MIDI Utility Pack Instruction Manual - KBD

MIDI Utility Pack Instruction Manual - KBD
MIDI Utility Pack
Instruction Manual
KBD-Infinity
Albuquerque, New Mexico
E mail: info@kbd-infinity.com
Internet: http://www.kbd-infinity.com
Copyright 2016
1
Contents
1 Introduction
3
2 MIDI Microscope
2.1 Loading files . . . .
2.2 The byte window . .
2.3 The event window .
2.4 Connections between
2.5 MIDI ports . . . . .
2.6 Playing tracks . . .
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the windows
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3 MIDI Typer
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4 Mini MIDI Player
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5 Mini MIDI Recorder
5.1 Recording procedure . . . . . . . . .
5.2 Arm and stop buttons . . . . . . . .
5.3 Reviewing and archiving the recording
5.4 Metronome . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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13
13
15
15
16
6 MIDI File Organizer
6.1 General features . .
6.2 Navigation . . . . .
6.3 Operations . . . . .
6.4 Saved locations . .
6.5 Program settings . .
6.6 Advanced functions
6.7 MIDI files . . . . . .
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17
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7 Tempus Fugit
24
2
1
Introduction
The MIDI Utility Pack contains six programs invaluable to anyone who creates or uses MIDI
files.
MIDI Microscope
An essential utility for music students and digital musicians. MIDI Microscope helps you
to understand the organization of MIDI files. The program displays the byte content of mid,
kar or sty files in one window and gives an English translation of the MIDI events in another
window. The translation can be saved as a text file. Clicking on an event in the translation
window highlights the corresponding timing, status and data bytes. Conversely, clicking on
a byte shows its function in the translation window. MIDI Microscope also plays the file
content on any connected MIDI device. You can choose to play all tracks or selected tracks to
hear their contributions to the total sound.
MIDI Typer
The program does general bulk cleaning operations on sets of MIDI files. A primary function
is conversion between Type 0 and Type 1 formats. MIDI Typer can also be set to remove
specific content such as system exclusive messages, text messages, program controls, XG voice
settings,....
MiniMIDI Player
A compact, fast and accurate MIDI file player. The program handles all Type 0 and Type 1
MIDI files. Output may be ported to any connected MIDI device.
MiniMIDI Recorder
A program to record your electronic keyboard performances and to save them as MIDI files.
MiniMIDI Recorder features an easy-to-learn and reliable interface. You can record from
any connected MIDI device. Use the built-in player to preview a performance before saving.
The program includes a metronome.
MIDI File Manager
A general-purpose two-window file manager with special features to organize MIDI files. The
program has a clear and logical layout of controls that makes it quick to learn and easy to use.
A unique Backup command makes it easy to synchronize files between computers via a USB
drive. Several advanced functions are particularly useful for data organization (e.g., create text
listings of directory contents, determine directory sizes, copy full file paths to the clipboard,
launch a terminal window in the current directory,...). The program includes a built-in player
to review the contents of MIDI files.
Tempus Fugit
A versatile MIDI-based metronome.
3
2
MIDI Microscope
MIDI Microscope (Fig. 1) dissects the content of any MIDI, karaoke or style file. It is a
valuable resource for music students or anyone who wants to understand the structure of MIDI
files.
2.1
Loading files
The first step is to load a file for inspection. Click on the Load MIDI file button to bring up
a standard load dialog. You can navigate to any directory on your computer. The program
shows all available files with names of the form *.mid (general MIDI file), *.kar (MIDI file
with lyrics included) and *.sty (Yamaha-format style files). When the file loads, the program
displays the file size in bytes, the MIDI type and the number of tracks. The type numbers have
the following interpretation:
• 0: single song in a single track
• 1: single song with information divided between multiple tracks
• 2: multiple songs and multiple tracks
Several buttons become active when a file has been loaded. MIDI Microscope can help in
debugging corrupted MIDI files. If a bad file is encountered, the program gives the option to
save a file of commands up to the error point.
2.2
The byte window
The raw byte content of the file is displayed in the left-hand window. Numbers are displayed
in hexadecimal notation. The numbers in the header and left column show the position of the
byte in the file. For example, the highlighted byte in the screenshot is at position 60h + 02h =
62h = 98. The cells show the byte content as two hex characters. The cell content may range
from 00h (0) to FFh (255). The bytes are color coded according to function:
• Chunk designators are shown in bold red. In the screenshot, note that the first four bytes
are 4Dh 54h 68h 64h (the code numbers for the characters MThd ). Track chunks begin
with the bytes 4Dh 54h 72h 6Dh (MTrk ).
• Event time differences and the lengths of system exclusive messages are shown in cyan.
• Status bytes are in bold green.
• Chunk header data are in violet.
• Event and system-exclusive data bytes are in black.
4
Figure 1: Screenshot of MIDI Microscope.
2.3
The event window
The event window on the right-hand is the crux of MIDI Microscope. It gives an Englishlanguage translation of the mysterious bytes organized by MIDI events. The first column lists
the time in units of pulses. If the Display absolute time box is unchecked, the progam shows
the delay of an event relative to the previous event (the quantity recorded in the MIDI file).
When the box is checked, MIDI Microscope shows the absolute timing of the events (the
sum of all previous delays). The example in the screenshot specifies that there are 96 pulses
per quarter note and a starting tempo of 342912 microseconds/quarter note. Therefore, each
pulse corresponds to 3.572 ms. The first delay of 203 pulses corresponds to 0.725 seconds. The
second column is the file position (in hexadecimal notation) of the event status byte (or the
first data byte in the event of a running status). Note that the sixteen MIDI channels are
designated 00h through 0Fh.
The remainder of the line is a description of the action of the status and data bytes. Note
that MIDI Microscope gives the names of notes and general MIDI program values rather
than simple byte values.
The Find buttons are useful for locating track divisions or specific features like system
exclusive events. Type search text in the box and click Find (F2 ) to locate the first instance
in the file. Use Find next (F3 ) to locate the next instance below the current position or Find
prev (F4 ) to locate the previous one. Note that the find routines are case insensitive. Use the
Write text file button to make a permanent record of the contents of the event window. Table 1
shows an example of the program output.
5
Table 1: Example of event text output from MIDI Microscope.
MIDI command analysis of file: 1540mando2.mid
KBD-Infinity
PO Box 13595, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87192 U.S.A.
Telephone: +1 505 220 3975
FAX: +1 617 752 9077
URL: http://www.kbd-infinity.com
E mail: info@kbd-infinity.com
Content of data lines
Column 1: Event time difference
Column 2: Start position in file
Column 3: Status
Column 4+: Data
HEADER CHUNK
Chunk length: 6
Midi file type: 1
Number of tracks in file: 8
Pulses per quarter note: 120
TRACK 001 CHUNK
Chunk length: 267
0
000017
Non-MIDI event, time sig: 4/4 Notes/click: 24 Clock/quat: 4
0
00001F
Non-MIDI event, key signature: C Major
0
000025
Non-MIDI event, tempo change: 300000 microseconds/quarter note
480
00002D
Non-MIDI event, tempo change: 1463414 microseconds/quarter note
...
30
000117
Non-MIDI event, tempo change: 2000000 microseconds/quarter note
0
00011E
End of track
TRACK 002 CHUNK
Chunk length: 1732
0
00012A
Non-MIDI event, MIDI port: 0
0
00012F
Non-MIDI event, sequence/track name: Mandolin
0
00013B
Program change, channel 00
Koto
0
00013E
Control change, channel 00
Pan:
46
0
000142
Control change, channel 00
Bank select:
00
0
000146
Control change, channel 00
CMM Reset All Controllers:
00
525
00014A
Note on, channel 00
Note: A4
Velocity: 3E
15
00014E
Note on, channel 00
Note: A4
Velocity: 00
0
000151
Note on, channel 00
Note: A4
Velocity: 3E
...
6
Figure 2: Dialog to choose tracks for playback.
2.4
Connections between the windows
The byte and event windows are connected so you can quickly find 1) the function that corresponds to a byte sequence or 2) the byte sequence that corresponds to a function. Regarding the
first action, a byte is highlighted when you left-click on it. The right-hand window highlights
the corresponding event line that contains the byte. The included byte may be either a timing,
status or data byte associated with the event. To go in reverse, select an event line. MIDI
Microscope highlights the first timing byte of the event.
2.5
MIDI ports
When you first start MIDI Microscope, the program determines the available MIDI output
ports and picks the first one available. Thereafter, it will attempt to open the last port that
you used. If you add a port after the program has started (e.g., turning on a keyboard), click
on the Set MIDI port button and pick the desired output port from the list.
2.6
Playing tracks
The program can play MIDI files through the current MIDI output device. Use the Play button
to start the loaded file and the Pause button to stop it temporarily. The Stop button terminates
playing and rewinds the file. To start a file in the middle, left-click the mouse at the appropriate
position inside the play progress bar. The default is to include all tracks. Use the Set tracks
button to open the dialog of Fig. 2 to deactivate and activate selected tracks. With this feature,
you can understand the role of individual tracks in the creation of the total sound. If you have
inspected several files with MIDI Microscope, you’ve probably noticed that some tracks may
not affect the performance note values. For example, the events in the first track shown in
Table 1 consist entirely of tempo changes.
7
3
MIDI Typer
MIDI Typer is a utility for bulk conversion of MIDI files between Type 0 and Type 1 formats.
In addition, the program may be used to remove unecessary or unwanted information from
files. To review, a Type0 file combines musical and control information for all channels into a
single track. This is the type of file that is used for ringtones. In contrast, a Type1 file contains
multiple tracks, often one for each MIDI channel. Furthermore, special data like lyrics or tempo
changes may occupy individual tracks. During conversion, MIDI Typer can remove System
Exclusive messages, voice settings and non-musical information.
Operation of MIDI Typer is simple. Use the navigation window and buttons in the lower
portion of the screen (Fig. 3) to open a folder that contains MIDI files (mid and kar). There
are three main functions:
• Type1 → Type0. Change Type1 files to Type0 format, applying any user-specified
output filters.
• Type0 → Type1. Change Type0 files to Type1 format, applying any user-specified
output filters. In this conversion, MIDI Typer puts information for each MIDI channel
(00h to 0Fh) in a corresponding track. System exclusive and non-MIDI messages are
recorded in Track 1.
• Clean. Rewrite files in a standard, logical format without changing the MIDI type,
applying any user-specified output filters.
One option is to select one or more files and then to click one of the function buttons. Select
files with the left mouse button. Hold down the Ctrl key to select multiple files. To select a
block of files, select the top (bottom) entry, hold down the Shift key and then select the bottom
(top) entry. For example, in response to the Type1 → Type0 button, the program checks the
set of selected files. If a file is of Type1, it is converted to Type0 and then is either saved as a
new file or overwrites the old file. If there is no selection, the operation is applied to all Type1
MIDI files in the folder.
Use the Delete button to erase selected files. Right-click anywhere in the program window
to view a popup menu of options, including Activate program. Use the function keys for the
following operations:
• F1: show the MIDI Utility Pack instruction manual in your default PDF reader.
• F3: refresh the folder display if files have been changed by another program.
• F6: display the setup dialog.
• F8: delete selected files.
8
Figure 3: Screenshot of MIDI Typer.
To specify information included in the output files, click the Settings button to open the
dialog of Fig. 4. The checkboxes at the top control the following functions:
• Overwrite files. When checked, MIDI Typer overwrites the existing MIDI file. In this
case, the output file has the same name as the original. When unchecked, the program does
not delete the original file and creates a modified name for the output file by appending
a suffix: T0, T1 or CL.
• Show messages. When checked, the program shows a message at the end of a bulk
conversion to show how many files were converted and how many were left unchanged.
The checkboxes in the File filters group control the type of information included in the
output MIDI file:
• Tempo changes (after start). Sometimes, MIDI files may contain a large number of
tempo messages because the transcriber was either particularly expressive or did not use a
metronome. Such tempo changes are undesirable if you are preparing an accompaniment.
If you uncheck the box, all tempo messages after the first one will be omitted.
• System exclusive messages. These messages are extended structures that contain
binary instructions for specific hardware devices. They are generally ignored, so you can
remove them from files intended for general distribution.
9
Figure 4: MIDI Typer output file settings dialog.
• Program messages. Program messages set the GM (general MIDI) numbers of channels.
The numbers control the type of instrumental voice associated with the channel. Such
messages may cause a conflict if you are working with a digital workstation with a virtual
instrument setup. Uncheck this box to exclude all program messages.
• XG voice settings. XG messages specify synthesizer voices beyond the 128 general
MIDI options. These settings are hardware specific. Uncheck this box if you want to
ensure compatibility between all GM compliant devices.
• Other voice control messages. These messages control characteristics of channel
voices, such as volume, pan reverberation and timbre. If you want to control voices
entirely from software when playing the output file, uncheck this box as well as Program
messages and XG voice settings.
• Text messages and lyrics. The words in karaoke files are sometimes stored as text
messages and sometimes as lyric messages. Uncheck these boxes if you want to remove
the information, converting a KAR file to a standard MID file. This option is useful for
creating scores with music notation programs. Some programs attempt to include lyrics,
making a messy display.
• Markers. Markers designate sections of a MIDI file. They may appear in specialized
applications like Yamaha style files.
• Other non-MIDI messages. Include or exclude specialized non-MIDI messages that
are usually not required to play the file, including SMPTE, MIDI port, MIDI channel,
copyright, cue point, instrument and sequence track name.
• Pitch wheel messages. Pitch wheel messages shift the frequency of the synthesizer to
give a twangy or bluesy sound. Uncheck this box if you want all notes to sound at their
prescribed pitch.
10
4
Mini MIDI Player
MiniMIDI Player (Fig. 5) is a fast and accurate utility to play MIDI files on any connected
port. The program follows the conventions of MIDI Microscope for choosing an output port.
Loading files
Start by loading a file. The select-file dialog displays files with the suffixes mid, kar and sty.
The program remembers the last directory that you accessed. File information is displayed in
the boxes: name, size in bytes and MIDI type. Load a different file to hear a different song.
(Note that the program does not play Type 2 files that may contain multiple songs.)
Playing files
Use the Play button to start the loaded file and the Pause button to stop temporarily. The Stop
button terminates playing and rewinds the file. To start a file in the middle, left-click the mouse
at the appropriate position inside the play progress bar. MIDI files tend to vary considerably
in volume, so a control has been included. The program remembers the last volume setting.
Figure 5: Screenshot of MiniMIDI Player.
11
Command line operation
The program can start from a terminal window with a command of the form
[Path]\minimidiplayer.exe [Path]\MIDIFileName.mid
[Path]\minimidiplayer.exe [Path]\MIDIFileName.kar
If you make MiniMIDI Player the default program for MIDI and karaoke files, it will start
if you double-click a file with extensions mid, kar or sty in Windows Explorer or most
other file managers. Also, the program will play Internet MIDI files referenced in a browser
by clicking on the link. In the command mode, MiniMIDI Player will open in a window,
restore the previous configuration and load and play the specified file. Thereafter, the program
operates in the normal interactive mode.1
1
To set a default program in Windows 7, run the Control Panel and go to Programs. Under Default
programs, pick Make a file type always open in a specific program. The dialog displays a list of file extensions.
Highlight mid, kar or sty and click the Change program button. Click the Browse button to go to the folder
Program Files (X86)\MiniMIDIPlayer and then pick MiniMIDIPlayer.exe.
12
5
Mini MIDI Recorder
MiniMIDI Recorder records keyboard performances (including complete voice and style
information) and saves them as general MIDI files.
5.1
Recording procedure
To illustrate the general program organization, consider a specific example of an input device:
the Yamaha PSR E423. Other keyboards have similar control functions. The challenge is to
include all information in the recording: melody notes, accompaniment styles and voices. In
order to see how to accomplish this with MiniMIDI Recorder, it is necessary to understand
some basics of data flow from the keyboard to a computer. Figure 6 shows a flow chart. The
keys of the keyboard (along with a simple processor) generate basic MIDI NoteOn and NoteOff
commands that are sent to the computer via a MIDI output port. These signals are sent when
KbdOut = ON, the default setting of the E423.
The main processor can generate sequences of accompaniment style notes based on the set
of styles in memory. Harmonic offsets are added to the style notes when the user presses key
combinations below the split point. In the default mode, style notes are not added to the MIDI
output flow. The parameter StyleOut must be set manually with the following procedure:
• Press the Function button.
• Use the Up/Dn arrows under Category to scroll through the list of options to StyleOut.
• Rotate the wheel above Category to turn the option ON.
A complete MIDI file of a keyboard performance contains two main types of information.
The beginning of the file contains data on voice settings for the melody and the instruments of
the style. This initialization is followed by the notes and other musical signals that constitute
the performance. The following procedure instructs the main processor to send MIDI data on
voices and other settings.
• Press the Function button
• Use the Up/Dn arrows under Category to find InitSend.
• Press Reset button and then the Yes button to send the information.
With this background, here is how to use MiniMIDI Recorder to record a keyboard
performance, complete with voice and style information:
1. Set up the keyboard for the performance.
2. Click the Arm button of MiniMIDI Recorder (Fig. 7). The button turns green and
the Stop button turns red to show that the program is in the static armed mode.
13
Figure 6: Data flow in a recording.
3. Send out the voice and other initialization information using the keyboard InitSend procedure. MiniMIDI Recorder remembers the data and will include them in the file as
MIDI events at time zero. It is not necessary to hurry – synchronized recording doesnt
begin until the first NoteOn message is received. If this step is omitted, the melody voices
and all voices of the style are set to piano by default.
4. If the performance uses an accompaniment style, make sure it is active by pressing Synch
start on the keyboard.
5. Start playing the song. When MiniMIDI Recorder detects a NoteOn signal (either
from the melody or style), the program enters the dynamic armed mode. The Arm
button flashes and the program records incoming MIDI signals with timing information.
6. Press Stop when the song ends. Again, there is no need to hurry. Nothing else is recorded
if there are no incoming NoteOn signals.
At this point, you can listen to the recording using the controls in the Review box (upper-right).
If everything sounds good, use the Write file button to create a Type 0 MIDI file.
Any connected input MIDI source can supply the incoming data. The output port is used
to review the recording before writing a file. When you first start the program, it will determine
the available MIDI output ports and pick the first ones available. Thereafter, it will attempt
to open the last ports that you used. Use the Change port button to set the ports.
14
Figure 7: Screenshot of MiniMIDI Recorder.
5.2
Arm and stop buttons
The Arm and Stop buttons are the main recording controls. Assuming the keyboard is set up
properly, press the Arm button to set the program to the static armed mode. At this point,
send time-zero setup information from the keyboard to be included at the beginning of the
MIDI file (t = 0.0 s). The program enters the dynamic armed mode when the first NoteOn
signal is received from the keyboard. Subsequent MIDI information is recorded with timing
information.
Press Stop when the performance is complete. A delay in pressing the button is not critical –
the program does not record information if keyboard keys are not pressed. The Write file button
and the controls of the Review section become active when MIDI information is available.
5.3
Reviewing and archiving the recording
The recording may be checked with the controls of the Review group. Use the Play button to
start playback on the current MIDI output device. Click the Pause button to stop temporarily.
The Stop button terminates playing and rewinds the file.
Use the Write file button to create a Type 0, general MIDI file of the recording. Note that
MiniMIDI Recorder faithfully records input signal sequences, but has no idea of the tempo
and key signature values you had in mind. The program adds arbitrary timing information to
the MIDI file to ensure that it plays back at the correct speed. If you want specific values to
appear in the output file, set values for Tempo and Time signature in the Metronome group.
This data will be included in the file, even if the metronome is not used.
15
5.4
Metronome
The program includes a metronome which sends timing sounds to the MIDI output device.
These sounds are not included in the recording. To use the function, check the Metronome
box, set the tempo in quarter notes per minute and set the time signature. For example, if you
are playing a waltz, enter 3 in the left-hand box and 4 in the right hand box. Some players may
tend to lead or lag the metronome. In this case, notes will be shifted with respect to measure
divisions if you load the recorded MIDI file into musical notation software. The resulting score
may be confusing. Compensate by setting the Offset time. Use a positive value if you are
playing notes early, or a negative value if you late. For reference, a 32nd note at a tempo of
120 quarter-notes/minute has a 32 ms duration.
You should not use the metronome when you use a style because the keyboard controls the
timing. In this case, you can use the internal metronome of your keyboard. The main processor
sends timing signals to the keyboard speakers but not to the computer interface, so the sounds
are not added to the recording.
16
6
MIDI File Organizer
MIDI File Organizer is a versatile two-window file-management system for personal computers with special features for MIDI files. The program’s clear and logical layout of controls
makes it quick to learn and easy to use. For on-line instructions, press the F1 key.
6.1
General features
Figure 8 shows the program layout. The left and right windows give listings of directories
(folders) and files at chosen locations on a hard disk or USB drive. The controls above the
windows are used for navigation between directories. One window is active at any time. The
red active-button shows the window that currently has the focus. Some of the controls (Delete,
Rename, Create dir, Edit file) act on selected files in the active window. The other controls
(Copy, Move, Backup) transfer files from the active window to the other. The active window
changes if you click on the opposite window or on any of the controls on the other side.
Selection of files in the windows follows the standard Window conventions. Left-click an
entry to select a single file or directory. Hold down the control key to select multiple entries. To
select a block of files or directories, select one entry at the top (or bottom) and select another
entry at the bottom (or top) while holding the shift key.
6.2
Navigation
Directory names in a window are shaded. To move into a directory, double-click it’s name.
Use the Up button to move up one level in the directory tree. The Root button takes you to
the root of the current drive. Use the Change drive menu to change the active window to a
different drive of the computer. Sometimes it’s useful to set both windows to the same location
(for example, to move files into a new child directory). To set the right window to the same
location as the left window, right-click the right active-button.
As you move between directories, MIDI File Organizer saves a list of previous locations.
Use the Back button to move to the previous directory. When you move back, the program
saves a list of locations in the forward stack. In this case, use the Forward button to return to
a directory.
MIDI File Organizer saves it’s current state when you exit. Information includes the
current directories of the left and right windows, tools and saved locations. The settings are
restored the next time you run the program.
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Figure 8: Screenshot of MIDI File Organizer.
6.3
Operations
The file-operation controls located between the windows are the core of MIDI File Organizer.
They perform the following functions:
• Copy: copy the selected directories and files of the active window to the directory of the
other window. The copy function may also be initiated with the F5 key.
• Move: move the selected directories and files of the active window to the directory of the
other window. In this case, the directories or files are copied to the destination directory,
checked for validity and then deleted in the source directory. (F6 key)
• Backup: this command is useful for backing up a project or synchronizing data if you
work on multiple computers. Its primary task is copying project directories to and from
a master copy on a portable device such as a USB stick. If the project directory does not
exist in the destination, all source files and subdirectories are copied. Otherwise, only
new directories and files are copied. Source files replace existing destination files only
if they have a more recent modification date/time. In typical operation, you would use
the Backup command with the master USB stick as the source when you start work on
a computer to ensure that all files reflect the latest version. At the end of the session,
use Backup with the USB stick as the destination to archive and to synchronize your
work. If the setting Make backup log is active, MIDI File Organizer prompts you to save
a record of the backup as a file. The file contains a list of directories and files created on
the destination and also the files that were replaced. (F9 key)
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• Delete: delete the selected directories and files of the active window. If the Confirm delete
condition is active (see Settings), MIDI File Organizer prompts to delete the collection of
files and directories. (F8 key)
• Create dir: create a new directory within the directory of the active window. Type a
name in the text field of the dialog and press OK or Cancel. Alternatively, press Enter
in the text field to create the directory or Esc to cancel the operation. (F7 key)
• Edit file: open a single file selected in the active window with an editor. A text or hex
editor must be defined in the Settings dialog to use this feature. (F4 key)
• Select all: select all directories and files in the active window.
• Deselect all: cancel all selections in the active window.
• Refresh: use this command to update the display if you change the files in one or both
of the displayed directories with an external program. (F3 key)
To launch an external program (FileName.exe) or batch file (FileName.bat), double-click
the program name. You can also open files whose extensions are associated with programs in
Windows by double-clicking on them. For example, double-clicking an HTML file will open it
in your default browser. You can copy the path of the directory locations of the left or right
windows to the clipboard. Click on the text field listing the directory above the window and
press Ctrl-C. You can also copy the names of any group of directories or files in either window
to the clipboard. Make a selection using the standard rules and then press Ctrl-C.
MIDI File Organizer shows the progress of extended copy, move or delete operations.
During this period, other program commands are deactivated. Click Cancel to abort the
operation.
6.4
Saved locations
You may often return to a specific directory when working on a project. In this case, a saved
location can eliminate the effort of stepping through the directory tree each time. If you want
to return to the directory of the active window later, click the Add location button to add the
folder to the list of saved locations.
Click the Saved locations button to show the dialog of Fig. 9. The window shows a listed
of saved directories. Double-click on an entry to move the active window to the directory.
Alternatively, select a location and click OK. To delete a location, select it and click the Remove
from list button. Click Cancel if you decide not to change the location of the active window.
You can drag entries up and down with the mouse to organize the list. Note that the location
list is saved when you exit MIDI File Organizer and restored next time you run the program.
6.5
Program settings
Click the Settings button to bring up the settings dialog of Fig. 10. Use the Pick file editor
button to specify an external program called by the Edit file control. Navigate through Program
files or Program files (X86) to find your editor of choice.
The Confirm delete checkbox controls whether the program prompts to confirm delete operations. Use caution if you deactivate this feature. When the Confirm overwrite checkbox is
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Figure 9: Saved locations dialog.
Figure 10: Program settings dialog.
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active, the program prompts if you attempt to copy or move a file or directory into a directory
where an item has the same name. When the Save to trash checkbox is checked, files are copied
to the Windows recycle directory before being deleted. Use the Clear back/forward stacks to
reset operation of the Back and Forward buttons.
The sort options control how directory and file names are displayed in the windows and
what additional information is available.
• Sort-by-name. Directories are listed in alphabetic order with their last-modification
date, and files are organized alphabetically with their byte size.
• Sort-by-extension. The same as the previous option, except that files are grouped
alphabetically by their extension (suffix) and then by name.
• Sort-by-date. Both directories and files are ordered first by last-modification date and
then alphabetically by name showing the last-modification date.
• Sort-by-size. Directories are listed in alphabetic order with their last-modification date,
and files are organized in the order of their byte size.
In all cases, directories are listed first. You can change the display method quickly with the
following shortcuts: Ctrl-N (sort by name), Ctrl-D (sort by date), Ctrl-E (sort by extension)
or Ctrl-S (sort by size). The sort options may also be changed in the advanced-features popup
menu. The current sort method is shown in the Sort text field.
6.6
Advanced functions
Advanced features of MIDI File Organizer are collected in a popup menu. To bring up
the menu, right-click anywhere in the program window. Besides, the sort options, the menu
includes the following capabilities:
• Open terminal window. Run cmd.exe, opening the program in the currently-active
window.
• Selected path to clipboard. Use this command after selecting a file or directory (leftclick). The full path to the item is copied to the Windows clipboard. This function is
useful to fill in programs and parameters for user-defined tools (see below).
• List items in current directory. Collect information on the files and directories in the
currently-active directory (names, lengths, modification date, creation date) and save it
to a text file.
• Size of current directory. Show the number of directories and files in the currentlyactive directory and the cumulative byte size of the files.
• Size of selected directory. List the total number of items (files and directories) and
cumulative file bytes in a selected directory. All subdirectories are included. To use
the feature, select a directory, right-click to display the popup menu and click on the
command.
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Figure 11: SearchMyFiles launched from MIDI File Organizer.
• Shortcut on desktop. Add a shortcut to the selected program or document on the
Windows desktop.
• Available space on drive. Shows the following information for the drive of the window
that currently has the focus: total size on the drive, free bytes available to the current
user and total free bytes.
• Fast file search. Find a lost file quickly on a disk or in a folder. To use the utility,
first navigate in either window to the folder where you want to start the search. (To
search an entire disk, click the Root button.) Then, bring up the popup menu and run
the command. Enter the file name in the dialog – you can use the standard wildcard
characters (* and ?) to specify classes of files. Click OK to display the window of Fig. 11.
The command launches the independent program SearchMyFiles from NirSoft. For
information on advanced search capabilities and other utilities, see www.nirsoft.net.
You can also define custom commands that appear in the popup menu. They will launch
external programs with specified pass parameters. Commands are created in the list box at the
bottom of the Settings dialog (Fig. 10). Click the Add tool button to add a new command, then
type in replacements for the default text entries. The first column is the name that will appear
in the popup menu. The second column is the full path of the executable that will be launched.
The third column contains parameters to pass to the program at startup. Leave this column
blank if you simply want to start an external program. The examples in Fig. 10 show how to
launch FileZilla, open a password protected FTP connection and go to a remote directory.
The symbols %f and %d may be used in a pass parameter to represent the full path of the
currently-selected file or directory. To launch a program to operate on a specific file, left-click
the file in the left or right windows to select it and then right-click anywhere in the program
window to bring up the popup menu.
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Figure 12: Dialog to set the MIDI output port.
6.7
MIDI files
To work exclusively with MIDI files, right-click to raise the popup menu and click on Toggle
display MIDI only. The current state is shown in the Display text field. In the MIDI files
mode, the program displays and operates on only files with extensions mid, kar and sty.
In either display mode, you can load a MIDI file for playing by double-clicking the file entry
in either window. When loaded, the file length, type and number of tracks is displayed at the
upper-left part of the screen. Also, the Start button of the player (upper-right) becomes active.
Use the Start, Pause, Stop and Volume controls to play the file. To start a file in the middle,
left-click the mouse at the appropriate position inside the play progress bar. Click the Change
port button to set the destination for the player output. The button brings up the dialog of
Fig. 12.
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7
Tempus Fugit
Tempus Fugit is a digital metronome for MIDI devices with several convenient features: 1)
audio and visual indicators, 2) customizable beat sound (volume, pitch and MIDI instrument),
3) output to any connected MIDI port and 4) output channel control to avoid interference.
Figure 13 shows the program interface.
Audio output may be directed to any MIDI device – the computer soundcard via a virtual
instrument or a connected keyboard. In the later case, you can set the MIDI channel to avoid
interference with performances or recordings. The first time you run the program, click the Set
button to choose a MIDI device. Use the up-down arrows to change the MIDI channel if there
is a problem with the default of 07h. Port parameters are preserved for the next session.
To use the metronome, set the time-signature controls using the up-down arrows. For
example, the number 6 in the left box and 8 in the right box corresponds to 6/8 time. Set the
tempo using the up-down arrows or type in a value. The tempo equals the number of quarter
notes per minute. The allowed range is 10 to 400 bpm. The On/Off button starts and stops
the metronome. For audio output, the first beat in a measure is louder. Beats are also shown
by the visual indicators.
You can fine-tune the metronome sound to achieve an audible but pleasing sound. Use the
controls at lower-right to set the volume, note pitch and instrument (GM program value). The
Test button plays one beat with the current settings. Voice settings are also preserved for the
next session.
Figure 13: Screenshot of Tempus Fugit.
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