operator`s manual
GRANITE 1300 SERIES
COMBINATION LATHE/MILL/DRILL
OPERATOR’S MANUAL
Updated April, 2008
170 Aprill Dr., Ann Arbor, MI, USA 48103
Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
www.smithy.com
© 2008 Smithy Co. All rights reserved (Revision 3).
170 Aprill Dr., Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA 48103
Toll Free Hotline: 1-800-476-4849
Fax: 1-800-431-8892
International: 734-913-6700
International Fax: 734-913-6663
All images shown are from Granite Classic 1324 model.
All other images for other Granite models are specified.
All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced or transmitted in any form
by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise,
without prior written permission of Smithy Co. For information on getting permission for
reprints and excerpts, comments, or suggestions, contact info@smithy.com
While every precaution has been taken in the preparation of this manual, Smithy Co. shall not
have any liability to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damage caused or
alleged to be caused directly or indirectly by the instructions contained in this manual.
Please see section on warranty and safety precautions before operating the machine.
Printed and bound in the United States of America.
Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction
Welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-1
Contact Information and Customer Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-2
Chapter 2: Safety
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-1
Symbols Used in this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-1
Shop Safety Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-2
Machine Safety Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-3
Chapter 3: Inventory Check List
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-1
Items Mounted to your machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-1
Items Packed in the larger Smithy Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-2
Items Packed in smaller Smity Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4
Items Packed in Plastic Bag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-5
Additional Items for GN-IMX Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-5
Chapter 4: Machine Overview
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-1
Major Features Identified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-1
Millhead Components and Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-3
Powerhead Components and Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-5
Pulley Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-7
Carriage Asssembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-8
Carriage Assembly - Compound Angle Toolpost . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-11
Tailstock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-12
For Granite MAX and IMX Series Machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-13
Chapter 5: Preparing Your Machine For Operation
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-1
Assembly of Minor Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-1
Drill Chuck and Arbor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-1
Arbor Plug . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-2
Mill Spindle Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-2
Cleaning and Lubricating Your Machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-3
Lubrication Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-3
Lubrication Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-3
Gearbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-4
Ways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-5
Carriage Assembly - Saddle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-5
Carriage Assembly - Cross-Slide Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-6
Compound Angle Toolpost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-6
Cross-Slide Screw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-6
Leadscrew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-7
Oil Drip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-7
Quick Change Gearbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-7
Tailstock Barrel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-8
Mill/Drill Clutch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-8
Adjusting Gibs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-9
Carriage Assembly - Saddle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-9
Carriage Assembly - Cross-Slide Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-10
Compound Angle Toolpost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-11
Tailstock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-12
Adjusting Backlash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-13
Cross-Slide Screw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-13
Cross-Slide Screw to the Front Screw Mount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-13
Cross-Slide Screw to Brass Nut and Nut to the Saddle . . . . . . . .5-14
Longitudinal Leadscrew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-15
Half-Nut to Leadscrew Backlash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-16
Mill Feed Backlash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-16
Adjusting the fit between the Worm Gear
and Pinion Gear Shaft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-16
Adjusting the fit of the Quill Gear to the Quill Rack . . . . . . . . . . . .5-17
Adjusting Drive Belt Tension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-19
Adjusting Millhead Belt Tension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-19
Adjusting Lathe Belt Tension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-19
Becoming Familiar with Operating Your Smithy Granite . . . . . . .5-20
Running in the Lathe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-21
Running in the Mill/Drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-22
Chapter 6: Tooling Installation
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-1
Setting-up Lathe Turning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-1
Lathe Spindle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-1
Removing D1-4 Camlock Tooling from the Lathe Spindle . . . . . . . .6-2
Installing D1-4 Camlock Tooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-2
Installing Tailstock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-3
Installing Compond Angle Toolpost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-3
Installing Tooling into the Compound Angle Toolpost . . . . . . . . . .6-3
Setting-up Tooling in the Mill/Drill Spindle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-4
Aligning Tooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-4
Installing R-8 Tooling with the Drawbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-4
Removing R-8 Tooling from the Drawbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-5
Chapter 7: Manual Operations
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-1
Changing Between Lathe and Mill Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-1
Manual Feeding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-2
Mill/Drill Spindle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-2
Coarse Feed Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-3
Fine Feed Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-3
Cross-Slide Table and Carriage Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-3
Cross-Slide Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-3
Carriage Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-4
Chapter 8: Speeds and Feeds
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-1
Speed and Feed Rates Defined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-1
Setting the Spindle Rotational Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-2
High Range Speed Set-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-3
Mid Range Speed Set-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-3
Low Range Speed Set-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-4
Feed Chart Explained . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-5
Sample Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-8
Chapter 9: Powerfeeding
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-1
Powerfeeding Defined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-1
The Jog Knob . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-4
Step-by-Step Lathe Powerfeeding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-4
Step-by-Step Mill Powerfeeding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-5
Chapter 10: Threading
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-1
Leadscrew Safety Clutch Adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-1
Basic Threading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-2
Changing Gears . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-3
Cutting Inch Threads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-4
Using the Threading Dial to Cut Inch Threads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-5
Cutting Metric Threads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-6
Chapter 11: Machine Maintenance Schedule
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11-1
Before Each Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11-1
After Each Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11-1
10 Hours (Daily) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11-2
25 Hours (Daily) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11-2
110 Hours (Yearly) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11-2
Chapter 12: Troubleshooting
Powerfeed and Thread Cutting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-1
Carriage/Milling Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-2
Lathe Turning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-3
Milling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-4
Drilling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-4
Drive System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-5
Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-6
Chuck and Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-6
Leadscrew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-8
Granite Series Leadscrew Handwheel
Fabrication and Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-18
Chapter 13: Machine Specifications
Granite 1324 Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13-1
Granite 1340 Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13-3
Chapter 14: Diagrams and Parts List
Lathe Bed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-1
Lathe Bed and Handwheel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-2
Motor and Mount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-3
Headstock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-4
Headsctock Clutch Mechanism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-7
Pulley Box for Models Prior to May 2003 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-8
Pulley Box for Models After May 2003 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-9
Pulley Box (Prior to May 2003) List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-10
Pulley Box (After May 2003) List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-11
Mill/Drill Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-12
Compound Angle Toolpost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-17
Tailstock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-19
Carriage Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-22
Apron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-25
Gearbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-30
Speed Reduction Pulley 40-300G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-34
Granite 1340 Stand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-35
Appendix A: Machining Reference Guide
How to Determine Speeds and Feeds for
Lathe Turning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-1
Turning Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-1
Cutting Speed and Feed for High Speed Steel Tools . . . . . . . . . . .A-3
How to Determine Speeds and Feeds for Milling . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-5
Feeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-6
Up Milling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-6
Down Milling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-6
Feed Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-6
How to Form Blank Cutters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-6
High Speed Steel Cutters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-6
Materials Other Than Steel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-8
Bits for Turning and Machining Brass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-9
Special Chip Craters and Chip Breakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-9
Using a Center Gauge to Check V-Thread Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-9
Acme or Other Special Threads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-10
Carbide-Tipped Cutters and Cutter Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-10
When To Use Differnt Kinds of Endmills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-11
Endmill Cutters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-11
Plain Milling Cutters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-12
Side Milling Cutters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-13
Slitting Saws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-13
Angle Milling Cutters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-13
Form-Relieved Cutters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-14
Flycuttters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-14
How to do Threading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-14
Cutting Right-hand Threads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-16
Cutting Left-hand Threads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-17
Cutting Multiple Threads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-17
Cutting Internal Threads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-17
Cutting Speed From Internal Threads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-18
Cutting Threads on a Taper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-18
Appendix B: Inch Feed Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-1
Machine Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C-1
Introduction 1
Welcome
Congratulations on the purchase of your Smithy Granite machine. We welcome
you to the Smithy family. Smithy strives to provide you with the best in machine
tools. Please read through this manual carefully to ensure that you get the most
out of your Granite 3-in-1 lathe-mill-drill.
The purpose of this manual is to give beginning thru advanced machinists the
information needed to operate the Smithy Granite 1300 series. It will teach you
about the machine’s parts and how to care for them. Most of the photographs
in this manual show the GN-1324 model. Individual model variations will be
noted as necessary. This manual is complete and current at the time of
printing*. In our continuing effort to bring you the best in machine tools,
changes may be made. Please visit us at www.smithy.com for the latest
updates.
This manual—and any other manuals associated with this Smithy machine—
should remain with the machine. If ownership changes, please include the Quick
Start Manual and the Operating Manual with the machine.
Please read the operating manual carefully and closely follow the procedures
described. If you don’t understand how your machine works, you risk injury to
yourself or others. Misuse of the machine can lead to damaging it or your
project. To learn more about general machining practices, Smithy offers books
that meet the needs of machinists with varying levels of experience. We also
suggest your local library as a resource. Enrolling in a machining class will give
you the best knowledge of machining.
*Last Update: 06/16/2008
Version 1.02
1-1
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Suggestions or Comments
We are interested in any suggestions you might have to improve our products
and services. Feel free to contact us with your suggestions by phone or in
writing. If you have comments about this operator’s manual, or if you have a
project you’d like to share with other Smithy owners, contact the Smithy
Company, P.O. Box 1517, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1517. You can also e-mail
info@smithy.com 24 hours a day.
Questions?
If you have questions not covered in the manuals, please call our toll-free number:
1-800-476-4849
Our friendly service technicians are available Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. You can also e-mail your questions 24 hours a day to
info@smithy.com.
Customer Information
Please record the information below about your Smithy machine. Having this information
readily available will save time if you need to contact Smithy for questions, service,
accessories, or replacement parts.
Model number:_____________________________________
Serial Number: ____________________________________
Purchase Date: ____________________________________
Delivery Date: ____________________________________
We look forward to a long working relationship with you, and thank you again
for putting your trust in Smithy.
1-2
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
Safety 2
Overview
Smithy machines are proven to be safe and reliable; however, if abused or operated
improperly, any machine can cause injury. Please read this manual carefully before you
start machining. Proper use will create a safe working environment and prolong the life
of your machine.
Symbols Used In This Manual
In this manual, the symbols below draw attention to specific operating issues.
CAUTION
Potential hazard, unsafe
situation, or potential
equipment damage that may
result in injury to yourself or
damage to your machine.
DANGER
Hazardous situation which if not
avoided could result in series
injury or death.
WARNING
Potential hazard, unsafe
situation, or equipment damage
could result in death or serious
injury.
! NOTICE !
Alerts user to helpful and proper
operating instructions.
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2-1
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Shop Safety Rules
Your workshop is only as safe as you make it. Take responsibility for the safety of those
who use or visit it. This list of rules is by no means complete, so remember that common
sense is a must.
DANGER
Smithy strongly discourages the use of casters or wheels on metal-working machine
benches. The weight of the machine could result in the bench tipping while being moved.
Once the machine is mounted, consider your workbench to be permanent. If you must
move the machine, first remove it from the bench
WARNING
1. Read this manual thoroughly before operating your machine. Don’t try to do
more than you or your machine can handle. Understand the hazards of operating a
machine tool. In particular, remember never to change speeds or setups until the machine
is completely stopped and never operate it without first rolling up your sleeves.
2. Wear proper clothing. Avoid loose-fitting clothes, gloves, neckties, or jewelry that
could get caught in moving parts. If you have long hair, tie it up or otherwise keep it from
getting into the machine. Always wear non-slip footwear.
3. Protect yourself. Use ANSI approved safety glasses, goggles, or a face shield at all
times. Use safety glasses designed for machinery operation; regular glasses will not do.
Have extras available for visitors. Know when to wear a face mask or earplugs as well.
4. Keep your work area clean and organized. Cluttered work areas and benches
invite accidents. Have a place for everything and put everything in its place.
5. Childproof your work area and keep children away from the machine while
it is in use. Childproof your shop with padlocks, master switches, and starter keys or
store the machine where children do not have access to it.
6. Never operate your machine under the influence of drugs and alcohol.
7. Keep track of tools. Remove adjusting keys and wrenches from the machine before
operating. A chuck key or misplaced Allen wrench can be a safety hazard.
8. Avoid accidental starts. Turn the switch to the OFF position before plugging in the
machine. Turn the speed dial to zero before starting your machine.
9. Ground your machine. The machine has a three-conductor cord and three-prong,
grounding-type plug. Never connect the power supply without proper grounding
10. Keep your mind on your work. By paying attention to what you are doing and
avoiding distractions you will spend many safe, enjoyable hours in your workshop.
11. Never leave your machine running unattended.
2-2
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
2: Safety
Machine Safety Rules
WARNING
1. Stop the machine before servicing. Stop the machine before making changes,
removing debris, or measuring your work.
2. Don’t over reach. Don’t reach over the machine when it’s operating. Keep your hands
out of the way.
3. Turn the switch OFF. Turn the switch to off before plugging in the machine. Turn
the speed dial to zero before starting your machine.
4. Use proper tooling. Use only recommended accessories and understand how they
should be used before trying them out. Don’t try to make a tool into something it isn’t or
attempt to use a tool in inappropriate ways. Remember to always use the proper tooling
for the material you are cutting. Reference a general machining guide such as Machinist
Ready Reference for recommended tooling for your material.
5. Secure your work. Before starting your machine, be certain that your workpiece is
properly and securely mounted. Flying metal is dangerous!
6. Do not run you machine beyond its limits of travel. Before starting your
project, ensure that your work area does not go beyond the limits of travel on your
machine. Going beyond the limits of travel will cause serious damage to your machine
which will not be covered by your warranty.
7. Run your machine at recommended spindle speeds and feed rates. Always
cut at the recommended speed and feed rates for the type of metal that you are cutting
for optimum performance. Do not begin your cut until the machine has reached the full
and proper speed.
8. Do not change the direction of the spindle rotation or leadscrew rotation
while your machine is running. Changing the rotation direction of the spindle or
leadscrew while your machine is running could cause serious damage to your machine.
9. Do not stop the spindle by hand. Always use your on/off switch to stop the spindle from rotating.
10. Do not clear chips by hand. Metal chips are very sharp and can easily cut your
hand. Use a brush to clear chips.
11. Protect bed ways. When removing or installing tooling from your lathe spindle,
place a piece of wood or other material across the bed to protect the ways from being
damaged if the tooling is dropped.
12. Keep your machine maintained. Always replace worn or damaged parts before
using your machine to prevent damage to your machine or the operator. Follow the
maintenance schedule outline in this manual for peak performance.
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2-3
3 Inventory Check List
Overview
It is a good idea to take inventory of the parts of your machine soon after it is
unpacked. By doing so, you can quickly determine if any parts are missing. In addition,
should you find it necessary to return the machine to Smithy for any reason, the
inventory will ensure that all the parts you received have been returned.
A third reason to perform an inventory is to become familiar with the names of all of
the parts of your Smithy machine. To aid with this, the following parts lists have
individual photos of the items listed.
Items Mounted To Your Machine
The items listed below are shipped mounted on the Smithy Granite. Kindly check if the
following items are present. Use the box before the item as your reference.
3-1
!
6” 3 Jaw Chuck
Part # G03046
Quantity 1
!
Compound Angle Toolpost
Part # 45-110
Quantity 1
!
7/16” Drawbar
Part # K99-168
Quantity 1
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
3: Inventory Check List
Items Packed in the Larger Smithy Box
The following items are packed in the larger of the two Smithy boxes.
!
Air Mask
Part # 15-020
Quantity 1
!
Protective Goggles
Part # 15-015
Quantity 1
!
Ear Plugs
Part # 15-025
Quantity 1 Set
!
Oil Can
Part # 80-100
Quantity 1
!
7/16” T-Slot Nuts
Part # 35-105
Quantity 2
!
!
End Mill, 4 FL HSS
1/4” w/3/8” Shank
Part # 50-402
Quantity 1
!
End Mill, 4 FL HSS
3/8” w/3/8” Shank
Part # 50-406
Quantity 1
!
End Mill, 4 FL HSS
1/2” w/3/8” Shank
Part # 50-410
Quantity 1
!
End Mill
Adapter R-8
Part # 65-028
Quantity 1
!
Lathe Bit Set
Part # 43-000
Quantity 1 Set
(AR-8,AL-8,BR-8,
BL-8 & E8)
!
Lathe Chuck Key
Part # C30532
Quantity 1
Vise, 0-90º Adjustable Angle
Part # 32-110
Quantity 1
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3-2
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
!
Drill Chuck,
JT3, 0.8-16 mm
with key
(for millhead)
Part # 72-003
Quantity 1
!
Drill Chuck Arbor,
R-8/JT3
Part # 73-080
Quantity 1
!
Drill Chuck,
JT33, 0.8-13 mm
with key
(for tailstock)
Part #72-001
Quantity 1
!
!
3-3
Drill Chuck Arbor,
MT3/JT33
Part # C30523
Quantity 1
Arbor Plug
(M12 x 1.5 x 20 mm
setscrew)
Part # S12898
Quantity 1
!
MT3 Dead Center
Part #41-003
Quantity 1
!
MT4 Dead Center
Part # 41-004
Quantity 1
!
6” Adjustable Wrench
Part # G20006
Quantity 1
!
13/16 mm Open End
Wrench
Part # G20131
Quantity 1
!
10/12 mm Open End
Wrench
Part # G20101
Quantity 1
!
Allen Wrench, 3 mm
Part # G20003
Quantity 1
!
Allen Wrench, 4 mm
Part # C30540
Quantity 1
!
Allen Wrench, 5 mm
Part # C30542
Quantity 1
!
Allen Wrench, 8 mm
Part # C30536
Quantity 1
!
Allen Wrench, 10 mm
Part # G20002
Quantity 1
!
Belt Set Millhead Belt
(Shipped On Machine)
Part # G05042 -A900 Or
Part # G05042A 1/2”
Quantity 1
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
3: Inventory Check List
!
Spindle to Speed Reduction
Pulley Belt
Part # G02043-A630 Or
Part # G02043A 1/2” x 27
Quantity 1
!
Spindle to Motor Pulley Belt
(Shipped On Machine)
Part # G03020 Or
Part # G03020A-1/2” x 41”
Quantity 1
!
Speed Reduction Pulley To Motor
Pulley Belt
Part # G02034-A710 Or
Part# G02034A-1/2” X 30
Quantity 1
!
Crossfeed Handle &
Rack & Pinion
Travel Handle
Part # G08031
Quantity 2
Items Packed in Smaller Smithy Box
!
Outside Jaws for
Lathe Chuck
Part #
Quantity 1
!
Spindle Cover
Part # G05057
Quantity 1
!
!
!
Millhead Crank
Part # G05123
Quantity 1
Handle for
Leadscrew
Handwheel
Part # G01028
Quantity 1
Wrench, Compound
Angle Toolpost
Part # G06039
Quantity 1
!
Spanner Wrench
Part # G20001
Quantity 1
!
Metric Gear Set
Gear,33 Teeth
Part # G10116
Quantity 1
!
Gear,63 Teeth
Part # G10117
Quantity 1
!
Gear,64 Teeth
Part # G10118
Quantity 1
!
Gear,66 Teeth
Part # G10119
Quantity 1
!
Gear,80 Teeth
Part # G10120
Quantity 1
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3-4
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Items Packed in Plastic Bag
!
DVD, Machine
Tool Basics
Part # 12-003
Quantity 1
!
Manual Cover
Part # 83-942
Quantity 1
!
Operator’s Manual
Part # 83-950
Quantity 1
Additional Items for GN-IMX Series
!
Quick Change
Toolpost*
(Mounted)
Part # 45-271
Quantity 1
!
Live Center**
(Large Box)
Part # 41-103
Quantity 1
!
3” Superlock Vise***
(Large Box)
Part # K99-310
Quantity 1
!
Chuck Guard
(Mounted)
Part # 15-610
Quantity 1
*
**
***
Quick Change Toolpost replaces standard turret for IMX series.
Live Center additional item for IMX series.
Superlock Vise replaces angle vise for IMS series.
Missing Items?
If you find that an item is missing or defective from your Quick Start Tool Pack
Call Us TOLL FREE 1-800-476-4849
or send an e-mail to info@smithy.com
within 30 days of receiving your machine so that we may assist you immediately.
Our sales and service technicians are available 8am to 5pm ET, Mondays to Fridays.
3-5
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
Machine Overview 4
Overview
This chapter will help you to familiarize yourself with the Smithy Granite 1300 models and
standard accessories. Figures 4.1 through 4.15 identify the major components and
functions of your machine. The photographs in this section depict a Granite 1324 model.
Distinguishing features are noted.
Major Features Identified
Millhead
Tailstock
Powerhead
Carriage
Assembly &
Compound
Angle Toolpost
Figure 4.1 Granite 1324 Front View
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4-1
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Millhead
Tailstock
Carriage
Assembly
Figure 4.2 Granite 1324 Back View
4-2
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
Motor
Assembly
4: Machine Overview
Millhead Components & Functions
The photos below show the front and back of the millhead of the Smithy Granite machine.
The millhead holds the tooling necessary to perform milling and drilling operations. The
following section identifies the components and functions of the millhead.
A
B
F
G
I
H
J
E
C
D
Figure 4.3 Granite Millhead (Front & Back)
A. Spindle Cover - The spindle cover protects the spindle from dust and debris. It also
protects the operator from injury. The spindle cover should be in place whenever the
machine is in operation. The drawbar is located under the spindle cover.
B. Millhead Cover - The Millhead cover protects the belt and pulleys of the millhead.
The cover should always be in place when the machine is in operation.
C. Quill Lock - The quill lock locks the mill/drill quill in place during a horizontal milling
operation or while changing tools.
D. Mill/Drill Spindle - The mill drill spindle is an R-8 taper. It holds and rotates the the
tooling used during milling and drilling operation. The spindle also moves in and out of
the millhead quill. The quill is an internal part which is not seen in this picture.
E. Drill Press Handles - The drill press handles move the quill in and out of the mill
head during a drilling operation. Rotating the handles in a clockwise direction moves the
quill downward, out of the millhead casting.
F. Coarse Feed/Fine Feed Clutch - Pulling out the coarse feed/fine feed clutch knob
engages the drill press handles/coarse feed. Pressing the knob in engages drill/mill fine
feed hand wheel. To easily engage/disengage the clutch, rotate the drill press handles
slightly while pulling/pushing the knob.
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4-3
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
G. Drill/Mill Fine Feed Handwheel - The handwheel controls the fine feed movement
of the quill in and out of the millhead.
H. Height Adjustment Drive - The height adjustment drive works with the millhead
crank to raise and lower the millhead. Insert the millhead crank over the stud, as in
Figure 4.4, rotate clockwise to raise the millhead and counter clockwise to lower the
millhead.
One revolution of the crank handle will move the millhead 0.25 inches.
Figure 4.4 Adjusting Millhead Height
I. Millhead Locking Studs - The locking studs secure the millhead in position. Insert
the millhead crank over the upper stud, rotate counterclockwise to unlock the stud.
Repeat the process on the lower stud. Position the millhead in the desired position and
lock BOTH locking studs before starting your machine.
J. Bellows - Bellows keep debris off of the Z-Axis column and rack.
4-4
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
4: Machine Overview
Powerhead Components & Functions
A
B
D
C
I
E
J
H
F
G
Figure 4.5 Granite Powerhead Parts (Front View)
A. Lathe/Mill Clutch - This clutch engages the mill portion of the Smithy Granite LatheMill-Drill when pulled out and moved to the left. When moved to the right the lathe is
engaged. Center position is neutral.
B. Speed Dial - The speed dial controls the motor rpm. Rotating clockwise increases the
speed.
C. Forward/Reverse & On/Off Switch - The red toggle button underneath the yellow
cover reverses the direction of the motor. The green middle button is the “power-on”
button. The large red button is the stop button and cuts power to the machine.
D. Powerfeed Function Lever - Moving the lever to the left, powers the lathe
powerfeed. Moving the lever to the right powers the mill powerfeed.
E. Leadscrew Rotation Direction Handle - Positioning this handle to the right
causes the leadscrew to rotate clockwise. Positioning to the left causes the leadscrew to
rotate counterclockwise.
F. Selector Lever 1-7 - Used in conjunction with Selector Lever I-III to set feed rate or
pitch setting for cutting threads.
G. Selector Lever I-III - Used in conjunction with Selector Lever I-7 to set feed rate
or pitch setting for cutting threads.
H. Jog Knob - Assists in meshing gears inside the quick change gear box which is
controlled by selector levers 1-7 and I-III. Rotating the knob helps align gears
I. Oil Level/Sight Glass - Normal oil level is at the half way point, add oil if the level
of oil in the sight glass drops below this level.
J. Quick Change Gear Box - Houses the gears that determine feed rates and gear
settings for cutting threads.
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4-5
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
B
A
C
Figure 4.6 Granite Powerhead Parts (Back View)
A. Oil Fill Port - Located directly above the motor, it holds 8-10 oz of 30 weight oil.
Remove the screw to add oil as necessary.
B. Belt Tension - Moves the motor pulley up and down releasing tension on the belts.
Pull the lever down to loosen the tension on the belt and push the lever up to add
tension to the belts.
C. DC Motor - Runs on standard 110 volt power.
4-6
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
4: Machine Overview
Pulley Box
L-3
L-4
L-5
L-2
L-10
L-6
L-1
L-7
L-9
L-8
Figure 4.7 Granite Pulley Box (Inside)
The pulley box houses the drive pulleys, gears and power components.
L-1. Motor Pulley - A three-step pulley attached to the shaft of the motor.
L-2. Speed Reduction Pulley - Sits between the motor and spindle pulley and is used
for low speed operations when increased torque is desired.
L-3. Spindle Pulley - A two-step pulley attached to the main lathe spindle.
L-4. Change Gear A - A 30-tooth gear installed at the factory. The change gears only
need to be reconfigured when cutting metric threads.
L-5. Change Gear B - A 60 tooth gear installed at the factory. The change gears only
need to be reconfigured when cutting metric threads.
L-6. Change Gear C - A 66 tooth gear that rides behind change gear B (60 tooth gear)
and is installed at the factory. The change gears only need to be reconfigured when
cutting metric threads.
L-7. Change Gear D - A 60 tooth gear installed at the factory.
L-8. SCR Module - Converts the AC power coming into the machine to DC power for the
motor.
L-9. Inch/Metric Selector - Used when cutting threads. Pull the lever out toward the
operator when cutting metric threads. When cutting inch (SAE) threads, make sure the
lever is pushed in toward the machine.
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4-7
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
! NOTICE !
There is a neutral position with this selector. Be sure that it is completey
engaged in either the metric or inch mode before you begin your threading
operation.
L-10. Leadscrew Clutch- Is designed to slip to reduce damage to the machine
apron if the carriage is accidentally run into the head of the machine.
Carriage Assembly
I
A
B
G
E
H
D
C
F
Figure 4.8 Granite Carriage Assembly
The carriage assembly consists of:
• Crossslide table
• Carriage; the lower portion of the table that rides on the bed ways,
• Apron; the portion that hangs from the cross-slide table in front of the
machine.
The carriage moves by hand or by power along the bed ways. Its function is to support
the cutting tool rigidly while in the lathe mode and to secure the workpiece while in the
mill mode. The carriage can be locked into place with the lock found on the back of the
carriage.
The figure to the above right identifies and defines the major components of the carriage
assembly.
A. Cross-SlideTable - The top portion of the carriage assembly. It supports the
compound angle toolpost (not pictured) which holds the lathe cutters and tooling. The
table also supports your workpiece when operating the mill. The cross-slide table has four,
7/16” sized t-slots for securing tooling and mounting workpieces.
4-8
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
4: Machine Overview
B. Cross-Slide Handwheel - This handwheel moves the table toward and away from
the operator along the Y-Axis. Rotating the handwheel clockwise moves the table away
from the operator while moving it counterclockwise moves the table toward the operator.
C. Longitudinal Handwheel - This handwheel is located at the bottom left of the
carriage assembly. Manually rotating the handwheel clockwise will move the carriage
assembly along the X-Axis towards the tailstock end of the machine. Rotating the
handwheel counter clockwise will move the the carriage assembly towards the headstock
end of the machine.One revolution moves the assembly approximately .040”.
NOTE: This handwheel is for coarse movements only. Use the handwheel at the end of
the leadscrew for fine movement (0.001”)
D. Half-Nut Engagement Lever - This lever closes the half-nut on to the leadscrew.
When the half-nut is engaged, in the down position, the table assembly will be powered
to move right and left along the X-Axis leadscrew.
! NOTICE !
The half-nut engagement lever is only engaged for rapid
travel or threading operations.
E. Longitudinal and Lateral Powerfeed Selector - This selector determines whether
the carriage will be powered to move along the X-Axis (longitudinal axis) or the Y-Axis
(lateral axis). When the lever is in the upper position the table will move along the Y-Axis.
When moved into the lower position, the table will move along the X-Axis. Center
position is neutral.
F. Threading Dial - The threading dial is used to coordinate consecutive cuts when
cutting threads. Restarting each cut from the same point on the dial ensures that each
cut follows the same path, leading to accurately machined threads.
! NOTICE !
The threading dial can only be used when cutting inch
(SAE) threads.
G. Saddle - The saddle supports the cross-slide table and moves along the X-Axis of the
machine.
H. Apron - The apron houses the gear mechanism for the X and Y-Axis powerfeed.
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4-9
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Figure 4.9 Granite Carriage Gib Adjustment Screws (Quantity 4)
I. Carriage Gib Adjustment Screws - These screws press a small metal plate (the gib)
to the ways of the bed, increasing or decreasing the tension when moving the cross-slide
assembly. (Figure 4.9)
Figure 4.10 Granite Carriage Lock Y-Axis
J. Carriage Lock (Y-Axis) - is an M8 screw. Turning the screw clockwise will prohibit
movement of the carriage along the Y-Axis. (Figure 4.10)
Figure 4.11 Granite Carriage Lock X-Axis (Rear View)
K. Carriage Lock X-Axis - is an M8 screw located on the back side of the carriage.
Turning this screw clockwise locks the carriage to the bedways.
Figure 4.12 Granite Carriage Travel Indicators
L. Travel Indicators - mark the limit of travel on the crossfeed table. Running the top
portion of the indicator located on the tailstock side of the cross-slide table past the lower
indicator on the bottom portion of the table (carriage) will cause serious damage to your
machine.
4-10
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
4: Machine Overview
WARNING
Do not let the top indicator mark travel past the bottom indicator
mark on the right side (side facing tailstock) of the carriage assembly.
Figure 4.13 Granite Carriage Gib Adjustment Screws (Rear View)
M. Carriage Gib Adjustments Screws - when screwed in, these screws press a small
metal plate (the gib) to the ways of the bed, increasing or decreasing the tension when
moving the carriage assembly along the bed ways.
Carriage Assembly-Compound Angle Toolpost
A
B
C
I
D
H
G
E
F
Figure 4.14 Granite Compound Toolpost
The compound angle toolpost is bolted to the cross-slide table with 10mm T-Bolts. The
compound angle toolpost swivels to any angle horizontal to the lathe axis. The
calibrations on the swivel base are in degrees, (60º-0º-60º). The following section
identifies and explains the functions of the toolpost.
A. CATP (Compound Angle Toolpost) Lock down handle - The handle rotates
counterclockwise to loosen the tension on the four position turret, allowing the user to
turn the turret 90º per turn.
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4-11
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
B. Turret Bolts - These bolts secure your tooling to the turret.
C. 4 Position Turret - The turret holds up to 1/2” tooling. The turret can support up to
4 tools.
D. Compound Slide - The compound slide moves the tooling in towards and away from
the workpiece.
E. Floating Dial - The floating dial can be repositioned to zero at any point to measure
tool feed in or out.
F. CATP Carriage -The carriage supports the compound slide and is bolted directly to
the swivel base.
G. Swivel Base - The swivel base secures the CATP and allows it to rotate 360º in either
direction. A calibrated scale at the bottom of the base shows positioning in degrees from
60º-0º-60º.
H. Slide lock - This slide lock locks the compound slide to the carriage to secure the slide
in position.
I. Compound Gib Adjustment Screws - These screws press a small metal plate (the
gib) to the ways of the bed, increasing or decreasing the tension when moving the
compound slide.
Tailstock
A
C
F
E
B
G
D
Figure 4.15 Granite Tailstock (Front & Back)
The tailstock holds tooling that supports the end of a workpiece. It also holds tooling such
as center drills, reamers and taps. It moves along the bed of the machine and can be
stopped and locked in position at any point on the bedways. The photos above depict the
tailstock of the Granite machine. This section will identify and define major components
and functions of the Granite tailstock.
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4: Machine Overview
A. Tailstock Body - This is the main casting of the tailstock.
B. Off-Setting Lock Bolts -These bolts lock the top base of gthe tailstock and prevent
it from moving off center.
C. Tailstock Handwheel -This handwheel moves the tailstock barrel in and out of the
tailstock body.
D. Tailstock Lock -This locks the tailstock body to the bed ways.
E. Tailstock Barrel Lock -This locks the barrel into position.
F. Tailstock Barrel -The barrel holds the MT3 tooling that supports the end of the
workpiece.
G. Tailstock Off-Setting Bolts -These bolts allow the user to offset the toolpost for
cutting tapers.
For Granite MAX and I-MAX Series Machines
The following are some of the modifications and improvements for the Granite MAX and
Granite Industrial MAX machine series.
A. 30% Longer Millhead - An extended millhead to
accept larger workpieces for more efficient milling
operations.
B. Crash Protection System (Y-Axis) - A unique shear pin design that protects your
machine from major damage if the machine is run past its limits of travel. Found inside
the carriage assembly.
C. Electrical Overload Protection - Improvement on the powerhead section of the
machine that safely shut offs the machine for prolonged motor life.
D. Extended Tailstock Travel - Drill or ream deeper with 3” travel, also reach farther
across the table with the center securely placed in the tailstock.
E. Quick Change Toolpost (For Idustrial MAX Series
Only) - The fastest, most convenient way to change a tool.
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4-13
Preparing Your Machine
5 For Operation
Overview
The Quick-Start Manual you received before delivery of your Smithy machine
provides detailed instructions for mounting and locating your machine. Please
complete those instructions if you have not already done so. As you unpack, it
is a good idea to inventory the parts. (See chapter 3 for a complete list.) Before
operating your machine, you should assemble the remaining components of
your machine, clean the machine, and lubricate it. This section will guide you
through those steps.
Assembly of Minor Components
The installation of the drill chuck, arbor and arbor plug; mill spindle covers; and several
handles should be completed according to the procedures described below.
Drill Chuck and Arbor
Before proceeding both the arbor and the chuck should be thoroughly cleaned to ensure
a good fit. Once cleaned attach the chucks to the respective arbors. Follow the steps
below to achieve the best possible fit.
Chuck
Jacobs Taper
MT3 Arbor
Figure 5.1 Installing Arbor into Chuck
Step 1: Place the arbor in a freezer for about 1 hour to slightly shrink the metal.
Step 2: Remove the cold arbor from the freezer and place it into the drill chuck.
Step 3: Use a soft mallet or a block of wood to tap the end of the arbor.
Step 4: Allow the arbor to return to room temperature.
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5: Preparing Your Machine For Operation
Arbor Plug
! NOTICE !
MT3 Arbor
Plugs
Figure 5.2 Installing Arbor Plug
Install the plug setscrew (S12898 into the tailstock arbor before inserting the
arbor into the tailstock. A plug is installed in the tailstock arbor (the MT3 to JT33
arbor, part number C30523), which allows the ejector pin inside the tailstock to
eject the arbor when the tailstock barrel is retracted.
Morse Taper 3 (MT3) tooling is used in the tailstock of the machine. R-8
tooling is used in the millhead of the machine and used in conjunction with a
drawbar.
Mill Spindle Cover
Figure 5.3 Installing Mill Spindle Cover
The mill spindle cover slides over the flange on the top of the millhead.
WARNING
Do not operate your machine without the mill spindle
cover. Doing so could cause harm to yourself or your
machine.
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Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Handles
Figure 5.4 Installing Handles
Install any handles or handwheels that have been removed for shipping. Handles can be
hand installed and tightened with a flat-head screwdriver. Remove and reverse the
tailstock handwheel.
Cleaning & Lubricating Your Machine
Smithy machines are shipped with a light protective grease coating that must be removed
prior to use. Use a noncorrosive kerosene or white mineral spirits to remove the coating.
WD-40® also works well.
Once cleaned, your Smithy must be lubricated. Make sure to lubricate carefully and
thoroughly before starting the machine. Use a pump oil can and a supply of good
quality SAE30 weight nondetergent oil or 30-weight compressor oil. Lubricants can be
obtained at most home and building supply stores. A lubrication point chart can be found
on the backside of the millhead.
Lubrication Schedule
Lubrication depends a lot on the use of your machine and your climate. The schedule
below is intended to be used as a guide, use your best judgement for lubricating your
machine based on your use and environment.
Check Oil
Oil Ports
Add Oil
Before each use
Before each use
As Needed
See Chapter 11 for a complete maintenance schedule.
Lubrication Points
Follow the instructions on the next page and refer to the lubrication chart on the
backside of the millhead.
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5: Preparing Your Machine For Operation
Gearbox
Open the gearbox door. Lightly grease the gears with a good quality molybdenum or
lithium grease or motorcycle-chain lubricant.
Figure 5.5 Brush a thin layer of lithium grease over
the gear quadrant in the pulley box
Check the oil sight glass under the chuck. If necessary, add oil until the sight glass is half
full. The oil-fill plug is at the back of the headstock above the motor. Be careful not to
overfill, the gearbox requires only 8 to 10 ounces of oil.
Oil should be at
the mid point in the
site glass.
Figure 5.6 The oil level should be half way in the oil site glass
located under the lathe spindle.
Figure 5.7 Add oil through the oil port located
on the back side of the headstock.
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5-4
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Ways
Run the carriage as far to the left as possible. Put a few drops of oil on the ways. Run
the carriage to the extreme right and repeat.
Carriage Assembly-Saddle
Lubricate the four oil buttons of the cross-slide table
There are two buttons on both the right (tailstock) side and left side (head stock) of the
carriage for the ways.
Figure 5.8 Carriage Assembly Saddle Oil Points
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5: Preparing Your Machine For Operation
Carriage Assembly-Cross-Slide Table
There is one button on each side of the cross slide for the cross-slide ways.
Figure 5.9 Carriage Assembly Cross Slide Table Points
Compound Angle Toolpost
Oil the two buttons on the top of the compound rest.
Figure 5.10 Oil the Compound Angle Toolpost at its oil points
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5-6
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Cross-Slide Screw
Oil the cross-slide screw. The first oil button is located on the apron next to the crossslide dial and the other is found on the top of the cross-slide table.
Oil the buttons between the cross-slide and longitudinal-feed handwheels (at right).
Figure 5.11 A & B Cross-Slide Screw Apron Oil Points
and Cross-Slide Screw Table Oil Points
Leadscrew
Oil the support for the right end of the leadscrew. Put a few drops of oil along the
leadscrew itself.
Figure 5.12 Leadscrew Oil Point
Oil Drip
Oil the end of the oil-drip trough from inside the gear box.
Figure 5.13 Oil Drip
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5: Preparing Your Machine For Operation
Quick Change Gear Box
Use a spray can of lithium grease or motorcycle-chain lubricant. Spray inside the
quick-change gearbox through the slot for the powerfeed (1-7) selector.
Figure 5.14 Oil the Quick Change Gear Box through the Powerfeed Slot
Tailstock Barrel
Oil the two buttons on top of the tailstock.
Figure 5.15 Tailstock Barrel Oil Points
Mill/Drill Clutch, Fine Feed
Oil the button on top of the mill/drill clutch housing.
Figure 5.16 Mill/Drill Clutch Oil Points
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5-8
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Adjusting Gibs
The Granite 1300 models have a series of straight gibs. The gibs are found on the
carriage, the cross-slide table, compound angle toolpost and the tailstock. These gibs
should be adjusted periodically to maintain accuracy and smooth operation.
! NOTICE !
Always make sure your machine is well lubricated before
adjusting the gibs.
Carriage Assembly-Saddle
Adjust the gibs on the saddle assembly using the procedure below.
Figure 5.17 Carriage Gibs
Step1: Loosen the four jam nuts on the back side of the saddle with the 6” adjustable
wrench that was shipped with your machine.
Step 2: Back out the gib adjusting screws found on the back side of the saddle two turns
with the 4 mm allen wrench.
Step 3: Using the 4 mm Allen wrench, tighten each of the four gib adjustment screws
until they are lightly touching the gib.
CAUTION
Do not apply excessive force.
Step 4: Back the gib adjustment screws out 1/8 to 1/4 turn.
Step 5: With the adjustment screws now set at roughly the same position, make the
fine adjustments on each individual screw. Starting with one of the inner screws, slowly
tighten the screw while moving the carriage assembly by turning the leadscrew
handwheel until you feel slight resistance.
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5: Preparing Your Machine For Operation
Step 6: Once slight resistance is felt, hold the gib adjustment screw in position and
tighten the jam nut.
Step 7: Repeat steps 5 and 6 with the other inner screw and then with the two outer
screws.
Adjusting the Gibs on the Carriage Assembly Cross-Slide Table
Adjust the gibs on the cross-slide table using the procedure below.
Figure 5.18 Gib Adjustment Screws - Cross-Slide Table
Step 1: Loosen the four jam nuts on the tailstock side on the table with the 6” adjustable
wrench that was shipped with your machine.
Step 2: Back out the gib adjusting screws two turns.
Step 3: Using the 4 mm Allen wrench, tighten each of the four gib adjustment screws
until they are lightly touching the gib.
CAUTION
Do not apply excessive force.
Step 4: Back the gib adjustment screws out 1/8 to 1/4 turn.
Step 5: With the adjustment screws now set at roughly the same position, make the
fine adjustments on each individual screw. Starting with one of the inner screws, slowly
tighten the screw while moving the cross-slide table by turning the cross-slide handwheel
until you feel slight resistance.
Step 6: Once slight resistance is felt, hold the gib adjustment screw in position and
tighten the jam nut.
Step 7: Repeat steps 5 and 6 with the other inner screw and then with the two outer
screws.
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5-10
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Adjusting the Gibs on the Compound Angle
Toolpost
Adjust the gibs on the compound-angle toolpost using the procedure below.
Figure 5.19 Gib Adjustment Screws - Compound Angle Toolpost
Step 1: Loosen the jam nuts on the side of the compound-angle toolpost with the
6 inch adjustable wrench.
Step 2: Back out the gib adjustment screws out two turns .
Step 3: Using the a flat-head screw driver, tighten the two gib adjustment screws until
they are lightly touching the gib.
CAUTION
Do not apply excessive force.
Step 4: Back the gib adjustment screws out 1/8 to 1/4 turn.
Step 5: With the adjustment screws now set at roughly the same position, make the
fine adjustments on each individual screw. Starting with the screw closest to the handle,
slowly tighten the screw while moving the compound angle toolpost by turning the
compound-slide handle until you feel slight resistance.
Step 6: Once slight resistance is felt, hold the gib adjustment screw in position and
tighten the jam nut.
Step 7: Repeat steps 5 and 6 with the remaining gib adjustment screw.
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5: Preparing Your Machine For Operation
Adjusting the Gibs on the Tailstock
Adjust the gibs on the tailstock using the procedure below.
Figure 5.20 Gib Adjusting Screws - Tailstock (Shown with tailstock lock removed)
Step 1: Unlock the tailstock.
Step 2: Remove the outer setscrews with the 4 mm Allen wrench provided.
! NOTICE !
There are two setscrews in each hole. To tighten the
tailstock gibs the outer setscrews need to be removed.
Step 3: Using the 4 mm Allen wrench, tighten each gib adjustment screw until it
touches the gib lightly.
Step 4: Back each gib adjustment screw out 1/4 turn.
Step 5: Reinstall each outer setscrew and bottom it against the inner screws to lock the
corresponding inner screw in place.
Step 6: Repeat steps 2 through 5 on the remaining screw.
! NOTICE !
Unlike the carriage, cross-slide and compound-angle toolpost gib
adjustments, you will not feel a slight resistance when moving the
tailstock. The tailstock will be locked to the ways with the tailstock
lock. The objective of adjusting the tailstock is to ensure that the
tailstock remains parallel to the ways.
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5-12
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Adjusting Backlash
Backlash is lost motion in the screw. The user will notice an initial small movement in the
handwheel before the screw responds. The procedures in this section will help minimize
backlash.
Adjusting Backlash from the Cross-Slide Screw
Before making any adjustments to the cross-feed screw system, all the gibs on the table
and carriage system should be checked and adjusted as described previously.
Excessive backlash in the cross-slide can come from three different places.
• The fit of the cross-slide screw to the front screw mount
• The fit of the cross-slide screw into the brass crossfeed nut
• The fit of the brass cross-feed nut into the carriage casting
There are adjustments for each of these areas. Follow the procedures below to make
each adjustment.
Adjusting Backlash Cross-Slide Screw to the Front
Screw Mount
Step 1: Loosen the two nuts that hold the cross-slide handwheel on to the end of the
cross-slide screw.
Figure 5.21 Loosen the two outer nuts holding the handwheel
Step 2: Tighten the inner nut slowly while checking the ease of movement of the
cross-slide handwheel. When the screw starts to become difficult to turn, loosen the nut
slightly so that the screw turns freely.
Step 3: Hold the inner nut in place with a wrench and tighten the outer nut against the
inner nut to lock both nuts in position.
5-13
Step 4: Recheck the backlash.
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5: Preparing Your Machine For Operation
Cross-Slide Screw to Brass Nut & Nut to Saddle
If there is still excess backlash after the previous adjustment, the backlash is either
between the cross-slide screw and the brass nut or between the brass nut and the
saddle. The following procedure covers both adjustments.
Step 1: Remove the rear support on the backside of the cross-slide table.
Figure 5.22 Remove mount on backside of the table
to access the brass cross slide nut
Step 2: Loosen the allen bolt that locks the brass nut into the saddle. (See Figure 5.23)
Step 3: Use the handwheel to move the cross-slide table toward the operator side of
the machine. Watch under the table from the backside and stop before the cross-slide
screw comes out of the brass nut.
Step 4: Slowly tighten the four adjusting screws on the brass nut, one at a time, until
a slight drag is felt while turning the cross-slide handwheel. It is best to continue
turning the handwheel back and forth while adjusting the nut to balance ease of
operation and backlash.
Adjusting Screws
Saddle
Brass Nut
Cross-slide table
2 Piece Brass Nut
Cross-slide screw
Saddle
Table view from
rear of machine.
Adjusting Screws
Locking Bolt
Figure 5.23 Tighten the adjusting screws on the brass nut
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Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Step 5: Reinstall the rear support and tighten the locking bolt for the brass nut.
Step 6: Recheck the backlash on the cross-slide.
! NOTICE !
If you find that the four adjusting screws will not stay in place, use
a small amount of thread-locking compound to keep the screws
tight. If you use a Lock-Tite® product, use the Lock-Tite® Purple,
not Red which will not allow for future adjustments
Adjusting Backlash from the Longitudinal
Leadscrew
Excessive backlash in the longitudinal feed can come from two places.
• The fit of the longitudinal feed screw to the right-hand mounting trestle
• The fit of the half-nut to the feed screw
Engage the half-nut lever. Slowly turn the longitudinal handwheel clockwise as viewed
from the right end of the machine and watch the gap between the dial and the feed screw
mounting trestle. Reverse the direction you are turning the feed screw and see if the gap
increases slightly. If so then there is some backlash in the mounting. Follow the
procedure below to reduce the backlash.
Adjusting the fit of the longitudinal feed screw
to the right-hand mounting trestle
Lead Screw &
Dial
Mounting
Trestle
Spanner
Nut
Handwheel
Retaining Screw
& Washer
Figure 5.24 Adjusting backlash from the leadscrew
Step 1: Remove the retaining screw and washer in the right end of the longitudinal feed
handwheel.
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5: Preparing Your Machine For Operation
Step 2: Unscrew the handwheel from the end of the feed screw.
Step 3: Using a punch and a small hammer, tighten the spanner nut about one-eighth
of a turn and recheck the backlash in the leadscrew.
Step 4: If backlash is acceptable, replace the handwheel, washer, and retaining screw.
If more adjustment is needed, repeat step 3 above.
Half-Nut to Leadscrew Backlash
Worn threads on the half-nut can cause excessive backlash in the longitudinal direction.
Half nuts are made of a brass-like material and do wear out over a period of time. The
only fix for a worn half nut is to replace the worn nut with a new one.
! NOTICE !
The longitudinal handwheel (Rack & Pinion) is intended for rapid,
coarse feed and is not calibrated for fine measurement. There is no
backlash procedure for this mechanism.
Adjusting Mill Feed Backlash
Excessive backlash in the vertical fine feed can come from two places.
• The fit between the worm gear and the pinion gear shaft
• The fit of the quill gear to the quill rack
Adjusting the Fit Between the Worm Gear and
Pinion Gear Shaft
Follow the procedure below to adjust the fit between the worm gear and pinion gear.
Step 1: Remove the fine-feed handwheel and dial.
Step 2: Loosen the two setscrews that hold the left and right worm gear bearing supports in place. They are located on top of the vertical feed housing at the left and right
end of the worm gear.
! NOTICE !
The bearing housing has two holes in the outside surface
to allow a punch or spanner wrench to turn the housing.
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Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Setscrews
Dial
Bearing
Housing
Handwheel
Worm Gear & Shaft
(Inside Casting)
Drill Press Handles
Pinion Gear
(Inside Casting)
Figure 5.25 Adjusting backlash from the mill feed
Step 3: Use a small spanner wrench or a punch with a small mallet to rotate the
bearing supports one at a time. The support bearings are mounted slightly off center in
these housings and rotation of the housings will raise or lower the worm gear down
towards the pinion gear. The bearing support on the right should be rotated clockwise
and the left should be rotated counter clockwise. Rotating the right and left bearing
supports should be done in conjunction with each other.
Step 4: Turn the right housing and watch the worm gear shaft to see in which direction
it moves. Turn the housing in the direction that will move the worm gear down towards
the pinion gear.
Step 5: Move to the left housing and repeat step 4.
Step 6: Alternate moving the front a little and then the rear a little while turning the
worm gear to check for binding.
Step 7: Stop as soon as resistance is felt in the rotation of the worm gear. The
adjustment is completed.
Step 8: Tighten the setscrews to the bearing housings to lock adjustment in place.
Adjusting the fit of the Quill Gear to the Quill
Rack
Adjusting the fit between the quill shaft feed gear and the quill rack is done using the
split section of the feed gear. The feed gear is made up of two parts.
•
5-17
A wide section that is locked to the feed shaft by a key and has a fixed
position on the shaft
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5: Preparing Your Machine For Operation
• Another section that is not as wide and is not keyed to the shaft. It is held in
place on the shaft via a locking nut and can be repositioned as desired.
The narrow section can be offset from the wide section to give the effect of a gear with
thicker teeth. This in turn will give a tighter tooth-to-tooth fit between the feed shaft gear
and the rack on the spindle.
Adjustments are made on the split gear from up inside the mill head casting. This is
accessible from under the mill head between the quill and the support column. Follow the
procedure below to make these adjustments.
Step 1: Look into the millhead casting and locate the items shown in the drawing 5.26.
Step 2: Turn the feed shaft with the coarse feed handwheel until the locking tab of the
locking washer is accessible. Lock the quill in that position with the quill lock lever on the
rear of the millhead.
Step 3: Bend the locking tab straight and use a small punch to loosen the spanner nut
just enough to be able to rotate the adjustable gear with the same punch and small hammer.
Step 4: With the quill still locked in position, have someone turn the coarse feed
handwheel clockwise until it removes any backlash. Then have them hold the handle
in this position until the completion of step 6. This will move the bottom part of the
wide fixed gear to the left as viewed from below.
Figure 5.26 Adjusting the quill gear to the quill rack
Figure 5.27 Adjusting the quill gear to the quill rack
Step 5: Using the punch and small hammer, tap the narrow movable gear toward the
right. This will make the gear assembly appear to have thicker teeth.
Step 6: Tighten the spanner nut with the punch and hammer.
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Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Step 7: With the quill still locked, move the coarse feed handle and check for a
reduction in backlash.
Step 8: Bend the locking tab back into one of the slots in the spanner nut.
Adjusting Drive Belt Tension
Adjust the belt tension before using your machine and recheck it periodically.
Adjusting Millhead Belt Tension
Step 1: Remove the millhead cover.
Step 2: Position the roller to the outside of the belt.
Step 3: Loosen the shaft with a wrench on the two flats at the
top of the shaft.
Step 4: Position the roller against the flat side of the belt and
apply light thumb pressure to tension the belt.
Step 5: Tighten the roller shaft.
Figure 5.28 Adjusting
Millhead Belt Tension
Adjusting Lathe Belt Tension
The lathe-belt tensioner is made up of a Quick Release Handle and the Tension
Adjustment Knobs. Raise the Quick Release Handle to apply tension and down to release
tension. Proper setting of the tension follows:
Step 1: Raise Quick Release Tension handle all the way up
Step 2: Adjust the tension by turning the knurled knob clockwise to increase tension or
counter clockwise to loosen tension. Once the belt tension is adjusted the Quick Release
Handle can be used to release and apply tension for positioning belts.
Figure 5.29 Adjusting Lathe Belt Tension - Shown in the down position
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5: Preparing Your Machine For Operation
Becoming Familiar with Operating Your Smithy
Granite
Once the machine has been lubricated and adjusted and before you begin working, take
time to become familiar with the operation of your Smithy machine.
Although all Smithy machines are run at the factory, it is wise to put your machine
through a break-in run before putting it to work.
Follow the steps below.
Step 1: With the machine unplugged, set the variable speed selector to 0.
Step 2: Set the leadscrew direction selector in neutral and disengage the powerfeed/
thread selector (1-7).
Step 3: Verify that the single belt on the machine in the pulley box is on the mediumspeed range. (Granite machines are shipped in this position, but it is always best to
confirm this before starting your machine.)
Step 4: Place the lathe/mill clutch selector into the lathe position.
Step 5: Plug the machine into an appropriately grounded circuit.
Step 6: Push the green button to start the motor. There is an intentional 6 to 8 second
delay before the lathe chuck begins turning.
To reverse the motor, push the red button to stop the button. Lift the cover over
the rocker switch only after the motor has stopped, and push the rocker switch only after
the motor has stopped. Press the rocker switch either up or down to reverse the motor
rotation. Set the variable speed selector to zero and then push the green button to start
the machine
CAUTION
Do not change motor rotation until the motor and spindle
are fully stopped. Changing directions while the motor is
running can damage the motor.
Step 7: Use the variable speed selector to increase the speed gradually to
approximately 1000 rpm and let the lathe run for 15 minutes.
Step 8: Turn the variable speed selector to zero and push the red stop button.
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5-20
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Running in the Lathe
Perform these operations to familiarize yourself with lathe operation.
Step 1: Position the carriage and cross-slide table to a mid-range position.
Step 2: Keep the lathe/mill clutch in the lathe position from the previous steps.
Step 3: Position the powerfeed function selector to lathe operation.
Step 4: Position the leadscrew direction selector. This is just an operation check, it
doesn’t matter if the position is in the clockwise or counter clockwise position.
Step 5: Position the powerfeed/thread selector lever (1-7) in position 7.
Step 6: Position the powerfeed/thread selector lever (I-III) in position III.
Step 7: Push the green button to start the motor.
Step 8: Use the variable speed selector to slowly increase motor speed to between 150
and 200 rpm.
Step 9: Engage the half nut engagement lever and observe the longitudinal movement
of the carriage assembly. Disengaged the half nut.
! NOTICE !
The half nut engagement lever is used primarily for
threading operations and for manual longitudinal feed
movement.
Step 10: Move the longitudinal and lateral powerfeed selector to the longitudinal
position. (Move the handle to the left and down.) Observe the slower longitudinal
movement of the carriage assembly.
Step 11: Move the longitudinal and lateral powerfeed selector to the neutral position.
! NOTICE !
The longitudinal and lateral powerfeed selector is used to
move the carriage assembly for all lathe operations
except threading.
Step 12: Move the longitudinal and lateral powerfeed selector to the lateral position.
(Move the handle to the right and up.) Observe the lateral movement of the cross-slide
table.
Step 13: Move the longitudinal and lateral powerfeed selector to the neutral position.
Step 14: Turn the variable speed selector to zero.
Step 15: Push the red mushroom stop switch to stop the lathe.
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5: Preparing Your Machine For Operation
CAUTION
Figure 5.30 Travel indicator marks
Remain aware of the travel limits, Figure 5.30, during the initial running
in. To prevent damage to your machine, do not run the table past the
travel indicator marks.
Running in the Mill/Drill
Perform these operations to familiarize yourself with mill and drill press operation.
Step 1: Position the carriage and cross-slide table to a mid-range position.
Step 2: Engage the mill with the lathe/mill clutch.
Step 3: Position the powerfeed function selector to mill operation.
Step 4: Push the green button to start the motor.
Step 5: Use the variable speed selector to slowly increase motor speed rpm. Verify that
the speed rotation is correct. It the rotation is not correct, the STOP the machine, reverse
the toggle switch under the yellow cover on the main switch panel and then restart.
Step 6: Move the longitudinal and lateral powerfeed selector to the longitudinal
position. (Move the handle to the left and down.) Observe the slower longitudinal
movement of the carriage assembly.
Step 7: Move the longitudinal and lateral powerfeed selector to the neutral position.
Step 8: Move the longitudinal and lateral powerfeed selector to the lateral position.
(Move the handle to the right and up.) Observe the lateral movement of the cross-slide
table.
Step 9: Move the longitudinal and lateral powerfeed selector to the neutral position.
Step 10: Turn the variable speed selector to zero.
Step 11: Push the red mushroom stop switch to stop the machine.
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5-22
6 Tooling Installation
Overview
This section contains information on installing tooling for your lathe and mill.
Setting-up Lathe Tooling
There are three main areas to set-up tooling when you are using the lathe
portion of your Granite 1300 series tool:
•Lathe Spindle
•Compound Angle Toolpost
•Tailstock
Lathe Spindle
Spindle Flange
Figure 6.1 D1-4 Lathe Chuck
Any tooling that is mounted to the lathe spindle will use the D1-4 camlock
mounting system.
Three studs on each attachment are inserted into matching holes in the lathe
spindle. (See figure 6.1 for example.) A camlock socket for each stud is rotated
with the lathe chuck key to lock it securely in place. Index marks on the spindle as well as the camlock sockets must be aligned properly for installation or
removal of the studs from the holes.
The position of the index marks on the spindle flange and on the tooling should
meet at the 12 o’clock position when they are in the unlocked position.
Standard rotation is clockwise to lock the studs into postion and counter
clockwise to loosen. Each cam should turn approximately 140º to 180º for a
secure lock on the stud. Adjustment of stud depths can be made if necessary to
obtain proper rotation.
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6: Tooling Installation
Cam in Unlocked Position
Spindle
Flange
Unlocked
D1-4 Camlock
Tooling
Cam in Locked Position
Spindle
Flange
Locked
D1-4 Camlock
Tooling
Figure 6.2 D1-4 Lathe Spindle in Locked & Unlocked Positon
Removing D1-4 Camlock Tooling From the
Lathe Spindle
Step 1: Protect the ways by placing a wooden board or protective material
such as styrofoam on the ways below the lathe spindle.
Step 2: Insert the chuck key provided into each of the three camlock sockets
on the spindle nose and turn counterclockwise to the unlocked position.
Step 3: Using a soft mallet, tap the tooling off the spindle.
If you prefer you can also mount a piece of stock in the chuck and then
“wiggle” the tooling loose.
WARNING
When the tooling comes loose, be prepared to
support it immediately.
Installing D1-4 Camlock Tooling
Tooling attaches quickly to the lathe spindle with three camlocks.
Step 1: Check the sockets on the spindle flange to make sure the index marks
are at the 12 o’clock/unlocked position.
Step 2: Align the three mounting studs to the spindle nose and slide the chuck
into place.
Step 3:
With the chuck in position, insert the chuck key provided into each
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Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
socket on the spindle flange and rotate each camlock clockwise to the locked
position. The indicator hashmark on each camlock socket should be somewhere
between the 5 and 6 o’clock position.
If the desired rotation on any cam lock cannot be obtained, the mounting studs
may need to be adjusted. (See Troubleshooting in chapter 12.)
Tailstock
The tailstock will accept any tooling with a Morse Taper #3 shank or arbor. This
type of mount is a friction-fit taper, so it is important that the mounting
surfaces be clean and dry. You will need to extend the tailstock barrel
approximately 1/2 to 3/4 inches before inserting any tooling, and then firm
hand pressure is all that is needed to lock tooling into the taper.
Figure 6.3 Install a plug into MT3 arbors when using them
in the tailstock of a Granite machine
! NOTICE !
You can use either the tang or drawbar style arbors, however,
it is important that the threaded drawbar hole be plugged with
a bolt or setscrew before inserting into the barrel so that the
item will be automatically ejected when you retract the barrel.
Installing Compound Angle Toolpost
The compound-angle toolpost (CATP) is mounted to the top of the cross-slide
table using 10mm t-bolts, washers and nuts. You can substitute t-nuts and the
proper length studs in place of the t-bolts if desired. Mount the toolpost on the
table surface wherever there is a t-slot that allows the tooling to reach your
workpiece.
Installing Tooling into the Compound Angle
Toolpost
The four-sided turret can hold up to four individual cutters up to a 1/2 inch in
size. To insert tooling, loosen the screws on top of the turret with the provided
wrench. Insert tooling and tighen the screws again. Each cutter can be moved
into place by loosening the top turret lock and rotating the turret counter
clockwise 90º. Each cutter in the turret must be adjusted so that the cutting tip
is aligned with the center line of the workpiece. This is achieved by installing
shims or feeler gauges under the cutter before tightening it in place.
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6: Tooling Installation
Turret Lock
Turret
Figure 6.4 Compound Angle Toolpost Installed on Cross-Slide Table
Setting-up Tooling in the Mill/Drill Spindle
This section will explain tool mounting in the mill/drill spindle.
The mill spindle of the Granite 1300 series machines is an R-8 (Bridgeport®)
standard. It features a straight shank with a flared nose for centering the tool
and a keyway for alignment.
Aligning Tooling
Use the procedure below to align your tooling in the R-8 spindle:
Step 1: Select the appropriate tool or fixture.
Step 2: Wipe the surfaces of the tooling and spindle interior to ensure a
proper fit. Grease or debris on either surface will cause misalignment.
Step 3: Align the keyway in your tooling with the key inside the mill spindle
and insert the fixture in the lower mill spindle opening.
You can feel the key in the mill spindle with your finger. It is located just beyond
the tapered portion of the spindle.
Securing R-8 Tooling with the Drawbar
Use the procedure below for the drawbar:
Step 1: Remove the mill spindle cap located on the top of the mill belt cover
and insert a drawbar (SAE standard 7/16-20) from the top of the spindle.
Step 2: Tighten the drawbar clockwise into the fixture or tooling that is
inserted into the mill spindle opening. Use the spanner wrench to stabilize the
spindle while tightening the drawbar.
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Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Step 3: Use a wrench to apply torque to the drawbar. This will draw
fixture firmly into the spindle.
the
Step 4: Reinstall the spindle cap when the fixture/tooling is in place.
Figure 6.5 Use the supplied spanner wrench to hold
the spindle in place while tightening the drawbar
! NOTICE !
When installing or removing tooling with sharp edges, always
cover the sharp edges with a shop towel or appropriate covers
or guards to prevent injuries. Always shield yourself
appropriately when using hammers.
Removing R-8 Tooling from the Drawbar
Use the procedure below to remove tooling using the drawbar method:
Step 1: Stabilize the drawbar with the spanner wrench and use a wrench to
apply force counterclockwise to the drawbar nut.
Step 2: Loosen the drawbar two to three turns counterclockwise.
Step 3: Use a deadblow or brass hammer to strike a downward blow on the
top of the drawbar to loosen the fixture from the spindle.
Unscrew the drawbar only two to three turns before striking. Unscrewing it
further before striking the drawbar can damage the threads on the drawbar or
the fixture.
Step 4:
Continue turning the drawbar until it unscrews from the tooling.
Step 5: After the tool is free from the spindle, hold the fixture with your free
hand or use a catch box to prevent the tooling from dropping onto your machine
or workpiece.
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6: Tooling Installation
A common catch box consists of a cardboard or wooden box eight to ten
inches square with four- to six-inch high sides. Rags loosely thrown in the
bottom of the box provide padding for the tool to land in when the drawbar is
removed from the fixture and the fixture falls from the mill spindle.
NOTES:
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6-6
7 Manual Operations
Overview
This section contains information on manual machine operations that are
specific to the Granite 1300 series machines. General machining practices can
be found in one of the many machining reference books that Smithy carries
such as the Home Machinist Handbook, item 10-005. Appendix A includes a
machining guide.
General Safety Operations
CAUTION
For your own safety and the safety of those around you,
follow the rules below.
DANGER
Never leave or walk away from an operating machine.
DANGER
Do not change motor rotation direction until the motor and
spindle are fully stopped. Changing directions while the
motor is running can damage the motor.
! NOTICE !
Observe all general safety rules as presented in Chapter 2.
Instructions in this section apply to both lathe and mill operations.
Changing Between Lathe and Mill Operation
The lathe/mill clutch lever is located on the upper front surface of the lathe
pulley box. Turning the spindle slowly by hand will help align the drive gears
smoothly when engaging the lathe/mill clutch.
To change the position of the selector, pull the knob outward and move the
selector to the desired position. There are three positions for the selector.
• The center position is marked with an “O.” This is the neutral position
where neither the mill or lathe spindle are engaged.
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7: Manual Operations
• The right position is marked with a lathe-chuck icon. This position
engages the lathe spindle for all lathe operations.
• The left position is marked with a mill-spindle icon. This position
engages the mill spindle for all mill operations
Figure 7.1 Lathe/Mill Clutch Shown in the Neutral Position
WARNING
Turn the machine off and wait for the motor and
spindle to stop turning before shifting between
positions.
Manual Feeding
Feeding is the act of moving the cutter through the workpiece or moving the
workpiece along the cutter while the machine is in operation.
Manual feeding uses a handwheel to move the quill or the carriage and crossslide table.
When manually feeding your machine, make sure the selector lever (1-7)
is not engaged into any position before attempting to manually feed the
carriage assembly or cross-slide table.
Position the carriage assembly and table in the mid-range position at the
beginning of any setup to ensure the pending operation will not proceed past
the mechanical limits of travel on any moveable axis.
Mill/Drill Spindle
When in the mill mode, the rotating cutter can be fed down into the stationary
workpiece one of two ways:
• The spindle coarse feed is used for positioning during setup and for
feeding drill-press operations.
• The spindle fine feed is used for milling operations and can also be
used for drilling where a more precise control of the drill bit may be
required.
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Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Coarse Feed Operation
Figure 7.2 Mill/Drill Press Clutch pulled out, engaging the Drill Press
Pull the fine-feed clutch knob outward while slowly rotating the drill press
handles back and forth. Once the knob is pulled out, the drill press handles can
be used for coarse feeding by rotating the handles clockwise to feed into the
workpiece and counter clockwise to feed away from the workpiece.
Fine Feed Operation
Figure 7.3 Mill/Drill Clutch pushed in engaging the Fine Feed
Push the fine-feed clutch knob inward while slowly rotating the drill press
handles to engage the fine feed. Turning the fine-feed handwheel allows for
slow and precise movement of the spindle up or down. The dial behind the
handwheel indicates the amount of vertical movement. The dial is calibrated in
0.001”
There is no powerfeed available for vertical movement of the mill spindle.
Cross-Slide Table and Carriage Assembly
In milling, the crossfeed table and carriage assembly feed the workpiece into
the rotating cutter. In lathe work, the same mechanisms move the tool into the
rotating workpiece.
Cross-Slide Table
The cross-slide table is moved laterally by rotating the cross-slide handwheel.
Rotate the handwheel clockwise to move the cross-slide table away from the
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7: Manual Operations
operator or counterclockwise to move it toward the operator.The dial is
calibrated in 0.001”. One rotation moves the table 0.10”.
Figure 7.4 The Cross-Slide Table Handwheel
Carriage Assembly
The carriage assembly (crossfeed table and saddle) is moved left and right by
the longitudinal handwheel (coarse feed) on the front of the apron or the finefeed handwheel on the right end of the leadscrew.
Figure 7.5 Manually moving the carriage assembly for coarse feed
Figure 7.6 Longitudinal Fine Feed Handwheel (Left) & Half-Nut Engaged (Right)
Rotate the handwheel clockwise to move the carriage assembly toward the
tailstock end of the machine and counter-clockwise to move the carriage
assemble toward the headstock end of the machine.
The longitudinal handwheel is always engaged and movement is measured by
the dial behind the handwheel. This feed is typically used for rapid movement
of the carriage assembly.
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Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Before using the longitudinal fine feed handwheel disengage Selector Lever (17) and the Selector Lever (I-III). Move the half-nut engagement lever to the
engaged position (handle pointing down). Turn the leadscrew handwheel to
feed the carriage assembly left or right. The movement is measured by the dial
on the right end of the leadscrew. This is a very precise feed that is used for
most lathe and mill operations.
NOTES:
7-5
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
Speeds and Feeds 8
Overview
Before using the more advance features of your Granite 1300 Series Lathe-MillDrill, it is important to have a basic understanding of feeds and speeds. This
section contains information on how to set the speed and feeds rates for your
machine. We encourage you to learn and understand as much as you can about
this fundamental element of machining. A general reference guide such as the
Home Machinist Handbook or the Ready Reference are good reference guides to
assist you with this task. As always, remember to follow the general safely rules
listed below and in Chapter 2 of this manual.
CAUTION
For your own safety and the safety of those around you,
follow the rules below.
DANGER
Never leave or walk away from an operating machine.
WARNING
Do not change motor rotation direction until the motor and
spindle are fully stopped. Changing directions while the motor
is running can damage the motor.
Speed and Feed Rates Defined
Speed is how fast the spindle rotates. Feed rate is how fast the cutter moves
along the workpiece.
Speed and feed rates are calculated based on the type of material you are
cutting, the size of the material and the type of cutter being used. Refer to the
Home Machinist Handbook (Item # 10-005) or Ready Reference (Item #10-015)
for more detail. Remember, speed and feed rates are given in a range and you
will need to adjust within that range for your machine’s size and power.
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Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Setting the Spindle Rotational Speed
Once you have determined the proper speed and feed rate for the material that
you are cutting and the type of cutter that you will be using, you will need to
setup your machine to cut within the range of the selected speeds and feed
rates.
Setting the spindle speed is a two-stage operation consisting of an initial belt
position setting and a final adjustment with the variable speed selector on the
front of the gearbox.
The drive system on your machine is much like a car with a manual
transmission. It has a “transmission” with several gear ranges and a “throttle”
to vary the speeds within each gear selection.
The belt positions give you three speed ranges and the electronic control gives
fine adjustments within the selected range. The variable speed selector dial
shows the speeds for each of the three speed ranges. These speeds are
applicable to both the lathe and mill spindles.
Figure 8.1 Use the Granite Speed Dial for fine adjustments
Step 1: Refer to a machining reference guide such as the Home Machinist
Handbook or Ready reference to determine the optimal rotational spindle speed
for the materials and tooling you are using.
! NOTICE !
Many reference charts give feed and speed rates
for high speed steel cutters. Most work today is
done with carbide cutters which can cut at much
faster rates. If you are using carbide cutters,
make sure the charts you are referencing are for
carbide cutters.
Step 2: Examine the decal that surrounds the variable speed selector dial to
determine which of the three belt positions need to be selected inside of the
gearbox. The low-speed range located on the inner ring of the dial (0-400 rpm)
will require using the low-speed idler pulley and a dual-belt setup. The mid and
high-speed ranges will use a single belt that bypasses the center idler pulley.
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8: Speeds & Feeds
Step 3: Set up the belts as necessary to obtain the desired speed range. The
variable speed selector dial can be used to adjust the speed within the range.
! NOTICE !
The life of the electrical system will be greatly extended and
available machine torque increased by using the lower pulley
setting and keeping the motor speed up.
Machines purchased after mid-2003 have the speed reducer
pulley installed on the machine. A retrofit kit, part number 40300G, to add this feature to earlier machines is available from
the Smithy Sales Department at 1-800-476-4849 or at
www.smithy.com.
High Range-Speed Set-up
Use the procedure below to set up for high speed (1500 to 3000 RPM)
operations.
Step 1: Release the belt tensioned at the motor by rotating the tension lever
down.
Step 2: Position the belt around the largest sheave of the motor and the
smallest sheave on the spindle pulley.
Step 3: Tension the belt by rotating the tension lever on the motor all the way
up.
Mid Range-Speed Set-up
Use the procedure below to set up for middle speed (400 to 1500 RPM)
operations.
Step 1: Release the belt tensioned at the motor by rotating the tension lever
down.
Step 2: Position the belt around the center sheave of the motor and the
largest sheave on the spindle pulley.
Step 3: Tension the belt by rotating the tension lever on the motor all the way
up.
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Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
High Speed
Range
Mid Speed
Range
Motor
Motor
Figure 8.2 The high & mid-speed ranges only require the use of one belt
Low Range-Speed Set-up
For low-speeds (optional on early machines), you must convert to a double
drive belt configuration. Use the procedure below to set up for low speed (400
RPM or less) operations.
Step 1: Release the belt tensioned at the motor by rotating the tension lever
down.
Step 2: Remove the belt from the motor pulley by following steps 3-6 below.
Step 3: Loosen the cap screw on the shaft of the lathe/mill clutch inside the
pulley box and pull the selector lever outward to move the shifter fork arm away
from the shifter fork.
Lathe/Mill
Clutch Lever
Shifter Fork Arm
Figure 8.3 Loosen the cap screw from the lathe-mill clutch lever
Step 4: Slide the single belt off the spindle pulley and the end of the main
drive spindle.
Step 5: Loosen the bolt that holds the gear quadrant and the reduction pulley
bracket in place. This will allow the two belts you are about to install to be
properly tensioned.
Step 6: Place the larger of the two belts on the smallest motor pulley sheave
and on the largest pulley sheave of the speed reduction pulley. Place the
smaller belt on the smallest sheave on the speed reduction pulley and the
largest sheave on the main drive spindle pulley.
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8: Speeds & Feeds
Figure 8.4 Loosen the bolt of the speed reduction pulley bracket
when installing belts for the low speed
Low Speed
Range
Motor
Figure 8.5 Low Range Belt Setting
Step 7: Tension the belts by rotating the tension lever on the motor all the
way up. Tighten the bolt on the gear quadrant to lock the quadrant and the
reduction pulley in place.
Step 8: Reassemble the lathe/mill selector arm and tighten the cap screw to
secure the selector shaft in place.
Feed Char t Explained
Before setting the feed rates, it is important to know how to correctly read the
feed rate and threading chart found on the headstock of your Granite 1300
series machine.
The chart is comprised of six vertical sections (one header and five data
sections) and four horizontal sections (one header and three data sections).
Section 1 is headed by the symbol at the left. The meaning is
“Do NOT change selector handle positions while the
machine is running”. Please stop the machine while changing
feed directions, gear selections, feed-rate selections, etc.”
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Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Below the symbol is a representation of the feed gears, A, B, C, and D on the
gear quadrant. These gears are located inside the pulley box. Immediately to
the right of the gear symbols are the numbers 1 through 7, which refer to the
position of the powerfeed selection lever (1-7) on the feed transmission.
A X
B
C Below the gear symbols is the location guide for the gear numbers
D which are stamped on the face of the gears. This formula refers to
which gear number belongs in which location in order to move the
carriage or table for threading and powerfeeding.
Header
Section 1
Section 2
1”
N
A
B
Section 3
Section 4
in
in
in
Section 5
in
I
II
III
1
7
14
28 0.125 0.250 0.500 0.039 0.079 0.157 0.35 0.70
1.75 3.50
2
8
16
32 0.109 0.218 0.437 0.034 0.069 0.138 0.40 0.80
1.00 2.00 4.00
3
9
18
36 0.097 0.194 0.388 0.031 0.061 0.122 0.45
4
10
20
40 0.087 0.175 0.349 0.028 0.055 0.110 0.50 1.00
5
11
22
44 0.079 0.159 0.317 0.025 0.050 0.100
6
12
24
48 0.073 0.146 0.291 0.023 0.046 0.092 0.60
7
13
26
52 0.067 0.134 0.269 0.021 0.042 0.085
III
II
I
III
II
I
III
II
I
III
II
I
C
4.50
1.25 2.50 5.00
D
C
A
X
B
D
30 X 60
66 60
INCH
METRIC
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
1.50
3.00 6.00
(0.75)
3.25 6.50
33 X 63
80 60
Figure 8.6 Feed Rate Chart
8-6
2.75 5.50
INCH
(33)66 63
X
64 60
METRIC
8: Speeds & Feeds
Below the gear formula is a repetition of the “Do not change selector
handle positions while the machine is running” symbol.
The Header Row contains a number of symbols explained below:
1”
N
in
in
in
This symbol refers to inch thread pitches (threads per inch).
The “N” represents the
distance the carriage assembly
travels for each rotation of the spindle based on the positions
of the selector lever (I-III) and selector lever 1-7. For
example, if the distance traveled in one rotation of the
spindle is 1/10 inch per rotation, the machine will travel 1
inch in 10 rotations, yielding 10 threads per inch (tpi).
This symbol represents the longitudinal (X-Axis Travel) in
inches per spindle revolution.
This symbol represents the
inches per spindle revolution.
lateral
Y-Axis
Travel)
in
This symbol refers to the the inch thread pitch. Inch pitches
measures the distance between each thread peak.
Directly below this set of symbols is a row of Roman Numbers I-III, This row
represents the position of the selector lever (I-III) when cutting a threads or
determining a feed rate.
Section one of the chart list the inch thread pitches that can be cut with the
Granite series machines. The last row corresponding with the gear location
guide shows the position of the gears inside the pulley box. When cutting inch
threads the following gears are required:
A=30
B=66
C=60
D=60
This is the default setting from the factory.
Section two of the chart list the feed rates for the X-Axis (longitudinal feed).
The same gear set-up is required as for cutting inch threads.
Section three of the chart list the feed rates for the Y-Axis (lateral feed). The
same gear set-up is required as for cutting inch threads.
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Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Section four and five of the chart list the metric thread pitches when using the
following gear set-up:
Section 4
A=33
B=80
C=63
D=60
Section 5
A=66
B=64
C=63
D=60
Changing gears will be covered in the Threading chapter.
Sample Settings
Here are a couple of examples to illustrate the speed/feed chart.
Example 1
Settings to thread 10 threads per inch.
In section 1, locate number 10. Follow the row over to the column next to the
meshing gears which is the number 4. Follow the column up to the Roman
Numerals which is Roman Numeral I. To cut this thread you will need:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Selector lever (1-7) in position 4
Selector lever (I-III) in position I
30 tooth gear in position A
66 tooth gear in position B
60 tooth gear in position C
60 tooth gear in position D.
Set the Inch/Metric selector, found in the pulley box, to Inch.
Example 2
Setting to move the carriage assembly 0.0069 in per spindle
revolution.
Locate the rate 0.159 in section 2. Follow the row over to the column next to
the diagram of the meshing gears which is 5. Follow the column up to the
Roman Numerals which is II. To feed your carriage at this rate you will need to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Selector lever (1-7) in position 5
selector lever (I-III) in position II
30 tooth gear in position A
66 tooth gear in position B
60 tooth gear in position C
60 tooth gear in position D.
The Inch/Metric selector found in the gear box would need to be set to Inch.
These example settings will aid you in correctly setting up your machine for
powerfeeding which will be covered in the next section of this manual.
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8: Speeds & Feeds
! NOTICE !
The feed chart on your machine is in millimeters
per spindle revolution. Please see Appendix B for
feed rates based in inches per spindle revolution.
NOTES:
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8-9
9 Using Powerfeeds
Overview
The previous section of this manual explained speeds and feed and how they
are determined. This section will give you step by step instructions for using
the powerfeed on your Granite 1300 series lathe-mill-drill.
General machining practices can be found in the one of the many machining
reference books that Smithy carries such as the Home Machinist Handbook, item
10-005.
General Safety Operations
CAUTION
For your own safety and the safety of those around you, follow
the rules below and those listed in chapter 2 of this manual.
DANGER
Never leave or walk away from an operating machine.
CAUTION
Do not change motor rotation direction until the motor and
spindle are fully stopped. Changing directions while the motor
is running can damage the motor.
Powefeeding Defined
Power feeding is using the motor and gear train of the machine to provide
power to move the cross-slide table and carriage assembly along the X and
Y-axes.
The carriage can be moved longitudinally and the cross-slide table laterally
using the powerfeed capabilities of the machine. Power feeding will give a more
uniform finish on the workpiece and is available for both milling and lathe work.
9-1
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
9:Using Powerfeeding
CAUTION
The two-position powerfeed function selector must
be in either the lathe or mill position according to
which machine function is being used at the time.
Figure 9.1 Always match the Powerfeed Function lever to
the appropriate operation
! NOTICE !
If the mill/lathe clutch is in the mill position, you
must also position the powerfeed function selector
in the mill position to enable the machine to move
the table.
The powerfeed operates in either the x- or y-axis. It incorporates the quick
change gear box by engaging the Selector Lever (1-7) and Selector Lever (I-III)
as well as the carriage gearing by engaging the powerfeed lever into the
proper position.
Figure 9.2 Selector Lever (1-7) & Selector Lever (I-III)
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Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
The powerfeed engagement lever is located on the upper right side of the apron
and has a three-position gate with neutral, longitudinal (x axis) and cross feed
(y axis). The powerfeed engagement lever can be operated while the machine
is running.
Figure 9.3 Powerfeed Engagement Lever Shown with Y-Axis powerfeed engaged
Engagement of the x axis is achieved by moving the lever to the left and
pushing down and the engagement of the y axis is to the right and lifting up.
DANGER
Don’t allow the table to move beyond the travel limitations.
Before running the powerfeed, do a “dry run” by manually
feeding the cross-slide table and carriage assembly the
distance that you will be feeding your project. This will
prevent any unnecessary crashes that can cause serious
damage to your machine.
Figure 9.4 Half Nut Disengaged
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For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
9:Using Powerfeeding
! NOTICE !
When using the X-Axis powerfeed for a given feed rate,
make sure the the half nut is DISENGAGED.
! NOTICE !
If the powerfeed lever will not engage, first check the
half-nut lever.
The powerfeed will not engage if the
half-nut is engaged (down position). You may also have a
situation where the teeth on the respective gears are not
meshing. Rotate the leadscrew handwheel slightly to allow
the teeth to mesh.
The Jog Knob
The chrome knurled knob located on the upper right side of the gearbox can be used to
manually turn the gear shafts and allow the straight cut gears to mesh easier when
moving the powerfeed selector levers.
Figure 9.5 Jog Knob
Step-By-Step Lathe Power feeding
Step 1: Determine the proper speed and feed rate for the material you are
cutting and the cutter you will be using from a general reference guide such as
the Machinist Ready Reference.
Step 2: With your workpiece and tooling properly mounted, place the powerfeed selection lever in the lathe mode by moving the lever to the lathe chuck
icon all the way to the left.
Step 3: Referencing the chart on the front of the machine’s headstock, find the
desired feed rate (or the closest to the listed range for your work material
cutter.) See section 8 for a detailed chart explanation.
Step 4: Position the selector (1-7) into the position listed on the chart for the
desired feed rate.
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9-4
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Step 5: Position the selector (I-III) into the position listed on the chart for the
desired feed rate.
Step 6: Set the recommeded speed for the work stock material and cutter that
you are using. (See chapter 8 for setting speeds.)
! NOTICE !
For optimum performance, be certain to set the belts to run in the
upper portion of the suggested spindle rotation speed range.
Step 7: Before running the powerfeed do a “dry run” by manually feeding the
cross-slide table and carriage assembly the distance that you will be feeding
your project. Also, rotate the chuck by hand to verify tool clearances. This will
prevent any unnecessary crashes.
Step 8: Once your speed has been set start the machine and engage the
powerfeed selector into the desired position. (Pushing the lever up will run the
powerfeed along the Y-Axis. Pushing the lever down will engage the X-Axis
powerfeed.)
Step 9: To stop powerfeeding, disengage the powerfeed by moving the lever
into the neutral position which is half way between the Y-Axis and X-Axis
engagement.
Step I0: If you wish to reverse the direction of your cut,stop the machine and
move the leadscrew rotation lever into the opposite direction. Restart the
machine and engage the powerfeed selector lever.
Step-By-Step Mill Power feeding
Step 1: Determine the proper speed and feed rate for the material your cutting
and the cutting material you will be using from a general reference guide such
as the Machinist Ready Reference.
Step 2: With your workpiece and tooling properly mounted, place the
powerfeed selection lever in the mill mode by moving the lever to the mill
spindle icon all the way to the right. (Reference figure 9.1 above.)
Step 3: Referencing the chart on the front of the machine’s headstock, find the
desired feed rate (or the closest to the listed range for your work material and
cutter.)
Step 4: Position the selector (1-7) into the position listed on the chart for the
desired feed rate.
Step 5: Position the selector (I-III) into the position listed on the chart for the
desired feed rate.
9-5
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
9:Using Powerfeeding
Step 6: Set the recommended speed for the work stock material and cutter
that you are using. (See chapter 8 for setting speeds.)
! NOTICE !
For optimum performance be certain to set the belts to run in the
upper portion of the suggested spindle rotation speed range.
Step 7: Before running the powerfeed do a “dry run” by manually feeding the
cross-slide table and carriage assembly the distance that you will be feeding
your project. This will prevent any unnecessary crashes.
Step 8: Once your speed has been set start the machine and engage the
powerfeed selector into the desired position. (Pushing the lever up will run the
powerfeed along the Y-Axis. Pushing the lever down will engage the X-Axis
powerfeed.)
Step 9: To stop powerfeeding, disengage the powerfeed by moving the lever
into the neutral position which is half way between the Y-Axis and X-Axis
engagement.
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9-6
10 Threading
Overview
This section of your manual covers threading operations on your Granite 1300
series lathe-mill-drill. This section will build the information presented in
chapters 8 and 9. If you have not read these sections, please do so before
continuing.
General Safety Operations
CAUTION
For your own safety and the safety of those around you, follow
the rules below and those listed in chapter 2 of this manual.
DANGER
Never leave or walk away from an operating machine.
CAUTION
Do not change motor rotation direction until the motor and
spindle are fully stopped. Changing directions while the motor
is running can damage the motor.
Leadscrew Safety Clutch Adjustment
Before begining your threading operation, note the leadscrew safety clutch may
need to be adjusted.
The lead screw safety clutch is functioning in the threading mode. It will slip to
prevent damage to the machine apron if the carriage is accidentally run into the
head of the machine.
N O T E : The clutch will not prevent damage if the carriage or cross-slide table
pass the end of their mechanical limits
The clutch assembly is located inside the lathe pulley box. It is a round flat nub
in the change gear shaft with the “D” gear. There are six setscrews above the
springs and ball bearings located radially around the clutch in front of the gear.
The setscrews screw inward toward the center of the clutch.
10-1
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
10: Threading
Figure 10.1 Leadscrew Safety Clutch
If slippage occurs during your threading operation adjust the safety clutch by
turning each setscrew one at a time a half turn each time untill the clutch is
solid and no slippage occurs. Do not bottom the screws completely of the clucth
will not work.
An approximate initial setting is when the set screws have two threads exposed
from the surface of the clutch housing.
Basic Threading
Refer to a machining reference guide such as the Machinist Ready Reference for
threading theory and spindle speeds based on the material type and diameter
that you will be machining.
Step 1: Select the thread pitch which you want to cut from the chart located
on the headstock of your Granite series machine (The is also reprinted on page
8-5 of this manual.) Chose the desired pitch from the chart and follow the
horizontal row and vertical columns to set the correct positions for selector
levers (1-7) and selector lever (I-III).
Figure 10.2 Selector Lever (1-7) & Selector Lever (I-III)
Step 2: Consult the thread chart on the headstock support column for the
thread pitch that you wish to cut. The bottom row of the chart will show you
the gear set-up inside the pulley box that is required to cut the desired thread
pitch.
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10-2
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Step 3: If changing the gear set-up is necessary to achieve the desired thread
pitch, follow the procedure under the title “Changing Gears” in the next section.
Changing Gears
Step 1: The A gear is secured with a bolt and washer assembly and the
location is fixed. To remove the gear remove the bolt and washer.
Step 2:The B and C gears share the same shaft and are secured with a snap
ring. Remove the snap ring from the shaft to remove the gears.
Step 3: Place the proper gear in the A position for cutting the desired thread
pitch. Reinstall the washer and bolt.
A
B
C
Figure 10.3 Make certain that your gears are properly set-up
to obtain the desired thread pitch
Step 4:The shaft for the B/C gears mounts on a slotted plate to adjust for the
different diameters of the gears. There are two flats on the end of the shaft to
loosen and tighten the assembly to allow for adjustment. Adjust the B/C gear
shaft as needed to accommodate the B and C gears needed for cutting your
desired thread pitch.
Figure 10.4 Inch/metric Selector located inside the pulley box
10-3
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
10: Threading
Step 5: Loosen the hex head bolt. This allows the assembly to drop down.
Step 6: Position the installed B/C gear unit to mesh with the D gear.
Step 6: Rotate the gear assembly until the B gear meshes with the A gear.
Lock the assembly in place by tightening the hex head bolt.
The hex head bolt also tensions the speed reduction pulley support arm. Be
sure the belts are in the appropriate position before tightening the hex head
bolt.
Cutting Inch Threads
Step 1: Select the desired thread pitch that you wish to cut from the chart
located on the headstock of the Granite 1300 series lathe-mill-drill.
Step 2: Engage selector levers (1-7) and selector lever (I-III). Remember, you
can use the jog knob located on the right side of the gear box to help align the
gears if the levers are difficult to engage.
Step 3: Check the gear set-up inside the pulley box to confirm the gearing is
set-up correctly to cut your desired thread pitch. If the gears are not correct,
change gears using the previous procedure.
N O T E: The default factory setting is for cutting inch, SAE, threads.
Step 4: Confirm that your belts inside the pulley box are properly set-up to
reach the recommended spindle speed for cutting your work piece material with
your specific cutter.
Step 5: Set your compound angle toolpost to 29-1/2º and install the E8
carbide bit that came with your machine.
Step 6: Inside the pulley box at the left lower side of the gear cluster is the
inch/metric lever, which must be pushed away from you for inch threading.
Step 7: Turn your machine on and adjust variable speed to the recommended
speed.
Step 8: Once you have made all of your tooling and machine settings, you are
ready to begin the first pass. Set the dials on the compound angle toolpost and
cross-slide table to zero. Move the compound angle toolpost into the desired
position and feed the cutter into your workpiece using the small CATP feed
handle. Watch the threading dial rotate until one of the numbers is just about
to the reference mark. At this point apply firm constant downward pressure on
the half-nut engagement lever until you feel the lever drop into position and the
carriage begins to move. (More information to follow on the threading dial.)
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10-4
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Figure 10.5 Half Nut Engaged
Step 9: When you reach the end of the first cut, lift up on the half-nut
engagement lever, back the cutter out using the CATP feed and return the
cutter to the starting point.
Step 10: Feed the cutter in the desired amount for the next cut, wait for the
same number as before to come up on the dial and engage the half nut.
Continue making passes until you have completed the full depth of cut.
Using the Threading Dial to Cut Inch
Threads
The threading dial is used for cutting inch threads only. Special procedures for
cutting metric threads can be found in the section under “ Cutting Metric
Threading” on the next page.
Figure 10.6 Note the number on the threading dial as your
halfnut engages
The threading dial is a mechanical indicator for
same point for each consecutive pass. The
specific reference to pitch, but they provide a
at the earliest available point and use the
consecutive pass.
engaging the cutter at the exact
numbers on the dial have no
reference point so you can start
same number again for each
N o t e : When the carriage is moving and the half nut is engaged, you will notice
that the dial no longer rotates. This is normal.
10-5
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
10: Threading
Cutting Metric Threads
Step 1: Select the desired thread pitch that you wish to cut from the chart
located on the headstock of the Granite 1300 series lathe-mill-drill.
Step 2: Engage selector levers (1-7) and
selector lever (I-III). Remember, you can use the jog knob located on the right
side of the gear box to help align the gears if the levers are difficult to engage.
Step 3: Check the gear set-up inside the pulley box to confirm the gearing is
set-up correctly to cut your desired thread pitch. If the gears are not correct,
change gears using the previous procedure.
Step 4: Confirm that your belt set-up inside the pulley box is properly set-up
to reach the recommended spindle speed for cutting your work piece material
with your specific cutting tool material.
Step 5: Set your compound angle toolpost to 29-1/2º and install the E8
carbide bit that came with your machine.
Step 6: Inside the pulley box at the left lower side of the gear cluster is the
inch/metric lever, which must be pulled toward you for metric threading.
Step 7: Turn your machine on and adjust the variable speed to the
recommended rpm.
Step 8: Once you have made all of your tooling and machine settings, you are
ready to begin the first pass. Apply firm constant downward pressure on the
half-nut engagement lever until you feel the lever drop into position and the
carriage begins to move.
.
Step 9: Do not disengage the half nut at the end of the pass, stop your
machine and reverse the feed direction. Rotate the handle on the compound
angle toolpost counter clockwise to back out your cutter.
Step 10: Restart your machine and bring the cutter back to is original
position. Stop your machine, reverse the direction again.
Step 11: Feed the cutter in the desired amount for the next cut using the CATP
and restart your machine. Continue this process until you have reached the
desired depth of cut.
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10-6
11
Machine Maintenance
Schedule
Overview
To keep your Smithy Granite machine running at optimum performance, follow
this basic maintenance schedule:
Before Each Use
1.
Make sure your work area is clean and free of all obstructions.
2.
Clear machine cross-slide table, bed ways and tool post of all chips built
up from your previous job.
CAUTION
Do not clear chips by hand. Metal chips are very sharp and can
easily cut your hand. Use a brush or shop vaccum to clear chips.
3.
Oil all oil buttons.
4.
Clean tailstock barrel taper and mill spindle taper with a clean shop towel.
5.
Check the oil site gauge under the lathe chuck and add oil if the level is below the
half-way point.
6.
Check all tooling and holding devices for tightness before you turn on the machine.
7.
Check the condition and tension of the drive belts.
After Each Use
11-1
1.
Clean chip build up from machine.
2.
Brush chips off the longitudinal feed screw.
3.
Remove any excess cutting fluid that may have accumulated on the
machine.
4.
Apply protective oil coating to all bare metal surfaces that may rust or
corrode.
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11: Maintenance Schedule
10 Hours (Daily)
1.
Clean chip build up from machine.
2.
Brush chips off the longitudinal feed screw.
3.
Check the oil site gauge under the lathe chuck and add oil if the level is below the
half-way point.
4.
Oil all oil buttons
25 Hours (Monthly)
1.
Check the oil site gauge under the lathe chuck and add oil if the level is below the
half-way point.
2.
Oil all oil buttons
3.
Apply a light coating of oil to the outside of the mill spindle and the top of the mill
spindle splines.
4.
Lubricate the change gears in the lathe pulley box with an aerosol chain lubricant.
5.
Lubricate the inside of the quick change gearbox with an aerosol chain lubricate
by spraying through the openings in the front of the gearbox.
6.
Remove and clean the lathe chuck and the spindle nose. Lubricate the chuck and
the cam locks with oil.
7.
Check all gib adjustments.
8.
Check and adjust backlash as necessary.
9.
Check the condition of all drive belts and replace if necessary.
100 Hours (Yearly)
1.
Change oil in the headstock.
2.
Remove the X and Y-Axis gibs and clean with solvent. Coat gibs with way
oil and reinstall.
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11-2
12 Troubleshooting
Powerfeed and Thread Cutting
1. Powerfeed does not move carriage
Cause
Solution
• Carriage locked
• Speed selector not engaged
• Unlock carriage
• Select speed I or II or III, engage
drive selector
• Replace pin
• Check gears and adjust
• Engage fully
• Sheared pin
• Gears not meshing or teeth missing
• Inch/metric lever in neutral
2. Cut is not smooth
Cause
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Solution
Tool dull
Tool not on center
Tools not mounted tightly in post
Cross-slide gibs to bed and base loose
Gibs in toolpost loose
Tool turret not tight
Feed rate too fast
Gear loose
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Sharpen or replace tool
Center tool (shim, if needed)
Remount tools
Adjust gibs
Adjust gibs in toolpost
Tighten toolpost
Choose correct setting
Tighten gears and posts
3. Thread is not smooth
Cause
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Solution
Tool dull
Tool not centered
Tools not mounted tight in post
Cross-slide gibs to bed and base loose
Gibs in compound loose
Tool turret not tight
Gears loose
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Sharpen tool
Center tool
Remount tool
Adjust gibs
Adjust gibs
Tighten toolpost
Tighten gears and posts
4. Tools is not cutting “on thread”
12-1
Cause
Solution
• Powerfeed slipping
• Clutch slipping
• Engage halfnut fully
• Tighten screws (6)
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12: Troubleshooting
Carriage/Milling Table
1. Table won't move
Cause
Solution
• Table locks engaged
• Gibs too tight
• Loosen locks
• Loosen gibs
2. Horizontal and vertical movement in cross-slide table
Cause
Solution
• Carriage gib improperly adjusted
• Table gib improperly adjusted
• Adjust carriage gib
• Adjust table gib
3. Carriage moves smoothly in only one direction
Cause
•
•
•
•
Solution
Debris on way or gib
Burr on gib
Gib improperly tensioned
One or more wipers mounted too low
•
•
•
•
Remove debris
Remove burr with fine file
Loosen gib and re-tension
Reposition wiper(s)
4. Cross-slide handwheel turns during cutting operations
Cause
Solution
• Cross-slide brass nut worn
• Carriage lock not tight
• Gibs too loose
• Tighten or replace brass nut
• Tighten carrriage locks
• Readjust gibs
5. Too much backlash in the cross-slide
Cause
Solution
• Loose screw
• Tighten screw, review how to
eliminate backlash
• Put a shim between the stud on
the nut and the side of the hole
• Replace brass nut or adjust screw
at end of nut
• Add shim washer and dial
• Loose brass nut
• Worn brass nut
• Excessive space between bearing
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12-2
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Lathe Turning
Cause
Solution
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Tool dull
Tool not ground properly
Tool at wrong angle
Tools not held tightly
Wrong cutter for material
Cutting speed incorrect
Sharpen or replace tool
Regrind tool
Correct tool position
Tighten toolholder
Use correct cutter
Increase or reduce speed
2. Work has unwanted taper
Cause
Solution
• Work improperly aligned
• Debris in spindle, setup, or tools
• Realign centers on work
• Clean and reset setup, work, or
tool
• Correct position of tailstock
• Tighten taper bearings to return to
alignment, replace spindle
bearings
• Offset tailstock incorrectly positioned
• Spindle bearings loose
3. Machine vibrates
Cause
Solution
• Work mounted wrong
• Speed too high
• Too much pressure at tailstock
• Remount work
• Reduce Speed
• Reduce pressure and increase
lubrication
4. Work stops turning but machine continues to run
Cause
Solution
• Work not mounted securely
• Tools forced into work/ excessive cut
• Belts slipping
• Remount work
• Reduce force on tools
• Tension belts, use belt dressing, or
replace belts
5. Diameter of work is not consistent
Cause
Solution
• Too much flex in workpiece
• Use a follow rest, use tailstock
center
• Tighten gibs, clean ways
• Too much flex compound rest,
cross slide, or carriage
12-3
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
12: Troubleshooting
6. Too much backlash in the compound
Cause
Solution
• Loose spanner nuts
• Worn Nut
• Tighten spanner nuts
• Replace nut
7. Machine slings oil from behind the chuck or in belt box
Cause
Solution
• Oil reservior overfilled
• Worn oil seal
• Check oil lever
• Replace felt in seal
Milling
1. Tool chatter
Cause
Solution
• Gibs too loose on cross slide,
compound, or carriage
• Unused feeds not locked
• Millhead not locked
• Quill too loose
• Tool not on center
• Improper tool shape, tool dull
• Feed too light or slow
• Readjust gibs
•
•
•
•
•
•
Lock all axes but the one moving
Lock millhead
Tighten quill lock
Center tool
Reshape, sharpen, or replace tool
Adjust feed rate
2. Depth of cut is not consistent
Cause
Solution
• Quill moving
• Setup wrong
• Lock quill
• Make sure setup is parallel to
table
Drilling
1. Hole is off center or bit wanders
Cause
Solution
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Bit dull
Bit not mounted correctly in chuck
Bit bent
Chuck loose in spindle
Drawbar not secured
Debris on spindle
• Bearing loose or worn
Use sharp bits
Remount tool
Replace bit
Remount chuck on arbor
Tighten drawbar
Clean debris and arbor and
remount tool
• Tighten or replace bearings
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12-4
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
• Cutting too fast
• Incorrect bit
• No pilot hole
• Reduce speeed
• Use correct bits
• Drill small pilot hole
2. Entrance hole is out of round
Cause
Solution
• Bit dull
• Incorrect drill bit
• Use sharp bit
• Use correct drill bit
3. Bit turns erratically or stops
Cause
Solution
• Bit fed into work too fast
• Belts slipping
• Reduce feed rate
• Reduce feed rate, re-tension belts
4. Chuck is difficult to tighten or loosen
Cause
Solution
• Chuck sticking
• Debris in chuck
• Apply lubricant
• Clean chuck
5. Chuck wobbles
Cause
Solution
• Chuck loose on arbor
• Drawbar not tight
• Clean arbor and remount
• Clean spindle and replace drawbar
Drive System
1. Turn on the machine and nothing happens
Cause
Solution
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Breaker Blown
Machine unplugged
Loose electrical connections
Electrical components bad
Re-set circuit breaker
Plug in the machine
Tighten wiring connections
Replace defective parts
2. Motor and pulleys turn, but not lathe or mill
12-5
Cause
Solution
• Mill or lathe not selected
• Select proper function
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
12: Troubleshooting
Motor
How to check a Motor
Get a car battery and attach the two wires coming from the motor to the terminals of the
battery. If the motor runs, the motor is okay, if not it needs to be replaced.
Uncscrew brush caps and inspect the brush carbon, spring and wire. If damaged or worn
out replace it.
Chuck and Accessories
If the chuck does not seat properly.
Adjusting the chuck mounting studs
The D1-4 mounting system used on all Granite machines consists of three adjustable
studs mounted on the chuck and three rotating cam locks on the spindle flange. This is
a very fast and accurate method of chuck mounting; however, there are some
adjustments to be made to insure optimum fit and accuracy.
Removing the chuck
1. The first step in removing the chuck is to place a piece of wood on top of the machine
bed underneath the chuck. This will protect the bed if the chuck accidentally slips out of
your hand and falls onto the machine.
2. There is an alignment mark on each cam and on the spindle flange adjacent to each
cam. Using the chuck key, turn the cam counter clockwise until the two marks align with
each other as shown below.
Cam in Unlocked Position
Spindle
Flange
Unlocked
D1-4 Camlock
Tooling
Cam in Locked Position
Spindle
Flange
Locked
D1-4 Camlock
Tooling
Figure 12.1 D1-4 Lathe Chuck in Locked & Unlocked Position
3. Position all three cams in the unlocked position, put your right hand under the chuck
for support and tap the chuck with a block of wood to break it loose from the spindle.
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12-6
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
4. Inspect the mating surfaces on the end of the spindle and the back of the chuck for
burrs or foreign matter. Clean and deburr these areas as necessary.
Installing and Adjusting the chuck
1. Make sure that the cams are aligned in the unlocked position and slide the chuck
onto the spindle.
2. Turn each cam clockwise to lock the chuck in place.
3. Each cam should turn between 140o to 180o of a turn to lock correctly. See the diagram below.
Prefered locking area
Figure 12.2 Locking area positon
4. If the cam turns less than one fourth of a turn, it will be necessary to remove the
chuck and adjust the corresponding chuck stud.
5. Before removing the chuck, mark each location on the chuck that will need
adjusting.
6. Remove the chuck and place it face down on a work surface.
7. There is a locking screw along side each chuck stud. Remove the locking screws for
the studs that need adjusting.
8. Unscrew the studs one turn and install the locking screws.
Stud
Lock Screw
Figure 12.3 Back of the chuck
12-7
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
12: Troubleshooting
9. Install the chuck and check the cam rotation. Repeat as necessary.
Since there are three studs and cam mounts on the chuck, there are three possible
position that the chuck may be mounted. You will find that one of these positions will be
slightly more accurate than the others. Try the chuck in all three possible positions. Once
the most accurate position is determined, mark the chuck and spindle flange so that the
chuck can be installed in the same position each time that it is mounted onto the
machine. This is best done by putting a punch mark on the chuck and a corresponding
mark on the spindle flange.
This next step is only for the 3-jaw self centering chuck.
Mark each of the three jaws, and the slot it is in. Remove the jaws, and keeping them
in the same order, reinsert them into the next slot over making sure the scroll plate
engages the first thread on the first jaw. Try the jaws in all three positions; one should
be more accurate than the other two.
Leadscrew
Having trouble on the leadscrew backlash particularly on engaging the half
nut?
Leadscrew Backlash Adjustment
Excessive backlash in the longitudinal feed can come from two places:
1. The fit of the longitudinal feed screw to the right hand mounting trestle.
2. The fit of the half nut to the feed screw.
Screw to mount backlash
Engage the half nut lever. Slowly turn the longitudinal feed screw clockwise as viewed
from the right end of the machine and watch the gap between the dial and the feed screw
mounting trestle. Reverse the direction you are turning the feed screw and see if the gap
increases slightly. If so then there is some play in the mounting. To reduce the play,
accomplish the following.
1. Remove the bolt/ washer from the right end of the longitudinal feed screw.
2. Unscrew the handle from the end of the feed screw.
3. Using a punch and a small hammer, tighten the spanner nut about one eigth of a turn
and recheck the play in the screw.
4. If the play is acceptable, replace the handle and retaining bolt. If more adjustment is
needed, repeat the step above.
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12-8
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Spanner Nut
Lead Screw & Dial
Mounting Trestle
Handwheel
Retaining Bolt &
Washer
Figure 12.4 Parts of the Handwheel
Half nut to screw backlash
Worn threads on the half nut can cause excessive backlash in the longitudinal direction.
Half nuts are made of brass and do wear out over a period of time. The only fix for a
worn half nut is to replace the worn nut with a new one.
Crossfeed Backlash Adjustment
Excessive backlash in the crossfeed can be coming from three different places:
1. The fit of the crossfeed screw to the front screw mount.
2. The fit of the crossfeed screw into the brass crossfeed nut.
3. The fit of the brass crossfeed nut into the carriage casting.
There are adjustments for each of the above areas. Before making any adjustments to
the crossfeed screw system, it is recommended that all the gibbs on the table and
carriage system be checked and adjusted as per the owners’ manual.
Crossfeed Screw To Front Mount
Slowly turn the crossfeed handle clockwise and watch the gap between the dial and the
front screw support mount. Change directions and note if the gap increases slightly. If so
this is a sign that there is some play in the mounting. To reduce this play, follow the
procedure below.
1. Loosen the two nuts that hold the crossfeed handle on the end of the screw.
2. Tighten the inner nut slowly while checking the ease of movement of the crossfeed
12-9
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
12: Troubleshooting
handle. When the screw starts to get hard to turn, loosen the nut slightly so the screw
turns free.
3. Hold the inner nut in place and tighten the outer nut against it to lock the nuts in
position.
4. Recheck the backlash.
Dial
Note: Watch for gap in this area
Inner & Outer
Nuts
Crossfeed
Table
Handle
Support
Figure 12.5 Crossfeed Screw Parts
Crossfeed Screw to Brass Nut & Nut to Carriage (Locking Bolt)
If there is still an excess of backlash after the above adjustments are made, the play will
be either between the crossfeed screw and the brass nut or between the brass nut and
the carriage. The following procedure covers both adjustments at the same time:
1. Remove the crossfeed screw rear support.
2. Loosen the Allen head bolt that locks the brass nut into the carriage.
3. Crank the crossfeed table toward the operator side of the machine. Watch under the
table from the backside and stop before the crossfeed screw comes out of the brass nut.
Cross-slide table
2 Piece Brass Nut
Cross-slide screw
Adjusting Screws
Locking Bolt
Saddle
Figure 12.6 Crossfeed Table Cross Section
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12-10
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Adjusting Screws
Saddle
Brass Nut
Table view from rear of
machine.
Figure 12.7 Crossfeed Table Rear View Cross Section
4. Slowly tighten the four adjusting screws on the brass nut, one at a time, until a slight
drag is felt while turning the crossfeed handle.
5. Install the rear crossfeed support and tighten the locking bolt for the brass nut.
6. Recheck the backlash on the crossfeed.
If you find that the four adjusting screws are not staying in place, you can use a small
amount of a thread-locking compound to keep the screws tight.
Granite Series Leadscrew Handwheel Fabrication
& Installation (Earlier Machines)
Purchase part # G91027 or use the instructions below.
Installation of a handwheel to the right end of the leadscrew will allow a more precise
lateral feeding of the carriage travel than is now possible using the carriage feed handwheel. The following is a simple handwheel plan that can be made using the Granite
machine. The wheel portion can be made from a piece of mild steel, aluminum, or cast
iron. The handle portion should be made of mild steel.
Hole is drilled & tapped to match
the thread of the handle that was
selected. The handle may be
fabricated from scratch or
purchased already made.
Center hole drilled 27/64
and threaded M12 x 1.25
9mm long & threaded to match the
small hole in the handwheel
Diameter & length of the handle
your preference
Handwheel dimension - 85mm
Diameter - 9mm
Screw the handwheel on the end of
the leadscrew. Install a bolt &
fender washer into the 5/16 x 24
hole that is in the end of the
leadscrew to hold the handwheel
in place. Screw the handle into the
handwheel & tighten into place.
Figure 12.8 Handwheel Fabrication & Installation
12-11
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
12: Troubleshooting
Note: If you have an older Granite model, the end of the lead screw may not be drilled
and tapped. This is a very simple process. You will need a 5/16 x 24 tap, a 17/64 or a “I”
drill bit, and an electric hand drill. Set up your machine on the slow speed pulley, full RPM,
with leadscrew turning counter clockwise as viewed from the right end and the gearbox
set on 1 and “I”. By having the leadscrew turning as well as the drill, the drill bit will
center itself and go straight down the center of the lead screw. Drill the hole about 5/8
inch deep. Tap the hole with the 5/16 tap. Do not forget to use oil when drilling and
tapping.
NOTES:
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12-12
13 Machine Specifications
Granite 1324 Series Machine
13-1
General Specifications
General Dimension:
Machine Weight:
Crate Size:
Footprint (static):
Footprint (operating):
T-Slot Size:
Spindle Accuracy TIR:
Powerfeed (X-Axis):
Powerfeed (Y-Axis):
Powerfeed (Z-Axis):
Table Size:
Threading Dial:
39” height X 46” length X 22-1/2” width
Shipping 770 lbs, Machine 661 lbs
49-1/2” X 22-3/4” X 44”
48” X 36”
72-1/2” X 45-1/4”
7/16”
0.00078”
Yes
Yes
No
6-3/4” X 17-3/4”
Yes
Lathe Specifications
Distance Between Centers:
Dial Calibration on Crossfeed:
Dial Calibration on Toolpost:
Dial Calibration on Leadscrew:
Dial Calibration on Tailstock:
Dial Calibration on Longfeed Rack:
Headstock Taper:
Lathe Chuck- Max. diameter workpiece:
Lathe Chuck- Min. diameter workpiece:
Lathe Chuck Bore:
Lathe Chuck Diameter:
Lathe Chuck Mount:
Lathe Chuck Type:
Spindle Bore:
Spindle Speeds:
X-Axis Travel (w/ tailstock installed):
Y-Axis Travel:
Feed Rate (X-Axis):
Feed Rate (Y-Axis):
Tailstock Offset:
Tailstock Barrel Travel:
Tailstock Taper:
Swing Over Bed:
Swing Over Work Table:
Threads:
Toolbit Size:
Toolpost Travel:
24”
0.001”
0.001”
0.001”
0.001”
0.01”
MT4
6”
1/8”
1.6”
6”
D1-4 Camlock
3 Jaw Self Centering
1.125”
Variable (Range 0-2800 RPM)
20”
7-5/8”
0.003”- 0.020”
0.001”- 0.006”
19/32”
3”
MT3
13”
7-1/2”
SAE 7-52 TPI
1/2”
3-3/16”
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
13: Machine Specifications
Mill Specifications
Column Diameter:
Dial Calibration Drill-Coarse Feed:
Dial Calibration Mill-Fine Feed:
Drawbars Size (included):
Drill Chuck Size (included):
Drill Chuck Arbor Size (included):
Head Rotation:
Quill Diameter:
Quill Travel:
Spindle Taper:
Spindle to Table Distance (min-max):
Tool Size Limits:
X-Axis Travel:
Y-Axis Travel:
Head Travel (Z-Axis):
Feed Rate (Y-Axis):
Feed Rate (X-Axis):
Spindle Speeds:
Spindle Center to Front of Chuck:
GN Classic:
GN-MAX & GN-IMX:
Spindle Center to Lathe Spindle Flange:
GN Classic:
GN-MAX & GN-IMX:
Spindle Center to Support Column:
GN Classic:
GN-MAX & GN-IMAX:
Electrical Specifications
Amperage:
GN Classic & GN-MAX:
GN-IMAX:
Horsepower:
GN Classic:
GN-MAX & GN-IMX:
Motor Type:
GN Classic:
3-3/16”
0.05”
0.001”
7/16”
5/8”
R-8/JT3
360 Degrees
2-3/4”
4-7/8”
R-8
4” to 13-3/8”
1”
9-1/2”
7-5/8”
4-3/8”
0.001”- 0.006”
0.003”- 0.020”
Variable (Range 0-2800 RPM)
4-5/8”
8-1/2”
7-1/4”
11-1/4”
9-1/2”
13-3/8”
15 amps
8-10 amps
1.5 HP
2.0 HP
D/C Variable Speed
(Permanent Magnet)
D/C Variable Speed
(Brushless Servo)
GN-MAX & GN-IMX:
Voltage:
GN Classic & GN-MAX:
GN-IMX:
Phase:
110 Volts A/C
220 Volts A/C
Single
Recommended Oil for Lubricant
For Gear Box:
For External :
For Cleaning:
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SAE30 weight non-detergent
oil or 30 weight compressor oil
Regular Oil
Noncorrosive Kerosene or
White Mineral Spirits or even
WD-40
13-2
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Granite 1340 Series Machine
13-3
General Specifications
General Dimention:
Machine Weight:
Crate Size:
Footprint (static):
Footprint (operating):
T-Slot Size:
Spindle Accuracy TIR:
Powerfeed (X-Axis):
Powerfeed (Y-Axis):
Powerfeed (Z-Axis):
Table Size:
Threading Dial:
39” height X 62” length X 22-1/2” width
Shipping 910 lbs, Machine 728 lbs
64-1/2” X 22-3/4” X 44”
64” X 36”
88-1/2” X 45-1/4”
7/16”
0.00078”
Yes
Yes
No
6-3/4” X 17-3/4”
Yes
Lathe Specifications
Distance Between Centers:
Dial Calibration on Crossfeed:
Dial Calibration on Toolpost:
Dial Calibration on Leadscrew:
Dial Calibration on Tailstock:
Dial Calibration on Longfeed Rack:
Headstock Taper:
Lathe Chuck- Max. diameter workpiece:
Lathe Chuck- Min. diameter workpiece:
Lathe Chuck Bore:
Lathe Chuck Diameter:
Lathe Chuck Mount:
Lathe Chuck Type:
Spindle Bore:
Spindle Speeds:
X-Axis Travel (w/ tailstock installed):
Y-Axis Travel:
Feed Rate (X-Axis):
Feed Rate (Y-Axis):
Tailstock Offset:
Tailstock Barrel Travel:
Tailstock Taper:
Swing Over Bed:
Swing Over Work Table:
Threads:
Toolbit Size:
Toolpost Travel:
40”
0.001”
0.001”
0.001”
0.001”
0.01”
MT4
6”
1/8”
1.6”
6”
D1-4 Camlock
3 Jaw Self Centering
1.125”
Variable (Range 0-2800 RPM)
20”
7-5/8”
0.003”- 0.020”
0.001”- 0.006”
19/32”
3”
MT3
13”
7-1/2”
SAE 7-52 TPI
1/2”
3-3/16”
Mill Specifications
Column Diameter:
Dial Calibration Drill-Coarse Feed:
Dial Calibration Mill-Fine Feed:
Drawbars Size (included):
3-3/16”
0.05”
0.001”
7/16”
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
4: Machine Overview
Drill Chuck Size (included):
GN Classic:
GN-MAX & GN-IMX:
Drill Chuck Arbor Size (included):
Head Rotation:
Quill Diameter:
Quill Travel:
Spindle Taper:
Spindle to Table Distance (min-max):
GN Classic:
GN-MAX & GN-IMX:
Tool Size Limits:
X-Axis Travel:
Y-Axis Travel:
Head Travel (Z-Axis):
Feed Rate (Y-Axis):
Feed Rate (X-Axis):
Spindle Speeds:
Spindle Center to Front of Chuck:
GN Classic:
GN-MAX & GN-IMX:
Spindle Center to Lathe Spindle Flange:
GN Classic:
GN-MAX & GN-IMX:
Spindle Center to Support Column:
GN Classic:
GN-MAX & GN-IMX:
Electrical Specifications
Amperage:
GN Classic & GN-MAX:
GN-IMX:
Horsepower:
GN Classic:
GN-MAX & GN-IMX:
Motor Type:
GN Classic:
1/2”
5/8”
R-8/JT3
360 Degrees
2-3/4”
4-7/8”
R-8
4” to 13-1/3”
4” to 13-3/8”
1”
9-1/2”
7-5/8”
4-3/8”
0.001”- 0.006”
0.003”- 0.020”
Variable (Range 0-2800 RPM)
4-5/8”
8-1/2”
7-1/4”
11-1/4”
9-1/2”
13-3/8”
15 amps
8-10 amps
1.5 HP
2.0 HP
D/C Variable Speed
(Permanent Magnet)
D/C Variable Speed
(Brushless Servo)
GN-MAX & GN-IMX:
Voltage:
GN Classic & GN-MAX:
GN-IMAX:
Phase:
110 Volts A/C
220 Volts A/C
Single
Or Visit www.smithy.com
13-4
Appendix A
Machining Reference Guide
How to Determine Speeds and Feeds for Lathe
Turning (machine, materials, and tools)
The lathe rotates a workpiece against a cutting edge. With its versatility and numerous
attachments, accessories, and cutting tools, it can do almost any machining operation.
The modern lathe offers the following:
•
•
•
•
•
The strength to cut hard, tough materials
The means to apply power
The means to hold the cutting point tight
The means to regulate operating speed
The means to feed the tool into or across, or into and across, the work, either
manually or by engine power, under precise control
• The means to maintain a predetermined ratio between the rates of rotating
works and the travel of the cutting point or points
Turning Speed
When metal cuts metal at too high a speed, the tool burns up. You can machine soft
metals like aluminum at fast speeds without danger or trouble, but you must cut hard
steels and other metals slowly.
You must also consider the diameter of the workpiece. A point on a 3” diameter shaft will
pass the cutting tool three times as fast as a point an a 1”-diameter shaft rotating at the
same speed. This is because the point travels a tripled circumference. For work in any
given material, the larger the diameter, the slower the speed in spindle revolutions
needed to get the desired feet-per-minute (fpm) cutting speed.
Lathes cut threads in various numbers per inch of materials threaded, according to the
operator's needs. The Smithy Granite Series machine cuts threads to metric or inch
standards.
In thread cutting, the carriage carries the thread-cutting tool and moves by the rotating
leadscrew. The basic principle is that the revolving leadscrew pulls the carriage in the
desired direction at the desired speed. The carriage transports the toolrest and the
threading tool, which cuts the screw thread into the metal being machined.
The faster the leadscrew revolves in relation to the spindle, the coarser the thread. This
is because the threading tool moves farther across the revolving metal with each
workpiece revolution.
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A-1
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
The lathe spindle holding the workpiece revolves at a selected speed (revolution per
minute, or rpm) according to the type and size of the workpiece. The leadscrew, which
runs the length of the lathe bed, also revolves at the desired rpm. There is a definite and
changeable ration between spindle and leadscrew speeds.
Cutting Speeds for Various Diameters
FPM
50
60
70
80
90
100
DIAM
110
120
130
140
150
200
300
RPM
1/16” 3056 3667 4278 4889 5500 6111 6722 7334 7945 8556 9167 12229 18344
1/8” 1528 1833 2139 2445 2751 3056 3361 3667 3973 4278 4584 6115 9172
3/16” 1019 1222 1426 1630 1833 2037 2241 2445 2648 2852 3056 4076 6115
764
917
1070 1222 1375 1538 1681 1833 1986 2139 2292 3057 4586
5/16” 611
733
856
978
1100 1222 1345 1467 1589 1711 1833 2446 3669
509
611
713
815
917
1019 1120 1222 1324 1426 1528 2038 3057
7/16” 437
524
611
698
786
873
960
1048 1135 1222 1310 1747 2621
1/2”
382
458
535
611
688
764
840
917
993
1070 1146 1529 2293
5/8”
306
367
428
489
550
611
672
733
794
856
917
1223 1834
3/4”
255
306
357
407
458
509
560
611
662
713
764
1019 1529
7/8”
218
262
306
349
393
426
480
524
568
611
655
874
1310
1”
191
229
267
306
366
372
420
458
497
535
573
764
1146
1-1/8” 170
204
238
272
306
340
373
407
441
475
509
679
1019
1-1/4” 153
183
216
244
275
306
336
367
397
428
458
612
918
1-3/8” 139
167
194
222
250
278
306
333
361
389
417
556
834
1-1/2” 127
153
178
204
229
255
280
306
331
357
382
510
765
1-5/8” 117
141
165
188
212
235
259
282
306
329
353
470
705
1-7/8” 102
122
143
163
183
204
224
244
265
285
306
408
612
95
115
134
153
172
191
210
229
248
267
287
382
573
2-1/4” 85
102
119
136
153
170
187
204
221
238
255
340
510
2-1/2” 76
91
107
122
137
153
168
183
199
214
229
306
459
2-3/4” 69
82
97
111
125
139
153
167
181
194
208
278
417
64
76
89
102
115
127
140
153
166
178
191
254
371
1/4”
3/8”
2”
3”
A-2
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
Appendix A: Machining Reference Guide
! NOTICE !
The data table provides exact speeds (RPM). It
does not take machine speed limitations into
account. Determine the desired rate of speed and
find the closest speed available on your machine.
Cutting Speed and Feeds for
High Speed Steel Tools
The energy expended at the lathe's cutting point converts largely into heat, and because
the energy expended is great, the heat is intense. Before today's HSS, carbide, and
ceramic tool, this heat created a serious machining problem. Machining could be done
only under a steady flow of coolant, which kept the tool from heating to its annealing
point, softening, and breaking down.
With HSS, you can cut dry on cast iron or non-ferrous metals unless a small lathe is
running at extremely high speed on continuous, heavy-duty production work. Because
steel expands when heated, it is a good idea, especially when working on long shafts, to
check the tightness of the lathe centers frequently and make sure workpiece expansion
does not cause the centers to bind.
Cutting Speeds and Feeds for High Speed Steel Tools
Low-Carbon
Steel
Speed (sfm)
Roughing
Finishing
Feed (ipr)
Roughing
Finishing
90
120
HighCarbon
Alloy Steel Aluminum
Steel
Normalized
Alloys
Annealed
50
65
45
60
200
300
Cast Iron
Bronze
70
80
100
130
0.010-0.202 1.101-0.020 0.010-0.020 0.015-0.030 0.010-0.020 0.010-0.020
0.003-0.005 0.003-0.005 0.003-0.005 0.005-0.010 0.003-0.010 0.003-0.10
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A-3
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
In everyday lathe operations like thread cutting and knurling, always use a cutting oil or
other lubricant. On such work, especially if the cut is light and lathe speed low, dipping
a brush in oil occationally and holding it against the workpiece will provide sufficient
lubrication. For continuous, high-speed, heavy-duty production work, however, especially
on tough alloy steels, using a cutting oil or coolant will increase cutting efficiency. It's
essential if you're using a non-HSS cutting tool. When you use coolant, direct it against
the cutting point and cutter. Consider installing a coolant system if you don't have one.
To set up safe rpm rates, you should follow the list for cutting speeds and feeds for HSS
cutters. The formula is as follows:
rpm = CS x 4 / D”
where:
CS - cutting speed in surface feet per minute (sfm)
D” - diameter of the workpiece in inches.
To use this formula, find the cutting speed you need on the chart and plug that number
into the CS portion of the formula. After calculating the rpm, use the nearest or nextlower speed on the lathe and set the speed.
If you were to make a finish cut on a piece of aluminum 1” in diameter, for example, you
would see the desired sfm is 300. Then
rpm = 300 sfm x 4 / 1
rpm = 1200 / 1
rpm = 1200 or next lower speed.
For high-carbon steel, also 1” in diameter,
rpm = 50 sfm x 40 / 1
rpm = 200 / 1
rpm = 200 or next slower speed.
The four-turret toolpost lets you mount up to four different tools at the same time. You
can install all standard-shaped turning and facing tools with 1/2” or smaller shanks. The
centerline is approximately 5/8” above the bottom of the turret. Smithy also offers quickchange tool sets that greatly speed up lathe operations. Contact a Smithy technician for
details.
A-4
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
Appendix A: Machining Reference Guide
How to Determine Speeds and Feeds for Milling
(machine, materials, and tools)
Speeds
Milling cutting rates vary according to the machinability of the material being cut; whether
cutting fluid is used and, if so, what kind; the type, size, and material of the cutter and
the coarseness of its teeth; and the amount of metal being removed. Cutting speed for
milling is the distance the cutting edge of a tooth travels in one minute. If cutting speed
is too high, the cutter overheats and becomes dull. If it's too low, production is inefficient
and rough.
There is no exact right cutting speed for milling a particular material. Machinist usually
start with an average speed, then increase or decrease it as needed. For light cuts, use
the upper end. Use the lower end for heavy cuts and when you don't use cutting fluid.
Determining rpm. To set the spindle speed, you have to know the cutter rpm (revolutions
per minute). For inch measurements, use this formula:
rpm = 12 x CS (fpm) / D” x !
where:
CS - cutting speed
fpm - feet per minute
D” - diameter of the cutter in inches
! - 3.14 You can use an rpm chart for selected diameters of cutting tools at
different cutting speeds.
For metric measurement, use this formula:
rpm = CS (mpm) x 1000 / D (mm) x !
where:
CS - cutting speed
mpm - meters per minute
D (mm) - diameter of the cutter in millimeters
! - 3.14. You can use an rpm chart for selected diameters of cutting tools at
different cutting speeds.
Change Speeds by selecting the belt location and turning the speed dial
Feeds
Set the direction of feed before you begin milling. Up milling, or conventional milling, is
when the direction of feed is opposite to the direction of cutter rotation. Down milling, or
climb milling, is when the direction of feed is the same as the direction of cutter rotation.
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A-5
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Up Milling
In up milling, forces on the workpiece tend to pull it out of the vise or fixture holding it,
so fasten it securely. These forces also push the workpiece away from the cutter, which
eliminates backlash. Up milling is advised for milling cast iron, softer steels, and other
ductile materials. In general, it's how you should perform milling operations.
Down Milling
Down milling usually produces good surface finishes because chips do not sweep back
into the cut. Setups are more rigid, an advantage when cutting thin workpieces held in a
vise or workpieces held in a magnetic chuck. Down milling also produces straighter cuts.
We recommend down milling when using carbide cutters because there is less wear on
the cutting tool. In general, however, avoid it because of the backlash problems
associated with it.
Feed Rates
Your feed rates should be as high as your machine, cutting tool, workholding method, and
workpiece can tolerate while giving a good finish. Feed rate is usually given in inches per
minute (ipm). You determine feed rate by the speed of the cutter in rpm and the number of teeth in the cutter.
There are many factors to consider in selecting the feed per tooth, and there is no easy
formula to follow. Here are several principles to guide you:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Use the highest feed rate conditions allow
Avoid using a feed rate below 0.001” per tooth
Harder materials required lower feed rates than softer materials
Feed wider, deeper cuts more slowly than narrow, shallow cuts
Slower feed rates gives a better surface finish
Never stop the feed before finishing the cut
If you know the feed in inches per tooth, use the formula to calculate table feed rate in
inches per minute (ipm):
ipm = ipt x N x rpm
where:
ipt - inches per tooth
N - number of teeth in the milling cutter
rpm - spindle speed of the milling machine.
High-speed-steel Cutters
The advantage of HSS cutter bits is you can shape them to exact specifications through
grinding. This lets you grind a stock shape into any form. Stock shapes come in an
assortment of types, including squares, flats, and bevels. Many shops buy their cutters as
ready-ground or ready-to-grind bits or blades.
A-6
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
Appendix A: Machining Reference Guide
Ready-to-grind bits and blades are of specially selected HSS, cut to length and properly
heat-treated. They are fine tools in the rough and generally superior to HSS shapes sold
by the pound.
In grinding HSS cutter bits, you have five major goals:
• A strong, keen cutting edge or point
• The proper cutting form (the correct or most convenient shape for a specific
operation)
• Front clearance away from the toolpoint
• Clearance away from the side of the tool (side rake)
• Free chip movement over the tool and away from the cutting edge
Side
Rake
Side Clearance
3-10o
Angle of
Keenness
Figure A.1 Keenness angles vary from 60°
to 90°.
Back Rake
Front Clearance
3-15o
Figure A.2 The edge weakens if front
clearance is too great.
Keenness angles can vary from 60° for mild softness to 90° for hard steels and castings
(Figure A.1).
Front clearance must always be sufficient to clear the work. If it is too great, however,
the edge weakens and breaks off (Figure A.2). Side and back-rate requirements vary with
the material used and operation performed. Back rake is important to smooth chip flow,
which is needed for a uniform chip and good finish, especially in soft materials. Side rake
directs the chip flow away from the point of cut.
Grind cutters on a true-surfaced, good-quality, medium-grit grinding wheel (preferably an
8”, 46-60A-grit or 68A-grit Carborundum wheel) at 3000 or 3500 rpm. When starting with
an unground cutter bit, the procedure in Figure A.3 is usually to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
grind
grind
grind
grind
grind
the
the
the
the
the
left-side clearance
right-side clearance
end form or radius
end clearance
top rake, touching in a chipbreaker.
If you are honing the cutting edge (for fine finishing or machining soft materials), draw
the cutter away from the cutting edge across the oilstone (Figure A.4).
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A-7
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Cutter Bit
Grinding Wheel
1. Left Side
Clearance
2. Rigt Side
Clearance
3. End
Clearance
4. Radius
5. Top Rake
Figure A.3 Grinding sequence for an unground cutter bit
Oilstone
Figure A.4 When honing, draw the cutter away
from the cutting edge across the oilstone
Materials other than Steel
As pointed out earlier,when grinding HSS cutters, we determine cutting angles primarily
by strength requirements, not keenness requirements. Angles and rakes for general
industrial shops use are established. In machining steel, the softer the steel, the keener
the angle of the cutting edge. For soft steels, angles as acute as 61° are possible (Figure
A.5).
The same general rule applies to cast iron. Chilled or very hard cast iron requires tools
with cutting-edge angles as great as 85°. For ordinary cast iron, you obtain greatest
efficiency with a more accurate cutting edge – approximately 71° (Figure A.6).
Figure A.5 With soft steels, 61° angles are possible
Figure A.6 With cast iron, a 71° angle is most efficient
A-8
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
Appendix A: Machining Reference Guide
Bits for Turning and Machining Brass
Brass tends to pull or drag when machined. It's best to machine it on dead center with
the top rake in the horizontal plane of the lathe centers. Softer than steel, brass needs
less support for the cutting edge. Brass cutters require an almost flat top angle and can
gain greater angle keenness only in increased side and end rakes. It is often advisable to
hone the cutting edges of cutters used to machine brass.
Note: All roundnose cutters are ground with flat tops and equal side rake because they
are fed across the work, to both right and left.
Special Chip Craters and Chip Breakers
When grinding cut-off blades, and occasionally on other cutter bits where the material's
extreme hardness or toughness makes it difficult to control the chip leaving the work, it
sometimes helps to grind a smooth, round crater just behind the cutting edge. This serves
as a chip guide and starts the chip curling smoothly (Figure A.7).
Figure A.7 A crater starts the chip curling smoothly
Using a Center Gauge to Check V-Thread Form
It may be convenient to grind a standard cutter bit for thread cutting, especially for cutting standard 60° V-threads. When grinding an ordinary square cutter into a thread-cutting tool, take care to ensure a true thread form. The easiest way is to use an ordinary
center gauge for a standard V-thread tool or a special thread gauge for special thread
forms.
To grind a cutter for an ordinary V-thread, grind first the left side of the tool, then the
right side, to 30°. Be careful to grind equally from both sides to center the toolpoint. Then
test for true form by inserting the newly ground point in the closest-sized V in a standard
center gauge (Figure A.8)
Examine the gauge and cutter above a light. When the cutter is ground perfectly, no light
streak shows between the tool and gauge. Use a grinding chart for other rakes.
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Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Figure A.8 Insert the point into the nearest-sized V in the center gauge
Acme or Other Special Thread
Thread gauge are available for all standard threads. Before grinding such cutters,
ascertain the correct pitch angle of the particular thread profile. For example, the pitch
of an acme thread is 29° to a side, and the toolpoint is ground back square to an exact
thread profile that requires a different end width for each thread size.
Thread forms must be accurate if threads are to fit snugly and smoothly. Every
resharpening of this type of cutter requires regrinding the entire form. It is far better,
when doing any amount of threading, to use a threading tool with a special form cutter.
Sharpening such cutters requires only flat, top grinding, whch does not alter the cutting
profile.
Carbide-Tipped Cutters and Cutter Forms
Carbide is a compound of carbon and a metal. In cutting tools, it is usually carbon and
tungsten. The hardness of carbide cutting materials approaches that of diamond. While
carbides permit easy machining of chilled cast iron, hard and tough steels, hard rubber,
bakelite, glass, and other difficult or “unmachinable” materials, its primary use in
industry is for long production runs on ordinary steel. On such work, carbide-tipped tools
permit higher running speeds and much longer runs between resharpenings. The cutting
edge of carbide tools stands up 10 to 200 times as long as the edge of HSS tools.
The advantage of carbide is that it tolerates much higher heat than HSS or other alloys
so you can run at higher speeds. The disadvantage is that it is more brittle than HSS and
must have adequate support in the toolpost to prevent vibration and breakage.
The table on the next page shows the different Carbide grades used in different
applications and uses.
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Appendix A: Machining Reference Guide
Application
Cast Iron
Use
Roughing cuts
Grade
C-1
Non-ferrous, non-metallic,
General purpose
high-temperature alloys
C-2*
200 and 300 Series
stainless steels
Light finishing
Precision boring
Roughing cuts
General Purpose
C-3
C-4
C-5
C-6*
Alloy steels
Finishing cuts
C-7
400 Series stainless steel,
Precision boring
high velocity
C-8
*C-2 and C-6 are the most commonly used carbides.
When to Use Different Kind of Endmills
Choose milling cutters for the type of cut, the number of parts, and the material. Rake
angles depend on both cutter and work material. Clearance angles range from 3° to 6°
for hard or tough materials to 6° to 12° for soft materials.
To determine the number of teeth you want, consider the following:
• There should not be so many teeth that they reduce the free flow of chips.
• The chip space should be smooth so chips don't clog.
• Don't engage more than two teeth at a time in a cut.
Endmill Cutters
Endmill cutters cut on their ends and sides. They are either solid (cut from a single piece
of material) or shell (separate cutter body and shank). They have two, three, four, or
more teeth and may do right or left-handed cutting. Their flute twist or helix may also be
right or left-handed. Solid endmills have straight or tapered shanks; shell endmill adapters
have tapered shanks.
Endmills machine horizontal, vertical, angular, or irregular surfaces in making slots,
keyways, pockets, shoulders, and flat surfaces.
• Two-flute or center-cutting endmills have two teeth that cut to the center
of the mill. They may feed into the work like a drill (called plunge milling), then
go lengthwise to form a slot. Teeth may be on one end (single-ended) or both
ends (double-ended).
• Multiple-flute endmills have three, four, six, or eight flutes and may be
single or double-ended. Multiple-flute mills are center-cutting or non-center
cutting. Don't use noncenter-cutting endmills for plunge milling.
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Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
• Geometry-forming endmills form particular geometries. They include ball
endmills, roughing endmills, dovetail endmills, T-slot cutters, keyseat cutters,
and shell endmills.
• Ball endmills cut slots or fillets with a radius bottom, round out pockets and
bottoms of holes, and do diesinking and diemaking. Four-flute ball endmills with
center cutting lips are available.
• Roughing endmills remove large amounts of metal rapidly with minimum
horsepower. They have three to eight flutes. Also called hogging endmills, they
have wavy teeth on their periphery that provide many cutting edge, minimizing
chatter.
• T-slot Cutters cut T-slots. After machining a groove for the narrow part of the
T-slot with an end or side mill, finish up with the T-slotcutter.
• Keyseat cutters cut keyseats for Woodruff keys (shaped like a half circle)
• Shell endmills, which mill wide, flat surfaces, have a hole for mounting on a
short arbor. The center of the shell is recessed to provide space for the screw or
nut that fastens the cutter to the arbor. The teeth are usually helical, and
diameters are as large as 6”.
• Insert-type endmills use replaceable HSS or carbide inserts. Small endmills
use two inserts; larger endmills, three or more.
• Face milling cutters start in size at 2” and have inserted teeth on the
periphery and face. Most of the cutting takes place on the periphery. They are
similar to, but larger than, shell endmills.
Plain Milling Cutters
Plain milling cutters have teeth only on their periphery. Used to mill plain, flat surfaces,
they may combine with other cutters to produce various shapes. Thay are cylindrical and
come in many widths and diameters.
• Light-duty plain cutters for light cuts and fine feeds come in two forms.
Narrow ones have straight teeth parallel to the cutter axis. Wide ones have
helical teeth at a 25° angle. Features include ease of starting cuts, little chatter,
and good surface finishes.
• Heavy-duty plain cutters, or coarse-tooth cutters, come in a larger widths
and have larger and fewer teeth. Strongly supported cutting edges and wide
flutes provide strength and space for heavy chip removal. The helix angle of their
teeth is 25° to 45°.
• Helical plain milling cutters have even fewer and coarser teeth with a helix
angle of 45°-60° or greater. These cutters are for wide, shallow profiling cuts on
brass or soft steel.
A-12
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Appendix A: Machining Reference Guide
Side Milling Cutters
Similar to plain milling cutters, side milling cutters also have teeth on one or both sides.
The teeth on the periphery do most of the cutting; those on the sides finish the side of
the cut to size. They cut grooves or slots and often work with other cutters to mill
special shapes in one operation.
• Plain side milling cutters have straight teeth on the periphery and both sides.
Side teeth taper toward the center of the cutter, giving side relief or clearance.
• Half side milling cutters have helical teeth on the periphery and one side.
These cutters do heavy-duty face milling and straddle milling where teeth are
needed on only one side. The side teeth are deeper and longer for more chip
clearance.
• Staggered-tooth side milling cutters are narrow cutters with teeth
alternating on opposite sides. There is less dragging and scoring and more space
for chip removal. These cutters do heavy-duty keyway and slotting cuts.
Slitting Saws
Slitting saws do narrow slotting and cut-off operations.
• Plain slitting saws are thin, plain milling cutters with only peripheral teeth.
The teeth are fine, and the sides taper slightly toward the hole, giving side relief.
• Slitting saws with side teeth are like side milling cutters and are for deeper
slotting and cut-off operations normally done with plain slitting saws.
• Staggered-tooth slitting saws have peripheral teeth with alternate right and
left hand helix and alternate side teeth. They are for 0.2” and wider cuts and
may do deeper cuts with standard feeds.
• Screw-slotting cutters are plain slitting saws with fine-pitch teeth that cut
slots in screwheads. Their sides are straight and parallel and offer no side relief.
Angle Milling Cutters
Angle milling cutters, for such operations as cutting V-grooves, dovetails, and reamer
teeth, come as single and double-angle cutters.
• Single-angle cutters have one angular surface. Teeth are on the angular
surface and the straight side, and they usually have 45° or 60° angles.
• Double-angle cutters machine V-grooves. Those with equal angles on both
faces usually have an included angle of 45°, 60°, or 90°.
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A-13
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Form-relieved Cutters
• Formed-tooth cutters machine surfaces with curved outlines. You can
sharpen them without changing the tooth outline. Concave cutters mill convex
half-circles; Convex cutters cut concave surfaces.
• Corner-rounding cutters round outside corners. Gear cutters cut gear teeth.
Fluting cutters cut flutes in reamers and milling cutters. Formed-tooth cutters
come in right and left-hand styles various special shapes.
Flycutters
With one or more single-point toolbits or cutters, flycutters perform end milling even
though they're not endmills. They take light face cuts from large surface areas. You must
grind the toolbit properly to get correct rake and clearance angles. Grind toolbits for
flycutters as you grind lathe tools. You can also use flycutters for boring.
Note: When the tool revolves, the cutting tool becomes almost invisible, so be careful.
How To Do Threading
Before beginning to cut threads, it's useful to learn the major terms used in thread
cutting:
• Pitch. Metric pitch is the distance from the center of a thread to the center of
the next thread. To measure pitch in inches, measure an inch on a bolt and count
the threads.
• Pitch Diameter. This is the diameter of an imaginary cylinder superimposed
on a straight screw thread, the surface of which would make an equal width of
the thread and the spaces cut by the cylinder.
• Lead. The lead is the distance a screw thread advances axially (as through a
nut) with one complete revolution.The lead and pitch of a single thread are
identical, but they differ on multiple threads (the lead of a double thread is twice
its pitch; of a triple thread, three times its pitch).
Because screw-thread cutting is generally a part of machine work, anyone interested in
building things of metal should master it. Threading requires a bit of patience and skill.
Before attempting to cut a thread on a workpiece, cut a few practice threads on odd bits
of steel, iron, and aluminum.
Built for thread cutting, the Smithy Granite Series machine, cuts standard internal and
external threads, as well as special threads. You may cut coarse or fine threads in a great
range of threads per inch, in V or square shapes, in established profiles like Unified
National, acme, and metric. You can cut single threads or multiple threads that are
concurrently along the shaft. You determine the type of thread by how you'll use the
screw. Each thread form requires a different shaped tool to cut or chase it.
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For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
Appendix A: Machining Reference Guide
For most work, the beginner will use the Unified National Standard, which is a V-form
thread slightly flat on top and at the root. Screw threads are usually referred to by pitch
numbers, such as 18 or 24, meaning 18 or 24 threads per inch (tpi). The Smithy Granite
Series machine cuts standard threads in pitches from 7 to 52 tpi and metric threads from
0.35 to 6.5 mm.
Because the lathe spindle, which carries the work, connects by gearing to the leadscrew,
which moves the cutting tool along the lathe bed, a ratio exist between spindle speed in
revolutions per minute and cutting tool movement in inches. When you change the
gearing, you change this ratio. For this reason you can cut screw threads of various
pitches by changing both the thread selection lever and the rate-of-feed selection lever
at the head of the lathe.
Thread charts on the machine show both inch and metric measures. The inch chart on
the headstock shows the tpi from 7 to 52. The metric chart show the distance from
thread crest to crest from 0.35 to 6.5 mm.
For right-hand threads, start the threading or chasing tool at the right end of the
workpiece and feed it toward the headstock. For left-hand threads, reverse the
leadscrew's rotation direction using the direction lever on the headstock and feed the
threading tool from left to right. (You actually have the choice of changing the spindle
rotation and/or cutting off the backside).
With practice, you can grind cutters to almost any profile. It is difficult, however, to
sharpen such cutters without altering the cutting form, and almost every resharpening
requires a complete regrinding of profile and clearance angles.
After turning the work to be threaded to the outside diameter of the thread and setting
the gears for the desired thread, put a threading tool in the toolpost. Set it exactly on the
dead center of the workpiece you'll be threading, using a center gauge as a guide.
To make sure your cutter is on dead center, place a credit card or shim between the
cutter point and workpiece. When the tool is on dead center, the credit card or shim will
remain vertical. With a credit card, there in no possibility of chipping the cutter as the
workpiece and cutter come together.
Set the compound perpendicular to
Workpiece
the line of centers and rotate it
29-1/2° to the right. Place the
thread gauge on the point of the
threading tool and feed the tool
toward the workpiece (Figure A.9).
Adjust the tool so the edge of the
gauge is
exactly parallel to the
Center
workpiece. A slip of white paper held
Gauge
below the gauge will help check the
parallel of the gauge to the shaft and
Toolbit
the fit of the tool point in the V of
the gauge. Placing the threading tool
perpendicular to the surface of the Figure A.9 Using a center gauge, set the threading
tool at exactly dead center on the workpiece
workpiece assures a true-form
thread.
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A-15
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Before
Tool
After
Figure A.10 Chamfer the end of the thread to protect it from damage
Cutting Right-hand Threads
Now you are ready to cut right-hand threads. First, advance the tool so it just touches
the workpiece and turn the compound calibration to zero. Then, using the compound
feed, feed in the tool 0.002”. Turn on the motor, engage the power feed (lever located on
the lower right hand face of the headstock) at the speed as indicated on the threading
chart. (You'll choose, I, II or III depending on the chart). With the leadscrew turning,
engage the half-nut by pushing the lever down and note the number lined up wiht the
mark on the threading dial. This closes the half-nut on the leadscrew and the powers the
cross-slide table to the left or right on the lathe bed ways. When you have finished the
cut, disengage the half-nut by lifting up on the handle.
It is best to take a light, scratch cut first without using cutting fluid. After the tool runs
the desired length, disengage the half-nut and back the tool out of the work. Then return
the tool to the starting position. Do not engage the half-nut until the threading dial is at
the same point as when you began. (If you began cutting at zero, do not re-engage until
zero on the threading dial once again matches the hashmark. Using a screw-pitch gauge,
check the thread pitch. The benefit of taking the light cut is that you can correct any
mistakes you might have made.
It's time to take the real cut now, so apply the appropriate cutting fluid to the work. Feed
the compound feed in 0.005-0.020” for the first run, depending on the pitch of the thread
you have to cut. If you are cutting a coarse thread, start by taking a few heavy cuts.
Reduce the cut depth for each run until it is about 0.002” at the final run. Bring the
cross-feed calibration to zero, then make the second cut.
Continue this process until the tool is within 0.010” of the finished depth. Brush the
threads regularly to remove chips. After the second cut, check the thread fit using a ring
gauge, a standard nut or mating part, or a screw thread micrometer. It is required to
leave the piece in the chuck and not remove it for testing.
Continue taking 0.002” cuts. Then check the fit between each cut. when you thread the
nut, it should go on easily but without end play. When you have the desired fit, chamfer
the end of the thread to protect it from damage. To chamfer is to take a 45° cut off the
end of the bolt.
A-16
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
Appendix A: Machining Reference Guide
Cutting Left-hand Threads
Cut left-hand threads exactly as you cut right-hand threads, except feed the carriage
toward the tailstock instead of away from it. Or the spindle rotation is reversed. Reverse
the cutter clearance and grind the cutters back with a clearance angle on the left side.
swing the compound rest to the left rather than to the right.
Cutting Multiple Threads
Cut multiple threads one at a time exactly as you cut single threads, except increase the
lead to make room for succeeding threads (a double lead for a double thread, a triple lead
for a triple thread, etc.). After completing the first thread, remove the work from the
centers without loosening the lathe dog. Then put it back in the lathe with the tail of the
lathe dog in the correct slot to index the work for the next thread. This work requires a
faceplate with accurately positioned slot, uniformly spaced and equal in number to the
number of threads to be cut.
Single Thread
Double Thread
Triple Thread
Figure A.11 When cutting multiple threads, increase the lead
to make room for succeesding threads.
Cutting Internal Threads
Internal thread cutting is like external thread cutting, except you have the clearance
restrictions and tool problems of boring. You use the same toolholders, but the cutters
have thread forms and are fed at thread-cutting ratios of feed to spindle revolutions.
Another difference between boring and inside threading is the cutting angle at which the
cutter approaches the workpiece. As with external thread cutting, the internal threading
tool must engage the work on dead center and be held so the cutter coincides with the
workpiece's center radius.
In squaring the cutter with the work, use a center gauge or thread gauge. Internal
cutters require greater end and side clearance, and cutter length is also restricted
because internal thread cutters must have enough end clearance that the cutter lifts clear
of the thread for removal. Before cutting an internal thread, bore the workpiece to the
exact inside diameter.
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A-17
Granite 1300 Series Operator’s Manual
Because the feed of successive cuts is toward, not away from the operator, the
thread-cutting set is reversed. Also, you must take lighter cuts because of the cutter's
extension from the toolpost. Take an extra finishing cut without changing the setting of
the compound rest.
Cutting Special-form Internal Threads
You can cut internal forms in all the thread forms used for external threads. There is only
one factor that calls for special attention in cutting special-shaped internal threads: the
difference of clearances between the nut and screw recommended for different thread
types. If you don't have recommended clearances, it is safe to cut a nut (internal thread)
thread 0.005” to 0.010” per inch larger than the screw's outside diameter.
Cutting Threads on a Taper
Cut thread on a taper the same as on a straight shaft, except in the setup of the tools.
set the threading tool at 90° to the axis of the taper, rather than at 90° to its surface.
A-18
For Assistance: Call Toll Free 1-800-476-4849
Appendix B
Inch Feed Rates
INCH THREADS
THREADING Inch threads
are defined as
CHART the number of
FEED RATES =
Cross Feed
Longitudinal Feed
”
”
threads in
one inch.
Selector
I - III
I
II
III
I
II
III
METRICTHREADS
Distance traveled per
Spindle Revolution
I
II
III
Metric threads are
defined as the distance between two
adjacent crests.
I
II III
I
II III
S
E
L
E
C
T
O
R
1
7
14
28
0.0197” 0.0098” 0.0049” 0.0062” 0.0031” 0.0015”
0.70 0.35 3.50 1.75
2
8
16
32
0.0172” 0.0086” 0.0043” 0.0054” 0.0027” 0.0014”
0.80 0.40 4.00 2.00 1.00
3
9
18
36
0.0153” 0.0076” 0.0038” 0.0048” 0.0024” 0.0012”
4
10
20
40
0.0137” 0.0069” 0.0034” 0.0043” 0.0022” 0.0011”
5
11
22
44
0.0125” 0.0062” 0.0031” 0.0039” 0.0020” 0.0010”
5.50 2.75
6
12
24
48
0.0115” 0.0057” 0.0029” 0.0036” 0.0018” 0.0009”
0.60 6.00 3.00 1.50
1-7
7
13
26
52
0.0106” 0.0053” 0.0026” 0.0033” 0.0017” 0.0008”
6.50 3.25
Gear
Selection
Lever located
inside Pully Box
below gear cluster
X = Teeth per gear
INCH
A = 30
B = 66
C = 60
D = 60
METRIC
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0.45 4.50
1.00 0.50 5.00 2.50 1.25
A = 33 C = 63 A = 66 C = 63
B = 80 D = 60 B = 64 D = 60
INCH
METRIC
B-1
Machine Warranty
30 Day Trial Offer
Try a Smithy for 30 days. If, for any reason within that time, you decide to return your
Smithy, just call our Customer Service department at 1-800-476-4849. We will help you
arrange shipping back to us. When we receive the machine back, we’ll refund your full
purchase price. Please note: return shipping charges and any shipping damage from
improper repacking is your responsibility.
Smithy Warranty
Smithy 3-in-1 and Dedicated Machines are warranted for two years (unless otherwise
noted)to the original purchaser against defects in materials and workmanship. During
that time, Smithy will replace any defective parts that are returned to our warehouse, free
of charge. Upon receipt of the defective parts, Smithy technicians will arrange with you
to send replacement parts immediately. This warranty does not cover parts that are worn
out through the negligence on the part of the operator nor does it cover consequential
damages resulting from defects in material or workmanship.
SmithyCNC warrants its machines and control systems for a period of one (1) year to the
original purchaser from the date of purchase. If within one (1) year form the date of
purchase a SmithyCNC machine and/or control system fails due to defect in material or
workmanship, SmithyCNC will at their choice repair and/or replace components with new
or remanufactured parts free of charge.
(Some have asked why SmithyCNC machines have a shorter warranty period than Smithy
manual machines. There are several reasons, but the greatest factor is that, on average,
CNC automated machine tools, are operated a significantly greater number of hours per
day than the average manual machine. Also, by comparison, most of our competitors
selling benchtop CNC machines only offer a six (6) months warranty. Whereas SmithyCNC
machine have a full one (1) year warranty.)
Most warranty repairs and/or replacements are handled routinely, but sometimes request
for warranty service many not be appropriate. This warranty does not apply to defects
due directly or indirectly to misuse, abuse, negligence, accidents, repairs, or lack of
routine maintenance. This warranty is also void if the serial number of the machine or
SmithyCNC control system has been removed or has been altered or modified.
In no event shall Smithy be liable for indirect, incidental or consequential damages for the
sale or use of the product. This disclaimer applies to both during and after the term of
this warranty.
C-1
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We do not warrant or represent that the merchandise complies with the provisions of any
law or acts unless Smithy Company so warrants. In no event shall Smithy's liability under
this warranty exceed the purchase price paid for the product. Legal actions brought
against Smithy Co. shall be tried in the State of Michigan, County of Washtenaw.
Smithy Co. shall in no event be liable for death, injuries to persons or property for
incidental, contingent, special or consequential damages arising from the use of our
products.
This is Smithy Co.’s sole warranty and any and all warranties that may be implied by law,
including any merchantability or fitness, for any particular purpose, are hereby limited to
the duration of this written warranty.
This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights, which
vary from state to state. Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of
incidental or consequential damages, so the above limitation or exclusions may not apply
to you.
Telephone Support (Service engineers are available 8 am to 5 pm EST)
Service and Parts
Tel No. 1-800-476-4849
Fax No. 1-734-913-6663
Email Address: sales@smithy.com
Software and Programming
Consultancy Services
In addition to our customary technical support for the machines and controls, we also
provide technical consulting support to our customers by providing engineering and Gcode programming services. The standard rate for these services is $28.00 per hour. Our
principal objective is to support you and to increase your productivity while reducing the
machining cost. Give us a call for such support as and when required.
Tel No. 1-800-476-4849
Fax No. 1-734-913-6663
Email Address: sales@smithy.com
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C-2
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