output uses XON/XOFF to control the flow of data on the transmit line
171
CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS
RS-232 hardware flow control (RTS/CTS)
Hardware flow control uses specialized RS-232 lines of the serial cable to determine whether the device is ready
to process incoming data. These lines are called RTS (Request to Send) and CTS (Clear to Send). This form of
flow control is often called RTS toggle/CTS handshaking.
Using this form of flow control, the server (data terminal equipment or DTE) will raise the RTS line when it
wants to transmit data. The device (data communications equipment or DCE) will raise its CTS line when it is
ready to receive data. When both the RTS and CTS lines are raised, the server will transmit data. After the
server has finished sending data, it lowers the RTS line. The device will then lower its CTS line. The device
might also lower its CTS line if its input buffer becomes full. If this occurs the server will stop transmitting data
and will wait until the device raises its CTS line again before recommencing transmission. Hardware flow
control has special cabling requirements.
To configure your channel to use hardware flow control, on the Quick Builder Port tab for serial ports, ensure
Enable RTS/CTS flow control is selected.
Attention
Because hardware flow control uses special RS-232 lines, this type of flow control is unavailable for RS-422 and
RS-485 communications.
The following timing diagram shows how this works with a radio system.
RTS
DTE Originated (server)
CTS
DCE originated (Radio Modem)
DATA
DTE Originated
RTS is dropped in
order to allow the
radio system to
key transmission
in the other
direction so that
the Controller may
respond to the
Server.
Figure 27: Timing diagram for RTS/CTS flow control
Related topics
“RS-232 cabling requirements for Stallion EasyConnection” on page 173
RS-232 modem and radio link support
Some devices, such as modems and radio links, are limited not only by the rate at which they process data, but
by whether their links (radio or telephone) are currently good. These devices sometimes use extra RS-232 lines
to signal whether the device has a good connection.
Modems typically use DCD (Data Carrier Detect) to signal that they have a good connection. Other devices
sometimes use DSR (Data Set Ready). The server can be configured to watch either or both of these lines. If the
lines go down, the channel will fail.
To configure your channel to use these settings, on the Quick Builder Port tab for serial ports, ensure the
appropriate Detect DCD or Detect DSR is selected.
172
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS
RS-232 cabling requirements for Stallion EasyConnection
Most devices have their own particular RS-232 cabling requirements. See the documentation for your device to
determine how to wire your RS-232 cable.
The lines from the Stallion EasyConnection board use the standard RS-232 pin assignments. The following
table lists the standard RS-232 pin assignments.
Table 5: Stallion RS-232 pin assignments
Pin Number
Data Line
Description
1
Shield
Signal Shield
2
TXD
Transmit serial data
3
RXD
Receive serial data
4
RTS
Request to Send
5
CTS
Clear to Send
6
DSR
Device (DCE) ready
7
GND or COM
Signal common (ground)
8
DCD or RLSD
Carrier Detect (Received line signal detector)
20
DTR
Server (DTE) ready
22
RI
Ring Indication
Related topics
“Setting flow control” on page 171
“RS-232 hardware flow control (RTS/CTS)” on page 172
RS-422 cabling requirements for Stallion EasyConnection
There are no special settings required in Quick Builder for a RS-422 setup. The following figure shows the
wiring requirements.
Stallion Board Lines
RS-422 device
15
17
19
25
3
18
Tx
Tx
Rx
Rx
+ve
-ve
+ve
-ve
To other RS-422 devices
Figure 28: RS-422 wiring diagram
RS-485 port configuration and wiring requirements
To use the Stallion EasyConnection board with RS-485, select Enable Stallion RS-485 Half Duplex on the
serial port tab for the channel properties in Quick Builder.
173
CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS
Stallion Board Lines
15
17
19
25
3
18
RS-485 4-wire device
Tx
Tx
Rx
Rx
+ve
- ve
+ve
-ve
To other RS-485 devices
Figure 29: RS-485 wiring diagram for 4-wire configuration
To use the Stallion EasyConnection board with a 2-wire RS-485 configuration, select Echo (Required for
Stallion RS-485 ports) on the serial port tab for the channel properties in Quick Builder.
Stallion Board Lines
15
17
19
25
3
18
RS-485 2-wire device
Tx /Rx +ve
Tx /Rx -ve
To other RS-485 devices
Figure 30: RS-485 wiring diagram for 2-wire configuration
174
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS
Building controllers
To build controllers in Quick Builder
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Control Strategy.
2
In the SCADA Control list, click the Build controllers task.
Quick Builder appears.
3
Create a controller item for each controller in your system.
Note that when you create a controller item, you need to specify the controller type; for example, an AllenBradley, a Series 9000, and so on.
4
Select one (or more) of the controller items in the item list and then complete the relevant options on each
tab.
The information you need to specify depends on the type of controller. For details, see Quick Builder's help.
5
Download the items to the server.
175
CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS
Enabling and disabling channels and controllers
After you have downloaded the channels and controllers to the server, you need to 'enable' them so that the
system can send and receive data.
To enable or disable channels and controllers, you need to be using Station with a the minimum security level or
higher for enabling or disabling channels and controllers. The minimum security level for enabling or disabling
hardware is defined in the Security tab of the Server Wide Settings display.
By default, all channels are initially disabled and all controllers are initially enabled.
Even if a controller is enabled, it is only scanned by the server if the corresponding channel is also enabled.
To enable a channel
1
In Station choose Configure > System Hardware > Channels.
2
On the Channel Configuration Summary display, select the Enable check box located next to the name of
channel.
3
If you are using redundant communication links select both the A and B check boxes.
Attention
The Hiway column in the System Status–Channels display only applies to channels for TDC 3000 Data Hiway
controllers.
Related topics
“Setting security levels for enabling/disabling channels and hardware” on page 361
“Defining redundant communication links” on page 170
“About controllers and channels” on page 168
“Monitoring channel and controller communications” on page 177
“Communications status” on page 168
“Marginal and fail limit alarms” on page 169
176
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS
Monitoring channel and controller communications
You can monitor your Experion system communications by checking on the status and error statistics of each
channel and each controller in your system.
The Channel Status Detail and the Controller Status Detail display shows the current status of the selected
channel or controller and a range of error statistics.
If you have defined redundant communications links for any of your channels and controllers, the Status Detail
display works like the display for a single link, except that there are two columns of information: one for link A,
and one for link B.
To view status and error statistics information of a channel
1
Choose View > System Status > Channels.
The Channel Status Summary display appears.
2
Click the required channel.
The Channel Status Detail display for the selected channel appears.
3
Open the Location Pane if it is not already open.
4
Expand the system components tree to find the required channel.
5
Double-click the channel.
The Channel Status Detail display for the selected channel appears.
To view the status and error statistics of a controller
1
Choose View > System Status > Controllers.
The Controller Status Summary appears.
2
Click the required controller.
The Controller Status display for the selected controller appears.
Related topics
“Enabling and disabling channels and controllers” on page 176
“Communications status” on page 168
“Marginal and fail limit alarms” on page 169
177
CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS
Communications tests
It is important to resolve any connection problems before starting to define points.
After downloading the channel and controller definitions from Quick Builder to the server database, you can
test the communications between the server and the controllers by running the special test utilities that come
with Experion.
To run a test utility, go to a command prompt and type the name of the utility.
If your controller type does not have a test utility, enable the channels and controllers to ensure they can
communicate with the server.
The test utilities for controllers supported by Experion are described in the Quick Builder's controller-specific
help.
178
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS
Viewing channel configuration information
You can call up system Configuration displays to view information about the channels that have been defined
and enabled for your system.
To call up the Channel Configuration Summary display
1
Choose Configure > System Hardware > Channels from the Station menu bar.
2
To call up the Channel Configuration display for a channel, click its number or title in the Channel
Configuration Summary display.
Attention
The Hiway identifier and the Enable Hiway Switching check box under TDC Channel Options apply only to
channels for TDC 3000 Data Hiway controllers.
The Enable Hiway Switching check box is used to enable and disable automatic switching by the server to the
backup TDC 3000 Data Hiway when the channel fails. See the online reference module for the TDC 3000 Data
Hiway controller interface for more details.
179
CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS
Viewing the controller configuration summary
You can call up system Configuration displays to view information about the controllers that have been defined
and enabled for your system.
For each controller in your system, the Controller Configuration Summary display shows:
•
•
•
The controller ID
Whether or not the controller is enabled
The channel/point server name
This information is also available on the System Status–Controllers display, and you can enable or disable
controllers on both displays.
This procedure can be used only for the following controllers:
This procedure can only be used from a Flex Station.
To call up the Controller Configuration Summary display
180
1
Choose Configure > System Hardware > Controllers from the Station menu.
2
Click the required controller.
The Controller Status display for the selected controller appears.
3
Click Details.
Details that are specific to the controller appear.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS
Viewing point names on a specific controller
After you have downloaded your points to the system, you can view a list of points defined for each controller
in the server database.
The points listed are those that have an address that refers to a real location within the controller. Points that
have been associated with the controller for scanning purposes, but have addresses that reference other points or
locations in the database, are not included.
1
Choose Configure > System Hardware > Controller Interfaces > Controllers from the Station menu bar.
2
Click View Points to display a list of the point parameters that have addresses defined for the chosen
controller.
181
CONFIGURING CONTROLLERS
182
www.honeywell.com
Points
The information in this section applies to configuring points on controllers other than Experion Process
Controllers. For information on points on Experion Process Controllers, see the Control Building User's Guide.
This section provides an overview of the different types of points you can configure and how they can be used.
This section assumes that you have:
•
•
A basic understanding of the various point types and how they are used in Experion. (If not, you should read
the general information about points in the Station Planning Guide before continuing with the procedures in
this chapter.)
Followed the instructions in for building and customizing a Station and for configuring your controllers and
channels.
Related topics
“About points” on page 184
“Point types” on page 185
“About flexible points” on page 186
“About derived points” on page 187
“Naming rules for points” on page 188
“Associating points with assets” on page 190
“Flexible point parameters” on page 191
“Standard point parameters” on page 192
“Status point parameters” on page 194
“Analog point parameters” on page 196
“Accumulator point parameters” on page 201
“Summary of internal point parameters” on page 204
“Scanning and standard points” on page 212
“Control properties for points” on page 215
“About alarms and events for standard points” on page 219
“Station displays for points” on page 224
“About changing point configuration via Station displays” on page 226
“Advanced point configuration” on page 227
“About user-defined data formats” on page 229
“About algorithms” on page 235
“Customizing Stations” on page 61
“Configuring controllers” on page 167
183
POINTS
About points
Experion uses points to store information about field values or devices, for example, the state of a pump, a
temperature sensor, the process variable of a control loop.
Experion records each significant change in the values for a point as an event, which operators can see on the
Event Summary display. Point events can also be treated as alarms, for which you can configure a priority that
determines whether it is included in the Alarm Summary.
Depending on your data acquisition and control requirements, you might only need to define very simple points.
For example, you might only need to define points that are going to be used in simple processes or applications,
such as monitoring an oven temperature or monitoring the state of a pump.
On the other hand, your data acquisition and control requirements might be more sophisticated. For example,
you might want to use a point to:
•
•
•
•
•
Monitor and provide access to a PID loop in a controller .
Generate an alarm.
Collect historical data.
Start an application.
Run a server script to perform a task on point change.
Related topics
“Configuring alarms” on page 258
184
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
Point types
Experion provides the following point types:
Type
Description
Flexible Point
A point that is accessed via a system interface. The format of the point is determined by the system
interface, not by Experion.
Process
A point on an Experion Process Controller, which is accessed directly via the Control Data Access
Server.
Status
Represents digital inputs or outputs. For example, the on and off states of a pump or light. It is a
standard point type with a fixed data structure.
Analog
Represents continuous values. For example, pressures in a boiler or temperatures in a blast
furnace. It is a standard point type with a fixed data structure.
Accumulator
Represents total values. For example, the volume of water that has flowed into a tank or through a
turbine. It is a standard point type with a fixed data structure.
Database
A standard point that accesses data from parameters of other points, or from user files.
Container
A point that ties together a set of related standard points so that you can manage them as if they
were one point. A container point is, in effect, a user-defined point type that matches your data
requirements for a particular device type or scenario.
Related topics
“About flexible points” on page 186
“About system interfaces and flexible points” on page 162
“Database addresses” on page 227
“Template displays and container points” on page 377
185
POINTS
About flexible points
A system interface reads data directly from a field when required. When a display containing the flexible point
is called up, the server creates the point if it does not already exist. The point's parameter values are read from
the field using the system interface, and then shown on the display. The value of a flexible point parameter is
stored in the Experion server while the point parameter is being accessed (for example, the point parameter is
assigned to history collection, on a display that is currently shown in Station, or being accessed through the
Experion OPC server). Parameter values are updated and cached by the Experion server for a configured period
after a point is accessed.
Flexible point parameters can be added to groups, trends, history collection, point control schedules, reports,
and displays.
Related topics
“Point types” on page 185
“Considerations for flexible points” on page 186
Considerations for flexible points
•
•
•
•
•
Flexible points do not support algorithms. A derived point must be used whenever a server algorithm is
required to be configured on a flexible point parameter.
Flexible points are not processed by the Experion server's alarm subsystem. For most system interfaces or
point servers this is not an issue, because the controller or point server would generate alarms on the point.
However, if you are using a system interface or point server that does not support alarming, you must use
derived points to do the alarming. See the reference for the particular system interface or point server for
more information.
Flexible points might not have standard parameters PV, OP and SP. You need to consider this when you are
creating custom displays with flexible points or adding flexible points to trends.
Flexible point data can be accessed using the OPC Server.
Not all system interfaces support redundancy. If your system interface does not support redundancy and you
have a system with redundant servers you must install your system interface on a computer that is not one of
the redundant servers.
Related topics
“About flexible points” on page 186
“About derived points” on page 187
186
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
About derived points
A derived point is a point whose parameters are mapped to another point's parameters or a user table. Derived
points are typically used to perform a function that the referenced point or user table cannot perform. For
example, you build derived points if you have flexible points and want to use algorithms.
Derived points are built as standard points. You also need to build a user scan task channel and a user scan task
controller.
Related topics
“Considerations for flexible points and point servers” on page 162
“Considerations for flexible points” on page 186
“Building a derived point” on page 187
“Considerations for derived points” on page 187
“Summary of internal point parameters” on page 204
“Standard point parameters” on page 192
Considerations for derived points
•
•
Use a separate channel and controller for your derived points.
User tables 1, 2, and 3 (Files 251, 252 and 253) are configured by default in all Experion servers. It is
convenient to build a channel and controller referring to File 251, Record 1 (unless this has been used for
another purpose)
Related topics
“Building a derived point” on page 187
“About derived points” on page 187
Building a derived point
To build a derived point
1
Add a user scan task controller and channel and configure them as appropriate.
2
Add a point of the appropriate type, that is, status, analog or accumulator.
3
Enter the appropriate Parent Asset.
4
Set the PV Scan Period to a suitable value, such as 60 seconds.
5
Click the button to the right of PV Source Address to open the Address Builder and then:
Set Address Type to Point.
Type the name of the flexible point in Point Name.
c Type the name of the flexible point's parameter in Parameter.
d Select the user scan task controller from the Controller Name list.
e Click OK.
a
b
6
Configure the point's remaining properties as appropriate.
7
Download the point to the server.
Related topics
“About derived points” on page 187
“Considerations for derived points” on page 187
187
POINTS
Naming rules for points
All points within your system have a tag name (also called a point ID or point name) and an item name. Tag
names must be unique, whereas item names can be duplicated as long as the resulting full item name is unique.
When a point is created, it is given a unique tag name, for example, POINT01 or POINT02. This identifier is
used in Experion whenever it is necessary to refer to a point in the server (for example, on a custom display or
in a report).
Point names must follow certain naming rules:
•
•
•
•
•
An item name cannot match the item name of any other point belonging to the same parent asset.
Tag names must be unique within the cluster server.
Tag names and item names can contain up to 40 single-byte or 20 double-byte alphanumeric characters, with
at least one alpha character.
Tag names and item names are not case-sensitive: POINT01 and Point01 represent the same asset.
Tag names and item names cannot contain any of the following characters:
•
– Space (rule applies to tag names only)
– Ampersand (&)
– Less than (<)
– Greater than (>)
– Asterisk (*)
– Backslash (\)
– Braces { } (rule applies to item names only)
– Caret (^)
– Brackets [ ]
– Parentheses ( )
– Percent (%)
– Question mark (?)
– Single quote (')
– Double quote (")
– Period (.)
– Comma (,)
– Forward slash (/)
– Vertical bar (|)
– Colon (:)
– Semi colon (;)
– Tabs
– Equals (=)
The first character of a tag name and an item must not be any of the following characters:
•
•
– Space
– At sign (@)
– Dollar sign ($)
The last character of a tag name and an item must not be a space.
A full item name:
– Must not be longer than 200 characters
– Must be unique
188
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
It is also important for both engineers and operators that points are named in a consistent and ‘user-friendly’
manner. You might, for example, consider:
•
•
•
Basing the names on existing documentation, such as schematics and wiring diagrams, so that users can
easily switch between documents and displays.
Using the same prefix for related points, so that users can easily find related points.
Starting each part of a name with a capital, to improve readability. For example: Boiler1Temp.
189
POINTS
Associating points with assets
By associating points with assets, the point becomes an entity within the Asset model. As a result points can be
more easily located within the Asset model because the Asset model is a representation of your system. After
you have created assets, you then associate points with the appropriate asset when you build your points.
An asset model is used to represent your process. It is a hierarchical arrangement of entities that represent
assets, such as individual pieces of equipment in your organization. You create assets and the asset model using
Configuration Studio. For more information see the 'About asset models' section of the Station Planning Guide.
Assets can be assignable, enabling you to control access to assets. By associating points with assignable assets,
you can control access to those points.
190
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
Flexible point parameters
Flexible point parameters represent the data structures and applications existing in a particular controller or
device. Flexible points can have the equivalent of PV, OP and SP parameters, however they may have different
names and different data structures. Flexible points are accessed via a system interface.
For more information about the parameters used by flexible points in your system, see the relevant Controller
Reference for the interface being used.
191
POINTS
Standard point parameters
Each point type has a different set of parameters available.
To learn about
Go to
Summary of standard point parameters and addresses
“Summary of standard
point parameters and
addresses” on page 192
Status point parameters
“Status point parameters”
on page 194
Analog point parameters
“Analog point parameters”
on page 196
Accumulator point parameters
“Accumulator point
parameters” on page 201
Source and destination addresses
“Source and destination
addresses” on page 211
Related topics
“Summary of standard point parameters and addresses” on page 192
“Database addresses” on page 227
“About derived points” on page 187
“Summary of internal point parameters” on page 204
Summary of standard point parameters and addresses
The names of the parameters reflect their most common usage. They can, however, be used to hold any
controller values.
Because Experion can store and manage multiple values in the one point, you can use a single point to monitor
and control a complete loop.
Not all parameters need to be configured for each point. In many cases, the only parameter of a point that needs
to be configured is the PV to show the current value of a given location within a controller.
The following table summarizes the addressable parameters of the standard point types.
Table 6: Summary of point parameter types
Parameter Types
Status Points
SP (Set Point)
Analog Points
Accumulator Points
Yes
PV (Process Variable)
Yes
Yes
OP (Output)
Yes
Yes
MD (Mode)
Yes
Yes
A1 (Auxiliary #1)
Yes
A2 (Auxiliary #2)
Yes
A3 (Auxiliary #3)
Yes
A4 (Auxiliary #4)
Yes
Yes
Except for the PV parameter, the input/output point parameters listed in “Table 6: Summary of point parameter
types” can all be configured to have a source address, or a destination address, or both. The PV parameter can
192
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
only be configured to have a source address, as it is used for the measured value of some element of the process,
such as a temperature, that cannot be changed directly by the operator.
193
POINTS
Status point parameters
A status point has three parameters that can address field values:
•
•
•
Process Variable (PV)
Output (OP)
Mode (MD)
“Figure 31: Status point representing a pump” shows the relationship between a field value and a status point.
Server (Station Display)
Controller
Plant Equipment
Ladder
Logic
PV
MD
OP
Digital Input
Digital Output
PV
OP
MD
Pump
Figure 31: Status point representing a pump
Related topics
“Status point process variable (PV)” on page 194
“Status point output (OP)” on page 195
“Status point mode (MD)” on page 195
Status point process variable (PV)
For every point in your system that is to be used in monitoring a process, you need to define the 'input' (for
example, the reading from a field device) so that the server knows what kind of information it has to read from
the controller that is regulating that process.
This input is known in Experion as the 'process variable' (or PV) of a point, because it represents values that are
a function of the process itself (or the controller or both). Process variables cannot be changed by an operator.
When you define the PV you need to know the:
•
•
Number of states
State descriptors
Status point PVs are used to represent the current 'state' of the field device or process. For example, you could
define four distinct states for a valve that has two limit switches: TRAVEL, CLOSED, OPEN, and FAIL. The
PV for a status point in Experion can be used to represent up to eight discrete states.
194
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
Status points represent these states by reading up to three consecutive discrete values from an address in the
controller. You will need two states to monitor 1 bit, up to four states to monitor 2 bits, and up to eight states to
monitor 3 bits.
Attention
Bits are numbered from the least significant to the most significant.
For 2- and 3-bit addresses, the bits are assumed to have contiguous controller addresses.
For each state you want to use, you need to define a short alphanumeric descriptor (8 characters maximum). The
number of descriptors you enter must match your selected number of states.
For example, if you wanted to use a point to monitor and control a valve, the PV might be used to represent 4
states of that valve and the descriptors might be: TRAVEL, CLOSED, OPEN, and FAIL.
Related topics
“Status point parameters” on page 194
Status point output (OP)
OP is the opposite of PV, that is, OP represents values that can be changed by an operator, or by another
component of the system, when performing supervisory control. The OP of a point can usually only be changed
by an operator if the mode of that point is set to 'manual.'
For points in your system that are to be used in controlling a process or value, you need to define the available
states that can be controlled.
For a status point, you can define up to four output states, which correspond to four of the input states for that
point. In the valve example, you might define CLOSED, and OPEN as the two controllable output states.
Related topics
“Status point parameters” on page 194
Status point mode (MD)
The mode of a status point is used to determine whether or not an operator is permitted to control the output
value. The two most common modes are: 'manual' and 'automatic'.
The MD state is usually determined by addressing a single bit in the controller, however some controller types
support 2 bit modes.
Related topics
“Status point parameters” on page 194
195
POINTS
Analog point parameters
An analog point can represent the following different types of field values:
•
•
•
•
•
Process Variable (PV)
Output (OP)
Mode (MD)
Set point (SP)
Up to four auxiliary values (A1, A2, A3, A4)
Analog points represent continuous values such as pressures or temperatures. “Figure 32: Analog point
representing a flow control loop” shows the relationship between field values and an analog point.
Server (Station Display)
Controller
Plant Equipment
PID
SP PV
OP MD
SP
PV
OP
MD
Pump
Valve
Flow Sensor
Figure 32: Analog point representing a flow control loop
Related topics
“Analog point process variable (PV)” on page 196
“Analog output (OP)” on page 199
“Analog mode (MD)” on page 199
“Analog set point (SP)” on page 199
“Analog auxiliary values (A1, A2, A3, and A4)” on page 199
“About drift deadband” on page 197
“About the clamp point” on page 198
“Control modes for standard points” on page 216
Analog point process variable (PV)
The PV of an analog point represents the current 'reading' (represented in engineering units) of the field device
or process. PVs are often used to represent the process variable of a control loop.
196
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
When you define the PV you need to specify the:
•
•
•
•
Engineering units
Range high value and range low value
Drift deadband
Clamp point
In defining the PV of an analog point, you need to specify the engineering units used in representing the PV
value; for example, Deg. K, ohms, ML/min. The maximum length is 8 characters.
You also need to specify the highest and the lowest valid values of the range for this point. For example, if the
maximum output of a temperature transmitter represents 600 degrees centigrade, and the minimum is zero
degrees centigrade, you need to enter the value 600 as the Range High Value and 0 as the Range Low Value so
that the server can correctly 'scale' or convert the raw data captured from the controller.
Related topics
“Analog point parameters” on page 196
About drift deadband
In defining the parameters of an analog point you can specify a 'drift deadband' to eliminate unnecessary point
processing and therefore reduce system load.
Tip
The processing power available in a computer qualified to run Experion server software makes it unnecessary to set
a value of greater than 0% for the drift deadband in most applications.
Whenever a new parameter value is scanned from a controller, further point processing is only performed if the
value has changed by more than the configured drift deadband amount since processing last occurred. The
deadband value is expressed as a percentage of the point range.
Further point processing includes:
•
•
Updating the parameter value
Processing point alarms
The following figure shows how drift deadbands work in relation to PV.
197
POINTS
Field Value
Upper
Deadband
PV Limit
75
74
Lower
Deadband
Limit
Time
Point PV Value
PV
75
74
Time
Figure 33: Drift deadband
Related topics
“Analog point parameters” on page 196
About the clamp point
When defining an analog point you can indicate whether you want the PV to be clamped to 0% if it less than the
PV clamp low limit, and 100% if it is greater than the PV clamp high limit.
For example, because of instrumentation inaccuracies or anomalies, a controller might give a reading of 9 units,
when in fact you know that the reading should be zero. By setting a PV clamp limit of 10, you can force the
reading from the controller to be read as zero whenever it is less than 10. This can be useful when integrating a
value over time.
The high and low limits for the PV clamp are defined on Point Processing tab on the Alarm & Point
Processing display. The values are entered as a percentage of the point range.
Leaving the clamp limits at the default values of -10% (low) and 110% (high) makes them essentially
ineffective.
The following figure shows how PV clamps work.
198
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
PV
Field Value
Low Clamp
Limit
0%
Clamped PV
Time
PV
100%
High Clamp
Limit
Clamped PV
Time
Field Value
Figure 34: Effects of PV clamping
Related topics
“Analog point parameters” on page 196
Analog output (OP)
The output (or 'OP') can be used to read and write an analog value. It can only be changed by an operator if the
mode is set to MANUAL.
The OP value is always in the range of 0% to 100% and is intended to indicate '% open' of a valve. If the valve
is reverse acting, for example, 4 mA represents valve fully open and 20 mA represents valve fully closed, then
the OP Reverse parameter should be enabled so that the OP indicator still shows '% open.'
Related topics
“Analog point parameters” on page 196
Analog mode (MD)
The mode (or MD) is used to determine whether or not an operator is permitted to control the output value. The
two most common modes are 'manual' and 'automatic.'
Related topics
“Analog point parameters” on page 196
Analog set point (SP)
The set point (or 'SP') can be used to read and write an analog value in a controller. Set points are represented in
engineering units and are often used to represent the required operating value for a control loop.
Related topics
“Analog point parameters” on page 196
Analog auxiliary values (A1, A2, A3, and A4)
Up to four additional values can be used to read and write four analog values in a controller. These auxiliary
values are given names A1 to A4 and are represented in engineering units. Auxiliary values can be used to
display the tuning constants of a control loop, or any other addressable parameters in the controller.
199
POINTS
Related topics
“Analog point parameters” on page 196
200
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
Accumulator point parameters
Accumulator points represent totalizers. “Figure 35: Accumulator point” shows the relationship between a field
value and an accumulator point.
Accumulator Point
Server
Counter
Controller
Turbine
Flow Meter
Field
Figure 35: Accumulator point
An accumulator point can access a single counter input value.
Related topics
“Accumulator point process variable (PV)” on page 201
Accumulator point process variable (PV)
The PV for an accumulator point is used to read a value from a counter (in a controller) that continues to
increment until it reaches its rollover value, at which time it resets.
When you define the accumulator point you specify:
•
•
•
•
•
Engineering units
Rollover value of controller counter
Range high value (used for the PV indicator and RSHI alarm only)
Scale factor
Meter factor
The following example describes how accumulator process variables work and illustrates some of the concepts
used in defining the PV of an accumulator point.
201
POINTS
Example
Suppose there is a server accumulator point named AZGALLONS and that this point is connected to a field
value that is a counter that counts from 0 to 4095. At 4,096, the counter's value rolls over to 0. Suppose also
that the AZGALLONS scale and meter factors are set to 1 and that the values of AZGALLONS and the field
values are both 4,000:
If the field counter increases by:
The raw value of the counter is:
And the PV value of AZGALLONS is:
50
4,050
4,050
50
4
4,100
50
54
4,150
The value of AZGALLONS will continue to increase either until it is reset by an operator, or until it reaches
the maximum value that it can display (in which case it will display a series of asterisks).
Engineering units
In defining the PV of an accumulator point, you need to specify the engineering units used in representing the
PV value for an accumulator point; for example, ML, Kwh. The maximum length is 8 characters.
Rollover value
In defining an accumulator point you need to specify the value at which the 'physical' counting or totalizing
mechanism on the device or controller rolls over.
Note that, regardless of this 'physical' rollover value, the accumulator point PV continues to increase indefinitely
until it reaches its maximum value or until it is reset by an operator.
Range high value
You also need to specify the value that represents the highest available range for this point. This is only used to
scale the height of the PV indicator and for the RSHI alarm.
Scale factor
The scale factor is a multiplier (usually close to 1) that is used to convert the raw counts of the totalizing device
into engineering units. For example, if you are measuring totals in megaliters, and the counting device uses 1
count to indicate 1 megaliter, the scale factor would be 1; if it uses 1 count to indicate 2 megaliters, the scale
factor would be 2.
Meter factor
A meter factor is a multiplier that is used for calibration purposes.
Every time the controller's counter value is scanned, the PV value is determined by the following formula:
PVnew = PVold + (SF × MF × Rawcounts)
202
Part
Description
PVnew
The new PV.
PVold
PV at the last scan.
SF
The scale factor.
MF
The meter factor.
Rawcounts
The change in the counter value since the last scan. If the new raw count is less than the old
raw count, the counter is assumed to have rolled over.
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
Related topics
“Accumulator point parameters” on page 201
203
POINTS
Summary of internal point parameters
The following table shows the internal parameters for the point types accumulator, analog, and status.
Internal Parameter
Description
A1AssociatedParameter
If non zero, the A1 value is store to this parameter.
Yes
A1ExternalChangeAlarmEnabl
e
If enabled (=1), an alarm is generated if the A1
changes.
Yes
A1InError
The A1 value is unreliable. (0=ok, 1=error)
Yes
A1Status
The composite state of the A1 parameter, where bit:
Yes
•
•
•
If non zero, the A2 value is store to this parameter.
Yes
A2ExternalChangeAlarmEnabl
e
If enabled (=1), an alarm is generated if the A2
changes.
Yes
A2InError
The A2e value is unreliable. (0=ok, 1=error)
Yes
A2Status
The composite state of the A2 parameter, where bit:
Yes
0 is Off scan
1 is In error
3 is Control inhibit
A3AssociatedParameter
If non zero, the A3 value is store to this parameter.
Yes
A3ExternalChangeAlarmEnabl
e
If enabled (=1), an alarm is generated if the A3
changes.
Yes
A3InError
The A3 value is unreliable. (0=ok, 1=error)
Yes
A3Status
The composite state of the A3 parameter, where bit:
Yes
•
•
•
0 is Off scan
1 is In error
3 is Control inhibit
A4AssociatedParameter
If non zero, the A4 value is store to this parameter.
Yes
A4ExternalChangeAlarmEnabl
e
If enabled (=1), an alarm is generated if the A4
changes.
Yes
A4InError
The A4 value is unreliable. (0=ok, 1=error)
Yes
A4Status
The composite state of the A4 parameter, where bit:
Yes
•
•
•
Status
point
0 is Off scan
1 is In error
3 is Control inhibit
A2AssociatedParameter
•
•
•
204
Accumul Analog
ator point point
0 is Off scan
1 is In error
3 is Control inhibit
ActionAlgoBlock
The number of the algorithm block used by the PV
change algorithm.
Yes
Yes
Yes
ActionAlgoExists
If set (=1), an Action algorithm has been built on the
point.
Yes
Yes
Yes
ActionAlgoNumber
The number of the algorithm used during PV change
processing.
Yes
Yes
Yes
Alarm1SubPriority
The alarm subpriority of alarm 1. (0-15)
Yes
Yes
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
Internal Parameter
Description
Accumul Analog
ator point point
Alarm1Priority
The alarm priority of alarm 1, for example, Urgent.
Yes
Yes
Alarm2SubPriority
The alarm subpriority of alarm 2. (0-15)
Yes
Yes
Alarm2Priority
The alarm priority of alarm 2, for example, Urgent.
Yes
Yes
Alarm3SubPriority
The alarm subpriority of alarm 3. (0-15)
Yes
Yes
Alarm3Priority
The alarm priority of alarm 3, for example, Urgent.
Yes
Yes
Alarm4SubPriority
The alarm subpriority of alarm 4. (0-15)
Yes
Yes
Alarm4Priority
The alarm priority of alarm 4, for example, Urgent.
Yes
Yes
Alarm5Priority
The alarm priority of alarm 5, for example, Urgent.
Yes
Yes
Alarm6Priority
The alarm priority of alarm 6, for example, Urgent.
Yes
Yes
Alarm7Priority
The alarm priority of alarm 7, for example, Urgent.
Yes
Yes
Alarm8Priority
The alarm priority of alarm 8, for example, Urgent.
Yes
Yes
AlarmDeadbandPercent
The value must drop below the alarm limit by this
amount before the alarm is returned.
Yes
Yes
AlarmDisabled
Alarming is disabled for the point. (0=enabled.
1=disabled)
Yes
Yes
AlarmLimit1
The value at which alarm 1 is tripped.
Yes
Yes
The value at which alarm 2 is tripped.
Yes
Yes
The value at which alarm 3 is tripped.
Yes
Yes
The value at which alarm 4 is tripped.
Yes
Yes
The value at which alarm 5 is tripped.
Yes
Yes
The value at which alarm 6 is tripped.
Yes
Yes
The value at which alarm 7 is tripped.
Yes
Yes
The value at which alarm 8 is tripped.
Yes
Yes
AlarmMessageIndex
A point can be configured to generate a message. This
is the message number.
Yes
Yes
AlarmPriority
The alarm priority of unreasonable alarm.
Yes
Yes
AlarmSubPriority
The alarm subpriority of unreasonable alarm.
Yes
Yes
AlarmType1
The type of alarm 1, for example, PVHI
Yes
Yes
AlarmType2
The type of alarm 2, for example, PVHI
Yes
Yes
AlarmType3
The type of alarm 3, for example, PVHI
Yes
Yes
AlarmType4
The type of alarm 4, for example, PVHI
Yes
Yes
AlarmType5
The type of alarm 5, for example, PVHI
Yes
Yes
AlarmType6
The type of alarm 6, for example, PVHI
Yes
Yes
Status
point
Yes
(Short name AL1)
AlarmLimit2
(Short name AL2)
AlarmLimit3
(Short name AL3)
AlarmLimit4
(Short name AL4)
AlarmLimit5
(Short name AL5)
AlarmLimit6
(Short name AL6)
AlarmLimit7
(Short name AL7)
AlarmLimit8
(Short name AL8)
Yes
205
POINTS
206
Internal Parameter
Description
Accumul Analog
ator point point
AlarmType7
The type of alarm 7, for example, PVHI
Yes
Yes
AlarmType8
The type of alarm 8, for example, PVHI
Yes
Yes
AlarmValue
If the point is not in alarm, the AlarmValue parameter
has a value of 0. Otherwise the value is equal to the
alarm type as defined in the alarm limit. For example,
if the point is in the PV LO state the AlarmValue
parameter is 6.
Yes
Yes
Yes
AssociatedDisplay
When the associated display key is pressed, this
display is called up.
Yes
Yes
Yes
ControlConfirmRequired
If enabled (=1), the operator must confirm all changes
to the point.
Yes
Yes
ControlDeadbandPercent
The value gets this close to the target value, the control
is considered complete.
Yes
ControlFailAlarmPriority
The alarm priority at which a control failure is
alarmed.
Yes
Yes
Yes
ControlFailAlarmSubPriority
The alarm subpriority at which a control failure is
alarmed
Yes
Yes
Yes
ControlLevel
The operator must have this control level or better to
be able to control the point.
Yes
Yes
Yes
ControlTimeout
An index to a system table that specifies the time in
seconds that a control takes to complete.
Yes
Yes
Description
The description of the point.
Yes
Yes
DriftDeadbandPercent
The value must change by more than this amount to be
considered a change.
EUHI
100% range
Yes
Yes
Yes
EULO
0% range
Yes
Yes
Yes
FullItemName
The item name of the point combined with the item
name of its parent asset, and so forth, up to a top level
node in the asset model.
Yes
Yes
Yes
GroupDetailDisplayDefault
The default group display for the point type.
Yes
Yes
Yes
H1H
History Standard 1 hour
Yes
Yes
Yes
H1HE
History Extended 1 hour
Yes
Yes
Yes
H1M
History Standard 1 min
Yes
Yes
Yes
H24H
History Standard 24 hour
Yes
Yes
Yes
H24HE
History Extended 24 hour
Yes
Yes
Yes
H5SF
History Fast, configured between 1 and 30 seconds.
Yes
Yes
Yes
H6M
History Standard 6 min
Yes
Yes
Yes
H8H
History Standard 8 hour
Yes
Yes
Yes
H8HE
History Extended 8 hour
Yes
Yes
Yes
InDeviationHighAlarm
If set (=1), a Deviation High alarm exists.
InDeviationLowAlarm
If set (=1), a Deviation Low alarm exists.
InHighAlarm
If set (=1), a PV High alarm exists.
Yes
Yes
InHighHighAlarm
If set (=1), a PV High High alarm exists.
Yes
Yes
InLowAlarm
If set (=1), a PV Low alarm exists.
Yes
InLowLowAlarm
If set (=1), a PV Low Low alarm exists.
Yes
www.honeywell.com
Yes
Status
point
Yes
Yes
Yes
POINTS
Internal Parameter
Description
Accumul Analog
ator point point
InRateOfChangeAlarm
If set (=1), a Rate of Change alarm exists.
Yes
InState0
The status point is in state 0.
Yes
InState1
The status point is in state 1.
Yes
InState2
The status point is in state 2.
Yes
InState3
The status point is in state 3.
Yes
InState4
The status point is in state 4.
Yes
InState5
The status point is in state 5.
Yes
InState6
The status point is in state 6.
Yes
InState7
The status point is in state 7.
Yes
InTransmitterLowAlarm
If set (=1), a Transmitter Low alarm exists.
Yes
InTransmitterHighAlarm
If set (=1), a Transmitter High alarm exists.
Yes
InUnreasonablyLowAlarm
If set (=1), an Unreasonably Low alarm exists.
Yes
InUnreasonablyHighAlarm
If set (=1), an Unreasonably High alarm exists.
InUserAlarm1
If enabled (=1), an alarm is generated
Yes
InUserAlarm2
If enabled (=1), an alarm is generated
Yes
InUserAlarm3
If enabled (=1), an alarm is generated
Yes
InUserAlarm4
If enabled (=1), an alarm is generated
Yes
ItemName
An alternative name for the point that is used in the
context of the asset mode.
Yes
Yes
Yes
LastProcessedDate
The day when the value of the PV last changed.
Yes
Yes
Yes
LastProcessedTime
The time of day when the value of the PV last
changed.
Yes
Yes
Yes
LocationFullItemName
The full item name of the point's parent asset.
Yes
Yes
Yes
LocationTagName
The tag name of the point's parent asset.
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
MDExternalChangeAlarmEnabl If enabled (=1), an alarm is generated if the MD
e
changes.
MDStatus
The composite state of the MD parameter, where bit:
•
•
•
Yes
Status
point
Yes
Yes
0 is Off scan
1 is In error
3 is Control inhibit
MeterFactor
The accumulator meter factor. Normally 1.0, is
adjusted after meter proving.
Yes
ModeCheckDisabled
If set (=1), the mod is not checked before doing a
control.
Yes
Yes
ModeInError
The Mode value is unreliable. (0=ok, 1=error)
Yes
Yes
NormalMode
The normal mode of the point, for example, Auto.
Yes
Yes
NumberOfInputStates
Number of bits (less one) holding the Status PV states
(2, 4, or 8)
Yes
For example: 0 = 1 bit (holding 2 states) 1 = 2 bit
(holding 4 states) 2 = 3 bit (holding 8 states)
207
POINTS
Internal Parameter
Description
NumberOfOutputState
Number of bits (less one) holding the Status OP states
(2 or 4)
Accumul Analog
ator point point
Status
point
Yes
For example: 0 = 1 bit (holding 2 states) 1 = 2 bit
(holding 4 states)
OnScan
0=off,1=on
OPExternalChangeAlarmEnabl
e
Yes
Yes
If enabled (=1), an alarm is generated if the OP
changes.
Yes
Yes
OPReverse
The OP value is reversed.
Yes
Yes
OPStatus
The composite state of the OP parameter, where bit:
Yes
Yes
•
•
•
OutputHighLimit
0 is Off scan
1 is In error
3 is Control inhibit
Data entry of Outpoint values above this value will be
rejected.
Yes
OutputInError
The Output value is unreliable. (0=ok, 1=error)
Yes
OutputLowLimit
Data entry of Outpoint values below this value will be
rejected.
Yes
(Short name OPHI)
(Short name OPLO)
Yes
PointDetailDisplayDefault
The default detail display for the point type.
Yes
Yes
Yes
PointID
The name of the point. This name identifies the point.
Yes
Yes
Yes
PointInAlarm
The point is in alarm (0=no alarm, not 0=in alarm)
Yes
Yes
Yes
PulseWidthSecs
For a status OP, if this is non zero, the OP will be reset
to zero after this time.
PVAlgoBlock
The number of the algorithm block used by the PV
algorithm.
Yes
Yes
Yes
PVAlgoExists
If set (=1), a PV algorithm has been built on the point.
Yes
Yes
Yes
PVAlgoNumber
The number of the algorithm used during PV
processing.
Yes
Yes
Yes
PVClampingEnabled
If enabled (=1), the PV will be clamped between the
high and low clamp limits.
Yes
PVExternalChangeAlarmEnabl
e
If enabled (=1), an alarm is generated if the PV
changes.
Yes
Yes
PVInError
The Process value is unreliable. (0=ok, 1=error)
Yes
Yes
Yes
PVStatus
The composite state of the PV parameter, where bit:
Yes
Yes
Yes
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
RawPV
208
Yes
www.honeywell.com
Yes
0 is Off scan
1 is In error
2 is Unreasonable (out of range) [Analog point
only]
3 is Control inhibit
4 is Manual PV
5 is Alarming and journaling disabled
6 is Alarming disabled (journal only)
7 is In alarm (not filtered by SOR assignment)
The value of the accumulator raw input (the counter it
is reading).
Yes
POINTS
Internal Parameter
Description
REALARM
If set (=1), the point in alarm transitions between
alarm states.
RollOver
Accumulator input rollover value, for example, a 12
bit counter rolls over at 4095.
Yes
ScaleFactor
The accumulator scale factor, for example, 1
pulse.count = 5.678 liters.
Yes
SetpointHighLimit
Data entry of set point values above this value will be
rejected.
Yes
SetPointInError
The set point value is unreliable. (0=ok, 1=error)
Yes
SetpointLowLimit
Data entry of set point values below this value will be
rejected.
Yes
(Short name SPHI)
(Short name SPLO)
Accumul Analog
ator point point
Yes
SPExternalChangeAlarmEnable If enabled (=1), an alarm is generated if the SP
changes.
Yes
SPStatus
Yes
The composite state of the SP parameter, where bit:
•
•
•
Status
point
0 is Off scan
1 is In error
3 is Control inhibit
State0AlarmEnabled
State 0 is an alarm state.
Yes
State0AlarmPriority
The alarm priority of state 0, for example, Urgent.
Yes
State0AlarmSubPriority
The alarm subpriority of state 0. (0-15)
Yes
State0Descriptor
The text that describes PV state 0, for example, Travel.
Yes
State0InAlarm
If set (=1), a State 0 alarm exists.
Yes
State1AlarmEnabled
State 1 is an alarm state.
Yes
State1AlarmPriority
The alarm priority of state 1, for example, Urgent.
Yes
State1AlarmSubPriority
The alarm subpriority of state 1. (0-15)
Yes
State1Descriptor
The text that describes PV state 1, for example, Open.
Yes
State1InAlarm
If set (=1), a State 1 alarm exists.
Yes
State2AlarmEnabled
State 2 is an alarm state.
Yes
State2AlarmPriority
The alarm priority of state 2, for example, Urgent.
Yes
State2AlarmSubPriority
The alarm subpriority of state 2. (0-15)
Yes
State2Descriptor
The text that describes PV state 2, for example,
Closed.
Yes
State2InAlarm
If set (=1), a State 2 alarm exists.
Yes
State3AlarmEnabled
State 3 is an alarm state.
Yes
State3AlarmPriority
The alarm priority of state 3, for example, Urgent.
Yes
State3AlarmSubPriority
The alarm subpriority of state 3. (0-15)
Yes
State3Descriptor
The text that describes PV state 3, for example,
Invalid.
Yes
State3InAlarm
If set (=1), a State 3 alarm exists.
Yes
State4AlarmEnabled
State 4 is an alarm state.
Yes
State4AlarmPriority
The alarm priority of state 4, for example, Urgent.
Yes
State4AlarmSubPriority
The alarm subpriority of state 4. (0-15)
Yes
209
POINTS
Internal Parameter
Description
Accumul Analog
ator point point
Status
point
State4Descriptor
The text that describes PV state 4, for example,
Stopped.
Yes
State4InAlarm
If set (=1), a State 4 alarm exists.
Yes
State5AlarmEnabled
State 5 is an alarm state.
Yes
State5AlarmPriority
The alarm priority of state 5, for example, Urgent.
Yes
State5AlarmSubPriority
The alarm subpriority of state 5. (0-15)
Yes
State5Descriptor
The text that describes PV state 5, for example,
Stopped.
Yes
State5InAlarm
If set (=1), a State 5 alarm exists.
Yes
State6AlarmEnabled
State 6 is an alarm state.
Yes
State6AlarmPriority
The alarm priority of state 6, for example, Urgent.
Yes
State6AlarmSubPriority
The alarm subpriority of state 6. (0-15)
Yes
State6Descriptor
The text that describes PV state 6, for example,
Stopped.
Yes
State6InAlarm
If set (=1), a State 6 alarm exists.
Yes
State7AlarmEnabled
State 7 is an alarm state.
Yes
State7AlarmPriority
The alarm priority of state 7, for example, Urgent.
Yes
State7AlarmSubPriority
The alarm subpriority of state 7. (0-15)
Yes
State7Descriptor
The text that describes PV state 7, for example,
Stopped.
Yes
State7InAlarm
If set (=1), a State 7 alarm exists.
Yes
TargetPVforOPState0
The PV state that is expected for OP state 0, for
example, 0=Travel.
Yes
TargetPVforOPState1
The PV state that is expected for OP state 1, for
example, 1=Open.
Yes
TargetPVforOPState2
The PV state that is expected for OP state 2, for
example, 2=Closed.
Yes
TargetPVforOPState3
The PV state that is expected for OP state 3, for
example, 3=Invalid
Yes
UnackAlarmExists
The point has alarmed and the alarm has not been
acknowledged.
Yes
Yes
Units
The engineering units for the point, for example,
Liters, The PV is 3.45 Liters.
Yes
Yes
Yes
Related topics
“Database addresses” on page 227
“About derived points” on page 187
“Standard point parameters” on page 192
“About auxiliary parameters” on page 227
“Experion parameters with Microsoft Excel Data Exchange functions” on page 586
About internal point parameters
Apart from the standard point parameters there is a range of other parameters to store internal information for
the point. Examples of these types of parameters are alarm limits and ranges for an analog point.
210
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
Whenever an item of information in a point needs to be referenced in another part of the server (for example,
when building custom displays), you identify that item by specifying the point ID and the parameter name.
Source and destination addresses
To define the main properties and control properties of a point, you need to understand source and destination
addresses and how they are used.
Points are generally used to read values from and write values to an address in a controller.
Addresses (usually in the memory of the controller) that are to be read (or 'scanned') by the server are referred to
as the source address for a point parameter.
Addresses that are to be written to (or 'controlled') by the server are referred to as the destination address for a
point parameter.
Source and destination addresses generally refer to memory locations within real controllers. These addresses
are known as hardware addresses.
Experion uses 'control confirmation' scans to ensure that controls are actually performed by a controller. When a
point parameter has both a source and a destination address, the source address is scanned immediately after the
destination address is written to. An alarm is generated if the scanned value does not match the controlled value,
indicating that an attempted operator action did not actually occur.
The formats of hardware source and destination addresses depend on the type of controller. Details about the
format of these addresses can be found in Quick Builder's help for each controller.
It is also possible to address information in the server database, for example, the parameter of another point.
These are known as database addresses.
Related topics
“Control properties for points” on page 215
“About auxiliary parameters” on page 227
“Scanning and standard points” on page 212
211
POINTS
Scanning and standard points
This section is applicable to standard points only.
Scanning is the process by which the server reads values from locations in controllers, specified by the source
addresses, and stores them in point parameters.
The server uses the scanning process for status, analog, and accumulator points.
To minimize the load on the whole system, it is important to plan for and implement an efficient scanning
strategy. A point can have multiple parameters associated with it and all point parameters must be considered
when analyzing the point scan load of a system.
The methods of scanning are:
•
•
•
Periodic
Exception
Demand
Related topics
“About auxiliary parameters” on page 227
“Source and destination addresses” on page 211
Periodic scanning
Periodic scanning is the regular scanning of a point parameter at specified time intervals.
With periodic scanning, you select the appropriate scan period, ranging from seconds to minutes, for each input/
output parameter. For example, if you assign a scan period of 15 seconds to the PV, the server scans the value in
the controller every 15 seconds.
When choosing a scan period, consider the following factors:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Whether the controller automatically reports changes of state. If so, periodic scanning might not be
necessary.
The rate of change of the value. If a value only changes once an hour, it is inefficient to scan that value every
five seconds.
The rate at which history needs to be collected for the parameter. A point requiring one minute snapshots to
be recorded would not necessarily require a scan period less than 60 seconds.
How quickly field changes need to be available on a Station display. Dynamic values on a display are
updated from the database at the configured update rate of the Station.
The number of values that can be scanned from a controller at a particular scan rate. For example, it is
unlikely that 2,000 analog values could be scanned every second from a controller connected to server via a
serial line operating at 1200 baud. Many factors influence this value.
Whether periodic scanning is available—some controllers do not respond to scanning polls and rely on
reporting by exception.
You may have to experiment to arrive at optimum scanning periods. For details about using the lisscn utility to
analyze analyzing scanning performance, see the Configuration Guide.
Exception scanning
Exception scanning is only available for those controllers that support the reporting of significant events to the
server. They are setup and configured to report by exception (initiate the communication).
Significant events can be caused by events such as:
•
212
Changes in a status point
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
•
•
Significant changes in an analog point
Analog alarms
For more information about configuring this type of scanning, see the controller-specific help in Quick Builder.
Demand scanning
Demand scanning provides a one-shot scan of a point parameter in response to a request. Two main types of
demand scanning are used:
•
•
Scan Point Special
Control Confirmation
A 'Scan Point Special' is the term used to describe a demand scan of point parameters. A Scan Point Special is
performed whenever scanning of a point is disabled and then re-enabled (for example using the Point Detail
display). Application programs and free format reports can cause a Scan Point Special demand scan of a point.
A Control Confirmation demand scan is issued on the source address (if configured) after an OP, SP, MD, or an
auxiliary parameter control is issued. This is to confirm that the control took place correctly. If the scanned
value does not match the controlled value (within the deviation deadband), a control fail alarm may be
generated.
Related topics
“Analog point alarms” on page 221
“Status point alarms” on page 220
Scan packets
The basic unit of scanning created by the server to acquire data from a controller is referred to as a scan packet.
One scan packet represents a single transaction with a controller; that is, every time the server requests a
controller for data, one scan packet is used.
A scan packet can access several addresses within a controller to provide values for several server points.
Because the number of requests per second is generally a limiting factor, the scanning strategy should attempt to
obtain the maximum number of point parameter values in the minimum number of scan packets.
The basic requirements for points to be in the same scan packet are as follows:
•
•
•
Parameters should be at the same scan period.
Parameters should have source addresses that reference the same controller and are contiguous.
The number of values to be acquired does not exceed the scan packet size for the particular controller.
Every time points are configured, the server rebuilds its scan packets in the server database in order to reoptimize point scanning. For example, the server will ensure that:
•
•
If there are multiple references to an address at the same scan rate, there will be only one entry in the scan
packet.
If there are multiple references to an address at different scan rates, a single entry will be made at the fastest
rate.
A separate scan packet is created for each database address. Database addresses are used to scan information
from other point parameters or from files in the server database.
In order to have the controller perform the most efficient supply of point data to service a server request, it is
strongly recommended that you follow the instructions for optimizing scan packets (and hence maximizing
scanning performance) as described in Quick Builder's help for each controller interface.
Related topics
“Database addresses” on page 227
213
POINTS
Analyzing the scanning load with lisscn
The lisscn utility that comes with Experion can be used to list the details about the currently configured scan
packets in the server database.
Use the lisscn utility program to list the currently configured:
•
•
•
Scan packets in each scan period (interval)
Number of scan packets per period
Scan packets per period per second
Related topics
“lisscn” on page 612
214
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
Control properties for points
When you create a point you specify properties relating to how the point is controlled. When specifying control
properties for a point you need to consider the following topics.
Related topics
“Control confirmation for flexible points” on page 215
“Control modes for flexible points” on page 215
“Reverse output for standard points” on page 215
“Control confirmation for standard points” on page 215
“Control modes for standard points” on page 216
“Control level” on page 216
“Control properties for status points” on page 216
“Control properties for analog points” on page 217
“Source and destination addresses” on page 211
“Database addresses” on page 227
“Changing passwords for integrated accounts” on page 349
“Operator definition, General tab” on page 326
Control confirmation for flexible points
When an operator performs a control action on a point for which control confirmation has been specified, a
prompt is displayed to the operator to confirm control. The operator must respond yes before the control action
is carried out or no to abort the command.
Control modes for flexible points
The current control mode of a point determines whether or not an operator is permitted to control the certain
parameters of the point.
The available control modes are defined by the type of controller or device you are using.
Reverse output for standard points
Reverse output for an analog point is used to allow the OP parameter to always indicate '% open' regardless of
the control valve action. If the valve is forward acting (for example, 4 mA is closed, 20 mA is open) then leave
Reverse Output deselected. If the valve is reverse acting (for example, 4 mA is open and 20 mA is closed) then
ensure Reverse Output is selected.
Reverse output for a status point can be used to correct incorrect (or reversed) output wiring. However, it is
advisable to physically correct the wiring as soon as possible and deselect Reverse Output.
Control confirmation for standard points
When an operator performs a control action on a point for which control confirmation has been specified, a
prompt is displayed to the operator to confirm control. The operator must respond 'yes' before the control action
is carried out or 'no' to abort the command. If electronic signatures has been specified in conjunction with
control confirmation, the operator must enter an authorized ID and password before the action is carried out. For
more information on electronic signatures see the 'Configuring Electronic Signatures and Compliance
Restrictions' section of the Advanced Configuration Guide.
215
POINTS
Control modes for standard points
The current control mode of a point determines whether or not an operator is permitted to control the OP or SP
of the point.
The available control modes are: manual, automatic, cascade, and computer although cascade and computer are
only available with specific controllers. Most Experion device interfaces support just single bit modes (that is,
values of 0 and 1, displayed by default as MAN and AUTO).
For PLC devices this is used to scan/control a bit within the controller that can then be used for mode control
within its logic. Other device interfaces define specific behavior for the mode values (for example, S9000
supports this feature).
Property
Description
Man
When the manual mode is set, an operator is permitted to change either the set point or the output value.
Auto
When the automatic mode is set, the controller itself (or sometimes the server) controls the output and
operators cannot change the output value, unless 'Disable mode checking on output' is set.
Casc
Cascade mode is specific to S9000, TDC, and UDC controllers. The cascade mode is used when the SP is
coming from the output of another PID loop within the controller (that is, PID loops are cascaded
together). When the mode is set to cascade, operators cannot change either the set point or the output
value.
Mode checking
Normally, the server checks that the mode of the point is set to MAN before it allows an operator to change the
OP for that point. In some circumstances (for example, you might not want to implement modes for that point),
you might want to disable this mode-checking by the server.
Related topics
“Analog point parameters” on page 196
Control level
Using the control level provides an additional form of security on individual points. For each point, you can
specify a control level between 0 and 255. At Stations using operator-based security, operators can only control
a point if they are defined with a control level equal to or higher than the point's control level.
Related topics
“Configuring system security” on page 303
Control properties for status points
This section discusses control properties specific to status points.
Output states
The OP parameter can address 1 or 2 bits in the controller; the corresponding number of OP states is 2 or 4.
Target input state associations
For each OP state, you define the PV state you expect to see when that particular OP state is selected.
216
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
Pulsing
Pulsing is an action that is performed by the server. When an operator issues a control, one pulse width later the
server issues the reverse control. For example, if the operator switches an output ON the server switches the
output OFF one pulse width later.
When you configure your point you can specify the period of the pulse width.
By default pulsing is disabled.
Considerations
•
•
Where feasible, the controller should perform pulsing in preference to the server.
Critical applications should not use server pulsing.
Control time-out for status points
You use control time-out to specify the maximum allowable time for the PV of the point to reach the target state
for the OP action, before a PV Fail alarm is generated.
For example, if an operator has used Station to set the OP of a pump to the ON state, the server then reads the
controller every 10 seconds to determine whether the pump PV is in fact ON or OFF. If the ON state is not
achieved before the control time-out period expires, an alarm is raised to indicate that the control has failed.
To configure the generation of control time-out alarms for status point outputs or modes, as described in the
previous examples, you must:
•
•
Specify the target input states for the point.
Enable the control failure alarm option.
Control fail alarms for status points
When a status point control is issued, the server tests for control failure as follows:
•
•
After an OP or MD parameter control is issued, the server performs a demand scan on the source address. If
the scanned value does not match the controlled value, a control fail alarm is generated.
If a control time-out value has been defined, a PV Fail Alarm is generated when the PV fails to match the
OP.
Related topics
“Specifying addresses for alarm acknowledgments” on page 221
“Disabling alarming” on page 281
Control properties for analog points
This section discusses control properties specific to analog points.
Low and high control limit for OP and SP
You can set limits to specify the lowest and highest value that can be set for the OP or SP of a point. These
limits are called Low Control Limit and a High Control Limit.
These limits do not apply to the actual values that the controller is capable of registering or controlling, only to
the control limits set for performing supervisory control from the server.
Control deadband for analog points
You can specify a percentage value that is used in determining what constitutes a good control. This is called
control deadband.
217
POINTS
A control deadband works as follows. If the PV signal, read back after an SP control is issued, does not reach
the following value within the period specified for the Control Timeout option, a PV Fail alarm is generated:
New SP Value \± Deadband Percentage
This check is performed every 10 seconds (from when the control is performed) until good control has been
achieved or the control timeout period has elapsed (whichever happens first).
100%
+ Deadband
- Deadband
SP
PV
T
0%
If T> control timeout
then generate PV Fail alarm
Time
Figure 36: Control deadbands
Control fail alarms for analog points
When an analog point control is issued, the server tests for control failure as follows:
•
•
After an OP, SP, MD, or auxiliary parameter control is issued, a demand scan on the source address is
performed by the server. If the scanned value does not match the controlled value, a control fail alarm is
generated.
If a control timeout and control deadband value have been defined, a PV Fail Alarm is generated when the
PV fails to match the SP.
You select an alarm priority and sub-priority for the control fail alarm on the Alarms tab in Quick Builder.
Related topics
“Defining informational messages for standard points” on page 288
“Customizing alarm behavior for Process alarms” on page 273
“Disabling alarming” on page 281
218
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
About alarms and events for standard points
Alarms are primarily used to notify operators of conditions that might call for intervention or supervisory
control.
Experion records each significant change in the values for a point as an event, which is written to the Events file
and which operators can see on the Event Summary display.
Alarms for standard points are specified when you configure your points in Quick Builder.
For information on how alarms work with respect to points on Experion Process Controllers, see the Control
Building User's Guide.
You use the Alarms tab in Quick Builder to specify which changes in a standard point's values are recorded as
events, and which point events generate alarms.
You use Quick Builder to configure:
•
•
When a change is to be considered as significant and therefore generates an event.
Selected point events to be treated as alarms.
Attention
The priority of alarm for system events, such as communications failures, and operator-events, Station, and printer
alarms are configured using Station.
Every time a point PV changes, the server checks to see whether an alarm should also be generated for the new
value. If the server determines that an alarm condition exists, it sends an alarm to the appropriate Stations or
printers, depending on how the Station has been configured.
For each point in your system you can define:
•
•
A range of properties that determine the types of conditions or events that should generate alarms.
How alarms should be prioritized.
The priority determines whether the server treats a change as an event or an alarm:
Priority
Description
Journal
The change is written to the event file, where it can be accessed for alarm and
event reports, or event displays on a Station. Journal priority alarms do not
appear in the Alarm Summary.
Low, High, or Urgent
The change is displayed in Station's Alarm Line to bring new alarms to the
attention of operators and/or directed to an alarm/event printer. It also appears in
the Alarm Summary.
Within each alarm priority level, you can classify alarms as having a subpriority between 0 and 15, where 0
represents the lowest subpriority and 15 the highest.
Alarm priorities (and their sub-priorities) are used in determining which alarms will take precedence in the
alarm line of a Station display.
You can define alarm properties for status points, analog points, and accumulator points. However, the types of
alarms and how they are used vary according to the point type.
Related topics
“Configuring system alarm priorities” on page 280
“Accumulator point alarms” on page 223
“Example scenario: Audible annunciations” on page 262
“Configuring alarms” on page 258
“Disabling alarming” on page 281
“Configuring startup displays” on page 63
219
POINTS
“Determining the security settings for Windows group operators” on page 330
Status point alarms
You can define the following types of alarms and events for a status point:
•
•
•
•
•
State alarms
Change of state events
Alarms on transition
External change alarms
Control failure alarms
State alarms for status points
Any of the PV states of a status point can be defined to be an alarm state. For example, you might define an
alarm for the FAILED state of a valve so that the operator can be alerted as soon as there is a problem.
As well as defining which state(s) should generate an alarm, you can also define the priority and subpriority of
each alarm.
Change of state events for status points
You can configure events to be generated if the PV of a status point changes from one state to another. To do
this, ensure that alarms are enabled for the point and all alarm states are disabled.
Alarms on transition for status points
You can configure alarms to be generated if the PV of a point changes from one alarm state to another. For
example, if you define both CLOSED and FAILED as alarm states for a valve, the server generates an alarm
when the valve fails, and generates an additional alarm when the valve closes as a result of the failure.
External change alarms for status points
An external change is a change in the value of a parameter that is not caused directly by an operator control
issued through the server. An alarm is issued when the value referenced by the parameter is changed in the field
device.
For status points, you can enable alarms for external changes in PV, OP, and MD.
Attention
The external change alarm setting applies only to the parameter being directly controlled. For example:
•
•
Point1 and Point2 are built with their OPs viewing the same field location and with external change alarms
enabled on their OPs. An operator control to the OP of Point1 is an external change to the OP of Point2, so Point2
issues an external change alarm.
Point3 is built with its PV and OP viewing the same field location and with external change alarms enabled for the
PV. An operator control to the OP is an external change to the PV, so the point issues an external change alarm.
Control fail alarms for status points
When a status point control is issued, the server tests for control failure as follows:
•
•
220
After an OP or MD parameter control is issued, the server performs a demand scan on the source address. If
the scanned value does not match the controlled value, a control fail alarm is generated.
If a control time-out value has been defined, a PV Fail Alarm is generated when the PV fails to match the
OP.
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
Return-to-Normal alarms for status points
By default if a status point PV that has been configured with multiple alarm states and “re-alarm on state
transition” transitions from one alarm state to another alarm state, the alarm corresponding to the earlier state is
shown in the Summary display as “returned to normal.”
If it is appropriate for your system, you can prevent the alarms from being set to “return-to-normal” when the
status point PV moves between alarm states.
You can configure this setting by enabling the Alarm return-to-normal only on non-alarm option on the
Alarm Processing tab. When you enable this option, earlier instances of the alarm are only set to “return-tonormal” when the point changes to a non-alarm state.
Related topics
“Demand scanning” on page 213
“Analog point alarms” on page 221
“Configuring system alarm priorities” on page 280
“Accumulator point alarms” on page 223
“Example scenario: Audible annunciations” on page 262
“Configuring alarms” on page 258
“Specifying addresses for alarm acknowledgments” on page 221
“Disabling alarming” on page 281
Specifying addresses for alarm acknowledgments
You might use this feature, for example, if the controller on which this point is built cannot continue normal
functioning until the alarm state is acknowledged. For further details, see Quick Builder's help.
To specify an address for alarm acknowledgements for a status point
1
In Quick Builder, select the status point you want to specify an alarm acknowledgement address for.
2
Click the Alarms tab.
3
In the Ack Destination Address box, type the appropriate address.
4
Download the point to the server.
Related topics
“Status point alarms” on page 220
“Control properties for status points” on page 216
Analog point alarms
This topic describes alarm properties for analog points.
PV limit alarms for analog points
You can configure up to eight alarms for each analog point to indicate when the PV goes beyond the limit you
specify. You can also define the same types of alarms for accumulator points.
The types of PV limit alarms for analog points are:
•
•
•
•
PV High
PV High High
PV Low
PV Low Low
221
POINTS
•
•
•
•
Deviation High and Deviation Low (Note that Deviation Low must be a negative value, for example, -5.)
Rate Of Change
Transmitter Low
Transmitter High
Attention
When a point is off scan you can manually change the PV. However:
•
•
You cannot set a value that is higher than the PV High limit.
You cannot set a value that is lower than the PV Low limit.
As a result, you cannot enter a PV value outside of the alarm limits that would cause an alarm.
See Quick Builder's help for descriptions of these alarm types.
For each alarm, you can also specify the alarm priority, sub-priority and the specific limit.
Unreasonable low and unreasonable high alarms for analog points
In addition to the previous alarm types, you can also configure a pair of alarms for an unreasonable high value
and an unreasonable low value for the PV of an analog point. This one pair of alarms apply to all the analog
points in the server.
Unreasonable low and unreasonable high alarms appear as RSLO and RSHI alarms in the Alarm Summary.
To define these alarms you define the:
•
•
Unreasonable high and unreasonable low limit values (Point Processing tab of the Alarm & Point Processing
display). The default values are 110% and -10%.
Alarm priority and sub-priority for unreasonable values for each point (Analog Point Alarms tab) when you
build the point.
Alarm deadband for analog points
When defining your analog point in Quick Builder you can specify an alarm deadband so that an analog value
that is oscillating around an alarm limit will not generate unwanted alarms.
To define a deadband, select a percentage value from the Alarm Deadband list.
External change alarms for analog points
An external change is a change in the value of a parameter that is not caused directly by an operator control
issued through the server. An alarm is issued when the value referenced by the parameter is changed in the field
device.
For analog points, you can configure alarms for external changes in PV, OP, MD, and SP.
User alarms for analog points
If you have applications such as OPC Integrator, or if you use server scripting, you can generate additional
alarms for your analog points. Analog points have parameters InUserAlarm1, InUserAlarm2, InUserAlarm3,
InUserAlarm4 which are used to generate alarms.
When the InUserAlarm parameter value is set to 1, an alarm is generated. The default priority of the user alarm
is urgent.
The default alarm condition text that appears in the alarm summary is User1. To change the condition text, you
change acronyms 143 to 146 as shown in the following table.
222
Parameter
Acronym
Default value
InUserAlarm1
143
User1
InUserAlarm2
144
User2
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
Parameter
Acronym
Default value
InUserAlarm3
145
User3
InUserAlarm4
146
User4
Related topics
“Demand scanning” on page 213
“Status point alarms” on page 220
“Configuring system alarm priorities” on page 280
“Accumulator point alarms” on page 223
“Example scenario: Audible annunciations” on page 262
“Configuring alarms” on page 258
“Defining informational messages for standard points” on page 288
“Customizing alarm behavior for Process alarms” on page 273
“Disabling alarming” on page 281
Accumulator point alarms
For each accumulator point you can define up to four alarms for indicating when the PV has gone beyond
certain limits. (You use the Limit option for each alarm type to specify the value (in engineering units) at which
the alarm should be generated.)
For each alarm, you can also specify the alarm priority, subpriority, and the specific limit.
You can choose from three alarm types for an accumulator point when defining an alarm to indicate when the
PV has gone beyond certain limits.
Property
Description
Rate Of Change
The rate of change of the PV, in engineering units per second, exceeds the limit.
PV High
The PV rises above the PV High limit.
PV High High
The PV rises above the PV High High limit (which must be greater than the PV High limit).
Related topics
“Configuring system alarm priorities” on page 280
“About alarms and events for standard points” on page 219
“Status point alarms” on page 220
“Analog point alarms” on page 221
“Alarms and DSA” on page 455
“Configuring alarms” on page 258
“Customizing alarm behavior for Process alarms” on page 273
“Disabling alarming” on page 281
223
POINTS
Station displays for points
As part of points configuration you can:
•
•
Associate a display with each point
Group related points to form:
– Groups
– Trends
For any point in your system, you can also specify:
•
•
A user-defined Point Detail display, instead of the standard Point Detail display
A user-defined Group Faceplate Template display, instead of the standard Group Faceplate Template display
Associated displays
If you define an associated display for a point, operators can select a point (for example, on a custom display or
in the Alarm Summary) and call up the Associated display (by pressing F2 or clicking the associated display
button on the toolbar); the display that has been defined as the associated display for that point is then called up.
You can define an associated display for a point by using the following methods:
•
•
Using Quick Builder or Control Builder to specify the associated display
Using the Point Detail display on Station to specify the associated display
Groups and trends
You can configure up to 16,000 groups and up to 3,000 trends.
Groups enable users to view the current operating data (or configuration data) for up to eight points of any type
on a single group display.
Trends enable users to view trend information for up to eight point parameters.
You can use Quick Builder or Control Builder to configure points to form groups or trends or you can assign a
point to a group or trend in Station. If you assign a point to a group or trend in Station, this is not reflected in the
point definitions in Quick Builder or Control Builder unless the point definition is uploaded to Quick Builder or
uploaded to Control Builder. Consequently if you download points from Quick Builder or Control Builder,
changes to trends and groups that have not been uploaded are overwritten.
Attention
When you use Quick Builder to configure groups and trends, you can only assign a point to one group and one trend.
When you use Station to configure groups and trends, you can assign a point to as many groups or trends as you want.
If you assign a point to more than one group or trend on Station, and then upload your configuration data from the
server to Quick Builder, this information about the multiple groups and trends will not be present in Quick Builder
because Quick Builder can only handle a single group and a single trend per point.
User-defined point detail displays
You are supplied with a set of predefined displays that are used to show point detail data.
You can create custom Point Detail displays using Display Builder and then use Quick Builder to specify the
custom Point Detail display for particular points.
Group faceplate templates
You are supplied with a set of predefined 'faceplates' or templates that are used for status, analog, or
accumulator points in a Group Detail display.
For example, the following figure shows a Group Detail display for a group consisting of various types of points
using the standard faceplates for the point type.
224
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
Figure 37: Group Detail display
You can create custom Group Faceplate Template displays using Display Builder and then specify the template
for particular points when you build the point.
Related topics
“About changing point configuration via Station displays” on page 226
“Group and trend displays” on page 363
225
POINTS
About changing point configuration via Station displays
After a point definition has been loaded to the server database, you can use the Point Detail display on Station to
view configuration details for the point.
You can also use a Point Detail display to change point configuration information, but you must be using Station
at a security level of SUPV or higher.
Most point configuration information can be changed in Point Detail display however there are various items of
data that can only be changed from within Quick Builder or Control Builder and downloaded to the server
database.
Attention
When you use a Point Detail display to change the point configuration data in the server database, the configuration
data in the Quick Builder project file or the Control Builder project file will no longer match the server database.
It is good practice to keep the Quick Builder and Control Builder data synchronized with the server data by using the
upload function to upload point data from the server database to the Quick Builder and the Control Builder project file
databases.
Related topics
“Station displays for points” on page 224
“Group and trend displays” on page 363
“Building points off-scan” on page 228
“Viewing algorithm configuration information” on page 236
Calling up a Point Detail display
To call up a Point Detail display
•
226
In the Station command zone, type the point ID, then click Detail
www.honeywell.com
on the toolbar, or press F12.
POINTS
Advanced point configuration
This section is only applicable to standard points.
The configuration tasks described in this section relate to functions that are not essential to implement for the
successful running of your system, but rather allow you to take advantage of some advanced features of point
configuration.
The following topics discuss:
Related topics
“Database addresses” on page 227
“About auxiliary parameters” on page 227
“Building points off-scan” on page 228
Database addresses
You can configure points to access addresses in the database, rather than addresses in controllers. Such points
are sometimes known as 'derived points' or 'database points', but they have the characteristics of the type of
fixed point they are accessing.
The database addresses can be either point parameters or user files.
To configure a 'derived point', you specify that the address type for its PV Source Address is 'Point'.
When a source address is configured for a database type address, an equivalent destination address is
automatically defined. Destination addresses cannot be explicitly configured for database addresses.
Related topics
“Point types” on page 185
“Control properties for points” on page 215
“Scan packets” on page 213
“Building points off-scan” on page 228
“Understanding internal point numbers” on page 233
“Creating user-defined data formats” on page 229
“Summary of internal point parameters” on page 204
“Standard point parameters” on page 192
About auxiliary parameters
For an analog point you can define up to four auxiliary parameters for general purpose use. For example, you
might want to define auxiliary parameters to represent the proportional, integral, and derivative parameters of a
PID loop. Auxiliary parameters can also be used for tracking and modifying alarm limits that are held in a
controller.
For each auxiliary parameter, you can configure:
•
•
•
Source Address
Destination Address
Scan Period
If you set the auxiliary parameter name to match the name of an internal point parameter, then the internal point
parameter's value will track the value in the controller at the auxiliary parameter's source/destination address. If
the internal point parameter value is changed, the value will also be written to the auxiliary parameter's
destination address.
227
POINTS
This is especially useful for keeping alarm limits in a controller synchronized with point alarm limits. For
example, if a name AL1 (the short form for AlarmLimit1) was given to an auxiliary parameter, then the first
alarm limit for the point would follow the controller value addressed by the auxiliary parameter.
Related topics
“Scanning and standard points” on page 212
“Source and destination addresses” on page 211
“Summary of internal point parameters” on page 204
Building points off-scan
If you are adding points, and you do not want point processing (such as algorithm or alarm processing) while
you are implementing your system, you can build your points 'off-scan' by ensuring that the Scanning Enabled
check box is cleared as you define them with Quick Builder.
After completing your points configuration, you can call up the Point Detail display for each point on Station,
and use the Scanning and control enabled check box under Services to enable scanning and control for that
point.
Related topics
“Database addresses” on page 227
“Understanding internal point numbers” on page 233
“Creating user-defined data formats” on page 229
“About changing point configuration via Station displays” on page 226
228
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
About user-defined data formats
Data formats convert field values into values that are more useful for operators and other applications.
You can create user-defined data formats for the following types of controllers:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Allen-Bradley
Database
DNP3
FSC Ethernet
GE Series 90
Hitachi
Modbus
Omni
OPC Client Interface
Siemens
Siemens 7
You can create:
•
•
Unscaled formats, which generate a number that is not related to the point’s engineering unit. It is assumed
that operators will set the engineering unit to an appropriate value.
Scaled formats, which generates a normalized value between 0 and 1.0 that is automatically scaled to the
point’s engineering unit.
Related topics
“Creating user-defined data formats” on page 229
“User-defined data format scenario: linear conversion” on page 232
“User-defined data format scenario: piecewise linear conversion” on page 232
Creating user-defined data formats
To create a user-defined data format
1
In Station choose Configure > Application Development > User-defined Data Formats.
2
Click the Unscaled or Scaled tab, as appropriate.
3
Click an empty data format row.
4
Type the name for the data format. (Do not use any reserved data format names.)
5
Type the details as appropriate.
Related topics
“Database addresses” on page 227
“Building points off-scan” on page 228
“Understanding internal point numbers” on page 233
“User-defined data format scenario: linear conversion” on page 232
“User-defined data format scenario: piecewise linear conversion” on page 232
“About user-defined data formats” on page 229
“Reserved Data Format Names” on page 231
229
POINTS
User-defined data format properties
Property
Description
Name
The unique name of the data format. A maximum of 10 alphanumeric
characters (no spaces, underscores or double quotes).
Do not use any name that is reserved. For a list of reserved names see the
topic, 'Reserved Data Format Names'.
Data type
The data format of the field value, which can be:
•
INT2 (16-bit integer). If you select this, you can specify the Start bit and
•
•
Width of the field value. (By default these are 0 and 16 respectively).
INT4 (32-bit integer)
REAL4 (single-precision IEEE floating point)
Signed Value
If selected, indicates that the field value could be either negative or positive.
Minimum
Specifies the minimum and maximum field values.
Maximum
Type NaN if you do not want to specify a value.
Swap bytes
Specifies whether the bytes/words of the field value are swapped during
conversion. Field values are assumed to be big-endian (high order byte first).
Swap words
For example, if a device uses big-endian storage and the field value is INT4
in two 16-bit registers with the least significant 16-bits first, you would select
Swap words. If the device used little-endian storage, you would also select
Swap bytes.
Type
The type of conversion, which can be either:
•
Linear. A conversion ratio defined by Node 1 and Node 2. Note that the
nodes only define the conversion ratio, not the minimum/maximum
values.
Real Value
Node2
Node1
Instrument Value
230
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
Property
Description
•
Piecewise Linear. Approximates a conversion curve that can have up to
seven nodes.
Real Value
Node4
Node3
Node2
Node1
Instrument Value
Node 1 to Node 7
Each node specifies a Field value and its corresponding Converted value.
For a scaled data format, the converted values must be between 0.0 and 1.0.
Related topics
“Reserved Data Format Names” on page 231
Reserved Data Format Names
B0
DPS6I4
IEEEFP
MFCFP
SLC_AI
U4BCD
B12
E3BCD
IEEEFPBB
MFCTM
SLC_AO
U6BCD
B12E
FENUM
IEEEFPL
MMU
SREAL
U8B
B12ES
FS90DC
IEEEFPLB
MMUS
T1
U8BCD
B12S
FS90DS
LCN0
MODE
T2
U999
B15
FS90PVA
LCN1
PIUOP
TD
U9998
B4
FS90RDR
LCN10
PMXFP
U100
U9999
B7
FS90SEC
LCN2
R32
U1023
UBCD12
C16
FSC0TO10V
LCN3
REVWD
U14B
UBCD16
C3BCD
FSC0TO20MA
LCN4
S16B
U15B
VAXFP
C4BCD
FSC0TO5V
LCN5
S32B
U16B
XLPCC
C8BCD
FSC1TO5V
LCN6
S32BB
U32B
XLPRH
D9999
FSC2TO10V
LCN7
S32BS
U32BB
DPR3V
FSC4TO20MA
LCN8
S32BSB
U32BS
DPS6DP
FTEXT
LCN9
S8B
U32BSB
DPS6FP
HALFWD
LOWWORD
S9999
U3BCD
DPS6I2
HIGHWORD
LREAL
SCALED
U4095
Related topics
“Creating user-defined data formats” on page 229
“User-defined data format properties” on page 230
231
POINTS
User-defined data format scenario: linear conversion
A device stores values in a 16-bit register in big-endian format. Additionally, the value stored ranges from 10 to
60, but you want that value represented in Experion as 0 to 1000 regardless of what the point's range is.
To define a format for this
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Define an unscaled data format.
In the Field Value section select INT2 from Data type, and set the Start bit to 0 and Width to 16.
Select Signed value. (Do not select Swap words or Swap bytes.)
Type NaN in Minimum and Maximum.
In the Conversion section select Linear. Set the node values as follows.
Node
Field value
Converted value
1
10
0
2
60
1000
Related topics
“Creating user-defined data formats” on page 229
“User-defined data format scenario: piecewise linear conversion” on page 232
“About user-defined data formats” on page 229
User-defined data format scenario: piecewise linear conversion
A device stores values in two 16-bit registers in little-endian format. The value stored is an IEEE floating point
number. However, the response curve of the instrument that generates the value is shown in the following
figure.
Real Value
Instrument Value
To define a data format for this
1
232
Determine the nodes you need to define to obtain the desired accuracy. In this example, you decide to define
four nodes, as shown in the following figure. (The first node is at 0,0.)
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
Real Value
100
55.5
33.3
5
25
100
Instrument Value
2
Define an unscaled data format.
3
In the Field Value section select REAL4 from Data type.
4
Select Swap bytes. (Do not select Swap words.)
5
Type NaN in Minimum and Maximum.
6
In the Conversion section select Piecewise linear curve.
7
Set the Node values as follows.
Node
Field value
Converted value
1
0
0
2
5
33.3
3
25
55.5
4
100
100
5 to 7
NaN
NaN
Related topics
“Creating user-defined data formats” on page 229
“User-defined data format scenario: linear conversion” on page 232
“About user-defined data formats” on page 229
Understanding internal point numbers
The maximum number of flexible, status, analog, accumulator and other points you can create is determined by
the size of your database.
When you download point data from Quick Builder to the server database, each point is assigned a unique point
number. These numbers are used to uniquely identify points within the server. They are internal numbers that
are not displayed in Quick Builder.
When a point is deleted from the server, the internal number for that point is freed, and is available to be
allocated to another point.
If you need to know which internal point numbers are currently in use, you can use the listag utility to list the
points currently configured in the database.
233
POINTS
Attention
All references to points in the server database use the internal point number. If you reload a point, the point will retain
its internal point number. However, if you delete a point and then add the point some time later, it might be allocated a
different internal point number. This means that the point is no longer available to custom displays currently being
displayed, or to standard displays such as trends, that accessed it. You need to:
•
•
Re-enter the point on standard displays (such as trends).
Re-load into Station any currently displayed custom displays that reference the point (from the Station menu,
choose View > Reload Page).
Related topics
“Database addresses” on page 227
“Building points off-scan” on page 228
“Creating user-defined data formats” on page 229
“listag” on page 613
234
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
About algorithms
Algorithms perform additional point processing or initiate actions when standard point values change.
Attention
•
There are constraints on configuring algorithms in a DSA system.
A number of standard algorithms are available, each performing a different function. These algorithms are
available for alarm processing, data analysis, value transportation, action requests, and application task requests.
Each type of algorithm has a different number. This number is specified when the algorithm is configured for a
point. For example, the value transportation algorithm is algorithm number 68.
Two classes of algorithm are available:
•
•
PV algorithms
Action algorithms
Related topics
“Configuring algorithms” on page 236
“Disabling alarming” on page 281
“Console Stations ” on page 41
PV algorithms
PV algorithms perform data gathering or data manipulation. The result of the algorithm operation is usually
stored in the PV of the point to which it is attached. PV algorithms are processed whenever the raw PV changes
from its previously scanned value.
For example, say you needed to determine the number of hours that a pump has been running and to store this
value in a point's PV. You could attach the 'run hours' algorithm to a 'dummy' analog point, gate it from the
pump's status point, which indicates whether or not the pump is running, and this would give a 'run hours'
reading in the analog point's PV.
The following PV algorithms are available:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
General Arithmetic (Algo#4)
Production (Algo#5)
Run Hours (Algo#7)
General Logic (Algo#10)
Composite Alarm Processing (Algo#12)
Integration (Algo#15)
Cyclic Task Request (Algo#16)
Piecewise Linearization (Algo#22)
Maximum/Minimum (Algo#64)
Value Transportation (Algo#68)
Related topics
“Configuring algorithms” on page 236
Action algorithms
Action algorithms initiate some action when the PV of the point to which they are attached changes. Action
algorithms are processed whenever the PV of a point changes by more than the drift deadband for the point.
235
POINTS
For example, say you needed to run a report when a status point changes to a certain state. You could attach the
Status Change Report Request algorithm to the status point, and the report would be requested when the status
point changed to the nominated state.
The following action algorithms are available:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Composite Alarm Initiation (Algo#11)
Value Transportation (Algo#68)
Status Change Task Request (Algo#69)
Status Change Report Request (Algo#70)
Status Value Transportation with Mapping (Algo#72)
Status Change Display Request (Algo#77)
Group Control of Points (Algo#78)
Status Change Alarm Group Inhibit (Algo#79)
Status Change Alarm Area Inhibit (Algo#80)
Queued Task Request (Algo#92)
Attention
If you want to configure Algo#11, consider using Alarm Groups and the aggregate alarming capabilities.
Related topics
“Configuring algorithms” on page 236
“Alarm Groups and Aggregate Alarming” on page 291
Configuring algorithms
To configure an algorithm for a point
1
Select the point item in the Quick Builder item list.
2
In the PV Algo box or the Action Algo box, select the type of algorithm you need to configure.
3
Select the PV Algo tab or the Action Algo tab and complete the options.
Quick Builder's help describes how to configure each algorithm.
Related topics
“About algorithms” on page 235
“Template displays and container points” on page 377
“Algorithms and DSA” on page 460
“PV algorithms” on page 235
“Action algorithms” on page 235
Viewing algorithm configuration information
After an algorithm has been configured for a point, you can view the algorithm details at a Station via the Point
Detail display.
To call up the Algorithm Detail display
236
1
Call up the Point Detail display for a point.
The currently configured PV or Action algorithm number is under Algorithms at the bottom of the display.
2
Click the algorithm number and then press F12 or choose View > Detail.
The Algorithm Detail display for the selected algorithm appears, with the algorithm block number shown in
the title bar of the display.
www.honeywell.com
POINTS
Attention
If you use an Algorithm Detail display to change the point configuration data in the server database, the
configuration data in the Quick Builder project file no longer matches the server database. It is good practice to
keep the Quick Builder data synchronized with the server data by using the Quick Builder upload function to
upload point data from the server database to the Quick Builder project file database.
Related topics
“About changing point configuration via Station displays” on page 226
Algorithm blocks
Algorithm blocks are used to store the algorithm configuration as well as working values required by the
algorithm. Algorithm blocks are part of the database.
Details of the number of blocks available can be found in the Installation Guide.
Algorithm blocks are generally not shared between algorithms so each algorithm attached to each point should
be assigned a unique block number, unless you are using algorithms 11 and 12, which need to share common
block numbers.
To find out which algorithm blocks have been used and which are free, you can run the Point Cross Reference
report.
Alternatively, you can use the alglst utility to list the free algorithm blocks in the database.
Related topics
“alglst” on page 602
237
POINTS
238
www.honeywell.com
History collection and archiving
Experion can be configured to store the values of points at predetermined intervals to create a history of process
values. This process is known as history collection.
Any historical information for numerical data can then be called up on a Station Trend display so that operators
can monitor the trends in the processes represented by those points.
The history archiving option can be used in conjunction with history collection to increase the storage capacity
for history data.
Related topics
“Types of history collection” on page 240
“Configuring fast history collection rates” on page 242
“Configuring standard history collection rates” on page 244
“Setting history collection rates for point parameters” on page 246
“Defining gating points, parameters, and states” on page 247
“Configuring history offset groups” on page 248
“Viewing history collection configuration” on page 249
“History file sizes” on page 250
“History collection and DSA” on page 251
“History archiving” on page 252
239
HISTORY COLLECTION AND ARCHIVING
Types of history collection
Experion provides two different ways of collecting and storing historical data for point parameters:
•
•
Periodic history (standard, extended, and fast)
Exception history
While periodic history is used for numerical data and primarily for operational purposes such as the monitoring
of trends, exception history collects string data for analysis by enterprise historians such as PHD servers. And
unlike periodic history, exception history is based on sampling rather than regular collection: it only stores the
scanned values when they are different to the last stored value.
The history collection choices are described below.
Related topics
“Standard history” on page 240
“Extended history” on page 240
“Fast history” on page 241
“Exception history” on page 241
“Configuring history archives” on page 255
Standard history
When you configure standard history collection for a point, you can choose from 8 collection rates. The default
collection rates are 1, 2, 5, 10 and 30 minutes, and you can configure up to 3 user-defined rates for standard
history collection.
Standard history averages
When you configure a point parameter for standard history collection, Experion also collects 4 different
standard history averages, based on the standard history snapshot rate that you choose for standard history
collection. The default standard history snapshot rate is 1 minute and the collection rates for averages are 6minute, 1-hour, 8-hour and 24-hour averages.
The averages are calculated using the 1-minute base interval. That is, 6-minute averages are calculated on six 1minute values. If you change the 1-minute base interval the averages are still calculated from the base interval.
For example, if you change the base interval to 30 seconds, 6-minute averages are calculated on twelve 30second values.
History is collected relative to the time specified as the start of day configured in shifts. If you change the start
of day time, this change is reflected in the averages. For example, if you change your start of day from 7.00 am
to 7.30 am, 1-hour averages are calculated on the half hour instead of the hour.
Related topics
“Configuring shifts” on page 498
Extended history
When you configure Extended History collection for a point, the following process history snapshots are stored:
•
•
•
1-hour snapshots
8-hour snapshots
24-hour snapshots
History is collected relative to the time specified as the start of day in the shift definition. The 1-hour, 8-hour,
and 24-hour snapshots are taken relative to the time configured as the start of day time for the shift. If you
240
www.honeywell.com
HISTORY COLLECTION AND ARCHIVING
change the start of day time, the history collection also changes. That is, if you change the start of day from
7.00am to 7.30am, the history snapshots are taken on the half hour instead of the hour.
Related topics
“Configuring shifts” on page 498
Fast history
Fast history stores snapshots at regular intervals—called fast history intervals. You can set a maximum of 8
collection rates, choosing from the following initial defaults: 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 seconds. Note that the initial
base rate of 5 seconds can be changed to 1 second, and that any additional rates you set must be multiples of the
base rate.
Exception history
When you configure exception history collection for point parameters, you can choose from the following
default collection rates:
•
•
•
5, 10, 15, 30, and 60 seconds
5, 10, 15, 30, and 60 minutes
2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 hours
Whereas standard, fast, and extended history collect and store point parameter values periodically, exception
history collects values at the rate configured for that point parameter but only stores them if the value or quality
of that point parameter has changed since it was last stored.
Note that exception history only collects and stores string values. For more information on supported types of
data, see the topic “History collection” in the “Points” section of the Station Planning Guide.
241
HISTORY COLLECTION AND ARCHIVING
Configuring fast history collection rates
Experion provides a selection of 5 predefined collection rates for fast history. These rates range from 5 seconds
to 30 seconds. If necessary, you can modify the collection rates by:
•
•
Creating up to 3 user-defined collection rates.
Changing the fastest collection rate from 5 seconds to 1 second. Note, however, that this increased collection
rate places an additional load on your process control network.
Attention
If the configured base rate for fast history collection is a value other than 1000 or 5000 milliseconds, you can only
collect history at that one rate. For example, if your fast history collection rate was 3 seconds before you migrated to
the current release of Experion this is the rate that all points assigned to fast history collection will use. If you want to
be able to assign points to different fast history collection rates, please contact Honeywell technical support staff.
To configure fast history collection rates
1
In Station, choose Configure > History > History Intervals.
This calls up the History Intervals displays.
2
Click the Fast History tab.
The Fast History display shows the currently defined collection rates.
3
In a new system the fastest collection rate is set at 5 seconds. To change this, click 1 second.
The Collection rates list now shows 1 second as the first collection rate instead of 5 seconds. The other 4
rates stay the same.
4
To specify additional collection rates for fast history, enter a value (representing whole seconds) in the boxes
at the bottom of the Collection rates list.
Note that all rates must be a multiple of the fastest rate and must not be greater than 1 minute.
Attention
After changing or adding history collection rates, you need to upload the new collection rates from the server to
Quick Builder to ensure that any history assignments for point parameters configured via Quick Builder and
downloaded to the server are using the latest history collection rates. For more information, see the topic
“Uploading items” in the Quick Builder Guide.
If you delete any user-defined collection rates that have point parameters assigned to that rate, no history will be
collected for those point parameters unless you reassign them to a different collection rate.
Fast history collection rate scenarios
Scenario: Changing the fastest rate from 5 seconds to 1 second
The plant engineer decides to leave the initial default settings for fast history collection as they are, and assigns
100 point parameters to what is currently the fastest collection rate — 5 seconds. Some time later, the engineer
determines that some point parameters need history to be collected more frequently and so uses the Fast History
display to change the fastest collection rate from 5 seconds to 1 second.
When the engineer changes the fastest collection rate, the 100 point parameters currently assigned to the 5
second collection rate are automatically assigned to the new rate of 1 second.
Scenario: Creating a user-defined collection rate of 5 seconds
As the 1 second collection rate is really only necessary for 40 of the point parameters, the plant engineer creates
a user-defined user-defined collection rate of 5 seconds and assigns the remaining 60 point parameters to that
rate.
242
www.honeywell.com
HISTORY COLLECTION AND ARCHIVING
Note
If the engineer were to change the fastest collection rate from 1 second back to 5 seconds, there would once again
be a total of 100 point parameters assigned to a history collection rate of 5 seconds but 40 of them were previously
assigned to the 1 second fastest collection rate and have now been automatically assigned to the fastest collection
rate of 5 seconds while the other 60 were manually assigned by the engineer to the user-defined collection rate of 5
seconds.
This difference is significant as it affects what happens if further changes are made to either the fastest history
collection rate or the user-defined collection rate of 5 seconds. Although the collection rates are nominally identical,
the two groups of point parameters are treated differently. So, for example, if the engineer later changes the userdefined rate of 5 seconds to, say, 25 seconds, the 60 point parameters that were assigned to the user-defined rate are
automatically assigned to the 25 second collection rate; and if the engineer later changes the fastest collection rate
from 5 seconds back to 1 second, the 40 point parameters assigned to the fastest collection rate of 5 seconds are
automatically assigned to the new fastest collection rate of 1 second.
Scenario: Creating a user-defined collection rate of 2 seconds
After some time, the engineer decides that the load on the process control network could be reduced by
minimizing the number of points on the 1 second collection rate. There are currently 40 point parameters
assigned to this rate, but it is only absolutely essential for 10 of these point parameters to have history collected
at the 1 second rate, while the other 30 could have history collected at 2 seconds. The engineer therefore decides
to create a user-defined collection rate of 2 seconds and assigns those 30 point parameters to that new rate.
The 100 point parameters that were originally assigned to the 5 second collection rate are now assigned as
follows:
•
•
•
10 to what is currently configured as the fastest collection rate — 1 second
30 to the user-defined rate of 2 seconds
60 to the user-defined rate of 5 seconds
Note
When the fastest collection rate was 5 seconds, it was not possible to define a collection rate of 2 seconds as all
user-defined collection rates must be a multiple of the fastest collection rate. This constraint on collection rates also
means that if you define a collection rate of 2 seconds, you cannot change the fastest rate from 1 second back to 5
seconds without first deleting or modifying collection rates that are not a multiple of the fastest rate. Remember that
if you delete a user-defined collection rate, no history will be collected for the point parameters that were assigned
to that rate.
243
HISTORY COLLECTION AND ARCHIVING
Configuring standard history collection rates
Experion provides a selection of 5 predefined collection rates for standard history. These rates range from 1
minute to 30 minutes. If necessary, you can modify the collection rates by:
•
•
Creating up to 3 user-defined collection rates.
Changing the fastest collection rate from 1 minute to 30 seconds.
Attention
Changing the fastest collection rate from 1 minute to 30 seconds places an additional load on your process control
network.
In addition to these collection rates, which represent “snapshots” in time, standard history can also calculate
averages based on these snapshots. These averages range from 6 minutes to 24 hours and cannot be modified.
If you need to make further modifications to the standard history collection rates, please contact Honeywell
technical support staff.
To configure standard history collection rates
1
In Station, choose Configure > History > History Interval.
This calls up the Standard History display, showing the currently defined collection rates.
2
In a new system the fastest collection rate for standard history is set at 1 minute. To change this, click 30
seconds.
The Collection rates list now shows 30 seconds as the first collection rate instead of 1 minute. The other 4
rates stay the same.
3
To specify additional collection rates for standard history, enter a value in either of the boxes at the bottom
of the Collection rates list.
Note that all rates must be a multiple of the fastest rate and must not be greater than 60 times the fastest rate.
Note also that if the fastest collection rate is set at 30 seconds, it is possible to define a new collection rate
using a decimal value like 1.5 but it is recommended that you only use whole minute values.
Attention
After changing or adding history collection rates, you need to upload the new collection rates from the server to
Quick Builder to ensure that any history assignments for point parameters configured via Quick Builder and
downloaded to the server are using the latest history collection rates. For more information, see the topic
“Uploading items” in the Quick Builder Guide.
If you delete any user-defined collection rates that have point parameters assigned to that rate, no history will be
collected for those point parameters unless you reassign them to a different collection rate.
Standard history collection rate scenarios
Scenario: Changing the fastest rate from 1 minute to 30 seconds
The plant engineer decides to leave the initial default settings for standard history collection as they are, and
assigns 100 point parameters to what is currently the fastest collection rate — 1 minute. Some time later, the
engineer determines that some point parameters need history to be collected more frequently and so uses the
Standard History display to change the fastest collection rate from 1 minute to 30 seconds.
When the engineer changes the fastest collection rate, the 100 point parameters currently assigned to the 1
minute collection rate are automatically assigned to the new rate of 30 seconds.
Scenario: Creating a user-defined collection rate of 1 minute
As the 30 second collection rate is really only necessary for 40 of the point parameters, the plant engineer
creates a user-defined user-defined collection rate of 1 minute and assigns the remaining 60 point parameters to
that rate.
244
www.honeywell.com
HISTORY COLLECTION AND ARCHIVING
Attention
If the engineer were to change the fastest collection rate from 30 seconds back to 1 minute, there would once again be
a total of 100 point parameters assigned to a history collection rate of 1 minute but 40 of them were previously
assigned to the 30 second fastest collection rate and have now been automatically assigned to the fastest collection
rate of 1 minute while the other 60 were manually assigned by the engineer to the user-defined collection rate of 1
minute.
This difference is significant as it affects what happens if further changes are made to either the fastest history
collection rate or the user-defined collection rate of 1 minute. Although the collection rates are nominally identical, the
two groups of point parameters are treated differently. So, for example, if the engineer later changes the user-defined
rate of 1 minute to, say, 25 minutes, the 60 point parameters that were assigned to the user-defined rate are
automatically assigned to the 25 minute collection rate; and if the engineer later changes the fastest collection rate
from 1 minute back to 30 seconds, the 40 point parameters assigned to the fastest collection rate of 1 minute are
automatically assigned to the new fastest collection rate of 30 seconds.
Scenario: Reducing the load on the process control network
After some time, the engineer decides that the load on the process control network could be reduced by
minimizing the number of points on the 30 second and 1 minute collection rate. There are currently 40 point
parameters assigned to the 30 second collection rate, but it is only absolutely essential for 10 of these point
parameters to have history collected at this fastest rate, while the other 30 could have history collected at 1
minute. Furthermore, 30 of the point parameters currently assigned to the user-defined collection rate of 1
minute could have history collected at the slower rate of 2 minutes, which is one of the predefined collection
rates for standard history. The engineer therefore assigns those 30 point parameters to the 2 minute collection
rate.
The 100 point parameters that were originally assigned to the 1 minute collection rate are now assigned as
follows:
•
•
•
10 to what is currently configured as the fastest collection rate — 30 seconds
60 to the user-defined rate of 1 minute
30 to the predefined rate of 2 minutes
245
HISTORY COLLECTION AND ARCHIVING
Setting history collection rates for point parameters
You can set the history collection rates for point parameters when you configure new points (or change the
configuration of existing points) in Configuration Studio.
Within Configuration Studio you use:
•
•
Control Builder for process points (use the Server History tab).
Quick Builder for status, analog, or accumulator points on other types of controllers (use the History tab).
When the point parameter and its configuration settings have been downloaded to the server from Quick Builder
or Control Builder, you can view and modify the history configuration settings in Station.
Attention
You can also set history collection rates from Station, using the History Assignment displays. Note, however, that any
changes you make in Station may be overwritten the next time you download history collection settings from Control
Builder or Quick Builder unless you first upload the changes you made in Station.
Before setting history collection rates for point parameters in Quick Builder, ensure that you have uploaded the current
default history collection rates from the server. You can do this by selecting the appropriate server and choosing
Upload > Selected Items Only.
246
www.honeywell.com
HISTORY COLLECTION AND ARCHIVING
Defining gating points, parameters, and states
To avoid collecting inaccurate historical data (for example, a zero error on a flow transmitter when the
associated valve is closed or the pump off), you can define the conditions under which data should be collected.
You can define gating point settings for history collection when you define the history collection rates for point
parameters in Configuration Studio. Use:
•
•
Control Builder for process points (use the Server History tab).
Quick Builder for status, analog, or accumulator points on other types of controllers (use the History tab)
You can also define gating point settings from Station using the History Assignment displays (which can be
accessed via the History tasks in Configuration Studio). Note, however, that any changes you make in Station
may be overwritten the next time you download history collection settings from Control Builder or Quick
Builder unless you first upload the changes you made in Station.
Example
For example, for a point monitoring a flow, you would probably only want to collect history when the pump
is running. In this case you would define:
•
•
The gating point as the point ID of the point that monitors the pump
The state of the gating point as ON (or whichever wording you have configured for that state of the PV)
Attention
A history sample is still collected regardless of the gating state. When the gate point is not in the gate state, the
history samples for the point are saved as 'bad values' or '0.0'. Use 'bad values' if you want these periods to be
excluded from subsequent average calculations. Use '0.0' if you want average calculations to include all history
values.
247
HISTORY COLLECTION AND ARCHIVING
Configuring history offset groups
History offsets apply only to TPS point parameters and are used for load balancing. You can configure up to 16
history offset groups in Experion. The first offset group is 0 seconds and cannot be changed. This is the offset
group that is used for all point parameter that have not been specifically assigned to a history offset group.
The other default offset groups of 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50 and 55 seconds can be changed if
necessary. The maximum offset period you can configure is 59 seconds but offsets would typically be between 1
and 45 seconds.
Prerequisites
•
You need to be logged on as MNGR or higher.
To configure history offset groups
1
In Station, choose Configure > History > History Assignment to call up the History Collection displays.
2
Click the History Offsets tab.
3
Type in new values and descriptions.
About history offset groups
When configuring standard or exception history collection for TPS point parameters, you can control the impact
of history collection on the LCN by assigning point parameters to a collection offset group.
A history offset group enables you to specify a delay period in seconds for history collection. By assigning a
point parameter to a history offset group, you can stagger the time when history is collected and thus help
reduce the impact on system performance.
If you do not assign a point parameter to an offset group, the point is automatically assigned to the default offset
group of 0 seconds.
Attention
•
•
•
•
248
Offset groups are for TPS points only.
You can only assign a point parameter to one collection offset group for each history type (either standard or
exception), and that group must be one of the 16 offset groups configured on the server.
Offset groups cannot be used with fast and extended history.
Offsets are not reflected in the time stamps for stored data. For example, if there is a 15-second offset and the data
is collected at 8:00:15, the data is still time-stamped as if it had been collected at the beginning of the interval, that
is, at 8:00:00.
www.honeywell.com
HISTORY COLLECTION AND ARCHIVING
Viewing history collection configuration
To view the points configured for history collection
1
Choose Configure > History > History Assignment to call up the History Collection displays.
2
If the point you are looking for is not visible in the list, in the Find row at the top of the display, type the
name of the point and click Find.
Attention
You can also use these displays to assign history collection rates to point parameters. However, if you do not
upload this data to Quick Builder or Control Builder, this information is overwritten next time you download from
Quick Builder or Control Builder to the server.
249
HISTORY COLLECTION AND ARCHIVING
History file sizes
The duration and the number of samples for each history interval are shown in the table below. You can
calculate the storage requirements for history files using the details provided in the following table, and apply
them to the formula provided in topic titled "Storage requirements for history samples" in the Station Planning
Guide.
Table 7: Default history file size factors
History Types
Standard History
File Sizes Factors
Duration
Number of Samples
1
1-minute snapshot
24 hours
1442
2
6-minute average
7 days
1682
3
1-hour average
31 days
746
4
8-hour average
3 months
281
5
24-hour average
1 year
368
Fast History
6
1 to 30-second snapshot
2 hours - 72 hours
8654
Extended History
7
1-hour snapshot
31 days
746
8
8-hour snapshot
3 months
281
9
24-hour snapshot
1 year
368
10
All intervals
Not applicable
Not applicable
Exception History
250
Intervals
www.honeywell.com
HISTORY COLLECTION AND ARCHIVING
History collection and DSA
If you have a DSA system, it is strongly recommended that you do not assign remote points to history
collection. History should be collected locally on each server. If history needs to be delivered to a historian on a
higher level network (L4) then a historian should be connected at L2/L3. The historian can then transport the
history data to the higher level network.
Related topics
“Defining informational messages for standard points” on page 288
“Requirements for implementing a DSA system” on page 451
“DSA and alarms, alerts, events and messages” on page 455
251
HISTORY COLLECTION AND ARCHIVING
History archiving
The number of samples that can be stored, and the number of points that can be assigned to have history
collected for them, depend on database sizing.
When the number of samples stored equals the maximum number that can be stored, the oldest history sample is
discarded in order to store a new sample. For more information about database sizing, see the Supplementary
Installation Tasks Guide.
If you need to keep point history data for future use, you can archive the online history files. When you archive
online history files, the history files for the nominated history intervals are copied to a default folder on the hard
disk of the server.
When you configure history archives you need to know about:
•
•
•
Specifying folders for history archives
Determining space requirements for a history archive
Moving history archives
Related topics
“Determining space requirements for a history archive” on page 254
“About moving history archives” on page 255
“Specifying folders for history archives” on page 252
“Configuring history archives” on page 255
“Automatically managing history archives” on page 255
“Experion PKS Server Configuration Panel” on page 609
Considerations History archive folder
Before configuring history archive folders, consider the following:
•
•
Because archive searches scan all subfolders under an additional history restore search path, you should not
specify the root folder of the server hard disk as a history archive folder. If you do, the search will scan the
entire hard disk before it returns any information.
There are performance issues if viewing archived history in a trend when that history is not on the server
computer. History archives should be located on the primary server if the history is to be viewed on a Station
trend display.
Related topics
“Configuring a trend” on page 367
“Specifying folders for history archives” on page 252
Specifying folders for history archives
During installation you specified the default folder for saving history archives and the default folder for
restoring history archives. These folders are also the default starting point for history archive searches.
You can specify additional history archive folders for use in archive searches. The additional folders are
automatically included in history archive searches, or you can specify one as the starting point of a search.
Prerequisites
•
252
You have read the considerations for history archive folders.
www.honeywell.com
HISTORY COLLECTION AND ARCHIVING
To change the default history archive folder
1
Open the Experion PKS Server Configuration Panel.
Start > All Programs > Honeywell Experion PKS > Server > Experion PKS Server Configuration
Panel
2
Click Edit.
3
For the History archive directory, click Browse.
4
Locate the new archive folder, and then click OK.
If necessary, click Make New Folder.
5
Click OK to close the Configuration Panel.
To specify additional history restore search paths
1
Open the Experion PKS Server Configuration Panel.
Start > All Programs > Honeywell Experion PKS > Server > Experion PKS Server Configuration
Panel
2
Click Edit.
3
For the Additional history restore search paths, type in any additional paths, separating them with
semicolons.
4
Click OK to close the Configuration Panel.
Results
Each history archive is created in a new subfolder under the default history archive folder, or the folder
specified in its configuration. The files in an archive folder should not be changed.
The name of each history archive subfolder indicates when the archive was made.
•
The folder naming convention is: ayYYYYmMMdDDhHHmNNtTT
For example: ay2011m12d04h09m25t01
Where…
…is the
YYYY
Year that the archive was created.
MM
Month that the archive was created (for example, 01 for January, 02 for February, and so on).
DD
Day that the archive was created (for example, 03 for the 3rd day of the month, and so on).
HH
Hour that the archive was created (for example, 13 for 1:00 PM).
NN
Minute the archive was created.
TT
History type (numeric).
Related topics
“Configuring history archives” on page 255
“Automatically managing history archives” on page 255
“History archiving” on page 252
“Determining space requirements for a history archive” on page 254
“About moving history archives” on page 255
“Considerations History archive folder” on page 252
253
HISTORY COLLECTION AND ARCHIVING
Determining space requirements for a history archive
Attention
For efficiency reasons, the history file size should be configured to be as close to 500MB as possible. The sysbld
utility is used to modify the number of parameters assigned and the number of samples collected for each type of
history.
Parameter type
Limit
Online History
Maximum parameters that can be assigned to standard history
50,0003
Maximum parameters that can be assigned to fast history
1,0004
Maximum parameters that can be assigned to fast history (1 second)
2,0005
Maximum parameters that can be assigned to fast history
5,0006
Maximum parameters that can be assigned to extended history
10,000
Maximum parameters that can be assigned to exception history
1,000
Maximum history file size
500MB7
Maximum history file size
500MB8
Archived History
Maximum number of history archive files in one directory
100
Maximum number of history archive files
1,000
Example
Standard history: 1-minute snapshots (history1); file size = 432,623,072 bytes.
Number of parameters assigned to standard history = 50,000.
Number of samples = (432623072/2) / ((50000*6) + 8)
Number of samples = 721 records
Related topics
“History archiving” on page 252
“About moving history archives” on page 255
“Specifying folders for history archives” on page 252
254
3
Standard history has a base collection of 60 seconds.
4
Fast history can be configured for 1-second to 30-second interval collection. The ability to collect at the configured rate
depends upon throughput of the underlying process control network. See the documentation associated with the process
control network for more information.
5
Fast history base rate can be configured for 1-second or 5 seconds. The ability to collect at the configured rate depends upon
throughput of the underlying process control network. See the documentation associated with the process control network for
more information.
6
Fast history can be configured for 1-second or 5 seconds. The ability to collect at the configured rate depends upon
throughput of the underlying process control network. See the documentation associated with the process control network for
more information.
7
If you want to collect P parameters for a particular history type and have a history file size in bytes of S then: Number of
samples = (S/2) / ((P*3) + 8)).
8
If you want to collect P parameters for a particular history type and have a history file size in bytes of S then: Number of
samples = (S/2) / ((P*6) + 8)).
www.honeywell.com
HISTORY COLLECTION AND ARCHIVING
“Configuring history archives” on page 255
“Automatically managing history archives” on page 255
Configuring history archives
History archives are created using the History Archiving display. History Archives created using the History
Archive report are supported for backward compatibility.
The History Archiving display allows you to:
•
•
•
Enable history archiving for each history type
Check the time of the last archive
Force an archive to be run
To configure history archives
1
In Station choose Configure > History > History Archiving.
2
Using the check boxes under History Types to Archive, select the history types you want to archive.
3
Enter the minimum free disk space that must be available for this archiving job to run. This prevents all of
the free disk space on the server from being used for history archive files. (If the disk becomes full, system
performance will be severely degraded.)
Related topics
“Specifying folders for history archives” on page 252
“Automatically managing history archives” on page 255
“History archiving” on page 252
“Determining space requirements for a history archive” on page 254
“About moving history archives” on page 255
“Types of history collection” on page 240
Automatically managing history archives
You can choose to retain, move, or delete different types of history archives.
To manage history archives automatically
1
On the History Archiving display, select the required archive management option for each history type. The
options you can select are Retain, Move, or Delete.
2
If you select Move or Delete, specify the number of days until the archive is moved or deleted. If you
specify 0, the archives are not moved or deleted.
3
If you select Move, specify the location to which the archives are to be moved.
Related topics
“Specifying folders for history archives” on page 252
“Configuring history archives” on page 255
“History archiving” on page 252
“Determining space requirements for a history archive” on page 254
“About moving history archives” on page 255
About moving history archives
You can move history archives from the default history archive folder when they are no longer needed for
current trending display purposes or history searches. This could be part of a long-term archiving and storage
255
HISTORY COLLECTION AND ARCHIVING
plan for your site. You should also perform this periodically to prevent the minimum free disk space value on
the server being reached which will cause history archiving to stop.
Moving history archives has implications for trends. If a trend requires data from an archive that has been
moved, you need to restore the archive. The archive should be restored to the restored archives folder <data
folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Server\Data\RestoredArchives, where <data folder> is the location where
Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder> is C:\ProgramData. Do not restore archives to
the default history archive folder.
Attention
Whilst it is possible to configure the server to also search network locations when retrieving trend data this can cause
performance degradation and is not recommended.
Related topics
“History archiving” on page 252
“Determining space requirements for a history archive” on page 254
“Specifying folders for history archives” on page 252
“Configuring history archives” on page 255
“Automatically managing history archives” on page 255
“Configuring shifts” on page 498
Restoring history archives
Attention
It is not possible to restore history archives that have been deleted (unless you have made a duplicate copy before
deletion).
Before restoring history archives, consider the following:
•
•
•
•
Only history archives which have been moved away from the archive folder—for example, copied to
removable media such as a tape or disc—can be restored.
Do not restore archives to the default history archive folder.
You may require suitable logon authorization to restore history archives.
Be aware that the event archiving and restoring procedures are different to the history archiving and
restoring procedures.
To restore history archives
1
Using Windows File Explorer, locate and select the history archive.
2
Copy it to the restored archives folder, <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Server\Data
\RestoredArchives, where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default
installations, <data folder> is C:\ProgramData.
Related topics
“Event Archiving” on page 511
256
www.honeywell.com
Configuring alarms, alerts, and messages
Alarms (for example, point alarms and system alarms), alerts, and messages notify operators of changes in the
system. Alarms, alerts, and messages are sometimes known as notifications.
•
•
•
Alarms are primarily used to notify operators of conditions that might call for intervention or supervisory
control.
Alerts are used in a similar way to alarms but generally indicate conditions whose urgency and priority are
not high enough to be alarms.
Messages can be used to provide additional information to operators.
To learn about
Go to
Configuring alarms
“Configuring alarms” on page 258
Configuring alerts
“Configuring alerts” on page 286
Configuring messages
“About configuring messages” on
page 288
Related topics
“Configuring alarms” on page 258
“Configuring alarm shelving” on page 259
“Configuring audible annunciations” on page 262
“Configuring external alarm notification” on page 270
“Configuring unanswered alarms” on page 271
“Elevating the priority of unacknowledged alarms” on page 272
“Customizing alarm behavior for Process alarms” on page 273
“Configuring page acknowledgement and page clear” on page 274
“Configuring alarm settings” on page 275
“Customizing alarm colors” on page 278
“Configuring system alarm priorities” on page 280
“Disabling alarming” on page 281
“About the alarm list overflow” on page 284
“About the precedence of alarms in the alarm line” on page 285
“Configuring alerts” on page 286
“About configuring messages” on page 288
“About the alarm list overflow” on page 284
“About the precedence of alarms in the alarm line” on page 285
257
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Configuring alarms
The following table lists the different aspects of alarm configuration or customization, the tools you need to use,
and where to find information about the configuration task.
Task
Tool
Go to
Configuring alarms for status, analog and
accumulator points
Quick Builder
“About alarms and events for standard points”
on page 219
Configuring process point alarms
Control Builder
Control Building User's Guide
Configuring flexible point alarms
System interface or
point server software
The documentation for the system interface or
point server
Configuring alarm shelving
Configuration Studio
“Configuring alarm shelving” on page 259
Configuring the annunciation of alarms on
Station
Station
“Example scenario: Audible annunciations” on
page 262
Configuring alarm annunciation on external
devices
Station
“Configuring external alarm notification” on
page 270
Configuring unanswered alarms
Station
“Configuring unanswered alarms” on page 271
Elevating the priority of unacknowledged
alarms
Station
“Elevating the priority of unacknowledged
alarms” on page 272
Customizing alarm behavior for Process alarms Configuration Studio
“Customizing alarm behavior for Process
alarms” on page 273
Configuring page acknowledgement
Configuration Studio
“Configuring page acknowledgement and page
clear” on page 274
Customizing alarm settings
Station
“Configuring alarm settings” on page 275
Configuring alarm colors
Station
“Customizing alarm colors” on page 278
Configuring system alarm priorities
Station
“Configuring system alarm priorities” on
page 280
Disabling alarms
Configuration Studio
“Disabling alarming” on page 281
Related topics
“About points” on page 184
“Configuring system alarm priorities” on page 280
“About alarms and events for standard points” on page 219
“Status point alarms” on page 220
“Analog point alarms” on page 221
“Alarms and DSA” on page 455
“Accumulator point alarms” on page 223
“Example scenario: Audible annunciations” on page 262
258
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Configuring alarm shelving
To configure alarm shelving
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Alarms and Event Management.
2
Click the Configure alarm processing task.
The Alarm settings displays appear.
3
Click the Alarm Shelving tab.
4
Ensure that the Enable Alarm Shelving check box is selected.
5
If you do not want operators to be able to shelve alarms using a default reason and shelving period, select
the Disable Quick Shelving check box.
If this check box is cleared, operators can shelve an alarm in one step (quick shelve); the default reason and
shelving period is used.
6
If required, create additional alarm shelving reasons or customize the preconfigured reasons.
In the Reason box, type the reason for shelving the alarm. This appears in the Reason for shelving list
when an operator shelves and alarm.
b Specify the maximum and default times that an alarm can be shelved when using this reason.
c Specify the maximum alarm priority and sub priority of alarms that can be shelved using this reason.
d Specify the minimum security level an operator must have to be able to use this reason to shelve an
alarm.
e Select the Comments required check box if you require operators to add a comment when shelving an
alarm.
f Select the Prevent beyond shift check box if you want to stop operators from shelving an alarm in a
situation where the alarm would still be shelved beyond the end of the current shift.
a
7
Choose the appropriate reason to be the default reason used in the quick shelve option by clicking Default
next to the reason name.
Skip this step if you disabled quick shelve in the steps above.
Related topics
“What is alarm or alert shelving?” on page 259
“How does alarm or alert shelving work in DSA?” on page 260
“Alarm Shelving tab” on page 260
“Preconfigured shelving reasons” on page 261
What is alarm or alert shelving?
Shelving an alarm or alert temporarily removes it normal alarm or alert views—it is typically used by operators
to hide 'nuisance' alarms or alerts that are distracting them from their work. (Shelved items can only be viewed
using the special 'shelved’ views.)
The shelved alarm or alert remains shelved until one of the following two situations occur:
•
•
It is manually unshelved by the operator.
It’s shelving period elapses, and Experion automatically unshelves the alarm.
When an alarm or alert is shelved, Experion automatically:
•
•
Acknowledges the alarm or alert
Silences the alarm or alert
259
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
If an item returns to normal while it is shelved, it remains shelved until its shelving period elapses, or it is
unshelved by the operator. When such an alarm or alert is unshelved it automatically disappears from the alarm
or alert list.
If an alarm or alert re-occurs while it is shelved, it remains shelved and remains acknowledged and silenced.
Related topics
“Configuring alarm shelving” on page 259
“Alarm Shelving tab” on page 260
“Preconfigured shelving reasons” on page 261
Alarm Shelving tab
Property
Description
Alarm shelving options
Enable alarm shelving
If selected, alarm shelving is enabled and operates as configured in the Alarm
Shelving Reasons section. Selected by default.
Disable quick shelving
If cleared, operators can shelve an alarm without having to specify a reason (in
which case, the default reason is used).
Alarm shelving reasons
Each row specifies a reason for shelving an alarm, as well as the shelving conditions that apply to alarms that are shelved
for that reason. You can configure up to 20 reasons. Reasons 1 to 4 are preconfigured, but you can change them if
appropriate.
Default
Indicates which of the reasons is the default reason.
Reason
The reason for shelving an alarm.
Default time
The default and maximum time for which the alarm is shelved when using this
reason. When the time expires, the alarm returns to its non-shelved state.
Max time
Max priority
Sub-priority
The maximum priority/sub-priority of an alarm that can be shelved when using
this reason.
Minimum security level
The minimum security level an operator needs to be able to shelve an alarm
when using this reason.
Comment required
If selected, the operator must add a comment (detailed reason) for shelving an
alarm when using this reason.
Prevent beyond shift
If selected, an operator cannot use this reason to shelve the alarm for a
duration which extends past the end of the current shift. For example, if the
shift ends in 3 hours, the operator can only select shelving durations of less
than 3 hours.
Related topics
“Configuring alarm shelving” on page 259
“What is alarm or alert shelving?” on page 259
“How does alarm or alert shelving work in DSA?” on page 260
How does alarm or alert shelving work in DSA?
Alarm or alert shelving in DSA works in the same way as alarm or alert acknowledgement in DSA.
By default, alarm or alert shelving is distributed to all servers. This means that the item only needs to be shelved
once, at any server that displays it. Remote alarms or alerts can be shelved in the same way as local items. You
can configure the Alarm or Alert Acknowledgement Policy setting so that alarms or alerts must be shelved at
each server. This setting must be the same on all servers.
260
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Events are also generated when an alarm or alert is shelved. In a DSA, when an alarm or alert is shelved, an
event is generated on the server where the alarm or alert was generated, regardless of whether the it was shelved
on the same server or on a remote server. An event is also generated on the server where the alarm or alert was
shelved.
If you have servers in your DSA with previous version of Experion, then alarm or alert shelving works as
follows:
•
•
•
An alarm or alert can be shelved in an Experion R100 server regardless of which server the alarm or alert
was generated on.
If an alarm or alert is shelved on an Experion R100 server, the same alarm or alert is acknowledged (not
shelved) on servers with previous versions of Experion.
If an alarm or alert reoccurs, it remains shelved on the Experion R100 server and is acknowledged on servers
with previous versions of Experion.
Related topics
“Configuring alarm shelving” on page 259
“Alarm Shelving tab” on page 260
“Preconfigured shelving reasons” on page 261
Preconfigured shelving reasons
This table describes the default settings for the preconfigured alarm or alert shelving reasons.
Reason
Default time Max. Time
Max.
Priority
Sub priority Minimum
Sec Level
Comment
Req'd
Prevent beyond
shift
Nuisance Alarm or
Alert
2 hours
8 hours
Urgent
15
Oper
No
No
Standing Alarm or
Alert
4 hours
8 hours
Urgent
15
Oper
No
No
Maintenance
1 day
1 week
Urgent
15
Oper
No
No
Maintenance long-term
1 week
3 weeks
Urgent
15
Oper
No
No
Related topics
“Configuring alarm shelving” on page 259
“What is alarm or alert shelving?” on page 259
“How does alarm or alert shelving work in DSA?” on page 260
261
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Configuring audible annunciations
Audible annunciations include alarms through PC speakers, message zone prompts, and external sources, such
as sirens.
You use the Sounds tab on the Connections Properties dialog box to configure which sounds to play with each
type of alarm.
Example scenario: Audible annunciations
You configure audible annunciations as part of the Station connection properties. This section describes five
example configurations.
Station alarms example 1: no sound
The following screen example shows the configuration settings for:
•
•
No audible annunciation for alarms of any priority.
No audible annunciation for messages.
The Use keyboard contact properties shown in the example are available only if you have an IKB or OEP
keyboard installed.
Station alarms example 2: message zone prompts only
The following screen example shows the configuration settings for:
•
262
No audible annunciations for alarms for any priority.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
•
Audible annunciations for messages through the computer's speaker.
Attention
The default annunciation for message zone prompts is the Windows "Default Beep" sound, which is configured
in Windows Control Panel. If you are using remote mounted hardware, you must install external speakers using
a remote assembly cable.
The Use keyboard contact properties shown in the example are available only if you have an IKB or OEP
keyboard installed.
Station alarms example 3: alarm and message zone prompts through a computer speaker
The following screen example shows the configuration settings for:
•
Audible annunciations for alarms through the computer's speaker.
Attention
The default low priority alarm is ding.wav, which is the same default as audible annunciations for messages.
The audible annunciation for low priority alarms and messages will be the same. You can select any .wav file
for each of the three alarm priorities. If you are using remote mounted hardware, you must install external
speakers using a remote assembly cable.
•
Audible annunciations for messages through the computer's speaker.
Attention
The default annunciation for message zone prompts is the Windows "Default Beep" sound, which is configured
in Windows Control Panel. If you are using remote mounted hardware, you must install external speakers using
a remote assembly cable.
The Use keyboard contact properties shown in the example are available only if you have an IKB installed.
263
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Station alarms example 4: alarm and message zone prompts through keyboard contacts
Keyboard contacts are available only if you have an IKB or OEP keyboard installed.
The following screen example shows the configuration settings for:
•
Audible annunciations for alarms through keyboard contacts.
Attention
You can select a specific contact for each alarm priority. Each contact drives a tone-configurable external alarm
horn.
•
264
Audible annunciations for messages through keyboard "beep" (not keyboard contacts).
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Station alarms example 5: alarm and message zone prompts through an external annunciator
The following screen example shows the configuration settings and schematic for:
•
•
Audible annunciations for alarms through external sound device.
Audible annunciations for messages through external sound device.
The Use keyboard contact properties shown in the example are available only if you have an IKB or OEP
keyboard installed.
265
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Power supply
Power supply return
Solid
State
Relay
Pin 4 to +
Pin 5 to -
Connector
Figure 38: External annunciator schematic
Related topics
“Configuring system alarm priorities” on page 280
“About alarms and events for standard points” on page 219
“Status point alarms” on page 220
266
www.honeywell.com
External annunciator
(such as a horn or bell)
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
“Analog point alarms” on page 221
“Alarms and DSA” on page 455
“Configuring alarms” on page 258
“Connection tab, Connection properties” on page 87
Configuring audible annunciation suppression
You configure the suppression of audible annunciations on the Alarm Processing tab.
Attention
You must have Engr security level or greater to perform this task.
To configure audible annunciation suppression
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Alarms and Event Management.
2
Click Configure alarm processing.
The Alarm Processing tab appears.
3
To enable suppression of audible annunciations, select the Allow alarm, message, and alert audible to be
suppressed check box.
4
From the Minimum security level required list, select the minimum security level required for users to be
able to suppress audible annunciations.
Users with a lower security level cannot suppress audible annunciations. Security levels are ranked in this
order, starting with the lowest rank:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5
Oper
Supv
Engr
Mngr
From the Maximum suppressible priority list, select Low or High.
Alarm priority
…includes these alarms, alerts, and messages
Low
Low priority process alarms
Low priority system alarms
TPS system alarms
TPS console alarms
Alerts
Info messages
Confirmable messages
High
Low priority alarms, alerts, and messages
High priority process alarms
High priority system alarms
Note that audible annunciation of urgent alarms cannot be suppressed. Urgent alarms include urgent system
alarms and urgent process alarms.
6
Type the suppression period, in seconds, in the Audible suppression duration box.
The maximum suppression period is 3,600 seconds (1 hour).
267
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
About suppressing audible annunciations
Overview
Experion server, Console Stations, and Flex Stations can be configured to suppress certain audible
annunciations, such as low priority alarms. This can be useful in situations where multiple alarms related to the
same event are triggered in quick succession, enabling operators to concentrate on fixing the issue at hand.
Attention
The audible annunciation of urgent alarms cannot be suppressed.
Configuration options
The suppression of audible annunciations is an option that is enabled and configured by a system engineer
security level or above. When enabled, Experion is configured with the following options:
•
•
•
Minimum security level required to suppress audible annunciations. That is, OPER, SUPV, ENGR, and
MNGR.
Users with a security level less than the minimum level required are unable suppress audible annunciations.
Audible suppression duration, in seconds. The default period is 600 seconds (10 minutes) and the maximum
period is 3,600 seconds (1 hour).
Maximum suppressible priority. That is, Low or High.
Table 8: Maximum suppressible priorities
Alarm priority
…includes these alarms, alerts, and messages
Low
Low priority process alarms
Low priority system alarms
TPS system alarms
TPS console alarms
Alerts
Info messages
Confirmable messages
High
Low priority alarms, alerts, and messages
High priority process alarms
High priority system alarms
Note that audible annunciation of urgent alarms cannot be suppressed. Urgent alarms include urgent system
alarms and urgent process alarms.
Suppression button behavior
The Suppress audible annunciations button that appears on the Alarm Summary comprises three icons:
Urgent, High, and Low.
As you click the button, its behavior changes, based on the type of audible annunciation configured for your
system. The button can have up to three states:
268
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Table 9: Suppression button states
When the button looks like
this…
…you will hear audible annunciation of
All alarms, alerts, and messages.
High priority alarms and urgent priority alarms.
Urgent priority alarms only.
If your system is configured to suppress both low and high priority alarms, each time you click the button, it
will cycle through each of the three states.
If your system is configured to suppress only low priority alarms, each time you click the button, it will cycle
between only the first two states.
If your security level does not permit you to suppress audible annunciations, the button is dimmed.
Functionality
When the suppression of audible annunciations is enabled, and you have the appropriate security level, you can
suppress Low and/or High priority alarms, depending on how your system is configured. Keep in mind the
following considerations:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
When you press the Suppress audible annunciations button, all alarms that are currently annunciated are
silenced. This includes urgent alarms.
Suppression of the audible annunciation will last for the duration predefined for your system.
Ten seconds prior to the suppression period ending, the suppression buttons begin to flash to alert you that
the suppression period is about to end.
At any time during the suppression period, you can click the suppression buttons to restart the duration
period.
Each time audible annunciation is suppressed, a log entry is added to the Event Summary. Events record the
start of a new audible suppression, and again when the current audible suppression period ends.
When the suppression period ends, the audible annunciation of alarms that were suppressed during the
suppression period will continue to remain suppressed. Re-annunciated alarms will also continue to remain
suppressed. Only new alarms will sound.
If at any time during the suppression period either Station closes and reopens, or an operator logs off and
then logs in (using Sign On Manager or Windows logon), audible annunciation suppression is not affected
and will continue to run.
When the suppression of audible annunciations is not enabled, the Suppress audible annunciations button
does not appear on the Alarm Summary.
269
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Configuring external alarm notification
You can specify up to four standard points to receive alarm notifications and control an external device, such as
a siren, that attracts attention even if no one is logged on to a Station.
Notifications are issued according to the priority of the alarm. You can specify an external alarm notification
point ID and parameter for Low, High, Urgent, and Any priority alarms.
When external alarm notification is enabled, the specified point parameter is controlled to:
1,
when an alarm occurs
0,
when an alarm is silenced.
You cannot specify active times or re-alarm times for external alarm notifications, as you can for Station's
audible alarms.
Note that the silence action is not passed to other Experion clusters in a DSA. A silence on a remote Experion
cluster will not cause the external alarm notification point control to 0 to occur on the local Experion cluster.
To configure external alarm notification
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Alarms and Event Management.
2
Click the Configure alarm processing task.
The Alarm Processing display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click the Alarm Forwarding tab.
4
Under External Alarm Notification, select the appropriate alarm priority check box.
5
For each alarm priority you have selected, enter the name of the point and the parameter for which you want
to raise an external alarm.
To enable or disable external alarm notification for any of the four priority choices, select or clear the
appropriate check box.
Alarm Forwarding tab
Property
Description
External Alarm Notification
Priority
Notify point
Parameter
Combobox
Alphanumeric
For each alarm priority you select, enter the name of the point and the
parameter for which you want to raise an external alarm.
To enable or disable external alarm notification for any of the four priority
choices, select or clear the appropriate check box.
If Combobox is selected, you can choose a parameter from a drop-down list.
If Alphanumeric is selected, you can type the parameter.
Sequence Of Events
270
Printer
Use the drop-down box to select a printer that will be used server-wide for
the printing of Sequence of Events (SOE) reports.
Wait
Use this box to specify a time-out period (in milliseconds).
Continuous dot matrix printing
Select this check box if you want SOE data to be printed continuously on the
one page. If the check box is not selected, each sequence of SOE data will be
printed as a separate report on a new page, framed by a report header and
trailer.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Configuring unanswered alarms
You can configure Experion to raise a further alarm if an existing alarm is not acknowledged within a specified
time. This type of alarm is called an unanswered alarm.
To configure unanswered alarms
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Alarms and Event Management.
2
Click the Configure alarm processing task.
The Alarm Processing display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click the Alarm Processing tab.
4
Select the Unanswered alarms enabled check box.
5
Specify the asset for which the unanswered alarm is to be raised.
6
In the Alarm Acknowledgement period box, specify the time (in hh:mm:ss format) that an alarm can
remain unacknowledged before an unanswered alarm is raised.
271
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Elevating the priority of unacknowledged alarms
You can specify a change in alarm priority for alarms that are unacknowledged for a configured amount of time.
To elevate the alarm priority
272
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Alarms and Event Management.
2
Click the Configure alarm processing task.
The Alarm Processing display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click the Alarm Shelving tab.
4
Select the Alarm Priority Elevation enabled check box.
5
In the Low to High box specify the time period after which unacknowledged low priority alarms are
elevated to high priority.
6
In the High to Urgent box specify the time period after which unacknowledged high priority alarms are
elevated to urgent priority.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Customizing alarm behavior for Process alarms
If you have Process controllers and Process points, by default, alarms are enabled at the block level. If a block
goes into alarm, other blocks in the same control module do not automatically go into alarm at the same time.
You can change this behavior so that alarms are enabled at the module level.
To enable alarms at the module level
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Alarms and Event Management.
2
Click the Configure alarm point processing task.
The Alarms display appears.
3
Clear the Maintain alarm state for each Control Module Function Block check box.
Related topics
“Analog point alarms” on page 221
“Control properties for analog points” on page 217
“Accumulator point alarms” on page 223
273
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Configuring page acknowledgement and page clear
If operators are using IKB or OEP keyboards, you can configure your system so that operators can use one
button to acknowledge all the alarms on a display, all alerts on the Alert Summary, or all messages on the
Message Summary, when no specific alarm, alert, or message is selected on the display. By default, operators
are prompted to confirm their action. You can change the default behavior.
Attention
Page acknowledgement may take one to two minutes to complete in situations where the Alarm Summary consists
mainly of alarms for points on SCADA devices that are configured to have alarm acknowledgement registered on the
controller using the Ack Destin setting.
To configure page acknowledgement and page clear
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Alarms and Event Management.
2
Click the Configure alarm processing tab.
The Alarm Processing tab appears in Configuration Studio.
3
On the Alarm Processing tab, enable the Perform page acknowledge/clear when no items selected (IKB
and OEP only) option.
4
If you want operators to acknowledge a page of alarms, alerts, or messages without being prompted to
confirm their action, enable the Do not prompt for confirmation on page acknowledge/clear option.
5
To configure page clearing for messages, enable the Message clear required option.
6
If you want to place restrictions on who can use page acknowledge and page clear, you need to change the
Minimum security level required setting on the Security tab of the Server Wide Settings display.
Related topics
“Enabling the manual clearing of messages” on page 289
“About configuring messages” on page 288
274
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Configuring alarm settings
To specify alarm settings for all Stations in your system
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Alarms and Event Management.
2
Click the Server wide alarm and event options task.
The Server Wide Settings display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
On the Alarm Processing tab, specify the required alarm settings.
To define Flex Station-specific alarm settings
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
2
Click the Configure Flex Stations task.
The Flex Station Configuration Summary display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration
Studio.
3
On the Station Summary display, click the number or title of the Station you want to configure. This calls up
the Station Configuration display.
4
Click the Flex Station you want to configure.
5
On the General tab, specify the required Audible Alarm/Station Failure Alarm settings.
To define Console Station-specific alarm settings
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
2
Click the Configure Console Stations task.
The Console Station Configuration Summary display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration
Studio.
3
Click the Console Station you want to configure.
4
On the General tab, specify the required Audible Alarm/Station Failure Alarm settings.
Tip
If you enable the Station failure alarm for a Station, you can also configure the priority of the Alarm.
To configure the priority of the Station failure alarm
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Alarms and Event Management.
2
Click the Configure alarm and point processing task.
The Alarm and Point Processing display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click the Alarm Enabling tab and select the appropriate priority for Station failure alarms.
Related topics
“Summary displays tab, server wide settings” on page 105
“General tab, flex Station configuration display” on page 109
“Operator keyboard support and DSA” on page 461
Alarm Processing tab
Property
Description
Processing settings
275
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Property
Description
Alarms enabled server-wide
Selected by default. You may need to temporarily disable alarming across the
server when you are building your system, or when equipment needs to be
repaired or replaced.
Alarm return-to-normal only on non-alarm
states
By default if a status point PV transitions from one alarm state to another
alarm state the alarm corresponding to the earlier state is shown in the
Summary display as “returned to normal”. When you select this option, the
earlier instance of the alarm is only shown as “returned to normal” when the
PV transitions to a state which is not an alarm state.
Perform page acknowledge/clear when no
items selected (IKB and OEP only)
If selected, enables operators to acknowledge a page of alarms, alerts, or
messages, when no specific alarm, alert, or message is selected on the
display. By default, operators are prompted to confirm their action.
Perform auto acknowledge when MSG
CONFM key pressed (IKB and OEP only)
If selected, enables operators to confirm and acknowledge a confirmable
message at the same time, by pressing the MSG CONFM key.
Maintain alarm state for each control
module function block
Selected by default. If selected, alarms are enabled at the block level. If a
block goes into alarm, other blocks in the same control module do not
automatically go into alarm at the same time.
Station alarms
Audible active time
The duration of audible alarms. For example, if you specify 10 seconds, the
alarms sound for 10 seconds each, unless the operator silences the alarm by
acknowledging it before the 10 seconds has passed. If the alarm is not
silenced or acknowledged, the alarm will sound again when the Audible realarm time expires.
Audible re-alarm time
The period after which an audible alarm sounds again if the alarm has not
been silenced or acknowledged by an operator. This setting is used in
conjunction with the Audible active time.
Show message for invalid references in
displays
Enable this setting if you want a message to appears when there is a point
value error.
Message clear required
Enable this setting if you want operators to manually clear messages from the
Message Summary display instead of having messages automatically
removed from the Message Summary when the messages are acknowledged
(or, in the case of confirmable messages, acknowledged and confirmed).
Attention
Because the message clearing state is not part of the OPC Alarm and
Event standard, you should not enable message clearing if you want to
manage messages via OPC.
Silence action applies to
Single station only
If selected, silences the alarm on the Station where it is silenced. The alarm is
not silenced on other Stations.
Single station or single console (all stations If selected, silences an alarm on the Station where it is silenced. The alarm is
in console)
not silenced on other Stations. If the alarm is silenced on a Station within a
Console, the alarm is silenced on all Stations in the Console.
All stations
If selected, silences the alarm on all Stations, including Flex Stations,
Console Stations, and Console Extension Stations, that are connected to the
same server.
Unanswered alarms
276
Unanswered alarms enabled
If selected, a further alarm will be raised if an existing alarm is not
acknowledged within a specified time.
Unanswered alarm's assignable
assetlocation
The asset for which an unanswered alarm should be raised.
Alarm acknowledgement period
The time (in hh:mm:ss format) that an alarm can remain unacknowledged
before an unanswered alarm is raised.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Property
Description
Alarms priority elevation
Alarm priority elevation enabled
If selected, alarms that are unacknowledged for a specified period of time
will be elevated in priority.
Low to high
The period after which alarms of a Low priority are elevated to High.
High to urgent
The period after which alarms of a High priority are elevated to Urgent.
277
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Customizing alarm colors
Experion has predefined colors for alarms in the alarm summary, the Status bar indicators, and off-scan points.
If these colors are not suitable for your site, you can customize these colors.
To customize alarm colors
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Alarms and Event Management followed by
the Configure alarm appearance task.
2
Under Alarm Colors select the appropriate color for each alarm priority you want to change.
3
Select Use these colors for points on displays if you want the custom alarm colors to be used on your
displays for data objects that also display their alarm status.
To customize Status bar indicator colors
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Alarms and Event Management followed by
the Configure alarm appearance task.
2
Under Status Bar Indicator Colors select the appropriate color for each indicator you want to change.
To customize the color of points off-scan
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Alarms and Event Management followed by
the Configure alarm appearance task.
2
Under Point State Colors select the appropriate color.
Related topics
“Alarm Appearance tab” on page 278
Alarm Appearance tab
Property
Description
Alarm colors
Urgent priority
Specifies the color for urgent priority alarms.
High priority
Specifies the color for high priority alarms.
Low priority
Specifies the color for low priority alarms.
Journal only
Specifies the color for journal only alarms.
Use these colors for points on display
If selected, specifies that the custom alarm colors are to be used on your
displays for data objects that also display their alarm status and also for the
Alarm indicator on the status bar.
If this option is not selected, the color specified for the alarm indicator is used
in both instances.
Status bar indicator colors
Alarm
Specifies the color of the alarm indicator in the status bar.
System
Specifies the color of the communications indicator in the status bar.
Message
Specifies the color of the message indicator in the status bar.
Alert
Specifies the color of the alert indicator in the status bar.
Point state colors
Point off scan
278
www.honeywell.com
Specifies the color used for points on displays if scanning is disabled.
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Related topics
“Customizing alarm colors” on page 278
279
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Configuring system alarm priorities
You use the Alarm Enabling display to configure the priority for system alarms such as failed communications,
operator logon, or Station-related alarms.
To configure the priority of system alarms
1
2
In Station, choose Configure > Alarm Event Management > Alarms.
The Alarm Enabling display appears. Following is a list of the alarms affected by these settings:
Option
Description
Communication diagnostic, marginal and fail
SCADA Channel and Controller alarms
Redundancy
Server redundancy alarms (for example, lost
synchronization)
Daily Warning if debug set
There is an option to alarm once a day if any debug
settings are not at the default level. Excessive debug
settings can impact performance.
Station
Station alarm (for example, station fail alarms).
Operator Logon
Logon or logoff alarms.
Printer Failed, Marginal
Printer alarms.
Operator lockout
Too many login attempts.
Server or console station unavailable
Server unavailable (reported on the console station) or
console station unavailable (reported on the server).
Console Fail, marginal
Console alarms.
In the System Alarm Priorities area of the display, select the priority (and where applicable, the subpriority) for each type of alarm listed.
Related topics
“About alarms and events for standard points” on page 219
“Status point alarms” on page 220
“Analog point alarms” on page 221
“Alarms and DSA” on page 455
“Accumulator point alarms” on page 223
“Example scenario: Audible annunciations” on page 262
“Configuring alarms” on page 258
“Alarm Enable tab” on page 282
280
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Disabling alarming
You might need to temporarily disable alarming in the following circumstances:
•
•
When you are building your system
When equipment needs to be repaired or replaced
For example, if you need to temporarily disable alarming on a set of points when a status point changes to a
nominated state, you can use the Status Change Alarm Group Inhibit algorithm (#79) or the Status Change
Alarm Area Inhibit algorithm (#80).
You can enable or disable alarms:
•
•
•
Server-wide, using the Alarm and Point Processing display. (By default, Alarms enabled server-wide is
selected.)
By asset, using the Enable Alarms display.
For individual points, using the Point Detail display.
When you are configuring a standard point, you can disable its alarms in Quick Builder.
To disable alarms server-wide
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Alarms and Event Management.
2
Click the Configure alarm and point processing task.
The Alarm & Point Processing display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click the Alarm Processing tab.
4
Clear the Alarms enabled server-wide check box.
To disable alarms for a particular asset
1
Call up the Alarm Enabling display.
2
Clear the check box for the required asset.
To disable alarms for individual points
1
Call up the Point Detail display for the point.
2
In the Services group, deselect Alarms Enabled.
Related topics
“Status point alarms” on page 220
“Control properties for status points” on page 216
“Analog point alarms” on page 221
“Control properties for analog points” on page 217
“Accumulator point alarms” on page 223
“About algorithms” on page 235
“About alarms and events for standard points” on page 219
“What happens when you disable alarms in a DSA system?” on page 456
281
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Alarm Enable tab
Enable alarms by asset
Property
Description
Minimum security level
required to enable or disable
alarms
The minimum security level of a user that can enable or disable alarms in Experion. If your
system uses the default security level names, your options are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
View only
Ack only (Acknowledge only)
Oper (Operator)
Supv (Supervisor)
Engr (Engineer)
Mngr (Manager) (Default)
CAUTION
Changing this setting can have serious consequences on the integrity of your
system. For example, choosing View only gives every user the ability to enable
and disable alarms. Before you change this setting, be certain that you understand
the effects of your actions.
Select the check boxes to
enable alarms for each item
If the box beside a given asset, network or system component displays a check mark, this
means that the alarms for that item are enabled. A cross indicates that alarms are currently
disabled. Clicking on a box alternates between enabling and disabling alarms.
A gray box with a check mark means that alarming is disabled on one or more assignable
assets below that item. Similarly, a gray box with a cross means that alarming is enabled on
one or more assignable assets below.
When you click on a gray box to change the current alarming setting for that item, you are
prompted to decide if you want the changes to affect all the items within that group or just
the item you have clicked.
System alarm priorities
Property
Description
Comms diagnostic
An alarm of the specified priority (and sub-priority) is raised if a controller diagnostic
check finds a problem. Only certain types of SCADA controllers, perform diagnostic
checks.
Comms marginal
An alarm of the specified priority (and sub-priority) is raised if the marginal barometer
level specified for a SCADA channel or controller is reached.
Comms fail
An alarm of the specified priority (and sub-priority) is raised if the fail barometer level for a
SCADA channel or controller is reached.
Redundancy
An alarm of the specified priority (and sub-priority) is raised if redundant servers lose
synchronization.
Tip
You can also change this control on the Redundant Server Advanced display.
Daily warning if debug is set A daily alarm of the specified priority (and sub-priority) is raised if the paranoid levels
(used when troubleshooting system problems) are set above the default values and are not
reset.
Station
282
www.honeywell.com
If Station failure alarms are enabled, an alarm of the specified priority (and sub-priority) is
raised when communication to the Station is lost.
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Property
Description
Operator logon
An alarm of the specified priority is raised when an operator attempt to log on has failed.
Operator lockout
An alarm of the specified priority is raised when an operator exceeds the specified number
of logon attempts.
Printer marginal
An alarm of the specified priority is raised when an error is received from the Windows
printer.
Printer fail
An alarm of the specified priority is raised when the Windows print queue cannot be
located.
Console fail
An alarm of the specified priority is raised when communication is lost with every single
Console Station and Console Station Extension in a Console.
Server or Console Station
unavailable
An alarm of the specified priority is raised when a server or Console Station is unavailable.
Console marginal
An alarm of the specified priority is raised when communication is lost with one or more
Console Stations or Console Station Extensions in the Console.
Related topics
“Configuring system alarm priorities” on page 280
283
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
About the alarm list overflow
The alarm list (which contains alarms/alerts that are shown in the Alarm, Alert, and System summaries) has a
limit of 4000 alarms.
(Note that if a point is assigned to both an asset and to an Alarm Group, and it goes into alarm, even though it
displays twice in the alarms list, it is only counted once for the purposes of the alarm list overflow.)
If the alarm list limit is reached, an algorithm runs which replaces alerts or alarms when new alarms/alerts are
generated. An event is also logged in the Event Summary for each alarm/alerts that is replaced.
(Note that during normal operation, the alarm list should never overflow. However, it may occur during
commissioning, or after a network failure when the system is suddenly flooded with large numbers of alarms/
alerts.)
The algorithm first searches for alarmsalerts. If any alarmsalerts are found, the oldest alarmsalerts is replaced
with the new alert or alarm.
If no alerts are found, the algorithm searches for an alarm that is similar to the alarm being added.The algorithm
then searches for an alarm that is similar to the alarm being added. A similar alarm must be of equal or lower
effective priority. If a similar alarm is found, it is replaced with the new alarm. An alarm is considered similar if
the associated asset, condition, point, and parameter are the same. The effective priority is a combination of the
priority, sub-priority, and additional alarm state information such as whether the alarm has been acknowledged.
An existing alarm of urgent priority that has been acknowledged or has returned to normal has a lower effective
priority than a new alarm that has low priority.
If a similar alarm is not found, the algorithm searches for the oldest alarm of equal or lower effective priority. If
found, the algorithm replaces that alarm with the new alarm.
If there is no older alarm of equal or lower effective priority, the algorithm replaces the oldest alarm with the
new alarm.
You can recover some alarms that were replaced during an overflow situation. Before you recover alarms, you
should ensure the situation which caused the alarm overflow has been resolved. The alarms that can be
recovered are those alarms that were active when they were replaced and have not returned to normal.
Related topics
“Configuring alarms, alerts, and messages” on page 257
284
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
About the precedence of alarms in the alarm line
In Station, one alarm appears in the alarm line. The alarm that appears in the alarm line is determined as
follows:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Unacknowledged
Highest priority
Highest sub-priority
Newest/oldest. The default setting is newest, but you can set your preference on the System Wide
Configuration display.
5. The order in which they appear on the alarm summary
For example, with the alarm precedence set to newest, and the following alarms having occurred:
10:18 unacknowledged, urgent, sub-priority 13
10:19 unacknowledged, urgent, sub-priority 13
10:20 unacknowledged, urgent, sub-priority 11
10:30 unacknowledged, low, sub-priority 15
10:30 unacknowledged, low, sub-priority 12
10:31 acknowledged, urgent, sub-priority 15
The alarm that is shown in the alarm line is:
10:19 unacknowledged, urgent, sub-priority 13
Related topics
“Configuring alarms, alerts, and messages” on page 257
285
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Configuring alerts
Alerts are notifications whose urgency and priority are not high enough to be alarms. Alerts are listed in the
Alert Summary, which provides a description of each alert.
Here are the main alerts types:
User-generated
alerts
These can be used as a reminder to an operator to schedule maintenance for a piece of
equipment.
System-generated
alerts
These are notifications of an abnormal condition in the system that could cause
problems if the condition is not fixed, but the priority of the condition is not high enough
to warrant an alarm.
For example, the gas pressure in a pipe has been rising steadily over the last couple of days, most probably due
a build-up of waste particles on the inner lining. This is leading to a degradation in process performance. An
alert is raised to indicate that pipe cleaning must take place in the next week.
User-generated alerts and system-generated alerts are configured by the User Alert application. The user alert
application exists in a Unified Real Time environment (URT).
The steps required to incorporate user-generated and system-generated alerts into Experion are:
Task
See
Install and set up the URT environment
URT documentation
Install the User Alert Server.
User Alert documentation
Identify which conditions will trigger an alert using User Alert
application.
URT documentation
Install the User Alert Explorer on Experion Stations.
User Alert documentation
Configure a URT connection between Experion and the User Alert
application.
“Connecting Experion and the
User Alert application” on
page 286
Map URT areas to Experion assets.
“Connecting Experion and the
User Alert application” on
page 286
Done
Related topics
“Connecting Experion and the User Alert application” on page 286
“Connecting Experion and the User Alert application” on page 286
Connecting Experion and the User Alert application
User-generated alerts and system-generated alerts are incorporated into Experion from the User Alert
application using a URT connection.
To configure the connection
286
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Interfaces.
2
Click the Configure system interfaces task to call up the System Interfaces display.
3
In an empty row select URT from Type and click URT in the Alias column to call up the System Interface
configuration displays.
4
Under Notification Sources, in the Network Name box, type the name of the computer where the URT and
user alert application are installed.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
5
In the ServerProgID list, ensure that Hci.URTOpcServer is selected.
6
Click the Asset Mapping tab and specify how the OPC areas are mapped to Experion assets.
Related topics
“Configuring alerts” on page 286
287
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
About configuring messages
Messages can be generated to provide additional information to an operator.For example when a point goes into
alarm, a message can provide an explanatory note or a procedure.
There are four types of messages:
•
•
•
•
Informational (available for messages associated with standard points, process points)
Confirmable (available if you have Process Controllers)
Single signature (available if you have Process Controllers)
Double signature (available if you have Process Controllers)
The following table lists the different tools that are used to configure messages.
Type of message
Configuration tool
Informational message for a standard point
Configuration Studio
Informational message for a process point
Control Builder
Single signature and double signature message
Control Builder
Confirmable message
Control Builder (for process points)
Related topics
“Enabling the manual clearing of messages” on page 289
“Configuring page acknowledgement and page clear” on page 274
Defining informational messages for standard points
For status, analog, and accumulator points you can specify a predefined message to be displayed in the Message
Summary when the point goes into alarm.
Each Station displays the message text defined on its local server. If you have a DSA system, the message
indexes and text should be the same on all servers to ensure that appropriate messages are displayed for remote
points.
To define an informational message for standard points:
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Alarms and Event Management.
2
Click the Configure alarm and point processing task.
The Alarm and Point Processing display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click the Messages tab.
4
In an empty line, type the message text.
5
Note the line number. This is the number you specify as the message index for your point.
Related topics
“Analog point alarms” on page 221
“Control properties for analog points” on page 217
“Alarms and DSA” on page 455
“Point IDs” on page 452
“History collection and DSA” on page 251
“Requirements for implementing a DSA system” on page 451
“DSA and alarms, alerts, events and messages” on page 455
288
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
Enabling automatic message acknowledgement for confirmable messages
If your system has an IKB or OEP keyboard and you have confirmable messages, you can configure your
system such that when an operator selects a confirmable message and presses the MSG CNFM button (message
confirm), the message is acknowledged and confirmed at the same time.
To enable automatic message acknowledgement for confirmable messages
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Alarms and Event Management.
2
Click the Configure alarm and point processing task.
The Alarm Processing display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Select the Perform Auto Acknowledge when MSG CONFM key pressed (IKB only) option.
Enabling the manual clearing of messages
By default messages are removed from the Message Summary display when they are acknowledged or
confirmed. You can change this to require operators to manually clear messages.
Attention
Because the message clearing state is not part of the OPC Alarm and Event standard, you should not enable message
clearing if you want to manage messages via OPC. If you enable message clearing, informational messages that have
been acknowledged via a third party OPC client will remain on the Message Summary. Similarly, confirmable
messages remain on the Message Summary even after they have been acknowledged and confirmed.
To enable the manual clearing of message
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
2
Click the Configure server wide station settings task.
The Server Wide Settings display opens at the General tab.
3
Click Alarm and Event Management.
4
Click the Alarm Processing tab.
5
Select the Message clear required option.
Related topics
“Configuring page acknowledgement and page clear” on page 274
“About configuring messages” on page 288
289
CONFIGURING ALARMS, ALERTS, AND MESSAGES
290
www.honeywell.com
Alarm Groups and Aggregate Alarming
Attention
Alarms Groups and aggregate alarming on custom displays are optional features of Experion.
An Alarm Group is an arbitrary collection of points and/or assets configured to conveniently show the sum of
their associated alarms in an organized manner. Alarm Groups allow the user to group points and/or assets from
different physical locations of a site. For example, a single Alarm Group could be configured to show alarms for
all boilers (regardless of their physical location).
The tasks required to understand and configure Alarm Groups and aggregate alarming on custom displays are as
follows:
Task
Go to
Learn what makes up an Alarm Group and how aggregate
alarming works.
“Understanding Alarm Groups and
aggregate alarming” on page 292
Review example scenarios and determine how best to plan your
Alarm Groups.
“Planning Alarm Groups” on page 293
Configure aggregate alarming on custom displays.
“Understanding and configuring aggregate
alarming on custom displays” on page 296
Complete
?
Related topics
“Understanding Alarm Groups and aggregate alarming” on page 292
“Planning Alarm Groups” on page 293
“Understanding and configuring aggregate alarming on custom displays” on page 296
“Action algorithms” on page 235
291
ALARM GROUPS AND AGGREGATE ALARMING
Understanding Alarm Groups and aggregate alarming
Alarm Groups are arbitrary collections of assets and points. They provide an alternative way of viewing alarms
associated with assets. By using Alarm Groups, you can create a group of assets and points regardless of their
physical location (unlike the Asset Model). For example, you may be interested in all mechanically agitated
tanks in the plant for the purposes of monitoring agitator-related alarms across the entire plant.
Aggregate alarming is the sum of alarms from assets and points, which is shown in brackets (at each group
level) on the location pane of the Alarm Summary display. The aggregate alarming operation is performed
automatically once your Alarm Groups have been built.
The benefits of using Alarm Groups are:
•
•
•
•
The ability to create a group of assets and points without the restriction of physical location.
Additional filtering capabilities on the Alarm Summary.
Aggregate alarm counts. The alarm counts of all the points within an Alarm Group are added together.
The ability to add aggregate alarming parameters to custom displays so you can see the number of alarms in
each section of the plant at a glance.
Related topics
“Alarm state icons” on page 301
292
www.honeywell.com
ALARM GROUPS AND AGGREGATE ALARMING
Planning Alarm Groups
Alarm Groups can be nested, meaning Alarm Groups can consist of other Alarm Groups as well as points. By
nesting Alarm Groups, you create hierarchies.
The visibility of Alarm Groups within the Alarm Summary can be controlled by asset assignment if you
associate an Alarm Group with an asset. If the asset is within the operator's (or Station's) scope of responsibility,
then the Alarm Group is visible to the operator.
Subsequently, the aggregate alarm count for an Alarm Group that is visible to a particular operator or Station is
determined by the scope of responsibility of the operator or Station. If an Alarm Group contains a point that
belongs to an asset that has not been assigned to the operator or Station viewing the Alarm Group, then the
alarms for this point are not included in the aggregate alarm count for the Alarm Group.
Custom operating displays are often organized hierarchically to provide an overview of the process being
monitored and controlled. Aggregate alarming and Alarm Groups enhance this display hierarchy by enabling
you to group your points into Alarm Groups and add aggregate alarm counts (from the Alarm Groups) to your
displays, making it possible for operators to see alarms in particular parts of the plant at a glance.
The Asset Model also makes use of aggregate alarming. The asset tree in the location pane on the Alarm
Summary contains aggregate alarm counts for each asset that contains a point that is in alarm. There is no
configuration required to make use of aggregate alarming for assets.
You create Alarm Groups using Configuration Studio.
Related topics
“Example Alarm Group” on page 294
“Guidelines and restrictions for Alarm Groups” on page 293
“Naming rules for Alarm Groups” on page 293
Guidelines and restrictions for Alarm Groups
In planning your Alarm Groups, you also need to bear in mind the following guidelines and restrictions:
•
•
•
•
•
The maximum number of Alarm Groups you can enter into your system is 5,000.
The maximum number of assets and points you can add to each Alarm Group is 500.
The maximum nesting depth for Alarm Group hierarchies is 5.
Make use of alarm aggregation by configuring alarm groups to collate data from disparate sources. For
example, you may want to capture the data for all the valves in your system, which are not necessarily
grouped under the one higher-level location.
Alarm groups must be associated with an asset for the purposes of scope of responsibility.
Related topics
“Naming rules for Alarm Groups” on page 293
“Planning Alarm Groups” on page 293
“Example Alarm Group” on page 294
Naming rules for Alarm Groups
All Alarm Groups have a tag name and an item name. Tag names must be unique, whereas item names can be
duplicated as long as the resulting full item name is unique.
Tag names and item names must follow certain naming rules:
•
An Alarm Group name cannot match the name of any other group belonging to the same parent group.
293
ALARM GROUPS AND AGGREGATE ALARMING
•
•
Tag names must be unique.
Tag names and item names can contain up to 40 single-byte or 20 double-byte alphanumeric characters, with
at least one alpha character.
•
•
Tag names and item names are not case-sensitive: Cooling Tower1 and cooling
entity.
Tag names and item names cannot contain any of the following characters:
•
– Space (rule applies to tag names only)
– Less than (<)
– Greater than (>)
– Asterisk (*)
– Backslash (\)
– Braces { } (rule applies to item names only)
– Caret (^)
– Brackets [ ] (rule applies to item names only)
– Parentheses ( ) (rule applies to item names only)
– Question mark (?)
– Single quote (')
– Double quote (")
– Period (.)
– Comma (,)
– Forward slash (/)
– Vertical bar (|)
– Colon (:)
– Semi-colon (;)
– Tab
The first character of tag names and item names must not be any of the following characters:
•
•
– Space
– At sign (@)
– Dollar sign ($)
The last character of tag names and item names must not be a space.
A full item name:
tower1
represent the same
– Must not be longer than 200 characters
– Must be unique
Related topics
“Guidelines and restrictions for Alarm Groups” on page 293
“Planning Alarm Groups” on page 293
“Example Alarm Group” on page 294
Example Alarm Group
The following figure shows an example Alarm Group.Unit71 is an Alarm Group which contains Alarm Groups
Boiler1 and Separator1 and points Valve101 and Valve201.Boiler1 contains the points Pump101, Valve102,
Valve103, Temp101, and Valve101. Separator1 contains the points Valve201, Valve202, Temp201, Temp202, and
Flow201.
Points Valve101 and Valve201 are included in two Alarm Groups however alarms for these points are counted
only once in the aggregate alarm parameters for Alarm Group Unit71.
294
www.honeywell.com
ALARM GROUPS AND AGGREGATE ALARMING
Pump101
Valve102
Valve103
Boiler1
Temp101
Valve101
Unit71
Valve201
Valve202
Separator1
Temp201
Temp202
Flow201
Related topics
“Planning Alarm Groups” on page 293
“Guidelines and restrictions for Alarm Groups” on page 293
“Naming rules for Alarm Groups” on page 293
295
ALARM GROUPS AND AGGREGATE ALARMING
Understanding and configuring aggregate alarming on custom displays
You can add aggregate alarm information for your Alarm Groups to custom displays and create a hierarchy of
displays that reflect the structure of your Alarm Groups. The higher level display can provide aggregate alarm
counts for the points within the Alarm Group. Operators can then drill down the display hierarchy to find more
detail about current alarms.
The following figure shows a custom display which incorporates aggregate alarm information for Alarm Groups
Unit71, Unit76, and Unit83.
An operator notices that Unit71 is in alarm. The operator clicks the Unit71 display object which calls up a more
detailed custom display of Unit71.
296
www.honeywell.com
ALARM GROUPS AND AGGREGATE ALARMING
From this more detailed custom display, the operator can see that the Alarm Group Boiler1 has several alarms.
The operator clicks the Boiler1 display object which calls up a custom display for Boiler1.
From this custom display for Boiler1, the operator can see which particular piece of equipment is in alarm and
take action to manage the alarm.
Aggregate alarm counts are added to a display by creating an alphanumeric, which is linked to the Alarm Group
and the aggregate alarm count parameters.
Related topics
“Aggregate alarm and alert count parameters” on page 298
“Aggregate message count parameters” on page 300
“Alphanumeric and alarm state options” on page 300
Aggregate alarm state and most important alarm state
There are two ways to show points, assets s and alarm groups in alarm on a custom display:
•
Using color. For example, you add an alphanumeric object to a custom display and link the alphanumeric to
a point and select the Indicate alarm state with color option for the alphanumeric object.
297
ALARM GROUPS AND AGGREGATE ALARMING
If you use color to indicate an item in alarm, then the alarm properties (active state, acknowledge state, and
priority) are aggregated for all alarms for the item and the aggregate alarm state is shown.
Using alarm state icons.
•
If you use alarm state icons, then you see the most important alarm for the item.
How aggregate alarm state is calculated
To calculate the aggregate alarm state, the priority, acknowledge state and active state are taken into
consideration for all alarms for a point, asset , or alarm group as follows:
•
•
•
Priority: urgent priority takes precedence over high priority, which takes precedence over low priority.
Acknowledge state: unacknowledged state takes precedence over acknowledged state.
Active state: active state takes precedence over returned-to-normal state.
The priority, acknowledge state and active state chosen may come from different alarms, but are combined
together to represent an aggregate of all the alarms.
When the aggregate alarm state is calculated, color is used on a display object as follows:
Aggregated alarm properties
System-defined color
In alarm, unacknowledged
Red and flashing
In alarm, acknowledged
Red
Returned to normal, alarm unacknowledged
Normal color and flashing
Point off-scan (scanning disabled)
White
If you have selected the Use these colors for points on display option on the Alarm Appearance tab of the
Alarm and Event Management display, the colors that you have specified for alarm priority are used to indicate
the alarm priority.
How the most important alarm state is calculated
The most important alarm state is determined by looking at all alarms for a point, asset , or alarm group and
identifying the most important individual alarm according to its priority, acknowledge state, and active state.
(The 'Alarm icons' section lists the order of importance of alarms.)
Example
•
•
Alarm 1 is Urgent priority, acknowledged, active
Alarm 2 is High priority, unacknowledged, returned to normal.
The aggregate alarm state would be: urgent priority, unacknowledged, active. An alphanumeric on a custom
display representing ASSET1 with the Indicate alarm state with color option selected would use the aggregate
alarm state and the alphanumeric would be red and flashing.
The most important alarm state would be: high priority, unacknowledged, returned to normal. An alarm icon
representing ASSET1 would show a solid flashing yellow alarm icon.
Related topics
“Alarm state icons” on page 301
Aggregate alarm and alert count parameters
The following table lists the aggregate alarm and alert count parameters that are available for Alarm Groups as
well as standard point types.
298
www.honeywell.com
ALARM GROUPS AND AGGREGATE ALARMING
Table 10: Aggregate alarm and alert count parameters
Parameter
Alarm Priority
Active State
Acknowledge State
Unack
Urgent
High
Low
Active
RTN
TotalAckAlarms
X
X
X
X
X
TotalActiveAckAlarms
X
X
X
X
TotalActiveAlarms
X
X
X
X
X
TotalActiveUnackAlarms
X
X
X
X
X
TotalAlarms
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
TotalDisabledAlarms
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
TotalHighActiveAckAlarms
X
X
TotalHighActiveAlarms
X
X
X
TotalHighActiveUnackAlarms
X
X
X
TotalHighAlarms
X
X
TotalHighRTNAckAlarms
X
X
TotalHighRTNAlarms
X
X
X
TotalHighRTNUnackAlarms
X
X
X
TotalHighUnackAlarms
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
TotalLowAckAlarms
X
X
TotalLowActiveAckAlarms
X
X
TotalLowActiveAlarms
X
X
X
TotalLowActiveUnackAlarms
X
X
X
TotalLowAlarms
X
X
TotalLowRTNAckAlarms
X
X
TotalLowRTNAlarms
X
X
X
TotalLowRTNUnackAlarms
X
X
X
TotalLowUnackAlarms
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
TotalRTNAckAlarms
X
X
X
X
TotalRTNAlarms
X
X
X
X
X
TotalRTNUnackAlarms
X
X
X
X
X
TotalUnackAlarms
X
X
X
X
X
X
TotalUrgentAckAlarms
X
X
X
TotalUrgentActiveAckAlarms
X
X
TotalUrgentActiveAlarms
X
X
X
TotalUrgentActiveUnackAlarms
X
X
X
TotalUrgentAlarms
X
X
TotalUrgentRTNAckAlarms
X
X
TotalUrgentRTNAlarms
X
X
X
TotalUrgentRTNUnackAlarms
X
X
X
TotalUrgentUnackAlarms
X
X
X
X
Disabled
X
TotalHighAckAlarms
X
Ack
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
299
ALARM GROUPS AND AGGREGATE ALARMING
Related topics
“Understanding and configuring aggregate alarming on custom displays” on page 296
“Adding aggregate alarm counts to a custom display” on page 300
Aggregate message count parameters
The following table lists aggregate message count parameters that are available for Alarm Groups as well as
standard point types.
Table 11: Aggregate message count parameters
Parameter
Message Type
Informational
TotalAckConfMessages
Acknowledge State
Confirmable
Unack
X
TotalAckInfoMessages
X
TotalAckMessages
X
TotalConfMessages
X
TotalMessages
X
TotalUnackConfMessages
TotalUnackInfoMessages
X
TotalUnackMessages
X
X
X
X
X
TotalInfoMessages
Ack
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Related topics
“Understanding and configuring aggregate alarming on custom displays” on page 296
Alphanumeric and alarm state options
If you select the Alarm state check box on the Animation tab, Station overrides the object's default color with
the 'aggregated alarm state' color if the associated point has one or more alarms. For example, if the point had
these two alarms:
•
•
Urgent, Acknowledged, Active
High, Unacknowledged, Returned-to-Normal
The object will flash red because:
•
•
•
Urgent is the highest priority of all the alarms (hence color is red)
One of the alarms is unacknowledged (hence flashing)
One of the alarms is active (show color)
Related topics
“Understanding and configuring aggregate alarming on custom displays” on page 296
Adding aggregate alarm counts to a custom display
To add an aggregate alarm count to a display
1
Start HMIWeb Display Builder:
•
300
If you are on the Experion server, choose Start > All Programs > Honeywell Experion PKS > Server
> HMIWeb Display Builder .
www.honeywell.com
ALARM GROUPS AND AGGREGATE ALARMING
•
If you are on a client computer, choose Start > All Programs > Honeywell Experion PKS > Client
Software > HMIWeb Display Builder .
2
Choose File > Open.
Select the display you to which you want to add an alarm count.
3
Click the (Alphanumeric) icon on the Toolbox toolbar and then drag the pointer on the display to define
the size, shape and position of the alphanumeric.
4
Double-click the alphanumeric to open the Properties window, which shows the alphanumeric's current
properties.
5
Click the Data tab and make sure that Point/Parameter is selected in Type of database link.
6
Select Alarm
7
Select the required aggregate alarming parameter from the Parameter list.
8
Save the display.
Group
from the point list.
Related topics
“Aggregate alarm and alert count parameters” on page 298
Adding alarm state icons for alarm groups to a custom display
To add an alarm state icon to a display
1
Start HMIWeb Display Builder:
•
If you are on the Experion server, choose Start > All Programs > Honeywell Experion PKS > Server
> HMIWeb Display Builder .
•
If you are on a client computer, choose Start > All Programs > Honeywell Experion PKS > Client
Software > HMIWeb Display Builder .
2
Choose File > Open.
Select the display you to which you want to add an alarm state icon.
3
Click the (Alarm State) icon on the Toolbox toolbar and then move the pointer on the display to define
the position of the alarm state icon.
4
Double-click the alarm state icon to open the Properties Window.
5
Click the Data tab and make sure that Point/Parameter is selected in Type of database link.
6
Select Alarm Group from the point list.
7
In the Parameter box, ensure NAME is selected.
8
Save the display.
Related topics
“Alarm state icons” on page 301
Alarm state icons
Tip
The topic 'Understanding Alarm Groups and aggregate alarming' shows an illustration of how alarm state icons can
appear on a custom display.
The following table describes the icons used to indicate the “most important” alarm on a point on custom
displays, point detail displays, and elsewhere in Station. In determining which alarm is the most important, the
system takes into account factors such as the alarm priority, alarm state, and whether or not the alarm has been
acknowledged.
301
ALARM GROUPS AND AGGREGATE ALARMING
Attention
The alarm colors described below are the default alarm colors. Your system may use custom alarm colors.
Table 12: Alarm state icons and their meanings
If the icon looks like
this…
…and it
The alarm state is…
…its priority is
…and its acknowledge
status is
Flashes
Active
Urgent priority
Not acknowledged
Flashes
Active
High priority
Not acknowledged
Flashes
Active
Low priority
Not acknowledged
Flashes
Inactive
Urgent priority
Not acknowledged
Flashes
Inactive
High priority
Not acknowledged
Flashes
Inactive
Low priority
Not acknowledged
Does not flash
Active
Urgent priority
Acknowledged
Does not flash
Active
High priority
Acknowledged
Does not flash
Active
Low priority
Acknowledged
All alarms on the point have been disabled.
The point is disabled.
There are only shelved alarms on the point.
(Invisible)
The point is not in alarm.
Related topics
“Aggregate alarm state and most important alarm state” on page 297
“Adding alarm state icons for alarm groups to a custom display” on page 301
“Understanding Alarm Groups and aggregate alarming” on page 292
302
www.honeywell.com
Configuring system security
This section describes how to configure security for your Experion system. It describes:
•
•
How you configure each type of security
How to use assignable assets to limit access and distribute alarms accordingly
Before you begin configuring security, you should read the Network and Security Planning Guide.
Related topics
“System security considerations” on page 305
“About Station-based security” on page 306
“About operator-based security” on page 307
“Station-based security configuration checklist” on page 308
“Operator-based security configuration checklist” on page 309
“About integrated security” on page 310
“Integrated security system topology scenarios” on page 311
“User environments scenarios” on page 318
“Building a Flex Station for operator-based security” on page 322
“Configuring a Console Station for operator-based security” on page 323
“Adding an operator account” on page 324
“About security levels” on page 330
“Assigning scope of responsibility to operators or Windows group accounts” on page 333
“Configuring profiles for scope of responsibility” on page 334
“About scope of responsibility” on page 336
“Assigning scope of responsibility to Flex Stations” on page 338
“Assigning scope of responsibility to Console Stations” on page 339
“Combining operator and Station scope of responsibility” on page 340
“Setting time access for an operator account” on page 341
“Setting Station access for an operator account” on page 342
“Deleting an operator account” on page 343
“Disabling an operator account” on page 344
“Converting traditional operator accounts to integrated accounts” on page 345
“Deleting an Experion Windows group account” on page 346
“Changing passwords for Station-based security” on page 347
“Changing passwords for traditional accounts” on page 348
“Changing passwords for integrated accounts” on page 349
“Configuring password administration for traditional operator accounts” on page 350
“Configuring Integrated Security signon policy” on page 352
“Assigning access to system alarms” on page 353
“Actions permitted at each security level” on page 355
“Setting security levels for enabling/disabling channels and hardware” on page 361
303
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
“Changing the names of security levels” on page 362
“Control level” on page 216
“Defining an LRN” on page 594
“Server display program” on page 94
“Report definition properties” on page 396
“Assigning scope of responsibility to Flex Stations” on page 338
“Assigning scope of responsibility to operators or Windows group accounts” on page 333
“Security” on page 459
“About recipe configuration” on page 506
304
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
System security considerations
Experion system security comprises both:
•
•
Windows operating system security
Station security: Station-based or operator-based
System security enables you to control who has access to the system and to control what users can do within the
system when access is granted.
Attention
Logging on to Windows does not necessarily grant permission for access to an Experion application, such as Station.
You therefore need to configure user access to Experion separately to configuring Windows user accounts.
When configuring security for your site you need to consider:
•
What type of Station security you want to use.
•
Do you want to use Station-based or operator-based security?
What access operators require within Experion.
•
You may want to restrict operators from controlling certain parts of the system.
If you choose operator-based Station security, what type of operator accounts do you want to use:
•
•
– Traditional operator accounts
– Integrated accounts using either domain Windows accounts or local Windows accounts
– Windows group accounts using either domain Windows groups or local Windows groups
How you implement Windows security.
What type of Windows accounts you require.
Profiles
You define Scope of Responsibility (SOR) by creating profiles. A profile can be assigned to an oper account,
which is related either to an individual Windows account or a Windows group account.
Profiles provide a convenient means of managing operator access rights. A profile specifies:
•
•
The assets that can be accessed.
The times during which those assets can be accessed.
By defining an appropriate set of profiles to each operator, you can manage operator access in a systematic
manner.
Related topics
“About Station-based security” on page 306
“About operator-based security” on page 307
“About integrated security” on page 310
305
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
About Station-based security
Station-based security works as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
Station starts without prompting users to enter any form of operator ID or password.
The initial security level setting allows users to perform the basic operating functions associated with the
user level of OPER (for example, acknowledging alarms and controlling points).
All of the Experion functions have a minimum security level requirement.
Users only need to use a password if they want to change to a higher level of security.
Asset assignment applies to the Station, not to the operator.
Related topics
“About security levels” on page 330
“System security considerations” on page 305
“About operator-based security” on page 307
“About integrated security” on page 310
306
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
About operator-based security
Operator-based security provides a higher level of security than Station-based security. In general, operatorbased security with traditional operator accounts works as follows:
•
•
•
•
You assign a specific security level to each user.
Users cannot access any Station functions unless they enter a valid ID and password.
To access a higher security level than the one they are currently using, users need to log off and log on again
as a different operator who has the higher security level.
Assignable assets are assigned to the operator, irrespective of which Station they are currently logged on to.
If you choose operator-based security, there are several alternatives that you can use:
Account type
Description
Traditional operator account
An account whose definition exists only in the Experion server database.
Authentication and authorization is done by the Experion server.
Integrated account
A combination of a Windows user account and an Experion operator
account.
The Windows user account can be a local account or a domain account.
For information to consider when deciding to use local or domain
accounts, see 'About integrated security'.
Authentication is done by Windows, authorization is done by the
Experion server.
Windows group accounts
An integrated account that allows you to add multiple operators by adding
the Windows group to the Experion server.
The Windows group can be a local Windows group or a domain Windows
group. For information to consider when deciding to use local or domain
Windows groups, see 'About integrated security'.
Authentication is done by Windows. Authorization is done by the
Experion server.
There are two aspects to operator-based security: authentication and authorization. Authentication is the process
of verifying that a user is known to the system, while authorization controls what a known user can do within
the system. Accounts are used to restrict access and authority within Station.
For traditional operator accounts, authentication of the user is done by the Experion server against credentials
stored in Experion. Authorization is also controlled by Experion using security levels and, if applicable,
assignable assets.
For integrated accounts and Windows group accounts, authentication of the user is done by Windows on the
server computer against the Windows user account. Authorization is then controlled by the Experion server
using security levels and, if applicable, assignable assets.
By using Windows group accounts you can add multiple users to Experion simply by adding the Windows
group. All users within the Windows group can then log on to Station in the same manner as traditional operator
accounts or integrated accounts.
You can further restrict operator authority by restricting the level of access to assets. Access to assets uses a
separate set of security levels.
Related topics
“System security considerations” on page 305
“About Station-based security” on page 306
“About integrated security” on page 310
307
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Station-based security configuration checklist
308
Task
Go to
Decide how to implement Windows security
Microsoft Windows documentation.
Assign scope of responsibility to Stations
“Assigning scope of responsibility to Flex
Stations” on page 338
Change passwords for security levels
“Changing passwords for Station-based
security” on page 347
www.honeywell.com
Done
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Operator-based security configuration checklist
Task
Go to
Decide the type of operator account you want to use:
“System security considerations” on page 305
•
•
•
Done
Traditional
Integrated (Windows account)
Windows group
Build a Station with operator-based security enabled.
“Building a Flex Station”.
If you are using integrated security with Windows
account create the Windows account
Microsoft Windows documentation.
If you are using integrated security with Windows
groups, create the group and add the Windows
accounts to the group.
Create the operator account
“Adding an operator account” on page 324
Assign scope of responsibility
“Assigning scope of responsibility to operators or
Windows group accounts” on page 333
Set time restrictions
“Setting time access for an operator account” on
page 341
Set Station restrictions
“Setting Station access for an operator account” on
page 342
Configure password administration
“Configuring password administration for traditional
operator accounts” on page 350
Configure failed login alarms
“Configuring failed logon alarms” on page 350
309
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
About integrated security
You can control operator access to Experion using an integrated account. An integrated account is a
combination of a Windows user account and an Experion operator definition:
•
•
The security credentials stored in the Windows user account are used to authenticate the user
The security details in the Experion operator definition are used to control the authority the user has within
Experion.
The benefits of using integrated accounts
Using integrated accounts enables you to:
•
•
•
Use existing enterprise-wide security policies
Minimize the number of accounts required for operators
Use Windows auditing to track user activities
Considerations when using integrated accounts
When deciding how to implement integrated accounts, consider the following:
•
•
You need to set up a Windows user account, so that the user can be authenticated, and create an operator
definition in Experion, so that the users authority can be controlled.
You need to decide what type of Windows user accounts you use, either local or domain accounts. Different
account types will suit different site requirements.
The benefits of using Windows group accounts
By using an Experion Windows group account, you only have to configure one account in Station for every
Windows group, which enables members of the Windows group to log on to Station.
The benefits of using Experion Windows group accounts are:
•
•
•
•
Ease of configuration
Reduces the number of accounts required in Experion
You can leverage any existing Windows security policies and settings
You can apply any Experion security and access restrictions at the Windows group level
Note
If you are using Domain - Local groups, ensure you meet the domain requirements.
Related topics
“Assigning scope of responsibility to operators or Windows group accounts” on page 333
“Combining operator and Station scope of responsibility” on page 340
“Assigning scope of responsibility to Console Stations” on page 339
“System security considerations” on page 305
“About Station-based security” on page 306
“About operator-based security” on page 307
“Integrated security system topology scenarios” on page 311
310
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Integrated security system topology scenarios
The benefits and impact of integrated accounts vary depending on your logical network configuration. This
section discusses a number of typical topologies. In all these scenarios users can be configured as traditional
Experion operators, in which case they will log onto Station with a user name, password and with the domain
set to <None>.
In the scenarios provided, multiple solutions are presented. Your chosen solution may be a combination of these.
Related topics
“Single node system scenario” on page 311
“Client server system (Windows workgroup environment) scenario” on page 312
“Client server system (domain environment) scenario” on page 313
“Redundant server system (domain environment) scenario” on page 315
“About integrated security” on page 310
“User environments scenarios” on page 318
“About domain environments” on page 319
Single node system scenario
You have a single Experion server with no network connections. Operators require access to Station and other
client applications on this computer.
Solution incorporating local Windows user accounts
Set up local Windows user accounts for each operator who requires access to Experion. Create operator
definitions for each operator in Experion that reference the relevant Windows user account.
You can also set up Experion to use single signon. That is, when operators log on to the computer, they provide
their user name and password. When the operator starts Station, they are not required to re-enter their user name
or password.
Figure 39: Single node system with local Windows user accounts
Solution incorporating local Windows groups
Set up local Windows user accounts for each operator who requires access to Experion. Create Windows groups
and add the Windows user accounts to the appropriate Windows group. Create an Experion Windows group
definition that references the relevant Windows group.
311
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Figure 40: Single node system with local Windows groups
Client server system (Windows workgroup environment) scenario
You have a client server system consisting of an Experion server and a number of Stations operating in a
Windows workgroup environment. A Windows Workgroup typically consists of a small number of machines
(typically less than 5), within a network. They are not part of a wider corporate network, and there is no
external, Internet or other access.
Solution incorporating local Windows user accounts
To use integrated accounts and single signon, you need to manually configure identical Windows user accounts
on all computers to enable network access. You also need to create operator definitions on the Experion server
that reference the relevant Windows user accounts. If this account duplication has been done and each operator
has the same Windows user account on the Station and the server, then Single Signon is possible.
You may also want to provide access to a support engineer. If the support engineer is not part of the workgroup,
use traditional operator accounts to provide access and set the appropriate authority levels.
For a larger system, this solution is inefficient as it requires manual replication of accounts. Consider using a
domain controller to reduce the overhead of manually replicating accounts.
Figure 41: Client server system with local accounts
In the preceding figure, Operator1, Engineer1 and Support can use integrated accounts and single signon only if
they have local Windows accounts and passwords on their client computers that match the Windows accounts
and passwords on the server computer.
312
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
The above figure also illustrates the use of a guest Support account to allow access to a support engineer. In this
case, it is unlikely that the support engineer's computer is part of the same workgroup as the Experion system or
that the support engineer has a matching Windows account and password, and hence single signon is not
available. The use of integrated accounts does not offer any advantage over traditional operator accounts.
Solution incorporating local Windows groups
To use integrated accounts and single signon, you need to manually configure identical Windows user accounts
and identical Windows groups on all computers to enable network access. You also need to create Experion
Windows group definitions on the Experion server that reference the relevant Windows groups. If this account
duplication has been done and each operator has the same Windows user account belonging to the same
Windows group on the Station and the server, then Single Signon is possible.
For a larger system, this solution is inefficient as it requires manual replication of accounts. Consider using a
domain controller to reduce the overhead of manually replicating accounts.
Figure 42: Client server system with local groups
In the preceding figure, Operator1 and Engineer1 can only use single signon if they have local Windows
accounts and passwords belonging to a Windows group on their client computers that match the Windows
accounts and passwords belonging to a matching Windows group on the server computer.
The above figure also illustrates the use of a guest Support account to allow access to a support engineer. In this
case, it is unlikely that the support engineer's computer is part of the same workgroup as the Experion system or
that the support engineer has a matching Windows account and password, and hence single signon is not
available. The use of integrated accounts does not offer any advantage over traditional operator accounts.
Client server system (domain environment) scenario
You have a large network of computers, included several Experion servers and client computers. The Experion
servers and client computers belong to a domain. The domain controller can be using the Windows 2003,
Windows 2008, or Windows Server 2008 R2 operating system.
Although Windows user accounts can be local, the advantage of using a domain is that accounts are known to
all computers in the domain, and account configuration need only be done once. Account management is
performed by the domain administrator, who can be a privileged Experion engineer, or may belong to the
company's IT department.
313
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Solution incorporating domain Windows accounts
Create Windows user accounts on the domain controller so that users are known to all computers within the
domain. Create operator definitions for each operator on the Experion servers the operators need to access.
Ensure that the operator definitions reference the relevant Windows domain account. You can then take
advantage of using single signon.
Figure 43: Client server system with domain accounts
In the preceding figure, two client server systems consisting of two servers and a number of operator Stations
operate in a domain environment. The servers and client computers belong to a single domain, or set of trusted
domains.
Engineer1 has a Windows domain account and can use the domain account to log onto Windows on any
computer in the domain. Both servers have an operator definition for Engineer1 therefore Engineer1 can use an
integrated account to access the two Experion systems.Engineer1 can also use single signon.
Operator1 and Operator2 do not have Windows domain accounts and therefore can only access computers
where they have a local account.Operator1 has a local Windows account and operator definition on Server 1
and can gain access to this server by entering the user name Operator1, password xyz456 and the server
machine name at the Station logon dialog.Operator2 can gain access to Server 2 in a similar manner.
Single signon could be available for Operator1 or Operator2 if their accounts are moved to the domain
controller or if they have matching Windows accounts and passwords created on the client computer.
Both servers have a local Support account, but the password is different on each system. This might be done to
in order to control access to the various Experion systems on site. There is no real advantage to using integrated
accounts for the support engineer's access.
Configurations where the server is not in the same domain as the client computer are quite valid, but add to the
complexity of account configuration. In particular, it should be noted that the authentication is done by the
server's domain, not the client's domain. Even if the domains do not trust each other, it is possible for an
operator to log on to the server providing the account is known to the server domain. Note that the server
domain does not appear in the list of domains in the Station logon dialog if it is not trusted by the client. In this
case the domain needs to be typed in.
Solution incorporating domain Windows groups
Create Windows user accounts and add these accounts to Windows groups on the domain controller so that
users are known to all computers within the domain. Create Experion Windows group definitions for each
314
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Windows group on the Experion server the operators need to access. Ensure that the Experion Windows group
definitions reference the relevant domain Windows group. You can then take advantage of using single signon.
Figure 44: Client Server system with domain Windows groups
In the preceding figure, two client server systems consisting of two servers and a number of operator Stations
operate in a domain environment. The servers and client computers belong to a single domain, or set of trusted
domains.
Engineer1 has a Windows domain account which belongs to the domain Windows group Engineers.Engineer1
can use the domain account to log onto Windows on any computer in the domain. Both servers have an
Experion Windows group definition for Engineers therefore Engineer1 can access the two Experion
systems.Engineer1 can also use single signon.
Operator1 has a Windows domain account which belongs to the domain Windows group Operators.Server 1 has
an Experion Windows group definition for Operators therefore Operator1 can access the Experion system on
Server 1 using the domain account.Operator1 can also use single signon.Operator2 does not have a domain
account and therefore can only access computers where there is a local account. In this case, Server 2 has a local
Windows account and an operator definition for Operator2.
Configurations where the server is not in the same domain as the client computer are quite valid, but add to the
complexity of account configuration. In particular, it should be noted that the authentication is done by the
server's domain, not the client's domain. Even if the domains do not trust each other, it is possible for an
operator to log on to the server providing the account is known to the server domain. Note that the server
domain does not appear in the list of domains in the Station logon dialog if it is not trusted by the client. In this
case the domain needs to be typed in.
Redundant server system (domain environment) scenario
You have redundant Experion servers and several client computers on a network. The Experion servers and
client computers belong to a domain.
Solution incorporating domain Windows accounts
Create Windows user accounts on the domain controller to ensure consistency of Windows accounts during a
failover. This eliminates any problems caused by differences in local accounts on the server computers. Create
315
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
operator definitions on the primary Experion server that reference the relevant Windows domain account. The
operator definitions are automatically replicated to the backup Experion server.
The use of local Windows user accounts in a redundant server system is not recommended because they need to
be manually replicated, including any password changes, to the backup server.
If you cannot set up a domain, use traditional operator accounts.
Figure 45: Redundant servers with domain accounts
In the preceding figure, Operator1 and Engineer1 have domain accounts and can access any computer in the
domain. During failover Operator1 and Engineer1 will continue to have access to the servers.Operator1 and
Engineer1 can both use single signon.
Solution incorporating domain Windows groups
Create Windows user accounts and add these accounts to Windows groups on the domain controller to ensure
consistency of Windows accounts during a failover. This eliminates any problems caused by differences in local
accounts on the server computers. Create Experion Windows group definitions on the primary Experion server
that reference the relevant Windows domain group. The Experion Windows group definitions are automatically
replicated to the backup Experion server.
The use of local Windows user accounts and groups in a redundant server system is not recommended because
they need to be manually replicated, including any password changes, to the backup server.
If you cannot set up a domain, use traditional operator accounts.
316
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Figure 46: Redundant servers with domain groups
In the preceding figure, Operator1 and Engineer1 have domain accounts which belong to domain groups and
can access any computer in the domain. During failover Operator1 and Engineer1 will continue to have access
to the servers.Operator1 and Engineer1 can both use single signon.
317
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
User environments scenarios
As well as deciding the best implementation of security for your system topology, you also need to consider the
best implementation of security for your work environment.
The typical environments are:
•
•
•
Control room
Desktop
Configuration
Related topics
“Integrated security system topology scenarios” on page 311
Control room environment scenario
You have a control room where Station computers must be strictly controlled. Computers in the control room
are used solely for the purpose of managing and interacting with the . Multiple applications can be used on a
single computer to provide multiple views of the site. For example you can run several instances of Station
running on the one computer, displayed on several monitors.
The primary concern in this environment is continual visibility of the . To facilitate this you need to minimize
disruptions due to:
•
•
Administrative tasks where engineers make changes.
Shift change where operators log on and off.
Other applications such as Configuration Studio or third-party applications exchanging server data may also run
on these computers.
Solution
To improve operator productivity, use integrated accounts or Experion Windows group accounts and single sign
on so that operators provide their credentials once when they log on to the computer. This is particularly useful
where you start multiple instances of Station.
In this environment it is useful to have a default 'view-only' operator account so that Station remains connected
to the server. This way alarms are evident at all times. To do this:
•
•
•
Create a generic Windows user account.
Create an operator definition in Experion that references the generic Windows account and assign the lowest
security level.
Set up the computer so that it starts with this account and Station starts automatically.
Desktop environment scenario
You have a conventional office computing environment involving a wide range of applications, including
Station. This environment is much less structured than the control room environment.
Users in this environment have a casual interest in the entire site or multiple sites and need to connect to several
different Experion systems, sometimes simultaneously.
The primary concerns in this environment are:
•
•
Flexibility
A high level of integration of process views with the desktop computing environment
Site managers spend most of their working time in this environment. They often have multiple instances of
Station connected to different Experion servers.
318
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Typically, domain accounts are used in this environment.
Solution
To remove the need to repeatedly provide credentials whenever the manager logs on to Station, use integrated
accounts or Experion Windows group accounts and single signon.
Create an operator definition or Windows group definition on each Experion server referencing the domain
Windows account or Windows group for the manager.
Remote user scenario
You need to provide access to a technical support engineer who needs to investigate problems from time to time.
This user is an infrequent user outside of your domain environment.
Solution
On the Experion server create a local Windows user account and an operator definition referencing the
Windows account. The account name and password are encrypted on the network.
The Windows account and operator definition can be disabled when they are not required.
About domain environments
For more information about Windows domains, see the Network and Security Planning Guide and the Windows
Domain and Workgroups Implementation Guide.
Related topics
“Integrated security system topology scenarios” on page 311
About the Operator Management Service
The Operator Management Service (OMS) is a Windows service that is installed when you install Experion. The
service provides a central point for:
•
•
•
Checking the existence of Windows accounts and groups for operator-based security.
Retrieving details for use by the server, for example full name.
Password changes in Station.
Because the Operator Management Service is not used as part of the logon process for any Station or other
clients that log on to the server, the service must run under an account that has the appropriate permissions to
perform the required functions. If the account does not have permission to query the local account database or a
domain based account database, then a user account that does exist may be reported as not being found, with
errors reported in the server log.
The default account under which the Operator Management Service runs is the System account. You need to
determine the most appropriate account for your topology.
By default the System account allows the Operator Management Service to support:
•
Local Windows accounts and groups.
Password changes are available only for:
•
•
Local accounts (regardless of whether the old password is known).
If the chgpsw command is used, an operator can change their own password for integrated accounts
regardless of whether the account is a local account or a domain account.
The System account does not support the High Security Policy.
319
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Choosing an appropriate account for the Operator Management Service
To determine the appropriate Windows account under which the Operator Management Service needs to run,
you need to know the location of Windows accounts and the facilities required for these accounts. The
following sections describe possible scenarios and the account requirements.
When choosing the account, considering the following:
•
•
•
If you have a combination of local Windows accounts and domain accounts, the Operator Management
Service must run under an account that has all the permissions required for local Windows accounts and
domain accounts. To achieve this you may have to use trust relationships between your domains.
The Operator Management Service account needs to be added to the Honeywell Administrators group on all
servers and Console Station utilizing the account for the Operator Management Service.
If a domain based account is chosen to modify user accounts, and if Local Windows accounts are also used,
ensure that the domain based account is a member of the Administrators group on the server.
Local Windows accounts
•
•
If you need to change the password in Station for other users, then the account must be a member of the
local Administrators group. The System account satisfies this requirement.
If you do not need to change passwords in Station for other users, then the account can be a domain account
or a local account. It does not need to be a member of the local Administrators group. The System account
satisfies this requirement.
Windows 2003/2008/2008 R2 Active Directory domain in any mode/functional level
•
•
If you need to change passwords in Station for other users, the account must be a member of the domain
Administrators group or the account must be delegated the Create, delete, and manage user accounts role
and the Reset passwords on user accounts role for the entire domain or the Organizational Unit (OU)
containing the accounts.
If users need to be able to change their own password in Station, the account must be known to the domain.
It can be a domain account or it can be an account from a trusted domain.
High Security Policy
•
If you have implemented the High Security Policy, the Windows account must be a member of a High
Security Policy group on the domain controller. The Windows account can be a member of any High
Security Policy group.
Setting the Operator Management Service account
After you have determined the account under which the Operator Management Service needs to run, you need
to set the service to run under this account on all Experion servers and Console Stations in the cluster.
Attention
If you are using DSA, the account that the Operator Management Service runs under does not need to be the same on
all clusters. However, it needs to be appropriate for the operators defined within each cluster, and should be the same
account on all servers and Console Stations within the cluster.
To set the account for the Operator Management service on Windows Server 2008 and Windows 7
320
1
Log on to the server or Console Station using an account that is a member of the Administrators group.
2
Choose Start, right-click on Computer and choose Manage.
3
If prompted, click Continue in the User Account Control dialog box.
4
Choose one of the following:
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Option
Description
Windows Server 2008
Expand the Configuration item.
Windows 7
Expand the Services and Applications item.
5
Click Services.
6
Locate the Experion PKS Server Operator Management service.
7
Right-click the service and choose Properties.
8
Click the Log On tab.
9
Click the This account option button.
10 Type the account name and password, and confirm the password.
11 Click OK.
12 Click OK to acknowledge any message dialog boxes.
13 Right-click the service and choose Restart.
321
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Building a Flex Station for operator-based security
If you want to use operator-based security, you need to:
•
•
Specify operator-based security for each Station that is to use this security method.
Define each operator (or Experion Windows group account) who needs to access these Stations.
You specify operator-based security for a Flex Station when you build the Flex Station. You specify operatorbased security for a Console Station (and Console Extension Stations) when you configure the Console Station.
The procedures for building a Flex Station are described in Quick Builder's help. If necessary, see Quick
Builder's help for assistance in completing the following instructions.
To specify operator-based security for one or more Flex Stations
322
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
2
Click the Build Flex Stations task.
Quick Builder appears.
3
Open the project file that contains the configuration data for the Stations.
4
In the item list, select all the Station items that are to have operator-based security.
5
Go to the Main tab, and select the Operator-Based Security check box.
A check mark in the box means that operator-based security is enabled for the selected Station(s).
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Configuring a Console Station for operator-based security
The security type you choose for a Console Station also applies to the Console Extension Stations connected to
the Console Station.
To specify operator-based security for a Console Station
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
2
Click the Configure Console Stations task.
The Console Station Configuration display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click the name of the Console Station to which you want to specify operator-based security.
4
Select Operator sign-on required.
Related topics
“Console Stations ” on page 41
323
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Adding an operator account
The server software is installed with a default traditional operator account of mngr. The security level for this
account is mngr and the default password is mngr1. You use this default operator account and password to set up
access for all other users. You should change the password for the mngr operator account from the default value
as soon as possible.
Attention
•
•
If you use integrated accounts, the operator must have an appropriate Windows account, and belong to the
appropriate Windows group.
Anyone who uses configuration tools, or who creates or modifies custom displays or Station setup files must have
their Windows account added to the group.
Prerequisites
•
•
To add operator account, you need to have the security level specified in the Change Operator
Configuration Security Level setting of the Sign-On Administration display (choose Configure >
Operators > Sign-On Administration).
You also need to be logged on at a security level higher than the operator whose account you want to add.
To add a traditional operator account
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Access.
2
Click the Configure operators and Windows group accounts task.
The Operators display appears in the System Display tab.
3
Click an empty row.
This opens the Operator Configuration display.
4
In the Type list, click Traditional Operator.
5
In the User name box, type the name of the operator.
6
In the Full name box, type the full name of the operator.
The full name appears in the operator configuration display, and is recorded with events if the Event
Summary is configured to show this information.
7
In the Job Title box, type the job title of the operator.
8
Click Change Password.
The Change Password dialog box appears.
9
Type the operator password in the New Password and Confirm New Password boxes, and then click OK.
10 In the Security level list, click the appropriate security level for this operator.
All operator actions in Experion require the operator to have a minimum security level.
11 If you have configured points with control levels, in the Control level box, type the control level that is
appropriate for this operator.
If the operator is required to control points with a control level of 250, then the operator requires a control
level of 250.
12 Click the Assignment tab and review or configure any settings as appropriate for this operator.
13 Click the Time Access tab and review or configure any settings as appropriate for this operator.
14 Click the Station Access tab and review or configure any settings as appropriate for this operator.
15 Click the Advanced tab and review or configure any settings as appropriate for this operator.
Tip
You can use the list at the top of the Operator Configuration display to view or change the details of any
operator who has already been entered in the system.
324
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
To add an integrated Windows account
1
Check that the Windows account exists and is added to the appropriate Windows group.
For example, if the operator needs to use configuration tools, the operator's Windows account must belong
to the group.
2
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Access.
3
Click the Configure operators and Windows group accounts task.
The Operators display appears in the System Display tab.
4
Click an empty row.
This opens the Operator Configuration display.
5
From the Type list, click Windows Operator.
6
In the User name box, type the name of the operator.
7
If Windows account resides on a domain, in the Domain box, type the name of the domain.
8
In the Security level list, click the appropriate security level for this operator.
All operator actions in Experion require the operator to have a minimum security level.
9
If you have configured points with control levels, in the Control level box, type the control level that is
appropriate for this operator.
If the operator is required to control points with a control level of 250, then the operator requires a control
level of 250.
10 Click the Assignment tab and review or configure any settings as appropriate for this operator.
11 Click the Time Access tab and review or configure any settings as appropriate for this operator.
12 Click the Station Access tab and review or configure any settings as appropriate for this operator.
13 Click the Advanced tab and review or configure any settings as appropriate for this operator.
Tip
You can use the list at the top of the Operator Configuration display to view or change the details of any
operator who has already been entered in the system.
To add an integrated Windows group account
1
Ensure that the Windows group exists before you define the account in Experion.
2
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Access.
3
Click the Configure operators and Windows group accounts task.
The Operators display appears in the System Display tab.
4
Click an empty row.
This opens the Operator Configuration display.
5
From the Type list, click Windows Group.
6
In the Group name box, type the name of the Windows group.
This is a unique identifier for the Experion Windows group, which can have a maximum of 32 alphanumeric
characters. The name specified here must be exactly the same as the Windows group already defined in the
Windows operating system.
Whenever a member of the Experion Windows group makes a change at a Station (for example, to control a
point or acknowledge an alarm) and that change is logged as an event, the operator user name is recorded
with the event in the following format:
domain\user name
If Show operators full name in the event summary on the Summary Displays tab of the Server Wide
Settings display is selected, then the full name of the operator is recorded with events in place of the user
name.
7
If the Windows group resides on a domain, type the name of the domain in the Domain box.
325
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
8
In the Security level list, click the appropriate security level for this operator.
All operator actions in Experion require the operator to have a minimum security level.
9
If you have configured points with control levels, in the Control level box, type the control level that is
appropriate for operators in this group.
If the operator is required to control points with a control level of 250, then the operator requires a control
level of 250.
10 Click the Assignment tab and review or configure any settings as appropriate for operators in this group.
11 Click the Time Access tab and review or configure any settings as appropriate for operators in this group.
12 Click the Station Access tab and review or configure any settings as appropriate for operators in this group.
13 Click the Advanced tab and review or configure any settings as appropriate for operators in this group.
Tip
You can use the list at the top of the Operator Configuration display to view or change the details of any
operator who has already been entered in the system.
Related topics
“What happens when there is an idle time out?” on page 67
“Server wide settings” on page 102
“Security tab, server wide settings” on page 104
“About security levels” on page 330
“Operator definition, General tab” on page 326
“Operator definition, Advanced tab” on page 328
“Determining the security settings for Windows group operators” on page 330
“Actions permitted at each security level” on page 355
“Sign-On Admin tab properties” on page 351
Operator definition, General tab
The Operator Configuration display is used to define the details for a new operator or to amend the details for an
existing operator. Specify the information as follows:
Property
Description
Operator or Windows Group Details
Type
Choose the type of operator account you want to configure:
•
•
•
Choose Traditional Operator if you do are not using Windows accounts. With this
type of account user authentication is carried out by the Experion server against
credentials stored in Experion.
Choose Windows Operator if you want to integrate the Experion operator account
with a Windows user account. The Windows user account can be a local account or a
domain account.
Choose Windows Group if you want to use an integrate account that allows you to add
multiple operators by adding the Windows group to the Experion server. The Windows
group can be a local Windows group or a domain Windows group.
With both Windows Operator and Windows Group accounts authentication is done by
Windows while authorization is done by the Experion server.
Enabled
If selected, indicates the operator account is active and the operator has access to the server.
The operator's access to the server can be disabled by clearing this check box. The operator
details are retained.
326
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Property
Description
User name
Applicable only to Traditional Operator or Windows Operator accounts.
A unique identifier for the operator. You can use a maximum of 20 alphanumeric
characters.
If you are using Windows accounts, the user name specified here must be exactly the same
as the Windows account.
Whenever an operator makes a change at a Station (for example, to control a point or
acknowledge an alarm) and that change is logged as an event, the operator user name is
recorded with the event in one of the following formats:
•
•
user name—for traditional operator accounts
.\user name—for local Windows integrated accounts
•
domain\user name—for domain Windows integrated accounts
If Show operators full name in the event summary on the Summary Displays tab of the
Server Wide Settings display is selected, then the Full name is recorded with events instead
of the User name.
Group
Applicable only to Windows Group accounts.
The name of the Windows Group that you want to add to Experion. This is a unique
identifier for the Experion Windows group, which can have a maximum of 32 alphanumeric
characters. The name specified here must be exactly the same as the Windows group
already defined in Windows.
Whenever a member of the Experion Windows group makes a change at a Station (for
example, to control a point or acknowledge an alarm) and that change is logged as an event,
the operator user name is recorded with the event in the following format:
domain\user name
Domain
Applicable only to Windows Operator or Windows Group accounts.
The name of the domain where the Windows accounts exists. If the Windows account is a
local account, leave blank.
Only use the short domain name, because the Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN) is not
supported.
Full name
Applicable only to Traditional Operator and Windows Operator accounts.
The operator's name. If you are configuring a Windows operator account, this information
is updated automatically from the Windows account and is read-only.
The full name is recorded with events if the Show operators full name in the event
summary on the Summary Displays tab of the Server Wide Settings display is checked.
Job title
Applicable only to Traditional Operator and Windows Operator accounts.
The operator's title, if applicable.
Password last changed
Applicable only to Traditional Operator accounts.
Click Change Password to change the operator's password.
Notes:
•
•
Passwords are case-sensitive.
Traditional operator accounts cannot use accented passwords.
Authority
Security level
The security level assigned to the operator.
Attention
Not applicable for DSA Advanced Security.
327
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Property
Description
Control level
Defines the control level assigned to the operator (from 0 to 255). The default is 255.
When a point is configured in the server database, a control level can be specified for that
point to define the level of authority required to control that point. With operator-based
security, an operator must have a control level greater than or equal to the control level
defined for a selected point in order to control that point.
Attention
Not applicable for DSA Advanced Security.
Related topics
“Adding an operator account” on page 324
“About security levels” on page 330
“Changing passwords for integrated accounts” on page 349
“Control properties for points” on page 215
Operator definition, Advanced tab
Property
Description
Asset
Use this option to specify the asset that must be assigned for viewing this operator's
configuration details. Only Stations or operators with this asset assigned are permitted to
view the details display for this operator.
Operator is allowed to login
at more than one Station
simultaneously
If selected, this operator ID can log on concurrently on multiple Stations using the same
user name and password.
This option is also known as the “Multi-user” option: it only applies to traditional operator
accounts or integrated Windows operator accounts. It does not apply to Windows group
accounts.
If this option is not selected and you have Console Stations, this operator can log on
concurrently to a single Flex Station and a Console Station or one of its Extension Stations.
Ignore any Windows group
settings for this operator
Applicable only to Windows operator accounts.
Password expiry disabled
Applicable only to traditional operator accounts.
Selecting this option means that any Windows group settings are ignored if the operator is
also a member of an Experion Windows group account.
This setting disables password expiry for this account only.
Idle time-out
If selected, the specified time is the idle time-out value, in seconds, for this operator. When
this time is exceeded without any operator activity, the operator has to re-enter their
password.
This idle time-out overrides the idle time-out specified for server-wide Station settings.
Note that this setting is ignored (except on a rotary Flex Station):
Start up display
If selected, the specified display is the startup display for this operator.
This setting overrides the start up display defined for the Station.
328
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Property
Description
Print the following Alarms/
Events on Station Alarm/
Event printer
•
•
•
•
•
URGENT priority alarms & events. Enables printing of urgent alarms and points
going out of urgent priority alarm conditions to Station's printer when the operator is
logged on to the Station.
HIGH priority alarms & events. Enables printing of high alarms and points going out
of high priority alarm conditions to Station's printer when the operator is logged on to
the Station.
LOW priority alarms & events. Enables printing of low alarms and points going out
of low priority alarm conditions to Station's printer when the operator is logged on to
the Station.
Journal priority alarms & events. Enables printing of events and journal alarms and
points going out of journal priority alarm conditions when the operator is logged on to
the Station.
Print Operator changes. Enables printing of all changes to points an operator has
made from the Station.
Attention
When the operator logs on to Station, these settings override the default Station
settings. The printer assigned to the Station as the alarm/event printer is used to print
the alarms and events.
Select all
Select the Set all check box to select all the print options.
Deselect the check box to deselect all the print options.
Related topics
“Adding an operator account” on page 324
“About security levels” on page 330
“Configuring startup displays” on page 63
“Flex Station Configuration Display” on page 109
“Assigning access to system alarms” on page 353
329
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
About security levels
The current security level of a Station is displayed in the Status Bar (right-hand side). If no operator is logged
on to the Station, this part of the Status Bar is blank.
Figure 47: Status bar showing the current security level setting ('MNGR')
You can use up to six different security levels in Experion. These levels are shown in the following table in
ascending order of access.
Table 13: Security levels
Default Security Level Acronym
Default Meaning
View Only, previously called Lvl1 (Available with operator-based
View-only mode
security only)
Ack Only, previously called Lvl2 (Available with operator-based security
Alarm acknowledgement mode
only)
OPER
Operator mode
SUPV
Supervisor mode
ENGR
Engineer mode
MNGR
Manager mode
If you have configured a Station to use operator-based security:
•
The Station prompts you to log on, and you cannot access any Station functions until you have successfully
logged on.
If you have configured a Station to use Station-based security:
•
The Station starts at a security level of OPER, but you need to enter a password if you want to access a higher
level of security.
The security levels OPER through MNGR can be assigned to server functions. In order to use the function, the
current security level used to run Station must be equal to or greater than the security level assigned to the
function. For example, a push button on a display might be assigned a security level of SUPV when a custom
display is built. In order for an operator to use the push button, the Station security level must be either SUPV,
ENGR, or MNGR.
Related topics
“About Station-based security” on page 306
“Adding an operator account” on page 324
“Operator definition, General tab” on page 326
“Operator definition, Advanced tab” on page 328
“Determining the security settings for Windows group operators” on page 330
“Actions permitted at each security level” on page 355
“Sign-On Admin tab properties” on page 351
Determining the security settings for Windows group operators
An operator can be a member of more than one Experion Windows group. The security settings of the first 10
groups (as they are stored in the server database) to which an operator belongs are used to determine the
security settings for the operator.
330
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
If an operator is a member of an Experion Windows group as well as being defined as a single operator, the
security settings for the Experion Windows group are ignored unless the Ignore Windows groups for this
operator option is disabled.
The following table describes how the combined security settings of each Experion Windows group are used to
determine the security settings for a particular operator belonging to more than one Experion Windows group.
Security setting
Applied security setting
Security level
The highest level of all Experion Windows group accounts is applied.
Control level
The highest level of all Experion Windows group accounts is applied.
Alarm/Event print settings
A union of all settings is applied. For example, Group1 prints urgent and high alarms,
Group2 prints low alarms and events. An operator belonging to both Windows groups can
print urgent, high, and low alarms and events.
Idle time-out
The longest time-out period is applied.
If a value of 0 is specified for any of the Experion Windows group accounts, then no timeout is applied.
If no idle time-out is specified for any of the Experion Windows group accounts, the
system wide idle time-out is used.
Startup page
Experion searches the Experion Windows group accounts to which the operator belongs in
the order listed in the Operator Summary display. It chooses the first of those Experion
Windows group accounts that has a startup page defined and uses this startup for the
operator.
If there is no startup page configured for any of the Experion Windows group accounts, the
system wide startup page is used.
Asset assignment
The highest permission for each asset is applied. If a profile is used, the profile is
calculated and merged with the permissions of the other Experion Windows group
accounts.
For example, if one Experion Windows group account has view only permission and
another Experion Windows group account has view and acknowledge permission, a
member of both will have view and acknowledge permission.
Time access
Time access is checked only at logon. If the Experion Windows group account has access
at the current time, then all of the settings in the Experion Windows group account are
considered in determining the settings for the operator.
If the Experion Windows group account does not have access at the time, then all of the
settings in the Experion Windows group account are ignored when determining the settings
for the operator.
Flex Station access
Flex Station access is checked only at logon. If the Experion Windows group account has
access at the current time, then all of the settings in the Experion Windows group account
are considered in determining the settings for the operator.
If the Experion Windows group account does not have access at the time, then all of the
settings in the Experion Windows group account are ignored when determining the settings
for the operator.
Console Station access
Console Station and Console Extension Station access is checked only at logon. If the
Experion Windows group account has access at the current time, then all of the settings in
the Experion Windows group account are considered in determining the settings for the
operator.
If the Experion Windows group account does not have access at the time, then all of the
settings in the Experion Windows group account are ignored when determining the settings
for the operator.
If the user logging in with an integrated account is also a member of a Windows group configured in Experion,
then care needs to be taken when using the Operator is allowed to login at more than one Station
331
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
simultaneously and Ignore any Windows Group settings for this Operator options when configuring an
operator account:
•
•
•
If the Ignore any Windows Group settings for this Operator option is disabled and Operator is allowed
to login at more than one Station simultaneously option is disabled, then this user can log in to more than
one Flex Station. However, the first Flex Station they log on to will have a Scope of Responsibility that is
based on the operator's record and also all of the relevant Windows Group records. For subsequent logons
the Scope of Responsibility will be determined completely by the relevant Windows Group records.
If Operator is allowed to login at more than one Station simultaneously is enabled then all logons will
have their Scope of Responsibility determined by the operator's record and all relevant Windows Group
records.
If the Ignore any Windows Group settings for this Operator option is enabled, all relevant Group records
are always ignored for all logon attempts by this user.
Related topics
“Adding an operator account” on page 324
“About security levels” on page 330
“Configuring startup displays” on page 63
“About alarms and events for standard points” on page 219
332
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Assigning scope of responsibility to operators or Windows group
accounts
To assign scope of responsibility to individual operators or Windows groups accounts
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Access.
2
Click the Configure operators and Windows group accounts task.
The Operators display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click the operator or Windows Group account to which you want to assign scope of responsibility.
4
Click the Assignment tab.
5
For each operator or Windows group account, you can select a responsibility profile from the list or you can
select level of access for each asset, Network node, and System component the needs to be assigned.
Tip
To change the assignment for different operators or Windows Groups, use the list available above the
Assignment tab.
Related topics
“Security” on page 45
“About integrated security” on page 310
“About scope of responsibility” on page 336
“Configuring profiles for scope of responsibility” on page 334
“Security” on page 459
“Configuring system security” on page 303
333
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Configuring profiles for scope of responsibility
A profile consists of an asset list, containing one or more assets, and a time period.
If you are using operator-based security, scope of responsibility profiles provide:
•
•
•
Additional security, through the ability to assign assets only for specified times.
A method of giving an operator additional access at specified times. For example, after hours monitoring
from a central location.
A quick way of assigning assets to operators.
If you make any changes to a scope of responsibility profile, these changes are not available to any operator
using that profile until the next time the operator logs on.
Task
Go to
Configure the assets in the system using Asset Builder.
“Building assets” on page 30
Configure asset lists.
“Configuring asset lists” on page 334
Configure time periods.
“Configuring time periods” on page 335
Configure profiles.
“Configuring profiles” on page 335
Done
Related topics
“Configuring asset lists” on page 334
“Configuring time periods” on page 335
“Configuring profiles” on page 335
“Assigning scope of responsibility to operators or Windows group accounts” on page 333
“About scope of responsibility” on page 336
Configuring asset lists
To configure an asset list, first ensure that all the assets you want to use have been defined.
Attention
The first list in the summary is a predefined list for which all configured assets are selected. This list is supplied with
the name All Assets. You can change the name, description, and asset name of the All Assets list, but you cannot
change the assets selected.
To create an asset list
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Access.
2
In the Profiles list, click the Configure asset lists task.
3
Click an empty row in the summary.
The Asset Lists Configuration display appears.
4
Under Definition, type:
•
•
334
The name you want to give the asset list.
A description of the list.
5
In the Assignable Asset box, click the ellipsis button (...) to display a list of assets. Select the asset that must
be assigned to operators to allow them to change this list.
6
Select the assets that you want to include in this list. If you want to include all assets in the list, click Select
All.
7
If you want to include subordinate assets, select Apply changes to subordinate items.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Configuring time periods
The first time period in the summary is a predefined time period that includes all hours of all days. This time
period is defined with the name All Hours. If you do not need to limit the hours that assets are assigned to
operators, you can use this time period for all your responsibility profiles.
You can change the name, description, and asset of the All Hours Time Period, but you cannot change its time
period details.
To configure a time period
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Access.
2
In the Profiles list, click the Configure time periods task.
3
Click an empty row in the summary.
The Time Periods configuration display appears.
4
Under Definition, type:
•
•
The name you want to give the asset time period.
A description of the time period.
5
In the Associated asset box, click the ellipsis button (...) to display a list of assets. Select the asset that must
be assigned to operators to allow them to change this time period.
6
Select the days and type the start time and stop time for the segments you need.
Configuring profiles
The Full Access profile in the summary is a system-defined profile that consists of the All Assets/All Hours pair
only. An operator with this profile has access to all assets at any time.
You can change the name, description, and asset name of the full access profile, but you cannot change its asset
list/time period details.
To configure a profile
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Access.
2
In the Profiles list, click the Configure profiles task.
3
Click an empty row in the summary. The Profiles configuration display appears.
4
Under Definition, type:
•
•
The name you want to give the profile.
A description of the profile.
5
In the Assignable Asset box, click the ellipsis button (...) to display a list of assets. Select the asset that must
be assigned to operators to allow them to change this profile.
6
The lower half of the screen provides for 16 Asset List/Asset Time Period pairs. Specify the pairs that you
require for this profile.
335
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
About scope of responsibility
You define an operator's or Station's scope of responsibility by assigning access to assets and components in the
System Components tree. Assigning access enables you to restrict or allow access to parts of the plant, process,
or equipment for your operators or Stations.
For example, if you have an asset called, Precipitator, then that asset and all child assets and points associated
with the Precipitator asset are viewable by Stations or operators that have had the Precipitator asset assigned
to them with an asset permission of at least 'View.' If a Station or operator does not have the Precipitator asset
assigned, they cannot view child assets or points associated with the Precipitator asset, (unless the point is on
a custom display and its security level has not been configured appropriately).
Attention
•
•
•
•
Scope of responsibility does not apply to point data on custom displays. If you want to limit the visibility and use
of point data on custom displays, you should assign an appropriate security level to the point or the display during
configuration of the custom display.
You can assign an asset to a display to restrict which operators can call up the display by assigning the asset to an
operator's scope of responsibility. Be aware that if an operator can call up the display, the operator has visibility to
all point data on the display, even if the point belongs to an asset that is not in the operator's scope of
responsibility.
If assets are associated with points or processes that are currently in alarm, these existing alarms will not observe
asset restrictions. It is therefore recommended that assets be configured before points are defined or otherwise
configured when there are no alarms affecting points and processes associated with the assets you are creating.
Alarms for an an asset can be temporarily disabled using the Status Change Alarm Area Inhibit algorithm.
Scope of responsibility and Station-based security
If you use Station-based security, you assign assets, Network tree nodes, and System Components to Stations
(Flex and Console Stations) to define the scope of responsibility of each Station. When an action is performed,
the assignment of the Station is checked to ensure the action is within the scope of responsibility of the Station.
If you use Console Extension Stations, the assignment of the Console Station to which they are connected is
used to determine access.
If a Console Station belongs to a console and is using the console settings, the asset assignment of the console is
used to determine access. If the Console Station is not using the console settings, the asset assignment of the
Station is used to determine access.
Scope of responsibility and operator-based security
If you use operator-based security, you assign assets, Network tree nodes, and System Components to operators
(or Experion Windows groups) to define scope of responsibility. When an operator performs an action, the
assignment of that operator (or the Experion Windows group to which the operator belongs) is checked to
ensure the action is within the defined scope of responsibility.
By default for operator-based security, only the assignment of the individual operator (or Experion Window
group) is used to define the scope of responsibility. You can, however, choose to combine operator (or group)
assignment with Station assignment, as described below.
Related topics
“Assignment tab” on page 111
“Configuring a Station to print alarms and events” on page 147
“Assigning scope of responsibility to operators or Windows group accounts” on page 333
“Configuring profiles for scope of responsibility” on page 334
“Assigning scope of responsibility to Console Stations” on page 339
“Assigning scope of responsibility to Flex Stations” on page 338
“Console Stations ” on page 41
“Asset Alarm Count reports” on page 407
336
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Scope of responsibility asset permissions
You can specify the asset permissions that an operator or Station has. The following table lists the asset
permissions available for each asset and the actions permitted.
Asset permission
Description
Full access
The operator or Station can perform all actions with this level of access on all
items that have been assigned to this asset.
View and acknowledge
The operator or Station can only view the assigned items and can only
acknowledge alarms associated with those items.
View only
The operator or Station can only view the assigned items and can view alarms
associated with the assigned items. No other actions are permitted.
337
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Assigning scope of responsibility to Flex Stations
To configure the assignment of individual Flex Stations
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
2
Click the Configure Flex Stations task.
The Flex Station Configuration Summary display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration
Studio.
3
Click the Station to which you want to assign access.
4
Click the Assignment tab.
5
Select the level of access for each asset and System component you want to assign to the Flex Station.
Tip
To change the assignment for different Flex Stations, use the list of Flex Stations available above the
Assignment tab.
Related topics
“About scope of responsibility” on page 336
“Security” on page 459
“Configuring system security” on page 303
“eServer home page” on page 478
“eServer security considerations” on page 474
“eServer configuration procedures” on page 472
338
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Assigning scope of responsibility to Console Stations
The assets you assign to a Console Station also apply to any Console Extension Stations connected to the
Console Station.
To assign scope of responsibility to a Console Station
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Stations and Consoles.
2
Click the Configure Console Stations task.
The Console Configuration Summary display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click the Console Station to which you want to assign assets.
4
Click the Assignment tab.
5
Select the level of access for each asset and System component you want to assign to the Console Station.
Related topics
“Security” on page 45
“About integrated security” on page 310
“About scope of responsibility” on page 336
339
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Combining operator and Station scope of responsibility
If you are using operator-based security, you can configure your server so that the scope of responsibility of
both the Station and the operator (or the Experion Windows group to which the operator belongs) are checked
before access is granted.
If you are using Station-based security, configuring your server to check the assignment of both the Station and
the operator has no impact: only the assignment of the Station is used to determine the access rights.
To configure the server to check the assignment for both the operator and the Station
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Access.
2
Click the Configure server wide security settings task.
The Server wide settings display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration studio.
3
Select the Check both the Operator’s AND the Station’s asset assignment for access to a given asset
check box.
Related topics
“Security” on page 45
“About integrated security” on page 310
340
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Setting time access for an operator account
To restrict an operator to logging on only between certain times of day, set the start and finish times of the
operator's valid access period.
Holiday access times are only applied on the days that have been defined as a holidays. On holidays, the holiday
start and finish times override the normal Sunday to Saturday times.
Any access you specify for a Console Station also apply to any Console Extension Stations connected to the
Console Station
To set time restrictions
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Access.
2
Click the Configure operators and Windows Group accounts task.
The Operators display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click the name of the operator or Experion Windows group for which you want to define sign-on
restrictions.
4
Click the Time Access tab.
5
Type the start and end time that this operator requires access.
6
Clear the check boxes for any days of the week when this operator does not require access.
Tip
Select the Select all check box to select all the days. Deselect the check box to clear any selections.
341
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Setting Station access for an operator account
The default setting is for all Flex Stations and all Console Stations to be accessible to new operators.
The settings you specify for a Console Station apply to the Console Extension Stations connected to the Console
Station.
Any access you specify for a Console Station also apply to any Console Extension Stations connected to the
Console Station
To set time Station access
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Access.
2
Click the Configure operators and Windows Group accounts task.
The Operators display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click the name of the operator or Experion Windows group for which you want to define sign-on
restrictions.
4
Click the Station Access tab.
5
Select or clear the check boxes for the Flex Stations and Console Stations that this operator needs to access.
Tip
Select the Select all check box to select all the days. Deselect the check box to clear any selections.
342
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Deleting an operator account
Deleting an operator ID deletes all the details of the operator such, as user name and domain, and sets security
attributes, such as security level, to the default settings.
To delete an operator account
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Access.
2
Click the Configure operators and Windows group accounts task.
The Operators display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click the Operator ID you want to delete.
4
Click Clear Details.
343
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Disabling an operator account
If you want to remove access to Experion for a particular operator but want to keep the operator account, you
can disable the operator access rather than deleting the operator account.
To disable an operator account
344
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Access.
2
Click the Configure operators and Windows group accounts task.
The Operators display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click the Operator ID you want to disable.
4
Clear the Enabled check box.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Converting traditional operator accounts to integrated accounts
If you already have traditional operator accounts, you can convert these accounts to integrated accounts.
You need to complete the following tasks:
•
If you have existing Windows accounts, modify your operator accounts by changing the user name of the
operator account to exactly match the user name of the existing Windows accounts.
•
Alternatively, create Windows accounts for each operator account, ensuring that the user name is exactly the
same for both the Windows account and the operator account.
Add the Windows accounts to the appropriate Honeywell Experion Windows group.
•
•
Note that anyone who uses configuration tools, or who creates or modifies custom displays or Station setup
files must have their Windows account added to the group.
In Station, modify each operator's configuration details and choose Windows operator from the Type box.
Enter the domain name if the Windows accounts belong to a domain.
345
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Deleting an Experion Windows group account
Deleting an Experion Windows group account deletes all the details of the group, such as name and domain
from the operator record on the Experion server, and sets security attributes, such as security level, to the default
settings. It does not delete the Windows group itself.
To delete an Experion Windows group account
346
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Access.
2
Click the Configure operators and Windows group accounts task.
The Operators display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click the Experion Windows group account you want to delete.
4
Click Clear Details.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Changing passwords for Station-based security
The passwords for the ENGR, SUPV, and MNGR security levels are predefined. The default passwords are:
•
•
•
engr, for the ENGR security level
supv, for the SUPV security level
mngr, for the MNGR security level
For security reasons, it is good practice to change these passwords. The passwords need to be changed for each
Station in your system.
When changing the passwords, consider:
•
•
Passwords are case-sensitive.
The scope of the password change on a Console Station includes Console Extension Stations.
To change a Station password for ENGR, SUPV, or MNGR
1
Log on to the Experion server with a Windows account that belongs to the group.
2
Choose Start > All Programs > Honeywell Experion PKS > Server > Experion Command Prompt to
open the Experion Command Prompt window.
Attention
To run Experion commands, you must be a member of the Product Administrators group. If you want to do
engineering tasks, you must be a member of the Local Engineers group.
You must run Experion commands from the Experion command prompt and not the standard Windows command
prompt, otherwise you will not see the output from the command and the command will fail.
3
Type paswrd.
4
If you are changing password(s) for a:
•
•
Flex Station, specify the Flex Station number as follows: Fnn
Console Station, specify the Console Station number as follows: Cnn
where nn is the number of the Flex Station/Console Station for which you want to change the password(s).
5
Type the number for the security level for which you want to change the password:
1 for SUPV
2
for ENGR
3
for MNGR
6
Type the new password. The password can be either 5 or 6 alphanumeric characters.
7
Type (for quit).Q
Related topics
“paswrd” on page 606
347
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Changing passwords for traditional accounts
When changing passwords for traditional operator accounts, consider the following:
•
•
•
•
Operator passwords are encrypted.
The 10 most recently used passwords cannot be re-used within a configured time period.
The validity period for passwords defaults to one month, but this setting can be configured as required.
Traditional operator accounts cannot use accented passwords.
To change your password
1
Type chgpsw in the Command Zone and press ENTER.
The Change Password dialog box opens.
2
Type your old password and press TAB.
3
Type your new password and press TAB.
4
Re-type your new password and click OK. (The new password is only accepted if the new password entries
are identical.)
Related topics
“Sign-On Admin tab properties” on page 351
348
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Changing passwords for integrated accounts
Operators can use the chgpsw Station command to change their own password for integrated accounts.
Operators with mngr security level can also change passwords for integrated accounts using the Operator
Configuration display. Operators with SUPV security level or higher can change their own password on the same
display.
Attention
You cannot use Station to change the password for an operator who belongs to an Experion Windows group unless that
operator also has an individual Experion operator definition.
To change a password using the chgpsw command
1
In Station, type chgpsw in the Command Zone and press ENTER.
The Change Password dialog box opens.
2
Type your old password and press TAB.
3
Type your new password and press TAB.
4
Re-type your new password and click OK. (The new password is only accepted if the new password entries
are identical.)
Related topics
“Operator definition, General tab” on page 326
“Control properties for points” on page 215
349
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Configuring password administration for traditional operator accounts
To configure password administration for traditional operator accounts
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Access.
2
Click the Administer operator signon task.
The Sign-on Administration display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
In the Password expiry box, type the number of days after which a password expires.
4
In the Password Validation Period box, type the number of days before a previously used password can be
re-used.
Related topics
“Sign-On Admin tab properties” on page 351
Configuring failed logon alarms
An alarm is raised when an operator enters an incorrect password or when the number of specified logon
attempts is exceeded. You can set the priority of these alarms. You might want to set the priority of an operator
lockout alarm to Urgent while you might want to set the priority to Journal when an operator enters an
incorrect password.
To configure failed logon alarms
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Access.
2
Click the Administer operator signon task.
The Sign-On Admin tab appears in the System Configuration display in Configuration Studio.
3
In the Number of failed logins before lockout box, type the number of times an operator can attempt to log
on unsuccessfully before they are locked out.
4
In the Lockout time box, type the amount of time Station remains locked after an operator has exceeded the
number of logon attempts.
5
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Alarms and Event Management.
6
Click the Configure alarm processing task.
The Alarms display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
7
Click the Alarm Enabling tab.
8
In the System Alarm Priorities area, set the required priorities for Operator Logon.
The Operator Logon alarm indicates when an operator has entered an incorrect password.
9
In the System Alarm Priorities area, set the required priorities for Operator Lockout.
The Operator Lockout alarm indicates the operator has exceeded the number of logon attempts and does not
have access to the Experion system.
Related topics
“Sign-On Admin tab properties” on page 351
350
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Sign-On Admin tab properties
Property
Description
Password Expiry Period
Operator passwords for traditional operator accounts will expire after this
number of days, and a new password will be required.
Password Validation Period
Experion does not allow operators with traditional operator accounts to reuse
any of their 10 most recently used passwords unless the password was
changed at least as many days ago as specified in this option.
Change Operator Configuration Security
Level
Defines the security level required to change operator configuration.
Number of failed logins before lockout
Specifies the number of unsuccessful logon attempts permitted before Station
lockout.
Lockout time
The Station will stay locked out for this period of time after the specified
number of failed logins.
Allow password changes in Station
If selected, operators can change the password for their Windows account in
Station.
Note, passwords for Experion Windows group accounts cannot be changed in
Station.
Related topics
“Changing passwords for traditional accounts” on page 348
“Configuring password administration for traditional operator accounts” on page 350
“Configuring Integrated Security signon policy” on page 352
“Adding an operator account” on page 324
“About security levels” on page 330
“Configuring failed logon alarms” on page 350
351
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Configuring Integrated Security signon policy
If you are using integrated accounts you can configure your system to allow:
•
Password changes in Station
To configure integrated security signon policy
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Access.
2
Click the Administer operator sign-on task.
The Operators display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Select the Allow password changes in Station check box if you want operators to be able to change
passwords for the integrated Windows operator accounts in Station.
Related topics
“Sign-On Admin tab properties” on page 351
352
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Assigning access to system alarms
By default, users (and Stations) have access to the system alarms (as distinct from the process alarms) on their
local server. If necessary you can disable the display of system alarms for a given server by navigating to the
Assignment tab of the Operator (or Station) Configuration display, selecting the server in the System
Components tree and setting the access to that component to No access.
When you assign a user (or Station) access to one or more servers in the System Components tree, that user (or
Station) has access to all the alarms for those servers on the System Status display. While this might be
appropriate for maintenance engineers, it is generally not advisable for operators to be given access to the
system alarms for multiple servers as it may flood the alarm summary and/or system alarm summary during
abnormal situations.
However, there may be situations where you want operators to see the system alarms for specific controllers on
given servers.
The high-level procedure for enabling operators (or Stations) to only see the system alarms is described below.
For detailed information about planning and creating an asset model, see the chapter 'Enterprise models' in the
Server and Client Planning Guide. For more information about Control Builder, see the Control Builder
Parameter Reference.
To associate a device with an asset
•
Choose one of the following:
Option
Description
Control Builder
1. Decide which asset you want to associate with the device.
2. Go to the Main tab of the Properties window for the device whose alarms you want
included in the System Status display, and specify the asset in the Associated Asset
field.
If you leave this field empty, the system alarms for those devices will be seen by
anyone who has access to the system alarms for the server on which the device is
located
Attention
Note that if you specify an associated asset for a device, the device still appears
in the Location pane of the System Status display. It is not relocated to the asset
tree in the Location pane of the Alarm Summary display.
3. Download your updated Control Builder database to the Experion server.
4. If the user (or Station) has not already been assigned to the associated asset that you
specified in Control Builder for that device, use the Assignment tab of the Operator
(or Station) Configuration display.
Attention
If an asset is disabled, any alarms from system components that have the asset
as their associated asset are also disabled.
Results
•
When you use Control Builder to define an associated asset, then users (and Stations) that have been
assigned access to that asset will see the alarms for that device on the System Status display regardless of
whether or not they have been assigned access to the system alarms for the server system on which that
device resides.
Conversely, if users (or Stations) have access to the system alarms for a specific server but a device on that
server has had an associated asset defined in Control Builder, then those users (or Stations) will not be able
to see the alarms for that device unless they have been assigned to the associated asset defined for that
device.
353
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Related topics
“Operator definition, Advanced tab” on page 328
“Configuring the Experion OPC Display Data Client” on page 540
Distributed system architecture (DSA) and locations
To assign a Station or an operator to a remote location, select the check box for the remote location. The remote
location must be defined on the Station or operator's local server.
To enable access to non-location alarms or items on a remote server
354
1
On the remote server, assign an location code to the system location (location 1).
2
Assign the location code of the remote system location to the Stations or operators that need it.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Actions permitted at each security level
The tables in this section show the actions permitted at each security level in Experion. Most of these actions
correspond to options available from Station.
Related topics
“Adding an operator account” on page 324
“About security levels” on page 330
“Configuring eServer” on page 471
Permissions for general actions
Table 14: Permissions for general Experion actions
Action
View
Only
Ack Only OPER
SUPV
ENGR
MNGR
View startup display
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Call up displays
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
View message pad
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Edit message pad
View system acronyms
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure system acronyms
View user acronyms
Yes
Configure user acronyms
View redundant server status
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure server redundancy
Yes
Yes
Yes
Failover/synchronize redundant servers
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
View History Assignment
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure History Assignment
View connections
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
View server wide Station settings
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure server wide Station settings
View application summary
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure application summary
View application point list summary
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure application point list summary
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Edit server scripts
View system sinewave
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure system sinewave
Yes
View Task Timers
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
View Watchdog Timers
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
View file replication
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure file replication
Yes
355
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Action
View
Only
Ack Only OPER
SUPV
ENGR
Start file replication
MNGR
Yes
View DSA configuration
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure DSA
View DSA tuning settings
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
DSA tuning
Yes
Print page
Yes
Yes
Yes
Change SUPV level display object
Yes
Yes
Change ENGR level display object
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Change mngr level display object
Yes
Edit displays
Yes
Yes
Edit SCADA control strategy
Yes
Yes
Edit Process control strategy
Yes
Edit assets
Yes
Edit Alarm Groups
Yes
Edit servers
Yes
Permissions for system security management
Table 15: Permissions for system security and asset
Action
View
Only
Ack Only OPER
SUPV
ENGR
MNGR
View profiles
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure and assign profiles
Yes
View Operator's ID and name
Yes
Yes
Yes
View Operator's full details
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure Operators, excluding security level
and asset assignment
Yes
Assign assets to operators, Flex Stations, and
Console Stations
Yes
View sign on administration
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure sign on administration
Yes
Yes
Permissions for point control
Table 16: Permissions for points
Action
View
Only
Ack Only OPER
SUPV
ENGR
MNGR
View point information
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure point information excluding descriptor
and asset
Configure point information descriptor and asset
356
www.honeywell.com
Yes
Yes
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Action
View
Only
Ack Only OPER
SUPV
ENGR
MNGR
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure shifts
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure shift management
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Ack Only OPER
SUPV
ENGR
MNGR
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Control points
View point algo information
Yes
Yes
Configure point algo information
View point schedules
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure point schedules
View shifts
Yes
Yes
Yes
Initialize shift management
View point processing limits
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure point processing limits
Permissions for system hardware management
Table 17: Permissions for system hardware
Action
View
Only
View Station, printer, channel, point server,
Yes
system interfaces, controller, DSA and redundant
server status
Yes
Modify Station, printer, channel and controller
status
View Channel maintenance
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure Channel maintenance
View Flex Station settings
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure Console Station settings
Yes
Yes
Delete Console Station
Yes
Yes
Configure Flex Station settings
View Console Station configuration
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure Console Station
View Console Station settings
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
View Console configuration
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
View Console settings
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure Console settings
Configure LEDs for specialized keyboards
Yes
Permissions for alarm management
Attention
eServer users do not have access to alarms and cannot perform any of the actions listed in this table.
357
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Table 18: Permissions for alarms and alarm management
Action
View
Only
Ack Only OPER
SUPV
ENGR
MNGR
View alarms
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Acknowledge Alarm
9
Acknowledge Page (default)
Enable and disable alarms server wide
Yes
Configure server-wide setting for Alarm returnto-normal only non-alarm states
Yes
Configure server-wide setting for Silence action
applies to
Yes
Configure server-wide setting for Alarms/
messages must be acknowledged
Yes
Configure external alarm notification
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure unanswered alarms
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
View system alarm priorities
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure system alarm priorities
Yes
Configure server redundancy alarm priority
Yes
View alarm pager
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure alarm pager
View alarm message text
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure alarm message text
View server wide alarm color settings
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure server wide alarm color settings
View Alarm, Event and Message Summary
permission
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure Alarm, Event and Message Summary
permission
View alarm priority elevation settings
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure alarm priority elevation settings
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure alarm shelving
Yes
Yes
Permissions for event management
Table 19: Permissions for events and event archiving
Action
View
Only
Ack Only OPER
SUPV
ENGR
MNGR
View events
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Archive/Restore events
Configure event archive parameters
View event tamper detection settings
9
358
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
The level is determined by the Server-wide setting for Alarm, Alert, Event, SOE and Message Summary Restrictions. The
default is OPER and higher.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Action
View
Only
Ack Only OPER
SUPV
ENGR
Configure event tamper detection settings
MNGR
Yes
Permissions for groups and trend
Table 20: Permissions for groups and trends
Action
View
Only
Ack Only OPER
SUPV
ENGR
MNGR
View groups
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure groups
Yes
Yes
View trends
Yes
Yes
Configure trends
10
Permissions for report management
Table 21: Permissions for report functions
Action
View
Only
Ack Only OPER
SUPV
ENGR
MNGR
View report definitions
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Configure report definitions, excluding security
requirement
Configure security on report definitions
Request reports
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
SUPV
ENGR
MNGR
Yes
Yes
Permissions for the IdentIPoint interface
Table 22: IndentIPoint Interface
Action
Configure the IdentIPoint point server
View
Only
Ack Only OPER
Generate security keys
Add card reader subnets
Yes
Yes
Configure default date and time for readers
Yes
Yes
Configure data and time for individual readers
Yes
Yes
Configuring the backlight
Yes
Yes
Configuring actions
Yes
Yes
Configuring templates
Yes
Yes
Discovering readers
Yes
Yes
Specifying card reader for enrollment
Yes
Yes
10
An operator with the OPER security level can configure a new group, however the operator cannot change an existing group
if the 'MNGR or ENGR security level required to change group' option has not been selected.
359
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Action
ENGR
MNGR
Build reader points
Yes
Yes
Applying templates to readers
Yes
Yes
Uploading firmware (In Station)
Yes
Yes
Downloading firmware (In Station)
Yes
Yes
Configuring a standalone reader
Yes
Yes
Configuring PIN and fingerprint settings
Yes
Yes
Ack Only OPER
SUPV
Configuring PIN duress scheme
Yes
Changing the admin password
Yes
Restoring security keys
Yes
Creating a maintenance card
360
View
Only
www.honeywell.com
Yes
Yes
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Setting security levels for enabling/disabling channels and hardware
Security levels are also used to define which level of security is required to enable or disable hardware items.
To set the minimum security level required for enabling or disabling
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Access.
2
Click the Server wide security settings task.
The Server wide Station settings display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click the Security tab.
4
Under Enable and disabling hardware, select the security level you want to set for this operator function.
Results
•
•
When you call up the Channel Status Summary and the Controller Status Summary display you will not be
able to use the Enable check boxes on these displays unless you are currently logged on at the security level
specified.
This enable/disable security level setting applies to every Station in your system.
Related topics
“Enabling and disabling channels and controllers” on page 176
“Defining redundant communication links” on page 170
361
CONFIGURING SYSTEM SECURITY
Changing the names of security levels
You can change the default names (Oper, Mngr, and so on) that are used to identify each security level, and which
are displayed in Station's status bar. The default name for security levels are Experion acronyms that can be
changed via the System Acronym Configuration display.
Before you change the names of security levels, consider the following:
•
•
•
Any changes you make to default security level names will be overwritten when you upgrade Experion. If
you do not use the default names for security levels, you need to repeat the above process every time you
upgrade Experion.
Acronyms are more commonly used in building custom displays. For information about how acronyms are
used in custom displays, see 'About acronyms' in the 'Object properties' section of the HMIWeb Display
Building Guide.
Changing the name of the security level does not change the password for the security level.
To change the security level acronyms
362
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, expand Advanced Options and click Acronyms.
2
Click the Configure system acronyms task.
The Acronyms display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click the acronym that you want to change and type in a new acronym.
www.honeywell.com
Group and trend displays
This section describes how you configure two types of standard displays that can be used for grouping
information and showing trends:
•
•
Group displays
Trend displays
These displays require only minimal configuration and provide a convenient way for operators and other users
to view information about a group of related points on a single display.
These displays are standard displays available with every Experion installation, but it is not mandatory to use
them. You might prefer to use custom displays instead of (or as well as) standard displays.
Related topics
“Station displays for points” on page 224
“About changing point configuration via Station displays” on page 226
“Creating groups” on page 364
“Configuring a trend” on page 367
363
GROUP AND TREND DISPLAYS
Creating groups
By default, an operator can change the configuration of a group while it is being displayed. To restrict the ability
to change the points or parameters in a group display, select the MNGR or ENGR security level required to
change group check box.
To add a new group
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Trends and Groups.
2
Click the Configure groups task.
The Group Configuration Summary display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click an empty title. This calls up the Group Configuration display for that group.
4
In the Title box, type a title for the group you are creating.
5
Enter the point IDs for the points you want to include in the group. Point descriptions appear automatically
as each point is entered.
6
Select the parameter that you want shown in the group trend and group numeric history for each point.
This parameter would normally be PV for standard points, or the equivalent for flexible points.
The choice of parameter does not change the parameters shown on the faceplates in the group displays.
7
If you want to prevent operators from changing the configuration of the group, select the MNGR or ENGR
security level required to change group check box.
8
Click View Group to call up the Group Detail display for this group.
Related topics
“Group and trend displays” on page 363
About groups and displays
When you configure groups, information for up to eight points can be viewed on a single Station display.
Each group can contain a mixture of point types: analog, status, accumulator, process, and flexible points.
The total number of groups you can create depends on the size of your database.
By configuring groups for your site, you can access the following standard Group display types:
Display
Description
Group Detail
Shows the important data, such as the PV and SP, for each point in the group.
Group Trend
Shows trend information for each point in the group.
Group Numeric History
Shows numeric history information for each point in the group.
The Operator's Guide describes these displays in detail.
The figure below shows an example of a typical Group display.
364
www.honeywell.com
GROUP AND TREND DISPLAYS
Figure 48: Group Detail display
Modifying groups and points
To change the name of an existing group
1
Call up the Group Configuration display for the group you want to rename.
2
Under Definition, edit the Title and press Enter.
3
Change the points assigned to the group using the Point IDs boxes.
Deleting groups and points
To delete a group
1
In the Group Configuration Summary display, click the name of the group you want to delete.
This calls up the Group Configuration display for that group.
2
Under Definition, place your cursor in the Title box and press Delete then Enter to remove the group from
the active list of groups.
3
To delete any point currently assigned to a group, select the point you want to delete in the relevant Point
IDs box, and press Delete, then press Enter.
Navigation methods to group displays
Standard navigation methods require no configuration. They are listed below because you might want to use
them when checking a group configuration or display.
The following standard methods can be used to call up a group display:
•
•
•
•
Go to the Group Summary display (View > Group Summary) click the name of a specific group to call up.
Click the Group icon on the Station toolbar and type a group number in the Station command zone and press
Enter.
Press F6 to call up a group by number.
In Station's Command Zone, type the GRP command and the number of the group you want to display then
press Enter.
365
GROUP AND TREND DISPLAYS
•
In any Group display, change the current number in the Group box to the number of the another group to
display. Alternatively, choose another group from the list of titles at the top of the display.
These standard methods are described in detail in the Operator's Guide.
Alternatively, you might want to configure one of the following custom call-up methods to provide a quick and
easy way of calling up a display:
•
•
User-defined Station function keys
Push-button objects on a custom display
Details on user-defined function keys are stored in the Station setup file.
For details on configuring push buttons on custom displays, see 'Details > Push button' in the 'Object Properties'
section in the HMIDisplay Building Guide.
Related topics
“Customizing toolbars, menus, and keyboard shortcuts” on page 70
366
www.honeywell.com
GROUP AND TREND DISPLAYS
Configuring a trend
Trend displays are standard Station displays that provide a way of viewing historical data for points.
Trend displays complement other types of displays that can be used to view historical data such as point detail
trends, group trends, and custom display trends.
Attention
Note that although an Experion system can collect date and time history, this data cannot be trended.
To configure a new trend
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Trends and Groups.
2
Click the Configure trends task.
The Trend Configuration Summary display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
In the Trend Summary display, click an empty title.
This opens the Trend Configuration display.
4
In the Title box, type the name of the trend.
5
From the Trend Type list, select the type of trend you want to configure.
6
In the Sample Interval box, select the desired history interval from the list (for example, 1-minute
snapshots, 6-minute averages, and so on).
7
In the Period box, select the period for which you want to see data.
8
If you are configuring a single scale trend, you use the default option setting of Single scale for all plots and
type the scale you want to display in the Trend Range boxes.
Alternatively, if you want to set the scale for each plot individually, choose either Individual scales in EU
or Individual scales in %.
Note that these settings apply to the display only and do not affect the actual range of the point. For more
details about these options, see “Changing the scale of a trend”.
9
If you want to prevent operators from changing the configuration of the trend, select the MNGR or ENGR
security level required to change traces check box.
10 Enter the point ID of each point you want to add to the trend.
Tip
To add a PHD tag to a trend, set the point ID to PHD and the parameter to the required PHD tag name. For more
information about PHD, see the PHD/Experion Link Installation and Configuration Guide.
11 From the Parameter list, select the point parameter to be trended for each point.
Tip
PHD tag names are not listed in the Parameter list. Change the parameter to display as an alphanumeric so that
you can type the PHD tag name in the parameter box.
If you the parameter is not available in the list, select the Alphanumeric check box and type the parameter.
12 To show or hide the trend for a particular point, select or clear the check box for that point.
This can reduce the complexity if a particular trend is obscured.
13 In the History offset box, type the date and time if a history offset is required. Otherwise, you can leave the
box blank.
14 Click View Trend to call up the Trend display in which you can change details interactively for this trend.
15 On single, dual, and triple, trend displays, use the date and time range to show trend data for a specific
period. Alternatively, use Live Updates to show current trend data.
367
GROUP AND TREND DISPLAYS
Figure 49: Trend Definition display
Tip
You can use the list in the Trend description box at the top of the Trend display to choose a different trend to
view.
Related topics
“Considerations History archive folder” on page 252
“Group and trend displays” on page 363
“Points that monitor redundant servers” on page 437
“eServer home page” on page 478
“eServer security considerations” on page 474
“eServer configuration procedures” on page 472
About trend displays
Trend displays show historical information for point parameters that have been selected to be tracked. If a
parameter that is not being tracked is allocated to a trend, the trend will update in real-time. In order to
configure and use the Trend displays effectively, it helps if you understand how Experion collects point history.
When configuring a Trend, you need to specify the required history interval to be viewed. (History intervals are
the periods between snapshots and the periods over which averages are calculated. These periods are then used
for collecting history.)
The number of trends available in your system depends on the server database sizing.
368
www.honeywell.com
GROUP AND TREND DISPLAYS
Figure 50: Trend display
Trends and history archiving
The history archive files are automatically searched to display archived history data for specified times and
dates on a Trend display. History archives should be located on the primary server if the history is to be viewed
within Station on a Station trend display.
If you want to view data in trends from history archives that have been moved to a network drive by History
Archiving Manager there are some performance issues to consider. It is preferable to manually move (or copy)
such archives (depending on the time period from which data is required) to the server\data\restoredarchives
folder on the primary server. The server is configured by default to include this folder in its search when trend
data is being retrieved.
Attention
Whilst it is possible to configure the server to also search network locations when retrieving trend data this can cause
performance degradation and is not recommended.
History aggregation
If the history interval you specify when you configure your trends differs from the history collection for any
point parameters in your trend, values for these point parameters are aggregated for the trend.
For example, if you had a point parameter that was assigned to standard history and the trend was configured to
show fast history, the trend would display an x every minute for historical data, and then a continuous plot line
in real time.
369
GROUP AND TREND DISPLAYS
Data can also be interpolated in instances where a point parameter is assigned to more that one history type but
gating has been configured for the point parameter for one of the history types.
Trend types
The following types of trends can be configured:
Attention
The multiplot has been replaced by the standard trend with single scale and the multirange trend has been replaced by
the standard trend with individual scales.
Trend type
Description
Standard Trend
Displays historical data for up to 32 points as line graphs.
Single Trend
Displays a bar graph of historical data for a single point. It also allows you to view a trend
and bar graph, as trend with events or trend with tabular history.
Dual Trend
Displays bar graphs of historical data for two points on separate charts.
Triple Trend
Displays bar graphs of historical data for up to three points on separate charts.
X-Y Plot
Used to display an X-Y plot of the historical data for two analog points with one point's
values plotted against the others.
Related display types
The Trend displays complement other types of displays that are used to view historical data:
Detail Trend display
Accessible directly from a Point Detail display. It requires no configuration and shows a
bar graph display of historical information for a single point.
Group Trend display
Accessible from a Group Detail display. Once the group itself is configured, no
configuration of the Group Trend display is required. It gives a standard trend of the
points in the group using a single scale for all points in the group. The points can be
trended and controlled from the same display. This enables the downstream effect of
point controls on cascaded functions to be observed on a single display.
Custom Trend display
Trends can be added to custom displays. For details, see the 'About trends' in the
'Object Properties' section of the HMIWeb Display Building Guide.
Standard trend properties
Trends are designed so an operator can change the way information is displayed directly in the Trend display.
When viewing trends in Station, use the various buttons on the display to change the trend. The following table
describes the buttons that are available on the default trend.
Button
Description
Individual scales in EU
Scaling used in the trend is separate for each point and is in engineering units.
Click the arrow to change the scale.
Individual scales in %
Scaling used in the trend is separate for each point and is shown as a percent.
Click the arrow to change the scale.
370
www.honeywell.com
GROUP AND TREND DISPLAYS
Button
Description
Single scale for all plots
The range displayed on the Y-axis is the same for all plots.
Plot selector
Indicates the plot that is currently selected, or if no plot is currently selected, indicates the last
plot you selected. If you are not using a single scale for all plots, the Y-axis displays the scale
for the plot that is shown in the box.
Display as bar graph
The selected point is displayed as a bar graph. Data for the remaining points is obscured by the
bar graph.
Click the arrow to change from a bar graph to a line graph.
Display as line graph
The plots are displays as line graphs.
Click the arrow to change from a line graph to a bar graph.
View trend only
Indicates the current view is a trend without the event pane or the tabular history pane.
Click the arrow to change the view to Trend with Events or Trend with Tabular History
View trend with tabular history
Indicates the current view is the trend with the tabular history pane.
Click the arrow to change the view to Trend Only or Trend with Events.
View trend with events
Indicates the current view is the trend with the event pane.
Click the arrow to change the view to Trend Only or Trend with Tabular History.
Show legend
Shows or hides the legend for this trend.
Configure trend
Calls up the Trend Configuration display.
Save trend
Saves any changes you have made to the trend. After you save, the changes are made available
to any other operators viewing the trend.
Pause live updates
Pauses the trend so that data is not updated.
Resume live updates
Restores the trend so that it is updated with live data.
Remove reference line
Removes the reference line.
Reset zoom level
Resets the zoom level.
371
GROUP AND TREND DISPLAYS
Button
Description
Zoom in
Zooms in by 25% of the visible range. If a reference line is visible, the zooming is centered
around the reference line.
Zoom out
Zooms out by 25% of the visible range. If a reference line is visible, the zooming is centered
around the reference line.
Show time selector
Shows the time selector and provides options for the position of the time selector which is used
to set a history offset.
Dual, triple and X-Y trends
The changes you can make to a dual, triple, and X-Y trends are different to the changes available on the
standard trend. The following list summarizes the changes you can make to a specialized trend:
•
•
•
Switch between displaying units as engineering units or percentage
Change the period
Change the sample interval
Changing the scale on a trend
When viewing a standard trend, you can change the scale that is used for the trend. For example, you can switch
from having a single scale for all plots as a engineering units to individual scales in percent, for each plot. The
following figure, “Figure 51: Scale options for a standard trend”, shows the scale options available in a list
which you can access from the trend toolbar.
Figure 51: Scale options for a standard trend
To specify an individual scale
1
Call up the trend.
2
Click arrow on the scale toolbar button at the top of the trend.
The button shown depends on the type of scale currently in use for the trend.
3
Select the required individual scale.
4
In the Low Scale box on the legend, type the low scale value for each plot.
5
In the High Scale box on the legend, type the high scale value for each plot.
Tip
The low and high scale for the selected plot can also be entered on the y-axis.
372
www.honeywell.com
GROUP AND TREND DISPLAYS
To specify a single scale
1
Call up the trend.
2
Click arrow on the scale toolbar button at the top of the trend and select Single scale for all plots.
The button shown depends on the type of scale currently in use for the trend.
3
On the y-axis, type the low and high scale value.
Scaling options
The following table describes all the scale options available for a standard trend.
Scale option
Description
Individual scales in EU
You specify the maximum and minimum value that will be shown on the
trend for each plot individually. Values that fall outside this scale are not
visible in the trend.
The scale is represented in engineering units.
Individual scales in %
You specify the maximum and minimum value that will be shown on the
trend for each plot individually. Values that fall outside this scale are not
visible in the trend.
The scale represents the point parameter range in percentage terms. For
example, if you specify the scale as 0% to 100%, the minimum value for
the point parameter is expressed as 0% and the maximum value for the
point parameter is expressed as 100%.
Single scale for all plots
One scale is used for all points in the trend. You specify the maximum
and minimum value that will be shown on the trend. Values that fall
outside this scale are not visible in the trend.
Auto scale current plot
Adjusts the selected plot so that it is centered vertically in the chart and
scaled such that the plot uses most of the vertical chart space.
Auto scale all plots
Adjusts all plots that are currently visible so that they are centered
vertically in the chart and scaled such that each plot uses most of the
vertical chart space.
Scale to point ranges in EU
Each plot is scaled to the related point's range and is shown in engineering
units.
Scale to point ranges in %
Each plot is scaled to the related point's range and is shown in percentage
terms. The minimum point parameter value is always 0% and the
maximum point parameter value is always 100%.
Revert to saved ranges
The scale options is restored to what was last saved for the trend. Any
changes to the scale that were not saved are removed.
Changing the period on a trend
When you are viewing a trend, you can change the period for the data you want to see. You specify the length of
time for which you want to see data, then you specify the start and end time for the period in which you are
interested.
You specify a period that either:
•
•
•
•
Starts at a specific date and time by showing the time selector on the left.
Ends at a specific date and time, by showing the time selector on the right.
Starts and ends at a specific date and time by showing the time selector on the left and right.
Is centered around a specific date and time by showing the time selector at the center.
373
GROUP AND TREND DISPLAYS
To change the period for the trend you are viewing
1
In the Period box, select the period you want to see on your trend.
2
Click the Time selector and choose the required position of the selector.
3
In the Date box, type or select the required date.
4
In the Time box, type the required time and press ENTER.
Example scenario
An incident occurred in your plant at around 11.00 A.M today. You want to see the values for a particular set
of points for the hour preceding the incident and the hour following the incident.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Call up a Trend Configuration display and add the required points to the trend.
Click View Trend.
In the Period box, select 2 hours.
Click Show Time Selector and choose Show Selector at center.
In the Date box, type today's date.
In the Time box, type 11.00.00 AM and press Enter.
Tip
Click the View trend with events button to see events that occurred during this time.
Adding a reference line to a trend
By adding a reference line to your trend you can obtain values for a point at a specific point in time. If the
Legend is visible, when you add a reference line, the legend contains the reference values for each point in the
trend. You can also mouse over the plot when the reference line intersects the plot to obtain the reference value.
To add a reference line to a trend you are viewing
•
Click on the chart area of the trend.
Tip
To move a reference line, drag the line to the required point. To remove the reference line, click the Remove
reference line button.
Viewing events with a trend
You can add an Event Summary to your trend so that you can see events that occurred within the time range of
your trend. This is useful for historical analysis and for real-time monitoring.
For historical analysis, viewing events with your trend can help you to investigate the cause of abnormal
process events and analyze and improve the alarm system performance.
For real-time monitoring, viewing events with your trend can help you analyze the relationship between alarms
and events and changes in point values in your trend.
After you add the events to your trend, you can filter events in the same manner as the standard Event Summary.
You should be aware of the following considerations when viewing events with your trend:
•
•
•
374
If you have DSA, events from remote servers are not included.
Events are not automatically filtered by the points that are included in the trend.
For performance reasons, there is a maximum of 200 events displayed in the event bar and 1000 events
displayed in the Event Summary.
www.honeywell.com
GROUP AND TREND DISPLAYS
•
The trend save function does not save changes you make to the Event Summary, however, if you navigate
away from the trend, any filtering, with the exception of date and time filters, is saved.
Example
An area of your plant is generating an unusually high number of alarms. You want to understand what is
causing this area of your plant to be unstable.
1. Call up a trend display for the area of your plant that is generating the alarms.
2. Click the View trend with events button.
The Event Summary is added underneath the trend.
3. The Event Summary shows several alarms occurred at the same time as values in the trend declined. To
see this in more detail, zoom in on this area of the trend.
The trend is paused enabling you to analyze the data and the number of events in the summary is filtered.
4. To investigate variations in other parts of the plant, add the related points to the trend and filter the event
summary to see events for assets related to this part of the plant.
5. If necessary, reduce the number of events in the summary by:
• Filtering the events using the column filters
• Zooming in on a time period of interest.
6. Save the trend.
Zooming in on a trend
If you want to focus on a particular part of you trend, you can use the zoom function to zoom in on the area of
interest.
To zoom in on a trend
•
Using the mouse, drag over the area of interest.
As you drag, a rectangle shows the area you are selecting.
Tip
Alternatively, click the Zoom in button to zoom in at increments of 25%.
To zoom out on a trend
•
Click Reset Zoom to return to the original zoom level.
Tip
Alternatively, click the Zoom out button to zoom out at increments of 25%.
Saving your changes
If you make changes to the trend you are viewing, these changes are only visible to you. If other operators are
viewing the same trend simultaneously, the changes you make are not visible to them.
You can save the changes you make to a trend. If you save the changes, these changes are then available to other
operators who are viewing the trend simultaneously.
To save the changes to a trend
•
Click the Save button.
375
GROUP AND TREND DISPLAYS
Navigation methods to trend displays
In addition to the standard methods available to call up trends, it is also possible to configure other methods to
call them up.
The following custom methods can be configured:
•
•
A user-defined Station function key
A push-button object on a custom display
For details on configuring push buttons on custom displays, see 'Details > Push button' in the 'Object Properties'
section in the HMIDisplay Building Guide.
376
www.honeywell.com
Template displays and container points
A template display is a custom display that is used to represent a unit of equipment containing several points of
one or more fixed types. A template display is functionally equivalent to the supplied Point Detail displays for
status, analog, and accumulator points.
To use a template display, you first define a container point for the unit of equipment. The container point
operates as a custom point type for a unit of equipment, such as a compressor or a door, that contains several
points of one or more fixed types. For example, you might have a number of compressors that all contain:
•
•
•
An analog point to monitor the pressure
A status point to control the motor
An accumulator point to monitor hours run
'Compressor' container points tie these sets of points together so that each set can be managed as a single point.
For information about how to define container points and point detail displays for container points, see 'Creating
a new type of container point''Creating a new type of container point' in the section in the Quick Builder Guide.
Attention
Template displays are different to generic displays. Generic displays are displays that can be reused across your plant
where you have implemented an Asset Model that has a repeated structure. For more information about generic
displays, see the topic 'About generic displays', in the section, 'Creating displays', in the HMIWeb Display Building
Guide.
Related topics
“Point types” on page 185
“Configuring algorithms” on page 236
377
TEMPLATE DISPLAYS AND CONTAINER POINTS
Engineering guidelines for container points
Container points behave like fixed type points, with the following exceptions:
•
Alarms raised on a contained point are not promoted to its container point. This means that a container point
never goes into alarm, and therefore never appears on the Station Alarms display.
To ensure that operators can quickly recognize an alarm on a container point, you might:
•
378
– Include the point ID of the container point in the description of all the points it contains.
– Configure the Associated Display for all contained points as the template display specified for the
container point.
You cannot attach an algorithm to a container point.
www.honeywell.com
Customizing summary displays
This section describes how you can customize the Alarm, Alert, Event, Sequence of Event (SOE), and Message
summaries to suit your requirements.
Related topics
“About customizing the summary displays” on page 380
“Filtering the summaries” on page 381
“Sorting the summary displays” on page 388
“Customizing the layout of the summary displays” on page 389
“Creating a view of a summary display” on page 390
“Resetting the summary displays” on page 392
“Enabling summary displays to be printed” on page 393
“Preventing operators from customizing the summary” on page 394
379
CUSTOMIZING SUMMARY DISPLAYS
About customizing the summary displays
The default summary displays provide a scrollable list of all alarms, alerts, events, SOEs, and messages.
About customizing the Alarm Summary
Customizing the Alarm Summary enables you to organize the information to provide more useful summaries for
operators. For example, you can customize the Alarm Summary to show only the urgent priority alarms for a
particular asset.
By default the Alarm Summary shows process alarms. If you want system alarms (as shown on the System
Status display) to be included on the Alarm Summary display, go to the Server-wide Station Settings
configuration display and check the Show system alarms on Process Alarm Summary option.
About customizing the System Status display
The System Status display provides a scrollable list of system alarms. This can often be a large amount of
information for an operator to view at one time.
You can also customize the system alarms viewed by an operator by adding or removing servers from the
System Components list on the Assignment tab of the operator or Station configuration display. For more
information, see 'Assigning access to system alarms'.
Other forms of customization
You can customize a summary by:
•
•
•
•
Filtering and sorting entries shown on the summary
Changing the layout of the summary
Showing or hiding the Location pane
Showing or hiding the Details pane
You can save the filtering, sorting and layout settings as a view so that operators can reapply customization
when required.
You can apply security to the customization functions so that only operators with the appropriate security level
are able to customize the summaries.
Related topics
“Filtering the summaries” on page 381
“Sorting the summary displays” on page 388
“Customizing the layout of the summary displays” on page 389
“Creating a view of a summary display” on page 390
“Preventing operators from customizing the summary” on page 394
“Filtering system alarms from the Alarm Summary” on page 382
380
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING SUMMARY DISPLAYS
Filtering the summaries
Filtering the summary displays allows you to show or hide information according to filter criteria. Each of the
summary displays have a set of filters available for some of the columns in the summary.
In addition to these column filters, you can create and apply custom filters to meet your specific criteria. You
can also filter by selection.
The table below summarizes the filtering actions you can perform on the summary displays.
To
Do This
Filter by asset
Select the asset from the Location pane.
Filter by system component or node
Select the component or node from the Location pane. This is applicable to
the System Status display; this is also applicable to the Alarm Summary if the
Show system alarms on process alarm summary option is selected.
Apply a filter saved in a predefined view
Select the view from the list of views.
Filter by column filter
Click the appropriate column heading and select the appropriate filter. For
example, click the Date & Time column and select Yesterday to show entries
for yesterday only.
Apply a custom filter
Click the column heading you want to filter by and select (custom filter). For
more information see 'Creating a custom filter'.
Filter by selection
Select the appropriate entry, click the column heading you want to filter by
and select (like currently selected).
Tip
If a custom filter has previously been applied to a summary, clicking Clear All Filters does not reset the summary
back to the default view. Rather, all filters are cleared and the view name is shown with an asterisk indicating it that
the view has been modified.
Related topics
“About customizing the summary displays” on page 380
Filtering the Alarm Summary
You are provided with several filters that are saved in predefined views. These are:
•
•
•
•
•
(recently unshelved alarms)—shows alarms that have been recently unshelved
(shelved alarms)—shows only shelved alarms
(unacknowledged alarms)—shows only unacknowledged alarms
(urgent and high priority alarms)—shows only urgent and high alarms
(urgent priority alarms)—shows only urgent alarms
The Alarm Summary contains column filters for the following columns:
•
•
•
Alarm state
Date & Time
Priority
These filters are listed in the table below.
381
CUSTOMIZING SUMMARY DISPLAYS
Alarm State
Date & Time
Priority
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Urgent
High
Low
Acknowledged
Unacknowledged
Active
Returned to normal
Enabled
Disabled
OK
Questionable
Shelved
Shelved and Unshelved
Today
Yesterday
Current Shift
Previous Shift
Last 24 hours
This week
Last week
Urgent
High
Low
The Category, Comments added, and the Video Link columns can be added to the Alarm Summary (using the
column organizer) and contain the following filters:
Category
Comments Added
Video Link
•
•
•
•
•
•
System Alarms
Process Alarms
With Comments Added
Without Comments Added
With Video Link
Without Video Link
Filtering system alarms from the Alarm Summary
The default Alarm Summary contains all alarms, including system alarms, which are also included on the
System Status display. You can change the Alarm Summary so that system alarms are not included in the Alarm
Summary.
Attention
Process and system alarms (displayed on the Alarm Summary) and alerts (displayed on the Alert Summary) have a
combined limit of 4000 notifications. Filtering system alarms does not have an affect on this count.
To filter system alarms from the Alarm Summary
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Alarms and Event Management.
2
Click the Server wide alarm and event options task.
The Server-wide Stations Settings display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Under Alarm Summary Options tab.
4
Clear the Show system alarms on Process Alarm Summary check box.
Related topics
“About customizing the summary displays” on page 380
Options for filtering the System Status display
The System Status display can be used to view system alarms as well as viewing the general status of items in
the System components tree.
By default, the System Status display lists all system alarms in the same manner as the Alarm Summary. The
System Status display can be easily filtered using the Location pane to show the status of items in the System
components tree.
382
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING SUMMARY DISPLAYS
If you choose not to use the Location pane, or there are many alarms for a particular item, you can use the filters
that are saved in predefined views. These are:
•
•
•
•
•
(recently unshelved alarms)—shows alarms that have been recently unshelved
(shelved alarms)—shows only shelved alarms
(unacknowledged alarms)—shows only unacknowledged system alarms
(urgent and high priority alarms)—shows only urgent and high system alarms
(urgent priority alarms)—shows only urgent system alarms
The System Status display contains column filters for the following columns:
•
•
•
Alarm state
Date & Time
Priority
These filters are listed in the table below.
Alarm State
Date & Time
Priority
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Urgent
High
Low
Acknowledged
Unacknowledged
Active
Returned to normal
Enabled
Disabled
OK
Questionable
Shelved
Shelved and Unshelved
Today
Yesterday
Current Shift
Previous Shift
Last 24 hours
This week
Last week
Urgent
High
Low
The Category, Comments added, and the Video Link columns can be added to the System Status display (using
the column organizer) and contain the following filters:
Category
Comments Added
Video Link
•
•
•
•
•
•
System Alarms
Process Alarms
With Comments Added
Without Comments Added
With Video Link
Without Video Link
Options for filtering the Alert Summary
To filter the Alert Summary, you are provided with several filters that are saved in predefined views. These are:
•
•
•
(all alerts)—shows all alerts
(my private alerts)—shows alerts for which the current operator is the author
(my private and public alerts)—shows alerts for which the current operator is the author, as well as any
alerts marked as public
The Alert Summary contains filters for the following columns:
•
•
•
Alert state
Date & Time
Author
These filters are listed in the following table.
383
CUSTOMIZING SUMMARY DISPLAYS
Alert State
Date & Time
Author
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Acknowledged
Unacknowledged
Active
Returned to normal
Shelved
Shelved and Unshelved
Today
Yesterday
Current Shift
Previous Shift
Last 24 hours
This week
Last week
My Private and Public Alerts
My Private alerts
The Comments added column can be added to the Alert Summary (using the column organizer) and contains the
following filters:
Comments Added
•
•
With Comments Added
Without Comments Added
Filtering the Event Summary
Events are initially collected into a circular event file called the online event file. This file forms part of the realtime server database and is independent of the SQL Server event database. Every 30 seconds, events are copied
from the online event file to the SQL event database, where events are stored permanently. As the online event
file becomes full, the oldest events from the file are deleted to make room for new events. For performance
reasons there is no sorting capability and only limited filtering capabilities when viewing events from the online
event file. However, you can perform all filtering and sorting of events when viewing events that are stored in
the SQL Server event database.
When viewing events from the online event file, you can only filter on the Criticality, Location, Priority and
Category columns. All other filter menus are disabled and you cannot sort on any columns. If you want to filter
or sort on the other columns, you need to view events from the SQL Server event database by changing the Date
and Time filter to something other than (all recent events - live).
Attention
The filtering and sorting restrictions are applicable to events viewed from the online event file only.
You are provided with two filters that are saved in predefined views. These are:
•
•
(all recent events with live updates)—shows events as they are occurring with the newest event at the top of
the summary. This is the default view and shows events from the online event file.
(all today's events snapshot)—shows all events that occurred today, up until the view was applied.
In addition, the Event Summary contains predefined column filters for the following columns:
•
•
•
•
Date & Time
Priority
Category
Video Link
These filters are listed in the following tables.
384
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING SUMMARY DISPLAYS
Date & Time
Priority
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
(all recent events - live)
(custom filters)
Today (snapshot)
Yesterday
Last…
Last…
Last…
Last…
Last…
Last 7 days
Urgent
High
Low
Journal
The (all recent events - live) Date and Time filter views events from the online event file and it provides live
events update, which means it shows events as they are occurring. All the other Date & Time filters view events
from the SQL Server event database and they provide only a snapshot view of the events that occurred up until
the view was applied.
The five Last… filters in the Date and Time column change depending on what day it is today. For example, if
today is Wednesday, the Last… filters are:
•
•
•
•
•
Last Monday
Last Sunday
Last Saturday
Last Friday
Last Thursday
The Category and the Video Link columns can be added to the Event Summary (using the column organizer)
and contain the following filters:
Category
Video Link
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
System Alarms
System Events
Process Alarms
Process Events
System Change Events
Operator Change Events
Batch Events
Procedure Events
SOE Events
•
•
•
•
Informational Messages
Confirmable messages
With Video Link
Without Video Link
Options for filtering the Message Summary
You are provided with several filters that are saved in predefined views. These are:
•
•
•
(all messages)—shows all messages
(confirmable messages)—shows confirmable messages only
(informational messages)—shows unacknowledged informational messages only
The Message Summary contains column filters for the following columns:
•
Message State
385
CUSTOMIZING SUMMARY DISPLAYS
•
•
Date & Time
Category
The filters are listed in the following table.
Message State
Date & Time
Category
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Single Signature
Double Signature
Confirmable
Informational
Acknowledged
Unacknowledged
Today
Yesterday
Current shift
Previous shift
Last 24 hours
This week
Last week
Information Messages
Confirmable Messages
Options for filtering the SOE Summary
The SOE Summary includes the following predefined filters:
•
•
(all recent events with live updates)—shows events as they are occurring with the newest event at the top of
the summary. This is the default view and shows events from the online event file.
(all today's events snapshot)—shows all events that occurred today, up until the view as applied.
Attention
Note that the SOE Summary list is limited to 9,999 items when no filter is applied. For 10,000 items or more, you
should view the SQL Server event database.
Creating a custom filter
Creating a custom filter enables you to perform more advanced filtering.
Note that when creating a custom filter:
•
•
•
You can filter on more than one column at a time.
Filters are not case-sensitive.
You can use wildcard characters in the filter criteria.
To create a custom filter
1
Click the column heading you want to filter.
2
Select (custom filter).
The Custom filter dialog box opens.
3
Specify the appropriate criteria for the column by which you are filtering.
4
Click OK.
Example
To filter the Alarm Summary so that it shows alarms only for the point called FLOW1:
1. Call up the Alarm Summary display.
2. Click the Source column heading and select (custom filter).
The Custom filter dialog box opens.
3. Select Equals.
4. Type in FLOW1.
386
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING SUMMARY DISPLAYS
5. Click OK.
The Alarm Summary shows any alarms for the point FLOW1.
About sequence of events (SOEs)
Some types of controller can identify the time at which they detect an event with a resolution of up to 0.1 ms—
which therefore allows you to examine the exact sequence in which the events occurred. Such events are called
sequence of events (SOEs).You view SOEs in SOE Summary, as well as in the Event Summary. You use the
Sequence of Events report and the Alarm and Event DSA report to generate reports on SOEs.
Related topics
“Sequence of Events (SOE) report” on page 415
“Configuring reports” on page 396
About time stamps
The time stamp applied to an alarm or event depends on where it came from:
•
•
If it came from a controller (instead of a point server), or is a system event, the time stamp is set when the
alarm/event is generated on the server.
If it came from a point server, then the time stamp is the time at which the point server received notification
of the alarm/event from the controller.
387
CUSTOMIZING SUMMARY DISPLAYS
Sorting the summary displays
Sorting the summaries is another way of organizing the information. You can sort by any of the columns that are
displayed in the summary. You can sort in ascending (0-9, A-Z) or descending order (9-0, Z-A).
Attention
You can only sort by the Date & Time and Source columns on the Event Summary and only if you are not viewing the
live events.
To sort by any column
1
Click the column heading by which you want to sort.
2
Select the appropriate sort order. A triangular arrow icon will be displayed beside the column heading,
indicating whether the sort is ascending or descending.
Tip
Example
To sort the Event Summary so that today’s oldest events are shown at the top of the summary:
1. Call up the Event Summary display.
2. Click the Date & Time column and select Today (snapshot).
The Today (snapshot) filter is applied.
3. Click the Date & Time column and select Sort Ascending.
The Event Summary is sorted by the Date & Time column, with the oldest events shown at the top of the
summary.
Related topics
“About customizing the summary displays” on page 380
388
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING SUMMARY DISPLAYS
Customizing the layout of the summary displays
Customizing the layout enables you to specify which items of information appear, and how they appear on the
summary displays. You can then save the layout as a view, combined with any filtering and sorting, and reapply
the view at a later time.
Other settings, such as the date/time format and number of decimal places, are controlled by the computer's
regional settings. To see or change the regional settings, go to the Region and Language setting in the
Windows Control Panel.
To
Do This
Hide columns
Open the Column Organizer and deselect the columns you want hide.
Change the order of the columns
Select the column and click Move Up or Move Down until the column is in
the required position.
Resize columns
On the summary display place the mouse pointer on the right side of the
column heading, click and drag until the column is the width you require.
Related topics
“About customizing the summary displays” on page 380
“Alarms and DSA” on page 455
“What happens when you disable alarms in a DSA system?” on page 456
389
CUSTOMIZING SUMMARY DISPLAYS
Creating a view of a summary display
If you have customized the summary display and want to retain the customization, you can save the customized
summary as a view. A view can contain information relating to:
•
•
•
Filtering and sorting
Column order
Column width
Creating views enables operators to easily switch between the default summary and a customized summary
without having to redo the customization each time.
Tip
Give your views a descriptive name so that operators have an idea of what is displayed in the summary. For
example, Cooling Tower Urgent Alarms to indicate the view shows urgent alarms for the asset called Cooling
Tower
Note that you can restrict the access to view by assigning an asset to the view.
To create a view
1
Click Show Configuration Pane
2
If you have not already done so, customize the summary.
3
Type a name for the view in Save current view as.
4
If you want to save the location filter as part of the view select the Include location filter in view definition
check box.
5
If you want to restrict which operators can use the view, select the Assign view to location check box and
type the location (asset) name.
Only operators with this location in their scope of responsibility can use this view.
6
Click Save.
.
Example
You want to customize the alarm summary as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
Filtered to show alarms for the asset Pump_Station only
Filtered to show urgent alarms only
The Location tag column is not in the summary
The Priority column is next to the alarm priority icons
The Description column is widened
To customize the alarm summary in this way:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Click Show Configuration Pane.
Click Show Location Pane.
Select asset Pump_Station and hide the Location Pane.
Click Show Column Organizer.
Deselect the Location Tag column.
Select the Priority column and click Move Up until Priority is below the Alarm State Indication column.
Click OK to apply the changes and close the Column Organizer.
Place your mouse over the right side of the Description column heading. Click and drag until the column
is the required width.
9. Type the name Pump Station Urgent Alarms in Save current view as.
390
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING SUMMARY DISPLAYS
10. Type the name Floor1 North Urgent Alarms in Save current view as.
11. Select the Include location filter in view definition check box.
12. Click Save.
The customization is now saved as a view called Pump Station Urgent Alarms. This view can be selected
from the list of views at the top of the Alarm Summary.
When you have created your views, you can make them read-only to prevent others from saving changes
to the view.
Related topics
“About customizing the summary displays” on page 380
Making a view read-only
If you do not want a view to be modified, you can make it read-only.
To make a view read-only
1
Open Windows Explorer.
2
Navigate to <data folder>\Honeywell\Server\Data\Views.
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder>
is C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only visible if you
select the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog box. To
change this setting in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options, and then click the
View tab.
The views for each of the summary displays are in separate subfolders. For example, views for the Event
Summary are located in the events subfolder.
3
Open the appropriate subfolder. The views are saved as .xml files.
4
Right-click the view you want to make read-only and select Properties.
5
On the General tab, select Read-only.
6
Click OK.
391
CUSTOMIZING SUMMARY DISPLAYS
Resetting the summary displays
By default, when you make changes to the summary display, such as filtering and changing column layout,
these changes are retained when you navigate to another display and then return to the summary display. There
are two methods of resetting the summary displays:
•
•
Manually, by using the reset button on the summary display.
Automatically by setting a server-wide option, which removes any changes to the summary when you
navigate to another display.
Manually resetting the summary displays
A
Reset View button is available on the toolbar of all the summary displays. When you click the Reset View
button, the default summary display is loaded. For example, it will load the All alarms view on an Alarm
Summary. It will also reset all filters and column positions back to default settings.
To reset a summary
1
On the summary toolbar click Reset View.
2
Click Yes to confirm to reset the summary.
Automatically resetting the summary displays
You can configure your system so that any changes that are made to a summary display, such as filtering, are
automatically removed if you navigate to another display.
To automatically reset the summary displays
392
1
In the Configuration Explorer in Configuration Studio, click Alarms and Event Management.
2
Click the Server wide alarm and event options task.
The Server-wide Stations Settings display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click the Alarm/Event Options tab.
4
Clear the Enable persistence on summary displays check box.
www.honeywell.com
CUSTOMIZING SUMMARY DISPLAYS
Enabling summary displays to be printed
As an alternative to requesting a preformatted alarm and event report, operators can print a report which
contains the same information as currently shown in the Alarm, Alerts, Events or Message Summary display.
In addition to the data shown in the summary display, these reports contain other information such as:
•
•
•
•
•
The date and time the report was requested.
The operator ID or Station that requested the report. (The operator ID if you use operator-based security; or
Station number if you use Station-based security.)
The filter and sort criteria.
The name of the server where the data originates.
A key to interpret the type of alarms and messages.
To enable summary displays to be printed
•
Configure a printer on each Station computer where summary displays need to be printed.
If more than one printer is configured for a Station, the report is printed using the Windows default printer
and the settings for that printer.
Related topics
“Printers” on page 145
393
CUSTOMIZING SUMMARY DISPLAYS
Preventing operators from customizing the summary
If you do not want your operators to be able to customize or print the summary, you can set security levels to
prevent operators from accessing these functions on the summary displays.
The Server Wide Settings display allows you to set the minimum security level required by an operator or
Station to access the following functions:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Full page acknowledgment
Filtering and sorting
Organize columns
Save views
Pause summaries
Printing
To set the minimum security level
1
Call up the Server Wide Settings display.
2
Click the Alarm/Event Options tab
3
Under Alarm, Event and Message Summary Restrictions, select the appropriate security level for each of the
functions for which you want to restrict access.
Related topics
“About customizing the summary displays” on page 380
394
www.honeywell.com
Reports
Experion reports provide a simple and flexible way to extract information from the server database.
The reports that are available as part of Experion are pre-formatted reports that can be configured via Station
displays. You can also configure custom reports. Microsoft Excel custom reports are available in Experion. This
section also includes information on how to configure these report types.
395
REPORTS
Configuring reports
To add a report to your system
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Reports.
2
Click the Define reports task.
The Reports display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Click on a blank row and the Report configuration display opens at the Definition tab.
4
From the Report type list, click the appropriate report type.
5
In the Name box, type a name for this report.
This name is used by operators to request the report and is displayed in the header section of the generated
report.
6
In the Title box, type a descriptive title that will be displayed in the header section of the generated report.
7
If you want operators to be able to request the report at any time, select the Enable reporting on request
check box and specify where the report is to be printed.
8
If you want the report to be generated periodically, select the Enable periodic reporting check box and
specify where the report is to be printed and how frequently the report is to be generated.
9
To restrict access to the report, select the asset that operators must be assigned to be able to access the report.
If you do not specify an asset in the Security section, anyone can access the report.
10 If you do not want operators to be able to request the report, clear the Enable reporting on request check
box.
11 To define the scope and contents of a report that is to be made available on request, click the Content tab and
use the settings and options on this tab to specify the data to be included in the report.
12 Click Request.
Related topics
“Cross Reference reports” on page 413
“Point Attribute Report” on page 414
“About sequence of events (SOEs)” on page 387
“Sequence of Events (SOE) report” on page 415
“Report definition properties” on page 396
“General tab, flex Station configuration display” on page 109
Report definition properties
The options in the Definition tab specify the general characteristics of the report. The following list shows all
options that can appear in a definition. Not all options apply to all types of report.
Property
Description
Report Definition
Report type
Select the report type you want from the list.
If you change the report type of an existing report, the report configuration
details for the old report are erased.
396
www.honeywell.com
REPORTS
Property
Description
Name
The name to be used when the report is requested by name. For example, you
might want to use a more specific description such as 'Shift1' for the report
name.
You can use a maximum of 10 characters. The name must be unique to this
report and must not contain any spaces.
Title
The report title to be shown on the report output and the summary display.
The title can be up to 70 characters. For example, you might want to use a
general description such as 'Alarm and Events Report for asset AB' for the
report title.
Request Program LRN
The LRN of an application program to be requested after the report is
completed. For more detailed information about LRNs and application
programs, see the Application Development Guide.
Reporting on Request
Use this option to enable the generation of one-off reports requested through
Station.
Users can either request a report by clicking the Request button on the
Definition tab or the Request button on the Content tab.
Enable reporting on request
Reporting on request means that operators and other users can run the report
at any time they need it. To configure a report to be run on demand, select
Enable reporting on request and complete the remaining options in that
area of the display.
When users request a report, they can view the report on screen at the Station
they are using, and they can also request that the report be printed.
Destination
If you want to print the report to:
•
•
•
•
Periodic Reporting
The report printer, select Station Default Printer. (To learn how to
define the report printer, see 'Printer Assignment'.)
A printer other than report printer, select it from the list.
Screen, select either: the first (empty) line in the list if a report printer has
been defined, or Station Default Printer if a report printer has not
been defined.
File, select a file type. The supported file types are text, MS Word, RTF,
HTML, MS Excel 5, CSV and TSV. (Note that some file types may not
support all the character sets and formatting options that are available if
the report is printed or viewed on-line.)
Recurring reports requested through Station, algorithm, or script.
Attention
To enable Period Reporting for an alarm report (Alarm and Event;
Alarm and Event DSA; Alarm Duration; and Asset Alarm Count) you
must first specify the Operator ID for whose scope of responsibility
you want to generate a report.
Enable Periodic Reporting
Select this check box if you want the report to be run automatically at
specified intervals.
Destination
If you want the report to print, select a printer from the Destination list.
In addition to periodic reporting initiated by Station, the Destination field is
used when a report is initiated by a script or algorithm, such as algorithm 70.
Next Report
The time and date that the report should run next.
397
REPORTS
Property
Description
Interval
To specify the frequency of periodic reporting, click the Interval list and
select the desired interval. The interval can be: none, hour, shift, day, week,
month, quarter or year.
If you specify an interval, the server will calculate the next run time
automatically. Every time the report runs, the next run time is recalculated. If
this calculation gives a date that does not exist, the run time is set to the
beginning (not necessarily the 1st) of the next month. For example, the next
run time for a monthly report scheduled for 31-Feb is calculated as 3-March,
because 31-Feb does not exist.
Operator ID
This setting is only available on the Definition page for alarm reports (Alarm
and Event; Alarm and Event DSA; Alarm Duration; and Asset Alarm Count).
Use this box to specify the user for whose scope of responsibility you want to
generate periodic reports.
Security
To access report, operators must be
assigned to
If you want to ensure that only operators or Stations with a particular asset
assigned can view or request the report, browse and select that asset name.
Attention
If you do not specify an asset here, this report can be viewed by
anyone.
Other
Request
Click this button to generate an updated version of the report.
Cancel
Click this button if you want to cancel a report that is currently generating or
queued.
Last Requested
Displays the date and time of the last successful report generation. The words
'Last Requested' serves as a hyperlink to the last requested report.
Status
Shows the condition of the report. Status conditions can be Completed,
Generating, Queued, Cancelled or Failed.
Previous/Next
Buttons that allow you to scroll backwards and forwards through the list of
reports located on the main Reports display.
Related topics
“Specifying time periods for reporting” on page 399
“Using wildcard characters to specify report data” on page 399
“Configuring reports” on page 396
“Configuring field sizes” on page 401
“Defining an LRN” on page 594
“Server display program” on page 94
“Configuring system security” on page 303
“Creating a points list” on page 409
“Creating the Microsoft Excel report” on page 417
Report output
Even if they are sent to a printer, reports are also always written to a file. The file names used are:
•
<data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Server\Data\Report\rptnnn.htm
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder>
is C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only visible if you
select the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog box. To
398
www.honeywell.com
REPORTS
change this setting in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options, and then click the
View tab.
Where nnn is the report number.
For example: C:\ProgramData\Honeywell\Experion
PKS\Server\Data\Report\rpt001.htm.
For Crystal Reports, the file names are:
•
<data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Server\Data\Report\rptnnn.asp
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder>
is C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only visible if you
select the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog box. To
change this setting in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options, and then click the
View tab.
Each time the report runs, it overwrites this output file using current data. Operators can use the “pr” command
to view and print an existing report through Station (for details, see 'Viewing a report' in the “Producing reports”
section of the Operator's Guide). Anyone who has access to Windows can view and print the file through
Microsoft Internet Explorer.
Specifying time periods for reporting
The Alarm and Event, the Alarm Duration and other similar reports all search the event file for required events
during a specified time. For some of these reports, you must specify the start and end times for the report period.
For others, you choose either a specific or a relative time period, and then type the time span in the appropriate
format. This section explains how to define these time spans.
To define a specific time period
1
Call up the Report Configuration Content tab.
2
Under Occurring, select the Between option.
3
In the Start time box type the start time in the format HH:MM and the start date in the format DD-MMMYY. For example, 10:24 for 10:24 am and 14-Nov-02 for 14 November 2002. To specify the current date,
leave the date blank.
4
In the End time box type the end time and end date.
To define a relative time period
1
Call up the Report Configuration Content tab.
2
Under Occurring, select the In the last option.
3
Type the required number of days, hours or minutes prior to the current time. For example specifying 1 in
the hours box and 30 in the minutes box means 'from 1 hour and 30 minutes before the present time up to the
present time'.
If you specify more than 24 hours, the number of days and hours is automatically calculated.
Related topics
“Report definition properties” on page 396
“Alarm Duration reports” on page 406
Using wildcard characters to specify report data
A number of the Content tabs allow you to search for specific information. Since the general conditions for
conducting a search are essentially the same for all these reports, the search procedure is described below.
399
REPORTS
Wildcard characters allow multiple items to be selected in a single field. Where indicated on reports, the ? and *
wildcard characters can be used. In addition, most text entry fields support the use of wildcard characters, even
though this may not be indicated on the report configuration display.
Wildcard Character
Description
?
Matches any single character.
*
Matches any sequence of zero or more characters.
Attention
•
•
•
The ? character matches exactly one character.
The characters '???' (3 question marks) matches only those points whose names are exactly three characters long.
To match all points in your database, use '*.' Some fields are blank for some records. A search on '*' will include
these blank entries.
To find only non-blank entries, use '?*.'
For Example, LC?? would only match point ID LC34 but would not match LC, LC2, or LC123. You can also use the *
wildcard character to match any string of characters.
Related topics
“Report definition properties” on page 396
Changing the date format for reports
The reports use the default Windows date format. If you change the Windows date format, the you need to
follow this procedure to ensure the reports are using the correct date format.
To change the date format
1
Change the Windows date format as described in the Windows Online Help.
2
Choose Start > All Programs > Honeywell Experion PKS > Server > Diagnostic Tools > Experion
Command Prompt to open the Experion Command prompt.
Attention
To run Experion commands, you must be a member of the Product Administrators group. If you want to do
engineering tasks, you must be a member of the Local Engineers group.
You must run Experion commands from the Experion command prompt and not the standard Windows command
prompt, otherwise you will not see the output from the command and the command will fail.
3
Type <install folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\server\run\defaultdateutil.exe,
folder> is the location where Experion is installed, and press ENTER.
4
Stop the Experion Server.
5
Restart the Experion Server.
where <install
Changing the font size for reports
You can change the font size used for printing reports.
To change the font size for printed reports
400
1
In Station choose Configure > System Hardware > Printers to call up the printer summary display.
2
Click the name of your report printer.
The printer configuration detail display is called up.
www.honeywell.com
REPORTS
3
In the Font size to use for reports box, type the font size you want to use.
Configuring field sizes
For reports that output event information, you can set the field sizes for certain fields in the report, on a server
wide basis. The field sizes you can configure are:
•
•
•
•
•
Source
Description
Value
Operator
Condition
Attention
If the data does not fit the field size, the data is truncated however a tilde (~) is not added to the field to indicate that it
is truncated.
To configure field sizes
1
Call up the Report Configuration Summary display.
2
Click the Server Wide Report Configuration link.
3
Type in values for each field size you want to configure.
Related topics
“Report definition properties” on page 396
“General tab, flex Station configuration display” on page 109
401
REPORTS
How reports are used
After you have configured reports for your site, operators and other users can request these reports. Reports can
be printed, viewed on a Station display, or saved in a file.
You can request a report from a configuration display by selecting the report you want from the Reports display
then clicking the Request button on the Definition or Content tab. (If you want to know more about how
operators can call up and request reports, see the Operator's Guide.)
You can also configure reports to be requested:
•
•
•
By selecting a button on a custom display. For information about adding a button to a display, see the
“Pushbutton object” topic in the HMIWeb Display Building Guide.
By pressing a function key.
As a result of a process event.
Related topics
“Customizing toolbars, menus, and keyboard shortcuts” on page 70
402
www.honeywell.com
REPORTS
Alarm and Event reports
Every alarm and event that occurs is saved in the SQL Server online event database for a configurable period,
after which they are removed. The Alarm and Event report retrieves data from the SQL Server online event
database.
If you have configured Event Archiving, events in the SQL Server online event database are archived according
to a schedule you specify. Archived events can be restored to a playback area and are available for reporting.
You can also print the Alarm Summary and the Event Summary as a report directly from the summary displays.
The following table lists the properties on the Content tab of the Reports configuration display. These properties
are used to define the scope of a report that is generated on request: they do not determine the data that is to be
included in a report configured for periodic reporting.
Property
Description
Alarm or Event type
Select the code for the alarm or event type you want included in the report.
The types available are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
All—All alarms and events
Journal—Journal events only
Low—Low priority alarms only
High—High priority alarms only
Urgent—Urgent priority alarms only
Operator—Operator-initiated events
Alert—Alerts only
Assignable Asset
Type the tagname of the asset to include alarms and events for a specific asset
only.
Source
Type a specific point ID or use wildcard characters to search for a number of
points.
Description
You can either type a specific event description or use wildcards to specify a
number of event descriptions.
Operator
For operator generated alarms and events, type the name of the operator or
part of the name with wildcard characters.
Events to search
The location where Experion searches for events to include in the report. The
options are:
•
•
Online. Searches the SQL Server online event database.
Playback. Searches the SQL Server online event database and any
archives that have been restored to the playback area.
Occurring
Specifies the time period covered by the report:
•
•
In the last. Includes events that have occurred between the specified
time and the present.
Between. Includes events that have occurred between the specified times.
Print field time
This option is not supported on all controllers. Where supported, it is used to
include in the report printout, the time that the event took place in the
controller.
Check for tampering and event data
Select this if you want to check for tampering of event data returned from
archives (such as modifications or deletions).
Note: Selecting this option will increase the time required to generate the
report.
403
REPORTS
Alarm and Event DSA reports
This report includes alarm and event details from other servers in the DSA. This report enables you to analyze
alarms, alerts, events, and SOEs that occurred during a specified time span on remote points.
The following table lists the properties on the Content tab of the Reports configuration display. These properties
are used to define the scope of a report that is generated on request: they do not determine the data that is to be
included in a report configured for periodic reporting.
Property
Description
Location
To report on one or more particular assets within the SOR of the current user,
type the name of a given asset or use wildcards to specify multiple assets.
To report on all assets within the current user's SOR, leave this box blank.
Source
If you want to report on alarms from a particular source, specify the source
name, for example, the point ID. For more than one alarm source, use
wildcard characters.
Condition
Type the code for a specific alarm or event type you want included in the
report. For example:
ALARM
ALARM OK
Action
If you want the report to include only shelving-related events, type *SHELVE*
in this box.
Operator
For operator generated alarms and events, type the name of the operator or
part of the name with wildcard characters.
Priority
Select the alarm priority:
•
•
•
•
J—Journal
L—Low
H—High
U—Urgent
Leave blank to specify alarms of every priority.
Sub-Priority
Select the alarm sub-priority, 0–15.
Description
You can either type a specific event description or use wildcards to specify a
number of event descriptions.
Events to search
The location where Experion searches for events to include in the report. The
options are:
•
•
Online. Searches the SQL Server online event database.
Playback. Searches the SQL Server online event database and any
archives that have been restored to the playback area.
Category
Use the drop-down list to restrict the report content to specific types of
alarms and events. For example, you may want the report to include only
System Alarms or System Events.
Check for tampering of event data returned If selected checks events for modifications or deletions.
from archives
Show user comments on alarms and events If selected includes any user comments associated with an alarm or event.
Show 0.1 milliseconds time resolution in
Time column
404
www.honeywell.com
If this option is selected the report shows the time of alarms and events to the
precision of a tenth of a millisecond instead of milliseconds.
REPORTS
Property
Description
Occurring
Specifies the time period covered by the report:
•
•
Servers
In the last. Includes events that have occurred between the specified
time and the present.
Between. Includes events that have occurred between the specified times.
Select the servers whose events you want to include in the report.
405
REPORTS
Alarm Duration reports
Alarm Duration reports show the duration of alarms that occurred during a particular time period.
The following table lists the properties on the Content tab of the Reports configuration display. These properties
are used to define the scope of a report that is generated on request: they do not determine the data that is to be
included in a report configured for periodic reporting.
Property
Description
Alarm or Event type
Use the Event type list to select the code for the event type you want included in the
report. The options are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
All
Journal
Low
High
Urgent
Operator
Alert
Assignable
Type the tagname of an asset to include alarms and events for a specific asset only.
Source
If you want to report on alarms from a particular source, specify the source name, for
example, the point ID. To specify more than one alarm source, use wildcard
characters.
Description
Type a specific event description or use wildcards to specify a number of event
descriptions.
Events to search
The location where Experion searches for events to include in the report. The options
are:
•
•
Online. Searches the SQL Server online event database.
Playback. Searches the SQL Server online event database and any archives that
have been restored to the playback area.
Check for tampering of event data If selected checks events for modifications or deletions.
returned from archives
Related topics
“Specifying time periods for reporting” on page 399
406
www.honeywell.com
REPORTS
Asset Alarm Count reports
Asset Alarm Count reports are used to generate information on the number of alarms raised on assets, and the
priority of those alarms. Unless otherwise specified, this report provides information in relation to assets that are
within the Scope of Responsibility (SOR) of the user who is currently logged on.
Note that the alarm counts for a higher level asset do not include alarm counts for any child assets; for example,
if the report shows 8 high priority alarms for Assets\Plant1 and 3 high priority alarms for its child Assets
\Plant1\Tank1, the 8 alarms at the parent level do not include the 3 alarms at the child level.
If you have configured Event Archiving, events in the SQL Server online event database are archived according
to a schedule you specify. Archived events can be restored to a playback area and are available for reporting.
The following table lists the properties on the Content tab of the Reports configuration display. These properties
are used to define the scope of a report that is generated on request: they do not determine the data that is to be
included in a report configured for periodic reporting.
Property
Description
Location
To report on one or more particular assets within the SOR of the current user, type the
name of a given asset or use wildcards to specify multiple assets.
To report on all assets within the current user's SOR, leave this box blank.
If you are logged on at MNGR level, you can choose to report on the assets within the
SOR of someone other than the current user by clicking another user's ID in the
Operator ID drop-down list box under Within the Scope of Responsibility for.
Events to search
The location where Experion searches for events to include in the report. The options
are:
•
•
Occurring
Online. Searches the SQL Server online event database.
Playback. Searches the SQL Server online event database and any archives that
have been restored to the playback area.
Specifies the time period covered by the report:
•
•
In the last. Includes events that have occurred between the specified time and
the present.
Between. Includes events that have occurred between the specified times.
Controller offline time
Offline time extends the time specified in Occurring to take into account the time any
associated controllers were offline. For example, if a controller was offline for an
hour, the time period covered by the report is one hour more than specified in
Occurring.
Within the Scope of
Responsibility for
This configuration setting is only available for users logged on at MNGR level.
To report on assets within the scope of responsibility (SOR) of someone other than the
current user, click that user's ID in the Operator ID drop-down list.
Related topics
“About scope of responsibility” on page 336
407
REPORTS
Batch Report
Batch reports are used to collect history for a set of points and events for an asset for the duration of a
production run.
A batch report can collect:
•
One type of history sample (such as 5-second samples or 1-hour averages) for up to 50 points.
•
•
Each point included in a batch report must be configured to collect the type of history required by the report.
For example, if the report requires 1-hour averages, each point must configured to collect Standard history,
which includes 1-hour averages.
Events for one asset.
Up to 65,000 history samples.
A batch report generates a set of four files with the read-only attribute set, and stores them in <data folder>
\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Server\Data\Report\Batch, where <data folder> is the location where Experion
data is stored. For default installations, <data folder> is C:\ProgramData. The files are:
•
•
•
•
A text file that contains the history and event data
A Microsoft Excel file that contains the history and event data
A comma-delimited (.csv) file that contains the history data
A comma-delimited (.csv) file that contains the event data
Once started, a batch report continues to run until it is stopped. Batch reports are started/stopped by using LRN
178.
Property/Button
Description
Batch identifier
A user-defined property (such as a batch) that forms part of the report filenames each time
the report is run.
20 characters maximum. (Because it forms part of a filename, it must not contain characters
such as *, ?, \, |, and /.)
Lot identifier
A user-defined property (such as a lot) that forms part of the report filenames each time the
report is run.
20 characters maximum. (Because it forms part of a filename, it must not contain characters
such as *, ?, \, |, and /.)
Size of production run
An information-only property that is included in the report's header. An integer.
Number of pieces in run
An information-only property that is included in the report's header. An integer.
Employee identifier
An information-only property that is included in the report's header. 20 characters
maximum.
Batch description
An information-only property that is included in the report's header. 80 characters per line.
Product re-run
Specifies whether the last batch run needs to be re-run.
If set to Yes, the Last sequence num value is re-used, and a re-run counter is used (which
is incremented each time the Lot is run). The Re-run number forms part of the report
filenames each time the report is run.
If set to No, the re-run number is set to 0.
408
Historical point list
The name of the points list used by this report. (The list specifies the points/parameters
whose history is included in the report.)
History type
The type of point history that is included in the report.
Assignable asset for events
The asset for which events are recorded by the report.
Generate Excel file
When selected (the default), a Microsoft Excel Batch report (.xls file) is generated. If you
deselect the option the text and comma-delimited files are still generated.
www.honeywell.com
REPORTS
Property/Button
Description
Status
Shows the current status of the report, which can be:
•
•
•
•
Ready – the report is not running.
Working – the report is running.
Finishing – a complete batch report is being generated.
Error – the report has stopped because of an error.
Start time
The time/date when the report started.
End time
The time/date when the report competed.
If Status is set to Working, End time is replaced by Duration.
Duration
Visible only when the report is running. The length of time in days, hours, minutes, and
seconds that the current report has been running.
Current sequence num,
Current sequence number displays only when the report is running. Indicates the
sequence number that is currently being used.
or
Last sequence num
Last sequence number displays only when the report is not running. Indicates the
sequence number that was used the last time the report was run.
Request
Calls up the report.
If the report is running, the data available from the time the report started to the time of the
request is displayed. If the report is not running, the last report that was run is displayed.
If you want to start the report, see the topic titled "Starting and stopping a batch report."
Reset sequence num
Sets the value of Last/Current sequence num to 0.
Batch Report Filename
The report's filename.
If Product Re-run is set to Yes, the incremental re-run number is used. If the report is
being run, the next partial report number is used.
Related topics
“Creating a points list” on page 409
Creating a points list
You use the Application Point List to define the set of points used in a batch report.
Note that every point on the list must be configured to collect the type of history required by the report. For
example, if the report requires 1-hour averages, each point must configured to collect Standard history, which
includes 1-hour averages.
To create a points list
1
Choose Configure > Application Development > Application Point Lists.
2
Click an empty row to call up the Application Point List display.
3
Give the list an appropriate name, and add each point/parameter that you want to include in the batch report.
409
REPORTS
Figure 52: Typical application point list
Related topics
“Batch Report” on page 408
“Starting and stopping a batch report” on page 411
“Batch report filenames” on page 410
“Report definition properties” on page 396
Batch report filenames
The filename of batch reports are defined as follow:
Rptnnn-bBatchId-lLotId-sSeqNo-rReRun-pPartial.ext
Part
Description
nnn
The report number, as shown in the Reports display.
BatchId
The Batch identifier specified for the report.
LotId
The Lot identifier specified for the report.
SeqNo
The report's sequence number, which contains three digits with leading zeros.
(Corresponds to the Last/Current sequence num on the Definition tab for the
report.)
ReRun
The report's re-run number, which contains 2 digits with leading zero.
Partial
The report's partial report number, which is incremented each time a report is
requested while it is being run. Two digits with leading zeros.
After the report has finished running, the number reverts to 00, and all partial
reports from the same run are removed.
410
www.honeywell.com
REPORTS
Part
Description
ext
Each report generates four files, which have the following extensions and
contents:
•
•
•
•
txt - plain text
hst.csv - CSV file containing history data
evt.csv - CSV file containing event data
xls - Excel file containing the history and event data
This example shows the four files that are created after a report is run in <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion
where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For
default installations, <data folder> is C:\ProgramData.
PKS\Server\Data\Report\Batch,
rpt001-bA1N0458-l105-s005-r00-p00.txt
rpt001-bA1N0458-l105-s005-r00-p00.hst.csv
rpt001-bA1N0458-l105-s005-r00-p00.evt.csv
rpt001-bA1N0458-l105-s005-r00-p00.xls
The <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion
text version (txt) of the report.
PKS\Server\Data\Report\Batch
folder also contains a copy of the
Related topics
“Creating a points list” on page 409
Starting and stopping a batch report
You use LRN 178 to start and stop the collection of data for a batch report. You can invoke LRN 178 in a
number of ways, for example by requesting it using a push button on a custom display, or by invoking it in a
script or using action algorithm 92 (Queued Task Request).
This LRN uses the following parameters.
Parameter
1
The number of the batch report for which you want to start/stop collecting
data.
2
Specifies the required action, depending on its value:
1 = Starts the collection of data for the report.
2 = Stops the collection of data for the report and outputs the report.
3 = Stops the collection of data for the report, but doesn't output the report.
For the various methods of invoking LRN 178, the parameters are entered in differing fields. The table below
lists the methods and the corresponding fields in which the parameters need to be entered.
Method
Enter Parameter 1 in:
Enter Parameter 2 in:
Pushbutton
Parameter 1
Parameter 1
Algo 69
Word 2
Word 3
Algo 92
Word 1
Word 2
Server script
Param1
Param2
Rqstsk
First word in buffer
Second word in buffer
Rqstkb
Param1
Param2
411
REPORTS
Related topics
“Creating a points list” on page 409
412
www.honeywell.com
REPORTS
Cross Reference reports
The Cross Reference Report can be used to find where points have been referenced in the server database. It can
be used to list the following types of references for the nominated points:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Custom displays (numbered displays, but not named displays)
Trends
Algorithms
Reports
Source address for another point
Application program point lists
Schedules
Group detail displays
Remote subscribers
History gating parameter of another point
Property
Description
Point ID(s)
The point ID you want to report on. You can use wildcard characters to report
on a number of points.
Report on unimplemented points
Specifies whether the report includes points that are not implemented in the
database. For example, you might report on unimplemented points if you
need to check whether any displays are still referencing a point that you have
deleted.
Use Previous Cross Reference file
Specifies whether to use the cross reference file generated the last time the
Cross Reference Report was run.
If there have been no changes to the database since the last time you ran this
report, you can save time by selecting this option. If this option is not
selected, the report examines the database and produces cross reference files,
which are then searched for the specified points.
Show all subscribed parameters on the
specified points
Lists the parameters that are being subscribed to by remote subscribers.
Viewing used algorithm blocks
Running the Cross Reference Report produces a file that lists used algorithm blocks. The file is called
algmap.rpt and is located in the <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Server\Data\Report folder, where
<data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder> is C:
\ProgramData.
For example:
C:ProgramData\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Server\Data\Report\algmap.rpt
Viewing cross reference errors
Any inconsistencies found in the database are recorded in the following file when the report is run. An error log
is also generated at the end of the actual report file (rptnnn.htm):
C:ProgramData\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Server\Data\Report\Xrferror
Related topics
“Configuring reports” on page 396
413
REPORTS
Point Attribute Report
This report includes points that are in a specified state. For example, you can generate a report on all points that
are off-scan, have alarms inhibited, have a bad PV, or are in manual mode. Remote and flexible points are
excluded.
Property
Description
Point ID(s)
The point ID you want to report on. You can use wildcard characters to search for a number
of points.
Attribute
The point attribute to be reported on:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
State list
Off Scan. Reports on points that are 'off-scan,' that is, points for which scanning is
disabled.
Alarm Inh. Reports on points for which alarming is inhibited.
Bad PV. Reports on points whose PV value is bad.
Manual MD. Reports on points in manual mode.
State. Reports on status points in a particular state.
Value. Reports on current point values, including PV, current alarm(s), OP, and MD.
Alarm Attr. Reports on alarm configuration settings.
Jrnl Only. Reports on points for which alarming is set to journal only.
Applicable to reports with the State attribute.
The point state to be reported on.
State Descriptor choices
Applicable to reports with the State attribute.
Descriptor choices such as Open, Alarm, Close and Normal. A descriptor can be up to eight
characters. If you enter a longer descriptor, it is truncated. These descriptions are listed in
the State List.
Related topics
“Configuring reports” on page 396
414
www.honeywell.com
REPORTS
Sequence of Events (SOE) report
Some types of controllers can time stamp events with a resolution of up to 0.1 millisecond, which enables you
to examine the exact sequence in which the events occurred. Such sequences are called sequence of events
(SOEs).
Property
Description
Point ID(s)
The point ID you want to report on. You can use wildcard characters to
search for a number of points.
IOLink(s)
SOEs for a particular IOLINK. The options are:
•
•
•
Occurring
All. The default option. Selects all SOEs (including all CDA and all
SCADA)
<IOLink Name>. Selects only SOEs for the selected CDA <IOLink
Name>
None. Selects only SOEs for SCADA (excluding all CDA)
Specifies the time period covered by the report:
•
•
In the last. Includes events that have occurred between the specified
time and the present.
Between. Includes events that have occurred between the specified times.
See 'Specifying time periods for reporting'.
Related topics
“About sequence of events (SOEs)” on page 387
“Configuring reports” on page 396
415
REPORTS
Microsoft Excel reports configuration checklist
Task
Go to
Decide whether you want to use Microsoft Excel Data Exchange
“Choosing between Microsoft Excel Data
Exchange and ODBC”
If you choose Microsoft Excel Data Exchange, create the report
definition file in Microsoft Excel using the procedure for
Microsoft Excel Data Exchange
“Creating a report definition file using
Microsoft Excel Data Exchange” on
page 416
Create the Microsoft Excel report in Station.
“Creating the Microsoft Excel report” on
page 417
Done
Related topics
“Creating a report definition file using Microsoft Excel Data Exchange” on page 416
“Creating the Microsoft Excel report” on page 417
“Security considerations” on page 417
“Storing the report definition file” on page 417
“About Microsoft Excel Reports” on page 418
“Microsoft Excel custom report tutorial: History values” on page 418
Creating a report definition file using Microsoft Excel Data Exchange
A report definition file is a Microsoft Excel file that is set up to access and process data from the server
database. This procedure describes how to set up the Excel file if you are accessing the server data using
Microsoft Excel Data Exchange.
Prerequisites
•
•
•
Install Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Query on the server.
Enable Microsoft Excel Data Exchange on the server using the Windows mngr account.
Disable the Ask to update automatic links prompt on Microsoft Excel.
To create a report definition file using Microsoft Excel Data Exchange
416
1
Log on using the mngr user account.
2
Start Microsoft Excel and open a spreadsheet.
3
Choose Tools > Microsoft Excel Data Exchange > Wizard.
4
Complete the steps of the wizard as required.
5
Click Finish to display the result.
6
To include the date-time at the which the report is run, select an empty cell and type Now().
7
Format the data in the Excel spreadsheet as required.
8
Save the Excel spreadsheet to a location that is accessible from the Experion server.
If you are saving the spreadsheet to the server computer and you have redundant servers, the spreadsheet
must be saved in the same location on both servers.
www.honeywell.com
REPORTS
Creating the Microsoft Excel report
Prerequisites
•
Microsoft Excel is set up for Excel Reports.
•
See the topic "Setting up Microsoft Excel for Excel Reports" in the Supplementary Installation Tasks Guide
for more information.
You have created a report definition file.
Attention
If you create a new spreadsheet for Integrated Microsoft Excel Reports, prompts and error messages are not visible in
Station. Before running the report for the first time in Station, you need to first disable the Deny log on locally
security policy, open the new spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel using the Windows MNGR account, and then re-enable the
Deny log on locally security policy.
See the topics "Disabling the Deny log on locally policy for the Local Servers account" and "Re-enabling the Deny log
on locally policy for the Local Servers account" in the Supplementary Installation Tasks Guide for more information.
To create a Microsoft Excel Report
1
In Station, choose Configure > Reports to call up the Report summary display.
2
Click the Definition tab and select Microsoft Excel from the Type list.
3
Complete the report definition details (see "Report definition properties").
4
Click the Content tab.
5
In the Definition File box, type the full path name of the report definition file.
Related topics
“Report definition properties” on page 396
Security considerations
Microsoft Excel Data Exchange, in conjunction with a Microsoft Excel Report, provides no operator
authentication or other security measure. It is recommended that the permissions for Microsoft Excel Data
Exchange be set to read-only.
Related topics
“Changing the read/write permissions for Microsoft Excel Data Exchange” on page 578
Storing the report definition file
Save the report definition file in a folder that is visible from the server. This may be over a network.
Redundant server systems
On redundant server systems, the report definition file must be saved in the same folder on both servers.
For example, <install
Where <install
folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Server\User
folder>
is the location where Experion is installed.
To automatically back up the report definition file, add the folder containing the files to the file flkbup.def,
located in the data folder. See “What other files should you synchronize?” in the “Configuring and monitoring a
redundant server system” section of the Station Configuration Guide for details on using flkbup.def to transfer
non-database files to the backup.
417
REPORTS
Related topics
“What other files should you synchronize?” on page 439
About Microsoft Excel Reports
With Microsoft Excel Reports you can:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Get values from point parameters
Perform calculations on those points
Retrieve historical data to determine summations, maximums, minimums, and standard deviations
Retrieve alarms and events
Generate graphs and tables
Store new values or calculations in the server database, provided you installed Microsoft Excel Data
Exchange with the 'write' option enabled.
Microsoft Excel reports enable you to design a custom report in Microsoft Excel, which is configured and run
from Station like other Experion reports. You can use Microsoft Excel Data Exchange to access data in the
server database from Microsoft Excel. When the report runs this data is refreshed and a copy of the data is
saved.
Data you can access using Microsoft Excel Reports includes:
•
•
•
Point parameter values and history data
Alarms and events
Other data in any server or system files
When the report is run:
•
•
•
•
All functions and queries contained within the report definition file are executed, updating the data in the
report.
Any calculations or graphs in the report are refreshed.
The data in the report definition file is saved as a Microsoft Excel file in the Experion report folder. All
links, and formulas are removed in the report output–it becomes a snapshot of the data in the file at the time
the report was requested. This prevents report data from being subsequently refreshed. The report file is
named rptnnn.xls, where nnn is the number of the report. A rptnnn.htm file is also generated, to enable
viewing of the report from Station.
The report can be printed. Printing uses the printer settings configured on Microsoft Excel and sent to the
printer configured in Station.
Related topics
“Using Experion data in other applications” on page 25
Microsoft Excel custom report tutorial: History values
This tutorial leads you through the steps involved in producing an Microsoft Excel report which uses Microsoft
Excel Data Exchange to access the server database. When requested, this report will retrieve the last 20 history
values of a system sinewave point.
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
418
Install Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Query on the server.
Enable Microsoft Excel Data Exchange on the server using the Windows mngr account.
Disable the Ask to update automatic links prompt on Microsoft Excel.
Configure a system sinewave point, called sinewave, and assign it to fast history.
www.honeywell.com
REPORTS
To create a report definition file which retrieves the last 20 fast history values of the point ID 'sinewave'
1
Log on using the mngr user account.
2
Start Microsoft Excel.
3
Choose Tools > Microsoft Excel Data Exchange > Wizard.
4
Select Get history values from server(s) and click Next.
5
Set the options as follows:
•
•
•
Server: localhost
Point ID: sinewave
Point parameter: pv
6
Click Add, then Next to display the next step.
7
Set the options as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
history type: Fast History Snapshots
number of values: 20
offset: 1
Arrange data: vertically
for all other options, accept the default.
8
Click Finish to display the result.
9
To include the date-time at the which the report is run, select an empty cell and type Now().
To save the report definition file
1
In Microsoft Excel, choose File > Save As.
2
Browse to the <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Server\User folder.
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder>
is C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only visible if you
select the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog box. To
change this setting in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options, and then click the
View tab.
3
Type sinewave as the filename.
4
Click OK and Exit Microsoft Excel.
To configure the report in Station
1
In Station, choose Configure > Reports to call up the Report summary display.
2
Go to an unassigned report row and click the Configure button.
3
In the Definition tab, complete the following:
•
•
•
add a title and a name
select Microsoft Excel from the Type list.
enable reporting on request
4
Click the Content tab.
5
In the Definition File box, type the full path to the file, sinewave.xls.
For example, <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Server\User\sinewave.xls, where <data folder> is
the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder> is C:\ProgramData.
Related topics
“Enabling Microsoft Excel Data Exchange under different user accounts” on page 584
419
REPORTS
420
www.honeywell.com
Configuring and monitoring a redundant server system
This topics lists the tasks you must complete to set up redundant servers.
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
•
•
Set up the computer names for your primary and backup servers. It is important that you follow the correct
server naming convention for redundant server systems when you install Windows. See the Software
Installation User’s Guide for details.
Installed the network cards in the primary and backup servers.
Configured TCP/IP on the primary and backup servers and assigned a TCP/IP addresses to each network
card.
If you have FTE, for instructions on configuring FTE, see the “FTE Installation and Configuration
Checklists” topic in the Fault Tolerant Ethernet Installation and Service Guide.
Installed Experion software on the primary and backup servers.
Installed Station software on client computers.
Set up time synchronization. It is important that the primary and backup servers are synchronized so that all
dates and/or times associated with events in the database are consistent between servers. See the “Setting up
time synchronization” topic in the Software Installation User’s Guide.
Task
Go to
Complete the TCP/IP configuration by configuring the primary
and backup server hosts files and testing the TCP/IP
configuration of the servers
“Editing the hosts file” on page 427
Done?
Ensure the duplex settings on your network card match the duplex “Checking network card settings” on
settings for your network switches
page 429
Define the arbitration
“Configuring arbitration” on page 430
Define the data link
“Defining the data links between redundant
servers” on page 431
Configure Station setup files for redundancy
“Configuring Station connections for
server redundancy” on page 432
Synchronize the servers
“Synchronizing the server databases” on
page 433
If your system has process points, synchronize the Engineering
Repository database
“Synchronizing the Engineering
Repository database” on page 434
If your system has process points, set failover settings in the event “What causes a failover of a redundant
of Process controllers communications subsystem failure
server system?” on page 440
If required, configure fast failover settings
“How can you make failover faster?” on
page 444
421
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
Task
Go to
Perform any troubleshooting steps, as necessary
"Analyzing Network Configuration" in the
Diagnostic Studio User's Guide
"Troubleshooting FTE" in the Fault
Tolerant Ethernet Installation and Service
Guide
Related topics
“Checklist for manually configuring redundancy” on page 423
“What is redundancy?” on page 424
“What type of network redundancy does Experion support?” on page 426
“Editing the hosts file” on page 427
“Testing the hosts file” on page 428
“Checking network card settings” on page 429
“Configuring arbitration” on page 430
“Defining the data links between redundant servers” on page 431
“Configuring Station connections for server redundancy” on page 432
“Synchronizing the server databases” on page 433
“Synchronizing the Engineering Repository database” on page 434
“Checking the status of redundant servers” on page 435
“What other files should you synchronize?” on page 439
“What causes a failover of a redundant server system?” on page 440
“Configuring automatic failover if CDA communication fails” on page 441
“Configuring the primary server to restart if it fails” on page 442
“Manually failing over a redundant server system” on page 443
“How can you make failover faster?” on page 444
“Checklist for manually configuring redundancy” on page 423
422
www.honeywell.com
Done?
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
Checklist for manually configuring redundancy
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
•
Set up the computer names for your primary and backup servers. It is important that you follow the correct
server naming convention for redundant server systems when you install Windows. For details, see the topic
“Computer names” in the Supplementary Installation Tasks Guide.
Installed the network cards in the primary and backup servers.
Configured TCP/IP on the primary and backup servers and assigned a TCP/IP addresses to each network
card.
Installed Experion software on the primary and backup servers.
Installed Station software on client computers.
Task
Go to:
Complete the TCP/IP configuration by configuring the primary
and backup server hosts files and testing the TCP/IP
configuration of the servers
“Editing the hosts file” on page 427
Define the arbitration
“Configuring arbitration” on page 430
Define the data link
“Defining the data links between redundant
servers” on page 431
Configure Station setup files for redundancy
“Configuring Station connections for
server redundancy” on page 432
Synchronize the servers
“Synchronizing the server databases” on
page 433
If required, configure fast failover settings
“How can you make failover faster?” on
page 444
Done?
Related topics
“Configuring and monitoring a redundant server system” on page 421
423
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
What is redundancy?
Redundancy is a configuration that allows a backup or second server to automatically continue the role of the
primary server in the event of a hardware or software failure on the primary server.
The primary server is the server that is performing all the Experion server roles at a given time. A backup server
is idle, waiting to take over the primary role if needed.
Redundant server names are always made up of two parts; the basename and an identifier letter of a or b. For
example, the base name could be hsserv, therefore one server would be named hsserva and the other hsservb.
In addition to redundant servers, you can also have network redundancy to avoid losing view of your process in
the event of a network failure.
Attention
If the servers are not synchronized, Station displays and operator log-ins are not restored after a server failover. They
are restored to their startup defaults.
If the servers are synchronized, displays and log-ins are only restored to their pre-failover state on static Stations
(either single- or multi-window). On rotary Stations, the system startup page is displayed after a failover.
Faceplates are only restored on multi-window Station, and popups are never restored after a failover.
What is redundant arbitration?
Redundant arbitration is the task of deciding which of the servers will run as the primary (that is,
communicating with field devices and Stations) and which will run as the backup (providing a standby system
in case the primary fails).
The method of arbitration is called Software arbitration.
When software arbitration is used, software running on the primary and backup servers provides the arbitration.
Each server polls the other (via the network) so that it knows if the other server has failed.
For example, if hsserva is running as the primary server and fails, the arbitration software running on hsservb
detects this and switches from running as backup to running as primary.
The following image illustrates software arbitration.
To Serial
Field Devices
hsserva
Primary
Server
Serial Data
Lines
hsservb
Backup
Server
Terminal
Server
Network
Figure 53: Software arbitration
When software arbitration is used, terminal servers provide the data link between the servers and the serial field
devices.
The server running as primary communicates with the field devices (via the terminal servers). If the primary
server fails, the backup server becomes the primary and takes over communications with field devices.
424
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
Related topics
“Configuring arbitration” on page 430
425
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
What type of network redundancy does Experion support?
Experion supports two types of network redundancy:
•
FTE network redundancy
You can use redundant networks between a pair of servers, as well as between Stations and redundant servers or
between Station and a single server.
By using redundant networks between a pair of servers, you can avoid a single point of failure so that database
synchronization and other redundancy functions can be maintained without interruption.
By using redundant networks between a Station and redundant servers, Station will always have a connection to
the primary server if there is a fault on one of the networks.
These capabilities are independent of each other and are configured separately.
Tip
A network architecture diagram is useful for checking the validity of your configuration and for finding problems
during configuration and testing.
If any node or network seems to be functioning incorrectly with respect to network communications, checking
its configuration against the network architecture drawing is a quicker way to find any misconfiguration than
just running diagnostics. The diagram should show:
•
•
•
•
•
All network-connected computers running Experion server or Station (generically called 'nodes')
Single, dual and FTE network connected
Network/subnetwork ID for each of the networks
Name and IP address for each network interface card (NIC) connected anywhere on either network
Hubs and switches used, including any cross over cables
Network redundancy with FTE
In an FTE configuration the servers are connected to two cables on the same subnet and have two network
cards. The cables are connected to two switches and the switches are connected by a cable as illustrated in the
following figure.
hsserva
Primary
Server
hsservb
Backup
Server
Switch A
Yellow Cable
Green Cable
Switch B
Figure 54: FTE configuration
426
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
Editing the hosts file
To modify the hosts file
1
Use a text editor to edit the hosts file.
Attention
If you use Microsoft Notepad to edit the hosts files, you need to remove the .txt extension after you save the files.
The hosts file is:
%SystemRoot%\system32\drivers\etc\hosts
For example:
c:\Windows\system32\drivers\etc\hosts
2
Add the required server names and respective TCP/IP addresses.
Related topics
“Example hosts file for FTE” on page 428
“Configuring Station connections for server redundancy” on page 432
427
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
Testing the hosts file
After you have modified the hosts file on both servers, you should test the TCP/IP configuration on both
servers.
To test the TCP/IP configuration
1
Open a Command Prompt window.
2
Ping each host name in turn; type the following command for each host name that you added to your hosts
file:
ping hostname
3
If any requests time out, or if the incorrect TCP/IP address is pinged, go back and re-examine your TCP/IP
configuration.
Example hosts file for FTE
Example
In this example, the TCP/IP address of the network card connected to the yellow cable on hsserva is
192.168.0.1 and the TCP/IP address of the network card connected to the yellow cable on hsservb is
192.168.0.3. (Normally, a computer's green address differs by 1 from its yellow address. For example, the
green address of hsserva would be 192.168.0.2.)
Add the following lines to the hosts file:
# TCP/IP address for primary
192.168.0.1 hsserva hsserva0
# TCP/IP address for backup
192.168.0.3 hsservb hsservb0
Note that you do not add entries for the network cards connected to the green cable.
Related topics
“Editing the hosts file” on page 427
428
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
Checking network card settings
Many network cards allow the duplex setting to be configured. Ensuring the duplex settings on your network
card are the same as the duplex settings for your network settings can help make synchronization more robust.
Contact your system administrator to find out the duplex settings of your network switches.
To check the network card duplex settings
1
Do one of the following:
Option
Description
Windows Server 2008
•
In the Windows Control Panel classic view, double-click Device Manager.
Windows 7
•
In the Windows Control Panel large or small icon view, click Device Manager.
2
In the Device Manager tree, locate Network adapters.
3
Right-click the appropriate adapter and select Properties.
4
Click the Advanced tab.
5
Click Speed & Duplex property and, if necessary, change the value to reflect the settings of your network
switches.
6
Close the Device Manager window.
7
Close Control Panel.
8
Restart the computer.
429
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
Configuring arbitration
The arbitration method to be used in your redundant server system must be defined for the primary and backup
servers.
Tip
An example hardware definition file (which you can modify and use) is shipped with Experion. The file name is
redun.hdw and is located in <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Server\User\, where <data folder>
is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder> is C:\ProgramData.
Prerequisites
•
You must stop the Experion server before using the hdwbld utility.
To define the arbitration method
1
In any text editor open or create your hardware definition file.
2
Add the following entry to the hardware definition file:
DEL PSW00
ADD PSW00 NETWORK_PSW RECOVER=recover_option IDLE=10 READ=15
Where recover_option is ABORT or REBOOT. ABORT means that when a failover occurs, Experion server service
is stopped and restarted on the failed server. REBOOT (the recommended option) means that when a failover
occurs, Experion server service is stopped and the database unloaded on the failed server. The Experion
server service is then restarted.
3
Save the file and copy to the primary and backup servers.
4
On the primary server, choose Start > All Programs > Honeywell Experion PKS > Server > Diagnostic
Tools > Experion Command Prompt to open the Experion PKS Command Prompt window.
Attention
To run Experion commands, you must be a member of the group.
You must run Experion commands from the Experion PKS command prompt and not the Windows command
prompt, otherwise you will not see the output from the command and the command will fail.
5
Type the following:
hdwbld filename.hdw
where filename is the path and filename of the file you created in the text editor.
6
Repeat the above step on the backup server.
Example
The following hardware definition file entries are for a redundant server system with software arbitration.
When a failover to the backup server occurs, Experion is stopped and restarted on the primary server.
DEL PSW00
ADD PSW00 NETWORK_PSW RECOVER=ABORT IDLE=10 READ=15
Related topics
“What is redundant arbitration?” on page 424
430
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
Defining the data links between redundant servers
When the primary and backup servers are running in redundant mode, all database changes on the primary
server are sent to the backup server via one or more data links. (A data link is a network path between the
primary server and the backup server.)
A hardware definition file must be created defining the data links. This file must be built individually on both
servers (using the hdwbld utility).
Tip
The example hardware definition file <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\server\user\redun.hdw also
includes data link definition examples.
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder> is
C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only visible if you select
the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog box. To change this setting
in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options, and then click the View tab.
To build the data link for FTE
1
Open a text editor such as Notepad.
2
Add the following entry to the file:
DEL LNK00
ADD LNK00 NETWORK_LINK
3
Save the file with a .hdw extension.
4
On the primary server, choose Start > All Programs > Honeywell Experion PKS > Server > Diagnostic
Tools > Experion Command Prompt to open the Experion Command Prompt window.
Attention
To run Experion commands, you must be a member of the Product Administrators group. If you want to do
engineering tasks, you must be a member of the Local Engineers group.
You must run Experion commands from the Experion command prompt and not the standard Windows command
prompt, otherwise you will not see the output from the command and the command will fail.
5
Type the following:
hdwbld filename.hdw
where filename is the path and filename of the file you created in the text editor.
431
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
Configuring Station connections for server redundancy
Stations need to connect to whichever server is running as the primary server. However, special Station
configuration is required for local and network-connected Stations to locate and connect to the server running as
primary.
Attention
If the servers are not synchronized, Station displays and operator log-ins are not restored after a server failover. They
are restored to their startup defaults.
If the servers are synchronized, displays and log-ins are only restored to their pre-failover state on static Stations
(either single- or multi-window). On rotary Stations, the system startup page is displayed after a failover.
Faceplates are only restored on multi-window Station, and popups are never restored after a failover.
To configure Station connections:
•
•
Configure a Station connection to the primary server and specify the auxiliary Station connection file.
Configure the auxiliary Station connection file, which contains connection details to the secondary server.
Related topics
“Example Station connections for FTE configuration” on page 432
“Accessing displays” on page 432
“Editing the hosts file” on page 427
Example Station connections for FTE configuration
In FTE configuration when a Station connection to the primary server is lost (or the primary server fails), the
Station should attempt to connect to the backup server.
Similarly when the backup server stops running as primary, the Station should try to reconnect to the primary
server.
You can configure Station to do this by configuring an auxiliary setup file. The auxiliary setup file contains the
name of the server to connect to if the current connection is lost (or the current server fails).
Station setup files are required:
•
•
default.stn
hsservb.stn
which connects to hsserva (and has auxiliary setup file hsservb.stn)
which connects to hsservb (and has auxiliary setup file default.stn)
When Station starts, it connects to hsserva (as configured in default.stn). If hsserva fails (or connection to
hsserva is lost), Station reconnects to hsservb (as configured in the auxiliary setup).
Related topics
“Connection Properties” on page 87
Accessing displays
In addition to specifying the auxiliary files, you need to ensure that Station can access displays.
•
•
•
Ensuring the host files include the host server names.
Creating the network connections on the computer running Station.
The relevant network paths are added to the Displays tab in the Connection Properties dialog box for all of
the required. stn files.
Related topics
“Connection Properties” on page 87
432
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
Synchronizing the server databases
Synchronization is the process of copying over the Experion server database from the primary server to the
backup server. When the server database on the backup server is identical to the database on the primary server,
the servers are said to be synchronized.
To synchronize your servers
1
Start Experion on the primary server and connect a Station to it.
2
Choose View > System Status > Server Redundancy.
The Server Redundancy Status display appears.
3
Ensure that:
•
•
•
•
The primary server status is Running.
The backup server status is Not synchronized and Running.
The link status is OK.
Your security level is SUPV or higher.
4
Click Synchronize to synchronize the two servers.
The message Synchronize databases? appears in the message zone.
5
Click Yes.
The Experion database on the primary server is automatically copied to the backup server.
It can take up to ten minutes to synchronize the two servers. However, for systems where the two servers
have been out of sync for an extended period (e.g., up to a day), synchronization can take longer.
Results
Once synchronization is complete, the synchronization indicator (the first LED in the Backup server group)
changes from red to green and the text changes from Not synchronized to Synchronized.
After the two servers have been synchronized, automatic checkpointing commences (the process whereby
database changes on the primary server are automatically sent to the backup server).
Related topics
“Server redundancy status display reference” on page 435
433
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
Synchronizing the Engineering Repository database
This section describes how to set up the Engineering Repository database redundancy on the backup server.
Prerequisites
•
You must log on to Configuration Studio using the mngr account.
To set up redundancy for the Engineering Repository database
1
In Configuration Studio, connect to the backup server.
2
In the Configuration Explorer, click the backup server.
3
Click the Administer the system database.
DBAdmin opens.
4
Choose DBAdmin > Server Node > ERDB Admin Tasks.
5
Click Enable Replication.
6
Click Yes when the Before proceeding to enable replication dialog box appears.
7
Click OK when the Successfully Enabled Database Replication message appears.
8
Close the ER Database Administration Tool.
Results
After you have enabled replication, any changes that are made to the primary Engineering Repository database
are automatically replicated to the backup Engineering Repository database.
You can check the status synchronization status of the Engineering Repository database using Control Builder.
434
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
Checking the status of redundant servers
After you have configured your redundant servers and have synchronized the servers, you should check the
status of the redundant servers to ensure that they are functioning correctly.
You can check the status of your redundant servers using the Server Redundancy Status display.
To check the status of redundant servers
•
In Station, choose View > System Status > Server Redundancy.
The Server Redundancy Status display appears. You can view information about:
•
•
•
•
The primary server
The backup server
The link status
The status of controller subsystems, such as the Engineering Repository Database (ERDB)
Server redundancy status display reference
Primary server
Property
Description
Server name
The name of the primary server.
The status of the primary server.
•
•
Running
Stopped
Backup server
Property
Description
The synchronization status of the backup server with the primary server.
•
•
•
Synchronized
Synchronizing
Not synchronized
The status of the backup server.
•
•
Running
Stopped
Last synchronization
The date and time when the backup server was last synchronized with the primary
server.
Last loss of synchronization
The date and time when the last synchronization with the primary server failed.
Link status
Property
Description
Link n (LNKnn)
The status of the link between the primary server and the backup server.
Example: Link 0 (LNK00)
•
•
•
OK
Failed
Not built
435
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
ERDB Status
The status of the engineering repository database (ERDB).
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Unknown
Auto sync enabled
Auto sync disabled
Error
Synched
Failed
Started
Related topics
“Synchronizing the server databases” on page 433
Redundant server advanced display reference
Queue
Property
Description
Availability
Experion uses a queue to buffer database information to be sent from the primary to
the backup server.
Availability shows the percentage of the queue size. In the course of normal
operations, this value should be close to 100%.
A value is less than 100% indicates there is currently data in the queue that needs to
be transferred to the backup server.
Lowest availability since
synchronization
The lowest level the redundancy data transfer queue has reached.
Time below availability threshold
The amount of time, in seconds, that the redundancy data transfer queue has
remained below the specified threshold.
Availability threshold
When you specify a value in the Availability threshold box, the system will record
the amount of time that the queue availability drops below the specified percentage.
Advanced settings and diagnostics
Property
Description
Time since last checkpoint
Typically there is a checkpoint made every minute to indicate that all data is
transferred from the queue. This is the time since the checkpoint. Due to high levels
of activity the checkpoint may be delayed, generally no more than an additional 60
seconds.
Checkpoint period
The checkpoint period is the cyclic period that the contents of the memory-resident
part of the database are sent to the backup server. The default value is 60 seconds (1
minute). This value is not normally changed.
Link transfer rate
The Link Transfer Rate value gives a measure of the throughput of the redundant
link.
Alarm priority
An alarm of the specified priority (and sub-priority) is raised if redundant servers
lose synchronization.
Tip
You can also change this control on the Alarm Enable display.
436
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
Property
Description
Tracing mask
The Tracing Mask value is used for diagnostic purposes. Do not change this value
unless advised to do so by Honeywell support personnel.
Failover to backup server on CDA
hosts, devices or nodes
communications subsystem failure if
servers are synchronized
Select this check box to failover to a backup server in the event of a failure with the
process controller communications subsystem. The primary and backup servers
must be synchronized in order for the failover to occur. This option is selected by
default.
Clear this check box to prevent failover to the backup server. For example, you are
performing maintenance on a process controller. During this time, operators will not
be able to view process controller information should a failure occur, so remember
to re-select this check box when you have finished your maintenance tasks.
Related topics
“Configuring automatic failover if CDA communication fails” on page 441
Points that monitor redundant servers
When you have synchronized your servers, you should define points to monitor the redundant server queue, by
using the point definition file, called redun.pnt, located in <install folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Server
\User, where <install folder> is the location where Experion is installed.
You define the points in Quick Builder and download the points to the primary server. The points are:
Point
Description
redun_ack_no
Monitors the last acknowledged message number.
redun_cur_q_ava
Monitors the amount of free queue space as a percentage.
redun_msg_no
Monitors the current message number.
redun_syncd
Monitors whether the servers are synchronized.
redun_xfer_rate
Monitors the transfer rate of the queue.
Attention
The syntax of the sample points assumes that the controller is controller one. If you need to, customize the points to
suit your requirements.
Configure a multiplot trend to display these points so that the status of the redundant server system can be
monitored. The current message number and the last acknowledged message number should closely follow. If
the current message continues to grow but the last acknowledge number is falling behind or flattening out,
redundant synchronization can be lost.
437
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
Figure 55: Trend Display for monitoring redundant server system
Related topics
“Configuring a trend” on page 367
438
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
What other files should you synchronize?
Experion database information is automatically transferred from the primary server to the backup server. This
includes configuration changes to the database such as changes to point configuration. In addition, history
archives, report output and OPC integrator configuration files are automatically transferred.
You might also want automatic copy of other files after they are modified on the primary server, such as any
custom Quick Builder projects, custom displays and application source files.
To synchronize these other files, you configure a file replication.
Related topics
“Storing the report definition file” on page 417
“File replication configuration checklists” on page 482
439
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
What causes a failover of a redundant server system?
The backup server takes over from the primary if:
•
•
•
The primary server software or hardware fails and the backup cannot communicate with it.
All network links between the primary and backup server are broken.
A user does a manual failover.
The following actions do not cause a failover:
•
A C300 controller is disconnected or fails.
The backup server does not take over from the primary if a SCADA channel fails.
Related topics
“Manually failing over a redundant server system” on page 443
440
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
Configuring automatic failover if CDA communication fails
If you have Process Controllers, you can specify that failover occurs when there is a failure in the Process
Controller communications subsystem. The following actions cause a failover:
•
•
The Experion PKS Control Data Access Server service is stopped via the Windows Control Panel.
A critical Process Controller communications failure is detected.
To specify failover when the CDA communications subsystem fails
1
Synchronize the servers.
2
Call up the Redundant server advanced display.
3
Select the check box labeled Failover to backup server on CDA hosts, devices or nodes
Communications Subsystem failure if servers are synchronized.
Related topics
“Redundant server advanced display reference” on page 436
441
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
Configuring the primary server to restart if it fails
The primary server can be configured to restart (with the backup server becoming primary) if one of the
following tasks fails:
•
•
•
controls timing of all Experion server tasks (Task 50)
controls the SCADA scanning subsystem (Task 60)
daqmgr controls the delivery of SCADA acquisition requests to the appropriate SCADA driver (Task 61)
timer
scanx
By default, these tasks are set to restart if they fail.
To configure the primary server to restart if a task fails
442
1
In Station, choose Configure > Application Development > Watchdog Timer.
2
Set the Action for the appropriate task to Reboot.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
Manually failing over a redundant server system
There might be times when you want the backup server to run as the primary for a while. For instance, you may
want to upgrade your primary server in some way (for example, upgrade memory, upgrade the hard disk or
install a Windows Service Pack).
Experion supports manual (operator-controlled) failover from the primary server to the backup server. This
failover causes the backup server to run as the primary.
CAUTION
•
•
•
If you manually fail over your Experion system, the primary and backup servers lose synchronization. The
servers need to be resynchronized if they are to run in redundant mode again. The automatic transfer of
database updates from the primary server to the backup server does not occur until the two servers have been
synchronized.
When you want to fail back to your primary server after a failover, you must first resynchronize your servers.
If you do not resynchronize them you lose changes to the Experion database that were made while the backup
server was running as the primary.
Stopping Experion on your primary server also causes your system to fail over to the backup server. If you do
not want this to happen, you should always stop your backup server before stopping your primary server.
To manually fail over
1
In Station, choose View > System Status > Server Redundancy.
The Server Redundancy Status display appears.
2
Click Manual Failover. This notifies the backup server that it is to run as the primary.
Related topics
“What causes a failover of a redundant server system?” on page 440
443
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
How can you make failover faster?
Configuring fast failover is only recommended for high performance servers running on high performance
networks, because it increases:
•
•
The traffic that the Stations and servers put onto the network
The servers' susceptibility to failover from disruptions on the network
One way to improve failover time without affecting network performance is to define IP addresses in the hosts
files so that IP address resolution is faster.
If you want to configure fast failover, you set parameters for:
•
•
•
The time until the backup server becomes primary after it detects that the primary is down.
The time until the server allows a new Station connection to use a Station number after a Station connection
fails.
The time until a Station fails over to the backup network after a connection to the server fails.
Related topics
“Station.ini” on page 112
Tuning the time until backup server becomes primary
To tune the time until the backup server becomes primary after it detects that the primary server is down, you
reset the number of messages permitted to be lost before failover occurs. The following steps must be performed
on both the primary and backup server:
1
On the primary server, choose Start > All Programs > Honeywell Experion PKS > Server > Diagnostic
Tools > Experion Command Prompt to open the Experion Command Prompt window.
Attention
To run Experion commands and utilities, you must be a member of the group.
You must run Experion commands from the Experion command prompt and not the Windows command prompt,
otherwise you will not see the output from the command and the command will fail.
2
Type hscserver
3
Isolate the network between the servers from other network traffic.
4
/database
to stop the Experion server.
Edit the PSW00 line in the redundancy configuration file, <data
folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Server
\User\redun.hdw.
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder>
is C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only visible if you
select the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog box. To
change this setting in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options, and then click the
View tab.
•
•
For fast failover, add IDLE=5
READ=10
to the PSW00 line
For normal operation, delete the IDLE and READ values from the PSW00 line, or set the default values
IDLE=10 READ=15.
For example:
ADD PSW00 NETWORK_PSW RECOVER=ABORT IDLE=5 READ=10
444
5
On the primary server, choose Start > All Programs > Honeywell Experion PKS > Server > Diagnostic
Tools > Experion Command Prompt to open the Experion Command Prompt window.
6
From the command prompt, run the command hdwbld
7
Use Start/Stop Experion PKS Server to set the server state to System Running.
www.honeywell.com
redun.hdw
to make the changes effective.
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
Tuning the time until server disconnects Station
Set the time that the server waits for data from a Station before disconnecting it. The fast failover setting is 5;
the normal setting is 30.
Attention
If you adjust this setting, you must also adjust the time until Stations fail over to the backup network. If the settings are
not properly synchronized, the Stations will disconnect frequently.
To change the time until the server disconnects Station
•
On the primary server, and then on the backup server, do the following:
a
On the primary server, choose Start > All Programs > Honeywell Experion PKS > Server >
Diagnostic Tools > Experion Command Prompt to open the Experion Command Prompt window.
Attention
To run Experion commands, you must be a member of the Product Administrators group. If you want to do
engineering tasks, you must be a member of the Local Engineers group.
You must run Experion commands from the Experion command prompt and not the standard Windows
command prompt, otherwise you will not see the output from the command and the command will fail.
b
Type fileio and then type the responses indicated below (bold indicates what you need to type):
C:\>fileio
Database contains
400 files
File number (=0 to exit) ? 8
Use memory image [YES|NO|BOTH(default)] ? both
File
8 contains
1 records of size 4096 words
Record number (=0 to back up) ? 1
Word offset (=0 to back up) ? 82
Mode = 0 to back up
= 1 for INTEGER
(int2)
= 2 for HEX
(int2)
= 3 for ASCII
(int2)
= 4 for F.P.
(real)
= 5 for SET bit
(int2)
= 6 for CLR bit
(int2)
= 7 for LONG INTEGER (int4)
= 8 for LONG F.P.
(dble) ? 1
INTEGER VALUE =
30 NEW VALUE = 5
Save value [YES|NO (default)] ? yes
Word offset (=0 to back up) ? 0
Record number (=0 to back up) ? 0
File number (=0 to exit) ? 0
Tuning the time until Stations fail over to backup network
The time until a Station fails over to the backup network depends on:
•
•
•
The KeepAliveTimeout and DisConnectTimeout settings in the station.ini file.
The TcpMaxConnectRetransmissions setting in the registry.
For Fault Tolerant Ethernet (FTE), you also need to set the interval properties for the Honeywell Fault
Tolerant Ethernet Service to 500 ms.
Attention
If you adjust the time-out settings, you must also adjust the time until the server disconnects Station. If these times are
not properly synchronized, Stations will disconnect frequently.
To change the KeepAliveTimeout and DisConnectTimeout settings for a computer
1
Edit the file %SystemRoot%\station.ini. In the [Station] section, add or uncomment the lines:
445
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
•
For fast failover (non Fault Tolerant Ethernet network):
KeepAliveTimeout=30
DisConnectTimeout=30
•
For fast failover (Fault Tolerant Ethernet network):
KeepAliveTimeout=50
DisConnectTimeout=0
•
For default failover:
KeepAliveTimeout=150
DisConnectTimeout=150
Both time-outs are in units of 0.1 seconds.
2
Edit the registry entry for TcpMaxConnectRetransmissions:
From a command prompt, type Regedt32.
The User Account Control window is displayed.
b Enter an administrator account and password and click OK.
c Open the path HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters
d Open TcpMaxConnectRetransmissions. If it does not exist, select Edit > Add Value to add it. The
Data Type is REG_DWORD.
e In the DWORD Editor, type 0 for fast failover, or Decimal 3 for default failover, and, then click OK.
f Exit Registry Editor. You need to restart the computer to use the new setting.
a
To set the interval properties for the Honeywell Fault Tolerant Ethernet Service
1
Do one of the following:
Option
Description
Windows Server
2008
•
•
In the Windows Control Panel classic view, double-click Network and Sharing Center.
Double-click Manage Network Connections.
Windows 7
•
In the Windows Control Panel large or small icon view, click Network and Sharing
Center.
2
Right-click the Local Area Connection you want to modify.
3
Select Honeywell Fault Tolerant Ethernet Service and click Properties
4
In the Interval box, type 500.
Making IP address resolution faster
One way to achieve faster failover without necessarily increasing network traffic is to define IP addresses in the
hosts files of all computers on the network.
To define IP addresses in the hosts file
1
2
On all Station computers, ensure that there is an entry in the hosts file (%SystemRoot%\system32\drivers\etc
\hosts) for both server computers.
On both server computers, ensure that there is an entry in the hosts file (%SystemRoot%\system32\drivers
for every Station computer.
\etc\hosts)
446
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
FTE-specific failover settings
If you have FTE, you should see the Fault Tolerant Ethernet Overview and Implementation Guide and the Fault
Tolerant Ethernet Installation and Service Guide for most of the configuration instructions. However, the
following details are specific to Experion.
•
•
The Honeywell Fault Tolerant Ethernet Service should be set to 500 ms.
The Station time-out must be longer than the time FTE might take to redirect output. This is essentially the
following:
where TCP
1 second.
retransmission time
is determined by the characteristics of your system, and can be up to about
(Disjoin multiplier + 1) * Interval + TCP retransmission time
447
CONFIGURING AND MONITORING A REDUNDANT SERVER SYSTEM
448
www.honeywell.com
Configuring Distributed System Architecture
The Distributed System Architecture (DSA) option enables multiple Experion servers to share data, alarms,
alerts, , messages, and history without the need for duplicate configuration on any server. This chapter describes
the architecture and functions of a DSA system and the configuration procedures that are required.
Related topics
“DSA Overview” on page 450
“Requirements for implementing a DSA system” on page 451
“DSA data access” on page 452
“Displays in a DSA system” on page 454
“DSA and alarms, alerts, events and messages” on page 455
“Trends” on page 458
“Security” on page 459
“Operational aspects of DSA” on page 460
“Configuration for Distributed System Architecture” on page 463
“Monitoring Distributed Server status” on page 468
449
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
DSA Overview
The Distributed System Architecture (DSA) option enables you to integrate multiple Experion servers into a
single operational system.
In a plant-wide system, data is typically shared between servers over a high-bandwidth network, such as a 100
MB or higher Ethernet. In this case each server is assumed to be responsible for controlling a different part of
the plant. Typically there are multiple control rooms, or multiple Stations in the same control room, each
associated with a specific server.
Plant-Wide Network
Plant A
Plant B
Figure 56: Plant-wide distributed system
450
www.honeywell.com
Plant C
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
Requirements for implementing a DSA system
The requirements for implementing a DSA system are:
•
•
•
The password for the Windows Mngr account (created when you install the Experion server) must be the
same on all servers connected via DSA.
If you intend to use Operator Management Service (OMS) over DSA, the account the OMS runs under does
not need to be the same on all clusters, however it needs to be appropriate for the Operators defined within
each cluster, and should be the same account on all Server and CStn nodes within the cluster. See 'Setting the
Operator Management Service account.'
Within a given system (as defined in Configuration Studio), you can have only one Enterprise Model
Database (EMDB).
Attention
Note that where there is more than one system, and therefore more than one Enterprise Model database, it is
possible to share an Enterprise Model (or parts thereof) across those systems, provided that the parts of the
Enterprise Model that you want to share between systems are identical; that is, the asset tag names (asset point
IDs) must be the same.
•
Assets must be assignable.
Attention
Note that if an asset is not assignable, then its closest ancestor that has the assignable property checked also needs
to be identical (as described above).
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
For points that are not assets, full item names must be unique across all servers.
The date and time must be synchronized on distributed servers to ensure that all dates and times associated
with events in the database are consistent. Servers can be in different time zones but still have their
coordinated universal time (UTC) synchronized.
To access points on another server with the same point ID, the point ID must be prefixed with a server alias
Every point that will be accessed from more than one server must be assigned to an asset.
All displays that a Station needs to access must be accessible through the Displays Path defined for the
Station.
Message indexes and text should be the same on all servers.
Each server database must contain all acronyms used on any displays it needs to access, including those
copied from remote servers.
Control Builder charts on Point Detail displays are only functional if the DSA connected servers are at the
same release level. Control Builder charts do not operator between DSA connected servers of different
releases. The Windows account used on the Station where charts are being viewed must be added to one of
the standard Experion Windows groups on the DSA publishing server.
Related topics
“Defining informational messages for standard points” on page 288
“Alarms and DSA” on page 455
“Point IDs” on page 452
“History collection and DSA” on page 251
“DSA and alarms, alerts, events and messages” on page 455
451
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
DSA data access
DSA provides global access to point parameter data on all servers in the system. Each server provides automatic
dynamic caching of remote data for all of its clients, so that clients access their local server for all data. Clients
do not access remote servers directly. In other words, Station accesses information from the server to which it is
connected, regardless of where the information is configured.
For example:
•
•
•
•
Station accesses its local server to display alarms or data for points on local and remote servers.
An OPC client application can access a local OPC server on an Experion server to obtain point data from
that or any other Experion server.
A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet connected only to its local server can display data through Microsoft Excel
Data Exchange from multiple servers.
An application, or a network application, connected only to its local server can access point data from
multiple servers.
A server establishes a local cache point and subscribes to a remote server when one of its clients requests data
for a point that is not already in the database. While the subscription is in effect the data owner uses report by
exception, only sending data to the caching server on change. When the data is no longer referenced by any of
its client Stations or applications, the subscribing server cancels the subscription to the data owner. This
subscription mechanism ensures maximum efficiency both on the servers and over the network.
How remote points are located
The first time a remote point is accessed, the local server asks the servers in the system for the data owner of the
point. When the data owner is determined, the local server automatically creates a cache reference in the local
database. This cache reference is known as a 'cache point.'
Point IDs
Duplicate point IDs can exist in a DSA system, however points with duplicate IDs must not belong to the same
server in the DSA. To distinguish between points with duplicate point IDs, you must prefix the point ID with the
server name, for example, ExperionServerNorth:FIC123.
Internal point numbers
Point data for a remote point is ultimately accessed by its internal point number on its local server. If a point is
deleted and then recreated, its internal point number might change, which means that remote group, trend, and
custom displays can no longer access the point. You need to re-enter the point into the remote group, trend, and
custom displays that access it.
The cache points are automatically deleted from all remote servers when the point is deleted at the data owner.
In a distributed system architecture, the internal numbering of points and the ordering of points cannot be
assumed. The internal point number for a cache point is usually different from the internal point number on the
local server, and cache points are created in the order that points are accessed.
Applications that run on a remote server should never use hardcoded point numbers, and custom displays that
are called from a remote server should never be created with point repeats.
Point count licensing
For more information about point count licensing, contact your Honeywell representative.
Related topics
“Defining informational messages for standard points” on page 288
“Requirements for implementing a DSA system” on page 451
452
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
“DSA and alarms, alerts, events and messages” on page 455
453
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
Displays in a DSA system
Operators interact with local and remote data on displays in the same way. From an operator's perspective, there
is no difference between a local and a remote point.
Related topics
“Displays locations” on page 454
“Consolidated Alarm Summary” on page 454
“Associated displays” on page 454
Displays locations
You can configure the Displays Path in the Station setup files to access displays from any server. This means
that you can set Stations in the distributed system to use displays from one central file server or from several
local servers, depending on your network and other environmental conditions. For example, in a geographically
distributed system, custom displays should be loaded on individual servers.
If displays are on more than one server, you need to ensure that all the appropriate paths are configured in the
Station setup files.
Custom displays
Custom displays engineered on one server can be used on any Station in the system without change, provided
they do not use internal database references (for example, user files).
Consolidated Alarm Summary
The Alarm Summary shows a consolidated list of local and remote alarms.
The remote alarms displayed to an operator are those from the assets for which alarms are enabled on the local
server, and which have been assigned to the Station or operator. Local and remote alarms can be filtered in the
same way.
The Station Alarm Zone shows the highest priority unacknowledged alarm, regardless of whether it is a local or
remote alarm.
An operator can navigate directly to the Associated or Point Detail display for a remote alarm, just as for a local
alarms.
The 'in-alarm' and acknowledgment status of remote points is indicated on custom displays in the same way as
local points.
Associated displays
Each Station displays the Associated Display defined on its local server. To ensure that the appropriate
Associated Display is displayed for remote points, the numbers and contents of Associated Displays should be
consistent across all servers.
454
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
DSA and alarms, alerts, events and messages
In a DSA system, alarms (including process alarms and system alarms) as well as alerts, messages, and events
are distributed as needed by the processes running on each server in the system.
The DSA does not pass events from remote servers, so every local Experion server is limited to only serving its
local events to OPC Alarm and Event subscribed clients. By default, an Experion OPC Alarm and Event Server
does not pass DSA alarms and messages, however, can be configured using server wide settings to do so, (but
not events).
Attention
Alerts function in the same way as alarms do. The following descriptions of alarm behavior are also applicable for
alert behavior.
Related topics
“Alarms and DSA” on page 455
“System alarms and DSA” on page 456
“What happens when you disable alarms in a DSA system?” on page 456
“DSA and alarm and message acknowledgement policy” on page 456
“DSA and message indexes” on page 457
“DSA and journaled events” on page 457
“DSA and journaled operator changes” on page 457
“Defining informational messages for standard points” on page 288
“Alarms and DSA” on page 455
“Point IDs” on page 452
“History collection and DSA” on page 251
“Requirements for implementing a DSA system” on page 451
“System alarms and DSA” on page 456
“What happens when you disable alarms in a DSA system?” on page 456
Alarms and DSA
On each server, you must set the server to subscribe to alarms from other servers in the DSA system.
To identify the server from which an alarm originates, you can show the following columns on the Alarm
Summary:
•
•
DSA Connection Name
DSA Server Name
An alarm is also displayed if a remote server cannot be accessed.
Related topics
“Configuring system alarm priorities” on page 280
“Accumulator point alarms” on page 223
“Example scenario: Audible annunciations” on page 262
“Configuring alarms” on page 258
“Defining informational messages for standard points” on page 288
“Requirements for implementing a DSA system” on page 451
“DSA and alarms, alerts, events and messages” on page 455
“Customizing the layout of the summary displays” on page 389
455
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
System alarms and DSA
If you need to display system alarms for one server on another server, you need to configure the locations on the
server that issues the alarms.
To configure locations, choose Configure > Alarm Event Management > Alarms. Enable or disable alarms
for a particular location by selecting or deselecting the applicable check box.
Related topics
“DSA and alarms, alerts, events and messages” on page 455
What happens when you disable alarms in a DSA system?
In a DSA system, the effect of disabling alarms depends on whether they are disabled by:
•
•
•
Individual points
Asset
Server
If alarms for an individual point are disabled, then no alarms for that point are shown on any server in the DSA
system.
If alarms are disabled for an asset on a local server, then no alarms are generated locally and no alarms are
distributed for that asset to remote servers. Alarms generated on a remote server for that asset are not displayed
locally. For example, ServerEast and ServerWest have an asset called ConveyorBelt. You disable alarms for
asset ConveyorBelt on ServerEast. Alarms generated for the asset ConveyorBelt on ServerEast are not
displayed on ServerEast or ServerWest. An alarm is raised on ServerWest indicating that alarms are disabled for
asset ConveyorBelt on ServerEast. Alarms generated for the asset ConveyorBelt on ServerWest are not
displayed on ServerEast but are displayed on ServerWest.
If alarms are disabled server-wide on a local server, then no alarms are generated locally and no alarms are
distributed to remote servers. An alarm is raised on the remote servers indicating alarms have been disabled
server-wide on the local server.
Related topics
“DSA and alarms, alerts, events and messages” on page 455
“Customizing the layout of the summary displays” on page 389
“Disabling alarming” on page 281
DSA and alarm and message acknowledgement policy
By default, alarm acknowledgements are distributed to all servers. This means that the alarm only needs to be
acknowledged once, at any server that displays it. Remote alarms can be acknowledged in the same way as local
alarms, from custom displays, the Alarm Summary display, and the Station Alarm Zone.
Attention
Currently, silencing is not passed over DSA.
You can configure the Alarm Acknowledgement Policy setting so that alarms must be acknowledged at each
server. This setting must be the same on all servers.
Message acknowledgements are always distributed to all servers.
456
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
DSA and message indexes
Each Station displays the message text defined on its local server. To ensure that appropriate messages are
displayed for remote points, the message indexes and text should be the same on all servers.
DSA and journaled events
Because distributing all journaled events would need significant bandwidth, most events are recorded only on
the server where the point is defined. The exceptions are Acknowledgement events and Point Value Change
events, which are recorded both on the server where they occurred and on the data owner.
This means that the event archive on each server includes all events for its local points, and Acknowledgement
events and Point Value Change events that occurred on the local server and affect remote points. In other words,
two events are generated for each single acknowledgement and point value change action that occurred
remotely; one on the point’s local server, and one on the remote server on which the action was performed.
To view events for a remote server:
•
•
Configure an Alarm and Event DSA report that includes events from the remote server.
Use Station to log on to the remote server and view the Event Summary display.
DSA and journaled operator changes
Operator changes to a remote point are journaled on both the local server and the data owner.
457
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
Trends
When a trend includes a remote point, historical data for that point is retrieved from the remote server in real
time. If the history intervals on local and remote servers are configured differently, trend data is interpolated.
For example, a local server is configured to collect fast history at 1 second intervals and a remote server is
configured to collect fast history at 5 second intervals. If you create a trend on the local server requesting data
from the remote server at 1 second intervals, data from the remote server is interpolated.
It is possible, but not advisable, to collect history locally for a remote point. Therefore a remote point should not
be assigned to history.
458
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
Security
Assignable assets are used to restrict access to both local and remote Server data.
If you are using Station-based security, you assign assets to the Stations.
If you are using operator-based security, you configure the operators on all servers where they need to log on.
You then assign assets to the operators.
If you are using point control levels, the control level is passed to the remote server and checked at the remote
Server.
Related topics
“Assigning scope of responsibility to Flex Stations” on page 338
“Assigning scope of responsibility to operators or Windows group accounts” on page 333
“Configuring system security” on page 303
459
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
Operational aspects of DSA
For normal operation, a DSA system works in the same way as a single server system.
This section discusses the characteristics of a DSA system for engineering tasks.
Related topics
“Algorithms and DSA” on page 460
“Hardware items and DSA” on page 460
“Performance considerations with DSA” on page 460
“Multicasting and DSA” on page 460
“Synchronization considerations with DSA” on page 461
“Server redundancy, networks and DSA” on page 461
“Operator keyboard support and DSA” on page 461
“Internationalization and DSA” on page 462
Algorithms and DSA
Point Algorithm displays use internal database references. This means that you need to log on to the remote
server, using standard Station networking facilities, to view point algorithm configuration from Station.
Related topics
“Configuring algorithms” on page 236
Hardware items and DSA
The configuration summaries for hardware items only show items configured on the local server. However, the
System Status display allows you to view alarms or work with the configuration of the following items on
remote servers:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Connections
Channels
Controllers
Printers
Redundant Servers
Stations
Performance considerations with DSA
The accuracy of information and timeliness of control for remote servers depends on the capacity and reliability
of the networks and data links.
A local server issues an alarm if the response from a remote server takes longer than the time specified in its
configuration. Operators can also monitor the status of links and remote servers from the System Configuration
- Distributed Systems summary. Clicking a server in the summary list displays more detailed status information.
Multicasting and DSA
For any server in the distributed architecture, you can choose multicasting to remote servers that are connected
over a network that supports it. The performance effects of multicasting depend on the network and the number
460
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
of servers. Contact your local Honeywell representative for information about the network devices that support
multicasting, and its appropriateness for your system.
When multicasting is used, a server sends a single copy of its data over the network to other servers. The other
servers on the network need to know the network address and port number the multicast packets use so that the
networking software can listen for data on that address. The benefit of multicasting is to conserve bandwidth
and reduce network traffic.
Some routers are not configured with multicasting enabled. In this situation multicasting must be manually
enabled on the router.
Experion uses multicasting to provide the status of both the server and the links between servers in a DSA
system. Each server has a link daemon which multicasts its status to the network. Daemons on the other servers
listen for these multicasts to obtain the status of other servers.
The multicast address used by DSA is 225.7.4.103. The multicast port is 2911.
Attention
eServer is not compatible with multicasting through firewalls. If you have an eServer behind a firewall, you should
disable multicasting on that firewall.
Synchronization considerations with DSA
To share alarms and historical data, the servers need to be time synchronized. However, the servers can be in
different time zones, each showing its own local time.
For information about how to synchronize servers, see 'Setting up time synchronization' in the Software
Installation User’s Guide.
Server redundancy, networks and DSA
If you are using Fault Tolerant Ethernet (FTE), your DSA system should be configured as a single link between
servers.
Attention
The DSA Status Detail display for link 500, which is the Console Station connection back to the server, will show only
one valid connection on a FTE link. Although physically a "dual link" system, FTE hides the secondary links at a
driver level, so that software such as the Console Station sees it as a single link. Since Console Station has to support
dual links without FTE, this display needs to show both links, even though on an FTE system the secondary link
display is unnecessary.
You can safely ignore the status of the FTE links A1 and B1 in this situation. FTE links A0 and B0 show the current
connection status.
No special configuration is required for DSA systems. The Distributed System status summary and status tabs
show the redundancy architecture of each server.
Operator keyboard support and DSA
Specialized operator keyboard functions, such as AUTO/MANUAL and raise/lower, are supported in the same
way for local and remote points.
The fast raise/lower step is specified in the system wide Station configuration for the server that the Station is
connected to. This step applies to local and remote points.
Related topics
“Configuring alarm settings” on page 275
461
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
Internationalization and DSA
All servers in the DSA system must be in the same language.
462
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
Configuration for Distributed System Architecture
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
Experion server software is installed on all servers that are participating in the DSA.
The Enterprise Model Builder database is installed on one of the Experion servers.
Configuration Studio is installed.
If there is a firewall in your DSA system, make sure that the necessary ports are opened in the firewall to
enable DSA communications between the DSA client and server nodes. For information on configuring
firewalls in a DSA system, see the “Firewall configuration” topic in the “Network security” section of the
Network and Security Planning Guide.
Tasks
Task
Go to
In Configuration Studio, define all distributed server that are to be
connected using DSA.
“Adding DSA servers to a system”
on page 463
In Configuration Studio, configure each server connected using DSA to
subscribe to data, alarms.
“Configuring servers to subscribe
to data and alarms” on page 465
In Configuration Studio configure tuning settings.
“Tuning your distributed system”
on page 466
Ensure the paths of any custom display files and numbered display files
are added to the Connections Properties for Stations connected to the
server.
“Displays tab, Connection
properties” on page 88
Done?
Copy all user-defined acronyms used by the custom display files to the
server, using fildmp.
If Station-based security is being used, assign the assets that each Station “Assigning scope of responsibility
needs to access.
to Flex Stations” on page 338
If operator-based security is being used, assign the assets that each
operator needs to access.
“Assigning scope of responsibility
to operators or Windows group
accounts” on page 333
Related topics
“Adding DSA servers to a system” on page 463
“Configuring servers to subscribe to data and alarms” on page 465
“Tuning your distributed system” on page 466
“About cache age times” on page 467
Adding DSA servers to a system
External servers can be added that communicate with the system through DSA. However, servers, assets, and
alarm groups cannot be downloaded to servers external to the system. External servers are represented in the
network tree by the
icon.
Prerequisites
•
•
At least one user has been defined on the server.
You have a security level of ENGR or higher.
463
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
Tip
When adding a server, you can choose to import any areas, assets, and alarm groups defined on that server into the
Enterprise Model Database. Messages will prompt you on your choices.
To add system servers to the Enterprise Model
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Distributed Servers.
2
Under Server Tasks, click the Add a server to this system task.
The SERVER Block Parameters dialog box appears.
Figure 57: Example SERVER Block Parameters dialog box
3
In the Alias box, type a new unique tag name.
4
In the Description box, type a description of the server.
5
In the Abbreviation box, type an abbreviated name for the server.
6
In the Node Name box, type the name of the server node. It can be the same as the server tag name.
7
In the Network Type list, select the server network connection type (SINGLE/FTE).
8
If the server is part of a redundant pair, select the Redundant? check box.
9
Click OK.
A message box appears prompting you to perform a load of the system configuration to distribute the change
to all of the servers.
10 Click Yes to continue loading system model into server’s database.
If you click No, the server is be added in the local server only and system model will not be loaded into the
server database. You can download the system model at a later time by clicking Load server configuration
on the DSA tool main page.
464
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
11 Repeat steps 1 to 10 for each server to be defined in the system model.
Configuring servers to subscribe to data and alarms
You configure each server in your system to subscribe to alarms and data from other servers in the system. A
server can subscribe to:
•
•
Alarms and data
Data only
When you first define a server and download this server definition to other servers in the system, the default
subscription for the server is disabled and it does not participate in the DSA.
You can change this default setting and subscribe to alarms and data (or data only) if you have not yet exceeded
the maximum number of DSA servers for which you are licensed. You can check the number of DSA servers
for which you are licensed on the Server License Details display.
In addition to subscriptions, on each server you can configure:
•
•
•
Overload alarms
Multicasting
Updates to the Point Browser
To configure data subscriptions
1
Choose one of the following.
Option
Description
Configuration Studio
1. In Configuration Explorer, expand the connected server node, and then click
System Interfaces.
2. Click the View distributed servers task.
Station
Click Configure > System Hardware > Distributed Servers.
The Distributed Server Configuration Summary display appears in the System Display tab.
2
Click the name of the remote server you want to configure.
3
Enter the following information:
Property
Description
Alarms and Data Subscriptions
Disable both Alarm and Data
This default setting ensures that the system is not flooded with alarms
immediately after DSA configuration.
You might also want to use this setting when DSA servers are down for
maintenance.
Enable both Alarm and Data
Choose this setting if you want this server to subscribe to process alarms
and process data on a remote server.
Also subscribes to:
When you choose Enable both Alarm and Data, you can clear these
check boxes to prevent the server from subscribing to the system model
and system alarms on a remote server.
•
System components tree
This not only reduces the amount of network traffic but also helps to
reduce the number of points currently in use if you are getting close to the
maximum point count for that server.
Enable Data Only
Choose this setting if you want this server to subscribe to process data but
not to process alarms on a remote server.
465
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
Property
Description
Also subscribes to:
When you choose Enable Data Only, you can clear these check boxes to
prevent the server from subscribing to remote points for system data.
•
System components tree
This not only reduces the amount of network traffic but also helps to
reduce the number of points currently in use if you are getting close to the
maximum point count for that server.
Overload Alarms
Enable Data Connection Overload
Alarm
Enables an alarm to be raised in the event of data connection overload.
Enable Notification Connection
Overload Alarm
Enables an alarm to be raised in the event of notification connection
overload.
Multicasting
Link Supports Multicast Traffic
If the network connection to the remote server supports multicast traffic,
check this option.
Related topics
“Checking your Experion license” on page 28
Tuning your distributed system
The Tuning tab contains Cache and Communications Settings for the remote server. These settings should only
be changed by experienced technical personnel in consultation with your local Technical Assistance Center.
To set tuning settings
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio or Station, expand the connected server node, and
click System Interfaces.
2
Click the View distributed servers task.
The Distributed Servers Configuration Summary display appears in the System Display tab.
3
Click the server alias name.
4
Click the Tuning tab.
You can tune the following settings for individual connections to publishing servers:
Property
Description
Cache flush time
The intervals (in milliseconds) that the subscription list is checked for
references to old data.
Cache age time
The amount of time (in milliseconds) old data remains in the dynamic
cache.
Maximum subscription time
This time is used to determine whether point parameter values are updated
using subscription or synchronous read (polls). If the required update rate
is less than the maximum subscription time, then subscription is used. If
the update rate is greater than the maximum subscription time then polling
is used.
The update rate can be taken from the display object, the display, or
Station. The fastest update rate is used for comparison with the maximum
subscription time.
Maintaining a slow subscription is not efficient.
The maximum subscription time must be the same on all servers in the
DSA. If you also have point servers, the maximum subscription time must
be the same for each point server.
466
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
Property
Description
List fragment size
The size of data packets sent over the network. This is tuned for optimal
performance on low bandwidth links.
Connection time-out
The amount of time (in seconds) a packet of data can remain on the
network without being acknowledged. When the time-out period expires,
the connection is broken and communication is initiated again.
Notification buffer interval
(Applicable to remote server)
The maximum amount of time (in seconds) a notification can be delayed
on the publishing server before being sent to the subscribing server.
Notification keep alive interval
(Applicable to remote server)
The maximum amount of time (in seconds) the publishing server does not
send packets to the subscribing server. If there are no notifications within
this time, an empty keep alive packet is sent to the subscribing server.
To tune the global cache settings
1
In Configuration Studio, connect to the server you want to tune.
2
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Interfaces.
3
Click the View distributed servers task.
The Distributed Servers Summary display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
4
Click the link flagged as This Server.
The Distributed System Local Configuration display opens.
5
Click the Tuning tab.
You can tune the following global cache settings to apply to all distributed architecture connections on the
subscribing server.
Property
Description
Cache Age Time
Sets the maximum limits (in milliseconds) for the tuning settings for each
remote server this server will access. (Also referred to as global cache age
time.)
Read Data Valid Time
The amount of time (in milliseconds) that data remains valid. When this
time expires, the values are read again from the publishing server. This
value is independent of the subscription time.
Related topics
“About cache age times” on page 467
About cache age times
The maximum tuning settings for each remote server are set by the global cache age time. The cache flush time
is calculated first. The cache flush time is then used to calculate the cache age time. The cache age time is then
used to calculate the maximum subscription time. These calculations are as follows:
Tuning Setting
Minimum Value
Maximum Value
Cache Flush Time
10,000 ms
(Global Cache Age Time)/4
Cache Age Time
Cache flush time
Global Cache Age Time - (2 * Cache Flush Time)
Maximum Subscription Time
100 ms
Cache Age Time
Related topics
“Tuning your distributed system” on page 466
467
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
Monitoring Distributed Server status
There are two displays that provide status information for the distributed servers:
•
•
Distributed Server Local Status
Distributed Server Status
Both displays are accessed from the Distributed Server Summary display; the local status server always being
the first on the list. Other servers listed are DSA connections of the local server.
Related topics
“Distributed Server Local Status display reference” on page 468
“Resetting statistics on the Distributed Server Local Status display” on page 469
Distributed Server Local Status display reference
The Distributed Server Local Status display summarizes all of the data and notifications being published from
this server to all connected DSA subscribers.
You can use this display to assess the load being placed on this server from DSA subscribers.
Data server status
Property
Description
Total remote clients
The total number of DSA subscribers subscribed to data from this server.
Total parameters subscribed
The total number of parameters subscribed to by DSA subscribers.
Total parameters output
The total number of parameter values published to DSA subscribers.
Average parameter output
The average number of parameters published per second (5-second average).
Maximum average parameter output The highest value of the average parameter output.
Total one-shot reads
The total number of parameter values read by DSA subscribers. This number does
not include parameter subscriptions.
Total one-shot writes
The total number of parameter values written to by DSA subscribers.
Transaction count
Increments by one each time a request is made to this server.
Notification server status
468
Property
Description
Total remote clients
The total number of DSA subscribers subscribed to notifications from this server.
Total notifications output
The total number of notifications published to DSA subscribers.
Average notification output
The average number of notifications published per second (5-second average).
Maximum average notification
output
The highest value of the average notification output.
Total tags output
The total number of tags published to DSA subscribers.
Average tag output
The average number of tags published per second (5-second average).
Maximum average tag output
The highest value of the average tag output.
Property
Description
Reset statistics
Resets all counters on this display to zero.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
Property
Description
Last reset
The last date and time that the counters were reset to zero.
Related topics
“Resetting statistics on the Distributed Server Local Status display” on page 469
Resetting statistics on the Distributed Server Local Status display
When troubleshooting DSA connection issues, you may want to reset statistics on the Distributed Server
Local Status display.
To reset statistics on the Distributed Server Local Status display
1
In Station, choose View > System Status > Distributed Servers
The Distributed Servers display appears, showing a list of distributed servers.
2
Click the server alias name for the local server (the first server in the Distributed servers list).
The Distributed Server Local Status display appears.
3
Click Reset statistics.
All counters are reset to zero and the current date and time appears in the Last reset area.
Related topics
“Distributed Server Local Status display reference” on page 468
469
CONFIGURING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
470
www.honeywell.com
Configuring eServer
The eServer combines Experion server and Web server technology, enabling you to provide secure read-only
access to casual users.
Users are isolated from control of the plant and do not have access to view or acknowledge alarms or alarm
status in graphic displays, for example, that of a tank picture turning red when the tank is nearly full.
Access is restricted to the view only security level.
The eServer calls up your process graphic displays and serves them as a read-only version to your casual users
on request. Casual users can navigate to your process schematics and other displays in the same way as
navigating to any Web site or Web page.
There are two types of access to the eServer:
•
•
Standard access
Premium access
With standard access, users are provided with a 'snapshot' of your plant displays with data current at the time of
calling up the display using any Web browser. Users are limited to using only the navigation controls provided
on the display pages. Standard access users only require a Web browser, and do not need to download or install
additional software.
With premium access, users are provided with 'live' plant displays with updating data, using Internet Explorer.
Their interaction is limited to navigation controls and copying trend and report data to other applications such as
Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Word. Premium access users need to download a small self-installing package
before connecting to eServer.
Related topics
“Actions permitted at each security level” on page 355
471
CONFIGURING ESERVER
eServer configuration procedures
The eServer accesses the Experion servers in your system by using Distributed System Architecture technology.
The tasks required to set up the eServer are similar to setting up a server in a DSA system. See “Requirements
for implementing a DSA system”.
Attention
eServer is not compatible with multicasting through firewalls. If you have an eServer behind a firewall, you should
disable multicasting in the DSA configurations on the eServer.
You need to complete the following tasks to enable eServer to access the Experion servers.
Prerequisites
•
You have installed the eServer software with EMDB, including Internet Information Services (IIS).
eServer configuration tasks
Task
Go to
From the eServer node define the Experion node as a
Distributed Server. Ensure that you select the Server
External To System check box.
Load the system model to your eServer.
Define the asset model to your eServer.
Secure your eServer.
Assign scope of responsibility to the eServer Stations.
“Assigning scope of responsibility to Flex
Stations” on page 338
From eServer, click Station > Configure > System Hardware
> Distributed Servers.
Select the Experion node and then in the Configuration tab,
in the Alarms and Data Subscription combo box select
Enable Data Only.
Ensure that all custom displays and external linked
stylesheets, including those specifically developed for
eServer, are stored locally in the eServer display folder.
HMIWeb Display Building Guide.
The default folder for custom displays is <data folder>
\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Client\Abstract, where
<data folder> is the location where Experion data is
stored. For default installations, <data folder> is C:
\ProgramData
Note also that Trends need to be configured locally on each
eServer.
Set up 'home' pages so that users can navigate to the
required displays and provide details of the links/URLs to
users.
Related topics
“Guidelines for tuning eServer for standard access” on page 473
“Assigning scope of responsibility to Flex Stations” on page 338
“Configuring a trend” on page 367
“eServer home page” on page 478
“eServer security considerations” on page 474
472
www.honeywell.com
Done
CONFIGURING ESERVER
Guidelines for tuning eServer for standard access
The eServer configuration tool enables you to specify:
•
•
The display size of pages served by eServer
Cache time
To set the size of pages served by the eServer, you specify the image height and width in pixels. If both are set
to zero (the default) pages appear in the client browser at the resolution of the eServer computer. If you specify
a width and height, pages appear at the specified dimensions, regardless of the eServer computer resolution.
Attention
Correct aspect ratio is not enforced. Ensure that the height and width you specify delivers a valid aspect ratio.
If displays are required to support different aspect ratios, such as PDA displays, custom displays should be designed
for this purpose.
The cache time is the time, in seconds, that the snapshot of display pages is kept and served to users. When a
page older than the cache time is requested, an updated page is served. Often the pages will not update very
frequently (for example monthly production records) therefore you do not require a new snapshot of the page
for each client that requests the page.
The cache time you specify will significantly affect the performance and scalability of eServer standard access.
Setting longer cache times allows the eServer to function mainly as a Web server, rather than forcing regular
requests to the eServer process database. As a Web server with few requests to the process database, standard
access can serve thousands of users. However, if used to provide a frequently updating view of process data, as
few as 10-20 users may be served.
The table below describes other settings you can change using the configuration tool. Information for these
settings is supplied during installation. Honeywell recommends that you do not change these settings.
Property
Description
Configuration file
The .stn file that defines the standard access connection to the eServer database. This is
preconfigured to point to the local database and to retrieve display files only from the
eServer display folder. You should not need to change this file.
Username
NA
Password
NA
URL of eServer machine
This is the URL that is used to access the eServer machine. This is set during installation.
Standard access Web root
directory
This is the folder that standard access uses to serve files out to clients. This is set during
installation.
If you change any of these settings, you need to restart your eServer computer.
473
CONFIGURING ESERVER
eServer security considerations
There are several security considerations you need to be aware of when setting up your eServer.
•
•
•
Securing access to the eServer by using IIS to restrict access for casual users and blocking access to your
connected Experion systems using firewalls.
The Station connections that occur when users access eServer (Station-based security for the eServer
administration Station and operator-based security for Premium Access users)
Restricting the data that can be viewed via eServer by assigning assets for all eServer Standard Access
clients and each Premium Access client.
Related topics
“Assigning scope of responsibility to Flex Stations” on page 338
“Configuring a trend” on page 367
“eServer home page” on page 478
“eServer configuration procedures” on page 472
Securing access to the eServer
By default, all users on the same network as your eServer have standard access privileges to the eServer. If you
want to restrict the access of certain users, you can use Internet Information Services (IIS) to secure the eServer.
For information about using IIS to restrict access, see the Network and Security Planning Guide.
You should also consider securing access to your connected Experion systems via the eServer. For example, you
could use a firewall between the eServer and your Experion system. For information about firewall settings for
eServers, see the Network and Security Planning Guide.
eServer Stations and operators
To facilitate the eServer serving pages to casual users, Station connections are required. During installation,
several Stations are defined. Two static Stations using Station-based security are created, one for administration
tasks that need to be done on the eServer, the other required for standard access. The remaining Stations are
rotary connections using operator-based security. These Station connections are required for premium access.
In addition to the Stations, an operator definition is created. The operator definition is locked with a security
level of View Only, which is a view-only security level.
Restricting access to assets
You assign assets to the eServer Stations and operators to restrict access to your Experion system. For example,
you may have sensitive data contained in a report to which casual users should not have access. Assign this
report to an asset which is only assigned to the appropriate operators.
474
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING ESERVER
Considerations for Standard Access displays
You can make your existing Experion process graphic displays available on eServer or optionally create
displays specifically for eServer. Displays can be DSP or HMIWeb. When providing or creating displays for
your eServer you should consider:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Because eServer users do not have access to the standard Station navigation aids, you need to create a home
page that provides adequate navigation to the displays that users can access via eServer. When creating
eServer displays, you therefore need to add navigation aids such as push buttons with display callup actions
or task requests that call up displays or hyperlink objects.
Controls that require interaction with the host system, such as combo boxes, do not work.
Do not use animation because standard access users will only see a static snapshot.
Not every kind of display can be viewed via eServer. For example, Alarm, Event, Message, and Alert
Summary displays use scripts and other interactive controls that are not available under 'view only' access.
Ensure that the information you put on a page can be displayed without scrolling. Scroll bars that appear in
displays are not active using standard access.
Alphanumeric data objects are used to display dynamic data. If you use alphanumerics, consider that the
data display will not update with standard access.
If you want to provide access to reports, consider the difference between calling up a report and requesting a
report. Users will only be able to call up a report.
There are various restrictions associated with the use of eServer: some are a consequence of eServer's 'view
only' access; some are associated with the use of the Web browser interface (as opposed to the Station
interface). For more information, see 'Actions permitted at each security level'.
475
CONFIGURING ESERVER
Considerations for Premium Access displays
eServer's 'view-only access' has a number of implications for Trend displays. The following table shows what
can and what cannot be done with Trend displays accessed through an eServer:
Action
Permitted?
View
Yes
Pause and restart trends
Yes
Use hairline
Yes
View trend with events
No
View trend with tabular history
No
Zoom
Yes
Scroll
Yes
Modify
Yes
Turning pre-configured pens off or on
Yes
Copy and paste trend data
Yes
Change the time period
Yes
Change the time interval
Yes
Change the chart type
Yes
Change the scale
Yes
Change the date and time
Yes
Configure
No
Add or remove trend pens
No
IIS support for EMF format images
If any of your custom displays make use of the Microsoft Windows Enhanced Metafile File (EMF) format
images in your shapes or displays, in order for them to show correctly when accessed through eServer, you must
enable IIS on the eServer computer to support the MIME type for EMF format images.
Attention
You must have Windows administrator permissions to perform this task.
To add the MIME type for EMF format images to IIS - Windows 2008
476
1
On the eServer computer, in the Windows Control Panel classic view, double-click Administrative Tools.
2
Double-click Internet Information Services(IIS) Manager.
The Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager window is displayed.
3
Expand the local computer, right-click the computer (eServer machine name) on which you want to add the
MIME type, and click Properties.
4
Click MIME Types.
5
Click New.
6
In the Extension box, type the file name extension emf.
7
In the MIME type box, type application/octet-stream.
8
Click OK.
9
Click Start > Run, type cmd, and then press ENTER to launch the command prompt.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING ESERVER
10 Type IISRESET, and then press ENTER.
11 Type exit, and then press ENTER.
To add the MIME type for EMF format images to IIS - Windows 7
1
On the eServer computer, in the Windows Control Panel large or small icon view, click Administrative
Tools.
2
Double-click Internet Information Services(IIS) Manager.
The Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager window is displayed.
3
In Features View, click the local computer (eServer machine name) on which you want to add the MIME
type.
The main panel displays available features on the local computer.
4
Double-click MIME Types.
The main panel displays MIME Types.
5
Click Add.
The Add MIME Type dialog box opens.
6
In the File name extension box, type the file name extension emf.
7
In the MIME type box, type application/octet-stream.
8
Click OK.
9
Restart the IIS service.
Click Start > Run.
The Run dialog box opens.
b Type cmd, and then press ENTER.
The command prompt launches
c At the command prompt, type iisreset, and then press ENTER.
IIS services are terminated, and IIS restarts.
d Type exit, and then press ENTER.
a
477
CONFIGURING ESERVER
eServer home page
eServer provides a default home page. The URL is http://<my
of the eServer computer. The home page provides access to:
•
•
•
server>/eServer
where <my
server>
is the name
The standard access home page. This HMIWeb page is located in the <install folder>\Honeywell
\Experion PKS\Client\System\R100\eServer folder, where <install folder> is the location where Experion
is installed, and can be modified to provide links to your commonly used standard access pages.
The download links for premium access. Premium access users need to download self-installing packages
for the premium access client to be able to access eServer pages.
The premium access home page. This is a HMIWeb page located in the <install folder>\Honeywell
\Experion PKS\Client\System\R100 folder, where <install folder> is the location where Experion is
installed, and can be modified to provide links to commonly used premium access pages.
After you have set up your eServer and created your displays, distribute the URL of the eServer home page to
your users. For example, you could send the URL as a link in an E-mail. Users can then bookmark the URL.
Related topics
“Assigning scope of responsibility to Flex Stations” on page 338
“Configuring a trend” on page 367
“eServer security considerations” on page 474
“eServer configuration procedures” on page 472
478
www.honeywell.com
File replication
The File Replication Service is a network file copying tool which is integrated with Experion. The File
Replication Service:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Copies user files between servers in a DSA system on schedule.
Copies user files from servers to clients on schedule.
Keeps folders synchronized between servers in a DSA system.
Synchronizes folders on clients with folders on their servers.
Keeps an entire folder sub-tree synchronized between servers and between a server and client.
Copies files from an Experion server to Console Stations.
Copies files from Experion server to Console Extension Stations
Related topics
“About Database and File Replication” on page 44
479
FILE REPLICATION
Understanding file replication
If you have Console Stations, you must use file replication so that alarm, message, alert, and event summary
views, category and attribute mapping files, and custom displays and shapes are replicated to Console Stations
from the Experion server.
The File Replication Service can also be used in large DSA systems to provide a reliable way to keep important
files, such as custom displays, synchronized between servers. For servers with large numbers of client
computers, it can improve client access by allowing displays and other files to be replicated to client computers.
File replication is complementary to Server Redundancy in Experion, and both should be used together in
redundant server systems. The File Replication Service does not copy any databases. If you have a redundant
server system, database synchronization is configured when you configure your system.
The File Replication Service is not intended for reports. The file replication feature for reports is automated by
the Experion reports subsystem. To include reports in the File Replication Service would result in duplicate
copies of report directories as well as needless allocation of system resources.
About file replication
A replication is an object in Experion configured for each Experion Server and which represents a set of files to
be copied from computer to computer. All replications are controlled and administrated by the Experion Server.
Each Experion Server has several preconfigured replications, which are created on the Server computer during
Experion installation, and configured using the File Replication display. Each Station computer, Console Station
computer, Station computer, or Client computer has the appropriate Experion preconfigured Windows network
shares for use with replications, and which are created appropriately on each computer, during its Experion
installation.
You can create and use custom replications, if required for your system configuration, by using the File
Replication display. However, you will also have to manually and locally create the appropriate Windows
network shares by using Windows File Explorer on each source and destination computer used in each custom
replication.
A replication:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Has a unique name (up to 16 characters) to differentiate it from all other replications.
Name must be the share name used on all computers participating in the replication. Note that Windows
network share names are case sensitive and must be spelled exactly the same where used.
Is configured separately at both the primary and backup servers, when used in a redundant server system.
Share name will match the name of the replication object on the server.
Has its own schedule and set of options for copying files.
Cannot copy files that are locked by the Windows operating system.
Servers can be both source and destination for files in a replication. The following figure shows three servers in
a distributed network. All three servers are both source and destination for the replication of user files.
480
www.honeywell.com
FILE REPLICATION
User Files
Server A
User Files
User Files
Server B
Server C
Figure 58: Source and destination servers in a DSA
A Console Station is a client and therefore only receives files. The following figures shows a server and two
Console Stations.ServerA is the source of all view files, category and attribute mapping files, and custom
displays.
Server A
Views
Category &
Attribute Mappings
Custom Displays
Views
Category &
Attribute Mappings
Custom Displays
Console Station 1
Console Station 2
Figure 59: Source server and Console Stations
481
FILE REPLICATION
File replication configuration checklists
The steps for configuring file replication vary depending on where file replication is required.
You configure file replications using:
•
•
•
The File Replication Summary display.
The File Replication Settings display.
Windows Explorer.
Related topics
“Checklist: File replication for DSA” on page 482
“Checklist: File replication for redundant servers” on page 482
“Checklist: File replication for Console Stations” on page 483
“Checklist: File replication for client computers” on page 484
“Checklist: File replication for a Console Extension Station” on page 484
“What other files should you synchronize?” on page 439
Checklist: File replication for DSA
For file replication to operate across a DSA system, the same name network share for each replication must
exist on every destination server in the DSA.
The All distributed servers option (when checked on the File Replication detail display page) for each
replication determines whether or not the File Replication Service attempts to replicate files from the source
Experion server to the distributed servers in the DSA.
Note that in this case, if any of the distributed servers are redundant, both the primary and backup servers in the
redundancy will receive the file replication.
If you manually select destination servers (by selecting the Specific PC's check box on the File Replication
detail display for the replication) that are redundant, you need to manually add both the primary and backup
servers to the destination list.
To configure File Replication Services for use in DSA, complete the tasks in the following order.
Task
Go to
Create a network share on the source Experion server for the
directory you want to replicate files from.
“Creating a network share on a server or
client computer” on page 485
If you have redundant server system, create a network share on
the backup server.
“Creating a network share on a server or
client computer” on page 485
Prepare each client computer to receive replicated files.
“Preparing client computer(s) to receive
replicated files” on page 488
Configure file replication on the source Experion server.
“Configuring replications on the source
Experion server” on page 486
If you have redundant server system, synchronize redundant
servers.
“Synchronizing the server databases” on
page 433
Done?
Checklist: File replication for redundant servers
You can use File Replication Services to copy other files such as custom displays and shapes (not included in
the redundancy process) from the primary server to the backup server.
482
www.honeywell.com
FILE REPLICATION
Tip
The redundancy process replicates system component information, and event archives.
Attention
Redundant servers must remain synchronized for file replication to be effective.
A network share with the same name must exist on both the primary and backup servers for file replication to operate.
To configure File Replication Services for use in redundant servers, complete the tasks in the following order.
Task
Go to
Create a network share on the primary server.
“Creating a network share on a server or
client computer” on page 485
Done?
Create a network share on the backup server.
“Creating a network share on a server or
client computer” on page 485
Configure file replication on the primary server.
“Configuring replications on the source
Experion server” on page 486
Synchronize redundant servers.
“Synchronizing the server databases” on
page 433
Checklist: File replication for Console Stations
When configuring File Replication Services for Console Stations, consider the following:
•
When you install Experion on your server, several replications are created automatically. These replications
are configured to copy files from the following folders to all Console Stations connected to the server:
–
<data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Server\Data\Views.
Contains view files for the Alarm, System Alarm, Alert, Message, Events, and SOE Summary displays.
– <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Server\Data\Mapping.
Contains notification, category and attribute mapping files.
– The folder where custom displays and shapes are stored. The default folder is <data
\Experion PKS\Client\Abstract, however, you can choose another folder.
folder>\Honeywell
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data
folder> is C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only
visible if you select the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options
dialog box. To change this setting in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options,
and then click the View tab.
•
If you store custom displays and shapes in a folder other than the abstract folder, you need to use a
unique name for the replication of the folder where you store your custom displays and shapes, for
example, CustomDisplays.
When you install Console Station, the network shares, views, mapping, and abstract, are automatically
created. This enables the Console Station to receive files from the replications that are automatically created
on the Experion server during installation. If you choose to store custom displays and shapes in a folder
other than the default, you must configure this folder on the Console Station as a network share with the
same name that was given to the replication on the source server.
To configure File Replication Services for Console Stations, complete the tasks in the following order.
Task
Go to
Create a network share on the source Experion server.
“Creating a network share on a server or client
computer” on page 485
Done?
483
FILE REPLICATION
Task
Go to
If you store custom displays and shapes in a different
location to <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS
\client\abstract, configure the folder where the custom
displays and shapes are stored as a network share on each
Console Station computer.
“Preparing client computer(s) to receive
replicated files” on page 488
Done?
Configure file replication on the source Experion server.
“Configuring replications on the source
Experion server” on page 486
Checklist: File replication for client computers
You can configure File Replication Services to copy files to any client computer, even if Experion client
applications are not installed on that computer.
To configure File Replication Services for client computers, complete the tasks in the following order.
Task
Go to
Create a network share on the source Experion server.
“Creating a network share on a server or
client computer” on page 485
Prepare each client computer to receive replicated files.
“Preparing client computer(s) to receive
replicated files” on page 488
Configure file replication on the source Experion server.
“Configuring replications on the source
Experion server” on page 486
Done?
Related topics
“Configuring a Console Extension Station to access custom displays on the Console Station” on page 54
Checklist: File replication for a Console Extension Station
You can use File Replication Services to copy custom displays from the Experion server to a Console Extension
Station. This ensures that custom displays are available on a Console Extension Station if the server is
unavailable.
To configure file replication for a Console Extension Station, complete the tasks in the following order.
484
Task
Go to
Create a network share on the source Experion server.
“Creating a network share on a server or
client computer” on page 485
Prepare the Console Extension Station to receive replicated files.
“Preparing client computer(s) to receive
replicated files” on page 488
Configure file replication on the source Experion server.
“Configuring replications on the source
Experion server” on page 486
www.honeywell.com
Done?
FILE REPLICATION
Creating a network share on a server or client computer
For each custom replication you must set up a network share on the source server and all destination servers and
client computers.
Prerequisites
•
You must be logged-in locally to the computer with an account that has privilege to create Windows network
shares, such as an Administrators group membership.
To create a network share
1
Open Windows Explorer and highlight the folder that you want to use as the share path for receiving files.
2
Right-click and select Properties.
3
Click the Sharing tab.
4
Do one of the following:
Operating System
Description
Windows Server 2008
1. Select Advanced Sharing.
2. Select the Share this folder check box.
Windows 7
5
Type the name of the share.
You must use the same name as the replication name on the server.
6
Click Permissions and add the mngr account, or the group containing the mngr account.
The Share Permissions dialog box opens.
7
Click Add, and then add the mngr account, or the group containing the mngr account.
8
In the Permissions for <Account or
check box on the Full Control row.
9
Click OK to apply the changes and close the Permissions dialog box.
Group>
area for the account or group you just added, select the Allow
10 Click OK to apply the changes and close the Properties dialog box.
485
FILE REPLICATION
Configuring replications on the source Experion server
The following procedure describes how to configure custom replications on the source Experion server.
Prerequisites
•
You must manually and locally create the appropriate Windows network shares on each source and
destination computer before configuring custom replications on the Experion Server, as intended for use in
each custom replication.
To configure replications on the server
1
In Station, choose Configure > File Replication.
2
To create a new replication, click a blank row. To edit an existing replication click the replication name. The
File Replication Settings display appears.
3
Complete the options as described in the following table.
Property
Description
Definition
Name
Type in a unique name for this replication, up to 16 characters (including
spaces).
This is used as the network share name when setting up the network shares
for custom replications. Note that when a replication name is entered,
Station performs a validation check to ensure that the network share exists
on the Experion Server. If the share name is invalid, a message appears
informing you to create the share.
This name identifies the replication across your system. The shares must
be created identically on all computers participating in this replication.
Path
Shows the file path where replication files exist. This path will be
automatically populated when you enter a valid share name in the Name
box. You cannot edit this path directly.
Replicate files from this path
Select this option, to have Station check the Send box automatically on the
File Replication summary page.
Designates the local server as the source for files in this replication, to be
replicated to destination computers.
Postpone replication if files are in use by
another application
Select this option to postpone file replication when the files are being used
by another application. For example, an Engineer may be working on some
files using Quick Builder, which places a lock on the files.
Experion will check the status of the locked file(s) every 10 seconds.
Replication will proceed when all files are unlocked.
Network bandwidth limit
Specify a limit to the rate at which files are replicated across the network.
It is used to stop a replication from consuming too much of the network
bandwidth. If set to None, files are transferred at maximum speed.
File selection
486
File mask
Use a file mask to specify files in the share path as part of this replication.
Files not matching the file mask are ignored on both the source and
destination computers. Leave blank to include all files in the replication.
Include subdirectories
If selected, copies all subfolders (subdirectories) of the share path. This is
useful in replicating an entire folder subtree.
www.honeywell.com
FILE REPLICATION
Property
Description
Overwrite existing files (even if newer)
If selected, overwrites the files at a destination server.
If cleared, files are still overwritten at the destination but only if they are
older.
Auto purge/mirror files (file mask will be If selected, deletes files at the destination that do not exist at the source.
cleared)
Any file mask you have specified is cleared if you select this option.
Destination
All console stations
Applicable only if you have Console Stations. Sends files in this
replication to all Console Stations connected to this server.
All distributed servers
If selected, sends files in this replication to all servers in the system
including any redundant pairs.
Note, if you do not have a DSA system, this option has no effect.
Attention
You should not use this option if the DSA nodes are not on the same
release and you are replicating directories holding specific data (for
example, an application compiled to work on a particular release, or
alarm/event views).
Specific PCs
If selected, sends files in this replication to the selected destination
computers. Type the names of all destination client computers (for
example, Console Extension Stations, or Flex Stations).
Note, when replicating to redundant servers, you must list both primary
and backup server names.
Note, when you input a computer name, Station performs a validation
check. The indicator light (next to each computer name) will change to
green when the computer is recognized on the network. A red indicator
light means the computer is not recognized.
Schedule
Replicate every day at
If selected, this replication runs on a daily schedule at the time you specify.
The time must be in 24-hour format.
Replicate automatically whenever files
change
If selected, the replication runs automatically whenever there is a change
on the share path. Note that replication process requires 5 seconds of
inactivity to initiate.
This option can cause the system to slow if changes occur often or the
folder in which changes occur has many files.
Failed replication raises alarm of priority: Sets the priority of alarms raised when replications fail. A journal level
alarm does not appear in the alarm summary but in the event log only.
4
Click Save to save the settings.
The Status indicator light changes to green and the Status description changes from Unconfigured to OK.
Replications with the All Console Stations check box selected automatically replicate to Console Stations
configured on this server.
487
FILE REPLICATION
Preparing client computer(s) to receive replicated files
Client computers are destinations for replicated files. They do not send files to the server.
A client computer does not need to have any Experion client software installed to receive replicated files. If a
client computer does not have Experion client software installed, the client computer must be accessible on the
network.
The steps for configuring replications on a client computer include:
•
•
Creating the Windows mngr account. If you have Console Station installed, the Windows mngr account
already exists.
Creating a network share for each replication defined on the server. The network share name must be
identical to the replication name on the server. If you have Console Station installed, the default shares
views, mapping, and abstract already exist.
To create the Windows MNGR account
1
Depending on your operating system, do one of the following:
Operating system
Description
Windows Server 2008
1. From the Start menu, right-click Computer and
choose Manage.
2. Expand the System tools > Configuration > Local
Users and Groups.
Windows 7
1. From the Start menu, right-click Computer and
choose Manage.
2. Expand the System Tools item then expand Local
User and Groups.
2
Click Users.
3
Choose Action > New User.
The New User dialog box opens.
4
In the User Name box, type MNGR.
5
In the Full Name box, type Experion
6
In the Password and Confirm Password boxes, type the password for this user.
The Windows mngr account password must be the same on all computers.
7
Clear the User must change password at next logon check box and then select the Password never
expires check box.
8
Click Create to add the account.
9
Close the Computer Management dialog box.
PKS Server Manager.
To create a network share
1
Open Windows Explorer and highlight the folder that you want to use as the share path for receiving files.
2
Right-click and select Properties.
3
Click the Sharing tab.
4
Do one of the following:
Operating System
Description
Windows Server 2008
1. Select Advanced Sharing.
2. Select the Share this folder check box.
Windows 7
5
488
Type the name of the share.
You must use the same name as the replication name on the server.
www.honeywell.com
FILE REPLICATION
6
Click Permissions and add the mngr account, or the group containing the mngr account.
The Share Permissions dialog box opens.
7
Click Add, and then add the mngr account, or the group containing the mngr account.
8
In the Permissions for <Account or
check box on the Full Control row.
9
Click OK to apply the changes and close the Permissions dialog box.
Group>
area for the account or group you just added, select the Allow
10 Click OK to apply the changes and close the Properties dialog box.
489
FILE REPLICATION
Running a file replication manually
Attention
The Purge button should be used with caution.It has the ability to delete data from destination servers and clients. It
should only be used when you want to mirror the share path to all destinations.
To run a file replication manually
•
Navigate to the File Replication Settings display and choose one of the following options:
•
•
•
Click Replicate Now on the File Replication Settings display. This runs the replication, as configured,
immediately.
Click Replicate All Now on the File Replication Summary display. This runs all configured replications
immediately.
Click Purge on the File Replication Details display. This runs the replication with the 'purge' option
selected. This means that all files on destinations that are not on the source are deleted at the destination.
This is useful if you want to mirror the source share path to destinations, that is, make the share paths at
the source and destination contain exactly the same files.
If you specify a file mask, using the Purge option does not delete any files on the destination server. You
need to manually delete any files on the destination that are not on the server.
490
www.honeywell.com
FILE REPLICATION
Automatic file replications
Replications configured to run automatically copy any additions or modifications to the share path of the
replication on destination servers without any user input. A background process runs which monitors the share
path constantly for changes in the file system. If a file is added or modified, the change is replicated to all
destinations immediately.
Automatic replications are useful for keeping folders synchronized with the same data across a distributed
system.
491
FILE REPLICATION
Checking the status of a replication
The File Replication Details and Configuration displays show the status of a replication. The status of a
replication can be:
Status
Description
Yellow (Running)
The replication is running and sending files.
Red (Failed)
Errors occurred the last time the replication ran.
Green (OK)
The replication ran without errors.
Black (Unconfigured)
The replication is not configured or is not configured correctly.
To check the status of a replication
•
Navigate to the File Replication Settings display and click View Report.
A report is created every time a replication runs. The report includes:
•
•
•
•
•
The time the replication ran
The duration of the replication
The number and names of files copied
The names of destination servers
Any errors encountered during the replication
The report is stored as a text file located in the <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Server\Data
folder with the name filrepnn.rpt, where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is
stored. For default installations, <data folder> is C:\ProgramData, where nn is the replication number.
\Report
The report file is overwritten every time a replication runs.
492
www.honeywell.com
FILE REPLICATION
Example file replication scenario: DSA with Console Stations
You have a DSA system set up as follows:
•
•
•
•
Three servers: Server1, Server2 and Server3.
One Console Station: ConsoleStation1.
One Console Extension Station: ConsoleExtnStn.
Two client computers: Client1 and Client2 connected to Server1.
You want user files in <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Server\User on Server1 to be replicated to
and Server3, ConsoleStation1, ConsoleExtnStn and Client1 and Client2.
Server2
Where <data
folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder> is
C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only visible if you select
the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog box. To change this
setting in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options, and then click the View tab.
The files on Server1 must be replicated once every day, automatically.
To set up file replication for Console Stations within a DSA system
1
2
Set up a network share on Server1 (the source server).
A prerequisite for configuring file replication is a network share. In Windows, set up a network share for
Server1 with the following settings:
Property
Value
Share Name
UserFiles
Set up a network share on Server2 and Server3 (destination servers).
In Windows, set up a network share for Server2 and Server3 with the following settings:
Property
Value
Share Name
UserFiles
Ensure the name is exactly the same as the replication name you specified
on Server1.
3
Prepare ConsoleStation1 to receive files from Server1.
You configure a Console Station to receive files in the same way you configure other client computers. In
Windows, prepare ConsoleStation1 to receive files from Server1.
For this particular scenario, configure ConsoleStation1 with the following network share settings:
Property
Value
Share Name
UserFiles
Ensure the name is exactly the same as the name you specified as the
replication name on Server1.
Share Permissions
mngr
Assign permission to the mngr account.
4
Prepare ConsoleExtnStn to receive files from Server1.
You configure a Console Extension Station to receive files in the same way you configure other client
computers. In Windows, prepare ConsoleExtnStn to receive files from Server1.
For this particular scenario, configure ConsoleExtnStn with the following network share settings:
493
FILE REPLICATION
Property
Value
Share Name
UserFiles
Ensure the name is exactly the same as the replication name you specified
on Server1.
Share Permissions
mngr
Assign permission to the mngr account.
5
Prepare Client1 and Client2 to receive files from Server1.
In Windows, prepare Client1 and Client2 to receive files from Server1.
For this particular scenario, configure Client1 and Client2 with the following network share settings:
Property
Value
Share Name
UserFiles
Ensure the name is exactly the same as the replication name you specified
on Server1.
Share Permissions
mngr
Assign permission to the mngr account.
6
Configure Server1 as the source server.
In Station, configure Server1 (the source server) to send files to all destination computers.
For this particular scenario, configure Server1 with the following settings:
Property
Value
Share Name
UserFiles
Once you enter the share name, validation is performed to ensure the share
has already been created.
Replicate files from this path
Select this option.
Sets Server1 as the source server.
All Console Stations
Select this option.
Sets ConsoleStation1 as a destination Console Station.
All distributed servers
Select this option.
Sets other servers in the DSA system as destination servers.
Client PCs named
Select this option. Type client1, client2, and ConsoleExtnStn in the
boxes provided.
Sets the named clients as destination clients.
Replicate every day at
Select this option. Type 23:30 in the box provided.
Schedules the file replication to take place automatically once every day at
the specified time.
The system is now ready to replicate user files.
To run a replication on demand, click Replicate now on the File Replication details page of Server1. Any
changes made to the user files folder on Server1 are automatically sent to Server2, Server3,
ConsoleStation1, ConsoleExtnStn, Client1, and Client2.
494
www.honeywell.com
FILE REPLICATION
Example file replication scenario: DSA with redundant servers
You have a DSA system set up as follows:
•
Four servers: HSCMyServer, HSCServerA and HSCServerB (a redundant pair) and HSCYourServer.
You want your custom displays and shapes to be replicated only to your redundant pair, HSCServerA and
HSCServerB.
Custom displays are stored in<data folder>\Honeywell Experion PKS\Client\Abstract, where <data folder>
is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder> is C:\ProgramData.
The files on HSCMyServer must be replicated whenever the files change.
To set up file replication for redundant servers within a DSA system
1
2
Set up a network share on HSCMyServer (the source server).
A prerequisite for configuring file replication is a network share. In Windows, set up a network share for
HSCMyServer with the following settings:
Property
Value
Share Name
Abstract
Set up a network share on redundant servers HSCServerA and HSCServerB (destination servers).
In Windows, set up a network share for HSCServerA and HSCServerB with the following settings:
Property
Value
Share Name
Abstract
Ensure the name is exactly the same as the replication name you specified
on HSCMyServer.
3
Configuring HSCMyServer as the source server.
Configure HSCMyServer (the source server) to send files to HSCServerA and HSCServerB.
For this particular scenario, configure HSCMyServer with the following settings:
Property
Value
Share Name
Abstract
Replicate files from this path
Select this option.
Sets HSCMyServer as the source server.
Specific PC's
Select this option. Type HSCServerA and HSCServerB in the boxes
provided.
Sets both the primary and backup servers as destination clients.
Replicate automatically whenever files
change
4
Select this option so that files are replicated whenever they are updated.
Synchronize HSCServerA and HSCServerB.
In order for file replication to work successfully, you must synchronize redundant servers before initializing
the replication process.
The system is now ready to replicate custom displays and shapes.
To run a replication on demand, click Replicate now on the File Replication details page on HSCMyServer.
Any changes made to the abstract folder on HSCMyServer are automatically sent to HSCServerA.
Automatic file replication from the primary to backup server initiates the subsequent file replication of the
abstract folder from HSCServerA to HSCServerB.
495
FILE REPLICATION
496
www.honeywell.com
Configuring schedules
This section describes how you configure:
•
•
Point control schedules
Holidays
Related topics
“Configuring shifts” on page 498
“Configuring holidays” on page 499
“About point control schedules” on page 500
“Configuring a point control schedule” on page 501
497
CONFIGURING SCHEDULES
Configuring shifts
Shift information is used in:
•
•
•
•
Point Control Schedules
Periodic Reports
Algorithms
Standard and Extended History storage
Prerequisites
•
You must be using a security level of SUPV or higher.
To configure a shift:
1
Type a time in the Start of Day box in the format HH:MM. (Start of day is the time since midnight on a 24
hour clock.)
CAUTION
Previously stored standard and extended history will not be re-calculated when or if the Start of Day is
modified.
2
Type a period in the Length of Shift box in the format HH:MM.
Related topics
“Standard history” on page 240
“Extended history” on page 240
“About moving history archives” on page 255
498
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SCHEDULES
Configuring holidays
You can configure the dates of up to 30 holidays.
Holiday information is used by Point Control Scheduler.
Prerequisites
•
You must be using a security level of SUPV or higher.
To configure holidays
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Schedules.
2
Click the Configure holidays task.
The Holiday Configuration display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
For each holiday you want to configure, type the date in the format DD-MMM-YY.
4
To download a holiday to controllers associated with access control, click the Download button.
499
CONFIGURING SCHEDULES
About point control schedules
Point Control Schedules are configured using Station displays. The following attributes can be configured for
each schedule:
•
•
•
•
The time and date of the point control
The point and point parameter to be controlled
The value to control the point parameter to
The schedule action
The schedule action can be one-shot, daily, work day, weekend, holiday, or a day of the week.
The number of schedules that can be configured is based on database sizing.
Configuration information that is related to the scheduling option is the configuration of holidays and shifts.
Considerations when adding a Point Control Schedule
The Point Control Scheduler runs once per minute to check if any scheduled controls should be performed.
Controls are performed sequentially. Therefore, if a large number of schedules are configured for the same time,
the last control request might be delayed. Depending on the channel capacity and the load from routine
scanning, it is possible that a number of Point Control Schedules configured for the same time may cause
channel overload or adversely impact communications performance. These factors should be assessed prior to
implementing Schedules.
Only one-shot and holiday schedules run on the holiday dates; all other schedule types are ignored. If you want
a point control to occur on a daily basis, you must also create separate schedules for holidays.
500
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SCHEDULES
Configuring a point control schedule
When configuring a point control schedule, consider the following:
•
•
You cannot add more than one schedule with the same point, date, and time. If you need to control more
than one parameter, for example, to set a point to manual before setting its value, add the schedules for each
parameter in sequence, a minute apart.
If you want a point control to occur each day, you need to configure both a daily schedule and a holiday
schedule for the point. Daily schedules do not occur on those days defined as holidays.
Prerequisites
•
You must have a security level of ENGR or higher.
To add a schedule:
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Schedules.
2
Click the Configure Point Control Schedules task.
The Point Control Schedules display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
Under Schedule Maintenance, set the properties as described in the table below.
4
When you have added all the schedule details, click Insert to add the schedule.
5
Select a reason from the Reason list.
6
Type your user name.
7
Type your password
8
Type the domain, if required.
9
Type any additional information in Comments.
10 Click OK.
Point control schedule properties reference
Property
Description
Date
The date that the schedule is performed.
Time
The time that the schedule is performed.
Point ID
The point ID of the point that is controlled by the schedule. If your system is
configured to use electronic signatures, you are required to provide a valid
user ID and password in order to add a point to a schedule.
Parameter
The point parameter of the point that is controlled by the schedule, usually
the OP (output).
For analog points, the SP, OP, MD, A1 - A4 parameters can be controlled.
For status points, the OP and MD parameters can be controlled.
You cannot schedule the control of a PV point parameter.
For flexible points, any writable numeric parameter can be controlled.
Target
The value that the point parameter is controlled to.
For analog points:
•
Type
The target value of the SP and OP parameters can be set to any value
between the SP and OP control limits respectively.
The type of schedule action.
501
CONFIGURING SCHEDULES
Schedule actions reference
Attention
•
•
Only One-shot and Holiday schedule actions run on the holiday dates. All other schedule types are ignored.
Exception type indicates only One-shot, Holiday or Exception schedule for a specified point parameter runs on the
exception date. All other schedule types are ignored.
Type
Description
One-shot
The control is performed when the scheduled date and time becomes equal to the current date and time,
then the schedule is deleted.
Daily
The control is performed when the scheduled date and time becomes equal to the current date and time
and the day has not been defined as a holiday. It is then re-scheduled for the following day at the same
time.
Work day
The control is performed when the scheduled date and time becomes equal to the current date and time,
if that is between Monday and Friday inclusive and the day has not been defined as a holiday. The
control is then re-scheduled for the following day at the same time to check for a work day condition.
Weekend
The control is performed when the scheduled date and time becomes equal to the current date and time,
if that is a Saturday or a Sunday and the day has not been defined as a holiday. The control is then rescheduled for the following day at the same time to check for a weekend condition.
Holiday
The control is performed when the scheduled date and time becomes equal to the current date and time,
if the day has been defined as a holiday. The control is then re-scheduled for the following day at the
same time to check for a holiday condition.
Monday Tuesday
Wednesday (and
so on through to)
Sunday
The control is performed when the scheduled date and time become equal to the current date and time
if it is the configured day of the week and the day has not been defined as a holiday. The control is then
re-scheduled for the following day at the same time to check for the specified day.
Deleting a point control schedule
To delete a schedule:
1
Specify the schedule you want to delete by clicking it in the display.
2
When the schedule you want to delete is displayed in the Schedule Maintenance boxes, click Delete.
Updating or copying a schedule
When updating a schedule, click the schedule you want to update (rather than manually typing in the
information in the Schedule Maintenance boxes).
To update a schedule:
502
1
Specify the schedule you want to update by clicking it.
2
In the Schedule Maintenance boxes, make your modifications.
3
Click Update.
4
Select a reason from the Reason list.
5
Type your user name.
6
Type your password
7
Type the domain, if required.
8
Type any additional information in Comments.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING SCHEDULES
9
Click OK.
To copy a schedule
1
Specify the schedule you want to copy by clicking it.
2
In the Schedule Maintenance boxes, make your modifications.
3
Click Insert.
4
Select a reason from the Reason list.
5
Type your user name.
6
Type your password
7
Type the domain, if required.
8
Type any additional information in Comments.
9
Click OK.
Filtering the Point Control Scheduler
You can filter the Point Control Scheduler to show schedules for a particular point ID.
To filter the Point Control Scheduler
1
Call up the Point Control Schedule display.
2
Select Only show point ID.
3
Specify the point ID you want to display schedules for.
The Point Control Schedule display shows schedules for the specified point only.
Tip
To remove the filter, select Show all.
503
CONFIGURING SCHEDULES
504
www.honeywell.com
Recipes
This section describes how you configure recipes.
A 'recipe' is a set of pre-configured values that can be loaded into one or more sets of point parameters. A set of
point parameters generally controls a 'unit', which is a set of equipment used to produce the recipe. A recipe can
be loaded into any units that share similar sets of points.
Recipes can consist of up to 30 ingredients. If more than 30 ingredients are required, you can chain individual
recipes together to form a larger recipe.
The Recipe Manager feature in Experion is designed as a simple way of downloading values to multiple point
parameters.
505
RECIPES
About recipe configuration
The total number of recipes that can be configured depends on the size of your database. For more information
about database sizing, see the .
For each recipe, the following attributes can be configured:
•
•
•
•
Recipe title
Scale factor for recipe ingredients (This can be specified by an operator.)
Descriptors of the units to be loaded with the recipe (This can be specified by an operator.)
Up to 30 ingredients (If more than 30 ingredients are required, you can chain recipes together.)
For each ingredient, the following attributes can be configured:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Partial ID of the point to be loaded (leaving out the 2-character unit prefix)
Parameter into which the value is to be loaded (usually a set point)
Description of the ingredient of action that it represents
Master value - the usual value that is loaded
Maximum value - the maximum allowable working value
Minimum value - the minimum allowable working value
Working value - the actual value to be loaded (can be specified by an operator)
Whether or not the value is scaled
After a recipe has been configured, operators can start the process by 'loading' the recipe. For details, see the
Operator's Guide.
You can use custom displays to monitor the progress of a loaded recipe. Custom displays can show the point
parameter values that are used to control the production. For details on how to build custom displays, see the
Display Building Guide.
To configure recipes, you need to be using Station at a security level of SUPV or higher.)
Depending on the channel capacity and the load from routine scanning, it is possible that recipes with large
numbers of steps may cause channel overload or adversely impact communications performance. These factors
should be assessed prior to implementing recipes.
Related topics
“Configuring system security” on page 303
506
www.honeywell.com
RECIPES
Considerations for configuring points for recipes
If a point will be in a recipe, the first two characters of the point ID must be the unit descriptor. The unit
descriptor is a 2-character identifier (for example 01, L7).
You need to configure a point for every combination of unit descriptor and ingredient that you want to use. For
example, if two units ('01' and '02') are to be used with a recipe that contains the ingredient WATER, the points
01WATER and 02WATER need to be configured.
You can also configure an analog point with the name uuRECIPE, where uu is the unit descriptor. Whenever a
recipe is run, uuRECIPE's SP and description are updated to reflect the recipe's number and name respectively.
Attention
For some controllers, you need to set the mode of points in the controller to allow control by programs such as recipes.
For example, the mode attribute (MODEATTR) for PID blocks in the Experion Process Controller must be set to
Program to allow control by recipes.
When the operator loads a recipe, Experion determines the point ID to be loaded by combining the unit
descriptor defined for the recipe with the partial point IDs defined for each ingredient. The following figure
shows how the unit descriptor and points in the recipe are used.
Unit (Descriptor Entered by Operator
or Engineer)
Point IDs to Be Loaded (Configured in
Database by Engineer)
Recipe 3
Unit 02
02WATER SP 95.0
Point Parameter Working Value
WATER SP 95.0
ACID SP 50.0
START OP 1.0
Load
02ACID SP 50.0
02START OP 1.0
Partial IDs for Ingredient Points
(Entered by Engineer)
Figure 60: How points are used with recipes
507
RECIPES
Configuring recipes
To configure a recipe:
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, expand Advanced Options and click Applications.
2
Click the Configure Recipes task.
The Recipe Summary display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
To work with an existing recipe, click its number or title. This calls up the Recipe Detail display.
4
To create a new recipe, click an unassigned row. When the blank Recipe Detail display opens, type the
appropriate information.
Related topics
“Recipe properties” on page 508
“Recipe ingredients properties” on page 508
Recipe properties
The options that define the recipe are:
Property
Description
Title
The title that appears on the Recipe Summary display.
Description
A fuller description of the recipe than can be displayed in the title.
Scale
The scale factor for the recipe. Ingredients in a recipe can be scaled to less
than 100% so that a partial recipe quantity can be produced. When the recipe
is loaded, all ingredients with Scaled set to 'Yes' are scaled by the percentage
specified. This percentage can be changed by anyone using the OPER
security level or higher.
Unit
The descriptor of a unit to which the recipe can be loaded.
Related topics
“Configuring recipes” on page 508
Recipe ingredients properties
You can define up to 30 ingredients in a recipe. If there are more than 30 ingredients, you need to divide the
process into 2 or more recipes and chain them together.
The options that define the recipe are:
508
Property
Description
Point
The last 38 characters of the point ID to be loaded (the first two characters
are taken from the unit descriptor).
Parameter
The point parameter to be loaded.
Description
A description of the ingredient. This description will be used in custom
reports.
Master
The usual value for the ingredient. This value is for operator information.
Minimum
The minimum value for the ingredient. If an operator enters a value that is
less than the minimum value, then the minimum value is used.
www.honeywell.com
RECIPES
Property
Description
Maximum
The maximum value for the ingredient. If an operator enters a value that is
greater than the maximum value, the maximum value is used.
Working
The value to be loaded. If Scaled is set to 'Yes' for this ingredient, this value
will be scaled by the percentage specified for the Scale option for the recipe.
This option can be changed by anyone using the OPER security level.
Scaled
Type Yes if the working value should be scaled by the Scale percentage.
Otherwise type No.
Begin/Continue/End Comboboxes
If the recipe consists of 30 ingredients or less, set the box above the list of
ingredients to BEGIN and the box at the bottom of the display to END. See
“Chaining recipes” on page 509 for details on using the Continue option.
Related topics
“Configuring recipes” on page 508
“Chaining recipes” on page 509
Chaining recipes
If more than 30 ingredients are required in a recipe, you need to divide the process into 2 or more recipes, which
you enter in sequence and chain together.
Prerequisites
•
Only an individual with a security level of SUPV or higher can chain recipes.
To chain two recipes
1
In Recipe 1, select BEGIN in the top combobox, and select CONTINUED in the bottom combobox.
2
In Recipe 2, select CONTINUED in the top combobox, and select END in the bottom combobox.
Related topics
“Recipe ingredients properties” on page 508
509
RECIPES
510
www.honeywell.com
Event Archiving
Every event, such as a point status change or an operator action, is stored in an event database. The event
database stores events for a specified period of time. Using Event Archiving, you can archive these events to a
network file server or to a disk where they can be stored for future retrieval and reporting.
For information on archiving events or restoring events from archive, see the Operator's Guide.
Events are collected in an Experion system database file. Periodically events are copied from the Experion
system database to the Microsoft SQL Server event database for queries and reporting. Events are archived from
the SQL Server database according to a schedule you specify. You can set up automatic archiving or you can set
an alarm to alert an operator to archive events. Events are kept in the SQL Server event database for a period of
time you specify. When the time period expires, the oldest events are progressively deleted.
The status (success or failure) of the archive is logged in the Event Summary, and the operator is notified with a
message.
If necessary, you can also perform an early archive (that is, before the scheduled archive or the low disk space
limit is reached). You can restore an archive of events at any time and use standard Experion reports to access
this information.
Related topics
“Restoring history archives” on page 256
511
EVENT ARCHIVING
Methods of archiving
Event Archiving allows you to archive events to a local disk or a network file server.Honeywell recommends
that you use your offline backup or archive strategy to backup the generated event archive files on the local disk
or network file server. For example, you can copy the generated event archive files to other media, such as CD
or tape, or include them in your system backup. For more information about system backup see the Backup and
Restore Guide.
For details about configuring a suitable tape device, see the Microsoft Windows documentation.
Performance considerations
There is a relationship between the number of events retained in the SQL Server event database and the
performance of the Experion system. The more events retained, the greater the negative impact on CPU
performance of the server. You should always keep them to a minimum. When considering the number of days
to retain events online, you should identify the minimum number of events to the meet the business
requirements for reporting. You can always restore event archives to meet your ad-hoc reporting requirements.
Space requirements
You require a base value of 10 MB of disk space for events online, plus additional disk space for each event.
You also require a base value of 10 MB of disk space for each event archive, plus additional disk space for each
event.
Attention
Experion will run a disk space check prior to creating an event archive. If the amount of free disk space is inadequate,
no archive will be created.
To estimate the disk space requirements, you need to know the following:
•
•
•
An estimate of the events generated per day.
The duration that events are to be kept online.
An average event size (2000 bytes per event).
Use the following formula to calculate the estimated disk space requirements both for events online and for each
event archive:
((number_of_events * duration) * average_event_size) + 10 MB
Example
You estimate your system generates 3000 events per day. You want to keep events online for 31 days. This is
the formula to estimate the disk space requirements for events online:
((3000 events * 31 days) * 2000 bytes) + 10 MB = 196 MB
In this example, you require 196 MB of disk space for events online.
In addition to events online, you also need to calculate the disk space requirements for each event archive.
You use the same formula to calculate the disk space for each event archive. For example, if you schedule
automatic archiving once every week, this is the formula to estimate the disk space requirements for each
event archive:
((3000 events * 7 days) * 2000 bytes) + 10 MB = 52 MB
In this example, you require 52 MB of disk space per event archive.
512
www.honeywell.com
EVENT ARCHIVING
Attention
These calculations are only a guide.
Related topics
“Configuring event archiving” on page 515
“Event archiving configuration properties” on page 515
“Event Archiving status” on page 516
Restored events
You can restore archived events so that they are available for reporting and can be viewed on the Event
Summary. You restore events from FileSystem, which may be a folder on the server disk itself or a designated
network file server. The Event Archiving Operations display lists restored archives.
For instructions on restoring events, see the Operator's Guide.
513
EVENT ARCHIVING
Configuring event tamper detection
You can configure your reports to check if event data has been added, modified, or deleted by anything other
than the normal Experion processes. If tampering is detected, a list of tampered events is included in the report.
To enable tamper detection for a report
514
1
Call up the Report Configuration Summary display.
2
Click the report for which you want to enable tamper detection.
3
Click the Content tab.
4
Select the Check for tampering of event data returned from archives check box.
www.honeywell.com
EVENT ARCHIVING
Configuring event archiving
You use Configuration Studio to configure Event Archiving as described below.
Prerequisites
•
•
•
To perform event archiving operations, the Windows account of the logged on user, must be a member of the
group.
When restoring an archive the group must have file system read access to the archive file.
You have estimated space requirements to prevent loss of data.
To configure Event Archiving
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click Alarm and Event Management.
2
Click the Configure Event Archiving task.
The Event Archiving Configuration display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
In the Keep events online for box, specify the amount of time you want to keep events online.
The Disk space required at current event rate updates as you change the length of time you want to keep
events online.
4
In the Raise alarm if disk space falls below box, specify the minimum disk space that is allowed.
If disk space falls below this value, an alarm is raised.
5
Select the Create an archive check box, and specify how often you want event archiving to occur.
6
If you want archiving to occur automatically click the Start automatically option button. If you want an
alarm to prompt an operator to commence archiving, click the Raise a Time to archive alarm option
button.
7
In the Create archive in directory box, specify where the events are to be archived.
The Windows mngr account needs write access to this directory.
8
If an alarm is to be raised when archiving is required, set the priority of the alarm from the Time to archive
list.
9
Set the priority of the alarm that is raised if event archiving fails from the Event archiving error list.
Related topics
“Space requirements” on page 512
“Event archiving configuration properties” on page 515
“Event Archiving status” on page 516
Event archiving configuration properties
Property
Description
Online Events
Keep events online for:
The period of time events are kept online before being deleted. You can specify the
time period in days, weeks or months.
The maximum value is six months.
Disk space required at current
event rate:
The estimated disk space required based on the current event rate and the time period
events are kept.
Raise alarm if disk space falls bel
ow:
The minimum disk space allowed before an alarm is raised.
Event Archiving
515
EVENT ARCHIVING
Property
Description
Create an archive:
Enables archiving at the time you specify. You specify the time of day on a daily,
weekly or monthly basis.
The maximum value is six months.
When archive is due:
Sets the action taken when archiving is due. You can set up automatic archiving or to
raise an alarm when archiving is due.
Create archive in directory:
Specifies the folder to archive events to. The default is blank. You must type a valid
path to enable event archiving to function correctly.
Alarm Priorities
Time to archive:
Applicable if you are raising an alarm when archiving is due. Sets the priority of the
alarm raised.
Event archiving error:
Sets the priority of the alarm if archiving is in error.
Privacy
Delete access events older than:
Enables access event expiry. Access events are deleted when they are older than the
number of days you specify.
Related topics
“Configuring event archiving” on page 515
“Space requirements” on page 512
Event Archiving status
The status of event collection and archiving is shown on the Event Archiving Operations display. The status can
be:
Status
Description
OK
Event collection and archiving is operating as required.
Overload
Events collection is overloaded. If this state continues for extended periods of time contact
Honeywell support.
Failed
Events collection has failed.
Full Disk
There is not enough disk space to continue events collection. Events collection is stopped until there
is sufficient disk space available.
Synchronizing
Events collections is temporarily stopped while servers are synchronizing.
Related topics
“Configuring event archiving” on page 515
“Space requirements” on page 512
516
www.honeywell.com
Configuring OPC
The following topics describe how to configure Experion OPC options.
Related topics
“Experion OPC Options” on page 518
“About OPC” on page 521
“About Experion-to-OPC Server/Client communications” on page 522
“Recommended topologies for redundant OPC servers” on page 524
“Guidelines for developing a compatible OPC DA Server” on page 526
“Connecting to a third party OPC AE Server” on page 527
“Configuring the Experion OPC Advanced Client” on page 528
“Configuring the Experion OPC Display Data Client” on page 540
“Accessing data from the Experion OPC Server” on page 542
“Accessing data from the Experion OPC Historical Data Access Server” on page 557
“Accessing data from the Experion OPC Alarm and Event Server” on page 559
“Experion OPC Integrator” on page 562
“Using Redirection Manager with Experion OPC clients” on page 574
517
CONFIGURING OPC
Experion OPC Options
Experion provides the following OPC options, each of which has been optimized for a particular purpose:
Related topics
“Experion OPC Client Interface” on page 518
“Experion OPC Advanced Client” on page 518
“Experion OPC Display Data Client” on page 519
“Experion OPC Server” on page 519
“Experion OPC Historical Data Access Server” on page 520
“Experion OPC Alarm and Event Server” on page 520
“Experion OPC Integrator” on page 520
Experion OPC Client Interface
The Experion OPC Client Interface is primarily designed for integrating low-complexity subsystems, such as
controllers. Configuration involves individually mapping OPC items to standard Experion points (analog, status
and so on). If you require alarming for an item, you must configure the associated point's alarm properties.
If your system has redundant third-party OPC servers, the OPC Client interface can be used as it natively
supports the concept of preferred and secondary servers. However, Honeywell recommends that you use
Redirection Manager when communicating with redundant third-party OPC servers, as it can give better
performance during OPC server failover, because it builds OPC groups on both OPC servers.
For more information about the Experion OPC Client Interface, see the OPC Client Interface Reference.
Experion OPC Advanced Client
The Experion OPC Advanced Client includes a data client, and an alarm and event client for connection to
third-party OPC servers.
If your system has redundant third-party OPC servers, Experion Redirection Manager (RDM) should also be
installed and used. RDM is the only way to provide redundancy with the Experion OPC Advanced Client.
For information about installing and configuring Redirection Manager and the System Management runtime
component, see : Experion “Installing Redirection Manager” in the Supplementary Installation Tasks Guide.
Attention
It is preferable for the third-party OPC servers to run in a dual active mode rather than an active-passive mode.
Experion OPC Advanced Data Client
The Experion OPC Advanced Data Client is primarily designed for integrating complex subsystems, such as
distributed control systems. Such systems typically have point-like structures, that is, complex data structures. It
is based on the OPC Foundation Data Access Specification Version 2.05.
OPC items are mapped to OPC advanced points. You build OPC advanced points in Quick Builder. The OPC
advanced point allows you to create arbitrary point parameter names to reference OPC items. The OPC
advanced point also allows you to have more than 8 scanned parameters. The scanned parameters can also have
user-defined names.
After you have built your OPC advanced points, you can add these points to trends, custom displays, group
displays, just as you can with other point types in Experion.
If you want alarms, you need to use the OPC Advanced Data Client in conjunction with the OPC Advanced
Alarm And Event Client.
518
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING OPC
Experion OPC Advanced Alarm and Event Client
The Experion OPC Advanced Alarm and Event Client enables Experion to receive alarms and events from
third-party OPC alarm and event servers. It is based on the OPC Foundation Alarm and Events Specification
Version 1.0.
OPC alarms are displayed and acknowledged in the same way as Experion alarms, giving operators a uniform
user interface. For example, when an OPC alarm is received, it appears in the Alarm Summary; and when an
operator acknowledges the alarm, confirmation of the acknowledgement is sent to the OPC alarm and event
server.
Experion OPC Display Data Client
The Experion Display Data Client is designed to be used when you want to add OPC data to custom displays
and you have no requirement for other information such as history or alarms. It supports the OPC Foundation
Data Access Specification.
If your system has redundant third-party OPC servers, Experion Redirection Manager (RDM) should also be
installed and used. RDM is the only way to provide redundancy with the Experion OPC Display Data Client.
For information about installing and configuring Redirection Manager and the System Management runtime
component, see 'Installing Redirection Manager' in the Supplementary Installation Tasks Guide .
Attention
It is preferable for the third-party OPC servers to run in a dual active mode rather than an active-passive mode.
You can add OPC data items directly to custom displays without having to build points in Quick Builder.
Attention
The Experion Display Data Client does not support:
•
•
•
•
•
Alarming
History
Server Scripting
Microsoft Excel Data Exchange
Reports
Experion OPC Server
The Experion OPC Server gives an OPC client read/write access to Experion point parameters. It is based on the
OPC Foundation Data Access Specification, and can accept connections from OPC clients.
The Experion OPC Server supports all mandatory OPC interfaces, including an automation interface for
application development in Visual Basic, as well as the IOPCBrowseServerAddressSpace interface. For more
information on the automation interface, see the OLE for Process Control Standard.
If your system has redundant third-party OPC servers, Experion Redirection Manager (RDM) should also be
installed and used. RDM is the only way to provide redundancy with the Experion OPC Server.
For information about installing and configuring Redirection Manager and the System Management runtime
component, see 'Installing Redirection Manager' in the Supplementary Installation Tasks Guide.
Attention
It is preferable for the third-party OPC servers to run in a dual active mode rather than an active-passive mode.
519
CONFIGURING OPC
Experion OPC Historical Data Access Server
The Experion OPC Historical Data Access Server (HDA) gives an OPC client access to Experion point
parameter history. It supports the OPC Historical Data Access Specification.
If your system has redundant third-party OPC servers, Experion Redirection Manager (RDM) should also be
installed and used. RDM is the only way to provide redundancy with the Experion OPC Historical Data Access
Server.
For information about installing and configuring Redirection Manager and the System Management runtime
component, see 'Installing Redirection Manager' in the Supplementary Installation Tasks Guide.
Attention
It is preferable for the third-party OPC servers to run in a dual active mode rather than an active-passive mode.
Experion OPC Alarm and Event Server
The Experion OPC Alarm and Event Server allows an OPC alarm and event client to receive alarm and event
information from Experion. It supports the OPC Foundation Alarm and Event Specification.
If your system has redundant third-party OPC servers, Experion Redirection Manager (RDM) should also be
installed and used. RDM is the only way to provide redundancy with the Experion OPC Alarm and Event
Server.
For information about installing and configuring Redirection Manager and the System Management runtime
component, see 'Installing Redirection Manager' in the Supplementary Installation Tasks Guide.
Attention
It is preferable for the third-party OPC servers to run in a dual active mode rather than an active-passive mode.
Experion OPC Integrator
The Experion OPC Integrator (OPCI) is designed to allow data to be transferred bi-directional between two or
more OPC servers. The following scenarios illustrate typical uses of the Experion OPC Integrator:
•
•
•
You have a system that provides an OPC server, but not an OPC client. However, the system needs to
retrieve data from Experion.
Experion data needs to be transferred to a third-party OPC server whenever it changes, irrespective of the
reason for the change (including when the data is changed by an operator).
You have Experion Process controllers and need to transfer data efficiently between the controllers at the
supervisory control layer.
CAUTION
Do not use OPC Integrator to transfer safety or mission critical information between controllers. For this type
of information, use a method that directly transfers information between controllers.
For more information about the Experion OPC Integrator, see “Experion OPC Integrator” in the Station
Planning Guide.
OPC Integrator supports redundant Experion servers, and is therefore itself redundant, and also supports
redundant third-party OPC servers.
If your system has redundant third-party OPC servers, OPCI can be used to manage the redundancy. However,
Honeywell recommends that you use Redirection Manager when communicating with redundant third-party
OPC servers, as it can give better performance during OPC server failover, because it builds OPC groups on
both OPC servers.
520
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING OPC
About OPC
OPC (OLE for Process Control) consists of a set of standards that define COM interfaces to be observed by
OPC clients and servers. (The COM interfaces are based on Microsoft's COM/OLE technology.)
These standards were established by the OPC Foundation to foster greater inter operability between automation
and control applications, field systems and devices, and business and office applications. (For detailed
information about OPC, visit the OPC Foundation's Web site, http://www.opcfoundation.org.)
OPC provides data from a data source (server) and communicates the data to any client application in a standard
way, thereby eliminating the requirement for an application to have specific knowledge about a particular data
source, such as its internal structure and communications protocols.
About the OPC Data Access standard
The OPC Data Access Standard does not have a concept of hardware or points—there are just items (units of
data in the data source).
Transferring data
To receive items from the OPC server, the OPC client must gather one or more items into a group. The OPC
client requests the OPC server to create a group with a client-specified maximum update rate and a deadband.
The OPC client then requests the OPC server to add items to the group. The update rate and the deadband of a
group apply to all items in that group. The support of deadband by an OPC server is optional. (Although the
OPC client can specify any update rate for a group, the OPC server decides whether the request is honored.)
Callback
Generally, the OPC server sends data to OPC clients using a callback technique.
After a group has been created, the OPC server creates a cache for the group, which is updated according to the
group's update rate. The OPC server only sends updated values to the OPC client for items in the group if there
has been significant change since the last cache update. (What constitutes 'significant' is based on the group's
deadband.)
The callback technique significantly reduces traffic between the OPC client and the OPC server because there is
no need for periodic read requests to the OPC server. An OPC client gets data whenever there is a significant
change (which is defined by the OPC client).
Synchronous read request
The OPC client can obtain data from the OPC server by sending synchronous read requests to the OPC server,
independent of the server callbacks. The OPC client specifies whether the data should come from the OPC
server's internal cache or from the field/hardware device.
About OPC performance counters
Experion OPC server supports a selection of performance counters in Windows Performance Monitor to help
you troubleshoot issues with the OPC server.
For information about configuring Windows Performance Monitor, see the topic titled "Configuring the
Performance Monitor" in the System Administration Guide.
521
CONFIGURING OPC
About Experion-to-OPC Server/Client communications
This section provides an overview of the way in which Experion OPC servers and clients communicate with
third-party OPC clients and servers.
The accounts used to communicate with third-party OPC clients and servers were set up when installing
Experion.
Communicating with third-party OPC clients
The following figure shows a typical setup where you have an Experion OPC server.
When the OPC client wants to communicate with the Experion OPC server, it connects to the server computer
using an account on the server computer that belongs to the group. (This group has the DCOM security
permissions required to access the OPC server.)
Conversely, when the Experion OPC server wants to communicate with the OPC client, it connects to the
remote computer using the mngr account on that computer.
Server Computer
Remote Computer
Experion Server
Third-party OPC Client
Experion
OPC Server
Windows Security
DCOM Security
Windows Security
Requests (account belongs to
Product Administrators group)
Callbacks/Notifications (mngr account)
Communicating with third-party OPC servers
The following figure shows a typical setup where you have an Experion OPC client (data or alarm/event).
When the Experion OPC client wants to communicate with the third-party OPC server, it connects to the remote
computer using the mngr account on that computer, and accesses the OPC server via DCOM security.
Conversely, when the third-party OPC server wants to communicate with the Experion OPC client, it connects
to the server computer using an account on the server computer that belongs to the group.
522
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING OPC
Server Computer
Remote Computer
Experion Server
Third-party OPC Server
Experion
OPC Client
DCOM Security
Windows Security
Windows Security
Callbacks/Notifications (account belongs to
Product Administrators group)
Requests (mngr account)
Firewall security
The Microsoft Windows operating system includes a firewall. By default, the firewall is enabled and will reject
any OPC connections.
If you are connecting to third-party OPC servers, you need to modify the default Windows security settings to
allow OPC connections.
DSA data access
The Experion OPC server enables you to access Experion server data such as history, event, and point data. In
an Experion Distributed System Architecture (DSA) system, the Experion OPC server on the local Experion
server can access point parameter data on all servers in the system.
523
CONFIGURING OPC
Recommended topologies for redundant OPC servers
The following figures show the recommended topologies for redundant OPC servers.
Communication can occur over either redundant Ethernet links or Honeywell's Fault Tolerant Ethernet (FTE).
Redirection Manager (RDM) provides transparent connection between OPC clients and redundant OPC servers.
The System Management runtime component communicates with RDM to enable it to identify which of the
redundant servers is running as the primary server.
For information about installing and configuring Redirection Manager and the System Management runtime
component, see 'Installing Redirection Manager' in the Supplementary Installation Tasks Guide.
Attention
Redirection Manager (RDM) should be configured to connect to the same OPC Server on A and B servers.
Third-party OPC
Client
System
Management
runtime
Redirection
Manager
System
Management
runtime
System
Management
runtime
Experion Server
Experion Server
Figure 61: Third-party OPC client with redundant Experion servers
524
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING OPC
Experion OPC
Client
System
Management
runtime
Redirection
Manager
System
Management
runtime
System
Management
runtime
Third-party OPC
Server
Third-party OPC
Server
Figure 62: Experion OPC client with redundant third-party OPC servers
525
CONFIGURING OPC
Guidelines for developing a compatible OPC DA Server
This section includes guidelines to help you build OPC DA servers that are as compatible with Experion as
possible.
It is important that OPC DA Server follows the OPC Specification and supports all compulsory interfaces such
as Device Read.
Read performance
The OPC specification defines requirements for connectivity, but does not specify things like acceptable alarm
performance. This could lead to a situation where integration may work at a functional level, but the
performance may be so bad that it is totally unacceptable.
Use these benchmarks as a guide to what is acceptable performance:
•
•
•
Device Read of 500 items should take less than 2 seconds.
Adding 500 items to an OPC group should take less than 2 seconds.
Reading the attributes of 500 items takes less than 2 seconds.
If an OPC call takes longer than the timeout value, the Experion OPC Client will assume the OPC server is not
responding and will disconnect then attempt a reconnect. Obviously, this situation should be avoided.
Case sensitivity
The Experion OPC Client handles items in a case-sensitive manner, in accordance with the OPC specification. It
is up to the OPC Server to determine if OPC items are treated with case sensitivity or not.
Related topics
“Configuring the Experion OPC Advanced Client” on page 528
526
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING OPC
Connecting to a third party OPC AE Server
Attention
Although the OPC AE specification provides guidance on how to transfer alarms and events using OPC, it is not
prescriptive. As a result, there are different interpretations of the OPC AE specification by third-party OPC AE server
vendors.
The risks with OPC simple and tracking events are lower than for OPC condition events. However, due to different
interpretations of the OPC AE standard, integration issues may still be found. Thorough testing between the Experion
OPC client and third-party server should be performed to ensure correct operation.
Related topics
“Configuring the Experion OPC Advanced Client” on page 528
527
CONFIGURING OPC
Configuring the Experion OPC Advanced Client
To use the Experion OPC Advanced Client, you must first configure a connection to the third-party OPC server.
Complete the tasks in the following order.
Prerequisites
•
The third-party OPC server is compatible with the Experion OPC Advanced Client. See the topics titled
"Guidelines for developing a compatible OPC DA Server" and/or "Connecting to a third party OPC AE
Server."
Tasks
Task
Go to:
Configure the OPC server connection (data and alarm/event).
“Configuring the OPC server
connection” on page 528
Map OPC alarms/events to Experion alarms/events.
“Mapping OPC alarms/events
to Experion alarms/events” on
page 531
If you are configuring the client for alarms/events, select the Notifications check
box on the Status tab to start processing OPC alarms/events.
If you are configuring the client for data only, build OPC advanced points in
Quick Builder.
Quick Builder Guide
If Stations are set up to monitor specific assets, set up the appropriate Stations to
monitor the assets you have assigned to the OPC server.
“Assigning scope of
responsibility to Flex Stations”
on page 338
Related topics
“Configuring the OPC server connection” on page 528
“Configuration tab” on page 529
“Attribute Mapping tab” on page 530
“Asset Mapping tab” on page 530
“Tuning tab” on page 530
“Status tab” on page 531
“Mapping OPC alarms/events to Experion alarms/events” on page 531
“Required OPC AE server behavior” on page 533
“Mapping simple events to condition events” on page 533
“Mapping OPC Honeywell-specific attributes to source or description” on page 533
“Attaching displays to alarms” on page 534
“Live value display” on page 534
“Interfaces and methods used by the Experion Advanced Client” on page 534
“Supported OPC event attributes” on page 536
“Guidelines for developing a compatible OPC DA Server” on page 526
“Connecting to a third party OPC AE Server” on page 527
Configuring the OPC server connection
This procedure is applicable to both data and alarm/event servers.
•
528
You must be logged on to Station with ENGR or mngr security level to perform this task.
www.honeywell.com
Done?
CONFIGURING OPC
•
•
When you configure asset or attribute mapping, you must disable notifications.
OPC AE server source names must obey Experion point naming conventions for legal characters.
To configure the OPC server connection
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Interfaces.
2
Click the Configure system interfaces task.
The System Interfaces display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
In an empty row select OPCADVNCE from Type and click OPCADVNCE in the Alias column to call up the
System Interface configuration displays.
4
Click the following tabs and configure the properties as appropriate:
•
Configuration tab
•
“Attribute Mapping tab” on page 530
•
“Asset Mapping tab” on page 530
(The Tuning tab properties are automatically adjusted to be compatible with the Experion server's global
cache settings. The Status tab provides status information about the connection.)
Configuration tab
The Configuration tab specifies the connection details for an OPC data server (Data Source properties) and an
OPC alarm/event server (Notification Source properties).
Property
Description
Server Identity
Server Alias
The name of the connection. This name is used in alarms and events
generated for this connection and also appears in the Location pane of the
System Status display.
Data Source
Network Name
The name of the network on which the OPC data server resides.
Server ProgID
The ProgID of the OPC data server.
Notification Source
Network Name
The name of the network on which the OPC alarm/event server resides.
Server ProgID
The ProgID of the OPC alarm/event server.
Configuration Options
Date/time data from OPC use local time
(instead of UTC time)
If the Date/time data that the OPC Server sends out are in local time, then
check this checkbox. If the Date/time data that the OPC Server sends out are
in UTC, then clear this checkbox.
Scope of Responsibility
Associated asset
The asset that an operator must have access to in order to see system alarms
from this system interface. If you leave the associated asset field empty, the
system alarms for this system interface will be seen by anyone who has
access to the system alarms for the server on which this system interface is
configured.
For more information, refer to “Assigning access to system alarms” on
page 353.
Related topics
“The Experion OPC Server ProgID” on page 542
“Mapping Experion Alarm and Event properties to OPC notification properties” on page 559
529
CONFIGURING OPC
“OPC Integrator Group Details tab” on page 567
Attribute Mapping tab
The Attribute Mapping tab specifies how the OPC server attributes (alarm/event) are mapped to Experion
attributes.
Every time you change the mapping file name, you should disable the notification connection and then reenable it so that the OPC Advanced Client loads the new mapping file.
Property
Description
Notification Category and Attribute Mapping
Mapping File
The name of the XML file that defines the mapping of OPC alarm/events to
Experion alarms/events. See “Mapping OPC alarms/events to Experion
alarms/events” on page 531.
Asset Mapping tab
The Asset Mapping tab specifies how areas defined on the OPC server (alarm/event) are mapped to Experion
assets. (When Experion receives alarm/event from the OPC server, it is automatically assigned to the
appropriate Experion asset.)
Before you can map OPC areas to Experion assets, you must first define the Experion assets.
Property
Description
Map all OPC areas to this default
assignable asset
Maps all OPC areas to the default Experion asset. Select this if areas have not
been defined on the OPC server.
Use assignable assets as defined on the
OPC server (direct mapping)
Automatically maps OPC areas to Experion assets with the same name.
Map OPC areas as follows
Individually map OPC areas to Experion assets.
Attention
The tag names of the Experion asset must exactly match the OPC areas.
If there is no matching Experion asset for an OPC area, Experion will
not correctly process data or alarms/events from that area. The
Experion asset must be an assignable asset.
Tuning tab
The Tuning tab specifies the communication-related properties of the connection.
Attention
The tuning properties are automatically adjusted to be compatible with the Experion server's global cache settings.
You should only change them if you have been instructed to do so by Honeywell support personnel, or you have
extensive experience with system interfaces.
Property
Description
Data Settings
530
Cache flush time
The intervals (in milliseconds) that the subscription list is checked for
references to old data.
Cache age time
The amount of time (in milliseconds) old data remains in the dynamic cache.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING OPC
Property
Description
Maximum subscription time
The slowest subscription time (in milliseconds). If the subscription time is
slower than that specified, the subscribing server switches from subscription
to synchronous read (polls). Maintaining a slow subscription is not efficient.
Connection Time-out
The maximum time (in seconds) the Experion server allows for a data request
to complete. If the connection times out, a connection failure is recorded and
a new connection is attempted.
List fragment size
The size of data packets sent over the network. This is tuned for optimal
performance on low bandwidth links.
Drift Deadband
The OPC server only sends an updated value to the Experion server if the
value has changed by the deadband percentage since the last update.
Notification Settings
Connection time-out
The amount of time (in seconds) a packet of data can remain on the network
without being acknowledged. When the time-out period expires, the
connection is broken and communication is initiated again.
Notification buffer interval
The maximum amount of time (in seconds) a notification can be delayed on
the publishing server before being sent to the subscribing server.
Notification keep alive interval
The maximum amount of time (in seconds) the publishing server does not
send packets to the subscribing server. If there are no notifications within this
time, an empty keep alive packet is sent to the subscribing server.
List fragment size
The size of data packets sent over the network. This is tuned for optimal
performance on low bandwidth links.
Status tab
The Status tab provides status information about the connection. It also contains the following controls:
•
•
Notifications check box which enables/disables notifications (alarm/events) from the OPC alarm/event
server
Reset Statistics button
Mapping OPC alarms/events to Experion alarms/events
When you create the OPC server connection, Experion defines the name for a mapping file, the name of which
is based on the server alias. Experion creates this file only when you first connect to the OPC server. This
mapping file, which is an XML file, defines the event types on both the Experion server and the OPC server.
The mapping file includes two parts:
•
•
Experion event type definitions (delineated by the element pair)
OPC server event type definitions (delineated by the <configuration> and </configuration> element pair)
Attention
The following pre-configured XML mapping files delivered with Experion should not be modified:
•
iec61850.xml
•
sysmgt.xml
•
teleperm.xml
•
tps.xml
•
urt.xml
531
CONFIGURING OPC
To map OPC alarms/events to Experion alarms/events
1
In Station choose Configure > System Hardware > System Interfaces.
2
Click the OPC server connection.
3
Click the Status tab.
4
Clear the Notifications check box.
This blocks incoming alarms/events from the OPC server.
5
Click the Attribute Mappings tab and note the name of the mapping file.
6
In Windows Explorer, locate the mapping file in the <data folder>\Honeywell\Experion PKS\Server\Data
folder, and open the file in a text editor such as Notepad.
Where <data folder> is the location where Experion data is stored. For default installations, <data folder>
is C:\ProgramData. The C:\ProgramData folder is a system folder, which means that it is only visible if you
select the Show hidden files, folders, and drives option button in the Folder Options dialog box. To
change this setting in Windows Explorer, click Organize > Folder and search options, and then click the
View tab.
\Mapping
7
8
Specify appropriate values for the “mapto” attributes of the OPC event types and save the file.
The mapping from OPC severity to Experion priority is defined using the following line in the XML file:
<severity journalLimit=”399” lowLimit=”599” highLimit=”799”/> This instance of the XML shows the
default mappings. You can change the OPC severity to Experion priority mapping by changing the numbers
in the XML. The default mappings in full are shown in the following table:
OPC Severity
Experion Priority
1–399
Journal priority
400–599
Low priority
600–799
High priority
800–1000
Urgent priority
In Station, navigate to the Status tab of the OPC server connection and select the Notifications check box.
Attention
Do not change or rename the mapping file once the Notification Link is established.
Example
The following extract from an XML file contains an Experion alarm called “Process Alarm” and an OPC
alarm called “Level”.
<configuration>
<category name="Level" type="Condition" mapto="">
<attribute name="AckComment" mapto="" />
<attribute name="Areas" mapto="" />
.
.
</category>
</configuration>
In order to map the “Level” alarm to the “Process Alarm”, you would edit the definition of “Level” as
follows:
<category name="Level" type="Condition" mapto="Process Alarm">
<attribute name="AckComment" mapto="Comment" />
<attribute name="Areas" mapto="Asset name" />
.
.
</category>
532
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING OPC
Required OPC AE server behavior
When an OPC AE server sends notifications from the OPCEventSubscription via the OnEvent callback, the
following members of the OPC AE Server ONEVENTSTRUCT’s must meet the following requirements:
•
•
•
ftActiveTime: This is the time that the condition became active. All condition-related events such as RTNs
for the same condition must specify the same ftActiveTime.
dwSeverity: The event severity (1 to 1000) is an indication of the urgency of the condition. All conditionrelated events such as RTNs for the same condition must specify the same severity. The event severity is an
indication of the urgency of the condition and NOT the urgency of the condition-related event.
szConditionName: The condition text can be a maximum of 30 characters.
Redirection Manager supports the management of third-party OPC Alarm and Event Servers, with the following
constraints:
•
•
As part of the switchover, the RDM refreshes each of the Active server’s subscriptions. This method call
forces refresh event notifications for all active conditions and all inactive but unacknowledged conditions.
RDM Alarm and Event clients must be able to handle these unsolicited (that is, not requested directly by the
client) refresh event notifications.
Individual conditions of both the Primary and alternate servers must carry the same cookie value and the
same timestamp value. This is required so that when a switchover occurs, the client receiving the unsolicited
refresh events from the alternate can determine that these events are simply refreshed copies of events
previously received from the Primary server.
Mapping simple events to condition events
If you want to map simple events to condition events, you modify the simple event entry to include the
'forcemapping' keyword. By default the condition field is filled in with the category name. This can be
overridden with the 'conditionname' keyword when used in conjunction with the forcemapping keyword:
<category name="System Configuration" type="Simple" mapto="System Alarm" forcemapping="true"
conditionname="SYSCON" >
<attribute name="AckComment" mapto="Comment" />
<attribute name="Areas" mapto="Area name" />
<attribute name="Attribute1" mapto="Value" />
<attribute name="Attribute2" mapto="" />
<attribute name="Attribute3" mapto="" />
</category>
After mapping, the simple events are treated as condition events; acknowledgement of the events is handled
inside Experion.
No remote acknowledgements are sent to the OPC Server. Acknowledging the converted alarms and messages
will be successful when the connection status to the OPC AE server is OK. If the connection status to the OPC
AE server is not OK, acknowledging the converted alarms and messages will fail, with a 'Remote
acknowledgement failed' warning message.
When recovery and refresh happens, the existing converted events will not disappear from the Alarm Summary
or the Message Summary.
Mapping OPC Honeywell-specific attributes to source or description
“Source” and “Message” are standard attributes defined by the OPC Alarms and Events Specification. When a
system interface to an OPC Server is configured in Experion, these two attributes are automatically mapped to
and shown as “Source” and “Description” in the Alarm and Event Summary displays.
However, in certain circumstances, the Source and Message standard attributes may not contain the desired
values—in which case the desired values may actually be stored in some Honeywell-specific attributes.
533
CONFIGURING OPC
To make the data in Honeywell-specific attributes appear correctly under the Source and Description columns in
Alarm and Event Summary summary displays, you need to modify the attribute mapping file as follows:
Modify the “mapto” property for the desired Honeywell-specific attributes. For example, if you want to map
“TagName” to Source and “Description” to Description:
<category name="SOE" type="Simple" mapto="SOE">
<attribute name="AckComment" mapto="" />
<attribute name="Areas" mapto="" />
<attribute name="Description" mapto="Description" />
<attribute name="TagName" mapto="Source" />
</category>
Attaching displays to alarms
There are three link attributes in the Experion A&E schema that you use to attach appropriate displays, such as
detail and associated displays, to alarms.
The attribute provided by the A&E server can have any name but it needs to be added to the mapping file.
The following example specifies that the 'display' attribute is to be mapped to link 1, and that link 1 is the detail
display (LinkType=6):
<category name="SOE" type="Simple" mapto="SOE">
<attribute name="AckComment" mapto="" />
<attribute name="Areas" mapto="" />
<attribute name="Display" mapto="Link 1" />
<attribute name="{%LinkType%}" mapto="Link 1 Type" LinkType="0x0006" />
</category>
This example specifies that MyAssocDsp is mapped to link 1, and that link 1 is the associated display
(LinkType=2):
<category name="SOE" type="Simple" mapto="SOE">
<attribute name="AckComment" mapto="" />
<attribute name="Areas" mapto="" />
<attribute name=" MyAssocDsp" mapto="Link 1" />
<attribute name="{%LinkType%}" mapto="Link 1 Type" LinkType="0x0002" />
</category>
These links are generic URLs so, in the HMIWeb displays the attribute must have the following syntax:
page:SysDtlTps?HSCPoint=21PCA21
where SysDtlTps is the name of the detail, and 21PCA21 is the point name.
Live value display
Experion can look at the live state of a given alarm. It will try to determine this value by looking at the source
name, and combining that with a Honeywell-specific attribute sent by the OPC AE server which indicates the
parameter associated with a given alarm.
The following maps the “LiveValueItem” attribute to “Data access item”, which is used to check the live value.
<category name="SOE" type="Simple" mapto="SOE">
<attribute name="AckComment" mapto="" />
<attribute name="Areas" mapto="" />
<attribute name=" LiveValueItem" mapto="Data access item" />
</category>
Interfaces and methods used by the Experion Advanced Client
The following tables list the interfaces and methods used by the Experion Advanced Client.
534
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING OPC
Table 23: Interfaces and methods used by the Experion OPC Advanced Data Client
Interface
Methods
IEnumOPCItemAttributes
Next
IEnumString
Next
Reset
IOPCAsyncIO2
Refresh2
IOPCBrowseServerAddressSpace
BrowseOPCItemIDs
ChangeBrowsePosition
QueryOrganization
IOPCCommon
SetClientName
IOPCDataCallback
OnDataChange
IOPCGroupStateMgt
SetState
IOPCItemMgt
AddItems
CreateEnumerator
RemoveItems
SetActiveState
IOPCItemProperties
GetItemProperties
LookupItemIDs
QueryAvailableProperties
IOPCServer
AddGroup
GetErrorString
GetStatus
RemoveGroup
IOPCSyncIO
Read
Write
Table 24: Interfaces and methods used by the Experion OPC Advanced Alarm and Event Client
Interface
Methods
IConnectionPoint
Advise
Unadvise
IConnectionPointContainer
FindConnectionPoint
IOPCEventSink
OnEvent
Table 25: Interfaces and methods required by an OPC server to support the Experion OPC Alarm and Event Advanced Client
Interface
Methods
IConnectionPoint
Advise
Unadvise
IConnectionPointContainer
FindConnectionPoint
IOPCEventAreaBrowser
BrowseOPCAreas
GetQualifiedAreaName
535
CONFIGURING OPC
Interface
Methods
IOPCEventSubscriptionMgt
Refresh
SelectReturnedAttributes
SetFilter
SetState
IOPCServer
AckCondition
CreateAreaBrowser
CreateEventSubscription
GetStatus
QueryEventCategories
QueryEventAttributes
Supported OPC event attributes
OPC events can be of type simple, tracking or condition. Each OPC event has its own OPC category. An OPC
category is a grouping of events supported by an OPC alarm and event server.
In order for Experion to interpret OPC events, each OPC category must be mapped into an Experion alarm and
event category. The following table shows the Experion alarm and event categories, the type of OPC events that
can be mapped into that category and which Summary displays the OPC event will appear on.
Experion alarm and event category
OPC event type
The summary display the OPC event will
appear on
Batch event
Simple
Event
Confirmable message
Conditional
Message
Informational message
Conditional
Message
Operator change
Tracking
Event
Procedure event
Simple
Event
Process alarm
Conditional
Alarm
Process alert
Conditional
Alert
Process event
Simple
Event
Simple alert
Simple
Event
SOE
Simple
SOE
System alarm
Conditional
System Status
System change
Tracking
Event
System event
Simple
Event
Notes
•
•
Alarms, alerts, messages and SOEs are also written to the Experion event journal.
Confirmable messages are only supported from Honeywell OPC Alarm and Event servers.
When each OPC category is mapped to an Experion alarm and event category, the attributes of the OPC event
associated with that category must be mapped to an Experion attribute (an attribute is a field of the OPC event).
Each attribute represents a column on the Summary displays.
All OPC events consist of a set of standard attributes. Implementers of OPC alarm and event servers may
choose to provide additional attributes with event notifications. These are called Honeywell-specific attributes.
536
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING OPC
The following table lists Experion alarm and event attributes, the data type of the alarm and event attribute and
which standard OPC event attributes are mapped to the Experion alarm and event attributes.
Experion alarm and
event attribute
Experion data type
OPC data type
Mapped to standard or
Honeywell-specific
OPC attribute
Notes
Action
Text (8 chars)
WORD
Standard
(wChangeMask)
Actor
Text (50 chars)
LPWSTR
Standard (szActorID)
Alarm Shelving
Reason
Text (30 chars)
VT_BSTR
Honeywell-specific
Alert Accessibility
Short Integer
VT_I2
Honeywell-specific
Area code
Short Integer
VT_I2
Honeywell-specific
Asset Name
Text (40 chars)
VT_BSTR
Honeywell-specific
Author
Text (50 chars)
VT_BSTR
Honeywell-specific
Block
Text (30 chars)
VT_BSTR
Honeywell-specific
Category
DWORD
DWORD
Standard
(dwEventCategory)
Changed Time
FILETIME
VT_DATE
Standard (ftTime)
Classification
Text (20 chars)
VT_BSTR
Honeywell-specific
Comment
Text (50 chars)
VT_BSTR
Honeywell-specific
Condition
Text (30 chars)
LPWSTR
Standard
(szConditionName)
Connection Number
Short Integer
VT_I2
Honeywell-specific
Criticality
WORD
WORD
Standard (wCriticality)
Description
Text (132 chars)
LPWSTR
Standard (szMessage)
EE Init ID
64-bit Integer
VT_I8
Honeywell-specific
Event ID
64-bit Integer
VT_I8
Honeywell-specific
Execution ID
64-bit Integer
VT_I8
Honeywell-specific
Field Time
FILETIME
VT_DATE
Honeywell-specific
Field Time Bias
Short Integer
VT_I2
Honeywell-specific
Flags
WORD
WORD
Honeywell-specific
Host Time
FILETIME
VT_DATE
Standard
(ftActiveTime)
Host Time Bias
Short Integer
VT_I2
Honeywell-specific
IOLim EE
Short Integer
VT_I2
Honeywell-specific
Limit
Double
VT_R8
Honeywell-specific
Link1
Text (128 chars)
VT_BSTR
Honeywell-specific
Reserved
Link1 Type
Short Integer
VT_I2
Honeywell-specific
Reserved
Link2
Text (128 chars)
VT_BSTR
Honeywell-specific
Reserved
Link2 Type
Short Integer
VT_I2
Honeywell-specific
Reserved
Link3
Text (128 chars)
VT_BSTR
Honeywell-specific
Reserved
Link3 Type
Short Integer
VT_I2
Honeywell-specific
Reserved
Data Access Item
Journal Only
537
CONFIGURING OPC
Experion alarm and
event attribute
Experion data type
Parameter
OPC data type
Mapped to standard or
Honeywell-specific
OPC attribute
VT_BSTR
Honeywell-specific
Previous Value
VARIANT
VARIANT
Honeywell-specific
Previous Value Type
Short Integer
VT_I2
Honeywell-specific
Priority
WORD
WORD
Standard (dwSeverity)
Quality
WORD
WORD
Standard (wQuality)
Reason
Text (60 chars)
VT_BSTR
Honeywell-specific
Received Delay
DWORD
DWORD
Honeywell-specific
Sequence ID
64-bit Integer
VT_I8
Honeywell-specific
Severity
DWORD
DWORD
Standard (dwSeverity)
Signature 2 Level
Short Integer
VT_I2
Honeywell-specific
Signature 2 Meaning
Text (24 chars)
VT_BSTR
Honeywell-specific
Signature Meaning
Text (24 chars)
VT_BSTR
Honeywell-specific
Source
Text (40 chars)
LPWSTR
Standard (szSource)
Source Entity Name
Text (40 chars)
VT_BSTRxx
Honeywell-specific
Station
Text (30 chars)
VT_BSTR
Honeywell-specific
Subcondition
Text (30 chars)
LPWSTR
Standard
(szSubConditionName
)
Transaction
64-bit Integer
VT_I8
Honeywell-specific
Units
Text (12 chars)
VT_BSTR
Honeywell-specific
Value
VARIANT
VARIANT
Honeywell-specific
Value Type
Short Integer
VT_I2
Honeywell-specific
Notes
Shelved
OPC severity mapping
OPC severity (1–1000)
538
Experion scale
Priority
Subpriority (0-15)
950
Urgent
12
900
Urgent
8
850
Urgent
4
800
Urgent
0
750
High
12
700
High
8
650
High
4
600
High
0
550
Low
12
500
Low
8
450
Low
4
400
Low
0
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING OPC
OPC severity (1–1000)
Experion scale
Priority
Subpriority (0-15)
350
Journal
12
300
Journal
8
250
Journal
4
200
Journal
0
100
1
Event
539
CONFIGURING OPC
Configuring the Experion OPC Display Data Client
This section describes how to set up the Experion OPC Display Data Client.
Prerequisites
•
You must be logged on to Station with ENGR or mngr security level to perform this task.
To configure the OPC server connection
1
In the Configuration Explorer of Configuration Studio, click System Interfaces.
2
Click the Configure system interfaces task.
The System Interfaces display appears in the System Display tab in Configuration Studio.
3
In an empty row, select OPCDISPLAY from the Type list and click the blue dash (-) in the Alias column to
call up the System Interface configuration displays.
4
In the Server Alias box, type the alias to use for this connection.
Experion creates a point with the same name to hold the OPC data item.
5
In the Network Name box, type the name of the OPC server you are connecting to.
6
In the Server ProgID list, select the program ID of the OPC server you are connecting to.
7
In the Raw item point asset box, click the ellipses to change the location of where the point with the same
name as the alias that holds the OPC data items is located in the asset tree.
8
If the Date/time data that the OPC Server sends out are in local time, then check the Date/time from OPC
use local time (instead of UTC time) checkbox. If the Date/time data that the OPC Server sends out are in
UTC, then clear this checkbox.
9
In the Associated asset box, click the ellipsis button (...) to specify the asset that an operator must have
access to in order to see system alarms from this system interface. If you leave the associated asset field
empty, the system alarms for this system interface will be seen by anyone who has access to the system
alarms for the server on which this system interface is configured.
Next steps
•
After you have configured the OPC Display Data Client you can add OPC data to custom displays.
Related topics
“Assigning access to system alarms” on page 353
“The Experion OPC Server ProgID” on page 542
Adding OPC data to a custom display
To add OPC data to a custom display
1
540
Start HMIWeb Display Builder:
•
If you are on the Experion server, choose Start > All Programs > Honeywell Experion PKS > Server
> HMIWeb Display Builder
•
If you are on a client computer, choose Start > All Programs > Honeywell Experion PKS > Client
Software > HMIWeb Display Builder
2
Choose File > New > Display.
A blank display appears.
3
Click the (Alphanumeric) icon on the Toolbox toolbar and then drag the pointer on the display to define
the size, shape and position of an alphanumeric.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING OPC
4
Click the
5
Under the Data Binding Properties ensure that Point/Parameter is selected in Database link.
6
In the Point box, type the OPC server alias.
7
In the Parameter box, type the OPC item you want to display.
8
Configure the other properties as appropriate.
9
Repeat the previous steps for other items you want to include in the display.
(Properties) icon to diplay the object's properties
Mapping OPC data types to Experion data types
OPC data from the OPC server is sent inside a variant. The following table shows how the variant data types
map to Experion data types.
Other variant types are stored as a variant in the Experion database. Their value can be accessed through the
API but not displayed in Station.
If the data type is numeric and has enumerated data attached, the Experion data type will be an enumeration. In
this case it is possible to access either the numeric index or the associated string value.
541
CONFIGURING OPC
Accessing data from the Experion OPC Server
This section describes information about the structure of Experion data and the Experion OPC Server that is
required when configuring your OPC client to access data from the Experion OPC Server.
To learn about
See the
Installing and setting up the third-party OPC client
components
Supplementary Installation Tasks Guide
Changing read/write permissions
Supplementary Installation Tasks Guide
The following topics describe how to access data from the Experion OPC Server.
Related topics
“The Experion OPC Server ProgID” on page 542
“Formats for accessing Experion data” on page 542
“Interpreting enumerated parameters” on page 543
“Update rates and deadbands for items” on page 543
“Specifying the model used in the browse address space” on page 543
“About the browse address space” on page 543
The browse address space represents your system by using one of two models.
“OPC-accessible status point parameters” on page 545
“OPC-accessible analog point parameters” on page 548
“OPC-accessible accumulator point parameters” on page 552
“OPC-accessible flexible point parameters” on page 555
“Error codes and qualities” on page 555
The Experion OPC Server ProgID
To connect to the Experion OPC Server you need to know the ProgID.
The ProgID of the Experion OPC Server is HWHsc.OPCServer.
Related topics
“Configuring the Experion OPC Display Data Client” on page 540
“Tuning Redirection Manager for use with OPC Advanced Client and OPC Display Data Client” on page 574
“Tuning Redirection Manager for use with OPC Client Interface” on page 575
“Configuration tab” on page 529
“Mapping Experion Alarm and Event properties to OPC notification properties” on page 559
“OPC Integrator Group Details tab” on page 567
Formats for accessing Experion data
In order to access Experion data, you need to build OPC items using the following format:
For details about building items, see the documentation supplied with your OPC client.
542
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING OPC
Examples
Interpreting enumerated parameters
An enumerated parameter is one that contains an integer value and a string. The Experion OPC Server supports
two methods of accessing enumerated parameters:
•
•
The parameter is written and/or read as text. (For this method to work, the parameter must be configured
with its enum property selected.)
The parameter is written and/or read as an integer. The server reads/writes the integer value, and it is the
responsibility of the client to convert the integer value into text if required.
Attention
If you build an item for which enumeration makes no sense, an empty string is returned.
Update rates and deadbands for items
Attention
Deadband functionality has not been implemented for the Experion OPC server.
An update rate can be associated with each item or group.
The update rate is the fastest rate at which the Experion OPC Server will notify the OPC client of changes in
data.
The client may automatically determine the update rate, or you may need to configure it. You can normally
specify any update rate in the client; however, specifying high rates will increase the load on the server and the
connecting network. If the load is too high, the server will not return data at the requested rate.
Specifying the model used in the browse address space
You can specify how the Experion OPC Server presents the browse address space. The alternatives are
presenting the enterprise model or the asset-point model.
To specify which model is used in the browse address space
1
From the System Configuration Menu display, click Server Wide Settings.
The Server Wide Settings display appears.
2
On the General tab select the Use Enterprise Model hierarchy when OPC clients browse into Server
address space check box.
Clear the check box to use the asset-point model.
Related topics
“About the browse address space” on page 543
The browse address space represents your system by using one of two models.
About the browse address space
The browse address space represents your system by using one of two models.
You can choose which model best represents your system whenever OPC clients browse the address space. See
the topic titled "Specifying the model used in the browse address space" for information on how to specify
which model is used.
543
CONFIGURING OPC
To see which point parameters you can access on the Experion OPC Server, browse the address space for that
server.
Enterprise model
This is the default model. Use this model to browse systems that contain multiple levels of assets, alarm groups,
and networks.
The enterprise model provides a hierarchical view of the assets and points on your Experion server. The first
level consists of Alarm Groups, assets, and system components. The first level assets then expand to show
assets as defined in your Asset Model.
Note that an OPC client cannot browse items within 'Unassigned Items.' (Experion uses Unassigned Items to
group points that have not yet been fully configured and assigned to assets.)
If you use the enterprise model, the name format used is the full item name, for example, /ASSETS/
DRIFT_AL_ASSET_ITEM/DRIFT_DB_STA161.PV. The following figure shows an example of how points and
parameters are shown in the browse address space using the enterprise model.
Figure 63: Enterprise model
Asset-point model
Some older OPC clients display only two levels of assets. Use this model when you need to accommodate those
clients. This model browses assets and points in a non-hierarchical, flat asset structure. The model does not
show other items, such as alarm groups and networks.
The asset-point model provides a list of all assignable assets. The assets then expand to show points associated
with each asset. If you use the asset-point model, CPM, CEE, and IOM hardware points are not shown in the
browse address space. To access these points you need to build OPC items using the format:
Point.block.parameter [/enum]
The following figure shows an example of how points and parameters are shown in the browse address space
using the asset-point model. Only two levels of assignable assets and points can display in this model.
544
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING OPC
Figure 64: Asset-point model
Related topics
“Specifying the model used in the browse address space” on page 543
OPC-accessible status point parameters
The following tables list the parameters for status points that can be accessed via the Experion OPC Server. The
tables also specify each parameter's OPC type, access type and whether it is enumerated.
Parameter
OPC type
OPC access
Enumerated?
PV
VT_I4
Yes
Mode
VT_I4
Yes
EUHI
VT_I2
EULO
VT_I2
OP
VT_I4
Asset
VT_I4
Read-only
Point ID
VT_BSTR
Read-only
Description
VT_BSTR
LastProcessedDate
VT_I2
LastProcessedTime
VT_I2
Yes
Yes
545
CONFIGURING OPC
546
Parameter
OPC type
OnScan
VT_I2
AlarmValue
VT_I4
ControlLevel
VT_I2
AlarmDisabled
VT_I2
PVInError
VT_I2
Read-only
ModeInError
VT_I2
Read-only
OutputInError
VT_I2
Read-only
State0Descriptor
VT_BSTR
State1Descriptor
VT_BSTR
State2Descriptor
VT_BSTR
State3Descriptor
VT_BSTR
State4Descriptor
VT_BSTR
State5Descriptor
VT_BSTR
State6Descriptor
VT_BSTR
State7Descriptor
VT_BSTR
TargetPVforOPState0
VT_I4
Read-only
Yes
TargetPVforOPState1
VT_I4
Read-only
Yes
TargetPVforOPState2
VT_I4
Read-only
Yes
TargetPVforOPState3
VT_I4
Read-only
Yes
EnterToZone
VTI2
InputStateforOutputState3
VT_I4
Read-only
Yes
PVAlgoNumber
VT_I2
Read-only
PVAlgoBlock
VT_I2
Read-only
ActionAlgoNumber
VT_I2
Read-only
ActionAlgoBlock
VT_I2
Read-only
UnackAlarmExists
VT_I2
AlarmPriority
VT_I4
Yes
ControlFailAlarmPriority
VT_I4
Yes
State0AlarmPriority
VT_I4
Yes
State1AlarmPriority
VT_I4
Yes
State2AlarmPriority
VT_I4
Yes
State3AlarmPriority
VT_I4
Yes
State4AlarmPriority
VT_I4
Yes
State5AlarmPriority
VT_I4
Yes
State6AlarmPriority
VT_I4
Yes
State7AlarmPriority
VT_I4
Yes
DefaultAlarmSubPriority
VT_I2
ControlFailAlarmSubPriority
VT_I2
State0AlarmSubPriority
VT_I2
State1AlarmSubPriority
VT_I2
State2AlarmSubPriority
VT_I2
www.honeywell.com
OPC access
Enumerated?
Read-only
Yes
CONFIGURING OPC
Parameter
OPC type
State3AlarmSubPriority
VT_I2
OPC access
Enumerated?
State4AlarmSubPriority
VT_I2
State5AlarmSubPriority
VT_I2
State6AlarmSubPriority
VT_I2
State7AlarmSubPriority
VT_I2
AssociatedDisplay
VT_BSTR
AssociatedDisplayDefault
VT_BSTR
InstructionDisplay
VT_BSTR
InstructionDisplayDefault
VT_BSTR
AlarmMessageIndex
VT_I2
REALARM
VT_I2
PVExternalChangeAlarmEnable
VT_I2
MDExternalChangeAlarmEnable
VT_I2
OPExternalChangeAlarmEnable
VT_I2
SPExternalChangeAlarmEnable
VT_I2
State0AlarmEnabled
VT_I2
State1AlarmEnabled
VT_I2
State2AlarmEnabled
VT_I2
State3AlarmEnabled
VT_I2
State4AlarmEnabled
VT_I2
State5AlarmEnabled
VT_I2
State6AlarmEnabled
VT_I2
State7AlarmEnabled
VT_I2
NumberOfInputStates
VT_I2
Read-only
NumberOfOutputStates
VT_I2
Read-only
NORMALMODE
VT_I4
PulseWidthSecs
VT_I4
OPREVERSE
VT_I2
ControlConfirmRequired
VT_I2
ControlTimeout
VT_I4
Yes
AlarmDeadbandPercent
VT_I4
Yes
PvSource
VT_BSTR
MdSource
VT_BSTR
OpSource
VT_BSTR
AckDestination
VT_BSTR
MdDestination
VT_BSTR
OpDestination
VT_BSTR
PvPeriod
VT_I2
MdPeriod
VT_I2
OpPeriod
VT_I2
PvController
VT_I2
Yes
547
CONFIGURING OPC
Parameter
OPC type
MdController
VT_I2
OPC access
OpController
VT_I2
CreateTime
VT_R4
AlarmPriority
VT_I4
AlarmSubPriority
VT_I2
PointDetailDisplayDefault
VT_BSTR
GroupDetailDisplayDefault
VT_BSTR
PVAlgoExists
VT_I2
Read-only
ActionAlgoExists
VT_I2
Read-only
PointInAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
State0InAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
State1InAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
State2InAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
State3InAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
State4InAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
State5InAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
State6InAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
State7InAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
ModeCheckDisabled
VT_I2
Enumerated?
OPC-accessible analog point parameters
The following tables list the parameters for analog points that can be accessed via the Experion OPC Server.
The tables also specify each parameter's OPC type, access type and whether it is enumerated.
548
OPC Data Access Param Name
OPC Type
PV
VT_R8
Mode
VT_R8
OP
VT_R4
SP
VT_R4
A1
VT_R4
A2
VT_R4
A3
VT_R4
A4
VT_R4
EULO
VT_R8
Read-only
EUHI
VT_R8
Read-only
AlarmLimit1
VT_R4
AlarmLimit2
VT_R4
AlarmLimit3
VT_R4
AlarmLimit4
VT_R4
AlarmType1
VT_I4
Yes
AlarmType2
VT_I4
Yes
www.honeywell.com
OPC Access
Enumerated?
Yes
CONFIGURING OPC
OPC Data Access Param Name
OPC Type
AlarmType3
VT_I4
OPC Access
Yes
AlarmType4
VT_I4
Yes
Asset
VT_I4
SetPointLowLimit
VT_R4
SetPointHighLimit
VT_R4
OutputLowLimit
VT_R4
OutputHighLimit
VT_R4
Point ID
VT_BSTR
Read-only
Description
VT_BSTR
Read-only
LastProcessedDate
VT_I2
LastProcessedTime
VT_R2
OnScan
VT_I2
AlarmValue
VT_I4
ControlLevel
VT_I2
AlarmDisabled
VT_I2
PVInError
VT_I2
Read-only
ModeInError
VT_I2
Read-only
OutputInError
VT_I2
Read-only
SetPointInError
VT_I2
Read-only
A1InError
VT_I2
Read-only
A2InError
VT_I2
Read-only
A3InError
VT_I2
Read-only
A4InError
VT_I2
Read-only
Units
VT_BSTR
Units1
VT_BSTR
Units2
VT_BSTR
Units3
VT_BSTR
Units4
VT_BSTR
Units5
VT_BSTR
Units6
VT_BSTR
Units7
VT_BSTR
PVAlgoNumber
VT_I2
Read-only
PVAlgoBlock
VT_I2
Read-only
Read-only
Read-only
Enumerated?
Yes
Yes
ActionAlgoNumber
VT_I2
Read-only
ActionAlgoBlock
VT_I2
Read-only
UnackAlarmExists
VT_I2
UnreasonableAlarmPriority
VT_I4
ControlFailAlarmPriority
VT_I4
Alarm1Priority
VT_I4
Yes
Alarm2Priority
VT_I4
Yes
Alarm3Priority
VT_I4
Yes
549
CONFIGURING OPC
550
OPC Data Access Param Name
OPC Type
Alarm4Priority
VT_I4
Alarm5Priority
VT_I4
Alarm6Priority
VT_I4
Alarm7Priority
VT_I4
Alarm8Priority
VT_I4
UnreasonableAlarmSubPriority
VT_I2
ControlFailAlarmSubPriority
VT_I2
Alarm1SubPriority
VT_I4
Alarm2SubPriority
VT_I4
Alarm3SubPriority
VT_I4
Alarm4SubPriority
VT_I4
Alarm5SubPriority
VT_I4
Alarm6SubPriority
VT_I4
Alarm7SubPriority
VT_I4
Alarm8SubPriority
VT_I4
AssociatedDisplay
VT_BSTR
AssociatedDisplayDefault
VT_BSTR
InstructionDisplay
VT_BSTR
InstructionDisplayDefault
VT_BSTR
AlarmMessageIndex
VT_I2
PVExternalChangeAlarmEnable
VT_I2
MDExternalChangeAlarmEnable
VT_I2
OPExternalChangeAlarmEnable
VT_I2
SPExternalChangeAlarmEnable
VT_I2
NormalMode
VT_I4
OPReverse
VT_I2
ControlConfirmRequired
VT_I2
ControlTimeout
VT_I4
Yes
DriftDeadbandPercent
VT_I4
Yes
AlarmDeadbandPercent
VT_I4
Yes
ControlDeadbandPercent
VT_I4
Yes
PVClampingEnabled
VT_I2
PvSource
VT_BSTR
MdSource
VT_BSTR
OpSource
VT_BSTR
SpSource
VT_BSTR
A1Source
VT_BSTR
A2Source
VT_BSTR
A3Source
VT_BSTR
A4Source
VT_BSTR
AckDestination
VT_BSTR
www.honeywell.com
OPC Access
Enumerated?
Yes
Yes
CONFIGURING OPC
OPC Data Access Param Name
OPC Type
MdDestination
VT_BSTR
OPC Access
OpDestination
VT_BSTR
SpDestination
VT_BSTR
A1Destination
VT_BSTR
A2Destination
VT_BSTR
A3Destination
VT_BSTR
A4Destination
VT_BSTR
PvPeriod
VT_I2
MdPeriod
VT_I2
OpPeriod
VT_I2
SpPeriod
VT_I2
A1Period
VT_I2
A2Period
VT_I2
A3Period
VT_I2
A4Period
VT_I2
PvController
VT_I2
MdController
VT_I2
OpController
VT_I2
SpController
VT_I2
A1Controller
VT_I2
A2Controller
VT_I2
A3Controller
VT_I2
A4Controller
VT_I2
CreateTime
VT_R4
AlarmLimit5
VT_R4
AlarmLimit6
VT_R4
AlarmLimit7
VT_R4
AlarmLimit8
VT_R4
AlarmType5
VT_I4
AlarmType6
VT_I4
AlarmType7
VT_I4
AlarmType8
VT_I4
AlarmPriority
VT_I4
AlarmSubPriority
VT_I2
PointDetailDisplayDefault
VT_BSTR
Read-only
GroupDetailDisplayDefault
VT_BSTR
Read-only
PVAlgoExists
VT_I2
Read-only
ActionAlgoExists
VT_I2
Read-only
PointInAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
InRateOfChangeAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
InDeviationLowAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
Enumerated?
551
CONFIGURING OPC
OPC Data Access Param Name
OPC Type
OPC Access
InDeviationHighAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
Enumerated?
InTransmitterLowAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
InTransmitterHighAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
InLowAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
InHighAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
InLowLowAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
InHighHighAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
InUnreasonablyLowAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
InUnreasonablyHighAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
A1ExternalChangeAlarmEnable
VT_I2
A2ExternalChangeAlarmEnable
VT_I2
A3ExternalChangeAlarmEnable
VT_I2
A4ExternalChangeAlarmEnable
VT_I2
ModeCheckingDisabled
VT_I2
A1AssociatedParameter
VT_I4
Read-only
Yes
A2AssociatedParameter
VT_I4
Read-only
Yes
A3AssociatedParameter
VT_I4
Read-only
Yes
A4AssociatedParameter
VT_I4
Read-only
Yes
OPC-accessible accumulator point parameters
The following tables list the parameters for accumulator points that can be accessed via the Experion OPC
Server. The tables also specify each parameter's OPC type, access type and whether it is enumerated.
552
OPC Data Access Param Name
OPC Type
PV
VT_R8
Mode
VT_I4
EUHI
VT_R8
EULO
VT_R8
AlarmLimit1
VT_R4
AlarmLimit2
VT_R4
AlarmLimit3
VT_R4
AlarmLimit4
VT_R4
AlarmType1
VT_I4
Yes
AlarmType2
VT_I4
Yes
AlarmType3
VT_I4
Yes
AlarmType4
VT_I4
Yes
RollOver
VT_I4
MeterFactor
VT_R4
ScaleFactor
VT_R4
RawPV
VT_I4
Asset
VT_I4
www.honeywell.com
OPC Access
Enumerated?
Read-only
Read-only
Yes
CONFIGURING OPC
OPC Data Access Param Name
OPC Type
OPC Access
PointID
VT_BSTR
Read-only
Description
VT_BSTR
LastProcessedDate
VT_I2
LastProcessedTime
VT_R2
OnScan
VT_I2
AlarmValue
VT_I4
AlarmDisabled
VT_I2
PVInError
VT_I2
ModeInError
VT_I2
Units
VT_BSTR
PVAlgoNumber
VT_I2
Read-only
Enumerated?
Yes
Read-only
Read-only
PVAlgoBlock
VT_I2
Read-only
ActionAlgoNumber
VT_I2
Read-only
ActionAlgoBlock
VT_I2
Read-only
UnackAlarmExists
VT_I2
DefaultAlarmSubPriority
VT_I4
ControlFailAlarmPriority
VT_I4
Alarm1Priority
VT_I4
Yes
Alarm2Priority
VT_I4
Yes
Alarm3Priority
VT_I4
Yes
Alarm4Priority
VT_I4
Yes
Alarm5Priority
VT_I4
Alarm6Priority
VT_I4
Alarm7Priority
VT_I4
Alarm8Priority
VT_I4
DefaultAlarmSubPriority
VT_I2
DefaultControlAlarmSubPriority
VT_I2
Alarm1SubPriority
VT_I2
Alarm2SubPriority
VT_I2
Alarm3SubPriority
VT_I2
Alarm4SubPriority
VT_I2
Alarm5SubPriority
VT_I2
Alarm6SubPriority
VT_I2
Alarm7SubPriority
VT_I2
Alarm8SubPriority
VT_I2
AssociatedDisplay
VT_BSTR
AssociatedDisplayDefault
VT_BSTR
InstructionDisplay
VT_BSTR
InstructionDisplayDefault
VT_BSTR
AlarmMessageIndex
VT_I2
ControlConfirmRequired
VT_I2
553
CONFIGURING OPC
554
OPC Data Access Param Name
OPC Type
AlarmDeadbandPercent
VT_I4
PvSource
VT_BSTR
MdSource
VT_BSTR
OpSource
VT_BSTR
SpSource
VT_BSTR
A1Source
VT_BSTR
A2Source
VT_BSTR
A3Source
VT_BSTR
A4Source
VT_BSTR
AckDestination
VT_BSTR
MdDestination
VT_BSTR
OpDestination
VT_BSTR
SpDestination
VT_BSTR
A1Destination
VT_BSTR
A2Destination
VT_BSTR
A3Destination
VT_BSTR
A4Destination
VT_BSTR
PvPeriod
VT_I2
MdPeriod
VT_I2
OpPeriod
VT_I2
SpPeriod
VT_I2
A1Period
VT_I2
A2Period
VT_I2
A3Period
VT_I2
A4Period
VT_I2
PvController
VT_I2
MdController
VT_I2
OpController
VT_I2
SpController
VT_I2
A1Controller
VT_I2
A2Controller
VT_I2
A3Controller
VT_I2
A4Controller
VT_I2
CreateTime
VT_R4
AlarmLimit4
VT_R4
AlarmLimit6
VT_R4
AlarmLimit7
VT_R4
AlarmLimit7
VT_R4
AlarmLimit8
VT_R4
AlarmType5
VT_I4
AlarmType6
VT_I4
www.honeywell.com
OPC Access
Enumerated?
Yes
CONFIGURING OPC
OPC Data Access Param Name
OPC Type
AlarmType7
VT_I4
OPC Access
AlarmType8
VT_I4
AlarmPriority
VT_I4
AlarmSubPriority
VT_I2
PointDetailDisplayDefault
VT_BSTR
GroupDetailDisplayDefault
VT_BSTR
PVAlgoExists
VT_I2
Read-only
ActionAlgoExists
VT_I2
Read-only
PointInAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
InRateOfChangeAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
InHighAlarm
VT_I2
Read-only
InHighHighAlarm
VT_I2
Enumerated?
OPC-accessible flexible point parameters
The following tables list the parameters for flexible points that can be accessed via the Experion OPC Server.
The tables also specify each parameter's OPC type, access type and whether it is enumerated.
The following parameters are mandatory for flexible points.
OPC Data Access Param Name
OPC type
OPC access
Name
VT-BSTR
Read-only
Asset
VT_I4
Read-only
Description
VT-BSTR
Read-only
PointDetailDisplay
VT-BSTR
GroupDetailDisplay
VT-BSTR
AssociatedDisplay
VT-BSTR
Control Level
VT-I2
InstructionDisplay
VT-BSTR
Enumerated?
Yes
Error codes and qualities
The following error codes and qualities can be returned by the Experion OPC Server.
Read function error codes and qualities
Function
HRESULT
Item HRESULT
Quality value
Condition
S_FALSE
0xE00483FD (for
all items)
OPC_QUALITY_BAD |
OPC_QUALITY_OUT_OF_SERVICE
Host backup
S_FALSE
0xE00483FC (for
all items)
OPC_QUALITY_BAD |
OPC_QUALITY_LAST_KNOWN
Host not running (but not
backup)
S_FALSE
0xE0048231
OPC_QUALITY_BAD |
OPC_QUALITY_CONFIG_ERROR
Invalid point number
555
CONFIGURING OPC
Function
HRESULT
Item HRESULT
Quality value
Condition
S_FALSE
0xE0048232
OPC_QUALITY_BAD |
OPC_QUALITY_CONFIG_ERROR
Invalid parameter number
S_FALSE
0xE004xxxx xxxx
= status
0x0000 (non-specific)
Any other error status
Write function error codes and qualities
556
Function HRESULT
Item HRESULT
Condition
S_FALSE
0xE00483FD (for all items)
Host backup.
S_FALSE
0xE00483FC (for all items)
Host not running (but not backup).
S_FALSE
0xE0048222
Point not active.
S_FALSE
0xE0048223
Parameter error
S_FALSE
0xE0048224
Control inhibited
S_FALSE
0xE0048227
RTU disabled.
S_FALSE
0xE0048228
Channel disabled.
S_FALSE
0xE0048229
Illegal mode for control.
S_FALSE
0xE004822A
Value error.
S_FALSE
0xE0048212
Point on scan.
S_FALSE
0xE004xxxx xxxx = status
Any other error status.
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING OPC
Accessing data from the Experion OPC Historical Data Access Server
To learn about
Installing and setting up the third-party OPC client components, see the Supplementary
Installation Tasks Guide.
Changing read/write permissions, see the Supplementary Installation Tasks Guide.
The following topics describe the interfaces and related methods supported by the Experion OPC Historical
Data Access server.
Related topics
“How the Experion HDA server returns data” on page 557
“Interfaces and methods used by the Experion OPC Historical Data Access Server” on page 557
“Aggregates supported by the Experion OPC Historical Data Access Server” on page 558
How the Experion HDA server returns data
•
•
•
•
•
The Experion OPC Historical Data Access server will only return data for local point parameters which are
assigned to history. If an OPC client attempts to add a point which is not assigned to history or is a remote
point assigned to history, the Experion OPC Historical Data Access server will return
OPC_E_UNKNOWNITEMID.
History data storage has been optimized so that Experion is far more efficient at returning history data when
a large number of point parameters are requested simultaneously. Therefore requests for history data should
contain as many point parameters assigned to the same history type as necessary in a single request.
For point parameters assigned to multiple history types (fast, standard, and extended), the Experion OPC
Historical Data Access server returns historical data from the fastest history collection interval.
Note that parameters can be assigned either to periodic history (fast, standard or extended) or to exception
history, but not to both.
For point parameters assigned to both fast and standard history and when no history archiving is configured
for fast history, the Experion OPC Historical Data Access server returns historical data from the history
collection interval that best satisfies the request from the OPC client. For example, a fast history file covers
three days and a standard history file covers ten days. For a request from an OPC client with a start time of
now minus eight days, the Experion OPC Historical Data Access server returns data from the standard
history file. When history archiving is configured for fast history, the Experion OPC Historical Data Access
server returns data from the fast history only.
If the fast history rate has been set to one second and fast history archiving has not been configured then
most queries to the Experion OPC Historical Data Access will return standard history by default. This is
because by default the fast history file holds only 12 minutes of one second history data online. To rectify
this, enable fast history archiving and configure it to retain the period of one second history online that is
needed by OPC clients.
Interfaces and methods used by the Experion OPC Historical Data Access Server
The following table lists the interfaces and methods supported by the Experion OPC Historical Data Access
Server.
557
CONFIGURING OPC
Interface
Methods
IOPCHDA_Server
GetItemAttributes
GetAggregates
GetHistorianStatus
GetItemHandles
ReleaseItemHandles
ValidateItemIDs
CreateBrowse
IOPCHDS_Browser
GetEnum
ChangeBrowsePosition
GetItemID
GetBranchPosition
IOPCHDA_SyncRead
ReadRaw
ReadAttribute
ReadProcessed
IOPCHDA_AsyncRead
ReadRaw
AdviseRaw
ReadAttribute
ReadProcessed
AdviseProcessed
Cancel
IOPCHDA_Playback
ReadRawWithUpdate
ReadProcessedWithUpdate
Cancel
IOPCHDA_SyncUpdate
QueryCapabilities
Insert
Aggregates supported by the Experion OPC Historical Data Access Server
The following aggregates are supported by the Experion OPC Historical Data Access server:
•
•
•
•
558
OPCHDA_INTERPOLATIVE
OPCHDA_AVERAGE
OPCHDA_MAXIMUM
OPCHDA_MINIMUM
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING OPC
Accessing data from the Experion OPC Alarm and Event Server
The following topics describe how to access data from the Experion OPC Alarm and Event Server.
Related topics
“Mapping Experion Alarm and Event properties to OPC notification properties” on page 559
Mapping Experion Alarm and Event properties to OPC notification properties
This section describes the mapping of Experion alarm/event properties to appropriate OPC notification
properties so that they are correctly processed by an OPC notification client.
The Experion OPC Alarm and Event Server supports the OPC Alarm and Events Specification, and the OPC
Common Definitions and Interfaces specification.
Notes
•
•
•
•
When an OPC client calls the IOPCEventServer::QueryEventAttributes method, it will get the relevant
attribute details for each category. However, for individual event instances, if some attributes for the
category are not applicable, those attributes are set to VT_NULL, as described by the OPC AE Standard.
The ProgID of the Experion OPC Server is HWHsc.OPCServer.
On your OPC client, you can create subscription filters to receive alarms for specific assets . If you create a
filter for a top level asset which contains lower level assets , you only receive alarms for the specified asset,
you do not receive alarms for any lower level assets. For example, if you have an asset hierarchy, Assets/
Precipitation1/Train1, and you create a filter for Precipitation1, you receive alarms only for
Precipitation1, not alarms for . To receive alarms for Train1, you must create a separate filter.
The Experion OPC AE Server does not pass DSA alarms and messages, however, can be configured using
Server wide settings to do so, but not DSA events (as DSA doesn't pass events). See 'DSA and alarms, alerts
and messages.'
Categories
Category
Category ID
OPC event type
Batch Event
4102
Simple
Confirmable Message
16392
Conditional
Info Message
16391
Conditional
OPC_SERVER_ERROR
12292
Tracking
Operator Change
8193
Tracking
Procedure Event
4103
Simple
Process Alarm
16385
Conditional
Process Alert
16389
Conditional
Process Event
4100
Simple
Simple Alert
4101
Simple
SOE
4098
Simple
System Alarm
16387
Conditional
System Change
8194
Tracking
System Event
4099
Simple
559
CONFIGURING OPC
Attributes
The following table lists Experion alarm and event attributes in alphabetical order.
560
Attribute
Attribute type
AckComment
VT_BSTR
Action
VT_BSTR
Alert accessibility
VT_I2
Areas
VT_ARRAY|VT_BSTR
Asset
VT_ARRAY|VT_BSTR
Author
VT_BSTR
Classification
VT_BSTR
Comment
VT_BSTR
Condition
VT_BSTR
Criticality
VT_BSTR
Data access item
VT_BSTR
DEVICE NAME
VT_BSTR
DISPLAY
VT_BSTR
ERROR CODE
VT_BSTR
Field Time
VT_DATE
HELP FILE
VT_BSTR
Limit
VT_R8
Link 1 Type
VT_I2
Link 2 Type
VT_I2
Link 3 Type
VT_I2
Link1
VT_BSTR
Link2
VT_BSTR
Link3
VT_BSTR
Location full name
VT_BSTR
Location tag name
VT_BSTR
Multiple Condition Instance
VT_BOOL
NAME OF PARAMETER
VT_BSTR
NEW VALUE
VT_BSTR
Parameter
VT_BSTR
Previous value
VT_BYREF|VT_VARIANT
PREV VALUE
VT_BSTR
Reason
VT_BSTR
Signature Meaning
VT_BSTR
Signature 2 Level
VT_I2
Signature 2 Meaning
VT_BSTR
SourceEntityName
VT_BSTR
SourceTagName
VT_BSTR
Station
VT_BSTR
www.honeywell.com
CONFIGURING OPC
Attribute
Attribute type
Units
VT_BSTR
Value
VT_BYREF|VT_VARIANT
Related topics
“The Experion OPC Server ProgID” on page 542
“Configuration tab” on page 529
“OPC Integrator Group Details tab” on page 567
561
CONFIGURING OPC
Experion OPC Integrator
The following topics describe recommended practices for configuring Experion OPC Integrator (OPCI) so that
it can exchange data with a third-party OPC server.
Related topics
“Recommendations for configuring Experion OPC Integrator” on page 562
“Performance considerations” on page 563
“Bidirectional data transfer” on page 565
“ OPC Integrator Configuration tasks ” on page 565
“Configuring OPC Integrator alarms” on page 566
“OPC Integrator Alarm settings tab” on page 566
“Configuring OPC groups” on page 566
“OPC Integrator Group Details tab” on page 567
“OPC Integrator Item List tab” on page 568
“Enabling OPC Integrator groups” on page 570
“Checking the status of OPC Integrator groups” on page 570
“Group states” on page 570
“Location of OPC Integrator files” on page 570
“OPC Integrator alarms and events” on page 571
“Monitoring the status of Experion OPC Integrator” on page 572
Recommendations for configuring Experion OPC Integrator
The Experion OPC Integrator (OPCI) option offers considerable flexibility. Therefore care is needed when
configuring Experion OPC Integrator in order to avoid placing undesirable load on the communications
subsystems of target controllers. This section describes recommended practices for configuration of an Experion
OPC Integrator solution.
Perform writes to local points rather than remote points via DSA
Experion OPC IntegratorData Transfer groups should be configured on the server where the writes will occur. If
one or more items in a destination group are part of a controller that is connected to a different Experion server,
the writes to that controller will use the DSA subsystem to transfer the data between servers; this may place an
unnecessary load on the DSA subsystem. It is recommended that items in OPC IntegratorData Transfer
destination groups are part of the same server as OPC IntegratorData Transfer itself.
Configure transfer rates that do not exceed communication throughput limits
Experion OPC Integrator data transfers are asynchronous, using OPC callbacks suc