Nayadic Operation / Maintenance - Consolidated Treatment Systems

Nayadic Operation / Maintenance - Consolidated Treatment Systems
WASTEWATER
TREATMENT SYSTEMS
MANUAL
FOR
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
AND
TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE
A Division of Consolidated Treatment Systems, Inc.
1501 Commerce Center Drive
Franklin, OH 45005
Tel: 937-746-2727
Fax: 937-746-1446
www.consolidatedtreatment.com
I.
BASIC OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENTS
The following is a description of the normal maintenance required to insure continuous
satisfactory operation of the NAYADIC systems:
START UP:
Allow 6-8 weeks for sufficient numbers of bacteria to develop in the NAYADIC in order to
provide proper treatment of the wastewater. During this period there may be some sudsing
due to laundry wastes. The sudsing can be decreased by reducing the number of loads
done at one time and by using a low sudsing detergent. In situations where excessive grey
water is expected, it may be necessary to seed the NAYADIC with mixed liquor from another
aerobic waste treatment plant. To prevent short-term hydraulic overloads, homeowners
should be advised to spread out laundry during this period.
PUMPING EXCESS SOLIDS:
Due to normal accumulation of inorganic solids and dead bacterial cells it is necessary to
pump out the excess solids periodically in order to maintain adequate aeration capacity.
For a typical single family residence, the NAYADIC will require pumping at 2-4 year intervals.
NAYADIC representatives should advise customers when the NAYADIC should be pumped.
On heavily used systems or residences with garbage disposals, the provision of a trash
trap will reduce pumping frequencies.
COMPRESSOR REPLACEMENT:
The normal life expectancy of the compressor is 3-5 years. For all new installations, there
is a two-year warranty on the compressor. For replacement compressors, there is a two
year warranty period. Compressors can also be repaired and/or rebuilt.
ALARM:
The NAYADIC alarm system indicates both loss of air and high water conditions. To prevent
unnecessary maintenance costs, the homeowner should contact the service representative
as soon as the alarm is activated or unusual odors are noticed.
SERVICE CONTRACT:
The NAYADIC system requires periodic servicing to prevent major operational difficulties.
With the purchase of each NAYADIC, the owner receives a two-year service contract that
provides warranty on all parts and service, including a minimum of two inspections of the
unit each year. After the initial two years of operation, the homeowner is urged to maintain
a service contract to insure regular inspection and service of the NAYADIC system.
REPLACEMENT PARTS/SERVICE:
Contact the factory for the name of the closest sales/service representative.
SUMMARY OF RESIDENTIAL MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENTS
1
Rev: 11/08/11
Start up period ......................................................... 6-8 weeks after sewage first enters unit
Pumping frequency .................................................. 2-4 years
Compressor replacement ......................................... 3-5 years
Routine inspection frequency................................... every 6 months or as required by state/local
regulatory authorities
NOTE: Due to differences in raw wastewater strength, increased user abuse and hydraulic
surges, additional pre-treatment facilities and/or increased maintenance may be required on nonresidential or commercial facilities. Please check with your NAYADIC representative.
II.
EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL ESSENTIAL FOR SERVICING THE NAYADIC
SYSTEM
100’ garden hose with spray nozzle
100’ extension cord
1/4 hp submersible pump with outlet made of flex pipe.
Small utility pump with 1/2 - 5/8” garden hose (6’) on inlet and outlet (Teal model IP 579E,
Simer Minivac Model M40 or equal.)
Pliers - standard with insulated handles
Pliers - channellock
Caulking gun
Caulking, silicone
Hammer
Electrical tape
Wire nuts
Knife
Screwdriver
Replacement parts:
compressor
diffusers
compressor repair kit
pressure switches, high level float switch (alarm)
alarm
2
Rev: 11/08/11
Wiping rags
Sample collection jars (quart size)
Volt ohm amp meter
Allen key for lid
III.
PROCEDURES FOR ROUTINE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE
The NAYADIC system requires routine, periodic inspection and maintenance to insure
continuous, trouble-free operation. At a minimum, the NAYADIC should be inspected every six
(6) months, assuming it is serving a typical single family residence. More frequent inspections
may be required if mandated by local or stated regulatory authorities; or, if the NAYADIC is used
on a non-residential application.
During the routine inspections, the following items are checked:
COMPRESSOR
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Check filters for cleanliness. Replace if the filters are dirty or clogged.
Check housing and air line fittings for signs of overheating.
Check for air leakage at fittings or in air supply line.
Check for excessive noise or vibration.
Check for moisture or mud accumulations which could indicate possible
flooding or direct rainfall on compressor.
Check air flow (with gauge), especially if odors or septic conditions are observed.
A minimum of 3.0 cfm should be provided on all models except the M2000A.
Check carbon vanes for excessive wear. Replace as needed
(approx. 2-3 years).
ALARM
1.
2.
3.
Check “test” button to insure proper operation.
Check alarm function by raising float in tank.
Check alarm function by disconnecting airline union in tank.
TREATMENT PLANT AERATION CHAMBER
1.
2.
3.
4.
Check for presence of septic odor.
Check for color of aeration chamber contents.
Check for excessive sudsing or foaming.
Check for excessive accumulation of grease balls and non-biodegradable
material. Using a wire skimmer basket, remove such material and dispose of it
in a proper manner.
5.
Check air supply at aeration chamber, especially if odors or septic
conditions exist. Air check can be performed by observing amount of
turbulence; or, by using an air flow meter. If necessary, check diffuser
for clogging.
3
Rev: 11/08/11
6.
Check aeration chamber solids (MLSS) by collecting a sample of aeration
chamber contents while compressor is running. Observe rate of settling,
volume of settled solids and clarity of supernatant.
CLARIFICATION CHAMBER
1.
2.
3.
Check color and depth of scum layer.
Check color and clarity of effluent. An effluent check can be done by
running water from a garden hose into the aeration (center) chamber.
Check level of effluent weir.
MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS TO BE CHECKED
1.
2.
3.
4.
Check access cover to insure that it is properly fastened.
Check all peripheral equipment such as chlorinators, dosing pumps,
filters, etc.
Check effluent disposal system.
Check compressor housing if installed outside. The housing should be
adequately fastened over the housing; be well ventilated and protect the
compressor from direct rainfall.
LABORATORY OR FIELD TESTS
Normally, laboratory testing is not required for the routine operation and maintenance of
the NAYADIC system. Occasionally testing may be necessary to identify the source of an
operational problem or to satisfy the requirements of the state or local regulatory agency.
SAMPLE COLLECTION
The NAYADIC, when properly sized and maintained, will produce an effluent exceeding
the performance requirements of NSF Standard 40 (Class I) for aerobic treatment plants: 30
day average of <25 mg/l CBOD and <30 mg/l TSS.
To collect sample from the NAYADIC, care must be taken to get a reliable and
uncontaminated sample of the effluent that is being discharged from the plant at the time of
the sampling. To accomplish this, the following steps must be taken:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
4
Provide a suitable sampling port on the outlet of the NAYADIC (see Fig. 1).
The port should be at least 6” in diameter, with a minimum depth of 8” below the
effluent line.
Using a clean cloth, wipe the interior of the effluent line where it enters the
sampling port. This is to remove any debris that may have accumulated.
By opening a faucet or inserting a garden hose into the cleanout before the
NAYADIC, generate a flow through the plant. Allow the flow to continue for
approximately one (1) minute in order to flush the line.
Shut off the water and dip the water out of the sampling port.
Turn on the water and collect a sample as the plant effluent flows into the
sampling port. Do not collect water that has accumulated in the sampling port.
Care needs to be taken to avoid catching dirt or other debris while
collecting the sample.
Rev: 11/08/11
Fig. 1
Treatment Plant
Effluent
IV.
To Disposal
MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES: Pumping (wasting) sludge
Bacteria and other microorganisms present in the wastewater utilize the soluble organic
material as a food source, converting it into a non-soluble mass. This non-soluble mass or floc
is comprised of living microorganisms, sewage particles, as well as inert (non-biodegradable)
material. As the process matures, the numbers of micro-organisms increase until there is an
adequate biomass to metabolize or digest all of the soluble organic material in the incoming
sewage. At this point, competition for food results in the dying (due to starvation) of organisms
as new organisms are formed. These dying organisms, in turn are metabolized, thereby
reducing the overall sludge volume.
The volume of solids will gradually increase due to the accumulation of the inert remains
of dead organisms (ash), combined with the non-degradable material in the raw wastewater. As
the solids increase, the mixed liquor (i.e., contents of the aeration chamber) becomes thicker,
developing an increasing darker brown color. Periodically, the excess solids must be pumped
(wasted) from the NAYADIC in order to insure continued plant efficiency.
PUMPING FREQUENCY
The rate at which the solids (biomass) accumulates in the NAYADIC, and the subsequent
rate at which the excess solids must be pumped out, is dependent upon the total volume and
strength (i.e., BOD) of the wastewater entering the plant. The typical residential system will
need to be pumped every 2-3 years. Commercial systems or systems that receive close to their
design loading may need to be pumped every 1-2 years. Conversely, weekend cottages or
systems serving only 1 or 2 people may go 4-5 years or longer.
DETERMINING PUMPING FREQUENCY
In order to insure optimum treatment efficiency and effluent quality, it is necessary to
maintain the level of aeration solids (MLSS) within a suitable range (refer to Operational Control
Chart). A low level of solids in the aeration chamber (i.e., during the plant start-up) reduces the
treatment plant’s ability to provide adequate treatment during peak operating periods.
Excessive solids, on the other hand, may result in poor settling during periods of hydraulic
surges; or, in the development of septic conditions in the plant. In order to determine when the
NAYADIC system should be pumped it is necessary to perform a settleable solids test (30minute) during each semi-annual service check:
Procedure:
1.
5
Mark a quart jar into 10 equal portions.
Rev: 11/08/11
2.
While the compressor is running, fill the jar with the liquid (MLSS) from the
aeration chamber. This sample should be collected at mid-depth in the tank.
Do not collect a sample from within the draft tube.
3.
Allow the sample to sit for 30 minutes. If the sample settles slowly, allow it to sit
for 24 hours in order to insure complete settling.
4.
Measure the volume of the settled sludge as a percentage of the total volume of
the sample. Occasionally, after the sample sits, a portion of the settled sludge
may float to the top of the sample. If this occurs, add together the volume of
settled sludge and the volume of floating sludge.
5.
Compare the percent of settled sludge (i.e., sludge volume) to the figures given
in the “Operational Control Chart”. The optimum level of settleable solids is
normally between 5-50%. Whenever the sludge volume exceeds 50%, the
plant should be pumped.
PROCEDURE FOR PUMPING THE NAYADIC
1.
Remove 30” access cover.
2.
Carefully lower the pumper hose into the inner (aeration) chamber. Slide the
hose down the wall of the inner tank until it rests on the bottom of the outer tank
(clarifier). Do not insert the hose down the draft tube unless the airline and
diffuser are removed.
3.
Pump solids from the bottom of the outer tank. This will lower the liquid level in
both the inner tank and outer tank simultaneously.
4.
As the liquid level drops, the scum layer between the inner tank and scum baffle
will normally break loose and drop to the bottom of the tank where it can be
pumped out. With a garden hose, flush any remaining scum or residue to the
bottom of the tank. If the scum layer is more than 2” thick, it should be
removed first.
5.
In areas with a high-water table, immediately re-fill the tank with clear
water to prevent shifting or floatation.
SLUDGE CHARACTERISTICS
It is important to observe the MLSS (mixed liquor suspended solids) sample that is
collected from the aeration chamber. As the sample settles you should note the
following:
1.
What is the color of the sludge?
2.
Do the sludge particles clump together in a dense floc, which settles rapidly?
3.
Is the liquid above the settled sludge (supernatant) clear?
4.
Does the sample have a noticeable odor?
A good healthy sludge should have a chocolate brown color. It should form a dense floc
that settles rapidly leaving a clear, odorless supernatant. A sludge sample that has a grey/black
color, settles slowly, has a cloudy supernatant, or has a supernatant containing very fine,
suspended particles, usually indicates poor treatment plant operation. Therefore, it is important
to compare your observations of the NAYADIC plant, as well as the sample of mixed liquor
suspended solids to the conditions described on the “Operational Control Chart” to determine if
the plant is operating properly or if any corrective action needs to be taken.
6
Rev: 11/08/11
NAYADIC WASTE TREATMENT SYSTEMS MAINTENANCE
PROCEDURES: Component Replacement
V.
COMPRESSOR REPLACEMENT
Procedure:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
VI.
ALARM REPLACEMENT
Procedure:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
VII.
Remove the housing from the compressor (if applicable).
Disconnect the two sensor wires from the old pressure switch.
Unscrew the pressure switch from the airline and replace with a new one.
Re-attach the two sensor wires.
Check alarm by shutting off the compressor.
Replace housing.
DIFFUSER REPLACEMENT
Procedure:
1.
2.
7
Disconnect power before working on alarm.
Unscrew the faceplate of the alarm.
Remove the wire nuts and disconnect the following wires:
a)
black and white to float and pressure switch
b)
black, white and green to compressor
Remove the alarm faceplate and replace with a new alarm.
Reconnect the wires described in item 3.
Replace the faceplate and restore power to the alarm.
Check alarm by pressing test button and by raising float in the NAYADIC plant.
PRESSURE SWITCH REPLACEMENT
Procedure:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
VIII.
Disconnect power before working on compressor.
Remove the compressor housing if located outside.
Disconnect the airline from the compressor air discharge fitting.
Disconnect the compressor’s power cord from the electrical service line that
goes to the alarm.
Remove the compressor.
Take the new compressor out of its packing carton. Remove the plywood
shipping base and assemble the base plate (foot support) in accordance with
the enclosed directions. NOTE: Keep the box and shipping base to return
compressor for warranty.
Transfer the air discharge fittings from the original compressor to the
replacement unit.
Remove plug from the air intake opening and screw in air filter (supplied with
compressor).
Set the new compressor in place and re-connect the airline and electrical power
cord.
Replace the housing, if applicable.
Re-connect the power and check for proper operation (refer to Section 5.0)
Remove the access lid on NAYADIC.
Using a garden hose, wash down the interior surfaces of the center (aeration)
tank and airline, including the union on the top of the airline.
Rev: 11/08/11
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
IX.
FLOAT REPLACEMENT
Procedure:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
8
Unscrew the union and remove the lower portion of the air supply line (with
diffuser).
Unscrew the diffuser from the end of the airline and replace with a new one.
Re-install the airline being careful to insert the airline and diffuser into the draft
tube.
Tighten union and check to insure that there is adequate turbulence in
the tank.
Replace the access lid.
Remove the access lid on NAYADIC.
Using a garden hose wash down the interior surfaces of the center (aeration)
tank, airline, float, cord and cable connectors.
Remove the wire nuts on the float cord and disconnect the two wires.
Loosen the clamp on the airline and remove the old float.
Replace with a new float, making sure that the float is set at the same distance
from the clamp and that the clamp is fastened securely to the topside of the
airline and away from the inlet pipe.
Reconnect the two wires of the float making sure to use approved water
resistant wire nuts.
Check the alarm by raising the float.
Re-secure the access lid.
Rev: 11/08/11
NAYADIC
TROUBLE-SHOOTING CHECKLIST
PROBLEM/CONDITION OBSERVED
POSSIBLE CAUSE
CORRECTIVE ACTION
(IMPORTANT: Disconnect power to compressor or alarm before attempting repairs.)
I. COMPRESSOR
A. New compressor will not start but
motor hums when power is turned
on.
1. Rotary assembly is locked up due
to prolonged storage time.
1. Remove internal filters, muffler box
and head plate. Using the palm of
your hand turn the rotary assembly
until it moves freely. Replace head
plate, muffler box and filters.If motor
still does not run, return to factory
(NAYADIC).
B. New compressor runs but provides
insufficient air pressure.
1. Internal filters are not properly
tightened.
1. Tighten filters by hand. If this does
not correct problem, return
compressor to factory for repair or
replacement.
2. Kinked or crushed airline. Check with air
flow meter at compressor and at NAYADIC
tank to detect pressure loss.
2. Replace airline.
1. Breaker is tripped.
1. Re-set breaker. Check for other
appliances connected to breaker.
2. No power at electrical receptacle.
2. Check receptacle with voltage
meter. If no voltage or low voltage,
check with electrician.
3. Wiring leads are not properly
connected.
3. Check and reconnect if necessary.
4. Power cord is cut or damaged.
4. Inspect cord for cut and test with
meter for continuity. Replace if
necessary.
C. Compressor will not start (or hum)
when power is turned on.
NAYADIC
TROUBLE-SHOOTING CHECKLIST
PROBLEM/CONDITION OBSERVED
D. Used compressor does not run but
motor hums.
E. Used compressor runs but provides
insufficient air pressure. (Check
with air gauge).
POSSIBLE CAUSE
CORRECTIVE ACTION
1. Rotary assembly is locked up. This may
occur if compressor is not in use for
several days.
1. Remove internal filters, muffler box
and head plate. Check carbon
blades to see if they move freely. If
not, clean blade path; check for
broken carbon blades. If necessary
replace using repair kit (N6508 or
N6510).
2. Rotary assembly is locked up.
Compressor shows evidence of
being exposed to excessive moisture
2. Remove internal filters, muffler box
and head plate. Remove 2 allen
bolts from cylinder and remove or
flooding. cylinder shield. Clean
rusted parts with light grit sand
paper. Replace cylinder shield.
Install repair kit (N6508 or N6510) If
compressor still does not run, return
to factory (NAYADIC). CAUTION:
Locate compressor in area
protected from flooding.
1. Filters are clogged.
1. Remove and check both external
internal filters. Clean or replace, if
necessary. Provide protective
enclosure around compressor to
protect from dust if located in
exposed area.
2. Internal filters are not properly
tightened.
2. Tighten by hand.
3. Internal filter o-ring hard or cut.
3. Replace.
4. Muffler box loose.
4. Tighten bolts
NAYADIC
1
Rev: 11/08/11
TROUBLE-SHOOTING CHECKLIST
PROBLEM/CONDITION OBSERVED
POSSIBLE CAUSE
CORRECTIVE ACTION
5. Head plate loose.
5. Remove internal filters and muffler
box. Tighten head plate bolts and
reassemble
6. Worn or broken blades in rotory
assembly.
6. Disassemble and install repair kit
(N6508 or N6510).
If compressor still provides
insufficient air pressure, return to
factory for repair.
1. ON/OFF switch of the alarm is in the
“off” position.
1. Turn switch to “on” position. Re-set
“test” button.
A. Light and buzzer do not come on when
pressing test button.
1. Alarm is not properly energized
1. Check to make sure power cable is
plugged into 115 vac outlet.
B. Alarm remains activated after TEST
button is pressed. Compressor is
running properly.
1. Float activated.
1. Make sure float is in down position.
2. Faulty float.
2. Replace float.
3. Pressure switch.
3. Check wiring, making sure
connecting wires are on terminal
#’s 1 & 2.
4. Faulty pressure switch.
4. Replace pressure switch.
5. Alarm is faulty.
5. Replace alarm.
1. Float is not properly wired in alarm
system.
1. Check wiring diagram provided
and reconnect if necessary.
2. Wiring connections are loose.
2. Tighten all wiring connections.
3. Float is faulty.
3. Replace float.
F. Compressor with old style alarm does
not run.
II. ALARM (New Installation)
C. Alarm is not activated when float
is raised.
NAYADIC
2
Rev: 11/08/11
TROUBLE-SHOOTING CHECKLIST
PROBLEM/CONDITION OBSERVED
D. Alarm is activated, but the compressor
is operating properly and the water
level is normal.
POSSIBLE CAUSE
1. Float is set too low in NAYADIC.
E. (Old Style Alarm) Alarm remains
1. Alarm is improperly wired. Black wires
activated after TEST/RESET button
marked “To 115 vac” and “To Compressor”
is pressed. Compressor is running properly.
are reversed.
CORRECTIVE ACTION
1. Raise float (alarm) so that it is at or
slightly above the normal water level.
1. Rewire alarm so that the black wire
from the 115 vac is connected to the
ON/OFF switch. The black wire
from the compressor should be
connected to the TEST/RESET
button.
F. (Old Style Alarm) Light does not come
on when pressing test button.
1. Alarm is not properly energized.
1. Turn ON/OFF switch to “on”
position.
G. (Old Style Alarm) Compressor shuts off
when float (in pump tank) is raised.
1. Float is improperly wired to black wires in
alarm box.
1. Rewire float so that one wire from
is connected to white (neutral) wire;
and the second wire from the float is
connected to the red wire.
1. Insufficient air supply due to
compressor failure, Check with air
flow meter.
1. Refer to Trouble-Shooting Checklist,
Section I: A-E.
2. Plugged diffuser.
2. Disconnect union on airline and
remove lower airline with diffuser.
Clean or replace diffuser.
3. Loose connections on airline.
Leakage of air at these locations
is reducing air to plant.
3. Check and tighten all airline
connections, including union and
connections at the compressor and
tank.
4. Damaged airline. To determine, check
4. Expose airline and replace damaged
III. AERATION CHAMBER (Inner Tank)
A. Compressor is running but little or no
turbulence is observed in aeration.
chamber. Aeration contents have
greyish (dishwater) appearance.
Noticeable odor. Poor effluent quality.
NAYADIC
3
Rev: 11/08/11
TROUBLE-SHOOTING CHECKLIST
PROBLEM/CONDITION OBSERVED
POSSIBLE CAUSE
CORRECTIVE ACTION
with air flow meter at compressor and
at plant for a drop in cfm.
or crushed sections.
B. Aeration chamber contents has a
greyish-brown to black appearance.
Slight to strong septic odor observed.
Compressor is running and good
turbulence is noted. Poor quality
effluent has a grey color.
1. Heavy hydraulic surge flows due to
excessive grey water discharges
from laundry or kitchen activities.
Generally this problem observed
only on commercial applications.
Residential systems will usually be
characterized by light or sporadic
usage comprised mostly of laundry.
1. For commercial applications, provide
surge tank to eliminate surge flows.
Residential systems may improve
operation by reducing frequency of
laundry to 1-2 loads per day.
NOTE: The use of a large pretank may increase the severity of
the problem because of the
shock load caused by heavy
short-term water usage (ie.,
laundry).
C. Aeration chamber has a clear
appearance with very few solids
(MLSS<5%). Effluent is clear, no
odor. White suds observed in
aeration chamber.
1. Light loading to NAYADIC resulting in
complete oxidation (digestion) of solids
in plant.
1. No action required if effluent is clear.
Typical of intermittent use. (See
also Section III - D).
D. Aeration chamber has the same
appearance as III-C (above).
However, the effluent is somewhat
turbid. Settleable solids test indicates
<5% solids with very fine suspended
particles in supernatant.
1. Excessive aeration due to light loading
of plant. Turbidity in effluent due to "ash"
particles that settle very slowly.
1. Reduce air by providing timer on
compressor. Settings should cause
the compressor to run 2 hours and
be off for 2 hours. Contact factory
before making this change.
E. Aeration chamber has greyish
appearance with a slightly septic
odor. Systems has been in use for
less than 6 months.
1. Oversized septic tank preceeding
the NAYADIC causing slow start-up.
This problem is more noticeable during
cold weather.
1. Seed plant with 100 gal. of fresh
activated sludge to help initiate
start-up.
2. Excessive surge flows (grey water) due
to heavy laundry activities. (Problem
2. Spread out laundry and limit to 2-3
loads/day. Once the plant achieves
NAYADIC
4
Rev: 11/08/11
TROUBLE-SHOOTING CHECKLIST
PROBLEM/CONDITION OBSERVED
F. Aeration chamber has a grey,
dishwater appearance. Effluent
has a grey septic odor. Accumulation
of grease balls are observed.
POSSIBLE CAUSE
CORRECTIVE ACTION
is worse when NAYADIC is preceeded
by a large septic tank).
normal operation, the laundry usage
may be increased somewhat.
Extreme condition (or commercial
application) may require flow
equalization.
1. Organic overload due to excessive
use of garbage disposal (See also
cause #3 below).
1. Eliminate discharge of food scrap,
grease, oil, etc. into garbage
disposal.
2. Excessive laundry usage.
2. See Section III-E corrective action.
3. Insufficient air being supplied. The
minimum air flow on all models except
the M2000A should be at least 5.0 cfm.
NOTE: Older M6A plants may have a
Gast 323 compressor which would have
a minimum air flow of 3.0 cfm.
3. Check airflow (cfm) at compressor
and at NAYADIC. If appropriate for
specific Model, check dissolved
oxygen in aeration tank. Shut off
compressor 10-15 minutes before
test. If DO is less than 1.0 ppm
during peak usage period, contact
factory for assistance.
1. Normal start-up period of 6-8 weeks
is required to attain sufficient numbers
of bacteria. During this period treatment
efficiency may not be at its highest,
especially during periods of hydraulic
surge loading, (ie. laundry periods).
1. No major action is required.
Reducing the frequency of laundry
will help. Re-check plant in 4-6
months unless other problems
develop sooner.
2. Septic tank is installed prior to the
NAYADIC. This problem is usually
apparent when the daily flow is light
or when excessive laundry usage
occurs.
2. Reduce frequency of laundry until
plant achieves normal operation
(6-8 weeks). Seeding the NAYADIC
with 100 gallons of fresh "activated"
sludge may reduce start-up period.
IV. CLARIFIER (Settling Chamber)
A. (Start-up) Effluent is slightly turbid or
cloudy. Slight odor detected. Plant
is in the first 3 months of operation.
Excessive amount of white suds in
aeration chamber.
NAYADIC
5
Rev: 11/08/11
TROUBLE-SHOOTING CHECKLIST
PROBLEM/CONDITION OBSERVED
POSSIBLE CAUSE
CORRECTIVE ACTION
Extreme cases may require the
removal of septic tank.
6
B. Effluent has very fine suspended
particles which settle slowly leaving
a clear supernatant.
1. Over-aeration
1. Refer to Section III-D.
C. Effluent contains brown suspended
solids. Condition is more noticeable
during periods of heavy water usage.
System has not been pumped in 2-3
years. Settleable solids test indicates
sludge volume > 50%.
1. Heavy build-up of MLSS (mixed
liquor suspended solids) due to
normal, long-term usage.
1. Pump NAYADIC. Refer to
"Maintenance Procedures: Pumping
(wasting) sludge".
D. Excessive (>5 inches) of scum has
accumulated in 6-12 months of use.
Grease balls may be observed in
aeration chamber. System requires
pumping on a frequent basis.
1. Over-use (or abuse) of garbage
disposal.
1. Discontinue dumping grease, food
scraps, etc. into the disposal. This
material should be put in garbage
can.
2. Excessive use of powdered laundry
2. Use liquid detergent or the
detergent. "concentrated" powders.
E. Excessive (>5”) of scum has accumulated
In 6-12 months of use. Noticeable odor
from scum layer. Aeration chamber has
very low suspended solids (MLSS).
1. Settled sludge or inorganic solids (i.e., paper, 1. Contact the factory for advice and
trash, etc) may be restricting return of solids
the proper equipment to shorten the
into aeration chamber. This may be caused
draft tube. This can be done
by the draft tube being too close to the bottom
without pumping the tank.
Of the tank.
F. Excessive solids carry-over with
Effluent aeration chamber has
Normal color but sludge (MLSS)
Settles slowly, forming a light floc
that does not compact. Most common
with commercial (especially food service)
facilities.
1. Overabundance of “filamentous” microorganisms that prevent compaction and
settling of sludge. The presence of these
organisms should be confirmed by laboratory
(micro-biological) examination.
1. Contact the factory for specific
recommendations.
Rev: 11/08/11
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